Science.gov

Sample records for additional spectral components

  1. Additive manufacturing of optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Andreas; Rank, Manuel; Maillard, Philippe; Suckow, Anne; Bauckhage, Yannick; Rößler, Patrick; Lang, Johannes; Shariff, Fatin; Pekrul, Sven

    2016-08-01

    The development of additive manufacturing methods has enlarged rapidly in recent years. Thereby, the work mainly focuses on the realization of mechanical components, but the additive manufacturing technology offers a high potential in the field of optics as well. Owing to new design possibilities, completely new solutions are possible. This article briefly reviews and compares the most important additive manufacturing methods for polymer optics. Additionally, it points out the characteristics of additive manufactured polymer optics. Thereby, surface quality is of crucial importance. In order to improve it, appropriate post-processing steps are necessary (e.g. robot polishing or coating), which will be discussed. An essential part of this paper deals with various additive manufactured optical components and their use, especially in optical systems for shape metrology (e.g. borehole sensor, tilt sensor, freeform surface sensor, fisheye lens). The examples should demonstrate the potentials and limitations of optical components produced by additive manufacturing.

  2. Additive Manufacturing of Aerospace Propulsion Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.; Grady, Joseph E.; Carter, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will provide an overview of ongoing activities on additive manufacturing of aerospace propulsion components, which included rocket propulsion and gas turbine engines. Future opportunities on additive manufacturing of hybrid electric propulsion components will be discussed.

  3. Spectral Components Analysis of Diffuse Emission Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Malyshev, Dmitry; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2012-09-14

    We develop a novel method to separate the components of a diffuse emission process based on an association with the energy spectra. Most of the existing methods use some information about the spatial distribution of components, e.g., closeness to an external template, independence of components etc., in order to separate them. In this paper we propose a method where one puts conditions on the spectra only. The advantages of our method are: 1) it is internal: the maps of the components are constructed as combinations of data in different energy bins, 2) the components may be correlated among each other, 3) the method is semi-blind: in many cases, it is sufficient to assume a functional form of the spectra and determine the parameters from a maximization of a likelihood function. As an example, we derive the CMB map and the foreground maps for seven yeas of WMAP data. In an Appendix, we present a generalization of the method, where one can also add a number of external templates.

  4. Inspection of additive-manufactured layered components.

    PubMed

    Cerniglia, D; Scafidi, M; Pantano, A; Rudlin, J

    2015-09-01

    Laser powder deposition (LPD) is a rapid additive manufacturing process to produce, layer upon layer, 3D geometries or to repair high-value components. Currently there is no nondestructive technique that can guarantee absence of flaws in LPD products during manufacturing. In this paper a laser ultrasonic technique for in-line inspection of LPD components is proposed. Reference samples were manufactured from Inconel and machined flaws were created to establish the sensitivity of the technique. Numerical models of laser-generated ultrasonic waves have been created to gain a deeper understanding of physics, to optimize the set-up and to verify the experimental measurements. Results obtained on two sets of reference samples are shown. A proof-of-concept prototype has been demonstrated on some specific deposition samples with induced flaws, that were confirmed by an ultra-high sensitivity X-ray technique. Experimental outcomes prove that typical micro-defects due to the layer-by-layer deposition process, such as near-surface and surface flaws in a single layer deposit, can be detected.

  5. Spectral Synthesis via Mean Field approach to Independent Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ning; Su, Shan-Shan; Kong, Xu

    2016-03-01

    We apply a new statistical analysis technique, the Mean Field approach to Independent Component Analysis (MF-ICA) in a Bayseian framework, to galaxy spectral analysis. This algorithm can compress a stellar spectral library into a few Independent Components (ICs), and the galaxy spectrum can be reconstructed by these ICs. Compared to other algorithms which decompose a galaxy spectrum into a combination of several simple stellar populations, the MF-ICA approach offers a large improvement in efficiency. To check the reliability of this spectral analysis method, three different methods are used: (1) parameter recovery for simulated galaxies, (2) comparison with parameters estimated by other methods, and (3) consistency test of parameters derived with galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We find that our MF-ICA method can not only fit the observed galaxy spectra efficiently, but can also accurately recover the physical parameters of galaxies. We also apply our spectral analysis method to the DEEP2 spectroscopic data, and find it can provide excellent fitting results for low signal-to-noise spectra.

  6. Spectral absorption characteristics of the major components of dust clouds.

    PubMed

    Flanigan, D F; Delong, H P

    1971-01-01

    It is well known that dust clouds selectively absorb radiation in the 700-1300 cm(-1) atmospheric window region. Studies have shown that dust clouds are composed of the same minerals as surface soils, although in different proportion. We have examined seventy soil samples from a number of locations around the world to determine their compositions and spectral characteristics. The results indicate that there are five major components which selectively absorb radiation in the 700-1300 cm(-1) region. These are three clay minerals, silica, and calcium carbonate. Absorptivity coefficient spectra of representative soil samples are given.

  7. Spectral discrimination of bleached and healthy submerged corals based on principal components analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, H.; LeDrew, E.

    1997-06-01

    Remote discrimination of substrate types in relatively shallow coastal waters has been limited by the spatial and spectral resolution of available sensors. An additional limiting factor is the strong attenuating influence of the water column over the substrate. As a result, there have been limited attempts to map submerged ecosystems such as coral reefs based on spectral characteristics. Both healthy and bleached corals were measured at depth with a hand-held spectroradiometer, and their spectra compared. Two separate principal components analyses (PCA) were performed on two sets of spectral data. The PCA revealed that there is indeed a spectral difference based on health. In the first data set, the first component (healthy coral) explains 46.82%, while the second component (bleached coral) explains 46.35% of the variance. In the second data set, the first component (bleached coral) explained 46.99%; the second component (healthy coral) explained 36.55%; and the third component (healthy coral) explained 15.44 % of the total variance in the original data. These results are encouraging with respect to using an airborne spectroradiometer to identify areas of bleached corals thus enabling accurate monitoring over time.

  8. X-RAY SPECTRAL COMPONENTS OBSERVED IN THE AFTERGLOW OF GRB 130925A

    SciTech Connect

    Bellm, Eric C.; Forster, Karl; Harrison, Fiona A.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Perley, Daniel A.; Rana, Vikram R.; Barrière, Nicolas M.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Bhalerao, Varun; Cenko, S. Bradley; Christensen, Finn E.; Fryer, Chris L.; Hailey, Charles J.; Horesh, Assaf; Ofek, Eran O.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Stern, Daniel; and others

    2014-04-01

    We have identified spectral features in the late-time X-ray afterglow of the unusually long, slow-decaying GRB 130925A using NuSTAR, Swift/X-Ray Telescope, and Chandra. A spectral component in addition to an absorbed power law is required at >4σ significance, and its spectral shape varies between two observation epochs at 2 × 10{sup 5} and 10{sup 6} s after the burst. Several models can fit this additional component, each with very different physical implications. A broad, resolved Gaussian absorption feature of several keV width improves the fit, but it is poorly constrained in the second epoch. An additive blackbody or second power-law component provide better fits. Both are challenging to interpret: the blackbody radius is near the scale of a compact remnant (10{sup 8} cm), while the second power-law component requires an unobserved high-energy cutoff in order to be consistent with the non-detection by Fermi/Large Area Telescope.

  9. X-Ray Spectral Components Observed in the Afterglow of GRB 130925A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellm, Eric C.; Barriere, Nicolas M.; Bhalerao, Varun; Boggs, Steven E.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Forster, Karl; Fryer, Chris L.; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Horesh, Assaf; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Madsen, Kristin K.; Miller, Jon M.; Ofek, Eran O.; Perley, Daniel A.; Rana, Vikram R.; Miller, Jon M.; Stern, Daniel; Tomsick, John A.; Zhang, William W.

    2014-01-01

    We have identified spectral features in the late-time X-ray afterglow of the unusually long, slow-decaying GRB 130925A using NuSTAR, Swift/X-Ray Telescope, and Chandra. A spectral component in addition to an absorbed power law is required at greater than 4 less than 1 significance, and its spectral shape varies between two observation epochs at 2 x 10 (sup 5) and 10 (sup 6) seconds after the burst. Several models can fit this additional component, each with very different physical implications. A broad, resolved Gaussian absorption feature of several kiloelectronvolts width improves the fit, but it is poorly constrained in the second epoch. An additive blackbody or second power-law component provide better fits. Both are challenging to interpret: the blackbody radius is near the scale of a compact remnant (10 (sup 8) centimeters), while the second power-law component requires an unobserved high-energy cutoff in order to be consistent with the non-detection by Fermi/Large Area Telescope.

  10. Achromatic registration of quadrature components of the optical spectrum in spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Shilyagin, P A; Gelikonov, G V; Gelikonov, V M; Moiseev, A A; Terpelov, D A

    2014-07-31

    We have thoroughly investigated the method of simultaneous reception of spectral components with the achromatised quadrature phase shift between two portions of a reference wave, designed for the effective suppression of the 'mirror' artefact in the resulting image obtained by means of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT). We have developed and experimentally tested a phase-shifting element consisting of a beam divider, which splits the reference optical beam into the two beams, and of delay lines being individual for each beam, which create a mutual phase difference of π/2 in the double pass of the reference beam. The phase shift achromatism over a wide spectral range is achieved by using in the delay lines the individual elements with different dispersion characteristics. The ranges of admissible adjustment parameters of the achromatised delay line are estimated for exact and inexact conformity of the geometric characteristics of its components to those calculated. A possibility of simultaneous recording of the close-to-quadrature spectral components with a single linear photodetector element is experimentally confirmed. The suppression of the artefact mirror peak in the OCT-signal by an additional 9 dB relative to the level of its suppression is experimentally achieved when the air delay line is used. Two-dimensional images of the surface positioned at an angle to the axis of the probe beam are obtained with the correction of the 'mirror' artefact while maintaining the dynamic range of the image. (laser biophotonics)

  11. Are Bulges and Disks Real? Decomposing Spectral Data Cubes Into Their Astrophysical Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrifield, Michael; Tabor, Martha; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Cappellari, Michele; Johnston, Evelyn

    2016-01-01

    Decomposing galaxies photometrically into bulge and disk components is now a well-established technique, but it remains unclear how distinct and real these components are, and how they relate to each other. To address these questions, we have been developing novel techniques to extract the various structural components from integral field unit (IFU) spectral observations of galaxies, in order to study simultaneously their spectral and spatial properties.As a first approach, by spatially decomposing each wavelength in a spectral data cube, we can discover how much light comes from the separate components as a function of wavelength, and hence derive unprecedentedly high quality spectra of bulge and disk for detailed analysis of their stellar populations.In addition, we have decomposed spectral data cubes by fitting the spectrum at each location with the sum of two components, with the spectral properties left entirely free to fit both kinematic and stellar population properties, subject only to the constraint that the relative flux contributions match those of a conventional bulge-disk decomposition.Initial results applied to MaNGA and other IFU surveys show the power of these techniques when applied to such high quality data. The first method allows us to understand the formation sequence of bulges and disks, with, for example, bulges showing the younger stellar populations in S0 galaxies, implying that this was where the last gasp of star formation occurred. The second technique reveals subtle population gradients within individual components, but also confirms that the decomposition into separate components is a credible procedure, as the resulting bulges and disks have entirely plausible kinematic properties that are in no way imposed by the decomposition.Although our initial application of these decomposition techniques has been to studying bulges and disks in S0 galaxies, the methods have much wider application to the spectral data cubes that MaNGA and other

  12. Spectral Separation of the Turbofan Engine Coherent Combustion Noise Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2008-01-01

    The core noise components of a dual spool turbofan engine (Honeywell TECH977) were separated by the use of a coherence function. A source location technique based on adjusting the time delay between the combustor pressure sensor signal and the far-field microphone signal to maximize the coherence and remove as much variation of the phase angle with frequency as possible was used. While adjusting the time delay to maximize the coherence and minimize the cross spectrum phase angle variation with frequency, the discovery was made that for the 130 microphone a 90.027 ms time shift worked best for the frequency band from 0 to 200 Hz while a 86.975 ms time shift worked best for the frequency band from 200 to 400 Hz. Since the 0 to 200 Hz band signal took more time to travel the same distance, it is slower than the 200 to 400 Hz band signal. This suggests the 0 to 200 Hz coherent cross spectral density band is partly due to indirect combustion noise attributed to hot spots interacting with the turbine. The signal in the 200 to 400 Hz frequency band is attributed mostly to direct combustion noise.

  13. Computed Tomography Inspection and Analysis for Additive Manufacturing Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beshears, Ronald D.

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) inspection was performed on test articles additively manufactured from metallic materials. Metallic AM and machined wrought alloy test articles with programmed flaws were inspected using a 2MeV linear accelerator based CT system. Performance of CT inspection on identically configured wrought and AM components and programmed flaws was assessed using standard image analysis techniques to determine the impact of additive manufacturing on inspectability of objects with complex geometries.

  14. Application of Additively Manufactured Components in Rocket Engine Turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, Marty, Jr.; Hanks, Andrew; Schmauch, Preston; Delessio, Steve

    2015-01-01

    The use of additive manufacturing technology has the potential to revolutionize the development of turbopump components in liquid rocket engines. When designing turbomachinery with the additive process there are several benefits and risks that are leveraged relative to a traditional development cycle. This topic explores the details and development of a 90,000 RPM Liquid Hydrogen Turbopump from which 90% of the parts were derived from the additive process. This turbopump was designed, developed and will be tested later this year at Marshall Space Flight Center.

  15. Additive Manufacturing Design Considerations for Liquid Engine Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitten, Dave; Hissam, Andy; Baker, Kevin; Rice, Darron

    2014-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center's Propulsion Systems Department has gained significant experience in the last year designing, building, and testing liquid engine components using additive manufacturing. The department has developed valve, duct, turbo-machinery, and combustion device components using this technology. Many valuable lessons were learned during this process. These lessons will be the focus of this presentation. We will present criteria for selecting part candidates for additive manufacturing. Some part characteristics are 'tailor made' for this process. Selecting the right parts for the process is the first step to maximizing productivity gains. We will also present specific lessons we learned about feature geometry that can and cannot be produced using additive manufacturing machines. Most liquid engine components were made using a two-step process. The base part was made using additive manufacturing and then traditional machining processes were used to produce the final part. The presentation will describe design accommodations needed to make the base part and lessons we learned about which features could be built directly and which require the final machine process. Tolerance capabilities, surface finish, and material thickness allowances will also be covered. Additive Manufacturing can produce internal passages that cannot be made using traditional approaches. It can also eliminate a significant amount of manpower by reducing part count and leveraging model-based design and analysis techniques. Information will be shared about performance enhancements and design efficiencies we experienced for certain categories of engine parts.

  16. Material Characterization of Additively Manufactured Components for Rocket Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert; Draper, Susan; Locci, Ivan; Lerch, Bradley; Ellis, David; Senick, Paul; Meyer, Michael; Free, James; Cooper, Ken; Jones, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    To advance Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies for production of rocket propulsion components the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is applying state of the art characterization techniques to interrogate microstructure and mechanical properties of AM materials and components at various steps in their processing. The materials being investigated for upper stage rocket engines include titanium, copper, and nickel alloys. Additive manufacturing processes include laser powder bed, electron beam powder bed, and electron beam wire fed processes. Various post build thermal treatments, including Hot Isostatic Pressure (HIP), have been studied to understand their influence on microstructure, mechanical properties, and build density. Micro-computed tomography, electron microscopy, and mechanical testing in relevant temperature environments has been performed to develop relationships between build quality, microstructure, and mechanical performance at temperature. A summary of GRCs Additive Manufacturing roles and experimental findings will be presented.

  17. Materials Characterization of Additively Manufactured Components for Rocket Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert; Draper, Susan; Locci, Ivan; Lerch, Bradley; Ellis, David; Senick, Paul; Meyer, Michael; Free, James; Cooper, Ken; Jones, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    To advance Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies for production of rocket propulsion components the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is applying state of the art characterization techniques to interrogate microstructure and mechanical properties of AM materials and components at various steps in their processing. The materials being investigated for upper stage rocket engines include titanium, copper, and nickel alloys. Additive manufacturing processes include laser powder bed, electron beam powder bed, and electron beam wire fed processes. Various post build thermal treatments, including Hot Isostatic Pressure (HIP), have been studied to understand their influence on microstructure, mechanical properties, and build density. Micro-computed tomography, electron microscopy, and mechanical testing in relevant temperature environments has been performed to develop relationships between build quality, microstructure, and mechanical performance at temperature. A summary of GRC's Additive Manufacturing roles and experimental findings will be presented.

  18. Additive manufacturing method for SRF components of various geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, Robert; Frigola, Pedro E; Murokh, Alex Y

    2015-05-05

    An additive manufacturing method for forming nearly monolithic SRF niobium cavities and end group components of arbitrary shape with features such as optimized wall thickness and integral stiffeners, greatly reducing the cost and technical variability of conventional cavity construction. The additive manufacturing method for forming an SRF cavity, includes atomizing niobium to form a niobium powder, feeding the niobium powder into an electron beam melter under a vacuum, melting the niobium powder under a vacuum in the electron beam melter to form an SRF cavity; and polishing the inside surface of the SRF cavity.

  19. Additive Manufacturing of Low Cost Upper Stage Propulsion Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Protz, Christopher; Bowman, Randy; Cooper, Ken; Fikes, John; Taminger, Karen; Wright, Belinda

    2014-01-01

    NASA is currently developing Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies and design tools aimed at reducing the costs and manufacturing time of regeneratively cooled rocket engine components. These Low Cost Upper Stage Propulsion (LCUSP) tasks are funded through NASA's Game Changing Development Program in the Space Technology Mission Directorate. The LCUSP project will develop a copper alloy additive manufacturing design process and develop and optimize the Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF3) manufacturing process to direct deposit a nickel alloy structural jacket and manifolds onto an SLM manufactured GRCop chamber and Ni-alloy nozzle. In order to develop these processes, the project will characterize both the microstructural and mechanical properties of the SLMproduced GRCop-84, and will explore and document novel design techniques specific to AM combustion devices components. These manufacturing technologies will be used to build a 25K-class regenerative chamber and nozzle (to be used with tested DMLS injectors) that will be tested individually and as a system in hot fire tests to demonstrate the applicability of the technologies. These tasks are expected to bring costs and manufacturing time down as spacecraft propulsion systems typically comprise more than 70% of the total vehicle cost and account for a significant portion of the development schedule. Additionally, high pressure/high temperature combustion chambers and nozzles must be regeneratively cooled to survive their operating environment, causing their design to be time consuming and costly to build. LCUSP presents an opportunity to develop and demonstrate a process that can infuse these technologies into industry, build competition, and drive down costs of future engines.

  20. Detection of a Spectral Break in the Extra Hard Component of GRB 090926A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Briggs, M. S.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carrigan, S.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Chaplin, V.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; Dermer, C. D.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dingus, B. L.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Goldstein, A.; Granot, J.; Greiner, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashi, K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Itoh, R.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kippen, R. M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lee, S.-H.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Makeev, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McBreen, S.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meegan, C.; Mehault, J.; Mészáros, P.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakajima, H.; Nakamori, T.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Nishino, S.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Preece, R.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Rau, A.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Reyes, L. C.; Ripken, J.; Ritz, S.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sander, A.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stamatikos, M.; Stecker, F. W.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Tibaldo, L.; Tierney, D.; Toma, K.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Uehara, T.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; von Kienlin, A.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wu, X. F.; Yamazaki, R.; Yang, Z.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2011-03-01

    We report on the observation of the bright, long gamma-ray burst, GRB 090926A, by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and Large Area Telescope (LAT) instruments on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. GRB 090926A shares several features with other bright LAT bursts. In particular, it clearly shows a short spike in the light curve that is present in all detectors that see the burst, and this in turn suggests that there is a common region of emission across the entire Fermi energy range. In addition, while a separate high-energy power-law component has already been observed in other gamma-ray bursts, here we report for the first time the detection with good significance of a high-energy spectral break (or cutoff) in this power-law component around 1.4 GeV in the time-integrated spectrum. If the spectral break is caused by opacity to electron-positron pair production within the source, then this observation allows us to compute the bulk Lorentz factor for the outflow, rather than a lower limit.

  1. Neutron Characterization of Additively Manufactured Components. Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, Thomas R.; Payzant, E. Andrew; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2015-09-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is a collection of promising manufacturing methods that industry is beginning to explore and adopt. Macroscopically complicated and near net shape components are being built using AM, but how the material behaves in service is a big question for industry. Consequently, AM components/materials need further research into exactly what is made and how it will behave in service. This one and a half day workshop included a series of invited presentations from academia, industry and national laboratories (see Appendix A for the workshop agenda and list of talks). The workshop was welcomed by Alan Tennant, Chief Scientist, Neutron Sciences Directorate, ORNL, and opened remotely by Rob Ivestor, Deputy Director, Advanced Manufacturing Office-DOE, who declared AM adoptees as titans who will be able to create customized 3-D structures with 1 million to 1 billion micro welds with locally tailored microstructures. Further he stated that characterization with neutrons is key to be able to bring critical insight/information into the AM process/property/behavior relationship. Subsequently, the presentations spanned a slice of the current state of the art AM techniques and many of the most relevant characterization techniques using neutrons. After the talks, a panel discussion was held; workshop participants (see Appendix B for a list of attendees) providing questions and the panel answers. The main purpose of the panel discussion was to build consensus regarding the critical research needs in AM that can be addressed with neutrons. These needs were placed into three categories: modes of access for neutrons, new capabilities needed, new AM material issues and neutrons. Recommendations from the workshop were determined based on the panel discussion.

  2. Spectral models of additive and modulation noise in speech and phonatory excitation signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoentgen, Jean

    2003-01-01

    The article presents spectral models of additive and modulation noise in speech. The purpose is to learn about the causes of noise in the spectra of normal and disordered voices and to gauge whether the spectral properties of the perturbations of the phonatory excitation signal can be inferred from the spectral properties of the speech signal. The approach to modeling consists of deducing the Fourier series of the perturbed speech, assuming that the Fourier series of the noise and of the clean monocycle-periodic excitation are known. The models explain published data, take into account the effects of supraglottal tremor, demonstrate the modulation distortion owing to vocal tract filtering, establish conditions under which noise cues of different speech signals may be compared, and predict the impossibility of inferring the spectral properties of the frequency modulating noise from the spectral properties of the frequency modulation noise (e.g., phonatory jitter and frequency tremor). The general conclusion is that only phonatory frequency modulation noise is spectrally relevant. Other types of noise in speech are either epiphenomenal, or their spectral effects are masked by the spectral effects of frequency modulation noise.

  3. Additively Manufactured Combustion Devices Components for LOX/Methane Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Sandra Elam; Protz, Christopher; Garcia, Chance; Goodman, Dwight; Baker, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has designed, fabricated, and hot-fire tested a variety of successful injectors, chambers, and igniters for potential liquid oxygen (LOX) and methane (CH4) systems since 2005. The most recent efforts have focused on components with additive manufacturing (AM) to include unique design features, minimize joints, and reduce final machining efforts. Inconel and copper alloys have been used with AM processes to produce a swirl coaxial injector and multiple methane cooled thrust chambers. The initial chambers included unique thermocouple ports for measuring local coolant channel temperatures along the length of the chamber. Results from hot-fire testing were used to anchor thermal models and generate a regeneratively cooled thruster for a 4,000 lbf LOX/CH4 engine. The completed thruster will be hot-fire tested in the summer of 2016 at MSFC. The thruster design can also be easily scaled and used on a 25,000 lbf engine. To further support the larger engine design, an AM gas generator injector has been designed. Hot-fire testing on this injector is planned for the summer of 2016 at MSFC.

  4. Spectral network based on component cells under the SOPHIA European project

    SciTech Connect

    Núñez, Rubén Antón, Ignacio; Askins, Steve; Sala, Gabriel; Domínguez, César; Voarino, Philippe; Steiner, Marc; Siefer, Gerald; Fucci, Rafaelle; Roca, Franco; Minuto, Alessandro; Morabito, Paolo

    2015-09-28

    In the frame of the European project SOPHIA, a spectral network based on component (also called isotypes) cells has been created. Among the members of this project, several spectral sensors based on component cells and collimating tubes, so-called spectroheliometers, were installed in the last years, allowing the collection of minute-resolution spectral data useful for CPV systems characterization across Europe. The use of spectroheliometers has been proved useful to establish the necessary spectral conditions to perform power rating of CPV modules and systems. If enough data in a given period of time is collected, ideally a year, it is possible to characterize spectrally the place where measurements are taken, in the same way that hours of annual irradiation can be estimated using a pyrheliometer.

  5. Deconvolving X-ray spectral variability components in the Seyfert 1.5 NGC 3227

    SciTech Connect

    Arévalo, P.; Markowitz, A.

    2014-03-10

    We present the variability analysis of a 100 ks XMM-Newton observation of the Seyfert 1.5 active galaxy, NGC 3227. The observation found NGC 3227 in a period where its hard power-law component displayed remarkably little long-term variability. This lucky event allows us to clearly observe a soft spectral component undergoing a large-amplitude but slow flux variation. Using combined spectral and timing analysis, we isolate two independent variable continuum components and characterize their behavior as a function of timescale. Rapid and coherent variations throughout the 0.2-10 keV band reveal a spectrally hard (photon index Γ ∼ 1.7-1.8) power law, dominating the observed variability on timescales of 30 ks and shorter. Another component produces coherent fluctuations in the 0.2-2 keV range and is much softer (Γ ∼ 3); it dominates the observed variability on timescales greater than 30 ks. Both components are viewed through the same absorbers identified in the time-averaged spectrum. The combined spectral and timing analysis breaks the degeneracy between models for the soft excess: it is consistent with a power-law or thermal Comptonized component but not with a blackbody or an ionized reflection component. We demonstrate that the rapid variability in NGC 3227 is intrinsic to continuum-emitting components and is not an effect of variable absorption.

  6. A principal component analysis to interpret the spectral electrical behaviour of sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inzoli, Silvia; Giudici, Mauro; Huisman, Johan Alexander

    2015-04-01

    litho-textural (granulometric class weight percentage, characteristic diameters, non-uniformity coefficients, porosity, mineralogical phases in the finest granulometric fraction, organic matter content) and chemical (electrical conductivity of the saturation fluid) properties of each cluster in order to link sedimentological and geophysical properties. Preliminary results show that this analysis is effective to identify samples that share comparable amplitude and phase spectra but have different properties of the solid and fluid components. Such a proper samples classification prevented the derivation of distorted empirical relationships between electrical and sedimentological parameters. On the other hand, the proposed approach highlights spectral similarities which are not apparent in available sedimentological data, thus indicating the need to consider additional variables in the explanation of the bulk complex electrical response (e.g. the spatial distribution of the fine granulometric fraction).

  7. Picosecond spectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging with principal component analysis of meibomian glands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chia-Yu; Suhalim, Jeffrey L.; Nien, Chyong Ly; Miljković, Miloš D.; Diem, Max; Jester, James V.; Potma, Eric. O.

    2011-02-01

    The lipid distribution in the mouse meibomian gland was examined with picosecond spectral anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging. Spectral CARS data sets were generated by imaging specific localized regions of the gland within tissue sections at consecutive Raman shifts in the CH2 stretching vibrational range. Spectral differences between the location specific CARS spectra obtained in the lipid-rich regions of the acinus and the central duct were observed, which were confirmed with a Raman microspectroscopic analysis, and attributed to meibum lipid modifications within the gland. A principal component analysis of the spectral data set reveals changes in the CARS spectrum when transitioning from the acini to the central duct. These results demonstrate the utility of picosecond spectral CARS imaging combined with multivariate analysis for assessing differences in the distribution and composition of lipids in tissues.

  8. Principal Components Analysis of Martian NIR Image Cubes to Retrieve Surface Spectral Endmembers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, David R.

    2016-07-01

    Presented here is a discussion of the complete principal components analysis (PCA) performed on all photometric NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) NSFCAM spectral image sets from 1995–2001 and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) spectral image sets from 2006–2008, detailing the similarities and differences and overall interpretation of the PC dimensional spaces. The purpose of the analysis is to use the PCA to recover surface spectral endmembers to be used in a full radiative transfer modeling program to recover ice cloud optical depths (and thus water content) over diurnal, seasonal, and interannual timescales. The PCA results show considerable consistency across all seasons, and can be optimized to increase the consistency through both spectral and geographic restrictions on the data.

  9. Principal Components Analysis of Martian NIR Image Cubes to Retrieve Surface Spectral Endmembers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, David R.

    2016-07-01

    Presented here is a discussion of the complete principal components analysis (PCA) performed on all photometric NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) NSFCAM spectral image sets from 1995-2001 and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) spectral image sets from 2006-2008, detailing the similarities and differences and overall interpretation of the PC dimensional spaces. The purpose of the analysis is to use the PCA to recover surface spectral endmembers to be used in a full radiative transfer modeling program to recover ice cloud optical depths (and thus water content) over diurnal, seasonal, and interannual timescales. The PCA results show considerable consistency across all seasons, and can be optimized to increase the consistency through both spectral and geographic restrictions on the data.

  10. Motor stator using corner scraps for additional electrical components

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.; Su, Gui-Jia; Adams, Donald J.; Nagashima, James M.; Stancu, Constantin; Carlson, Douglas S.; Smith, Gregory S.

    2004-03-16

    A method for making a motor and auxiliary devices with a unified stator body comprises providing a piece of material (10) having an area larger than a cross section of the stator (11), removing material from the piece of material (10) to form a pattern for a cross section of a core (11) for the stator, and removing material from the piece of material (10) outside the cross section of the core of the stator (11) to allow positioning of cores (22, 23, 24) for supporting windings (25, 26, 27) of least one additional electromagnetic device, such as a transformer (62) in a dc-to-dc converter (61, 62) that provides a low. voltage dc output. An article of manufacture made according to the invention is also disclosed and apparatus made with the method and article of manufacture are also disclosed.

  11. Competitive interactions between components in surfactant-cosurfactant-additive systems.

    PubMed

    Chaghi, Radhouane; de Ménorval, Louis-Charles; Charnay, Clarence; Zajac, Jerzy

    2010-04-15

    Complex interactions of phenol (PhOH), heptanol (HeOH) and heptanoic acid (HeOIC) with micellar aggregates of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HTAB) in aqueous solutions at surfactant concentrations close to the CMC, HeOH or HeOIC content of 0.5 mmol kg(-1), and phenol molality of 1, 5, or 10 mmol kg(-1) have been investigated at 303 K by means of (1)H NMR spectroscopy, titration calorimetry and solution conductimetry. The analysis of the composition-dependence of the (1)H chemical shifts assigned to selected protons in the surfactant and additive units revealed the location of PhOH both within the hydrophobic micelle core and in the vicinity of the quaternary ammonium groups, the phenol penetration being somewhat deeper in the presence of HeOIC. The phenomenon was globally more exothermic with increasing extent of PhOH solubilization and it was accompanied by a gradual decrease in the positive entropy of micellization. The solubilization was competitive for high phenol contents in the aqueous phase, with some HeOH and HeOIC units being displaced progressively towards the aqueous phase.

  12. Spectral components at visual and infrared wavelengths in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, W. A.; Tokunaga, A. T.; Rudy, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Aperture-dependent infrared photometry of active galactic nuclei are presented which illustrate the importance of eliminating starlight of the galaxy in order to obtain the intrinsic spectral distribution of the active nuclei. Separate components of emission are required to explain the infrared emission with a spectral index of alpha approx = 2 and the typical visual-ultraviolet continuum with alpha approx = 0.3 (where F(nu) varies as nu(sup-alpha). Present evidence does not allow unique determination of the appropriate mechanisms, but the characteristics of each are discussed.

  13. Separating Reflective and Fluorescent Components Using High Frequency Illumination in the Spectral Domain.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying; Lam, Antony; Sato, Imari; Okabe, Takahiro; Sato, Yoichi

    2016-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging is beneficial to many applications but most traditional methods do not consider fluorescent effects which are present in everyday items ranging from paper to even our food. Furthermore, everyday fluorescent items exhibit a mix of reflection and fluorescence so proper separation of these components is necessary for analyzing them. In recent years, effective imaging methods have been proposed but most require capturing the scene under multiple illuminants. In this paper, we demonstrate efficient separation and recovery of reflectance and fluorescence emission spectra through the use of two high frequency illuminations in the spectral domain. With the obtained fluorescence emission spectra from our high frequency illuminants, we then describe how to estimate the fluorescence absorption spectrum of a material given its emission spectrum. In addition, we provide an in depth analysis of our method and also show that filters can be used in conjunction with standard light sources to generate the required high frequency illuminants. We also test our method under ambient light and demonstrate an application of our method to synthetic relighting of real scenes. PMID:26336113

  14. Extracting spectral contrast in Landsat Thematic Mapper image data using selective principal component analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chavez, P.S., Jr.; Kwarteng, A.Y.

    1989-01-01

    A challenge encountered with Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data, which includes data from size reflective spectral bands, is displaying as much information as possible in a three-image set for color compositing or digital analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) applied to the six TM bands simultaneously is often used to address this problem. However, two problems that can be encountered using the PCA method are that information of interest might be mathematically mapped to one of the unused components and that a color composite can be difficult to interpret. "Selective' PCA can be used to minimize both of these problems. The spectral contrast among several spectral regions was mapped for a northern Arizona site using Landsat TM data. Field investigations determined that most of the spectral contrast seen in this area was due to one of the following: the amount of iron and hematite in the soils and rocks, vegetation differences, standing and running water, or the presence of gypsum, which has a higher moisture retention capability than do the surrounding soils and rocks. -from Authors

  15. HARD X-RAY IMAGING OF INDIVIDUAL SPECTRAL COMPONENTS IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, Amir; Shih, Albert Y.; McTiernan, James M.; Krucker, Säm

    2015-09-20

    We present a new analytical technique, combining Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) high-resolution imaging and spectroscopic observations, to visualize solar flare emission as a function of spectral component (e.g., isothermal temperature) rather than energy. This computationally inexpensive technique is applicable to all spatially invariant spectral forms and is useful for visualizing spectroscopically determined individual sources and placing them in context, e.g., comparing multiple isothermal sources with nonthermal emission locations. For example, while extreme ultraviolet images can usually be closely identified with narrow temperature ranges, due to the emission being primarily from spectral lines of specific ion species, X-ray images are dominated by continuum emission and therefore have a broad temperature response, making it difficult to identify sources of specific temperatures regardless of the energy band of the image. We combine RHESSI calibrated X-ray visibilities with spatially integrated spectral models including multiple isothermal components to effectively isolate the individual thermal sources from the combined emission and image them separately. We apply this technique to the 2002 July 23 X4.8 event studied in prior works, and image for the first time the super-hot and cooler thermal sources independently. The super-hot source is farther from the footpoints and more elongated throughout the impulsive phase, consistent with an in situ heating mechanism for the super-hot plasma.

  16. Origin of additional spectral features in modulated reflectance spectra of 2-dimensional semiconductor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Amlan; Ghosh, Sandip

    2014-03-28

    High resolution photoreflectance (PR) spectroscopy study on a single GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well representing a two-dimensional (2D) system, shows additional distinct spectral features on the high energy side of the first confined heavy-hole and light-hole exciton transitions. The PR experiments involved a special dual detection technique which significantly improved the measurement sensitivity. Photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy data on the sample showed broadened step-like features around these energies. A detailed lineshape analysis, including first principles simulations, was performed to understand the origins of these additional PR spectral features. They are shown to arise primarily from inhomogeneously broadened first excited state transition of the excitons, rather than from a change in the joint density of states at the exciton continuum edge. The analysis suggests that such features are more likely in the case of 2D excitons as compared to 3D excitons in bulk material. Apart from its significance for post-growth characterization, identification of these additional PR features enables direct estimation of the exciton binding energy.

  17. Spectral and Geological Characterization of Beach Components in Northern Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caraballo Álvarez, I. O.; Torres-Perez, J. L.; Barreto, M.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding how changes in beach components may reflect beach processes is essential since variations along beach profiles can shed light on river and ocean processes influencing beach sedimentation and beachrock formation. It is likely these influences are related to beach proximity within the Río Grande de Manatí river mouth. Therefore, this study focuses on characterizing beach components at two sites in Manatí, Puerto Rico. Playa Machuca and Playa Tombolo, which are separated by eolianites, differ greatly in sediment size, mineralogy, and beachrock morphology. Several approaches were taken to geologically and spectrally characterize main beach components at each site. These approaches included field and microscopic laboratory identification, granulometry, and a comparison between remote sensing reflectance (Rrs) obtained with a field spectroradiometer and pre-existing spectral library signatures. Preliminary results indicate a positive correlation between each method. This study may help explore the possibility of using only Rrs to characterize beach and shallow submarine components for detailed image analysis and management of coastal features.This study focuses on characterizing beach components at two sites in Manatí, Puerto Rico. Playa Machuca and Playa Tombolo, two beaches that are separated by eolianites, differ greatly in sediment size and mineralogy, as well as in beachrock morphology. Understanding how changes in beach components may reflect beach processes is essential, since it is likely that differences are mostly related to each beaches' proximity to the Río Grande de Manatí river mouth. Hence, changes in components along beach profiles can shed light on the river's and the ocean's influence on beach sedimentation and beachrock formation. Several approaches were taken to properly geologically and spectrally characterize the main beach components at each site. These approaches included field and microscopic laboratory identification

  18. Spectral derates phenomena of atmospheric components on multi-junction CPV technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armijo, Kenneth M.; Harrison, Richard K.; King, Bruce H.; Martin, Jeffrey B.

    2014-09-01

    The solar spectrum varies with atmospheric conditions and composition, and can have significant impacts on the output power performance of each junction in a concentrating solar photovoltaic (CPV) system, with direct implications on the junction that is current-limiting. The effect of changing solar spectrum on CPV module power production has previously been characterized by various spectral performance parameters such as air mass (AM) for both single and multi-junction module technologies. However, examinations of outdoor test results have shown substantial uncertainty contributions by many of these parameters, including air mass, for the determination of projected power and energy production. Using spectral data obtained from outdoor spectrometers, with a spectral range of 336nm-1715nm, this investigation examines precipitable water (PW), aerosol and dust variability effects on incident spectral irradiance. This work then assesses air mass and other spectral performance parameters, including a new atmospheric component spectral factor (ACSF), to investigate iso-cell, stacked multijunction and single-junction c-Si module performance data directly with measured spectrum. This will then be used with MODTRAN5® to determine if spectral composition can account for daily and seasonal variability of the short-circuit current density Jsc and the maximum output power Pmp values. For precipitable water, current results show good correspondence between the modeled atmospheric component spectral factor and measured data with an average rms error of 0.013, for all three iso-cells tested during clear days over a one week time period. Results also suggest average variations in ACSF factors with respect to increasing precipitable water of 8.2%/cmH2O, 1.3%/cmH2O, 0.2%/cmH2O and 1.8%/cmH2O for GaInP, GaAs, Ge and c-Si cells, respectively at solar noon and an AM value of 1.0. For ozone, the GaInP cell had the greatest sensitivity to increasing ozone levels with an ACSF variation of

  19. DETECTION OF A THERMAL SPECTRAL COMPONENT IN THE PROMPT EMISSION OF GRB 100724B

    SciTech Connect

    Guiriec, Sylvain; Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael S.; Burgess, Michael; Goldstein, Adam; Bhat, P.N.; Chaplin, Vandiver; Ryde, Felix; Daigne, Frederic; Meszaros, Peter; McEnery, Julie; Omodei, Nicola; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Diehl, Roland; Foley, Suzanne; Greiner, Jochen; Camero-Arranz, Ascension; Fishman, Gerald

    2011-02-01

    Observations of GRB 100724B with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor find that the spectrum is dominated by the typical Band functional form, which is usually taken to represent a non-thermal emission component, but also includes a statistically highly significant thermal spectral contribution. The simultaneous observation of the thermal and non-thermal components allows us to confidently identify the two emission components. The fact that these seem to vary independently favors the idea that the thermal component is of photospheric origin while the dominant non-thermal emission occurs at larger radii. Our results imply either a very high efficiency for the non-thermal process or a very small size of the region at the base of the flow, both quite challenging for the standard fireball model. These problems are resolved if the jet is initially highly magnetized and has a substantial Poynting flux.

  20. Detection of a Thermal Spectral Component in the Prompt Emission of GRB 100724B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiriec, Sylvain; Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael S.; Burgess, Michael; Ryde, Felix; Daigne, Frédéric; Mészáros, Peter; Goldstein, Adam; McEnery, Julie; Omodei, Nicola; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Camero-Arranz, Ascensión; Chaplin, Vandiver; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald; Foley, Suzanne; Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty M.; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; von Kienlin, Andreas; Kippen, Marc; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; McBreen, Sheila; Meegan, Charles A.; Paciesas, William; Preece, Robert; Rau, Arne; Tierney, Dave; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2011-02-01

    Observations of GRB 100724B with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor find that the spectrum is dominated by the typical Band functional form, which is usually taken to represent a non-thermal emission component, but also includes a statistically highly significant thermal spectral contribution. The simultaneous observation of the thermal and non-thermal components allows us to confidently identify the two emission components. The fact that these seem to vary independently favors the idea that the thermal component is of photospheric origin while the dominant non-thermal emission occurs at larger radii. Our results imply either a very high efficiency for the non-thermal process or a very small size of the region at the base of the flow, both quite challenging for the standard fireball model. These problems are resolved if the jet is initially highly magnetized and has a substantial Poynting flux.

  1. Phase Coupling Between Spectral Components of Collapsing Langmuir Solitons in Solar Type III Radio Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Bergamo, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present the high time resolution observations of one of the Langmuir wave packets obtained in the source region of a solar type III radio burst. This wave packet satisfies the threshold condition of the supersonic modulational instability, as well as the criterion of a collapsing Langmuir soliton, i.e., the spatial scale derived from its peak intensity is less than that derived from its short time scale. The spectrum of t his wave packet contains an intense spectral peak at local electron plasma frequency, f(sub pe) and relatively weaker peaks at 2f(sub pe) and 3f(sub pe). We apply the wavelet based bispectral analysis technique on this wave packet and compute the bicoherence between its spectral components. It is found that the bicoherence exhibits two peaks at (approximately f(sub pe), approximately f(sub pe)) and (approximately f(sub pe) approximately 2f(sub pe)), which strongly suggest that the spectral peak at 2f(sub pe) probably corresponds to the second harmonic radio emission, generated as a result of the merging of antiparallel propagating Langmuir waves trapped in the collapsing Langmuir soliton, and, the spectral peak at 3f(sub pe) probably corresponds to the third harmonic radio emission, generated as a result of merging of a trapped Langmuir wave and a second harmonic electromagnetic wave.

  2. High spectral specificity of local chemical components characterization with multichannel shift-excitation Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kun; Wu, Tao; Wei, Haoyun; Wu, Xuejian; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has emerged as a promising tool for its noninvasive and nondestructive characterization of local chemical structures. However, spectrally overlapping components prevent the specific identification of hyperfine molecular information of different substances, because of limitations in the spectral resolving power. The challenge is to find a way of preserving scattered photons and retrieving hidden/buried Raman signatures to take full advantage of its chemical specificity. Here, we demonstrate a multichannel acquisition framework based on shift-excitation and slit-modulation, followed by mathematical post-processing, which enables a significant improvement in the spectral specificity of Raman characterization. The present technique, termed shift-excitation blind super-resolution Raman spectroscopy (SEBSR), uses multiple degraded spectra to beat the dispersion-loss trade-off and facilitate high-resolution applications. It overcomes a fundamental problem that has previously plagued high-resolution Raman spectroscopy: fine spectral resolution requires large dispersion, which is accompanied by extreme optical loss. Applicability is demonstrated by the perfect recovery of fine structure of the C-Cl bending mode as well as the clear discrimination of different polymorphs of mannitol. Due to its enhanced discrimination capability, this method offers a feasible route at encouraging a broader range of applications in analytical chemistry, materials and biomedicine. PMID:26350355

  3. Full range complex spectral domain optical coherence tomography without additional phase shifters.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Bernhard; Pircher, Michael; Götzinger, Erich; Hitzenberger, Christoph K

    2007-10-01

    We demonstrate a new full range complex spectral domain optical coherence tomography (FRC SD-OCT) method. Other than FRC SD-OCT systems reported in literature, which employed devices such as electro-/acousto optic modulators or piezo-driven mirrors providing the phase modulations necessary for retrieval of the complex-valued signal, the system presented works without any additional phase shifting device. The required phase shift is introduced by the galvanometer scanner used for transversally scanning the sample beam. By means of a slight displacement of the probe beam with respect to the scanning mirror's pivot axis, the sample arm length and thus the phase is continuously modulated as the beam is scanned in lateral direction. From such modulated spectral data, the complex-valued data yielding a twofold increase of accessible depth range can be calculated using an algorithm based on the Hilbert transform. To demonstrate the performance of our method quantitative measurements of the suppression of mirror images as a function of induced phase shift were performed. In order to validate the FRC SD-OCT technique for high-speed imaging of biological tissue, we present full-range images of the human anterior chamber in vivo. PMID:19550607

  4. Photon counting spectral CT component analysis of coronary artery atherosclerotic plaque samples

    PubMed Central

    Coulon, P; Thran, A; Roessl, E; Martens, G; Sigovan, M; Douek, P

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the capabilities of photon counting spectral CT to differentiate components of coronary atherosclerotic plaque based on differences in spectral attenuation and iodine-based contrast agent concentration. Methods: 10 calcified and 13 lipid-rich non-calcified histologically demonstrated atheromatous plaques from post-mortem human coronary arteries were scanned with a photon counting spectral CT scanner. Individual photons were counted and classified in one of six energy bins from 25 to 70 keV. Based on a maximum likelihood approach, maps of photoelectric absorption (PA), Compton scattering (CS) and iodine concentration (IC) were reconstructed. Intensity measurements were performed on each map in the vessel wall, the surrounding perivascular fat and the lipid-rich and the calcified plaques. PA and CS values are expressed relative to pure water values. A comparison between these different elements was performed using Kruskal–Wallis tests with pairwise post hoc Mann–Whitney U-tests and Sidak p-value adjustments. Results: Results for vessel wall, surrounding perivascular fat and lipid-rich and calcified plaques were, respectively, 1.19 ± 0.09, 0.73 ± 0.05, 1.08 ± 0.14 and 17.79 ± 6.70 for PA; 0.96 ± 0.02, 0.83 ± 0.02, 0.91 ± 0.03 and 2.53 ± 0.63 for CS; and 83.3 ± 10.1, 37.6 ± 8.1, 55.2 ± 14.0 and 4.9 ± 20.0 mmol l−1 for IC, with a significant difference between all tissues for PA, CS and IC (p < 0.012). Conclusion: This study demonstrates the capability of energy-sensitive photon counting spectral CT to differentiate between calcifications and iodine-infused regions of human coronary artery atherosclerotic plaque samples by analysing differences in spectral attenuation and iodine-based contrast agent concentration. Advances in knowledge: Photon counting spectral CT is a promising technique to identify plaque components by analysing differences in iodine-based contrast agent

  5. The spectral relationships between NEA and the meteorites: An overview using principal components analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, D. T.; Tholen, D. J.; Bell, J. F.; Pieters, C. M.

    1991-01-01

    One of the primary reservoirs for meteorites is probably the planet-crossing Aten, Apollo, and Amor asteroids. Comparing the spectral characteristics of these two populations with each other and with the spectra of the main belt asteroids would provide insight into the dynamical processes that deliver meteorites to Earth. One method for obtaining an overview of general relationships in a large spectral data set is the statistical technique of principal components analysis. This technique quantifies general spectral similarities and reprojects the data in a plot of major axes of variation where distance is a measure of relative similarity. A major caveat should be kept in mind, however, spectra are sensitive to particle size and viewing geometry effects, and near Earth asteroids (NEA's) are probably significantly different from main belt asteroids in both these factors. The analysis was restricted to the spectral range of ECAS filters and included 116 meteorite spectra from the Gaffey (1976) survey and 417 asteroids from the Zellner et. al. (1985) survey of which 13 are planet-crossers. Although thirteen asteroids are not much of a sample on which to base conclusions, a few inferences can be drawn from this exercise. First, the NEA spectral characteristics are, on average, more consistent with the spectra of meteorites than are the main belt asteroids. Second, the S-type NEA's tend to be spectrally more similar to the ordinary chondrite meteorites than the main belt S-types. This suggests that the planet-crossing S-types do not represent the spectral range of the main belt S-type population and that the planet-crossing S-types are on average more like the ordinary chondrites than the main belt S-types. Third, the only direct asteroidal ordinary chondrite analog, the Q-type asteroid, 1862 Apollo, plots well within the field of the ordinary chondrite meteorites and represents the most common meteorite fall type. Finally, it is interesting that the planet

  6. Spectral principal component analysis of mid-infrared spectra of a sample of PG QSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Wei-Hao; He, Zhi-Cheng; Green, Richard; Shi, Yong; Ge, Xue; Liu, Wen-Shuai

    2016-03-01

    A spectral principal component (SPC) analysis of a sample of 87 Palomar-Green (PG) QSOs at z < 0.5 is presented for their mid-infrared spectra from Spitzer Space Telescope. We have derived the first five eigenspectra, which account for 85.2 per cent of the mid-infrared spectral variation. It is found that the first eigenspectrum represents the mid-infrared slope, forbidden emission line strength and 9.7 μm silicate feature; the 3rd and 4th eigenspectra represent the silicate features at 18 and 9.7 μm, respectively. With the principal components (PC) from optical principal component analysis, we find that there is a medium strong correlation between spectral SPC1 and PC2 (accretion rate). It suggests that more nuclear contribution to the near-IR spectrum leads to the change of mid-IR slope. We find mid-IR forbidden lines are suppressed with higher accretion rate. A medium strong correlation between SPC3 and PC1 (Eddington ratio) suggests a connection between the silicate feature at 18 μm and the Eddington ratio. For the ratio of the silicate strength at 9.7 μm to that at 18 μm, we find a strong correlation with PC2 (accretion rate or QSO luminosity). We also find that there is a medium strong correlation between the star formation rate (SFR) and PC2. It implies a correlation between SFR and the central accretion rate in PG QSOs.

  7. Spectral data compression using weighted principal component analysis with consideration of human visual system and light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Qian; Wan, Xiaoxia; Li, Junfeng; Liu, Qiang; Liang, Jingxing; Li, Chan

    2016-10-01

    This paper proposed two weight functions based on principal component analysis (PCA) to reserve more colorimetric information in spectral data compression process. One weight function consisted of the CIE XYZ color-matching functions representing the characteristic of the human visual system, while another was made up of the CIE XYZ color-matching functions of human visual system and relative spectral power distribution of the CIE standard illuminant D65. The improvement obtained from the proposed two methods were tested to compress and reconstruct the reflectance spectra of 1600 glossy Munsell color chips and 1950 Natural Color System color chips as well as six multispectral images. The performance was evaluated by the mean values of color difference under the CIE 1931 standard colorimetric observer and the CIE standard illuminant D65 and A. The mean values of root mean square errors between the original and reconstructed spectra were also calculated. The experimental results show that the proposed two methods significantly outperform the standard PCA and another two weighted PCA in the aspects of colorimetric reconstruction accuracy with very slight degradation in spectral reconstruction accuracy. In addition, weight functions with the CIE standard illuminant D65 can improve the colorimetric reconstruction accuracy compared to weight functions without the CIE standard illuminant D65.

  8. Spectral data compression using weighted principal component analysis with consideration of human visual system and light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Qian; Wan, Xiaoxia; Li, Junfeng; Liu, Qiang; Liang, Jingxing; Li, Chan

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposed two weight functions based on principal component analysis (PCA) to reserve more colorimetric information in spectral data compression process. One weight function consisted of the CIE XYZ color-matching functions representing the characteristic of the human visual system, while another was made up of the CIE XYZ color-matching functions of human visual system and relative spectral power distribution of the CIE standard illuminant D65. The improvement obtained from the proposed two methods were tested to compress and reconstruct the reflectance spectra of 1600 glossy Munsell color chips and 1950 Natural Color System color chips as well as six multispectral images. The performance was evaluated by the mean values of color difference under the CIE 1931 standard colorimetric observer and the CIE standard illuminant D65 and A. The mean values of root mean square errors between the original and reconstructed spectra were also calculated. The experimental results show that the proposed two methods significantly outperform the standard PCA and another two weighted PCA in the aspects of colorimetric reconstruction accuracy with very slight degradation in spectral reconstruction accuracy. In addition, weight functions with the CIE standard illuminant D65 can improve the colorimetric reconstruction accuracy compared to weight functions without the CIE standard illuminant D65.

  9. Spectral optical monitoring of nitrate in inland and seawater with miniaturized optical components.

    PubMed

    Kröckel, L; Schwotzer, G; Lehmann, H; Wieduwilt, T

    2011-01-01

    Miniaturized spectral analytical systems become ever increasingly important for in situ monitoring of natural waters' nutrients, such as nitrate, phosphate or ammonium. A miniaturized UV spectral photometer has been developed for online detection using liquid core wave guides (LCW), UV transmitting optical fibers, a low-cost miniature polychromator, and a deuterium light source. The LCWs were manufactured by coating the insides of silica glass capillaries with Teflon(®) AF 1600. Due to this setup our instrument needs only a few microliters of sample for each measurement. Nitrate can be directly detected by UV absorption spectroscopy in a spectral range between 200 and 350 nm. To separate the nitrate absorption from the superposition of other UV absorbing contaminations, a multi component analysis (MCA) software was applied to the measured spectra. With this developed photometer, nitrate levels can be determined online in inland and seawater or, if needed, in situ. It was evaluated twice in the field and the results for the measured amounts of nitrate in reservoir samples and in the North Sea are also presented in this work.

  10. Single-particle spectral function for the classical one-component plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortmann, C.

    2009-01-01

    The spectral function for an electron one-component plasma is calculated self-consistently using the GW(0) approximation for the single-particle self-energy. In this way, correlation effects that go beyond the mean-field description of the plasma are contained, i.e., the collisional damping of single-particle states, the dynamical screening of the interaction, and the appearance of collective plasma modes. Second, a nonperturbative analytic solution for the on-shell GW(0) self-energy as a function of momentum is presented. It reproduces the numerical data for the spectral function with a relative error of less than 10% in the regime where the Debye screening parameter is smaller than the inverse Bohr radius, κ<1aB-1 . In the limit of low density, the nonperturbative self-energy behaves as n1/4 , whereas a perturbation expansion leads to the unphysical result of a density-independent self-energy [Fennel and Wilfer, Ann. Phys. (Leipzig) 32, 265 (1974)]. The derived expression will greatly facilitate the calculation of observables in correlated plasmas (transport properties, equation of state) that need the spectral function as an input quantity. This is demonstrated for the shift of the chemical potential, which is computed from the analytical formulas and compared to the GW(0) result. At a plasma temperature of 100eV and densities below 1021cm-3 , the two approaches deviate by less than 10% from each other.

  11. Cistanches identification based on fluorescent spectral imaging technology combined with principal component analysis and artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jia; Huang, Furong; Li, Yuanpeng; Xiao, Chi; Xian, Ruiyi; Ma, Zhiguo

    2015-03-01

    In this study, fluorescent spectral imaging technology combined with principal component analysis (PCA) and artificial neural networks (ANNs) was used to identify Cistanche deserticola, Cistanche tubulosa and Cistanche sinensis, which are traditional Chinese medicinal herbs. The fluorescence spectroscopy imaging system acquired the spectral images of 40 cistanche samples, and through image denoising, binarization processing to make sure the effective pixels. Furthermore, drew the spectral curves whose data in the wavelength range of 450-680 nm for the study. Then preprocessed the data by first-order derivative, analyzed the data through principal component analysis and artificial neural network. The results shows: Principal component analysis can generally distinguish cistanches, through further identification by neural networks makes the results more accurate, the correct rate of the testing and training sets is as high as 100%. Based on the fluorescence spectral imaging technique and combined with principal component analysis and artificial neural network to identify cistanches is feasible.

  12. A STUDY OF A NEW INCREASING SUBMILLIMETER SPECTRAL COMPONENT OF AN X28 SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, A. H.; Li, J. P.; Wang, X. D.

    2011-01-20

    In this paper, we study a novel spectral component that increases with frequency above 200 GHz in an X28 solar flare that occurred on 2003 November 4. A maximum flux density of {approx}20,000 sfu was observed at 405 GHz at main phase. We model its spectra based on gyrosynchrotron (GS) radiation computations in the case of a magnetic dipole field. Our computations show that the new increasing submillimeter spectral component at the main peak P1 can be generated by energetic electrons with a harder spectral index (2.3), low-energy cutoff of 30 keV, and number density of 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3} in a compact source (0.''5 radius) with a strong local magnetic field varying from 780 to 4590 G via GS emission. The associated microwave (MW) spectral component can be produced by energetic electrons via GS emission, but with a 10 keV low-energy cutoff and number density 1.2 x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -3} in an extended source (40'' radius) with mean magnetic field strengths from 100 to 576 G. The MW and submillimeter emission sources, inferred from the magnetic dipole field model, are located in the corona and {approx}1000 km low atmosphere levels above the photosphere, respectively. Energy flux, energy loss rate, and total energy released by energetic electrons are estimated for the first time. It is found that the energy flux can attain values of 7.2 x 10{sup 13} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} in the submillimeter source. This value is four orders higher than that in the MW source. The energies released by electrons in the submillimeter and MW sources reach, respectively, 1.2 x 10{sup 32} and 1.9 x 10{sup 31} erg. The total energy released by energetic electrons is 1.4 x 10{sup 32} erg during the flare in the MW and submillimeter sources. The mean energy released by energetic electrons for a subsecond pulse, i.e., the fragment energy, is estimated to be about 5.2 x 10{sup 26} erg.

  13. Non-LTE spectral models for the gaseous debris-disk component of Ton 345

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, S.; Nagel, T.; Rauch, T.; Werner, K.

    2014-11-01

    Context. For a fraction of single white dwarfs with debris disks, an additional gaseous disk was discovered. Both dust and gas are thought to be created by the disruption of planetary bodies. Aims: The composition of the extrasolar planetary material can directly be analyzed in the gaseous disk component, and the disk dynamics might be accessible by investigating the temporal behavior of the Ca ii infrared emission triplet, hallmark of the gas disk. Methods: We obtained new optical spectra for the first helium-dominated white dwarf for which a gas disk was discovered (Ton 345) and modeled the non-LTE spectra of viscous gas disks composed of carbon, oxygen, magnesium, silicon, sulfur, and calcium with chemical abundances typical for solar system asteroids. Iron and its possible line-blanketing effects on the model structure and spectral energy distribution was still neglected. A set of models with different radii, effective temperatures, and surface densities as well as chondritic and bulk-Earth abundances was computed and compared with the observed line profiles of the Ca ii infrared triplet. Results: Our models suggest that the Ca ii emission stems from a rather narrow gas ring with a radial extent of R = 0.44-0.94 R⊙, a uniform surface density Σ = 0.3 g cm-2, and an effective temperature of Teff ≈ 6000 K. The often assumed chemical mixtures derived from photospheric abundances in polluted white dwarfs - similar to a chondritic or bulk-Earth composition - produce unobserved emission lines in the model and therefore have to be altered. We do not detect any line-profile variability on timescales of hours, but we confirm the long-term trend over the past decade for the red-blue asymmetry of the double-peaked lines. Based on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC).

  14. The relationship between variable and polarized optical spectral components of luminous type 1 non-blazar quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokubo, Mitsuru

    2016-08-01

    Optical spectropolarimetry by Kishimoto et al. (2004, MNRAS, 354, 1065) has shown that several luminous type 1 quasars show a strong decrease of the polarized continuum flux in the rest-frame near-ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths of λ < 4000 Å. In the literature, this spectral feature is interpreted as evidence of the broadened hydrogen Balmer absorption edge imprinted on the accretion disk thermal emission due to the disk atmospheric opacity effect. On the other hand, quasar flux variability studies have shown that the variable continuum component in UV-optical spectra of quasars, which is considered to be a good indicator of the intrinsic spectral shape of the accretion disk emission, generally has a significantly flat spectral shape throughout the near-UV to optical spectral range. To examine whether the disk continuum spectral shapes revealed as the polarized flux and as the variable component spectra are consistent with each other, we carry out multi-band photometric monitoring observations for a sample of four polarization-decreasing quasars of Kishimoto et al.'s (4C 09.72, 3C 323.1, Ton 202, and B2 1208+32) to derive the variable component spectra and compare the spectral shape of them with that of the polarized flux spectra. Contrary to expectation, we confirm that the two spectral components of these quasars have totally different spectral shapes, in that the variable component spectra are significantly bluer compared to the polarized flux spectra. This discrepancy between two spectral shapes may imply either (1) the decrease of polarization degree in the rest-frame UV wavelengths is not indicating the Balmer absorption edge feature but is induced by some unknown (de)polarization mechanisms, or (2) the UV-optical flux variability is occurring preferentially at the hot inner radii of the accretion disk and thus the variable component spectra do not reflect the whole accretion disk emission.

  15. Additive and non-additive genetic components of the jack male life history in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha).

    PubMed

    Forest, Adriana R; Semeniuk, Christina A D; Heath, Daniel D; Pitcher, Trevor E

    2016-08-01

    Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, exhibit alternative reproductive tactics (ARTs) where males exist in two phenotypes: large "hooknose" males and smaller "jacks" that reach sexual maturity after only 1 year in seawater. The mechanisms that determine "jacking rate"-the rate at which males precociously sexually mature-are known to involve both genetics and differential growth rates, where individuals that become jacks exhibit higher growth earlier in life. The additive genetic components have been studied and it is known that jack sires produce significantly more jack offspring than hooknose sires, and vice versa. The current study was the first to investigate both additive and non-additive genetic components underlying jacking through the use of a full-factorial breeding design using all hooknose sires. The effect of dams and sires descendant from a marker-assisted broodstock program that identified "high performance" and "low performance" lines using growth- and survival-related gene markers was also studied. Finally, the relative growth of jack, hooknose, and female offspring was examined. No significant dam, sire, or interaction effects were observed in this study, and the maternal, additive, and non-additive components underlying jacking were small. Differences in jacking rates in this study were determined by dam performance line, where dams that originated from the low performance line produced significantly more jacks. Jack offspring in this study had a significantly larger body size than both hooknose males and females starting 1 year post-fertilization. This study provides novel information regarding the genetic architecture underlying ARTs in Chinook salmon that could have implications for the aquaculture industry, where jacks are not favoured due to their small body size and poor flesh quality. PMID:27450674

  16. Additive and non-additive genetic components of the jack male life history in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha).

    PubMed

    Forest, Adriana R; Semeniuk, Christina A D; Heath, Daniel D; Pitcher, Trevor E

    2016-08-01

    Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, exhibit alternative reproductive tactics (ARTs) where males exist in two phenotypes: large "hooknose" males and smaller "jacks" that reach sexual maturity after only 1 year in seawater. The mechanisms that determine "jacking rate"-the rate at which males precociously sexually mature-are known to involve both genetics and differential growth rates, where individuals that become jacks exhibit higher growth earlier in life. The additive genetic components have been studied and it is known that jack sires produce significantly more jack offspring than hooknose sires, and vice versa. The current study was the first to investigate both additive and non-additive genetic components underlying jacking through the use of a full-factorial breeding design using all hooknose sires. The effect of dams and sires descendant from a marker-assisted broodstock program that identified "high performance" and "low performance" lines using growth- and survival-related gene markers was also studied. Finally, the relative growth of jack, hooknose, and female offspring was examined. No significant dam, sire, or interaction effects were observed in this study, and the maternal, additive, and non-additive components underlying jacking were small. Differences in jacking rates in this study were determined by dam performance line, where dams that originated from the low performance line produced significantly more jacks. Jack offspring in this study had a significantly larger body size than both hooknose males and females starting 1 year post-fertilization. This study provides novel information regarding the genetic architecture underlying ARTs in Chinook salmon that could have implications for the aquaculture industry, where jacks are not favoured due to their small body size and poor flesh quality.

  17. Spectral variability of the IR source IRAS 01005+7910 optical component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochkova, V. G.; Chentsov, E. L.; Panchuk, V. E.; Sendzikas, E. G.; Yushkin, M. V.

    2014-10-01

    High-resolution optical spectra of the IR source IRAS01005+7910 are used to determine the spectral type of its central star, B1.5±0.3, identify the spectral features, and analyze their profile and radial-velocity variations. The systemic velocity V sys = -50.5 km s-1 is determined from the positions of the symmetric and stable profiles of the forbidden [NI], [N II], [OI], [S II], and [Fe II] emission lines. The presence of the [NII] and [SII] forbidden emissions indicates the onset of the ionization of the circumstellar envelope and the fact that the star is very close to undergoing the planetary nebula stage. The broad range of radial velocity V r estimates based on the line cores, which amounts to about 34 km s-1, is partly due to the deformations of the profiles caused by variable emissions. The variations of the V r in the line wings are smaller, about 23 km s-1, and may be due to pulsations and/or hidden binarity of the star. The deformations of the profiles of absorption-emission lines may result from variations of their absorption components caused by the variations of the geometry and kinematics in the wind base. The H α lines exhibit PCyg III type wind profiles. Deviations of the wind from spherical symmetry are shown to be small. The relatively low wind velocity (27-74 km s-1 from different observations) and the strong intensity of the red emission (it exceeds the continuum level by up to a factor of seven) are typical for hypergiants rather than the classical supergiants. IRAS01005 is an example of spectral mimicry of a low-mass post-AGB star masquerading as a massive hypergiant.

  18. Biomass estimator for NIR image with a few additional spectral band images taken from light UAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pölönen, Ilkka; Salo, Heikki; Saari, Heikki; Kaivosoja, Jere; Pesonen, Liisa; Honkavaara, Eija

    2012-05-01

    A novel way to produce biomass estimation will offer possibilities for precision farming. Fertilizer prediction maps can be made based on accurate biomass estimation generated by a novel biomass estimator. By using this knowledge, a variable rate amount of fertilizers can be applied during the growing season. The innovation consists of light UAS, a high spatial resolution camera, and VTT's novel spectral camera. A few properly selected spectral wavelengths with NIR images and point clouds extracted by automatic image matching have been used in the estimation. The spectral wavelengths were chosen from green, red, and NIR channels.

  19. Principal Components Analysis on the spectral Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function of ceramic colour standards.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, A; Campos, J; Rabal, A M; Pons, A; Hernanz, M L; Corróns, A

    2011-09-26

    The Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) is essential to characterize an object's reflectance properties. This function depends both on the various illumination-observation geometries as well as on the wavelength. As a result, the comprehensive interpretation of the data becomes rather complex. In this work we assess the use of the multivariable analysis technique of Principal Components Analysis (PCA) applied to the experimental BRDF data of a ceramic colour standard. It will be shown that the result may be linked to the various reflection processes occurring on the surface, assuming that the incoming spectral distribution is affected by each one of these processes in a specific manner. Moreover, this procedure facilitates the task of interpolating a series of BRDF measurements obtained for a particular sample.

  20. Blind spectral unmixing based on sparse component analysis for hyperspectral remote sensing imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yanfei; Wang, Xinyu; Zhao, Lin; Feng, Ruyi; Zhang, Liangpei; Xu, Yanyan

    2016-09-01

    Recently, many blind source separation (BSS)-based techniques have been applied to hyperspectral unmixing. In this paper, a new blind spectral unmixing method based on sparse component analysis (BSUSCA) is proposed to solve the problem of highly mixed data. The BSUSCA algorithm consists of an alternative scheme based on two-block alternating optimization, by which we can simultaneously obtain the endmember signatures and their corresponding fractional abundances. According to the spatial distribution of the endmembers, the sparse properties of the fractional abundances are considered in the proposed algorithm. A sparse component analysis (SCA)-based mixing matrix estimation method is applied to update the endmember signatures, and the abundance estimation problem is solved by the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM). SCA is utilized for the unmixing due to its various advantages, including the unique solution and robust modeling assumption. The robustness of the proposed algorithm is verified through simulated experimental study. The experimental results using both simulated data and real hyperspectral remote sensing images confirm the high efficiency and precision of the proposed algorithm.

  1. 78 FR 52429 - Indirect Food Additives: Adhesives and Components of Coatings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 175 Indirect Food Additives: Adhesives and Components of Coatings CFR Correction In Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 170 to...

  2. Label-free observation of tissues by high-speed stimulated Raman spectral microscopy and independent component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Otsuka, Yoichi; Sato, Shuya; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; Umemura, Wataru; Sumimura, Kazuhiko; Nishizawa, Norihiko; Fukui, Kiichi; Itoh, Kazuyoshi

    2013-02-01

    We have developed a video-rate stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscope with frame-by-frame wavenumber tunability. The system uses a 76-MHz picosecond Ti:sapphire laser and a subharmonically synchronized, 38-MHz Yb fiber laser. The Yb fiber laser pulses are spectrally sliced by a fast wavelength-tunable filter, which consists of a galvanometer scanner, a 4-f optical system and a reflective grating. The spectral resolution of the filter is ~ 3 cm-1. The wavenumber was scanned from 2800 to 3100 cm-1 with an arbitrary waveform synchronized to the frame trigger. For imaging, we introduced a 8-kHz resonant scanner and a galvanometer scanner. We were able to acquire SRS images of 500 x 480 pixels at a frame rate of 30.8 frames/s. Then these images were processed by principal component analysis followed by a modified algorithm of independent component analysis. This algorithm allows blind separation of constituents with overlapping Raman bands from SRS spectral images. The independent component (IC) spectra give spectroscopic information, and IC images can be used to produce pseudo-color images. We demonstrate various label-free imaging modalities such as 2D spectral imaging of the rat liver, two-color 3D imaging of a vessel in the rat liver, and spectral imaging of several sections of intestinal villi in the mouse. Various structures in the tissues such as lipid droplets, cytoplasm, fibrous texture, nucleus, and water-rich region were successfully visualized.

  3. On- and offline ultrasonic characterization of components built by SLM additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, Hans; Spies, Martin; Bamberg, Joachim; Henkel, Benjamin

    2016-02-01

    Additive manufacturing processes have become commercially available and are particularly interesting for the production of free-formed parts. Selective laser melting allows for manufacturing components by localized melting of successive layers of metal powder. In this contribution, we report on investigations in view of the influence of the process parameter `laser power' on the microstructure of the manufactured component. It turned out that the online recorded A-scans allow inferring conclusions about the quality of the SLM process. We also report on offline measurements which have been performed to support the online results.

  4. A statistical evaluation of spectral fingerprinting methods using analysis of variance and principal component analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Six methods were compared with respect to spectral fingerprinting of a well-characterized series of broccoli samples. Spectral fingerprints were acquired for finely-powdered solid samples using Fourier transform-infrared (IR) and Fourier transform-near infrared (NIR) spectrometry and for aqueous met...

  5. Spectral images browsing using principal component analysis and set partitioning in hierarchical tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Long; Zhao, Deping

    2011-12-01

    Spectral imaging technology have been used mostly in remote sensing, but have recently been extended to new area requiring high fidelity color reproductions like telemedicine, e-commerce, etc. These spectral imaging systems are important because they offer improved color reproduction quality not only for a standard observer under a particular illuminantion, but for any other individual exhibiting normal color vision capability under another illuminantion. A possibility for browsing of the archives is needed. In this paper, the authors present a new spectral image browsing architecture. The architecture for browsing is expressed as follow: (1) The spectral domain of the spectral image is reduced with the PCA transform. As a result of the PCA transform the eigenvectors and the eigenimages are obtained. (2) We quantize the eigenimages with the original bit depth of spectral image (e.g. if spectral image is originally 8bit, then quantize eigenimage to 8bit), and use 32bit floating numbers for the eigenvectors. (3) The first eigenimage is lossless compressed by JPEG-LS, the other eigenimages were lossy compressed by wavelet based SPIHT algorithm. For experimental evalution, the following measures were used. We used PSNR as the measurement for spectral accuracy. And for the evaluation of color reproducibility, ΔE was used.here standard D65 was used as a light source. To test the proposed method, we used FOREST and CORAL spectral image databases contrain 12 and 10 spectral images, respectively. The images were acquired in the range of 403-696nm. The size of the images were 128*128, the number of bands was 40 and the resolution was 8 bits per sample. Our experiments show the proposed compression method is suitable for browsing, i.e., for visual purpose.

  6. Load-dependent Optimization of Honeycombs for Sandwich Components - New Possibilities by Using Additive Layer Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riss, Fabian; Schilp, Johannes; Reinhart, Gunther

    Due to their feasible geometric complexity, additive layer manufacturing (ALM) processes show a highpotential for the production of lightweight components.Therefore, ALM processes enable the realization of bionic-designedcomponents like honeycombs, which are optimized depending upon load and outer boundary conditions.This optimization is based on a closed-loop, three-steps methodology: At first, each honeycomb is conformed to the surface of the part. Secondly, the structure is optimizedfor lightweight design.It is possible to achieve a homogeneous stress distribution in the part by varying the wall thickness, honeycombdiameter and the amount of honeycombs, depending on the subjected stresses and strains. At last, the functional components like threads or bearing carriers are integrated directly into the honeycomb core.Using all these steps as an iterative process, it is possible to reduce the mass of sandwich components about 50 percent compared to conventional approaches.

  7. Eight is enough: Identification of additional Vestoids via NIR spectral and mineralogical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardersen, Paul S.; Reddy, Vishnu; Roberts, Rachel; Mainzer, Amy

    2014-11-01

    We present initial results of a large-scale effort to constrain the basaltic asteroid population in the main asteroid belt. Our main goal is to study potential Vestoids, which are defined as the group of asteroids most likely to be ejected fragments from (4) Vesta. Through the combination of ground-based near-infrared spectral observations, WISE-derived albedos, Vp-type taxonomies, and orbital elements (a,e,i), this work aims to better constrain the Vestoid population by studying a sample of ~125 candidate asteroids. A second part of this effort involves characterizing ~15 outer main belt asteroids to search for basaltic objects. Surface mineralogical characterizations derived from NIR spectra are a vital tool to confirm the basaltic nature of Vp-type asteroids due to ambiguities and misclassifications in taxonomies. Criteria for classification as a Vestoid includes the presence of the deep 0.9- and 1.9-μm pyroxene absorption features, derived spectral band parameters that are consistent with those of basaltic achondrites, and estimates of average surface pyroxene chemistries consistent with those of the HED meteorites derived from (4) Vesta. NIR spectral observations of 8 Vp-type asteroids were obtained at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), Mauna Kea, Hawai’i, on January 14, 2013 UT, utilizing SpeX in low-resolution prism mode. All eight asteroids exhibit orbital elements, taxonomies, and albedos that identify them as candidate Vestoids. They include (3867) Shiretoko, (5235) Jean-Loup, (5560) Amytis, (6331) 1992 FZ1, (6976) Kanatsu, (17469) 1991 BT, (29796) 1999 CW77, and (30872) 1992 EM17. Analysis indicates that all eight asteroids are likely Vestoids based on the criteria described above. (3867) Shiretoko has a surface mineralogy consistent with the eucrites while the remaining seven asteroids have surface mineralogies consistent with the howardites. The dominance of howarditic compositions among the Vestoids we studied is consistent with a

  8. Value addition in sesame: A perspective on bioactive components for enhancing utility and profitability

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Niti; Rai, A.K.; Kumari, Ratna; Bhat, K.V.

    2014-01-01

    Sesame seed is a reservoir of nutritional components with numerous beneficial effects along with health promotion in humans. The bioactive components present in the seed include vital minerals, vitamins, phytosterols, polyunsaturated fatty acids, tocopherols and unique class of lignans such as sesamin and sesamolin. The presence of phenylpropanoid compounds namely lignans along with tocopherols and phytosterols provide defense mechanism against reactive oxygen species and increases keeping quality of oil by preventing oxidative rancidity. In this article, we have reviewed the nutraceutical, pharmacological, traditional and industrial value of sesame seeds with respect to bioactive components that hold high antioxidant value. Valuable information on superior functional components of sesame will strongly promote the use of sesame seeds in the daily diet world-wide. In spite of huge repertoire of sesame germplasm collection, limited research efforts on the use of conventional and biotechnological methodologies have resulted in minimal success in developing nutritionally superior cultivars. In consequence, value addition efforts in sesame would enable development of genotypes with high antioxidant activity and subsequently prevention of free radical related diseases. Modification of bioactive components in sesame would enable production of stabilized sesame oil with enhanced shelf life and better market value. PMID:25125886

  9. Feasibility of modifying the high resolution infrared radiation sounder (HIRS/2) for measuring spectral components of Earth radiation budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, E. W.; Holman, K. A.

    1980-01-01

    The concept of adding four spectral channels to the 20 channel HIRS/2 instrument for the purpose of determining the origin and profile of radiant existence from the Earth's atmosphere is considered. Methods of addition of three channels at 0.5, 1.0 and 1.6 micron m to the present 0.7 micron m visible channel and an 18-25 micron m channel to the present 19 channels spaced from 3.7 micron m to 15 micron m are addressed. Optical components and physical positions were found that permit inclusion of these added channels with negligible effect on the performance of the present 20 channels. Data format changes permit inclusion of the ERB data in the 288 bits allocated to HIRS for each scan element. A lamp and collimating optic assembly may replace one of the on board radiometric black bodies to provide a reference source for the albedo channels. Some increase in instrument dimensions, weight and power will be required to accommodate the modifications.

  10. Addition Formulae of Discrete KP, q-KP and Two-Component BKP Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xu; Li, Chuan-Zhong; He, Jing-Song

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we construct the addition formulae for several integrable hierarchies, including the discrete KP, the q-deformed KP, the two-component BKP and the D type Drinfeld-Sokolov hierarchies. With the help of the Hirota bilinear equations and τ functions of different kinds of KP hierarchies, we prove that these addition formulae are equivalent to these hierarchies. These studies show that the addition formula in the research of the integrable systems has good universality. Supported by the Zhejiang Provincial Natural Science Foundation under Grant No. LY15A010004, the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11201251, 11571192 and the Natural Science Foundation of Ningbo under Grant No. 2015A610157. Jingsong He is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11271210, K.C. Wong Magna Fund in Ningbo University

  11. Addition of Alarm Pheromone Components Improves the Effectiveness of Desiccant Dusts Against Cimex lectularius

    PubMed Central

    BENOIT, JOSHUA B.; PHILLIPS, SETH A.; CROXALL, TRAVIS J.; CHRISTENSEN, BRADY S.; YODER, JAY A.; DENLINGER, DAVID L.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that the addition of bed bug, Cimex lectularius, alarm pheromone to desiccant formulations greatly enhances their effectiveness during short-term exposure. Two desiccant formulations, diatomaceous earth (DE) and Dri-die (silica gel), were applied at the label rate with and without bed bug alarm pheromone components, (E)-2-hexenal, (E)-2-octenal, and a (E)-2-hexenal:(E)-2-octenal blend. First-instar nymphs and adult females were subjected to 10-min exposures, and water loss rates were used to evaluate the response. Optimal effectiveness was achieved with a pheromone concentration of 0.01 M. With Dri-die alone, the water loss was 21% higher than in untreated controls, and water loss increased nearly two times with (E)-2-hexenal and (E)-2-octenal and three times with the (E)-2-hexenal: (E)-2-octenal blend. This shortened survival of first-instar nymphs from 4 to 1 d, with a similar reduction noted in adult females. DE was effective only if supplemented with pheromone, resulting in a 50% increase in water loss over controls with the (E)-2-hexenal:(E)-2-octenal blend, and a survival decrease from 4 to 2 d in first-instar nymphs. Consistently, the addition of the pheromone blend to desiccant dust was more effective than adding either component by itself or by using Dri-die or DE alone. Based on observations in a small microhabitat, the addition of alarm pheromone components prompted bed bugs to leave their protective harborages and to move through the desiccant, improving the use of desiccants for control. We concluded that short exposure to Dri-die is a more effective treatment against bed bugs than DE and that the effectiveness of the desiccants can be further enhanced by incorporation of alarm pheromone. Presumably, the addition of alarm pheromone elevates excited crawling activity, thereby promoting cuticular changes that increase water loss. PMID:19496429

  12. Addition of alarm pheromone components improves the effectiveness of desiccant dusts against Cimex lectularius.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Joshua B; Phillips, Seth A; Croxall, Travis J; Christensen, Brady S; Yoder, Jay A; Denlinger, David L

    2009-05-01

    We demonstrate that the addition of bed bug, Cimex lectularius, alarm pheromone to desiccant formulations greatly enhances their effectiveness during short-term exposure. Two desiccant formulations, diatomaceous earth (DE) and Dri-die (silica gel), were applied at the label rate with and without bed bug alarm pheromone components, (E)-2-hexenal, (E)-2-octenal, and a (E)-2-hexenal:(E)-2-octenal blend. First-instar nymphs and adult females were subjected to 10-min exposures, and water loss rates were used to evaluate the response. Optimal effectiveness was achieved with a pheromone concentration of 0.01 M. With Dri-die alone, the water loss was 21% higher than in untreated controls, and water loss increased nearly two times with (E)-2-hexenal and (E)-2-octenal and three times with the (E)-2-hexenal: (E)-2-octenal blend. This shortened survival of first-instar nymphs from 4 to 1 d, with a similar reduction noted in adult females. DE was effective only if supplemented with pheromone, resulting in a 50% increase in water loss over controls with the (E)-2-hexenal:(E)-2-octenal blend, and a survival decrease from 4 to 2 d in first-instar nymphs. Consistently, the addition of the pheromone blend to desiccant dust was more effective than adding either component by itself or by using Dri-die or DE alone. Based on observations in a small microhabitat, the addition of alarm pheromone components prompted bed bugs to leave their protective harborages and to move through the desiccant, improving the use of desiccants for control. We concluded that short exposure to Dri-die is a more effective treatment against bed bugs than DE and that the effectiveness of the desiccants can be further enhanced by incorporation of alarm pheromone. Presumably, the addition of alarm pheromone elevates excited crawling activity, thereby promoting cuticular changes that increase water loss.

  13. LOX/GOX sensitivity of fluoroelastomers. [effect of formulation components and addition of fire retardants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirshen, N.; Mill, T.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of formulation components and the addition of fire retardants on the impact sensitivity of Viton B fluoroelastomer in liquid oxygen was studied with the objective of developing a procedure for reliably reducing this sensitivity. Component evaluation, carried out on more than 40 combinations of components and cure cycles, showed that almost all the standard formulation agents, including carbon, MgO, Diak-3, and PbO2, will sensitize the Viton stock either singly or in combinations, some combinations being much more sensitive than others. Cure and postcure treatments usually reduced the sensitivity of a given formulation, often dramatically, but no formulated Viton was as insensitive as the pure Viton B stock. Coating formulated Viton with a thin layer of pure Viton gave some indication of reduced sensitivity, but additional tests are needed. It is concluded that sensitivity in formulated Viton arises from a variety of sources, some physical and some chemical in origin. Elemental analyses for all the formulated Vitons are reported as are the results of a literature search on the subject of LOX impact sensitivity.

  14. Written debriefing: Evaluating the impact of the addition of a written component when debriefing simulations.

    PubMed

    Reed, Shelly J

    2015-11-01

    Debriefing, the reflective period following a simulation, is said to be where the bulk of simulation learning takes place. Many expert opinions regarding debriefing exist, but evidence-based best practices have yet to be identified. Written debriefing is one of these practices; experts state learning can be extended through the addition of a written component to the debriefing process, but no evidence exists to support this. This study compares three debriefing types: discussion alone, and discussion followed by journaling or blogging. Undergraduate nursing students participating in a simulation were randomized as a simulation group to one of these three debriefing types. Following completion of debriefing activities, students completed a Debriefing Experience Scale, a tool designed to evaluate the student experience during debriefing. Data obtained from completed scales were analyzed with ANOVA followed by Fisher LSD post hoc testing. The results showed the students preferred their experience with discussion debriefing over discussion debriefing with a written component added.

  15. Multi-material additive manufacturing of robot components with integrated sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saari, Matt; Cox, Bryan; Galla, Matt; Krueger, Paul S.; Richer, Edmond; Cohen, Adam L.

    2015-06-01

    Fabricating a robotic component comprising 100s of distributed, connected sensors can be very difficult with current approaches. To address these challenges, we are developing a novel additive manufacturing technology to enable the integrated fabrication of robotic structural elements with distributed, interconnected sensors and actuators. The focus is on resistive and capacitive sensors and electromagnetic actuators, though others are anticipated. Anticipated applications beyond robotics include advanced prosthetics, wearable electronics, and defense electronics. This paper presents preliminary results for printing polymers and conductive material simultaneously to form small sensor arrays. Approaches to optimizing sensor performance are discussed.

  16. Effect of individual components of sea water on the coefficient of spectral brightness of emitted radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Naumenko, E.K.

    1987-07-01

    Increasing attention is being given to the determination of the bioproductivity of seas and oceans using remote aerial survey methods. This paper investigates correlations between the content of phytoplankton and other forms of biomass and the brightness of radiation subsequently emitted from the water. An optical model is used that accounts for the spectral properties of the water and the dissolved organisms and hydrosols. The coefficient of spectral brightness is calculated with an approximation equation which incorporates the survival probability of a photon and the indices of scattering and attenuation by an elementary volume of sea water.

  17. Generation of Stark spectral components in Nd:YAP and Nd:YAG lasers by using volume Bragg gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Vorob'ev, Nikolai S; Glebov, L B

    2009-01-31

    Generation of Stark spectral components in free-running Q-switched Nd:YAP (1064 nm and 1073 nm) and Nd:YAG (1062 nm) lasers is obtained. For this purpose reflecting volume Bragg gratings placed into the laser resonator and permitting to tune the laser emission spectrum were used. Stable generation of Stark components in both lasers is obtained. The possibility of obtaining two-frequency generation in an Nd-glass laser with the help of these gratings is shown. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  18. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  19. Validating a nondestructive optical method for apportioning colored particulate matter into black carbon and additional components

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Beizhan; Kennedy, Daniel; Miller, Rachel L.; Cowin, James P.; Jung, Kyung-hwa; Perzanowski, Matt; Balletta, Marco; Perera, Federica P.; Kinney, Patrick L.; Chillrud, Steven N.

    2011-01-01

    Exposure of black carbon (BC) is associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes. A number of optical methods for estimating BC on Teflon filters have been adopted but most assume all light absorption is due to BC while other sources of colored particulate matter exist. Recently, a four-wavelength-optical reflectance measurement for distinguishing second hand cigarette smoke (SHS) from soot-BC was developed (Brook et al., 2010; Lawless et al., 2004). However, the method has not been validated for soot-BC nor SHS and little work has been done to look at the methodological issues of the optical reflectance measurements for samples that could have SHS, BC, and other colored particles. We refined this method using a lab-modified integrating sphere with absorption measured continuously from 350 nm to 1000 nm. Furthermore, we characterized the absorption spectrum of additional components of particulate matter (PM) on PM2.5 filters including ammonium sulfate, hematite, goethite, and magnetite. Finally, we validate this method for BC by comparison to other standard methods. Use of synthesized data indicates that it is important to optimize the choice of wavelengths to minimize computational errors as additional components (more than 2) are added to the apportionment model of colored components. We found that substantial errors are introduced when using 4 wavelengths suggested by Lawless et al. to quantify four substances, while an optimized choice of wavelengths can reduce model-derived error from over 10% to less than 2%. For environmental samples, the method was sensitive for estimating airborne levels of BC and SHS, but not mass loadings of iron oxides and sulfate. Duplicate samples collected in NYC show high reproducibility (points consistent with a 1:1 line, R2 = 0.95). BC data measured by this method were consistent with those measured by other optical methods, including Aethalometer and Smoke-stain Reflectometer (SSR); although the SSR looses sensitivity at

  20. Validating a nondestructive optical method for apportioning colored particulate matter into black carbon and additional components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Beizhan; Kennedy, Daniel; Miller, Rachel L.; Cowin, James P.; Jung, Kyung-hwa; Perzanowski, Matt; Balletta, Marco; Perera, Federica P.; Kinney, Patrick L.; Chillrud, Steven N.

    2011-12-01

    Exposure of black carbon (BC) is associated with a variety of adverse health outcomes. A number of optical methods for estimating BC on Teflon filters have been adopted but most assume all light absorption is due to BC while other sources of colored particulate matter exist. Recently, a four-wavelength-optical reflectance measurement for distinguishing second hand cigarette smoke (SHS) from soot-BC was developed (Brook et al., 2010; Lawless et al., 2004). However, the method has not been validated for soot-BC nor SHS and little work has been done to look at the methodological issues of the optical reflectance measurements for samples that could have SHS, BC, and other colored particles. We refined this method using a lab-modified integrating sphere with absorption measured continuously from 350 nm to 1000 nm. Furthermore, we characterized the absorption spectrum of additional components of particulate matter (PM) on PM 2.5 filters including ammonium sulfate, hematite, goethite, and magnetite. Finally, we validate this method for BC by comparison to other standard methods. Use of synthesized data indicates that it is important to optimize the choice of wavelengths to minimize computational errors as additional components (more than 2) are added to the apportionment model of colored components. We found that substantial errors are introduced when using 4 wavelengths suggested by Lawless et al. to quantify four substances, while an optimized choice of wavelengths can reduce model-derived error from over 10% to less than 2%. For environmental samples, the method was sensitive for estimating airborne levels of BC and SHS, but not mass loadings of iron oxides and sulfate. Duplicate samples collected in NYC show high reproducibility (points consistent with a 1:1 line, R2 = 0.95). BC data measured by this method were consistent with those measured by other optical methods, including Aethalometer and Smoke-stain Reflectometer (SSR); although the SSR looses sensitivity at

  1. 4-Trifluoromethyl-p-quinols as dielectrophiles: three-component, double nucleophilic addition/aromatization reactions

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jinhuan; Shi, Lou; Pan, Ling; Xu, Xianxiu; Liu, Qun

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, numerous methods have emerged for the synthesis of trifluoromethylated arenes based on the late-stage introduction of a trifluoromethyl group onto an aryl ring. In sharp comparison, the synthesis of trifluoromethylated arenes based on the pre-introduction of a trifluoromethyl group onto an “aromatic to be” carbon has rarely been addressed. It has been found that 4-trifluoromethyl-p-quinol silyl ethers, the readily available and relatively stable compounds, can act as dielectrophiles to be applied to multi-component reactions for the synthesis of various trifluoromethylated arenes. Catalyzed by In(OTf)3, 4-trifluoromethyl-p-quinol silyl ethers react with C-, N-, and S-nucleophiles, respectively, in a regiospecific 1,2-addition manner to generate the corresponding highly reactive electrophilic intermediates. Further reaction of the in-situ generated electrophiles with a C-nucleophile followed by spontaneous aromatization enables the construction of functionalized trifluoromethyl arenes. This three-component, double nucleophilic addition/aromatization reaction based on the pre-introduction of a trifluoromethyl group onto an “aromatic to be” carbon provides a divergent strategy for the synthesis of trifluoromethylated arenes under mild reaction conditions in a single operation. PMID:27246540

  2. Additive Manufacturing of Multifunctional Components Using High Density Carbon Nanotube Yarn Filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, John M.; Sauti, Godfrey; Kim, Jae-Woo; Cano, Roberto J.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Stelter, Christopher J.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Working, Dennis C.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing allows for design freedom and part complexity not currently attainable using traditional manufacturing technologies. Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF), for example, can yield novel component geometries and functionalities because the method provides a high level of control over material placement and processing conditions. This is achievable by extrusion of a preprocessed filament feedstock material along a predetermined path. However if fabrication of a multifunctional part relies only on conventional filament materials, it will require a different material for each unique functionality printed into the part. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are an attractive material for many applications due to their high specific strength as well as good electrical and thermal conductivity. The presence of this set of properties in a single material presents an opportunity to use one material to achieve multifunctionality in an additively manufactured part. This paper describes a recently developed method for processing continuous CNT yarn filaments into three-dimensional articles, and summarizes the mechanical, electrical, and sensing performance of the components fabricated in this way.

  3. 4-Trifluoromethyl-p-quinols as dielectrophiles: three-component, double nucleophilic addition/aromatization reactions.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jinhuan; Shi, Lou; Pan, Ling; Xu, Xianxiu; Liu, Qun

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, numerous methods have emerged for the synthesis of trifluoromethylated arenes based on the late-stage introduction of a trifluoromethyl group onto an aryl ring. In sharp comparison, the synthesis of trifluoromethylated arenes based on the pre-introduction of a trifluoromethyl group onto an "aromatic to be" carbon has rarely been addressed. It has been found that 4-trifluoromethyl-p-quinol silyl ethers, the readily available and relatively stable compounds, can act as dielectrophiles to be applied to multi-component reactions for the synthesis of various trifluoromethylated arenes. Catalyzed by In(OTf)3, 4-trifluoromethyl-p-quinol silyl ethers react with C-, N-, and S-nucleophiles, respectively, in a regiospecific 1,2-addition manner to generate the corresponding highly reactive electrophilic intermediates. Further reaction of the in-situ generated electrophiles with a C-nucleophile followed by spontaneous aromatization enables the construction of functionalized trifluoromethyl arenes. This three-component, double nucleophilic addition/aromatization reaction based on the pre-introduction of a trifluoromethyl group onto an "aromatic to be" carbon provides a divergent strategy for the synthesis of trifluoromethylated arenes under mild reaction conditions in a single operation.

  4. Energy and emissions saving potential of additive manufacturing: the case of lightweight aircraft components

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Runze; Riddle, Matthew; Graziano, Diane; Warren, Joshua; Das, Sujit; Nimbalkar, Sachin; Cresko, Joe; Masanet, Eric

    2015-05-08

    Additive manufacturing (AM) holds great potential for improving materials efficiency, reducing life-cycle impacts, and enabling greater engineering functionality compared to conventional manufacturing (CM) processes. For these reasons, AM has been adopted by a growing number of aircraft component manufacturers to achieve more lightweight, cost-effective designs. This study estimates the net changes in life-cycle primary energy and greenhouse gas emissions associated with AM technologies for lightweight metallic aircraft components through the year 2050, to shed light on the environmental benefits of a shift from CM to AM processes in the U.S. aircraft industry. A systems modeling framework is presented, with integrates engineering criteria, life-cycle environmental data, and aircraft fleet stock and fuel use models under different AM adoption scenarios. Estimated fleetwide life-cycle primary energy savings in a rapid adoption scenario reach 70-174 million GJ/year in 2050, with cumulative savings of 1.2-2.8 billion GJ. Associated cumulative emission reduction potentials of CO2e were estimated at 92.8-217.4 million metric tons. About 95% of the savings is attributed to airplane fuel consumption reductions due to lightweighting. In addition, about 4050 tons aluminum, 7600 tons titanium and 8100 tons of nickel alloys could be saved per year in 2050. The results indicate a significant role of AM technologies in helping society meet its long-term energy use and GHG emissions reduction goals, and highlight barriers and opportunities for AM adoption for the aircraft industry.

  5. 4-Trifluoromethyl-p-quinols as dielectrophiles: three-component, double nucleophilic addition/aromatization reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jinhuan; Shi, Lou; Pan, Ling; Xu, Xianxiu; Liu, Qun

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, numerous methods have emerged for the synthesis of trifluoromethylated arenes based on the late-stage introduction of a trifluoromethyl group onto an aryl ring. In sharp comparison, the synthesis of trifluoromethylated arenes based on the pre-introduction of a trifluoromethyl group onto an “aromatic to be” carbon has rarely been addressed. It has been found that 4-trifluoromethyl-p-quinol silyl ethers, the readily available and relatively stable compounds, can act as dielectrophiles to be applied to multi-component reactions for the synthesis of various trifluoromethylated arenes. Catalyzed by In(OTf)3, 4-trifluoromethyl-p-quinol silyl ethers react with C-, N-, and S-nucleophiles, respectively, in a regiospecific 1,2-addition manner to generate the corresponding highly reactive electrophilic intermediates. Further reaction of the in-situ generated electrophiles with a C-nucleophile followed by spontaneous aromatization enables the construction of functionalized trifluoromethyl arenes. This three-component, double nucleophilic addition/aromatization reaction based on the pre-introduction of a trifluoromethyl group onto an “aromatic to be” carbon provides a divergent strategy for the synthesis of trifluoromethylated arenes under mild reaction conditions in a single operation.

  6. Additive manufacture (3d printing) of plasma diagnostic components and assemblies for fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieck, Paul; Woodruff, Simon; Stuber, James; Romero-Talamas, Carlos; Rivera, William; You, Setthivoine; Card, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Additive manufacturing (or 3D printing) is now becoming sufficiently accurate with a large range of materials for use in printing sensors needed universally in fusion energy research. Decreasing production cost and significantly lowering design time of energy subsystems would realize significant cost reduction for standard diagnostics commonly obtained through research grants. There is now a well-established set of plasma diagnostics, but these expensive since they are often highly complex and require customization, sometimes pace the project. Additive manufacturing (3D printing) is developing rapidly, including open source designs. Basic components can be printed for (in some cases) less than 1/100th costs of conventional manufacturing. We have examined the impact that AM can have on plasma diagnostic cost by taking 15 separate diagnostics through an engineering design using Conventional Manufacturing (CM) techniques to determine costs of components and labor costs associated with getting the diagnostic to work as intended. With that information in hand, we set about optimizing the design to exploit the benefits of AM. Work performed under DOE Contract DE-SC0011858.

  7. Separating spectral mixtures in hyperspectral image data using independent component analysis: validation with oral cancer tissue sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duann, Jeng-Ren; Jan, Chia-Ing; Ou-Yang, Mang; Lin, Chia-Yi; Mo, Jen-Feng; Lin, Yung-Jiun; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chiou, Jin-Chern

    2013-12-01

    Recently, hyperspectral imaging (HSI) systems, which can provide 100 or more wavelengths of emission autofluorescence measures, have been used to delineate more complete spectral patterns associated with certain molecules relevant to cancerization. Such a spectral fingerprint may reliably correspond to a certain type of molecule and thus can be treated as a biomarker for the presence of that molecule. However, the outcomes of HSI systems can be a complex mixture of characteristic spectra of a variety of molecules as well as optical interferences due to reflection, scattering, and refraction. As a result, the mixed nature of raw HSI data might obscure the extraction of consistent spectral fingerprints. Here we present the extraction of the characteristic spectra associated with keratinized tissues from the HSI data of tissue sections from 30 oral cancer patients (31 tissue samples in total), excited at two different wavelength ranges (330 to 385 and 470 to 490 nm), using independent and principal component analysis (ICA and PCA) methods. The results showed that for both excitation wavelength ranges, ICA was able to resolve much more reliable spectral fingerprints associated with the keratinized tissues for all the oral cancer tissue sections with significantly higher mean correlation coefficients as compared to PCA (p<0.001).

  8. An additional reference axis for determining rotational alignment of the femoral component in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Won, Ye-Yeon; Cui, Wen-Quan; Baek, Myong-Hyun; Yun, Tae-Bong; Han, Seung-Ho

    2007-10-01

    No studies have examined the trochlear line connecting the most anterior projections of the lateral and medial femoral condyles in relation to the surgical epicondylar axis. To determine if the trochlear line is more consistent relative to the transepicondylar axis than the posterior condylar axis and the Whiteside's line, the angles between the surgical epicondylar axis and each of the 3 axes in 50 knees of cadavers were measured using computed tomography scans. The results showed that the variability in the trochlear line for referencing the transepicondylar axis was comparable to those of the Whiteside line and the posterior condylar axis. The trochlear line may be considered as an additional reference axis for determining the rotational alignment of the femoral component in total knee arthroplasty.

  9. An Assessment of Nondestructive Evaluation Capability for Complex Additive Manufacturing Aerospace Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James; Beshears, Ron; Lambert, Dennis; Tilson, William

    2016-01-01

    The primary focus of this work is to investigate some of the fundamental relationships between processing, mechanical testing, materials characterization, and NDE for additively manufactured (AM) components using the powder bed fusion direct melt laser sintered process. The goal is to understand the criticality of defects unique to the AM process and then how conventional nondestructive evaluation methods as well as some of the more non-traditional methods such as computed tomography, are effected by the AM material. Specific defects including cracking, porosity and partially/unfused powder will be addressed. Besides line-of-site NDE, as appropriate these inspection capabilities will be put into the context of complex AM geometries where hidden features obscure, or inhibit traditional NDE methods.

  10. Energy and emissions saving potential of additive manufacturing: the case of lightweight aircraft components

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Runze; Riddle, Matthew; Graziano, Diane; Warren, Joshua; Das, Sujit; Nimbalkar, Sachin; Cresko, Joe; Masanet, Eric

    2015-05-08

    Additive manufacturing (AM) holds great potential for improving materials efficiency, reducing life-cycle impacts, and enabling greater engineering functionality compared to conventional manufacturing (CM) processes. For these reasons, AM has been adopted by a growing number of aircraft component manufacturers to achieve more lightweight, cost-effective designs. This study estimates the net changes in life-cycle primary energy and greenhouse gas emissions associated with AM technologies for lightweight metallic aircraft components through the year 2050, to shed light on the environmental benefits of a shift from CM to AM processes in the U.S. aircraft industry. A systems modeling framework is presented, with integratesmore » engineering criteria, life-cycle environmental data, and aircraft fleet stock and fuel use models under different AM adoption scenarios. Estimated fleetwide life-cycle primary energy savings in a rapid adoption scenario reach 70-174 million GJ/year in 2050, with cumulative savings of 1.2-2.8 billion GJ. Associated cumulative emission reduction potentials of CO2e were estimated at 92.8-217.4 million metric tons. About 95% of the savings is attributed to airplane fuel consumption reductions due to lightweighting. In addition, about 4050 tons aluminum, 7600 tons titanium and 8100 tons of nickel alloys could be saved per year in 2050. The results indicate a significant role of AM technologies in helping society meet its long-term energy use and GHG emissions reduction goals, and highlight barriers and opportunities for AM adoption for the aircraft industry.« less

  11. A Fully Non-Metallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing Part I: System Analysis, Component Identification, Additive Manufacturing, and Testing of Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.; Haller, William J.; Poinsatte, Philip E.; Halbig, Michael C.; Schnulo, Sydney L.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Weir, Don; Wali, Natalie; Vinup, Michael; Jones, Michael G.; Patterson, Clark; Santelle, Tom; Mehl, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    The research and development activities reported in this publication were carried out under NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI) funded project entitled "A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing." The objective of the project was to conduct evaluation of emerging materials and manufacturing technologies that will enable fully nonmetallic gas turbine engines. The results of the activities are described in three part report. The first part of the report contains the data and analysis of engine system trade studies, which were carried out to estimate reduction in engine emissions and fuel burn enabled due to advanced materials and manufacturing processes. A number of key engine components were identified in which advanced materials and additive manufacturing processes would provide the most significant benefits to engine operation. The technical scope of activities included an assessment of the feasibility of using additive manufacturing technologies to fabricate gas turbine engine components from polymer and ceramic matrix composites, which were accomplished by fabricating prototype engine components and testing them in simulated engine operating conditions. The manufacturing process parameters were developed and optimized for polymer and ceramic composites (described in detail in the second and third part of the report). A number of prototype components (inlet guide vane (IGV), acoustic liners, engine access door) were additively manufactured using high temperature polymer materials. Ceramic matrix composite components included turbine nozzle components. In addition, IGVs and acoustic liners were tested in simulated engine conditions in test rigs. The test results are reported and discussed in detail.

  12. Lightweight custom composite prosthetic components using an additive manufacturing-based molding technique.

    PubMed

    Leddy, Michael T; Belter, Joseph T; Gemmell, Kevin D; Dollar, Aaron M

    2015-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques are becoming more prominent and cost-effective as 3D printing becomes higher quality and more inexpensive. The idea of 3D printed prosthetics components promises affordable, customizable devices, but these systems currently have major shortcomings in durability and function. In this paper, we propose a fabrication method for custom composite prostheses utilizing additive manufacturing, allowing for customizability, as well the durability of professional prosthetics. The manufacturing process is completed using 3D printed molds in a multi-stage molding system, which creates a custom finger or palm with a lightweight epoxy foam core, a durable composite outer shell, and soft urethane gripping surfaces. The composite material was compared to 3D printed and aluminum materials using a three-point bending test to compare stiffness, as well as gravimetric measurements to compare weight. The composite finger demonstrates the largest stiffness with the lowest weight compared to other tested fingers, as well as having customizability and lower cost, proving to potentially be a substantial benefit to the development of upper-limb prostheses. PMID:26737367

  13. Lightweight custom composite prosthetic components using an additive manufacturing-based molding technique.

    PubMed

    Leddy, Michael T; Belter, Joseph T; Gemmell, Kevin D; Dollar, Aaron M

    2015-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques are becoming more prominent and cost-effective as 3D printing becomes higher quality and more inexpensive. The idea of 3D printed prosthetics components promises affordable, customizable devices, but these systems currently have major shortcomings in durability and function. In this paper, we propose a fabrication method for custom composite prostheses utilizing additive manufacturing, allowing for customizability, as well the durability of professional prosthetics. The manufacturing process is completed using 3D printed molds in a multi-stage molding system, which creates a custom finger or palm with a lightweight epoxy foam core, a durable composite outer shell, and soft urethane gripping surfaces. The composite material was compared to 3D printed and aluminum materials using a three-point bending test to compare stiffness, as well as gravimetric measurements to compare weight. The composite finger demonstrates the largest stiffness with the lowest weight compared to other tested fingers, as well as having customizability and lower cost, proving to potentially be a substantial benefit to the development of upper-limb prostheses.

  14. Mode-locked ytterbium fiber lasers using a large modulation depth carbon nanotube saturable absorber without an additional spectral filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y. Z.; Miao, J. G.; Liu, W. J.; Huang, X. J.; Wang, Y. B.

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate an all-normal-dispersion ytterbium (Yb)-doped fiber laser mode-locked by a higher modulation depth carbon nanotube saturable absorber (CNT-SA) based on an evanescent field interaction scheme. The laser cavity consists of pure normal dispersion fibers without dispersion compensation and an additional spectral filter. It is exhibited that the higher modulation depth CNT-SA could contribute to stabilize the mode-locking operation within a limited range of pump power and generate the highly chirped pulses with a high-energy level in the cavity with large normal dispersion and strong nonlinearity. Stable mode-locked pulses with a maximal energy of 29 nJ with a 5.59 MHz repetition rate at the operating wavelength around 1085 nm have been obtained. The maximal time-bandwidth product is 262.4. The temporal and spectral characteristics of pulses versus pump power are demonstrated. The experimental results suggest that the CNT-SA provides a sufficient nonlinear loss to compensate high nonlinearity and catch up the gain at a different pump power and thus leads to the stable mode locking.

  15. The Quality of Tumor Size Assessment by Contrast-Enhanced Spectral Mammography and the Benefit of Additional Breast MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lobbes, Marc B.I.; Lalji, Ulrich C.; Nelemans, Patty J.; Houben, Ivo; Smidt, Marjolein L.; Heuts, Esther; de Vries, Bart; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Beets-Tan, Regina G.

    2015-01-01

    Background - Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) is a promising new breast imaging modality that is superior to conventional mammography for breast cancer detection. We aimed to evaluate correlation and agreement of tumor size measurements using CESM. As additional analysis, we evaluated whether measurements using an additional breast MRI exam would yield more accurate results. Methods - Between January 1st 2013 and April 1st 2014, 87 consecutive breast cancer cases that underwent CESM were collected and data on maximum tumor size measurements were gathered. In 57 cases, tumor size measurements were also available for breast MRI. Histopathological results of the surgical specimen served as gold standard in all cases. Results - The Pearson's correlation coefficients (PCC) of CESM versus histopathology and breast MRI versus histopathology were all >0.9, p<0.0001. For the agreement between measurements, the mean difference between CESM and histopathology was 0.03 mm. The mean difference between breast MRI and histopathology was 2.12 mm. Using a 2x2 contingency table to assess the frequency distribution of a relevant size discrepancy of >1 cm between the two imaging modalities and histopathological results, we did not observe any advantage of performing an additional breast MRI after CESM in any of the cases. Conclusion - Quality of tumor size measurement using CESM is good and matches the quality of these measurement assessed by breast MRI. Additional measurements using breast MRI did not improve the quality of tumor size measurements. PMID:25561979

  16. Interaction of some fluorinated nucleic acid components with praseodymium: an absorption spectral approach.

    PubMed

    Misra, S N

    1990-10-01

    Absorption difference and comparative absorption spectrophotometric studies on praseodymium(III) and fluorouracil, fluorocytosine, fluoroadenine, fluorothymine, fluorouridine, fluorocytidine, fluoroadenosine and fluorothymidine systems at pH approximately 5.5 and in different stoichiometries in 80% DMF medium have been carried out. Magnitudes of spectral parameters, viz. Coulombic (Fk), spin-orbit (zeta 4f), nephelauxetic (beta), bonding (b), intensity (T lambda Judd-Ofelt), and oscillator strength (P) and their variation have provided information on the binding mode of these biomolecules in terms of outer and inner sphere complexation, degree of covalency and extent of 4f orbital involvement. Preliminary ultrasonic studies have indicated that these biomolecules behave as structure breakers, hence weak ligands in aqueous medium, while strengthening water structure in semi-nonaqueous medium. The analysis of the isolated solid complexes has suggested octa- and nona-coordination for praseodymium(III) in fluorinated nucleic bases and fluorinated nucleoside complexes.

  17. Clustering analysis to identify distinct spectral components of encephalogram burst suppression in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Zhou, David W; Westover, M Brandon; McClain, Lauren M; Nagaraj, Sunil B; Bajwa, Ednan K; Quraishi, Sadeq A; Akeju, Oluwaseun; Cobb, J Perren; Purdon, Patrick L

    2015-01-01

    Millions of patients are admitted each year to intensive care units (ICUs) in the United States. A significant fraction of ICU survivors develop life-long cognitive impairment, incurring tremendous financial and societal costs. Delirium, a state of impaired awareness, attention and cognition that frequently develops during ICU care, is a major risk factor for post-ICU cognitive impairment. Recent studies suggest that patients experiencing electroencephalogram (EEG) burst suppression have higher rates of mortality and are more likely to develop delirium than patients who do not experience burst suppression. Burst suppression is typically associated with coma and deep levels of anesthesia or hypothermia, and is defined clinically as an alternating pattern of high-amplitude "burst" periods interrupted by sustained low-amplitude "suppression" periods. Here we describe a clustering method to analyze EEG spectra during burst and suppression periods. We used this method to identify a set of distinct spectral patterns in the EEG during burst and suppression periods in critically ill patients. These patterns correlate with level of patient sedation, quantified in terms of sedative infusion rates and clinical sedation scores. This analysis suggests that EEG burst suppression in critically ill patients may not be a single state, but instead may reflect a plurality of states whose specific dynamics relate to a patient's underlying brain function. PMID:26737967

  18. Clustering analysis to identify distinct spectral components of encephalogram burst suppression in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, David W.; Westover, M. Brandon; McClain, Lauren M.; Nagaraj, Sunil B.; Bajwa, Ednan K.; Quraishi, Sadeq A.; Akeju, Oluwaseun; Cobb, J. Perren; Purdon, Patrick L.

    2016-01-01

    Millions of patients are admitted each year to intensive care units (ICUs) in the United States. A significant fraction of ICU survivors develop life-long cognitive impairment, incurring tremendous financial and societal costs. Delirium, a state of impaired awareness, attention and cognition that frequently develops during ICU care, is a major risk factor for post-ICU cognitive impairment. Recent studies suggest that patients experiencing electroencephalogram (EEG) burst suppression have higher rates of mortality and are more likely to develop delirium than patients who do not experience burst suppression. Burst suppression is typically associated with coma and deep levels of anesthesia or hypothermia, and is defined clinically as an alternating pattern of high-amplitude “burst” periods interrupted by sustained low-amplitude “suppression” periods. Here we describe a clustering method to analyze EEG spectra during burst and suppression periods. We used this method to identify a set of distinct spectral patterns in the EEG during burst and suppression periods in critically ill patients. These patterns correlate with level of patient sedation, quantified in terms of sedative infusion rates and clinical sedation scores. This analysis suggests that EEG burst suppression in critically ill patients may not be a single state, but instead may reflect a plurality of states whose specific dynamics relate to a patient’s underlying brain function. PMID:26737967

  19. A physical interpretation of the variability power spectral components in accreting neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, Adam; Done, Chris

    2010-07-01

    We propose a physical framework for interpreting the characteristic frequencies seen in the broad-band power spectra from black hole and neutron star binaries. We use the truncated disc/hot inner flow geometry, and assume that the hot flow is generically turbulent. Each radius in the hot flow produces fluctuations, and we further assume that these are damped on the viscous frequency. Integrating over radii gives broad-band continuum noise power between low- and high-frequency breaks which are set by the viscous time-scale at the outer and inner edge of the hot flow, respectively. Lense-Thirring (vertical) precession of the entire hot flow superimposes the low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) on this continuum power. We test this model on the power spectra seen in the neutron star systems (atolls) as these have the key advantage that the (upper) kHz QPO most likely independently tracks the truncation radius. These show that this model can give a consistent solution, with the truncation radius decreasing from 20 to 8Rg while the inner radius of the flow remains approximately constant at ~4.5Rg i.e. 9.2 km. We use this very constrained geometry to predict the low-frequency QPO from Lense-Thirring precession of the entire hot flow from ro to ri. The simplest assumption of a constant surface density in the hot flow matches the observed QPO frequency to within 25 per cent. This match can be made even better by considering that the surface density should become increasingly centrally concentrated as the flow collapses into an optically thick boundary layer during the spectral transition. The success of the model opens up the way to use the broad-band power spectra as a diagnostic of accretion flows in strong gravity.

  20. The Physical Content of the Leading Orders of Principle Component Analysis of Spectral Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skumanich, A.; Lopez Ariste, A.

    2001-05-01

    We consider the PCA (Principle Component Analysis) method of profile analysis introduced by Ref (1). In this method one constructs a covariance matrix Cij given by the product of the profile amplitudes at wavelengths λ i and λ j averaged over all profile samples (either over space or time). The matrix is 'diagonalized' and ordered by Singular Value Decomposition. The resulting orthonormal eigenfunctions over wavelength space are then used as a basis for the expansion of the observed profiles at each space(time) point. The eigenvalue ordering is by magnitude of the mean square over space(time) of the expansion coefficients and is given by the product of the frequency of occurrence of the particular eigenfunction and its intrinsic mean square amplitude. An error based truncation scheme yields a coefficient set which is a compression of the original data set. We have applied the PCA method to the 40,000 profiles for each Stokes component for a Solar active region. In the case of the intensity profile we find that the expansion appears to be similar to a Taylor series with the 0th efunction being the zero order term, the 1st efunction as the first derivative of the zero term and the 2nd efunction as the second derivative term. Thus we derive a line-of-sight velocity from the coefficients of the first derivative term and a magnetic signature, using the weak field Milne-Eddington approximation, from the second. A comparison with a Stokes profile inversion shows that the thus estimated velocity and magnetic parameters are in good agreement with the more time consuming profile fitting values but do show a "roll-off" for sufficiently large values. One also finds that the bright 'quiet' Sun points have an upflow while the dark have a downflow similar to that derived by other analysis. 1) Rees, D., López Ariste, A., Thatcher, J. & Semel, M. 2000, A & A, 355, 759 The National Center for Atmospheric Research is sponsored by the National Science Foundation.

  1. Multi-band morpho-Spectral Component Analysis Deblending Tool (MuSCADeT): Deblending colourful objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, R.; Courbin, F.; Starck, J.-L.

    2016-05-01

    We introduce a new algorithm for colour separation and deblending of multi-band astronomical images called MuSCADeT which is based on Morpho-spectral Component Analysis of multi-band images. The MuSCADeT algorithm takes advantage of the sparsity of astronomical objects in morphological dictionaries such as wavelets and their differences in spectral energy distribution (SED) across multi-band observations. This allows us to devise a model independent and automated approach to separate objects with different colours. We show with simulations that we are able to separate highly blended objects and that our algorithm is robust against SED variations of objects across the field of view. To confront our algorithm with real data, we use HST images of the strong lensing galaxy cluster MACS J1149+2223 and we show that MuSCADeT performs better than traditional profile-fitting techniques in deblending the foreground lensing galaxies from background lensed galaxies. Although the main driver for our work is the deblending of strong gravitational lenses, our method is fit to be used for any purpose related to deblending of objects in astronomical images. An example of such an application is the separation of the red and blue stellar populations of a spiral galaxy in the galaxy cluster Abell 2744. We provide a python package along with all simulations and routines used in this paper to contribute to reproducible research efforts. Codes can be found at http://lastro.epfl.ch/page-126973.html

  2. Interim Progress Report on the Application of an Independent Components Analysis-based Spectral Unmixing Algorithm to Beowulf Computers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lemeshewsky, George

    2003-01-01

    This report describes work done to implement an independent-components-analysis (ICA) -based blind unmixing algorithm on the Eastern Region Geography (ERG) Beowulf computer cluster. It gives a brief description of blind spectral unmixing using ICA-based techniques and a preliminary example of unmixing results for Landsat-7 Thematic Mapper multispectral imagery using a recently reported1,2,3 unmixing algorithm. Also included are computer performance data. The final phase of this work, the actual implementation of the unmixing algorithm on the Beowulf cluster, was not completed this fiscal year and is addressed elsewhere. It is noted that study of this algorithm and its application to land-cover mapping will continue under another research project in the Land Remote Sensing theme into fiscal year 2004.

  3. Maintaining accuracy of cellular Yule-Nielsen spectral Neugebauer models for different ink cartridges using principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Binyu; Xu, Haisong; Luo, M Ronnier; Guo, Jinyi

    2011-07-01

    The replacement of used-up ink cartridges is unavoidable, but it makes the existing characterization model far from accurate, while recharacterization is labor intensive. In this study, we propose a new correction method for cellular Yule-Nielsen spectral Neugebauer (CYNSN) models based on principal component analysis (PCA). First, a small set of correction samples are predicted, printed using new ink cartridges, and then measured. Second, the link between the predicted and measured reflectance weights, generated by PCA, is determined. The experimental results show that the proposed method provides a significant and robust improvement, since not only the color change between original and new inks but also the systemic error of CYNSN modelsis taken into account in the method.

  4. Additive, Multi-Component Treatment of Emerging Refusal Topographies in a Pediatric Feeding Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, William G.; Jaquess, David L.; Bogard, Jennifer D.; Morton, Jane F.

    2010-01-01

    This case study describes inter-disciplinary treatment of chronic food refusal and tube dependency in a 2-year-old female with a pediatric feeding disorder. Evidence-based behavioral components--including escape extinction (EE), differential reinforcement of alterative mealtime behavior (DRA), and stimulus fading--were introduced sequentially as…

  5. Additive Manufacturing Thermal Performance Testing of Single Channel GRCop-84 SLM Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Chance P.; Cross, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The surface finish found on components manufactured by sinter laser manufacturing (SLM) is rougher (0.013 - 0.0006 inches) than parts made using traditional fabrication methods. Internal features and passages built into SLM components do not readily allow for roughness reduction processes. Alternatively, engineering literature suggests that the roughness of a surface can enhance thermal performance within a pressure drop regime. To further investigate the thermal performance of SLM fabricated pieces, several GRCop-84 SLM single channel components were tested using a thermal conduction rig at MSFC. A 20 kW power source running at 25% duty cycle and 25% power level applied heat to each component while varying water flow rates between 2.1 - 6.2 gallons/min (GPM) at a supply pressure of 550 to 700 psi. Each test was allowed to reach quasi-steady state conditions where pressure, temperature, and thermal imaging data were recorded. Presented in this work are the heat transfer responses compared to a traditional machined OHFC Copper test section. An analytical thermal model was constructed to anchor theoretical models with the empirical data.

  6. Different responses of soil respiration and its components to nitrogen addition among biomes: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lingyan; Zhou, Xuhui; Zhang, Baocheng; Lu, Meng; Luo, Yiqi; Liu, Lingli; Li, Bo

    2014-07-01

    Anthropogenic activities have increased nitrogen (N) deposition by threefold to fivefold over the last century, which may considerably affect soil respiration (Rs). Although numerous individual studies and a few meta-analyses have been conducted, it remains controversial as to how N addition affects Rs and its components [i.e., autotrophic (Ra) and heterotrophic respiration (Rh)]. To reconcile the difference, we conducted a comprehensive meta-analysis of 295 published studies to examine the responses of Rs and its components to N addition in terrestrial ecosystems. We also assessed variations in their responses in relation to ecosystem types, environmental conditions, and experimental duration (DUR). Our results show that N addition significantly increased Rs by 2.0% across all biomes but decreased by 1.44% in forests and increased by 7.84% and 12.4% in grasslands and croplands, respectively (P < 0.05). The differences may largely result from diverse responses of Ra to N addition among biomes with more stimulation of Ra in croplands and grasslands compared with no significant change in forests. Rh exhibited a similar negative response to N addition among biomes except that in croplands, tropical and boreal forests. Methods of partitioning Rs did not induce significant differences in the responses of Ra or Rh to N addition, except that Ra from root exclusion and component integration methods exhibited the opposite responses in temperate forests. The response ratios (RR) of Rs to N addition were positively correlated with mean annual temperature (MAT), with being more significant when MAT was less than 15 °C, but negatively with DUR. In addition, the responses of Rs and its components to N addition largely resulted from the changes in root and microbial biomass and soil C content as indicated by correlation analysis. The response patterns of Rs to N addition as revealed in this study can be benchmarks for future modeling and experimental studies.

  7. A study of internal structure in components made by additive manufacturing process using 3 D X-ray tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Raguvarun, K. Balasubramaniam, Krishnan Rajagopal, Prabhu; Palanisamy, Suresh; Nagarajah, Romesh; Kapoor, Ajay; Hoye, Nicholas; Curiri, Dominic

    2015-03-31

    Additive manufacturing methods are gaining increasing popularity for rapidly and efficiently manufacturing parts and components in the industrial context, as well as for domestic applications. However, except when used for prototyping or rapid visualization of components, industries are concerned with the load carrying capacity and strength achievable by additive manufactured parts. In this paper, the wire-arc additive manufacturing (AM) process based on gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) has been examined for the internal structure and constitution of components generated by the process. High-resolution 3D X-ray tomography is used to gain cut-views through wedge-shaped parts created using this GTAW additive manufacturing process with titanium alloy materials. In this work, two different control conditions for the GTAW process are considered. The studies reveal clusters of porosities, located in periodic spatial intervals along the sample cross-section. Such internal defects can have a detrimental effect on the strength of the resulting AM components, as shown in destructive testing studies. Closer examination of this phenomenon shows that defect clusters are preferentially located at GTAW traversal path intervals. These results highlight the strong need for enhanced control of process parameters in ensuring components with minimal defects and higher strength.

  8. Chromatographic Evaluation and Characterization of Components of Gentian Root Extract Used as Food Additives.

    PubMed

    Amakura, Yoshiaki; Yoshimura, Morio; Morimoto, Sara; Yoshida, Takashi; Tada, Atsuko; Ito, Yusai; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Naoki; Akiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Gentian root extract is used as a bitter food additive in Japan. We investigated the constituents of this extract to acquire the chemical data needed for standardized specifications. Fourteen known compounds were isolated in addition to a mixture of gentisin and isogentisin: anofinic acid, 2-methoxyanofinic acid, furan-2-carboxylic acid, 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, isovitexin, gentiopicroside, loganic acid, sweroside, vanillic acid, gentisin 7-O-primeveroside, isogentisin 3-O-primeveroside, 6'-O-glucosylgentiopicroside, and swertiajaposide D. Moreover, a new compound, loganic acid 7-(2'-hydroxy-3'-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl)benzoate (1), was also isolated. HPLC was used to analyze gentiopicroside and amarogentin, defined as the main constituents of gentian root extract in the List of Existing Food Additives in Japan.

  9. [Component analysis of the circulating fluid in an adsorption tower in a P-xylene unit based on raman spectral decomposition].

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Dai, Lian-kui

    2015-02-01

    In order to achieve fast and accurate online analysis of the circulating fluid in an adsorption tower in a p-xylene unit, the Raman spectral analysis method is adopted. However, the Raman spectra of the pure components included in the circulating fluid overlap together, and the concentration of each component varies obviously, the present Raman analysis technology needs a large amount of training samples. Therefore, this paper applies Raman spectral decomposition method in component analysis of the circulating fluid. First of all, the Raman spectra of the pure components and the spectra of a few training samples must be measured, and baseline subtraction and mean normalization are applied to obtain pretreated Raman spectra. Then the characteristic wave number range, 680-880 cm(-1), is chosen, and the Raman spectral decomposition method is adopted, to get decomposition coefficients of each component for each training sample. Next, the mathematical model between coefficients and concentrations of each component are built based on all training samples. For a testing sample, the above spectral pretreatment and the spectral decomposition for the same wave number range is adopted, then the decomposition coefficients of each component can be obtained. Based on the built mathematical model, the concentrations of all components can be predicted. Experimental results show that the standard prediction errors for the concentration of toluene, ethylbenzene, p-xylene, m-xylene, o-xylene and p-diethylbenzene are 0.301%, 0.088%, 0.563%, 0.384%, 0.366% and 0.536% respectively. The above method provides a methodological basis for the online analysis of the circulating fluid in adsorption towers.

  10. 78 FR 41840 - Indirect Food Additives: Adhesives and Components of Coatings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-12

    ... uses have been abandoned. We are taking this action in response to a petition dated March 16, 2012... the Federal Register of July 17, 2012 (77 FR 41953), we announced that food additive petition (FAP... coatings in packaging for infant formula because these uses have been abandoned. BPA-based epoxy resins...

  11. 76 FR 5370 - Potential Addition of Vapor Intrusion Component to the Hazard Ranking System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    ... accurate in assessing relative risk. The revisions included the addition of the human food chain and... this pathway include drinking water, the human food chain (i.e., contaminants build up in the aquatic... (NPL). To implement CERCLA, EPA promulgated the revised NCP, 40 CFR Part 300, on July 16, 1982 (47...

  12. Very low levels of direct additive genetic variance in fitness and fitness components in a red squirrel population.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, S Eryn; Gorrell, Jamieson C; Coltman, David W; Humphries, Murray M; Boutin, Stan; McAdam, Andrew G

    2014-05-01

    A trait must genetically correlate with fitness in order to evolve in response to natural selection, but theory suggests that strong directional selection should erode additive genetic variance in fitness and limit future evolutionary potential. Balancing selection has been proposed as a mechanism that could maintain genetic variance if fitness components trade off with one another and has been invoked to account for empirical observations of higher levels of additive genetic variance in fitness components than would be expected from mutation-selection balance. Here, we used a long-term study of an individually marked population of North American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) to look for evidence of (1) additive genetic variance in lifetime reproductive success and (2) fitness trade-offs between fitness components, such as male and female fitness or fitness in high- and low-resource environments. "Animal model" analyses of a multigenerational pedigree revealed modest maternal effects on fitness, but very low levels of additive genetic variance in lifetime reproductive success overall as well as fitness measures within each sex and environment. It therefore appears that there are very low levels of direct genetic variance in fitness and fitness components in red squirrels to facilitate contemporary adaptation in this population.

  13. Very low levels of direct additive genetic variance in fitness and fitness components in a red squirrel population

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, S Eryn; Gorrell, Jamieson C; Coltman, David W; Humphries, Murray M; Boutin, Stan; McAdam, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    A trait must genetically correlate with fitness in order to evolve in response to natural selection, but theory suggests that strong directional selection should erode additive genetic variance in fitness and limit future evolutionary potential. Balancing selection has been proposed as a mechanism that could maintain genetic variance if fitness components trade off with one another and has been invoked to account for empirical observations of higher levels of additive genetic variance in fitness components than would be expected from mutation–selection balance. Here, we used a long-term study of an individually marked population of North American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) to look for evidence of (1) additive genetic variance in lifetime reproductive success and (2) fitness trade-offs between fitness components, such as male and female fitness or fitness in high- and low-resource environments. “Animal model” analyses of a multigenerational pedigree revealed modest maternal effects on fitness, but very low levels of additive genetic variance in lifetime reproductive success overall as well as fitness measures within each sex and environment. It therefore appears that there are very low levels of direct genetic variance in fitness and fitness components in red squirrels to facilitate contemporary adaptation in this population. PMID:24963372

  14. Disentangling unisensory and multisensory components in audiovisual integration using a novel multifrequency fMRI spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Uri; Amedi, Amir

    2010-08-15

    Events in the world are mediated through multiple sensory inputs which are processed separately in specific unisensory areas according to the division-of-labor principle, and then need to be integrated to create a unified percept. How this is done is still not clear. For instance, recent evidence showed crossmodal activation in primary areas. We developed a novel approach to study multisensory integration using multifrequency spectral analysis to investigate the processing of audio and visual streams in a multisensory context. Auditory and visual stimuli were delivered in the same experimental condition, each in different presentation frequencies, and thus could be detected by applying Fourier spectral analysis in their different presentation frequencies. The cochleotopic and retinotopic organization of primary auditory and visual areas were found to remain intact in spite of the multisensory context. Auditory responses were also found in the Precuneus, suggesting that it might be a new auditory area responsive to pure tone stimuli, and serving as one end of a novel sensory preference gradient stretching across POG to the calcarine sulcus. Additional audiovisual areal convergence was detected both in areas in the middle of sensory preference gradients, and in primary auditory areas. Interestingly, the in/out synchronization rate of the auditory and visual streams yielded a third interaction frequency, which could be analyzed independently to reveal higher-order audiovisual interaction responses. These results were detected in one compact and natural multisensory experimental condition, which has several advantages over previous approaches. The method can be further implemented to study any type of interaction, within and across sensory modalities.

  15. Univariate and multivariate molecular spectral analyses of lipid related molecular structural components in relation to nutrient profile in feed and food mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeysekara, Saman; Damiran, Daalkhaijav; Yu, Peiqiang

    2013-02-01

    The objectives of this study were (i) to determine lipid related molecular structures components (functional groups) in feed combination of cereal grain (barley, Hordeum vulgare) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) based dried distillers grain solubles (wheat DDGSs) from bioethanol processing at five different combination ratios using univariate and multivariate molecular spectral analyses with infrared Fourier transform molecular spectroscopy, and (ii) to correlate lipid-related molecular-functional structure spectral profile to nutrient profiles. The spectral intensity of (i) CH3 asymmetric, CH2 asymmetric, CH3 symmetric and CH2 symmetric groups, (ii) unsaturation (Cdbnd C) group, and (iii) carbonyl ester (Cdbnd O) group were determined. Spectral differences of functional groups were detected by hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal components analysis (PCA). The results showed that the combination treatments significantly inflicted modifications (P < 0.05) in nutrient profile and lipid related molecular spectral intensity (CH2 asymmetric stretching peak height, CH2 symmetric stretching peak height, ratio of CH2 to CH3 symmetric stretching peak intensity, and carbonyl peak area). Ratio of CH2 to CH3 symmetric stretching peak intensity, and carbonyl peak significantly correlated with nutrient profiles. Both PCA and HCA differentiated lipid-related spectrum. In conclusion, the changes of lipid molecular structure spectral profiles through feed combination could be detected using molecular spectroscopy. These changes were associated with nutrient profiles and functionality.

  16. Univariate and multivariate molecular spectral analyses of lipid related molecular structural components in relation to nutrient profile in feed and food mixtures.

    PubMed

    Abeysekara, Saman; Damiran, Daalkhaijav; Yu, Peiqiang

    2013-02-01

    The objectives of this study were (i) to determine lipid related molecular structures components (functional groups) in feed combination of cereal grain (barley, Hordeum vulgare) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) based dried distillers grain solubles (wheat DDGSs) from bioethanol processing at five different combination ratios using univariate and multivariate molecular spectral analyses with infrared Fourier transform molecular spectroscopy, and (ii) to correlate lipid-related molecular-functional structure spectral profile to nutrient profiles. The spectral intensity of (i) CH(3) asymmetric, CH(2) asymmetric, CH(3) symmetric and CH(2) symmetric groups, (ii) unsaturation (CC) group, and (iii) carbonyl ester (CO) group were determined. Spectral differences of functional groups were detected by hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal components analysis (PCA). The results showed that the combination treatments significantly inflicted modifications (P<0.05) in nutrient profile and lipid related molecular spectral intensity (CH(2) asymmetric stretching peak height, CH(2) symmetric stretching peak height, ratio of CH(2) to CH(3) symmetric stretching peak intensity, and carbonyl peak area). Ratio of CH(2) to CH(3) symmetric stretching peak intensity, and carbonyl peak significantly correlated with nutrient profiles. Both PCA and HCA differentiated lipid-related spectrum. In conclusion, the changes of lipid molecular structure spectral profiles through feed combination could be detected using molecular spectroscopy. These changes were associated with nutrient profiles and functionality.

  17. Baldwin Effect and Additional BLR Component in AGN with Superluminal Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patiño Álvarez, Víctor; Torrealba, Janet; Chavushyan, Vahram; Cruz González, Irene; Arshakian, Tigran; León Tavares, Jonathan; Popovic, Luka

    2016-06-01

    We study the Baldwin Effect (BE) in 96 core-jet blazars with optical and ultraviolet spectroscopic data from a radio-loud AGN sample obtained from the MOJAVE 2cm survey. A statistical analysis is presented of the equivalent widths W_lambda of emission lines H beta 4861, Mg II 2798, C IV 1549, and continuum luminosities at 5100, 3000, and 1350 angstroms. The BE is found statistically significant (with confidence level c.l. > 95%) in H beta and C IV emission lines, while for Mg II the trend is slightly less significant (c.l. = 94.5%). The slopes of the BE in the studied samples for H beta and Mg II are found steeper and with statistically significant difference than those of a comparison radio-quiet sample. We present simulations of the expected BE slopes produced by the contribution to the total continuum of the non-thermal boosted emission from the relativistic jet, and by variability of the continuum components. We find that the slopes of the BE between radio-quiet and radio-loud AGN should not be different, under the assumption that the broad line is only being emitted by the canonical broad line region around the black hole. We discuss that the BE slope steepening in radio AGN is due to a jet associated broad-line region.

  18. [Determination of the Plant Origin of Licorice Oil Extract, a Natural Food Additive, by Principal Component Analysis Based on Chemical Components].

    PubMed

    Tada, Atsuko; Ishizuki, Kyoko; Sugimoto, Naoki; Yoshimatsu, Kayo; Kawahara, Nobuo; Suematsu, Takako; Arifuku, Kazunori; Fukai, Toshio; Tamura, Yukiyoshi; Ohtsuki, Takashi; Tahara, Maiko; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Akiyama, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    "Licorice oil extract" (LOE) (antioxidant agent) is described in the notice of Japanese food additive regulations as a material obtained from the roots and/or rhizomes of Glycyrrhiza uralensis, G. inflata or G. glabra. In this study, we aimed to identify the original Glycyrrhiza species of eight food additive products using LC/MS. Glabridin, a characteristic compound in G. glabra, was specifically detected in seven products, and licochalcone A, a characteristic compound in G. inflata, was detected in one product. In addition, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) (a kind of multivariate analysis) using the data of LC/MS or (1)H-NMR analysis was performed. The data of thirty-one samples, including LOE products used as food additives, ethanol extracts of various Glycyrrhiza species and commercially available Glycyrrhiza species-derived products were assessed. Based on the PCA results, the majority of LOE products was confirmed to be derived from G. glabra. This study suggests that PCA using (1)H-NMR analysis data is a simple and useful method to identify the plant species of origin of natural food additive products. PMID:26537652

  19. [Determination of the Plant Origin of Licorice Oil Extract, a Natural Food Additive, by Principal Component Analysis Based on Chemical Components].

    PubMed

    Tada, Atsuko; Ishizuki, Kyoko; Sugimoto, Naoki; Yoshimatsu, Kayo; Kawahara, Nobuo; Suematsu, Takako; Arifuku, Kazunori; Fukai, Toshio; Tamura, Yukiyoshi; Ohtsuki, Takashi; Tahara, Maiko; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Akiyama, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    "Licorice oil extract" (LOE) (antioxidant agent) is described in the notice of Japanese food additive regulations as a material obtained from the roots and/or rhizomes of Glycyrrhiza uralensis, G. inflata or G. glabra. In this study, we aimed to identify the original Glycyrrhiza species of eight food additive products using LC/MS. Glabridin, a characteristic compound in G. glabra, was specifically detected in seven products, and licochalcone A, a characteristic compound in G. inflata, was detected in one product. In addition, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) (a kind of multivariate analysis) using the data of LC/MS or (1)H-NMR analysis was performed. The data of thirty-one samples, including LOE products used as food additives, ethanol extracts of various Glycyrrhiza species and commercially available Glycyrrhiza species-derived products were assessed. Based on the PCA results, the majority of LOE products was confirmed to be derived from G. glabra. This study suggests that PCA using (1)H-NMR analysis data is a simple and useful method to identify the plant species of origin of natural food additive products.

  20. An Equiratio Mixture Model for non-additive components: a case study for aspartame/acesulfame-K mixtures.

    PubMed

    Schifferstein, H N

    1996-02-01

    The Equiratio Mixture Model predicts the psychophysical function for an equiratio mixture type on the basis of the psychophysical functions for the unmixed components. The model reliably estimates the sweetness of mixtures of sugars and sugar-alcohols, but is unable to predict intensity for aspartame/sucrose mixtures. In this paper, the sweetness of aspartame/acesulfame-K mixtures in aqueous and acidic solutions is investigated. These two intensive sweeteners probably do not comply with the model's original assumption of sensory dependency among components. However, they reveal how the Equiratio Mixture Model could be modified to describe and predict mixture functions for non-additive substances. To predict equiratio functions for all similar tasting substances, a new Equiratio Mixture Model should yield accurate predictions for components eliciting similar intensities at widely differing concentration levels, and for substances exhibiting hypo- or hyperadditivity. In addition, it should be able to correct violations of Stevens's power law. These three problems are resolved in a model that uses equi-intense units as the measure of physical concentration. An interaction index in the formula for the constant accounts for the degree of interaction between mixture components. Deviations from the power law are corrected by a nonlinear response output transformation, assuming a two-stage model of psychophysical judgment.

  1. Application of Spectral Information for Investigation of Cultural Properties II—A Color Feature Extraction Based on Clustering and the Principal Component Analysis—

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Kimiyoshi; Andriyashin, Alexey; Jääskeläinen, Timo; Hauta-Kasari, Markku; Parkkinen, Jussi

    In the research and investigation on the historical materials and cultural properties, not only conventional RGB digital images but also spectral reflectance images serve valuable information. However, some suitable techniques to extract effective information corresponding to the purpose of the use of the spectral reflectance images are desired because the spectral reflectance images have so huge of information. In this article, a method for investigating the historical materials and cultural properties will be described. This method can extract useful features relating to color compositions in the cultural properties. In this method, the measured spectral reflectance images of the icons, which are examples of the cultural properties, are clustered and the principal component analysis is applied in each cluster. The first principal component in each cluster is used for approximating the original spectral reflectance. The color difference caused of this approximation is calculated and used to control features to be extracted from the icons. Based on this number of clusters, results of the clustering are compared and possibilities of this method for further investigation are discussed.

  2. On the impact of additional spectral bands usage on RST-ASH performance in volcanic ash plume detected from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falconieri, Alfredo; Filizzola, Carolina; Marchese, Francesco; Pergola, Nicola; Tramutoli, Valerio

    2016-04-01

    RST-ASH is an algorithm developed for detecting and tracking volcanic ash clouds from space based on the Robust Satellite Technique (RST) multi-temporal approach. For the identification of ash affected areas RST-ASH uses two local variation indexes in combination. They analyse the Brightness Temperature Differences (BTD) of the signal measured at 11 μm and 12 μm and at around 3.5 and 11 μm wavelengths to detect ash in both nighttime and daytime conditions. RST-ASH was tested on Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) records and was then implemented on Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) for studying and monitoring eruptions of different volcanoes. In this study, some experimental configurations of RST-ASH, analyzing signal also in other spectral bands (e.g. VIS, SO2) will be tested and assessed, studying recent ash plumes (e.g. Etna, Eyjafjallajökull, Grímsvötn) affecting different geographic areas. Results achieved using both polar and geostationary satellite data will be evaluated even for comparison with other state of the art methods. The work shows that when the extended spectral capabilities offered by high temporal resolution satellites are exploited an improvement of RST-ASH performance in some observational and plume conditions is achievable, making RST-ASH still more suited for identifying and monitoring ash clouds in the framework of possible operational scenarios.

  3. The HELLAS2XMM survey. XIII. Multi-component analysis of the spectral energy distribution of obscured AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzi, F.; Vignali, C.; Comastri, A.; Bellocchi, E.; Fritz, J.; Gruppioni, C.; Mignoli, M.; Maiolino, R.; Pozzetti, L.; Brusa, M.; Fiore, F.; Zamorani, G.

    2010-07-01

    Aims: We combine near-to-mid-IR Spitzer data with shorter wavelength observations (optical to X-rays) to get insight into the properties of a sample of luminous, obscured active galactic nuclei (AGN). We aim at modelling their broad-band spectral energy distributions (SEDs) in order to estimate the main parameters related to the dusty torus that is assumed to be responsible for the reprocessed IR emission. Our final goal is to estimate the intrinsic nuclear luminosities and the Eddington ratios for our luminous, obscured AGN. Methods: The sample comprises 16 obscured high-redshift (0.9 ⪉ z ⪉ 2.1), X-ray luminous quasars (L2-10 keV ~ 1044 erg s-1) selected from the HELLAS2XMM survey in the 2-10 keV band. The optical-IR SEDs are described by a multi-component model that includes a stellar component to account for the optical and near-IR emission, an AGN component that dominates in the mid-IR (mainly emission from a dusty torus heated by nuclear radiation), and a starburst to reproduce the far-IR bump. A radiative transfer code to compute the spectrum and intensity of dust reprocessed emission was extensively tested against our multiwavelength data. While the torus parameters and the BH accretion luminosities are a direct output of the SED-fitting procedure, the BH masses were estimated indirectly by means of the local Mbulge-MBH relation. Results: The majority (~80%) of the sources show moderate optical depth (τ9.7 µm ≤ 3), and the derived column densities NH are consistent with the X-ray inferred values (1022 ⪉ NH ⪉ 3 × 1023 cm-2) for most of the objects, confirming that the sources are moderately obscured Compton-thin AGN. Accretion luminosities in the range 5 × 1044 ⪉ Lbol ⪉ 4 × 1046 erg s-1 are inferred from the multiwavelength fitting procedure. We compare model luminosities with those obtained by integrating the observed SED, finding that the latter are lower by a factor of ~2 in the median. The discrepancy can be as high as an order of

  4. Application of independent component analysis method in real-time spectral analysis of gaseous mixtures for acousto-optical spectrometers based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadeyev, A. V.; Pozhar, V. E.

    2012-10-01

    It is discussed the reliability problem of time-optimized method for remote optical spectral analysis of gas-polluted ambient air. The method based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) enables fragmentary spectrum registration (FSR) and is suitable for random-spectral-access (RSA) optical spectrometers like acousto-optical (AO) ones. Here, it is proposed the algorithm based on statistical method of independent component analysis (ICA) for estimation of a correctness of absorption spectral lines selection for FSR-method. Implementations of ICA method for RSA-based real-time adaptive systems are considered. Numerical simulations are presented with use of real spectra detected by the trace gas monitoring system GAOS based on AO spectrometer.

  5. Plant for producing an oxygen-containing additive as an ecologically beneficial component for liquid motor fuels

    DOEpatents

    Siryk, Yury Paul; Balytski, Ivan Peter; Korolyov, Volodymyr George; Klishyn, Olexiy Nick; Lnianiy, Vitaly Nick; Lyakh, Yury Alex; Rogulin, Victor Valery

    2013-04-30

    A plant for producing an oxygen-containing additive for liquid motor fuels comprises an anaerobic fermentation vessel, a gasholder, a system for removal of sulphuretted hydrogen, and a hotwell. The plant further comprises an aerobic fermentation vessel, a device for liquid substance pumping, a device for liquid aeration with an oxygen-containing gas, a removal system of solid mass residue after fermentation, a gas distribution device; a device for heavy gases utilization; a device for ammonia adsorption by water; a liquid-gas mixer; a cavity mixer, a system that serves superficial active and dispersant matters and a cooler; all of these being connected to each other by pipelines. The technical result being the implementation of a process for producing an oxygen containing additive, which after being added to liquid motor fuels, provides an ecologically beneficial component for motor fuels by ensuring the stability of composition fuel properties during long-term storage.

  6. Application of Optical Parametric Generator for Lidar Sensing of Minor Gas Components of the Atmosphere in 3-4 μm Spectral Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanovskii, O. A.; Sadovnikov, S. A.; Kharchenko, O. V.; Shumskii, V. K.; Yakovlev, S. V.

    2016-07-01

    Possibility of application of a laser system with parametric light generation based on a nonlinear KTA crystal for lidar sensing of the atmosphere in the 3-4 μm spectral range is investigated. A technique for lidar measurements of gas components in the atmosphere with the use of differential absorption lidar (DIAL) and differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) method is developed. The DIAL-DOAS technique is tested for estimating the possibility of laser sensing of minor gas components in the atmosphere.

  7. Fatigue assessment of vibrating rail vehicle bogie components under non-Gaussian random excitations using power spectral densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfsteiner, Peter; Breuer, Werner

    2013-10-01

    The assessment of fatigue load under random vibrations is usually based on load spectra. Typically they are computed with counting methods (e.g. Rainflow) based on a time domain signal. Alternatively methods are available (e.g. Dirlik) enabling the estimation of load spectra directly from power spectral densities (PSDs) of the corresponding time signals; the knowledge of the time signal is then not necessary. These PSD based methods have the enormous advantage that if for example the signal to assess results from a finite element method based vibration analysis, the computation time of the simulation of PSDs in the frequency domain outmatches by far the simulation of time signals in the time domain. This is especially true for random vibrations with very long signals in the time domain. The disadvantage of the PSD based simulation of vibrations and also the PSD based load spectra estimation is their limitation to Gaussian distributed time signals. Deviations from this Gaussian distribution cause relevant deviations in the estimated load spectra. In these cases usually only computation time intensive time domain calculations produce accurate results. This paper presents a method dealing with non-Gaussian signals with real statistical properties that is still able to use the efficient PSD approach with its computation time advantages. Essentially it is based on a decomposition of the non-Gaussian signal in Gaussian distributed parts. The PSDs of these rearranged signals are then used to perform usual PSD analyses. In particular, detailed methods are described for the decomposition of time signals and the derivation of PSDs and cross power spectral densities (CPSDs) from multiple real measurements without using inaccurate standard procedures. Furthermore the basic intention is to design a general and integrated method that is not just able to analyse a certain single load case for a small time interval, but to generate representative PSD and CPSD spectra replacing

  8. Contribution of tonal components to the overall loudness, annoyance and noisiness of noise: Relation between single tones and noise spectral shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellman, R. P.

    1985-01-01

    A large scale laboratory investigation of loudness, annoyance, and noisiness produced by single-tone-noise complexes was undertaken to establish a broader data base for quanitification and prediction of perceived annoyance of sounds containing tonal components. Loudness, annoyance, and noisiness were distinguished as separate, distinct, attributes of sound. Three different spectral patterns of broadband noise with and without added tones were studied: broadband-flat, low-pass, and high-pass. Judgments were obtained by absolute magnitude estimation supplement by loudness matching. The data were examined and evaluated to determine the potential effects of (1) the overall sound pressure level (SPL) of the noise-tone complex, (2) tone SPL, (3) noise SPL, (4) tone-to-noise ratio, (5) the frequency of the added tone, (6) noise spectral shape, and (7) subjective attribute judged on absolute magnitude of annoyance. Results showed that, in contrast to noisiness, loudness and annoyance growth behavior depends on the relationship between the frequency of the added tone and the spectral shape of the noise. The close correspondence between the frequency of the added tone and the spectral shape of the noise. The close correspondence between loundness and annoyance suggests that, to better understand perceived annoyance of sound mixtures, it is necessary to relate the results to basic auditory mechanisms governing loudness and masking.

  9. Components of yeast (Sacchromyces cervisiae) extract as defined media additives that support the growth and productivity of CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Spearman, Maureen; Chan, Sarah; Jung, Vince; Kowbel, Vanessa; Mendoza, Meg; Miranda, Vivian; Butler, Michael

    2016-09-10

    Yeast and plant hydrolysates are used as media supplements to support the growth and productivity of CHO cultures for biopharmaceutical production. Through fractionation of a yeast lysate and metabolic analysis of a fraction that had bioactivity equivalent to commercial yeast extract (YE), bioactive components were identified that promoted growth and productivity of two recombinant CHO cell lines (CHO-Luc and CHO-hFcEG2) equivalent to or greater than YE-supplemented media. Autolysis of the yeast lysate was not necessary for full activity, suggesting that the active components are present in untreated yeast cells. A bioactive fraction (3KF) of the yeast lysate was isolated from the permeate using a 3kDa molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) filter. Supplementation of this 3KF fraction into the base media supported growth of CHO-Luc cells over eight passages equivalent to YE-supplemented media. The 3KF fraction was fractionated further by a cation exchange spin column using a stepwise pH elution. Metabolomic analysis of a bioactive fraction isolated at high pH identified several arginine and lysine-containing peptides as well as two polyamines, spermine and spermidine, with 3.5× and 4.5× higher levels compared to a fraction showing no bioactivity. The addition of a mixture of polyamines and their precursors (putrescine, spermine, spermidine, ornithine and citrulline) as well as increasing the concentration of some of the components of the original base medium resulted in a chemically-defined (CD) formulation that produced an equivalent viable cell density (VCD) and productivity of the CHO-Luc cells as the YE-supplemented medium. The VCD of the CHO-hFcEG2 culture in the CD medium was 1.9× greater and with equivalent productivity to the YE-supplemented media.

  10. Components of yeast (Sacchromyces cervisiae) extract as defined media additives that support the growth and productivity of CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Spearman, Maureen; Chan, Sarah; Jung, Vince; Kowbel, Vanessa; Mendoza, Meg; Miranda, Vivian; Butler, Michael

    2016-09-10

    Yeast and plant hydrolysates are used as media supplements to support the growth and productivity of CHO cultures for biopharmaceutical production. Through fractionation of a yeast lysate and metabolic analysis of a fraction that had bioactivity equivalent to commercial yeast extract (YE), bioactive components were identified that promoted growth and productivity of two recombinant CHO cell lines (CHO-Luc and CHO-hFcEG2) equivalent to or greater than YE-supplemented media. Autolysis of the yeast lysate was not necessary for full activity, suggesting that the active components are present in untreated yeast cells. A bioactive fraction (3KF) of the yeast lysate was isolated from the permeate using a 3kDa molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) filter. Supplementation of this 3KF fraction into the base media supported growth of CHO-Luc cells over eight passages equivalent to YE-supplemented media. The 3KF fraction was fractionated further by a cation exchange spin column using a stepwise pH elution. Metabolomic analysis of a bioactive fraction isolated at high pH identified several arginine and lysine-containing peptides as well as two polyamines, spermine and spermidine, with 3.5× and 4.5× higher levels compared to a fraction showing no bioactivity. The addition of a mixture of polyamines and their precursors (putrescine, spermine, spermidine, ornithine and citrulline) as well as increasing the concentration of some of the components of the original base medium resulted in a chemically-defined (CD) formulation that produced an equivalent viable cell density (VCD) and productivity of the CHO-Luc cells as the YE-supplemented medium. The VCD of the CHO-hFcEG2 culture in the CD medium was 1.9× greater and with equivalent productivity to the YE-supplemented media. PMID:27165505

  11. Determining the von Mises stress power spectral density for frequency domain fatigue analysis including out-of-phase stress components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonte, M. H. A.; de Boer, A.; Liebregts, R.

    2007-04-01

    This paper provides a new formula to take into account phase differences in the determination of an equivalent von Mises stress power spectral density (PSD) from multiple random inputs. The obtained von Mises PSD can subsequently be used for fatigue analysis. The formula was derived for use in the commercial vehicle business and was implemented in combination with Finite Element software to predict and analyse fatigue failure in the frequency domain.

  12. Apollo 16 regolith breccias and soils - Recorders of exotic component addition to the Descartes region of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, S. B.; Papike, J. J.; Laul, J. C.; Hughes, S. S.; Schmitt, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    Using the subdivision of Apollo 16 regolith breccias into ancient (about 4 Gyr) and younger samples (McKay et al., 1986), with the present-day soils as a third sample, a petrologic and chemical determination of regolith evolution and exotic component addition at the A-16 site was performed. The modal petrologies and mineral and chemical compositions of the regolith breccias in the region are presented. It is shown that the early regolith was composed of fragments of plutonic rocks, impact melt rocks, and minerals and impact glasses. It is found that KREEP lithologies and impact melts formed early in lunar history. The mare components, mainly orange high-TiO2 glass and green low-TiO2 glass, were added to the site after formation of the ancient breccias and prior to the formation of young breccias. The major change in the regolith since the formation of the young breccias is an increase in maturity represented by the formation of fused soil particles with prolonged exposure to micrometeorite impacts.

  13. Additive Regulation of Adiponectin Expression by the Mediterranean Diet Olive Oil Components Oleic Acid and Hydroxytyrosol in Human Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Scoditti, Egeria; Massaro, Marika; Carluccio, Maria Annunziata; Pellegrino, Mariangela; Wabitsch, Martin; Calabriso, Nadia; Storelli, Carlo; De Caterina, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Adiponectin, an adipocyte-derived insulin-sensitizing and anti-inflammatory hormone, is suppressed in obesity through mechanisms involving chronic inflammation and oxidative stress. Olive oil consumption is associated with beneficial cardiometabolic actions, with possible contributions from the antioxidant phenol hydroxytyrosol (HT) and the monounsaturated fatty acid oleic acid (OA, 18:1n-9 cis), both possessing anti-inflammatory and vasculo-protective properties. We determined the effects of HT and OA, alone and in combination, on adiponectin expression in human and murine adipocytes under pro-inflammatory conditions induced by the cytokine tumor necrosis factor(TNF)-α. We used human Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS) adipocytes and murine 3T3-L1 adipocytes as cell model systems, and pretreated them with 1-100 μmol/L OA, 0.1-20 μmol/L HT or OA plus HT combination before stimulation with 10 ng/mL TNF-α. OA or HT significantly (P<0.05) prevented TNF-α-induced suppression of total adiponectin secretion (by 42% compared with TNF-α alone) as well as mRNA levels (by 30% compared with TNF-α alone). HT and OA also prevented—by 35%—TNF-α-induced downregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor PPARγ. Co-treatment with HT and OA restored adiponectin and PPARγ expression in an additive manner compared with single treatments. Exploring the activation of JNK, which is crucial for both adiponectin and PPARγ suppression by TNF-α, we found that HT and OA additively attenuated TNF-α-stimulated JNK phosphorylation (up to 55% inhibition). In conclusion, the virgin olive oil components OA and HT, at nutritionally relevant concentrations, have additive effects in preventing adiponectin downregulation in inflamed adipocytes through an attenuation of JNK-mediated PPARγ suppression. PMID:26030149

  14. Extracellular zinc induces phosphoethanolamine addition to Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipid A via the ColRS two-component system

    PubMed Central

    Nowicki, Emily M.; O'Brien, John P.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.; Trent, M. Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Summary Gram-negative bacteria survive harmful environmental stressors by modifying their outer membrane. Much of this protection is afforded upon remodeling of the lipid A region of the major surface molecule lipopolysaccharide (LPS). For example, the addition of cationic substituents, such as 4-amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinose (L-Ara4N) and phosphoehthanolamine (pEtN) at the lipid A phosphate groups is often induced in response to specific environmental flux stabilizing the outer membrane. The work herein represents the first report of pEtN addition to P. aeruginosa lipid A. We have identified the key pEtN transferase which we named EptAPa and characterized its strict activity on only one position of lipid A, contrasting from previously studied EptA enzymes. We further show that transcription of eptAPa is regulated by zinc via the ColRS two-component system instead of the PmrAB system responsible for eptA regulation in E. coli and S. enterica. Further, although L-Ara4N is readily added to the same position of lipid A as pEtN under certain environmental conditions, ColR specifically induces pEtN addition to lipid A in lieu of L-Ara4N when Zn2+ is present. The unique, specific regulation of eptAPa transcription and enzymatic activity described in this work demonstrates the tight yet inducible control over LPS modification in P. aeruginosa. PMID:25846400

  15. Polymyxin Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phoQ Mutants Is Dependent on Additional Two-Component Regulatory Systems

    PubMed Central

    Gutu, Alina D.; Sgambati, Nicole; Strasbourger, Pnina; Brannon, Mark K.; Jacobs, Michael A.; Haugen, Eric; Kaul, Rajinder K.; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Høiby, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can develop resistance to polymyxin as a consequence of mutations in the PhoPQ regulatory system, mediated by covalent lipid A modification. Transposon mutagenesis of a polymyxin-resistant phoQ mutant defined 41 novel loci required for resistance, including two regulatory systems, ColRS and CprRS. Deletion of the colRS genes, individually or in tandem, abrogated the polymyxin resistance of a ΔphoQ mutant, as did individual or tandem deletion of cprRS. Individual deletion of colR or colS in a ΔphoQ mutant also suppressed 4-amino-l-arabinose addition to lipid A, consistent with the known role of this modification in polymyxin resistance. Surprisingly, tandem deletion of colRS or cprRS in the ΔphoQ mutant or individual deletion of cprR or cprS failed to suppress 4-amino-l-arabinose addition to lipid A, indicating that this modification alone is not sufficient for PhoPQ-mediated polymyxin resistance in P. aeruginosa. Episomal expression of colRS or cprRS in tandem or of cprR individually complemented the Pm resistance phenotype in the ΔphoQ mutant, while episomal expression of colR, colS, or cprS individually did not. Highly polymyxin-resistant phoQ mutants of P. aeruginosa isolated from polymyxin-treated cystic fibrosis patients harbored mutant alleles of colRS and cprS; when expressed in a ΔphoQ background, these mutant alleles enhanced polymyxin resistance. These results define ColRS and CprRS as two-component systems regulating polymyxin resistance in P. aeruginosa, indicate that addition of 4-amino-l-arabinose to lipid A is not the only PhoPQ-regulated biochemical mechanism required for resistance, and demonstrate that colRS and cprS mutations can contribute to high-level clinical resistance. PMID:23459479

  16. Assessing plant water relations based on hidden in formation in the hyper-spectral signatures: Parameterization of olive leaf P-V curve and estimation of water potential components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rallo, Giovanni; Provenzano, Giuseppe; Jones, Hamlyn G.

    2015-04-01

    The Soil Plant Atmosphere Continuum (SPAC) is characterized by complex structures and biophysical processes acting over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. Additionally, in olive grove systems, the plant adaptive strategies to respond to soil water-limited conditions make the system even more complex. One of the greatest challenges in hydrological research is to quantify changing plant water relations. A promising new technology is provided by the advent of new field spectroscopy detectors, characterized by very high resolution over the spectral range between 300 and 2500 nm, allowing the detection of narrow reflectance or absorptance peaks, to separate close lying peaks and to discover new information, hidden at lower resolutions. The general objective of the present research was to investigate a range of plant state function parameters in a non-destructive and repeatable manner and to improve methodologies aimed to parameterize hydrological models describing the entire SPAC, or each single compartment (soil or plant). We have investigated the use of hyperspectral sensing for the parameterization of the hydraulic pressure-volume curve (P-V) for olive leaf and for the indirect estimation of the two principal leaf water potential components, i.e. turgor and osmotic potentials. Experiments were carried out on an olive grove in Sicily, during the mature phase of the first vegetative flush. Leaf spectral signatures and associated P-V measurements were acquired on olive leaves collected from well-irrigated plants and from plants maintained under moderate or severe water stress. Leaf spectral reflectance was monitored with a FieldSpec 4 spectro-radiometer (Analytical Spectral Device, Inc.), in a range of wavelengths from VIS to SWIR (350-2500 nm), with sampling intervals of 1.4 nm and 2.0 nm, respectively in the regions from 350 to 1000 nm and from 1000 to 2500 nm. Measurements required the use of contact probe and leaf clip (Analytical Spectral Device, Inc

  17. Application of Principal Component Analysis to Large-Scale Spectral Line Imaging Studies of the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyer, Mark H.; Peter Schloerb, F.

    1997-01-01

    The multivariate statistical technique of principal component analysis (PCA) is described and demonstrated to be a valuable tool to consolidate the large amount of information obtained with spectroscopic imaging observations of the interstellar medium. Simple interstellar cloud models with varying degrees of complexity and Gaussian noise are constructed and analyzed to demonstrate the ability of PCA to statistically extract physical features and phenomena from the data and to gauge the effects of random noise upon the analysis. Principal components are calculated for high spatial dynamic range 12CO and 13CO data cubes of the Sh 155 (Cep OB3) cloud complex. These identify the three major emission components within the cloud and the spatial differences between 12CO and 13CO emissions. Higher order eigenimages identify small velocity fluctuations and therefore provide spatial information to the turbulent velocity field within the cloud. A size line width relationship δv ~ Rα is derived from spatial and kinematic characterizations of the principal components of 12CO emission from the Sh 155, Sh 235, Sh 140, and Gem OB1 cloud complexes. The power-law indices for these clouds range from 0.42 to 0.55 and are similar to those derived from an ensemble of clouds within the Galaxy found by Larson (1981) and Solomon et al. (1987). The size-line width relationship within a given cloud provides an important diagnostic to the variation of kinetic energy with size scale within turbulent flows of the interstellar medium.

  18. On the Use of Principal Component and Spectral Density Analysis to Evaluate the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 5 year (2002-2006) simulation of CMAQ covering the eastern United States is evaluated using principle component analysis in order to identify and characterize statistically significant patterns of model bias. Such analysis is useful in that in can identify areas of poor model ...

  19. Discriminating between cultivars and treatments of broccoli using mass spectral fingerprinting and analysis of variance-principal component analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolite fingerprints, obtained with direct injection mass spectrometry (MS) with both positive and negative ionization, were used with analysis of variance-principal components analysis (ANOVA-PCA) to discriminate between cultivars and growing treatments of broccoli. The sample set consisted of ...

  20. Independent component analysis (ICA) algorithms for improved spectral deconvolution of overlapped signals in 1H NMR analysis: application to foods and related products.

    PubMed

    Monakhova, Yulia B; Tsikin, Alexey M; Kuballa, Thomas; Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Mushtakova, Svetlana P

    2014-05-01

    The major challenge facing NMR spectroscopic mixture analysis is the overlapping of signals and the arising impossibility to easily recover the structures for identification of the individual components and to integrate separated signals for quantification. In this paper, various independent component analysis (ICA) algorithms [mutual information least dependent component analysis (MILCA); stochastic non-negative ICA (SNICA); joint approximate diagonalization of eigenmatrices (JADE); and robust, accurate, direct ICA algorithm (RADICAL)] as well as deconvolution methods [simple-to-use-interactive self-modeling mixture analysis (SIMPLISMA) and multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS)] are applied for simultaneous (1)H NMR spectroscopic determination of organic substances in complex mixtures. Among others, we studied constituents of the following matrices: honey, soft drinks, and liquids used in electronic cigarettes. Good quality spectral resolution of up to eight-component mixtures was achieved (correlation coefficients between resolved and experimental spectra were not less than 0.90). In general, the relative errors in the recovered concentrations were below 12%. SIMPLISMA and MILCA algorithms were found to be preferable for NMR spectra deconvolution and showed similar performance. The proposed method was used for analysis of authentic samples. The resolved ICA concentrations match well with the results of reference gas chromatography-mass spectrometry as well as the MCR-ALS algorithm used for comparison. ICA deconvolution considerably improves the application range of direct NMR spectroscopy for analysis of complex mixtures.

  1. Enhanced Spectral Anisotropies Near the Proton-Cyclotron Scale: Possible Two-Component Structure in Hall-FLR MHD Turbulence Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Sanjoy; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2011-01-01

    Recent analysis of the magnetic correlation function of solar wind fluctuations at 1 AU suggests the existence of two-component structure near the proton-cyclotron scale. Here we use two-and-one-half dimensional and three-dimensional compressible MHD models to look for two-component structure adjacent the proton-cyclotron scale. Our MHD system incorporates both Hall and Finite Larmor Radius (FLR) terms. We find that strong spectral anisotropies appear adjacent the proton-cyclotron scales depending on selections of initial condition and plasma beta. These anisotropies are enhancements on top of related anisotropies that appear in standard MHD turbulence in the presence of a mean magnetic field and are suggestive of one turbulence component along the inertial scales and another component adjacent the dissipative scales. We compute the relative strengths of linear and nonlinear accelerations on the velocity and magnetic fields to gauge the relative influence of terms that drive the system with wave-like (linear) versus turbulent (nonlinear) dynamics.

  2. Bayesian regression models outperform partial least squares methods for predicting milk components and technological properties using infrared spectral data.

    PubMed

    Ferragina, A; de los Campos, G; Vazquez, A I; Cecchinato, A; Bittante, G

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance of Bayesian models commonly used for genomic selection to predict "difficult-to-predict" dairy traits, such as milk fatty acid (FA) expressed as percentage of total fatty acids, and technological properties, such as fresh cheese yield and protein recovery, using Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectral data. Our main hypothesis was that Bayesian models that can estimate shrinkage and perform variable selection may improve our ability to predict FA traits and technological traits above and beyond what can be achieved using the current calibration models (e.g., partial least squares, PLS). To this end, we assessed a series of Bayesian methods and compared their prediction performance with that of PLS. The comparison between models was done using the same sets of data (i.e., same samples, same variability, same spectral treatment) for each trait. Data consisted of 1,264 individual milk samples collected from Brown Swiss cows for which gas chromatographic FA composition, milk coagulation properties, and cheese-yield traits were available. For each sample, 2 spectra in the infrared region from 5,011 to 925 cm(-1) were available and averaged before data analysis. Three Bayesian models: Bayesian ridge regression (Bayes RR), Bayes A, and Bayes B, and 2 reference models: PLS and modified PLS (MPLS) procedures, were used to calibrate equations for each of the traits. The Bayesian models used were implemented in the R package BGLR (http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/BGLR/index.html), whereas the PLS and MPLS were those implemented in the WinISI II software (Infrasoft International LLC, State College, PA). Prediction accuracy was estimated for each trait and model using 25 replicates of a training-testing validation procedure. Compared with PLS, which is currently the most widely used calibration method, MPLS and the 3 Bayesian methods showed significantly greater prediction accuracy. Accuracy increased in moving from

  3. Bayesian regression models outperform partial least squares methods for predicting milk components and technological properties using infrared spectral data.

    PubMed

    Ferragina, A; de los Campos, G; Vazquez, A I; Cecchinato, A; Bittante, G

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance of Bayesian models commonly used for genomic selection to predict "difficult-to-predict" dairy traits, such as milk fatty acid (FA) expressed as percentage of total fatty acids, and technological properties, such as fresh cheese yield and protein recovery, using Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectral data. Our main hypothesis was that Bayesian models that can estimate shrinkage and perform variable selection may improve our ability to predict FA traits and technological traits above and beyond what can be achieved using the current calibration models (e.g., partial least squares, PLS). To this end, we assessed a series of Bayesian methods and compared their prediction performance with that of PLS. The comparison between models was done using the same sets of data (i.e., same samples, same variability, same spectral treatment) for each trait. Data consisted of 1,264 individual milk samples collected from Brown Swiss cows for which gas chromatographic FA composition, milk coagulation properties, and cheese-yield traits were available. For each sample, 2 spectra in the infrared region from 5,011 to 925 cm(-1) were available and averaged before data analysis. Three Bayesian models: Bayesian ridge regression (Bayes RR), Bayes A, and Bayes B, and 2 reference models: PLS and modified PLS (MPLS) procedures, were used to calibrate equations for each of the traits. The Bayesian models used were implemented in the R package BGLR (http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/BGLR/index.html), whereas the PLS and MPLS were those implemented in the WinISI II software (Infrasoft International LLC, State College, PA). Prediction accuracy was estimated for each trait and model using 25 replicates of a training-testing validation procedure. Compared with PLS, which is currently the most widely used calibration method, MPLS and the 3 Bayesian methods showed significantly greater prediction accuracy. Accuracy increased in moving from

  4. Revealing a hard X-ray spectral component that reverberates within one light hour of the central supermassive black hole in Ark 564

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giustini, M.; Turner, T. J.; Reeves, J. N.; Miller, L.; Legg, E.; Kraemer, S. B.; George, I. M.

    2015-05-01

    Context. Arakelian 564 (Ark 564, z = 0.0247) is an X-ray-bright narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy. By using advanced X-ray timing techniques, an excess of "delayed" emission in the hard X-ray band (4-7.5 keV) following about 1000 s after "flaring" light in the soft X-ray band (0.4 - 1 keV) was recently detected. Aims: We report on the X-ray spectral analysis of eight XMM-Newton and one Suzaku observation of Ark 564. Our aim is to characterise the X-ray spectral properties of the source in the light of these recently reported results. Methods: High-resolution spectroscopy was performed with the RGS in the soft X-ray band, while broad-band spectroscopy was performed with the EPIC-pn and XIS/PIN instruments. We analysed time-averaged, flux-selected, and time-resolved spectra. Results: Despite the strong variability in flux during our observational campaign, the broad-band spectral shape of Ark 564 does not vary dramatically and can be reproduced either by a superposition of a power law and a blackbody emission or by a Comptonized power-law emission model. High-resolution spectroscopy revealed ionised gas along the line of sight at the systemic redshift of the source, with a low column density (NH ~ 1021 cm-2) and a range of ionisation states (-0.8 < log (ξ/erg cm s-1) < 2.4). Broad-band spectroscopy revealed a very steep intrinsic continuum (photon index Γ ~ 2.6) and a rather weak emission feature in the iron K band (EW ~ 150 eV); modelling this feature with a reflection component requires highly ionised gas, log (ξ/erg cm s-1) > 3.5. A reflection-dominated or an absorption-dominated model are similarly able to well reproduce the time-averaged data from a statistical point of view, in both cases requiring contrived geometries and/or unlikely physical parameters. Finally, through time-resolved analysis we spectroscopically identified the "delayed" emission as a spectral hardening above ~4 keV; the most likely interpretation for this component is a reprocessing of the

  5. [Analysis of Component Spectral Characteristics of PM10-Bound PAHs and the Influence of Weather Conditions During Spring in Xiamen].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Fan, Shu-xian; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Yue; Wei, Jin-cheng

    2015-04-01

    In order to study pollution status and distribution characteristics of PAHs in PM10 during the spring in city and suburban Xiamen. A total of 18 PAHs were analyzed in the aerosol samples collected in daytime and nighttime during 11th to 21st of April, 2013 in city and suburban Xiamen. Results showed diurnal variation of Σ PAHs in suburban was weaker than that in city. In the city, the concentration of PAHs during daytimes was higher than that during nighttimes, close to 1.83 times, and it is still under the national environmental standards. In different times and space scales, PAHs were a bimodal distribution, the components of PAHs gave the priority to low and middle rings in urban and suburban during daytimes and nighttimes. PAHs with high molecular weight decreased gradually by the increase of particle size, and the proportion of low molecular weight PAHs increased gradually in the meantime. In the city, the change of size distribution among 2-4 rings PAHs in PM10 during days and nights was bigger than these among 5-7 rings. The main sources of PAHs were estimated by DR, the main contributions included gasoline and diesel combustion, the smelting furnace exhaust emissions. During sampling periods, the relationship between the concentration of PAHs, temperature and WD is negative, PAHs had a positive correlation with the visibility and WS in suburban. And in urban, the relationship with temperature during the day was negative, and with an opposite correlation between other meteorological elements.

  6. Discriminating between cultivars and treatments of broccoli using mass spectral fingerprinting and analysis of variance-principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Luthria, Devanand L; Lin, Long-Ze; Robbins, Rebecca J; Finley, John W; Banuelos, Gary S; Harnly, James M

    2008-11-12

    Metabolite fingerprints, obtained with direct injection mass spectrometry (MS) with both positive and negative ionization, were used with analysis of variance-principal components analysis (ANOVA-PCA) to discriminate between cultivars and growing treatments of broccoli. The sample set consisted of two cultivars of broccoli, Majestic and Legacy, the first grown with four different levels of Se and the second grown organically and conventionally with two rates of irrigation. Chemical composition differences in the two cultivars and seven treatments produced patterns that were visually and statistically distinguishable using ANOVA-PCA. PCA loadings allowed identification of the molecular and fragment ions that provided the most significant chemical differences. A standardized profiling method for phenolic compounds showed that important discriminating ions were not phenolic compounds. The elution times of the discriminating ions and previous results suggest that they were common sugars and organic acids. ANOVA calculations of the positive and negative ionization MS fingerprints showed that 33% of the variance came from the cultivar, 59% from the growing treatment, and 8% from analytical uncertainty. Although the positive and negative ionization fingerprints differed significantly, there was no difference in the distribution of variance. High variance of individual masses with cultivars or growing treatment was correlated with high PCA loadings. The ANOVA data suggest that only variables with high variance for analytical uncertainty should be deleted. All other variables represent discriminating masses that allow separation of the samples with respect to cultivar and treatment.

  7. Fermi Observations of GRB 090510: A Short-Hard Gamma-ray Burst with an Additional, Hard Power-law Component from 10 keV TO GeV Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Briggs, M. S.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carrigan, S.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Dermer, C. D.; de Palma, F.; Dingus, B. L.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Finke, J.; Focke, W. B.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Granot, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kippen, R. M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Makeev, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meegan, C.; Mészáros, P.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakajima, H.; Nakamori, T.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Preece, R.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Ritz, S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sander, A.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stamatikos, M.; Stecker, F. W.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Toma, K.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Uehara, T.; Usher, T. L.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; von Kienlin, A.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Winer, B. L.; Wu, X. F.; Yamazaki, R.; Yang, Z.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2010-06-01

    We present detailed observations of the bright short-hard gamma-ray burst GRB 090510 made with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi observatory. GRB 090510 is the first burst detected by the LAT that shows strong evidence for a deviation from a Band spectral fitting function during the prompt emission phase. The time-integrated spectrum is fit by the sum of a Band function with E peak = 3.9 ± 0.3 MeV, which is the highest yet measured, and a hard power-law component with photon index -1.62 ± 0.03 that dominates the emission below ≈20 keV and above ≈100 MeV. The onset of the high-energy spectral component appears to be delayed by ~0.1 s with respect to the onset of a component well fit with a single Band function. A faint GBM pulse and a LAT photon are detected 0.5 s before the main pulse. During the prompt phase, the LAT detected a photon with energy 30.5+5.8 -2.6 GeV, the highest ever measured from a short GRB. Observation of this photon sets a minimum bulk outflow Lorentz factor, Γgsim 1200, using simple γγ opacity arguments for this GRB at redshift z = 0.903 and a variability timescale on the order of tens of ms for the ≈100 keV-few MeV flux. Stricter high confidence estimates imply Γ >~ 1000 and still require that the outflows powering short GRBs are at least as highly relativistic as those of long-duration GRBs. Implications of the temporal behavior and power-law shape of the additional component on synchrotron/synchrotron self-Compton, external-shock synchrotron, and hadronic models are considered.

  8. Ship-borne rotating shadowband radiometer observations for determination of components of spectral irradiance and aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, Jonas; Deneke, Hartwig; Macke, Andreas; Bernhard, Germar

    2015-04-01

    The Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN) has been established as a sub-project of AERONET and a long-term program to collect ship-borne aerosol optical depth measurements over ocean. Its purpose is to serve as reliable reference database for the evaluation of models and satellite products. Data are currently collected by handheld Microtops II photometers, as the automated acquisition of data from sun photometers on stabilized platforms is so far too expensive for wide-spread use. A promising alternative to the sun photometer is the rotating shadowband radiometer, whose principle of operation allows the determination of the direct-beam component of solar radiation without stabilizing the instrument, if the orientation of the detector horizontal is known. OCEANET, a project to investigate the exchange fluxes of energy and matter between the atmosphere and ocean, has contributed aerosol observations to MAN on several of its cruises on RV Polarstern during the transit between the hemispheres. On the recent cruise (PS 83) from Cape Town to Bremerhaven, TROPOS has operated for the first time a 19 channel rotating shadowband radiometer (GUVis-3511) built by the company Biospherical, as a possible means to provide automated irradiance and aerosol optical depth measurements. Calibration and processing of the raw data will be described, and an initial evaluation of the instrumental performance will be given. Aerosol optical depths derived from Microtops II measurements and the rotating shadowband radiometer will be compared. We show that the standard deviation of Aerosol optical depths observed with Microtops II and the shadowband radiometer is about 0.02 for matching channels, and an aerosol type classification based on Angstrom exponent shows good agreement. Also the influence of ship smoke and ocean swell is studied. The suitability of the instrument to automate MAN observations is discussed, and an outlook to the use of the instrument to also derive cloud optical properties is

  9. Mixed model methods for genomic prediction and variance component estimation of additive and dominance effects using SNP markers.

    PubMed

    Da, Yang; Wang, Chunkao; Wang, Shengwen; Hu, Guo

    2014-01-01

    We established a genomic model of quantitative trait with genomic additive and dominance relationships that parallels the traditional quantitative genetics model, which partitions a genotypic value as breeding value plus dominance deviation and calculates additive and dominance relationships using pedigree information. Based on this genomic model, two sets of computationally complementary but mathematically identical mixed model methods were developed for genomic best linear unbiased prediction (GBLUP) and genomic restricted maximum likelihood estimation (GREML) of additive and dominance effects using SNP markers. These two sets are referred to as the CE and QM sets, where the CE set was designed for large numbers of markers and the QM set was designed for large numbers of individuals. GBLUP and associated accuracy formulations for individuals in training and validation data sets were derived for breeding values, dominance deviations and genotypic values. Simulation study showed that GREML and GBLUP generally were able to capture small additive and dominance effects that each accounted for 0.00005-0.0003 of the phenotypic variance and GREML was able to differentiate true additive and dominance heritability levels. GBLUP of the total genetic value as the summation of additive and dominance effects had higher prediction accuracy than either additive or dominance GBLUP, causal variants had the highest accuracy of GREML and GBLUP, and predicted accuracies were in agreement with observed accuracies. Genomic additive and dominance relationship matrices using SNP markers were consistent with theoretical expectations. The GREML and GBLUP methods can be an effective tool for assessing the type and magnitude of genetic effects affecting a phenotype and for predicting the total genetic value at the whole genome level.

  10. Use of portable devices and confocal Raman spectrometers at different wavelength to obtain the spectral information of the main organic components in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trebolazabala, Josu; Maguregui, Maite; Morillas, Héctor; de Diego, Alberto; Madariaga, Juan Manuel

    2013-03-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit samples, in two ripening stages, ripe (red) and unripe (green), collected from a cultivar in the North of Spain (Barrika, Basque Country), were analyzed directly, without any sample pretreatment, with two different Raman instruments (portable spectrometer coupled to a micro-videocamera and a confocal Raman microscope), using two different laser excitation wavelengths (514 and 785 nm, only for the confocal microscope). The combined use of these laser excitation wavelengths allows obtaining, in a short period of time, the maximum spectral information about the main organic compounds present in this fruit. The major identified components of unripe tomatoes were cutin and cuticular waxes. On the other hand, the main components on ripe tomatoes were carotenes, polyphenoles and polysaccharides. Among the carotenes, it was possible to distinguish the presence of lycopene from β-carotene with the help of both excitation wavelengths, but specially using the 514 nm one, which revealed specific overtones and combination tones of this type of carotene.

  11. One component metal sintering additive for {beta}-SiC based on thermodynamic calculation and experimental observations

    SciTech Connect

    Noviyanto, Alfian; Yoon, Dang-Hyok

    2011-08-15

    Graphical abstract: . Standard Gibbs formation free energies vs. temperature for various metal carbides. The heavy line represents the standard Gibbs free energy for {beta}-SiC. The hatched area denotes the typical liquid phase hot pressing temperature of {beta}-SiC (1973-2123 K). Highlights: {yields} Various metal elements were examined as a sintering additive for {beta}-SiC. {yields} Al and Mg enhanced the density significantly without decomposing {beta}-SiC, as predicted by thermodynamic simulation. {yields} Cr, Fe, Ta, Ti, V and W additives formed metal carbide and/or silicide compounds by decomposing {beta}-SiC. {yields} This approach would be useful for selecting effective sintering additive for high temperature ceramics. -- Abstract: Various types of metals were examined as sintering additives for {beta}-SiC by considering the standard Gibbs formation free energy and vapor pressure under hot pressing conditions (1973-2123 K), particularly for applications in nuclear reactors. Metallic elements having the low long-term activation under neutron irradiation condition, such as Cr, Fe, Ta, Ti, V and W, as well as widely used elements, Al, Mg and B, were considered. The conclusions drawn from thermodynamic considerations were compared with the experimental observations. Al and Mg were found to be effective sintering additives, whereas the others were not due to the formation of metal carbides or silicides from the decomposition of SiC under hot pressing conditions.

  12. Effect of Feed Melting, Temperature History and Minor Component Addition on Spinel Crystallization in High-Level Waste Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Izak, Pavel; Hrma, Pavel R.; Arey, Bruce W.; Plaisted, Trevor J.

    2001-08-01

    This study was undertaken to help design mathematical models for high-level waste (HLW) glass melter that simulate spinel behavior in molten glass. Spinel, (Fe,Ni,Mn) (Fe,Cr)2O4, is the primary solid phase that precipitates from HLW glasses containing Fe and Ni in sufficient concentrations. Spinel crystallization affects the anticipated cost and risk of HLW vitrification. To study melting reactions, we used simulated HLW feed, prepared with co-precipitated Fe, Ni, Cr, and Mn hydroxides. Feed samples were heated up at a temperature-increase rate (4C/min) close to that which the feed experiences in the HLW glass melter. The decomposition, melting, and dissolution of feed components (such as nitrates, carbonates, and silica) and the formation of intermediate crystalline phases (spinel, sodalite [Na8(AlSiO4)6(NO2)2], and Zr-containing minerals) were characterized using evolved gas analysis, volume-expansion measurement, optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and X-ray diffraction. Nitrates and quartz, the major feed components, converted to a glass-forming melt by 880C. A chromium-free spinel formed in the nitrate melt starting from 520C and Sodalite, a transient product of corundum dissolution, appeared above 600C and eventually dissolved in glass. To investigate the effects of temperature history and minor components (Ru,Ag, and Cu) on the dissolution and growth of spinel crystals, samples were heated up to temperatures above liquidus temperature (TL), then subjected to different temperature histories, and analyzed. The results show that spinel mass fraction, crystals composition, and crystal size depend on the chemical and physical makeup of the feed and temperature history.

  13. Collaborative Technology Assessments Of Transient Field Processing And Additive Manufacturing Technologies As Applied To Gas Turbine Components

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Szabo, Attila; Ucok, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    ORNL partnered with GE Power & Water to investigate the effect of thermomagnetic processing on the microstructure and mechanical properties of GE Power & Water newly developed wrought Ni-Fe-Cr alloys. Exploration of the effects of high magnetic field process during heat treatment of the alloys indicated conditions where applications of magnetic fields yields significant property improvements. The alloy aged using high magnetic field processing exhibited 3 HRC higher hardness compared to the conventionally-aged alloy. The alloy annealed at 1785 F using high magnetic field processing demonstrated an average creep life 2.5 times longer than that of the conventionally heat-treated alloy. Preliminary results show that high magnetic field processing can improve the mechanical properties of Ni-Fe-Cr alloys and potentially extend the life cycle of the gas turbine components such as nozzles leading to significant energy savings.

  14. Comments on 'Improved delay-dependent stability criteria for continuous systems with two additive time-varying delay components'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, K.; Venkatachalam, V.; Ray, G.

    2015-07-01

    In this write-up, comments on the omission of few important inequality conditions (or constraints) in the LMI optimization problem stated as delay-dependent stability criterion for a class of linear systems with two additive time-varying state-delays in Cheng et al. (2014) is reported. The omission paves way to incorrectness of the published result. The consequence of the omission, and the revised result are presented in the sequel.

  15. Power spectral estimation algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Manjit S.

    1989-01-01

    Algorithms to estimate the power spectrum using Maximum Entropy Methods were developed. These algorithms were coded in FORTRAN 77 and were implemented on the VAX 780. The important considerations in this analysis are: (1) resolution, i.e., how close in frequency two spectral components can be spaced and still be identified; (2) dynamic range, i.e., how small a spectral peak can be, relative to the largest, and still be observed in the spectra; and (3) variance, i.e., how accurate the estimate of the spectra is to the actual spectra. The application of the algorithms based on Maximum Entropy Methods to a variety of data shows that these criteria are met quite well. Additional work in this direction would help confirm the findings. All of the software developed was turned over to the technical monitor. A copy of a typical program is included. Some of the actual data and graphs used on this data are also included.

  16. 26 CFR 1.23-6 - Procedure and criteria for additions to the approved list of energy-conserving components or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... geothermal energy, the energy source must be an inexhaustible energy supply. Accordingly, wood and... approved list of energy-conserving components or renewable energy sources. 1.23-6 Section 1.23-6 Internal... During A Taxable Year § 1.23-6 Procedure and criteria for additions to the approved list of...

  17. 26 CFR 1.23-6 - Procedure and criteria for additions to the approved list of energy-conserving components or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... geothermal energy, the energy source must be an inexhaustible energy supply. Accordingly, wood and... approved list of energy-conserving components or renewable energy sources. 1.23-6 Section 1.23-6 Internal... During A Taxable Year § 1.23-6 Procedure and criteria for additions to the approved list of...

  18. 26 CFR 1.23-6 - Procedure and criteria for additions to the approved list of energy-conserving components or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... geothermal energy, the energy source must be an inexhaustible energy supply. Accordingly, wood and... approved list of energy-conserving components or renewable energy sources. 1.23-6 Section 1.23-6 Internal... During A Taxable Year § 1.23-6 Procedure and criteria for additions to the approved list of...

  19. Two red blood cell units collected in SAG-M additive solution with the ALYX component collection system.

    PubMed

    Schooneman, F; Huart, J J; Dernis, D; Tunez, V; Aguettaz, D

    2005-06-01

    The first protocol available for the new ALYX component system (Baxter Healthcare Inc.) allows automated collection of two Red Blood Cell (RBC) units from one donor. The primary objective of our evaluation was to assess donor safety, comfort and to check the quality of blood products collected. 30 procedures were performed on eligible donors according to French best donation practices. Eligibility criteria were defined in order to ensure a post donation hemoglobin concentration of 11 g/dL minimum. Pre donation ferritin level was also checked. 360 ml of absolute RBC were collected from each donor. Donors physiological parameters and haematological profile were measured immediately before and after donation. Adverse events and donors were observed during the procedure and followed daily during 5 days after donation. Hemolysis in RBC was followed until of shelf life (<0.8% on 42 days storage). The evaluation of different parameters during storage show no difference if we compare with the manual technique. The concentration of hemoglobin is good and all ou concentrates are conform. No serious adverse effects were reported during and after donation. All donors confirmed they would agree to donate 2 RBC units again with this system. We have seen a good quality of RBC products. This evaluation indicates that 2 RBC donation is feasible on the ALYX system, comfortable and safe for eligible donors.

  20. Evolvability of individual traits in a multivariate context: partitioning the additive genetic variance into common and specific components.

    PubMed

    McGuigan, Katrina; Blows, Mark W

    2010-07-01

    Genetic covariation among multiple traits will bias the direction of evolution. Although a trait's phenotypic context is crucial for understanding evolutionary constraints, the evolutionary potential of one (focal) trait, rather than the whole phenotype, is often of interest. The extent to which a focal trait can evolve independently depends on how much of the genetic variance in that trait is unique. Here, we present a hypothesis-testing framework for estimating the genetic variance in a focal trait that is independent of variance in other traits. We illustrate our analytical approach using two Drosophila bunnanda trait sets: a contact pheromone system comprised of cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs), and wing shape, characterized by relative warps of vein position coordinates. Only 9% of the additive genetic variation in CHCs was trait specific, suggesting individual traits are unlikely to evolve independently. In contrast, most (72%) of the additive genetic variance in wing shape was trait specific, suggesting relative warp representations of wing shape could evolve independently. The identification of genetic variance in focal traits that is independent of other traits provides a way of studying the evolvability of individual traits within the broader context of the multivariate phenotype.

  1. Effects of additives on the phase transformation, occurrence state, and the interface of the Ti component in Ti-bearing blast furnace slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Wu; Zhang, Ju-hua; Li, Guang-qiang

    2016-09-01

    The influences of additives on the phase transformation, occurrence state, and the interface of the Ti component in Ti-bearing blast furnace slag were investigated. After oxidation, most of the Ti component in the slag was enriched into the perovskite phase, which served as the Ti-rich phase during the crystallization process. The phase transformation, occurrence state, and the interface of the Ti component were observed to be affected by the addition of different types of agents. During the oxidation process, titanaugite and Ti-rich diopside phases gradually transformed into non-Ti phases (anorthite: CaMgSi2O6 and CaAl2Si2O8) in the form of dendrites or columns, which were observed to be distributed at the surface of the perovskite phase. Several more cracks appeared along the grain boundaries of the perovskite phase after the addition of P2O5, facilitating the liberation of the perovskite phase. Composite additives combining both an acid and a base, such as CaO + CaF2 or P2O5 + CaF2, were used. We observed that the disadvantages of using single additives were successfully overcome.

  2. Pairwise additivity of energy components in protein-ligand binding: the HIV II protease-Indinavir case.

    PubMed

    Ucisik, Melek N; Dashti, Danial S; Faver, John C; Merz, Kenneth M

    2011-08-28

    An energy expansion (binding energy decomposition into n-body interaction terms for n ≥ 2) to express the receptor-ligand binding energy for the fragmented HIV II protease-Indinavir system is described to address the role of cooperativity in ligand binding. The outcome of this energy expansion is compared to the total receptor-ligand binding energy at the Hartree-Fock, density functional theory, and semiempirical levels of theory. We find that the sum of the pairwise interaction energies approximates the total binding energy to ∼82% for HF and to >95% for both the M06-L density functional and PM6-DH2 semiempirical method. The contribution of the three-body interactions amounts to 18.7%, 3.8%, and 1.4% for HF, M06-L, and PM6-DH2, respectively. We find that the expansion can be safely truncated after n=3. That is, the contribution of the interactions involving more than three parties to the total binding energy of Indinavir to the HIV II protease receptor is negligible. Overall, we find that the two-body terms represent a good approximation to the total binding energy of the system, which points to pairwise additivity in the present case. This basic principle of pairwise additivity is utilized in fragment-based drug design approaches and our results support its continued use. The present results can also aid in the validation of non-bonded terms contained within common force fields and in the correction of systematic errors in physics-based score functions. PMID:21895219

  3. Pairwise additivity of energy components in protein-ligand binding: The HIV II protease-Indinavir case

    PubMed Central

    Ucisik, Melek N.; Dashti, Danial S.; Faver, John C.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2011-01-01

    An energy expansion (binding energy decomposition into n-body interaction terms for n ≥ 2) to express the receptor-ligand binding energy for the fragmented HIV II protease-Indinavir system is described to address the role of cooperativity in ligand binding. The outcome of this energy expansion is compared to the total receptor-ligand binding energy at the Hartree-Fock, density functional theory, and semiempirical levels of theory. We find that the sum of the pairwise interaction energies approximates the total binding energy to ∼82% for HF and to >95% for both the M06-L density functional and PM6-DH2 semiempirical method. The contribution of the three-body interactions amounts to 18.7%, 3.8%, and 1.4% for HF, M06-L, and PM6-DH2, respectively. We find that the expansion can be safely truncated after n = 3. That is, the contribution of the interactions involving more than three parties to the total binding energy of Indinavir to the HIV II protease receptor is negligible. Overall, we find that the two-body terms represent a good approximation to the total binding energy of the system, which points to pairwise additivity in the present case. This basic principle of pairwise additivity is utilized in fragment-based drug design approaches and our results support its continued use. The present results can also aid in the validation of non-bonded terms contained within common force fields and in the correction of systematic errors in physics-based score functions. PMID:21895219

  4. The Very Bright and Nearby GRB130427A: the Extra Hard Spectral Component and Implications for Very High-Energy Gamma-Ray Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Pak-Hin Thomas

    2014-03-01

    The extended high-energy gamma-ray (>100 MeV) emission occurring after the prompt gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is usually characterized by a single power-law spectrum, which has been explained as the afterglow synchrotron radiation. We report on the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) observations of the >100 MeV emission from the very bright and nearby GRB 130427A, up to 100 GeV. By performing time-resolved spectral fits of GRB 130427A, we found a strong evidence of an extra hard spectral component above a few GeV that exists in the extended high-energy emission of this GRB. This extra spectral component may represent the first clear evidence of the long sought-after afterglow inverse Compton emission. Prospects for observations at the very high-energy gamma-rays, i.e., above 100 GeV, are described.

  5. Poultry egg components as cereal bait additives for enhancing rodenticide based control success and trap index of house rat, Rattus rattus

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Neena; Kanwar, Deepia

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the acceptance and efficacy of cereal bait containing different concentrations of poultry egg components in laboratory and poultry farms to control house rat, Rattus rattus (R. rattus). Methods Acceptance of cereal bait containing different concentrations (2%, 5% and 10%) of poultry egg components such as egg shell powder (ESP), egg albumin (EA) and crushed egg shell as bait additives were studied after exposing them to different groups of rats in bi-choice with bait without additive. Behaviour of rats towards cereal bait containing 2% concentration of different egg components was recorded in no-choice conditions through Food Scale Consumption Monitor. In poultry farm predominantly infested with R. rattus, acceptance and efficacy of 2% zinc phosphide bait containing 2% EA and ESP was evaluated. Trap success of single rat traps containing chapatti pieces smeared with 2% EA and 2% ESP was also evaluated in poultry farm. Results In bi-choice tests, significantly (P<0.05) higher preference was observed for baits containing 2% and 5% ESP and all the three concentrations of EA compared to plain bait by female rats and that of baits containing 5% and 10% EA by male rats. In no-choice test, non-significantly higher consumption, number of bouts made and time spent towards bait containing 2% EA was found by rats of both sexes. In poultry farm, acceptance and efficacy of 2% zinc phosphide bait containing 2% EA and ESP was significantly (P<0.05) more than 2% zinc phosphide bait without additive. No significant difference was, however, found in trap success of single rat traps containing chapatti pieces smeared with 2% concentration of EA and ESP placed in the poultry farm. Conclusions Present data support the use of 2% egg albumin and egg shell powder in cereal bait to enhance acceptance and efficacy of 2% zinc phosphide bait against R. rattus. This may further help in checking the spread of rodent borne diseases to animals and humans. PMID:25183108

  6. Multidimensional spectral load balancing

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.

    1993-01-01

    We describe an algorithm for the static load balancing of scientific computations that generalizes and improves upon spectral bisection. Through a novel use of multiple eigenvectors, our new spectral algorithm can divide a computation into 4 or 8 pieces at once. These multidimensional spectral partitioning algorithms generate balanced partitions that have lower communication overhead and are less expensive to compute than those produced by spectral bisection. In addition, they automatically work to minimize message contention on a hypercube or mesh architecture. These spectral partitions are further improved by a multidimensional generalization of the Kernighan-Lin graph partitioning algorithm. Results on several computational grids are given and compared with other popular methods.

  7. Additive Manufacturing of IN100 Superalloy Through Scanning Laser Epitaxy for Turbine Engine Hot-Section Component Repair: Process Development, Modeling, Microstructural Characterization, and Process Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Ranadip; Das, Suman

    2015-09-01

    This article describes additive manufacturing (AM) of IN100, a high gamma-prime nickel-based superalloy, through scanning laser epitaxy (SLE), aimed at the creation of thick deposits onto like-chemistry substrates for enabling repair of turbine engine hot-section components. SLE is a metal powder bed-based laser AM technology developed for nickel-base superalloys with equiaxed, directionally solidified, and single-crystal microstructural morphologies. Here, we combine process modeling, statistical design-of-experiments (DoE), and microstructural characterization to demonstrate fully metallurgically bonded, crack-free and dense deposits exceeding 1000 μm of SLE-processed IN100 powder onto IN100 cast substrates produced in a single pass. A combined thermal-fluid flow-solidification model of the SLE process compliments DoE-based process development. A customized quantitative metallography technique analyzes digital cross-sectional micrographs and extracts various microstructural parameters, enabling process model validation and process parameter optimization. Microindentation measurements show an increase in the hardness by 10 pct in the deposit region compared to the cast substrate due to microstructural refinement. The results illustrate one of the very few successes reported for the crack-free deposition of IN100, a notoriously "non-weldable" hot-section alloy, thus establishing the potential of SLE as an AM method suitable for hot-section component repair and for future new-make components in high gamma-prime containing crack-prone nickel-based superalloys.

  8. Microstructural architecture developed in the fabrication of solid and open-cellular copper components by additive manufacturing using electron beam melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Diana Alejandra

    The fabrication of Cu components were first built by additive manufacturing using electron beam melting (EBM) from low-purity, atomized Cu powder containing a high density of Cu2O precipitates leading to a novel example of precipitate-dislocation architecture. These microstructures exhibit cell-like arrays (1-3microm) in the horizontal reference plane perpendicular to the build direction with columnar-like arrays extending from ~12 to >60 microm in length and corresponding spatial dimensions of 1-3 microm. These observations were observed by the use of optical metallography, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The hardness measurements were taken both on the atomized powder and the Cu components. The hardness for these architectures ranged from ~HV 83 to 88, in contrast to the original Cu powder microindentation hardness of HV 72 and the commercial Cu base plate hardness of HV 57. These observations were utilized for the fabrication of open-cellular copper structures by additive manufacturing using EBM and illustrated the ability to fabricate some form of controlled microstructural architecture by EBM parameter alteration or optimizing. The fabrication of these structures ranged in densities from 0.73g/cm3 to 6.67g/cm3. These structures correspond to four different articulated mesh arrays. While these components contained some porosity as a consequence of some unmelted regions, the Cu2O precipitates also contributed to a reduced density. Using X-ray Diffraction showed the approximate volume fraction estimated to be ~2%. The addition of precipitates created in the EBM melt scan formed microstructural arrays which contributed to hardening contributing to the strength of mesh struts and foam ligaments. The measurements of relative stiffness versus relative density plots for Cu compared very closely with Ti-6Al-4V open cellular structures - both mesh and foams. The Cu reticulated mesh structures exhibit a slope of n = 2 in contrast to a slope of n = 2

  9. Discovery of Soft Spectral Component and Transient 22.7s Quasi Periodic Oscillations of SAX J2103.5+4545

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inam, S. C.; Baykal, A.; Swank, J.; Stark, M. J.

    2003-01-01

    XMM-Newton observed SAX J2103.5+4545 on January 6, 2003, while RXTE was monitoring the source. Using RXTE-PCA dataset between December 3, 2002 and January 29, 2003, the spin period and average spin-up rate during the XMM-Newton observations were found to be 354.7940+/-0.0008 s and (7.4 +/- 0.9) x 10(exp -13) Hz/s respectively. In the power spectrum of the 0.9-11 keV EPIC-PN lightcurve, we found quasi periodic oscillations around 0.044 Hz (22.7 s) with an rms fractional amplitude approx. 6.6 %. We interpreted this QPO feature as the Keplerian motion of inhomogeneities through the inner disk. In the X-ray spectrum, in addition to the power law component with high energy cutoff and approx. 6.4 keV fluorescent iron emission line, we discovered a soft component consistent with a blackbody emission with kT approx. 1.9 keV. The pulse phase spectroscopy of the source revealed that the blackbody flux peaked at the peak of the pulse with an emission radius approx. 0.3 km, suggesting the polar cap on the neutron star approx. 6.42 keV was shown to peak at the off-pulse phase, supporting the idea that this feature arises from fluorescent emission of the circumstellar material around the neutron star rather than the hot region in the vicinity of the neutron star polar cap.

  10. Discovery of a Soft Spectral Component and Transient 22.7 Second Quasi-periodic Oscillations of SAX J2103.5+4545

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    İnam, S. Ç.; Baykal, A.; Swank, J.; Stark, M. J.

    2004-11-01

    XMM-Newton observed SAX J2103.5+4545 on 2003 January 6, while the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) was also monitoring the source. Using the RXTE Proportional Counter Array data set between 2002 December 3 and 2003 January 29, the spin period and average spin-up rate during the XMM-Newton observations were found to be 354.7940+/-0.0008 s and (7.4+/-0.9)×10-13 Hz s-1, respectively. In the power spectrum of the 0.9-11 keV EPIC PN light curve, we found quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) around 0.044 Hz (22.7 s) with an rms fractional amplitude of ~6.6%. We interpreted this QPO feature as the Keplerian motion of inhomogeneities through the inner disk. In the X-ray spectrum, in addition to the power-law component with high-energy cutoff and the ~6.4 keV fluorescent iron emission line, we discovered a soft component consistent with blackbody emission with kT~1.9 keV. The pulse phase spectroscopy of the source revealed that the blackbody flux peaked at the peak of the pulse with an emission radius of ~0.3 km, suggesting the polar cap on the neutron star surface as the source of the blackbody emission. The flux of the iron emission line at ~6.42 keV was shown to peak at the off-pulse phase, supporting the idea that this feature arises from fluorescent emission of the circumstellar material around the neutron star rather than the hot region in the vicinity of the neutron star polar cap.

  11. Effect of Partition of Photo-Initiator Components and Addition of Iodonium Salt on the Photopolymerization of Phase-Separated Dental Adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedin, Farhana; Ye, Qiang; Song, Linyong; Ge, Xueping; Camarda, Kyle; Spencer, Paulette

    2016-04-01

    The polymerization kinetics of physically separated hydrophobic- and hydrophilic-rich phases of a model dental adhesive have been investigated. The two phases were prepared from neat resin containing 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and bisphenol A glycerolate dimethacrylate (BisGMA) in the ratio of 45:55 (wt./wt.). Neat resins containing various combinations of popular photo-initiating compounds, e.g., camphoquinone (CQ), ethyl 4-(dimethylamino)benzoate (EDMAB), 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), and diphenyliodonium hexafluorophosphate (DPIHP), were prepared. To obtain the two phases, 33 wt.% of deuterium oxide (D2O) was added to the neat resins. This amount of D2O exceeded the miscibility limit for the resins. The concentration of each component of the photo-initiating system in the two phases was quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). When combined with CQ, DMAEMA is less efficient as a co-initiator compared to EDMAB. The addition of DPIHP as the third component into either CQ/EDMAB or CQ/DMAEMA photo-initiating systems led to comparable performance in both the hydrophobic- and hydrophilic-rich phases. The addition of the iodonium salt significantly improved the photopolymerization of the hydrophilic-rich phase; the latter exhibited extremely poor polymerization when the iodonium salt was not included in the formulation. The partition concentration of EDMAB in the hydrophilic-rich phase was significantly lower than that of DMAEMA or DPIHP. This study indicates the need for a combination of hydrophobic/hydrophilic photosensitizer and addition of iodonium salt to improve polymerization within the hydrophilic-rich phase of the dental adhesive.

  12. Principal Component Analysis of Long-Lag,Wide-Pulse Gamma-Ray Burst Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhao-Yang; Liu, Wen-Shuai

    2014-09-01

    We have carried out a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the temporal and spectral variables of 24 long-lag, wide-pulse gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) presented by Norris et al. (2005). Taking all eight temporal and spectral parameters into account, our analysis shows that four principal components are enough to describe the variation of the temporal and spectral data of long-lag bursts. In addition, the first-two principal components are dominated by the temporal variables while the third and fourth principal components are dominated by the spectral parameters.

  13. Effectiveness of an additional individualized multi-component complementary medicine treatment on health-related quality of life in breast cancer patients: a pragmatic randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Witt, Claudia M; Außerer, Oskar; Baier, Susanne; Heidegger, Herbert; Icke, Katja; Mayr, Oswald; Mitterer, Manfred; Roll, Stephanie; Spizzo, Gilbert; Scherer, Arthur; Thuile, Christian; Wieser, Anton; Schützler, Lena

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an additional, individualized, multi-component complementary medicine treatment offered to breast cancer patients at the Merano Hospital (South Tyrol) on health-related quality of life compared to patients receiving usual care only. A randomized pragmatic trial with two parallel arms was performed. Women with confirmed diagnoses of breast cancer were randomized (stratified by usual care treatment) to receive individualized complementary medicine (CM group) or usual care alone (usual care group). Both groups were allowed to use conventional treatment for breast cancer. Primary endpoint was the breast cancer-related quality of life FACT-B score at 6 months. For statistical analysis, we used analysis of covariance (with factors treatment, stratum, and baseline FACT-B score) and imputed missing FACT-B scores at 6 months with regression-based multiple imputation. A total of 275 patients were randomized between April 2011 and March 2012 to the CM group (n = 136, 56.3 ± 10.9 years of age) or the usual care group (n = 139, 56.0 ± 11.0). After 6 months from randomization, adjusted means for health-related quality of life were higher in the CM group (FACT-B score 107.9; 95 % CI 104.1-111.7) compared to the usual care group (102.2; 98.5-105.9) with an adjusted FACT-B score difference between groups of 5.7 (2.6-8.7, p < 0.001). Thus, an additional individualized and complex complementary medicine intervention improved quality of life of breast cancer patients compared to usual care alone. Further studies evaluating specific effects of treatment components should follow to optimize the treatment of breast cancer patients.

  14. Novel Cosic resonance (standing wave) solutions for components of the JAK-STAT cellular signaling pathway: A convergence of spectral density profiles.

    PubMed

    Karbowski, Lukasz M; Murugan, Nirosha J; Persinger, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Cosic discovered that spectral analyses of a protein sequence after each constituent amino acid had been transformed into an appropriate pseudopotential predicted a resonant energy between interacting molecules. Several experimental studies have verified the predicted peak wavelength of photons within the visible or near-visible light band for specific molecules. Here, this concept has been applied to a classic signaling pathway, JAK-STAT, traditionally composed of nine sequential protein interactions. The weighted linear average of the spectral power density (SPD) profiles of each of the eight "precursor" proteins displayed remarkable congruence with the SPD profile of the terminal molecule (CASP-9) in the pathway. These results suggest that classic and complex signaling pathways in cells can also be expressed as combinations of resonance energies.

  15. Spectral library searching in proteomics.

    PubMed

    Griss, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    Spectral library searching has become a mature method to identify tandem mass spectra in proteomics data analysis. This review provides a comprehensive overview of available spectral library search engines and highlights their distinct features. Additionally, resources providing spectral libraries are summarized and tools presented that extend experimental spectral libraries by simulating spectra. Finally, spectrum clustering algorithms are discussed that utilize the same spectrum-to-spectrum matching algorithms as spectral library search engines and allow novel methods to analyse proteomics data.

  16. Spectral components of human cardiovascular responses to step changes in Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP) before and after 22 hour of 6 deg head down bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knapp, C. F.; Evans, J. M.; Grande, K. J.; Murphy, C. D.; Patwardhan, A. R.

    1992-01-01

    Changes in autonomic outflow to peripheral organs during the development of bedrest induced orthostatic intolerance have not been determined. Recent studies have indicated that spectral analysis provides an indirect assessment of these changes. Eight male subjects were studied before and after 22 hours of 6 degree head down bedrest plus Lasix (40 mg. P.P.). Cardiovascular spectra (using an autoregressive technique) were determined for heart rate (HR, ECG), arterial pressure (AP, Finapres), radial artery flow (RF, Hokansen) and respiration rate (RR, BoMed). Spectra were obtained from 2.5 minute segments during control, lower body negative pressure (minus 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 mmHg) and recovery. Bedrest increased HR spectra power in the low frequency (.001 to .041 Hz) range, increased RF power in the low and mid (.04 to .18 Hz) range and increased AP power in the high (.18 to .50 Hz) frequency range. Increasing levels of lower body negative pressure decreased HR power and increased RF power in the high frequency range and decreased AP power in the low frequency range. Since spectral power of HR in the high frequency range has been shown to indicate parasympathetically mediated regulation and power in the low and mid frequency ranges indicates a sympathetic / parasympathetic mixture, then both bedrest and lower body negative pressure appeared to shift sympathetic / parasympathetic balance toward sympathetic regulation of HR. The interpretation of the spectral content of AP and RF with respect to their autonomic origins remains unclear.

  17. Increase in activity of essential oil components carvacrol and thymol against Escherichia coli O157:H7 by addition of food stabilizers.

    PubMed

    Burt, Sara A; Vlielander, René; Haagsman, Henk P; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A

    2005-05-01

    The major components of oregano and thyme essential oils that had previously been shown to inhibit Escherichia coli O157:H7 were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection and liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometry. The MICs and MBCs of carvacrol, thymol, p-cymene, and gamma-terpinene against a strain of E. coli O157: H7 phage type 34 isolated from bovine feces were determined by microdilution assay. The constituents were then tested in checkerboard assays to detect possible interactions. Carvacrol and thymol displayed bacteriostatic and bactericidal properties with MICs of 1.2 mmol/liter and were additive in combination. p-Cymene and gamma-terpinene displayed no measurable antibacterial activity up to 50 mmol/liter, and neither influenced the activity of carvacrol or thymol. Growth curves in the presence of nonlethal concentrations of carvacrol with the addition of agar (0.05%, wt/vol) or carrageenan (0.125%, wt/vol) as stabilizer were produced by optical density measurement. The stabilizers agar and carrageenan both significantly improved the effectiveness of carvacrol in broth, possibly because of a delay in the separation of the hydrophobic substrate from the aqueous phase of the medium. When carvacrol was dissolved in ethanol before addition to broth, stabilizers were not needed. Carvacrol and thymol, particularly when used in combination with a stabilizer or in an ethanol solution, may be effective in reducing the number or preventing growth of E. coli O157:H7 in liquid foods. PMID:15895722

  18. A novel ion-pairing chromatographic method for the simultaneous determination of both nicarbazin components in feed additives: chemometric tools for improving the optimization and validation.

    PubMed

    De Zan, María M; Teglia, Carla M; Robles, Juan C; Goicoechea, Héctor C

    2011-07-15

    The development, optimization and validation of an ion-pairing high performance liquid chromatography method for the simultaneous determination of both nicarbazin (NIC) components: 4,4'-dinitrocarbanilide (DNC) and 2-hydroxy-4,6-dimethylpyrimidine (HDP) in bulk materials and feed additives are described. An experimental design was used for the optimization of the chromatographic system. Four variables, including mobile phase composition and oven temperature, were analyzed through a central composite design exploring their contribution to analyte separation. Five responses: peak resolutions, HDP capacity factor, HDP tailing and analysis time, were modelled by using the response surface methodology and were optimized simultaneously by implementing the desirability function. The optimum conditions resulted in a mobile phase consisting of 10.0 mmol L(-1) of 1-heptanesulfonate, 20.0 mmol L(-1) of sodium acetate, pH=3.30 buffer and acetonitrile in a gradient system at a flow rate of 1.00 mL min(-1). Column was an INERSTIL ODS-3 (4.6 mm×150 mm, 5 μm particle size) at 40.0°C. Detection was performed at 300 nm by a diode array detector. The validation results of the method indicated a high selectivity and good precision characteristics, with RSD less than 1.0% for both components, both in intra and inter-assay precision studies. Linearity was proved for a range of 32.0-50.0 μg mL(-1) of NIC in sample solution. The recovery, studied at three different fortification levels, varied from 98.0 to 101.4 for HDP and from 99.1 to 100.2 for DNC. The applicability of the method was demonstrated by determining DNC and HDP content in raw materials and commercial formulations used for coccidiosis prevention. Assays results on real samples showed that considerable differences in molecular ratio DNC:HDP exist among them.

  19. Easy oxidative addition of the carbon-halogen bond by dimethylplatinum(II) complexes containing a related series of diimine ligands: Synthesis, spectral characterization and crystal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeni, Badri Z.; Fathi, Nastaran; Mohagheghi, Arezoo

    2015-01-01

    Dimethylplatinum(II) complexes [PtMe2(NN)] {NN = 4,4‧-Me2bpy (4,4‧-dimethyl-2,2‧-bipyridine); 5,5‧-Me2bpy (5,5‧-dimethyl-2,2‧-bipyridine)} were reacted with alkyl halides (RX = EtI, EtBr) to yield the organoplatinum(IV) complexes [PtMe2RX(NN)]. On the basis of NMR data, the platinum(IV) product of each reaction contains almost exclusively the trans isomer but small traces of the cis isomers are also observed. On the other hand, the reaction of [PtMe2(NN)] {NN = bu2bpy (4,4‧-di-tert-butyl-2,2‧-bipyridine); 4,4‧-Me2bpy; 5,5‧-Me2bpy} with CH2Br2 gave a mixture of cis and trans-[PtMe2(CH2Br)Br(NN)] formed by the oxidative addition of one of the C-Br bonds. The formation of the cis isomer increases in the order of 5,5‧-Me2bpy > bu2bpy > 4,4‧-Me2bpy. The reaction of [PtMe2(NN)] {NN = bpy (2,2‧-bipyridine), phen (1,10-phenanthroline)} with 1,8-dibromooctane or 1,9-dibromononane afforded the mononuclear complexes [PtMe2{(CH2)nBr}Br(NN)] (n = 8-9). The products were fully characterized by elemental analysis, 1H, 13C, HH COSY, HMQC, DEPT and DEPTQ-135 NMR spectroscopy. The crystal structure of [PtMe2EtI(4,4‧-Me2bpy)] reveals that Pt(IV) atom is six-coordinated in a slightly distorted octahedral geometry with the ethyl group trans to iodide.

  20. X-rays sensing properties of MEH-PPV, Alq₃ and additive components: a new organic dosimeter as a candidate for minimizing the risk of accidents of patients undergoing radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Schimitberger, T; Ferreira, G R; Akcelrud, L C; Saraiva, M F; Bianchi, R F

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we report our experimental design in searching a smart and easy-to-read dosimeter used to detect 6 MV X-rays for improving patient safety in radiation oncology. The device was based on an organic emissive solutions of poly(2-methoxy-5(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylenevinylene) (MEH-PPV), aluminum-tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline) (Alq₃) and additive components which were characterized by UV-Vis absorption, photoluminescence and CIE color coordinate diagram. The optical properties of MEH-PPV/Alq₃ solutions have been examined as function of radiation dose over the range of 0-100 Gy. It has shown that MEH-PPV/Alq₃ solutions are specifically sensitive to X-rays, since the effect of radiation on this organic system is strongly correlated with the efficient spectral overlap between Alq₃ emission and the absorption of degraded MEH-PPV, which alters the color and photoemission of MEH-PPV/Alq₃ mixtures from red to yellow, and then to green. The rate of this change is more sensitive when MEH-PPV/Alq₃ is irradiated in the presence of benzoyl peroxide than when in the presence of hindered phenolic stabilizers, respectively, an accelerator and an inhibitor to activate or inhibit free radical formation. This gives rise to optimize the response curve of the dosimeter. It is clear from the experimental results that organic emissive semiconductors have potential to be used as dedicated and low-cost dosimeters to provide an independent check of beam output of a linear accelerator and therefore to give patients the opportunity to have information on the dose prescription or equipment-related problems a few minutes before being exposed to radiation.

  1. Numerical analysis of the harmonic components of the Bragg wavelength content in spectral responses of apodized fiber Bragg gratings written by means of a phase mask with a variable phase step height.

    PubMed

    Osuch, Tomasz

    2016-02-01

    The influence of the complex interference patterns created by a phase mask with variable diffraction efficiency in apodized fiber Bragg grating (FBGs) formation on their reflectance spectra is studied. The effect of the significant contributions of the zeroth and higher (m>±1) diffraction orders on the Bragg wavelength peak and its harmonic components is analyzed numerically. The results obtained for Gaussian and tanh apodization profiles are compared with similar data calculated for a uniform grating. It is demonstrated that when an apodized FBG is written using a phase mask with variable diffraction efficiency, significant enhancement of the harmonic components and a reduction of the Bragg wavelength peak in the grating spectral response are observed. This is particularly noticeable for the Gaussian apodization profile due to the substantial contributions of phase mask sections with relatively small phase steps in the FBG formation. PMID:26831768

  2. Spectral and Spread Spectral Teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S

    2010-01-01

    We report how quantum information encoded into the spectral degree of freedom of a single-photon state is teleported using a finite spectrally entangled biphoton state. We further demonstrate how the bandwidth of a teleported waveform can be controllably and coherently dilated using a spread spectral variant of teleportation. We present analytical fidelities for spectral and spread spectral teleportation when complex-valued Gaussian states are prepared using a proposed experimental approach, and we discuss the utility of these techniques for integrating broad-bandwidth photonic qubits with narrow-bandwidth receivers in quantum communication systems.

  3. [Review of digital ground object spectral library].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao-Hu; Zhou, Ding-Wu

    2009-06-01

    A higher spectral resolution is the main direction of developing remote sensing technology, and it is quite important to set up the digital ground object reflectance spectral database library, one of fundamental research fields in remote sensing application. Remote sensing application has been increasingly relying on ground object spectral characteristics, and quantitative analysis has been developed to a new stage. The present article summarized and systematically introduced the research status quo and development trend of digital ground object reflectance spectral libraries at home and in the world in recent years. Introducing the spectral libraries has been established, including desertification spectral database library, plants spectral database library, geological spectral database library, soil spectral database library, minerals spectral database library, cloud spectral database library, snow spectral database library, the atmosphere spectral database library, rocks spectral database library, water spectral database library, meteorites spectral database library, moon rock spectral database library, and man-made materials spectral database library, mixture spectral database library, volatile compounds spectral database library, and liquids spectral database library. In the process of establishing spectral database libraries, there have been some problems, such as the lack of uniform national spectral database standard and uniform standards for the ground object features as well as the comparability between different databases. In addition, data sharing mechanism can not be carried out, etc. This article also put forward some suggestions on those problems.

  4. [Review of digital ground object spectral library].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao-Hu; Zhou, Ding-Wu

    2009-06-01

    A higher spectral resolution is the main direction of developing remote sensing technology, and it is quite important to set up the digital ground object reflectance spectral database library, one of fundamental research fields in remote sensing application. Remote sensing application has been increasingly relying on ground object spectral characteristics, and quantitative analysis has been developed to a new stage. The present article summarized and systematically introduced the research status quo and development trend of digital ground object reflectance spectral libraries at home and in the world in recent years. Introducing the spectral libraries has been established, including desertification spectral database library, plants spectral database library, geological spectral database library, soil spectral database library, minerals spectral database library, cloud spectral database library, snow spectral database library, the atmosphere spectral database library, rocks spectral database library, water spectral database library, meteorites spectral database library, moon rock spectral database library, and man-made materials spectral database library, mixture spectral database library, volatile compounds spectral database library, and liquids spectral database library. In the process of establishing spectral database libraries, there have been some problems, such as the lack of uniform national spectral database standard and uniform standards for the ground object features as well as the comparability between different databases. In addition, data sharing mechanism can not be carried out, etc. This article also put forward some suggestions on those problems. PMID:19810544

  5. [Fast spectral modeling based on Voigt peaks].

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-rong; Dai, Lian-kui

    2012-03-01

    Indirect hard modeling (IHM) is a recently introduced method for quantitative spectral analysis, which was applied to the analysis of nonlinear relation between mixture spectrum and component concentration. In addition, IHM is an effectual technology for the analysis of components of mixture with molecular interactions and strongly overlapping bands. Before the establishment of regression model, IHM needs to model the measured spectrum as a sum of Voigt peaks. The precision of the spectral model has immediate impact on the accuracy of the regression model. A spectrum often includes dozens or even hundreds of Voigt peaks, which mean that spectral modeling is a optimization problem with high dimensionality in fact. So, large operation overhead is needed and the solution would not be numerically unique due to the ill-condition of the optimization problem. An improved spectral modeling method is presented in the present paper, which reduces the dimensionality of optimization problem by determining the overlapped peaks in spectrum. Experimental results show that the spectral modeling based on the new method is more accurate and needs much shorter running time than conventional method. PMID:22582612

  6. Characterizing Mafic and Clay Components in Libya Montes, Mars, using Automated Gaussian Modeling of Spectral Features found in MRO/CRISM Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarewicz, H. D.; Parente, M.; Bishop, J. L.

    2008-12-01

    Aqueous processes have been inferred at the Libya Montes rim/terrace complex of the southern Isidis Basin due to the dense concentration of valley networks [1]. Coordinated CRISM-HiRISE investigations of this region characterized discrete units of ancient phyllosilicate deposits covered by an olivine-rich material and a pyroxene caprock [2]. CRISM mapping data show minor phyllosilicate abundances widespread throughout the Southern Highlands [3], which are dominated by low-Ca pyroxene bearing material [4,5]. The layered capping materials have been suggested to be remnant eroded lavas that infiltrated the Libya Montes and Isidis Basin from Syrtis Major [6]. Our current study involves detailed characterization of the minerals present at Libya Montes through implementation of newly created data analysis tools. We have developed an automated procedure for modeling spectral features using Gaussians. This study builds on the modified Gaussian model (MGM) technique [7] that has been successfully applied to hyperspectral analyses of Mars [8]. However, these models require user-selected initial parameters. Initial efforts in automating this modeling process for CRISM hyperspectral images has been successful, but is limited to the study of pyroxene bands at 2 μm. We have extended this technique to model spectral features using Gaussians from 0.5-2.6 μm. We have developed an automatic parameter initialization step based on the features of the spectrum being modeled in order to further automate MGM modeling. Initial results have successfully yielded automatically generated starting parameters for the MGM with low residuals following optimization. This new algorithm is currently being applied towards analyses of hyperspectral images in Libya Montes. Specifically, olivine, pyroxene, and phyllosilicate deposits are being modeled and classified by composition in 13 CRISM images using the automatic parameter initialization with the MGM. We are investigating and mapping mineral

  7. Spectral fits with TCAF model : A global understanding of both temporal and spectral properties of black hole sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Dipak; Sarathi Pal, Partha; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Mondal, Santanu; Jana, Arghajit; Chatterjee, Debjit; Molla, Aslam Ali

    2016-07-01

    There are many theoretical and phenomenological models in the literature which explain physics of accretion around black holes (BHs). Some of these models assume ad hoc components to explain different timing and spectral aspects of black hole candidates (BHCs) which no necessarily follow from physical equations. Chakrabarti and his collaborators, on the other hand claim in the last two decades that the spectral and timing properties of BHCs must not be treated separately since variation of these properties happens due to variation of two component (Keplerian and sub-Keplerian) accretion flow rates, and the Compton cloud parameters only. Recently after the inclusion of Two-component advective flow (TCAF) model in to HEASARC's spectral analysis software package XSPEC as an additive local model, we found that TCAF is quite capable to describe the underlying accretion flow dynamics around BHs with spectral fitted physical parameters. Properties of different spectral states and their transitions during an outburst of a transient BHC are more clear. A strong correlation between spectral and timing properties could also be seen in Accretion Rate Ratio Intensity Diagram (ARRID), where transitions between different spectral states are prominent. One can also predict frequency of the dominating quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) from TCAF model fitted shock parameters and even predict the most probable mass range of an unknown BHC from TCAF fits. This gives us a confidence that the description of accretion process is more clear than ever before.

  8. Characterizing Mafic, Clay, and Carbonate Components found in MRO/CRISM Images in Libya Montes, Mars, using Advances in Automated Gaussian Modeling of Spectral Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarewicz, H. D.; Parente, M.; Perry, K. A.; McKeown, N. K.; Bishop, J. L.

    2009-12-01

    Aqueous processes have been inferred at the Libya Montes rim/terrace complex of the southern Isidis Basin due to the dense concentration of valley networks [1]. Coordinated CRISM-HiRISE investigations of this region characterized discrete units of ancient phyllosilicate deposits covered by an olivine-rich material and a pyroxene caprock [2]. CRISM mapping data show minor phyllosilicate abundances widespread throughout the Southern Highlands [3], which are dominated by low-Ca pyroxene bearing material [4,5]. The carbonate magnesite has also been located throughout this area [6] and at Libya Montes [7]. Our current study involves detailed characterization of the minerals present at Libya Montes through implementation of improved automated Gaussian modeling methods. We have developed an automated procedure for modeling spectral features using Gaussians that has been successfully applied to laboratory studies and hyperspectral analyses of Mars [8,9,10,11]. Several studies are being conducted to improve and validate these models. These include a comparison of initialization methods, continuum methods, optimization algorithms, and modeled functions. The modeled functions compared include Gaussians, saturated Gaussians, and Lorentzians. This algorithm and the modeling studies are currently being applied towards analyses of CRISM hyperspectral images of Libya Montes and laboratory spectra of mineral mixtures. Specifically, olivine, pyroxene, phyllosilicate, and carbonate deposits are being modeled and classified by composition in CRISM images. References [1]Crumpler, L. S., and K. L. Tanaka (2003) J. Geophys. Res., 108, DOI: 8010.1029/2002JE002040. [2]Bishop, J. L., et al. (2007) 7th Int'l Mars Conf. [3]Mustard, J. F., et al. (2008) Nature, 454, 07305. [4]Bibring, J.-P., et al. (2005) Science, 307,1576. [5]Mustard, J. F., et al.(2005) Science, 307, 1594. [6]Ehlmann, B. L., et al. (2008) Science, 322, 1828. [7]Perry, K., et al. (2009) AGU Fall Mtng. [8]Makarewicz, H. D., et

  9. Quantitative Raman spectral changes of the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into islet-like cells by biochemical component analysis and multiple peak fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xin; Fang, Shaoyin; Zhang, Daosen; Zhang, Qinnan; He, Yingtian; Lu, Xiaoxu; Liu, Shengde; Zhong, Liyun

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiate into islet-like cells, providing a possible solution for type I diabetes treatment. To search for the precise molecular mechanism of the directional differentiation of MSC-derived islet-like cells, biomolecular composition, and structural conformation information during MSC differentiation, is required. Because islet-like cells lack specific surface markers, the commonly employed immunostaining technique is not suitable for their identification, physical separation, and enrichment. Combining Raman spectroscopic data, a fitting accuracy-improved biochemical component analysis, and multiple peaks fitting approach, we identified the quantitative biochemical and intensity change of Raman peaks that show the differentiation of MSCs into islet-like cells. Along with increases in protein and glycogen content, and decreases in deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid content, in islet-like cells relative to MSCs, it was found that a characteristic peak of insulin (665 cm-1) has twice the intensity in islet-like cells relative to MSCs, indicating differentiation of MSCs into islet-like cells was successful. Importantly, these Raman signatures provide useful information on the structural and pathological states during MSC differentiation and help to develop noninvasive and label-free Raman sorting methods for stem cells and their lineages.

  10. Determination of organic additives in mortars by near-IR spectroscopy. A novel approach to designing a sample set with high-variability components.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Marcelo; Peguero, Anna

    2007-02-01

    Industrial mortars consist primarily of a mixture of cement and an aggregate plus a small amount of additives that are used to modify specific properties. Using too high or too low additive rates usually results in the loss of desirable properties in the end product. This entails carefully controlling the amounts of additives added to mortar in order to ensure correct dosing and/or adequate homogeneity in the final mixture. Near-IR (NIR) spectroscopy has proved effective for this purpose as it requires no sample pretreatment and affords expeditious analyses. The purpose of this work was to determine two organic additives (viz. Ad1 and Ad2) in mortars by using partial least squares regression multivariate calibration models constructed from NIR spectroscopic data. The additives are used to expedite setting and increase cohesion between particles in the mortar. In order to ensure that the sample set contained natural variability in the samples, we used a methodology based on experimental design to construct a representative set of samples. This novel design is based on a hexagonal antiprism that encompasses the concentration ranges spanned by the analytes and the variability inherent in each additive. The D-optimality criterion was used to obtain various combinations between Ad1 and Ad2 additive classes. The partial least squares calibration models thus constructed for each additive provided accurate predictions: the intercept and the slope of the plots of predicted values versus reference values for each additive were close to 0 and 1, respectively, and their confidence ranges included the respective value. The ensuing analytical methods were validated by using an external sample set.

  11. Effects of milk components and food additives on survival of three bifidobacteria strains in fermented milk under simulated gastrointestinal tract conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ziarno, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Background In the dairy industry, probiotic strains of Bifidobacterium are introduced into the composition of traditional starter cultures intended for the production of fermented foods, or sometimes are the sole microflora responsible for the fermentation process. In order to be able to reach the intestines alive and fulfil their beneficial role, probiotic strains must be able to withstand the acidity of the gastric juices and bile present in the duodenum. Objective The paper reports effects of selected fermented milk components on the viability of three strains of bifidobacteria in fermented milk during subsequent incubation under conditions representing model digestive juices. Design The viability of the bifidobacterial cells was examined after a 3-h incubation of fermented milk under simulated gastric juice conditions and then after 5-h incubation under simulated duodenum juice conditions. The Bifidobacterium strains tested differed in their sensitivity to the simulated conditions of the gastrointestinal juices. Results Bifidobacterial cell viability in simulated intestinal juices was dependent on the strain used in our experiments, and product components acted protectively towards bifidobacterial cells and its dose. Conclusions Bifidobacterial cells introduced into the human gastrointestinal tract as food ingredients have a good chance of survival during intestinal transit and to reach the large intestine thanks to the protective properties of the food components and depending on the strain and composition of the food. PMID:26546945

  12. Spectral Trends of Titan's Tropical Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Caitlin Ann; Penteado, Paulo F.; Turner, Jake; Montiel, Nicholas; Schoenfeld, Ashley; Lopes, Rosaly M. C.; Soderblom, Laurence A.; Neish, Catherine; Radebaugh, Jani

    2016-10-01

    Titan's surface can be observed most clearly at 8 spectral regions that lie in between the strong methane bands in Titan's spectrum. Within these "windows", between 0.9 to 5 microns, the surface is nonetheless obscured by methane and haze, the latter of which is optically thick at lower wavelengths. Thus studies of Titan's surface must eliminate the effects of atmospheric extinction and extract the subtle spectral features that underlie the dominant spectral trends.To determine the subtle spectral features of Titan's tropical surface (30S--30N) we conducted a Principal Components Analysis (PCA) of the I/F at the 1.1, 1.3, 1.6 and 2.0 um wavelength windows, recorded by Cassini/VIMS. The PCA analysis identifies the spectral trend that defines the highest variance in the data (the principal component), as well as successively weaker orthogonal trends, without a priori assumptions about the surface composition, e.g. as needed in radiative transfer analyses.Our analysis derives the spectral features at the four wavelengths that describe Titan's tropical surface. We detect a large almost contiguous region that extends roughly 160 degrees in longitude and which exhibits absorption features at 1.6 and 2.0, as well as 2.8 um (characteristic of water ice). This vast and perhaps tectonic feature is, in part, associated with terrain that is hypothesized to be some of the oldest surfaces on Titan. In addition, the PCA analysis indicates at least 2 separate organic spectra signatures, potentially due to the separation of liquid and refractory sediments or to their chemically alteration over time. Here we discuss the PCA analysis and compare our derived compositional maps of Titan's surface with Radar maps of the topography and morphology, to entertain questions regarding the geology of Titan's surface the age of its atmosphere.

  13. Spectral imaging microscopy web sites and data.

    PubMed

    McNamara, George; Gupta, Amit; Reynaert, James; Coates, Thomas D; Boswell, Carl

    2006-08-01

    The Internet is enabling greater access to spectral imaging publications, spectral graphs, and data than that was available a generation ago. The spectral imaging systems discussed in this issue of Cytometry work because reagent and hardware spectra are reproducible, reusable, and provide input to spectral unmixing and spectral components recognition algorithms. These spectra need to be readily available in order to determine what to purchase, how to use it, and what the output means. We refer to several commercially sponsored and academic spectral web sites and discuss our spectral graphing and data sites. Sites include fluorescent dye graph servers from Invitrogen/Molecular Probes, BD Biosciences, Zeiss/Bio-Rad Cell Sciences, and filter set servers from Chroma Technology and Omega Optical. Several of these sites include data download capabilities. Recently, two microscope manufacturers have published on their web sites transmission curves for select objective lenses-crucial data for anyone doing multiphoton excitation microscopy. Notable among the academic sites, PhotoChemCAD 2.0 has over 200 dyes and a downloadable database/graphing program, and the USC-A Chemistry UV-vis Database displays absorption spectra of many dyes and indicators used in clinical histology and pathology. Our Fluorescent Spectra graphing/calculator site presents dyes, filters, and illumination data from many of these and additional sources. PubSpectra is our free download site which uses Microsoft Excel files as standardized human/machine readable format with over 2,000 biomedical spectra. The principle that data is not subject to copyright provides a framework in which all scientific data should be made freely accessible. PMID:16969821

  14. Spectral imaging microscopy web sites and data.

    PubMed

    McNamara, George; Gupta, Amit; Reynaert, James; Coates, Thomas D; Boswell, Carl

    2006-08-01

    The Internet is enabling greater access to spectral imaging publications, spectral graphs, and data than that was available a generation ago. The spectral imaging systems discussed in this issue of Cytometry work because reagent and hardware spectra are reproducible, reusable, and provide input to spectral unmixing and spectral components recognition algorithms. These spectra need to be readily available in order to determine what to purchase, how to use it, and what the output means. We refer to several commercially sponsored and academic spectral web sites and discuss our spectral graphing and data sites. Sites include fluorescent dye graph servers from Invitrogen/Molecular Probes, BD Biosciences, Zeiss/Bio-Rad Cell Sciences, and filter set servers from Chroma Technology and Omega Optical. Several of these sites include data download capabilities. Recently, two microscope manufacturers have published on their web sites transmission curves for select objective lenses-crucial data for anyone doing multiphoton excitation microscopy. Notable among the academic sites, PhotoChemCAD 2.0 has over 200 dyes and a downloadable database/graphing program, and the USC-A Chemistry UV-vis Database displays absorption spectra of many dyes and indicators used in clinical histology and pathology. Our Fluorescent Spectra graphing/calculator site presents dyes, filters, and illumination data from many of these and additional sources. PubSpectra is our free download site which uses Microsoft Excel files as standardized human/machine readable format with over 2,000 biomedical spectra. The principle that data is not subject to copyright provides a framework in which all scientific data should be made freely accessible.

  15. SPAM- SPECTRAL ANALYSIS MANAGER (UNIX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The Spectral Analysis Manager (SPAM) was developed to allow easy qualitative analysis of multi-dimensional imaging spectrometer data. Imaging spectrometers provide sufficient spectral sampling to define unique spectral signatures on a per pixel basis. Thus direct material identification becomes possible for geologic studies. SPAM provides a variety of capabilities for carrying out interactive analysis of the massive and complex datasets associated with multispectral remote sensing observations. In addition to normal image processing functions, SPAM provides multiple levels of on-line help, a flexible command interpretation, graceful error recovery, and a program structure which can be implemented in a variety of environments. SPAM was designed to be visually oriented and user friendly with the liberal employment of graphics for rapid and efficient exploratory analysis of imaging spectrometry data. SPAM provides functions to enable arithmetic manipulations of the data, such as normalization, linear mixing, band ratio discrimination, and low-pass filtering. SPAM can be used to examine the spectra of an individual pixel or the average spectra over a number of pixels. SPAM also supports image segmentation, fast spectral signature matching, spectral library usage, mixture analysis, and feature extraction. High speed spectral signature matching is performed by using a binary spectral encoding algorithm to separate and identify mineral components present in the scene. The same binary encoding allows automatic spectral clustering. Spectral data may be entered from a digitizing tablet, stored in a user library, compared to the master library containing mineral standards, and then displayed as a timesequence spectral movie. The output plots, histograms, and stretched histograms produced by SPAM can be sent to a lineprinter, stored as separate RGB disk files, or sent to a Quick Color Recorder. SPAM is written in C for interactive execution and is available for two different

  16. Effect of fat additions to diets of dairy cattle on milk production and components: a meta-analysis and meta-regression.

    PubMed

    Rabiee, A R; Breinhild, K; Scott, W; Golder, H M; Block, E; Lean, I J

    2012-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to critically review randomized controlled trials, and quantify, using meta-analysis and meta-regression, the effects of supplementation with fats on milk production and components by dairy cows. We reviewed 59 papers, of which 38 (containing 86 comparisons) met eligibility criteria. Five groups of fats were evaluated: tallows, calcium salts of palm fat (Megalac, Church and Dwight Co. Inc., Princeton, NJ), oilseeds, prilled fat, and other calcium salts. Milk production responses to fats were significant, and the estimated mean difference was 1.05 kg/cow per day, but results were heterogeneous. Milk yield increased with increased difference in dry matter intake (DMI) between treatment and control groups, decreased with predicted metabolizable energy (ME) balance between these groups, and decreased with increased difference in soluble protein percentage of the diet between groups. Decreases in DMI were significant for Megalac, oilseeds, and other Ca salts, and approached significance for tallow. Feeding fat for a longer period increased DMI, as did greater differences in the amount of soluble protein percentage of the diet between control and treatment diets. Tallow, oilseeds, and other Ca salts reduced, whereas Megalac increased, milk fat percentage. Milk fat percentage effects were heterogeneous for fat source. Differences between treatment and control groups in duodenal concentrations of C18:2 and C 18:0 fatty acids and Mg percentage reduced the milk fat percentage standardized mean difference. Milk fat yield responses to fat treatments were very variable. The other Ca salts substantially decrease, and the Megalac and oilseeds increased, fat yield. Fat yield increased with increased DMI difference between groups and was lower with an increased estimated ME balance between treatment and control groups, indicating increased partitioning of fat to body tissue reserves. Feeding fats decreased milk protein percentage, but results were

  17. ADE spectral networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, Pietro; Park, Chan Y.

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a new perspective and a generalization of spectral networks for 4d {N} = 2 theories of class S associated to Lie algebras {g} = A n , D n , E6, and E7. Spectral networks directly compute the BPS spectra of 2d theories on surface defects coupled to the 4d theories. A Lie algebraic interpretation of these spectra emerges naturally from our construction, leading to a new description of 2d-4d wall-crossing phenomena. Our construction also provides an efficient framework for the study of BPS spectra of the 4d theories. In addition, we consider novel types of surface defects associated with minuscule ccrepresentations of {g}.

  18. Resolving the Large Scale Spectral Variability of the Luminous Seyfert 1 Galaxy 1H 0419-577: Evidence for a New Emission Component and Absorption by Cold Dense Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pounds, K. A.; Reeves, J. N.; Page, K. L.; OBrien, P. T.

    2004-01-01

    An XMM-Newton observation of the luminous Seyfert 1 galaxy 1H 0419-577 in September 2002, when the source was in an extreme low-flux state, found a very hard X-ray spectrum at 1-10 keV with a strong soft excess below -1 keV. Comparison with an earlier XMM-Newton observation when 1H 0419-577 was X-ray bright indicated the dominant spectral variability was due to a steep power law or cool Comptonised thermal emission. Four further XMM-Newton observations, with 1H 0419-577 in intermediate flux states, now support that conclusion, while we also find the variable emission component in intermediate state difference spectra to be strongly modified by absorption in low ionisation matter. The variable soft excess then appears to be an artefact of absorption of the underlying continuum while the core soft emission can be attributed to re- combination in an extended region of more highly ionised gas. We note the wider implications of finding substantial cold dense matter overlying (or embedded in) the X-ray continuum source in a luminous Seyfert 1 galaxy.

  19. Novel pure component contribution, mean centering of ratio spectra and factor based algorithms for simultaneous resolution and quantification of overlapped spectral signals: An application to recently co-formulated tablets of chlorzoxazone, aceclofenac and paracetamol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toubar, Safaa S.; Hegazy, Maha A.; Elshahed, Mona S.; Helmy, Marwa I.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, resolution and quantitation of spectral signals are achieved by several univariate and multivariate techniques. The novel pure component contribution algorithm (PCCA) along with mean centering of ratio spectra (MCR) and the factor based partial least squares (PLS) algorithms were developed for simultaneous determination of chlorzoxazone (CXZ), aceclofenac (ACF) and paracetamol (PAR) in their pure form and recently co-formulated tablets. The PCCA method allows the determination of each drug at its λmax. While, the mean centered values at 230, 302 and 253 nm, were used for quantification of CXZ, ACF and PAR, respectively, by MCR method. Partial least-squares (PLS) algorithm was applied as a multivariate calibration method. The three methods were successfully applied for determination of CXZ, ACF and PAR in pure form and tablets. Good linear relationships were obtained in the ranges of 2-50, 2-40 and 2-30 μg mL- 1 for CXZ, ACF and PAR, in order, by both PCCA and MCR, while the PLS model was built for the three compounds each in the range of 2-10 μg mL- 1. The results obtained from the proposed methods were statistically compared with a reported one. PCCA and MCR methods were validated according to ICH guidelines, while PLS method was validated by both cross validation and an independent data set. They are found suitable for the determination of the studied drugs in bulk powder and tablets.

  20. Spectral Predictors

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarria, L; Lindstrom, P; Rossignac, J

    2006-11-17

    Many scientific, imaging, and geospatial applications produce large high-precision scalar fields sampled on a regular grid. Lossless compression of such data is commonly done using predictive coding, in which weighted combinations of previously coded samples known to both encoder and decoder are used to predict subsequent nearby samples. In hierarchical, incremental, or selective transmission, the spatial pattern of the known neighbors is often irregular and varies from one sample to the next, which precludes prediction based on a single stencil and fixed set of weights. To handle such situations and make the best use of available neighboring samples, we propose a local spectral predictor that offers optimal prediction by tailoring the weights to each configuration of known nearby samples. These weights may be precomputed and stored in a small lookup table. We show that predictive coding using our spectral predictor improves compression for various sources of high-precision data.

  1. Covariance propagation in spectral indices

    DOE PAGES

    Griffin, P. J.

    2015-01-09

    In this study, the dosimetry community has a history of using spectral indices to support neutron spectrum characterization and cross section validation efforts. An important aspect to this type of analysis is the proper consideration of the contribution of the spectrum uncertainty to the total uncertainty in calculated spectral indices (SIs). This study identifies deficiencies in the traditional treatment of the SI uncertainty, provides simple bounds to the spectral component in the SI uncertainty estimates, verifies that these estimates are reflected in actual applications, details a methodology that rigorously captures the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI, andmore » provides quantified examples that demonstrate the importance of the proper treatment the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI.« less

  2. Covariance propagation in spectral indices

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, P. J.

    2015-01-09

    In this study, the dosimetry community has a history of using spectral indices to support neutron spectrum characterization and cross section validation efforts. An important aspect to this type of analysis is the proper consideration of the contribution of the spectrum uncertainty to the total uncertainty in calculated spectral indices (SIs). This study identifies deficiencies in the traditional treatment of the SI uncertainty, provides simple bounds to the spectral component in the SI uncertainty estimates, verifies that these estimates are reflected in actual applications, details a methodology that rigorously captures the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI, and provides quantified examples that demonstrate the importance of the proper treatment the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI.

  3. Covariance Propagation in Spectral Indices

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, P.J.

    2015-01-15

    The dosimetry community has a history of using spectral indices to support neutron spectrum characterization and cross section validation efforts. An important aspect to this type of analysis is the proper consideration of the contribution of the spectrum uncertainty to the total uncertainty in calculated spectral indices (SIs). This paper identifies deficiencies in the traditional treatment of the SI uncertainty, provides simple bounds to the spectral component in the SI uncertainty estimates, verifies that these estimates are reflected in actual applications, details a methodology that rigorously captures the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI, and provides quantified examples that demonstrate the importance of the proper treatment the spectral contribution to the uncertainty in the SI.

  4. USGS Digital Spectral Library splib06a

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Roger N.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Wise, Richard A.; Livo, K. Eric; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Sutley, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction We have assembled a digital reflectance spectral library that covers the wavelength range from the ultraviolet to far infrared along with sample documentation. The library includes samples of minerals, rocks, soils, physically constructed as well as mathematically computed mixtures, plants, vegetation communities, microorganisms, and man-made materials. The samples and spectra collected were assembled for the purpose of using spectral features for the remote detection of these and similar materials. Analysis of spectroscopic data from laboratory, aircraft, and spacecraft instrumentation requires a knowledge base. The spectral library discussed here forms a knowledge base for the spectroscopy of minerals and related materials of importance to a variety of research programs being conducted at the U.S. Geological Survey. Much of this library grew out of the need for spectra to support imaging spectroscopy studies of the Earth and planets. Imaging spectrometers, such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Airborne Visible/Infra Red Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) or the NASA Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) which is currently orbiting Saturn, have narrow bandwidths in many contiguous spectral channels that permit accurate definition of absorption features in spectra from a variety of materials. Identification of materials from such data requires a comprehensive spectral library of minerals, vegetation, man-made materials, and other subjects in the scene. Our research involves the use of the spectral library to identify the components in a spectrum of an unknown. Therefore, the quality of the library must be very good. However, the quality required in a spectral library to successfully perform an investigation depends on the scientific questions to be answered and the type of algorithms to be used. For example, to map a mineral using imaging spectroscopy and the mapping algorithm of Clark and others (1990a, 2003b

  5. Hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.

    2004-03-23

    A set of hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods in which spectral shapes of components or effects not present in the original calibration step are added in a following prediction or calibration step to improve the accuracy of the estimation of the amount of the original components in the sampled mixture. The hybrid method herein means a combination of an initial calibration step with subsequent analysis by an inverse multivariate analysis method. A spectral shape herein means normally the spectral shape of a non-calibrated chemical component in the sample mixture but can also mean the spectral shapes of other sources of spectral variation, including temperature drift, shifts between spectrometers, spectrometer drift, etc. The shape can be continuous, discontinuous, or even discrete points illustrative of the particular effect.

  6. Hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.

    2002-01-01

    A set of hybrid least squares multivariate spectral analysis methods in which spectral shapes of components or effects not present in the original calibration step are added in a following estimation or calibration step to improve the accuracy of the estimation of the amount of the original components in the sampled mixture. The "hybrid" method herein means a combination of an initial classical least squares analysis calibration step with subsequent analysis by an inverse multivariate analysis method. A "spectral shape" herein means normally the spectral shape of a non-calibrated chemical component in the sample mixture but can also mean the spectral shapes of other sources of spectral variation, including temperature drift, shifts between spectrometers, spectrometer drift, etc. The "shape" can be continuous, discontinuous, or even discrete points illustrative of the particular effect.

  7. SpecViz: Interactive Spectral Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earl, Nicholas Michael; STScI

    2016-06-01

    The astronomical community is about to enter a new generation of scientific enterprise. With next-generation instrumentation and advanced capabilities, the need has arisen to equip astronomers with the necessary tools to deal with large, multi-faceted data. The Space Telescope Science Institute has initiated a data analysis forum for the creation, development, and maintenance of software tools for the interpretation of these new data sets. SpecViz is a spectral 1-D interactive visualization and analysis application built with Python in an open source development environment. A user-friendly GUI allows for a fast, interactive approach to spectral analysis. SpecViz supports handling of unique and instrument-specific data, incorporation of advanced spectral unit handling and conversions in a flexible, high-performance interactive plotting environment. Active spectral feature analysis is possible through interactive measurement and statistical tools. It can be used to build wide-band SEDs, with the capability of combining or overplotting data products from various instruments. SpecViz sports advanced toolsets for filtering and detrending spectral lines; identifying, isolating, and manipulating spectral features; as well as utilizing spectral templates for renormalizing data in an interactive way. SpecViz also includes a flexible model fitting toolset that allows for multi-component models, as well as custom models, to be used with various fitting and decomposition routines. SpecViz also features robust extension via custom data loaders and connection to the central communication system underneath the interface for more advanced control. Incorporation with Jupyter notebooks via connection with the active iPython kernel allows for SpecViz to be used in addition to a user’s normal workflow without demanding the user drastically alter their method of data analysis. In addition, SpecViz allows the interactive analysis of multi-object spectroscopy in the same straight

  8. Chirp-dependent spectral distribution for few-cycle pulses propagating through nano-semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chaojin; Liu, Chengpu

    2016-09-01

    The propagation of an initially chirped incident few-cycle pulse through an ensemble of quantum wells is numerically investigated. It is found that the distribution characteristic of the transmitted spectrum sensitively depends on the incident laser parameters, especially its positive or negative chirp property. As for the incident pulse with a positive initial chirp, beyond the obvious spectral blue-shift, the transmitted spectral distribution is discrete. In contrast, as for a negative initial chirp, the spectral distribution is continuous instead. In addition, the insensitivity of chirp-dependent spectral distribution to medium symmetry character is also tested and the intensity of high-frequency spectral components enhances obviously due to the nonlinear propagation effects.

  9. Spectral face recognition using orthogonal subspace bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimberly, Andrew; Robila, Stefan A.; Peplau, Tansy

    2010-04-01

    We present an efficient method for facial recognition using hyperspectral imaging and orthogonal subspaces. Projecting the data into orthogonal subspaces has the advantage of compactness and reduction of redundancy. We focus on two approaches: Principal Component Analysis and Orthogonal Subspace Projection. Our work is separated in three stages. First, we designed an experimental setup that allowed us to create a hyperspectral image database of 17 subjects under different facial expressions and viewing angles. Second, we investigated approaches to employ spectral information for the generation of fused grayscale images. Third, we designed and tested a recognition system based on the methods described above. The experimental results show that spectral fusion leads to improvement of recognition accuracy when compared to regular imaging. The work expands on previous band extraction research and has the distinct advantage of being one of the first that combines spatial information (i.e. face characteristics) with spectral information. In addition, the techniques are general enough to accommodate differences in skin spectra.

  10. The suitability of concentration addition for predicting the effects of multi-component mixtures of up to 17 anti-androgens with varied structural features in an in vitro AR antagonist assay

    SciTech Connect

    Ermler, Sibylle; Scholze, Martin; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2011-12-15

    The risks associated with human exposures to chemicals capable of antagonising the effects of endogenous androgens have attracted considerable recent interest. Exposure is typically to large numbers of chemicals with androgen receptor (AR) antagonist activity, yet there is limited evidence of the combined effects of multi-component mixtures of these chemicals. A few in vitro studies with mixtures of up to six AR antagonists suggest that the concept of concentration addition (CA) provides good approximations of experimentally observed mixture effects, but studies with larger numbers of anti-androgens, and with more varied structural features, are missing. Here we show that the mixture effects of up to 17 AR antagonists, comprising compounds as diverse as UV-filter substances, parabens, perfluorinated compounds, bisphenol-A, benzo({alpha})pyrene, synthetic musks, antioxidants and polybrominated biphenyls, can be predicted well on the basis of the anti-androgenicity of the single components using the concept of CA. We tested these mixtures in an in vitro AR-dependent luciferase reporter gene assay, based on MDA-kb2 cells. The effects of further mixtures, composed of four and six anti-androgens, could be predicted accurately by CA. However, there was a shortfall from expected additivity with a ten-component mixture at two different mixture ratios, but attempts to attribute these deviations to differential expression of hormone-metabolising CYP isoforms did not produce conclusive results. CA provides good approximations of in vitro mixture effects of anti-androgens with varying structural features. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Humans are exposed to a large number of androgen receptor antagonists. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is limited evidence of the combined effects of anti-androgenic chemicals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We modelled the predictability of combined effects of up to 17 anti-androgens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested the

  11. Spectral and spread-spectral teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S.

    2010-06-15

    We report how quantum information encoded into the spectral degree of freedom of a single-photon state may be teleported using a finite spectrally entangled biphoton state. We further demonstrate how the bandwidth of the teleported wave form can be controllably and coherently dilated using a spread-spectral variant of teleportation. We calculate analytical expressions for the fidelities of spectral and spread-spectral teleportation when complex-valued Gaussian states are transferred using a proposed experimental approach. Finally, we discuss the utility of these techniques for integrating broad-bandwidth photonic qubits with narrow-bandwidth receivers in quantum communication systems.

  12. Spectral characterization of the LANDSAT thematic mapper sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, B. L.; Barker, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Data collected on the spectral characteristics of the LANDSAT-4 and LANDSAT-4 backup thematic mapper instruments, the protoflight (TM/PF) and flight (TM/F) models, respectively, are presented and analyzed. Tests were conducted on the instruments and their components to determine compliance with two sets of spectral specifications: band-by-band spectral coverage and channel-by-channel within-band spectral matching. Spectral coverage specifications were placed on: (1) band edges--points at 50% of peak response, (2) band edge slopes--steepness of rise and fall-off of response, (3) spectral flatness--evenness of response between edges, and (4) spurious system response--ratio of out-of-band response to in-band response. Compliance with the spectral coverage specifications was determined by analysis of spectral measurements on the individual components contributing to the overall spectral response: filters, detectors, and optical surfaces.

  13. Multi-spectral data decomposition for rock identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Denitsa; Nikolov, Hristo; Banushev, Banush; Iliev, Ilko

    The spectral reflectance data, recorded by remote sensors (such as Landsat), often result in from of spectral mixture of several "pure" spectral classes, included in the area covered by single pixel. This problem is the so-called mixed pixel problem. It has always been a diffi- culty in multi-spectral data decomposition and classification in deriving accurate proportions of the land cover classes. Including ground-measured data is especially useful with respect to increasing the accuracy of such classifications. This study proposes the use of a spectral linear unmixing or spectral mixture analysis (SMA) for mineral, rock and bare soils identification. If mixing is considered linear, then the resulting pixel reflectance is a linear summation of the individual material reflectance multiplied by the surface fraction they constitute. Besides, the problem of mixed pixels, limited spectral separability among similar minerals and rock types is another problem that causes inaccuracy in identification. Various methods of SMA have been developed to improve the classification of mixed pixels and to detect and identify subpixel components and their proportions. For this reason, additional laboratory and in-situ spectrometric measurements and approaches as well as rock line and ratio indices are applied. In laboratory experiments SPS-1 spectrometric system is used. In-situ measurements are performed using spectrometer TOMS. The rock line method is based on the soil line concept in remote sensing. The ratio indices are chosen considering rock types in the study as follow granite, granodiorite, basalt, limestone and marble samples. The main advantage of the presented technique is that mixed pixels are used during the training phase. Compared to these other techniques, the present one is simple, cheap and objective. The present study was supported by National Science Fund of Bulgaria (NSFB) under Contracts INI-12/05, NZ-1410/04 and MUNZ-1502/05.

  14. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  15. Spectral image reconstruction through the PCA transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Long; Qiu, Xuewei; Cong, Yangming

    2015-12-01

    Digital color image reproduction based on spectral information has become a field of much interest and practical importance in recent years. The representation of color in digital form with multi-band images is not very accurate, hence the use of spectral image is justified. Reconstructing high-dimensional spectral reflectance images from relatively low-dimensional camera signals is generally an ill-posed problem. The aim of this study is to use the Principal component analysis (PCA) transform in spectral reflectance images reconstruction. The performance is evaluated by the mean, median and standard deviation of color difference values. The values of mean, median and standard deviation of root mean square (GFC) errors between the reconstructed and the actual spectral image were also calculated. Simulation experiments conducted on a six-channel camera system and on spectral test images show the performance of the suggested method.

  16. Color Restoration of RGBN Multispectral Filter Array Sensor Images Based on Spectral Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chulhee; Kang, Moon Gi

    2016-01-01

    A multispectral filter array (MSFA) image sensor with red, green, blue and near-infrared (NIR) filters is useful for various imaging applications with the advantages that it obtains color information and NIR information simultaneously. Because the MSFA image sensor needs to acquire invisible band information, it is necessary to remove the IR cut-offfilter (IRCF). However, without the IRCF, the color of the image is desaturated by the interference of the additional NIR component of each RGB color channel. To overcome color degradation, a signal processing approach is required to restore natural color by removing the unwanted NIR contribution to the RGB color channels while the additional NIR information remains in the N channel. Thus, in this paper, we propose a color restoration method for an imaging system based on the MSFA image sensor with RGBN filters. To remove the unnecessary NIR component in each RGB color channel, spectral estimation and spectral decomposition are performed based on the spectral characteristics of the MSFA sensor. The proposed color restoration method estimates the spectral intensity in NIR band and recovers hue and color saturation by decomposing the visible band component and the NIR band component in each RGB color channel. The experimental results show that the proposed method effectively restores natural color and minimizes angular errors. PMID:27213381

  17. Color Restoration of RGBN Multispectral Filter Array Sensor Images Based on Spectral Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Park, Chulhee; Kang, Moon Gi

    2016-01-01

    A multispectral filter array (MSFA) image sensor with red, green, blue and near-infrared (NIR) filters is useful for various imaging applications with the advantages that it obtains color information and NIR information simultaneously. Because the MSFA image sensor needs to acquire invisible band information, it is necessary to remove the IR cut-offfilter (IRCF). However, without the IRCF, the color of the image is desaturated by the interference of the additional NIR component of each RGB color channel. To overcome color degradation, a signal processing approach is required to restore natural color by removing the unwanted NIR contribution to the RGB color channels while the additional NIR information remains in the N channel. Thus, in this paper, we propose a color restoration method for an imaging system based on the MSFA image sensor with RGBN filters. To remove the unnecessary NIR component in each RGB color channel, spectral estimation and spectral decomposition are performed based on the spectral characteristics of the MSFA sensor. The proposed color restoration method estimates the spectral intensity in NIR band and recovers hue and color saturation by decomposing the visible band component and the NIR band component in each RGB color channel. The experimental results show that the proposed method effectively restores natural color and minimizes angular errors. PMID:27213381

  18. Color Restoration of RGBN Multispectral Filter Array Sensor Images Based on Spectral Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Park, Chulhee; Kang, Moon Gi

    2016-05-18

    A multispectral filter array (MSFA) image sensor with red, green, blue and near-infrared (NIR) filters is useful for various imaging applications with the advantages that it obtains color information and NIR information simultaneously. Because the MSFA image sensor needs to acquire invisible band information, it is necessary to remove the IR cut-offfilter (IRCF). However, without the IRCF, the color of the image is desaturated by the interference of the additional NIR component of each RGB color channel. To overcome color degradation, a signal processing approach is required to restore natural color by removing the unwanted NIR contribution to the RGB color channels while the additional NIR information remains in the N channel. Thus, in this paper, we propose a color restoration method for an imaging system based on the MSFA image sensor with RGBN filters. To remove the unnecessary NIR component in each RGB color channel, spectral estimation and spectral decomposition are performed based on the spectral characteristics of the MSFA sensor. The proposed color restoration method estimates the spectral intensity in NIR band and recovers hue and color saturation by decomposing the visible band component and the NIR band component in each RGB color channel. The experimental results show that the proposed method effectively restores natural color and minimizes angular errors.

  19. Correlation functions in resonance fluorescence with spectral resolution: Signal-processing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatokhin, Vyacheslav N.; Kilin, Sergei Ya.

    2016-09-01

    In the framework of the signal processing approach to single-atom resonance fluorescence with spectral resolution, we diagrammatically derive an analytical formula for arbitrary-order spectral correlation functions of the scattered fields that pass through Fabry-Perot interferometers. Our general expression is then applied to study correlation signals in the limit of well separated spectral lines of the resonance fluorescence spectrum. In particular, we study the normalized second-order temporal intensity correlation functions in the case of the interferometers tuned to the components of the spectrum and obtain interferential corrections to the approximate results derived in the secular limit. In addition, we explore purely spectral correlations and show that they can fully be understood in terms of the two-photon cascades down the dressed state ladder.

  20. SPAM- SPECTRAL ANALYSIS MANAGER (DEC VAX/VMS VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The Spectral Analysis Manager (SPAM) was developed to allow easy qualitative analysis of multi-dimensional imaging spectrometer data. Imaging spectrometers provide sufficient spectral sampling to define unique spectral signatures on a per pixel basis. Thus direct material identification becomes possible for geologic studies. SPAM provides a variety of capabilities for carrying out interactive analysis of the massive and complex datasets associated with multispectral remote sensing observations. In addition to normal image processing functions, SPAM provides multiple levels of on-line help, a flexible command interpretation, graceful error recovery, and a program structure which can be implemented in a variety of environments. SPAM was designed to be visually oriented and user friendly with the liberal employment of graphics for rapid and efficient exploratory analysis of imaging spectrometry data. SPAM provides functions to enable arithmetic manipulations of the data, such as normalization, linear mixing, band ratio discrimination, and low-pass filtering. SPAM can be used to examine the spectra of an individual pixel or the average spectra over a number of pixels. SPAM also supports image segmentation, fast spectral signature matching, spectral library usage, mixture analysis, and feature extraction. High speed spectral signature matching is performed by using a binary spectral encoding algorithm to separate and identify mineral components present in the scene. The same binary encoding allows automatic spectral clustering. Spectral data may be entered from a digitizing tablet, stored in a user library, compared to the master library containing mineral standards, and then displayed as a timesequence spectral movie. The output plots, histograms, and stretched histograms produced by SPAM can be sent to a lineprinter, stored as separate RGB disk files, or sent to a Quick Color Recorder. SPAM is written in C for interactive execution and is available for two different

  1. (Development of high spectral resolution lidar technology)

    SciTech Connect

    Eloranta, E.W.

    1991-07-30

    The first year of this grant has been devoted to the design and construction of an upgraded version of the University of Wisconsin High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL). The new system incorporates additional data channels to measure depolarization and multiple scattering in the lidar return. Schematic diagrams describing the new configurations are attached to this report. Increases in optical efficiency and receiver aperture, coupled with improvements in the stiffness and the thermal stability of the mechanical system are expected to significantly improve the performance of the instrument. Most components of the system are nearly completed and system integration is about to begin. The HSRL is committed to participate in the NASA FIRE cirrus experiment during November and December of this year. Our progress is completing HSRL subsystems is outlined in the following paragraphs. 3 figs.

  2. Evaluating the crop coefficient using spectral reflectance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heilman, J. L.; Heilman, W. E.; Moore, Donald G.

    1982-01-01

    Significant linear relationships were found between PVI and percent cover (r2 = 0.911), and between Kc and percent cover (r2 = 0.815). In addition, the position of the PVl intersection on the soil background line changed as a result of soil moisture increases following irrigation, even at high percent cover. Thus, once experimental relationships between Kc and crop growth are established, a mean Kc can be determined from spectral estimates of stage of development and the soil background component of PVI can be used to adjust the mean K, for increased evaporation following irrigation because the ratio of actual to potential evapotranspiration will approach 1 when the soil surface is wet.

  3. Spectral ladar as a UGV navigation sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Michael A.; Davis, Christopher C.

    2011-06-01

    We demonstrate new results using our Spectral LADAR prototype, which highlight the benefits of this sensor for Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) navigation applications. This sensor is an augmentation of conventional LADAR and uses a polychromatic source to obtain range-resolved 3D spectral point clouds. These point cloud images can be used to identify objects based on combined spatial and spectral features in three dimensions and at long standoff range. The Spectral LADAR transmits nanosecond supercontinuum pulses generated in a photonic crystal fiber. Backscatter from distant targets is dispersed into 25 spectral bands, where each spectral band is independently range resolved with multiple return pulse recognition. Our new results show that Spectral LADAR can spectrally differentiate hazardous terrain (mud) from favorable driving surfaces (dry ground). This is a critical capability, since in UGV contexts mud is potentially hazardous, requires modified vehicle dynamics, and is difficult to identify based on 3D spatial signatures. Additionally, we demonstrate the benefits of range resolved spectral imaging, where highly cluttered 3D images of scenes (e.g. containing camouflage, foliage) are spectrally unmixed by range separation and segmented accordingly. Spectral LADAR can achieve this unambiguously and without the need for stereo correspondence, sub-pixel detection algorithms, or multi-sensor registration and data fusion.

  4. The Spectral Shift Function and Spectral Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azamov, N. A.; Carey, A. L.; Sukochev, F. A.

    2007-11-01

    At the 1974 International Congress, I. M. Singer proposed that eta invariants and hence spectral flow should be thought of as the integral of a one form. In the intervening years this idea has lead to many interesting developments in the study of both eta invariants and spectral flow. Using ideas of [24] Singer’s proposal was brought to an advanced level in [16] where a very general formula for spectral flow as the integral of a one form was produced in the framework of noncommutative geometry. This formula can be used for computing spectral flow in a general semifinite von Neumann algebra as described and reviewed in [5]. In the present paper we take the analytic approach to spectral flow much further by giving a large family of formulae for spectral flow between a pair of unbounded self-adjoint operators D and D + V with D having compact resolvent belonging to a general semifinite von Neumann algebra {mathcal{N}} and the perturbation V in {mathcal{N}} . In noncommutative geometry terms we remove summability hypotheses. This level of generality is made possible by introducing a new idea from [3]. There it was observed that M. G. Krein’s spectral shift function (in certain restricted cases with V trace class) computes spectral flow. The present paper extends Krein’s theory to the setting of semifinite spectral triples where D has compact resolvent belonging to {mathcal{N}} and V is any bounded self-adjoint operator in {mathcal{N}} . We give a definition of the spectral shift function under these hypotheses and show that it computes spectral flow. This is made possible by the understanding discovered in the present paper of the interplay between spectral shift function theory and the analytic theory of spectral flow. It is this interplay that enables us to take Singer’s idea much further to create a large class of one forms whose integrals calculate spectral flow. These advances depend critically on a new approach to the calculus of functions of non

  5. Spectral sensing technique for water constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing

    Spectral measurements of optical properties of water were conducted throughout the Chesapeake Bay area during the 2005 summer cruise campaign. This included reflectance, absorption, attenuation and backscattering spectra. The analysis of the data illustrates the diversity and complexity of constituents that shape spectral features of the coastal water. A novel technique is proposed to separate the chlorophyll fluorescence component from the reflectance spectra of algae contained water. This approach utilizes of polarization properties of elastically scattered light and the unpolarized nature of fluorescence and was successfully applied to measurements of various algae species first in lab and later in field measurements. The efficiency and limitation of this approach has been further examined under various conditions as well as through vector radiative transfer modeling. Finally Twomey Iterative Method (TIM) has been applied to the retrieval of hydrosol microphysical properties for the first time. Assuming a known refractive index, both single and multi-mode distributions were successfully retrieved from both simulation and experiments through the introduction of an initial distribution biased towards larger particles. In addition, the technique is extended to the retrieval of an unknown refractive index, which is also validated using both simulation and experimental results.

  6. Prediction of spectral acceleration response ordinates based on PGA attenuation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graizer, V.; Kalkan, E.

    2009-01-01

    Developed herein is a new peak ground acceleration (PGA)-based predictive model for 5% damped pseudospectral acceleration (SA) ordinates of free-field horizontal component of ground motion from shallow-crustal earthquakes. The predictive model of ground motion spectral shape (i.e., normalized spectrum) is generated as a continuous function of few parameters. The proposed model eliminates the classical exhausted matrix of estimator coefficients, and provides significant ease in its implementation. It is structured on the Next Generation Attenuation (NGA) database with a number of additions from recent Californian events including 2003 San Simeon and 2004 Parkfield earthquakes. A unique feature of the model is its new functional form explicitly integrating PGA as a scaling factor. The spectral shape model is parameterized within an approximation function using moment magnitude, closest distance to the fault (fault distance) and VS30 (average shear-wave velocity in the upper 30 m) as independent variables. Mean values of its estimator coefficients were computed by fitting an approximation function to spectral shape of each record using robust nonlinear optimization. Proposed spectral shape model is independent of the PGA attenuation, allowing utilization of various PGA attenuation relations to estimate the response spectrum of earthquake recordings.

  7. New procedure for capturing spectral images of human portraiture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qun; Fairchild, Mark D.

    2002-06-01

    This paper describes a new procedure of capturing spectral images of human portraiture. The designed imaging system was calibrated directly based on real human subjects and has the capability to provide accurate spectral images of human faces, including facial skin as well as the lips, eyes, and hair, from various ethnic races. The facial spectral reflectances obtained were analyzed by principal components analysis (PCA) method. Based on the results of PCA, spectral images using both three and six wide-band spectral sampling were estimated. The reconstructed spectral images for display based on an sRGB display model are evaluated. The results have proved that this new spectral imaging procedure is successful. The results also show that three basis functions are accurate enough to estimate the spectral reflectance of human faces. The derived spectral images can be applied to color-imaging system design and analysis.

  8. Impact of scattered radiation on spectral CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegert, Jens; Engel, Klaus Jürgen; Herrmann, Christoph

    2009-02-01

    In "Spectral CT" based on energy-resolving photon-counting detectors (also "multi-energy CT") spectral information of transmitted X-radiation is measured in order to extract additional information about the material composition of the scanned object. Common practice is to decompose the attenuation line integrals into several components based on models of physical (e.g. photo/Compton/K-edge) or material properties (e.g. water/calcium). Scattered radiation causes a significant deterioration to the results, which are obtained with these models, as the measured spectrum in a specific detector element contains additional contributions which are not related to the attenuation in the respective line integral of the beam. In this paper the detrimental impact of scattered radiation in multi-energy CT is quantitatively analyzed by means of Monte-Carlo simulations. Large projection data sets of full rotational acquisitions are computed by combining noise-free analytical primary radiation with Monte-Carlo calculated scattered radiation of high statistical accuracy. The simulations show that, compared to the primary spectrum, the scatter spectrum is significantly shifted towards lower energies resulting in very high scatter-to-primary ratios for energies below 50keV. In the analysis of sinograms and reconstructed data using extended Alvarez-Macovsky decomposition into Photo-, Compton-, and K-edge images, it is revealed that scattered radiation causes significant inhomogeneity artifacts especially in the Photo image. Additionally "crosstalk" between Photo-, Compton- and K-edge images is found as K-edge structures appear in the other images and vice versa. Quantitatively it is found that due to scatter the reconstructed concentration of the K-edge material is up to 23 % smaller than its correct value.

  9. Method to analyze remotely sensed spectral data

    DOEpatents

    Stork, Christopher L.; Van Benthem, Mark H.

    2009-02-17

    A fast and rigorous multivariate curve resolution (MCR) algorithm is applied to remotely sensed spectral data. The algorithm is applicable in the solar-reflective spectral region, comprising the visible to the shortwave infrared (ranging from approximately 0.4 to 2.5 .mu.m), midwave infrared, and thermal emission spectral region, comprising the thermal infrared (ranging from approximately 8 to 15 .mu.m). For example, employing minimal a priori knowledge, notably non-negativity constraints on the extracted endmember profiles and a constant abundance constraint for the atmospheric upwelling component, MCR can be used to successfully compensate thermal infrared hyperspectral images for atmospheric upwelling and, thereby, transmittance effects. Further, MCR can accurately estimate the relative spectral absorption coefficients and thermal contrast distribution of a gas plume component near the minimum detectable quantity.

  10. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  11. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  12. Nonlinear spectral imaging of biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palero, J. A.

    2007-07-01

    The work presented in this thesis demonstrates live high resolution 3D imaging of tissue in its native state and environment. The nonlinear interaction between focussed femtosecond light pulses and the biological tissue results in the emission of natural autofluorescence and second-harmonic signal. Because biological intrinsic emission is generally very weak and extends from the ultraviolet to the visible spectral range, a broad-spectral range and high sensitivity 3D spectral imaging system is developed. Imaging the spectral characteristics of the biological intrinsic emission reveals the structure and biochemistry of the cells and extra-cellular components. By using different methods in visualizing the spectral images, discrimination between different tissue structures is achieved without the use of any stain or fluorescent label. For instance, RGB real color spectral images of the intrinsic emission of mouse skin tissues show blue cells, green hair follicles, and purple collagen fibers. The color signature of each tissue component is directly related to its characteristic emission spectrum. The results of this study show that skin tissue nonlinear intrinsic emission is mainly due to the autofluorescence of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate), flavins, keratin, melanin, phospholipids, elastin and collagen and nonlinear Raman scattering and second-harmonic generation in Type I collagen. In vivo time-lapse spectral imaging is implemented to study metabolic changes in epidermal cells in tissues. Optical scattering in tissues, a key factor in determining the maximum achievable imaging depth, is also investigated in this work.

  13. Raman spectroscopy based identification of flame retardants in consumer products using an acquired reference spectral library.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, Sutapa; Fang, Huiting

    2015-01-01

    Flame retardants (FRs), a class of commonly used chemical additives in consumer products such as polyurethane foams, are well known for their persistence in the environment, bioaccumulation and potential toxicity [1]. In order to address the potential health concerns and environmental impacts associated with the wide-spread use these chemicals, it is essential to identify them efficiently in the environment and consumer products. Raman spectroscopy (RS) offers an attractive option for the non-invasive, in-situ identification of flame retardants in a variety of sample formats [2-4]. RS based chemical identification relies on the availability of spectral libraries for identification through spectral matching with reference chemicals. Here we present the application of Raman spectroscopy for identifying FR additives in select consumer products using an acquired spectral library of commonly used FRs. The RS based method described here enables simultaneous identification of multiple components within a sample, which can offer important insights into the sources of FR contamination, in addition to identification of the FR component itself. The availability of Raman spectral library of commercially used FRs, such as the one presented here, will facilitate the identification of these chemicals in consumer products.

  14. SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF RADIOXENON

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Matthew W.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; Hubbard, Charles W.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Schrom, Brian T.

    2008-09-23

    Monitoring changes in atmospheric radioxenon concentrations is a major tool in the detection of an underground nuclear explosion. Ground based systems like the Automated Radioxenon Sampler /Analyzer (ARSA), the Swedish Unattended Noble gas Analyzer (SAUNA) and the Automatic portable radiometer of isotopes Xe (ARIX), can collect and detect several radioxenon isotopes by processing and transferring samples into a high efficiency beta-gamma coincidence detector. The high efficiency beta-gamma coincidence detector makes these systems highly sensitive to the radioxenon isotopes 133Xe, 131mXe, 133mXe and 135Xe. The standard analysis uses regions of interest (ROI) to determine the amount of a particular radioxenon isotope present. The ROI method relies on the peaks of interest falling within energy limits of the ROI. Some potential problems inherent in this method are the reliance on stable detector gains and a fixed resolution for each energy peak. In addition, when a high activity sample is measured there will be more interference among the ROI, in particular within the 133Xe, 133mXe, and 131mXe regions. A solution to some of these problems can be obtained through spectral fitting of the data. Spectral fitting is simply the fitting of the peaks using known functions to determine the number and relative peak positions and widths. By knowing this information it is possible to determine which isotopes are present. Area under each peak can then be used to determine an overall concentration for each isotope. Using the areas of the peaks several key detector characteristics can be determined: efficiency, energy calibration, energy resolution and ratios between interfering isotopes (Radon daughters).

  15. ATR neutron spectral characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.W.; Anderl, R.A.

    1995-11-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INEL provides intense neutron fields for irradiation-effects testing of reactor material samples, for production of radionuclides used in industrial and medical applications, and for scientific research. Characterization of the neutron environments in the irradiation locations of the ATR has been done by means of neutronics calculations and by means of neutron dosimetry based on the use of neutron activation monitors that are placed in the various irradiation locations. The primary purpose of this report is to present the results of an extensive characterization of several ATR irradiation locations based on neutron dosimetry measurements and on least-squares-adjustment analyses that utilize both neutron dosimetry measurements and neutronics calculations. This report builds upon the previous publications, especially the reference 4 paper. Section 2 provides a brief description of the ATR and it tabulates neutron spectral information for typical irradiation locations, as derived from the more historical neutron dosimetry measurements. Relevant details that pertain to the multigroup neutron spectral characterization are covered in section 3. This discussion includes a presentation on the dosimeter irradiation and analyses and a development of the least-squares adjustment methodology, along with a summary of the results of these analyses. Spectrum-averaged cross sections for neutron monitoring and for displacement-damage prediction in Fe, Cr, and Ni are given in section 4. In addition, section4 includes estimates of damage generation rates for these materials in selected ATR irradiation locations. In section 5, the authors present a brief discussion of the most significant conclusions of this work and comment on its relevance to the present ATR core configuration. Finally, detailed numerical and graphical results for the spectrum-characterization analyses in each irradiation location are provided in the Appendix.

  16. Evaluating Spectral Signals to Identify Spectral Error

    PubMed Central

    Bazar, George; Kovacs, Zoltan; Tsenkova, Roumiana

    2016-01-01

    Since the precision and accuracy level of a chemometric model is highly influenced by the quality of the raw spectral data, it is very important to evaluate the recorded spectra and describe the erroneous regions before qualitative and quantitative analyses or detailed band assignment. This paper provides a collection of basic spectral analytical procedures and demonstrates their applicability in detecting errors of near infrared data. Evaluation methods based on standard deviation, coefficient of variation, mean centering and smoothing techniques are presented. Applications of derivatives with various gap sizes, even below the bandpass of the spectrometer, are shown to evaluate the level of spectral errors and find their origin. The possibility for prudent measurement of the third overtone region of water is also highlighted by evaluation of a complex data recorded with various spectrometers. PMID:26731541

  17. Spectral methods for CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Thomas A.; Streett, Craig L.; Hussaini, M. Yousuff

    1989-01-01

    One of the objectives of these notes is to provide a basic introduction to spectral methods with a particular emphasis on applications to computational fluid dynamics. Another objective is to summarize some of the most important developments in spectral methods in the last two years. The fundamentals of spectral methods for simple problems will be covered in depth, and the essential elements of several fluid dynamical applications will be sketched.

  18. Variability and Spectral Studies of Luminous Seyfert 1 Galaxy Fairall 9. Search for the Reflection Component is a Quasar: RXTE and ASCA Observation of a Nearby Radio-Quiet Quasar MR 2251-178

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighly, Karen M.

    1999-01-01

    Monitoring observations with interval of 3 days using RXTE (X Ray Timing Explorer) of the luminous Seyfert 1 galaxy Fairall 9 were performed for one year. The purpose of the observations were to study the variability of Fairall 9 and compare the results with those from the radio-loud object 3C 390.3. The data has been received and analysis is underway, using the new background model. An observation of the quasar MR 2251-178 was made in order to determine whether or not it has a reflection component. Older background models gave an unacceptable subtraction and analysis is underway using the new background model. The observation of NGC 6300 showed that the X-ray spectrum from this Seyfert 2 galaxy appears to be dominated by Compton reflection.

  19. Study of the spectral and the temporal properties of few black hole candidates with TCAF model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Santanu; Debnath, Dipak; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    We study spectral and temporal properties of outbursting black hole candidates (BHCs) using Two Component Advective Flow (TCAF) model in XSPEC as a local additive table model. Evolution of spectral and temporal properties of BHCs can easily be explained with spectral analysis using TCAF. From TCAF model fit of black hole spectra one can extract two types of flow rates (Keplerian and sub-Keplerian rates) and shock parameters (location and strength), which give new insight into the problem of accretion dynamics. Depending upon accretion rate ratio (ARR) and nature of QPOs (if present) we can classify total outburst phases of transient BHCs in different spectral states. This classification qualitatively match with the classifications based on spectral properties alone. However, in our process, use the physical quantities, such as accretion rates gave a complete, meaning of what exactly happens in a state transition. We also compare TCAF model fitted spectral results with combined disk black body and power-law model fitted results, which almost matches. In our study, evolution of quasi periodic oscillations (QPOs) also explained from the movement of shock location. It is also clear from the analysis that the rising and declining phases may not retrace the same path always and form a hysteresis loop.

  20. Rayleigh imaging in spectral mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berggren, Karl; Danielsson, Mats; Fredenberg, Erik

    2016-03-01

    Spectral imaging is the acquisition of multiple images of an object at different energy spectra. In mammography, dual-energy imaging (spectral imaging with two energy levels) has been investigated for several applications, in particular material decomposition, which allows for quantitative analysis of breast composition and quantitative contrast-enhanced imaging. Material decomposition with dual-energy imaging is based on the assumption that there are two dominant photon interaction effects that determine linear attenuation: the photoelectric effect and Compton scattering. This assumption limits the number of basis materials, i.e. the number of materials that are possible to differentiate between, to two. However, Rayleigh scattering may account for more than 10% of the linear attenuation in the mammography energy range. In this work, we show that a modified version of a scanning multi-slit spectral photon-counting mammography system is able to acquire three images at different spectra and can be used for triple-energy imaging. We further show that triple-energy imaging in combination with the efficient scatter rejection of the system enables measurement of Rayleigh scattering, which adds an additional energy dependency to the linear attenuation and enables material decomposition with three basis materials. Three available basis materials have the potential to improve virtually all applications of spectral imaging.

  1. Spectral compressor vibration analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, M.L.

    1982-02-01

    Studies at GAT have verified that the spectral distribution of energy in gaseous diffusion compressor vibrations contains information pertinent to the state of the compressor's ''health.'' Based on that conclusion, vibration analysis capabilities were included in the CUP computer data acquisition system. In order for that information to be used for diagnosis of incipient failure mechanisms, however, spectral features must be empirically associated with actual malfunctions and validated statistically as diagnostic symptoms. When the system was acquired, indicators were generally unknown except for those associated with unbalance, misalignment, 00 secondary surge and severe resonant blade vibrations. Others must be developed as in-service malfunctions occur. The power spectral density function (PSDF) has historically been used to compute vibration spectra. Accurate, high-resolution power density spectra require long data-acquisition periods which is inconsistent with frequent examinations of all up-rated compressors. Detection of gross spectral changes indicative of a need for detailed analyses has been accomplished at a rate of less than 1 minute per compressor. An optimum analytical sequence will be based on trade offs. Work is in progress to identify additional malfunction indicators and investigate tools other than the PSDF to provide faster diagnoses. 6 figs.

  2. A geostatistical approach to mapping site response spectral amplifications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, E.M.; Baise, L.G.; Kayen, R.E.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanaka, H.

    2010-01-01

    If quantitative estimates of the seismic properties do not exist at a location of interest then the site response spectral amplifications must be estimated from data collected at other locations. Currently, the most common approach employs correlations of site class with maps of surficial geology. Analogously, correlations of site class with topographic slope can be employed where the surficial geology is unknown. Our goal is to identify and validate a method to estimate site response with greater spatial resolution and accuracy for regions where additional effort is warranted. This method consists of three components: region-specific data collection, a spatial model for interpolating seismic properties, and a theoretical method for computing spectral amplifications from the interpolated seismic properties. We consider three spatial interpolation schemes: correlations with surficial geology, termed the geologic trend (GT), ordinary kriging (OK), and kriging with a trend (KT). We estimate the spectral amplifications from seismic properties using the square root of impedance method, thereby linking the frequency-dependent spectral amplifications to the depth-dependent seismic properties. Thus, the range of periods for which this method is applicable is limited by the depth of exploration. A dense survey of near-surface S-wave slowness (Ss) throughout Kobe, Japan shows that the geostatistical methods give more accurate estimates of Ss than the topographic slope and GT methods, and the OK and KT methods perform equally well. We prefer the KT model because it can be seamlessly integrated with geologic maps that cover larger regions. Empirical spectral amplifications show that the region-specific data achieve more accurate estimates of observed median short-period amplifications than the topographic slope method. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Analysis of exploitable spectral features of target and background materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, Max

    2015-10-01

    The spectral behavior of textile camouflage materials in the electro-optical spectral range is analyzed and compared with different backgrounds. It is shown that it will be difficult to develop camouflage materials that match a vegetative background in the NIR and SWIR spectral range. The problem of water absorption spectral features is discussed. In addition the effect of different surface finishing of textiles is shown.

  4. ARE SPECTRAL AND TIMING CORRELATIONS SIMILAR IN DIFFERENT SPECTRAL STATES IN BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARIES?

    SciTech Connect

    Kalamkar, M.; Klis, M. van der; Reynolds, M. T.; Miller, J. M.; Altamirano, D.

    2015-03-20

    We study the outbursts of the black hole X-ray binaries MAXI J1659-152, SWIFT J1753.5-0127, and GX 339-4 with the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT). The bandpass of the XRT has access to emission from both components of the accretion flow: the accretion disk and the corona/hot flow. This allows a correlated spectral and variability study, with variability from both components of the accretion flow. We present for the first time a combined study of the evolution of spectral parameters (disk temperature and radius) and timing parameters (frequency and strength) of all power spectral components in different spectral states. Comparison of the correlations in different spectral states shows that the frequency and strength of the power spectral components exhibit dependencies on the disk temperature that are different in the (low-)hard and the hard-intermediate states (HIMSs); most of these correlations that are clearly observed in the HIMS (in MAXI J1659-152 and GX 339-4) are not seen in the (low-)hard state (in GX 339-4 and SWIFT J1753.5-0127). Also, the responses of the individual frequency components to changes in the disk temperature are markedly different from one component to the next. Hence, the spectral-timing evolution cannot be explained by a single correlation that spans both these spectral states. We discuss our findings in the context of the existing models proposed to explain the origin of variability.

  5. TEMPORAL AND SPECTRAL EVOLUTION IN X- AND {gamma}-RAYS OF MAGNETAR 1E 1547.0-5408 SINCE ITS 2008 OCTOBER OUTBURST: THE DISCOVERY OF A TRANSIENT HARD PULSED COMPONENT AFTER ITS 2009 JANUARY OUTBURST

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiper, L.; Hermsen, W.; Den Hartog, P. R.

    2012-04-01

    The magnetar 1E 1547.0-5408 exhibited outbursts in 2008 October and 2009 January. In this paper, we present in great detail the evolution of the temporal and spectral characteristics of the persistent total and pulsed emission of 1E 1547.0-5408 between {approx}1 and 300 keV starting on 2008 October 3 and ending in 2011 January. We analyzed data collected with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL), and the Swift satellite. We report the evolution of the pulse frequency, and the measurement at the time of the onset of the 2009 January outburst of an insignificant jump in frequency, but a major frequency derivative jump {Delta}{nu}-dot of +(1.30 {+-} 0.14) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} Hz s{sup -1} ({Delta}{nu}-dot/{nu}-dot of -0.69 {+-} 0.07). Before this {nu}-dot glitch, a single broad pulse is detected, mainly for energies below {approx}10 keV. Surprisingly, {approx}11 days after the glitch a new transient high-energy (up to {approx}150 keV) pulse appears with a Gaussian shape and width 0.23, shifted in phase by {approx}0.31 compared to the low-energy pulse, which smoothly fades to undetectable levels in {approx}350 days. We report the evolution of the pulsed-emission spectra. For energies 2.5-10 keV all pulsed spectra are very soft with photon indices {Gamma} between -4.6 and -3.9. For {approx}10-150 keV, after the {nu}-dot glitch, we report hard non-thermal pulsed spectra, similar to what has been reported for the persistent pulsed emission of some anomalous X-ray pulsars. This pulsed hard X-ray emission reached maximal luminosity 70 {+-} 30 days after the glitch epoch, followed by a gradual decrease by more than a factor of 10 over {approx}300 days. These characteristics differ from those of the total emission. Both, the total soft X-ray (1-10 keV) and hard X-ray (10-150 keV) fluxes, were maximal already 2 days after the 2009 January outburst, and decayed by a factor of {approx}>3 over {approx}400

  6. Multispectral endoscopy and microscopy imaging system using a spectrally programmable light engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, N.; Stange, Ulrich; Lane, Pierre M.; MacAulay, Calum E.

    2005-03-01

    We report a spectrally and temporally programmable light engine based on a spatial light modulator that can dynamically create any narrow or broadband spectral profile for hyperspectral, fluorescence, or principal component imaging. Most hyperspectral or multispectral imaging systems use wavelength selection devices such as acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTFs), tunable grating or prism-based monochromators, or filter wheels. While these devices can select wavelengths they cannot create arbitrary spectral profiles. This simple and economical system can be controlled at high speed (up to 5000 illumination profiles per second). Digitally controlled illumination is bit additive with image data providing high dynamic range imaging with monochrome or color imaging devices. This is especially advantageous for endoscopes employing small well CCD or CMOS sensors since the dynamic range now can extend beyond the limits of the sensor itself. In this report we show multispectral images of in vivo tissue and in vitro tissue samples using endoscopes, surgical microscopes and conventional microscopes.

  7. Energy-discriminative performance of a spectral micro-CT system.

    PubMed

    He, Peng; Yu, Hengyong; Bennett, James; Ronaldson, Paul; Zainon, Rafidah; Butler, Anthony; Butler, Phil; Wei, Biao; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    Experiments were performed to evaluate the energy-discriminative performance of a spectral (multi-energy) micro-CT system. The system, designed by MARS (Medipix All Resolution System) Bio-Imaging Ltd. (Christchurch, New Zealand), employs a photon-counting energy-discriminative detector technology developed by CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research). We used the K-edge attenuation characteristics of some known materials to calibrate the detector's photon energy discrimination. For tomographic analysis, we used the compressed sensing (CS) based ordered-subset simultaneous algebraic reconstruction techniques (OS-SART) to reconstruct sample images, which is effective to reduce noise and suppress artifacts. Unlike conventional CT, the principal component analysis (PCA) method can be applied to extract and quantify additional attenuation information from a spectral CT dataset. Our results show that the spectral CT has a good energy-discriminative performance and provides more attenuation information than the conventional CT. PMID:24004864

  8. AGN Spectral Energy Distributions of GLAST Telescope Network Program Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adkins, Jeff; Lacy, Mark; Daou, Doris; Rapp, Steve; Stefaniak, Linda

    2005-03-01

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) has a proposed observing list that includes AGNs and Polars bright enough to be observed optically by amateurs and students. This observing list is maintained by the "GLAST Telescope Network" (GTN) and includes a number of objects that have yet to be observed by the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our project will observe one of these objects with the Spitzer MIPS and the IRAC instruments to determine their Spectral Energy Distribution (SED), which will be compared to a computer model of disk emission in order to determine what component of the SED is due to the disk and what component is due to synchrotron radiation induced by the jets. In addition we will observe our program objects prior to, simultaneously with, and after Spitzer observes them. This gives a direct connection from Spitzer research to student activities in the classroom.

  9. Long-wavelength adaptation reveals slow, spectrally opponent inputs to the human luminance pathway.

    PubMed

    Stockman, Andrew; Plummer, Daniel J

    2005-01-01

    In addition to its expected fast, additive L- and M-cone inputs (L + M), the luminance pathway has slow, spectrally opponent inputs. We have previously shown that on long-wavelength fields, the dominant slow signals change from L-M at moderate intensity levels to M-L signals at high. Here, we focus on the transition between them, which we find is marked by substantial changes in temporal phase delay, and by large and unexpected shifts in flicker spectral sensitivity. At moderate temporal frequencies, counter to the selective adaptation caused by the field, spectral sensitivity changes from being M-cone-like to more L-cone-like. These changes can be accounted for by a change in the relative strengths of the slow spectrally opponent cone signals from L-M exceeding M-L below the transition to M-L exceeding L-M above it, and by the resulting changes in constructive and destructive interference between the dominant signal components. We speculate that the transition is caused by the deep-red field becoming equivalent, postreceptorally, to a green field at high bleaching levels. These results further challenge the dogma that there are separable psychophysical channels for the transmission and processing of color and luminance information. Although its output generates an achromatic percept, the luminance channel has spectrally opponent inputs.

  10. Ground-motion prediction equations for the average horizontal component of PGA, PGV, and 5%-damped PSA at spectral periods between 0.01 s and 10.0 s

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, D.M.; Atkinson, G.M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper contains ground-motion prediction equations (GMPEs) for average horizontal-component ground motions as a function of earthquake magnitude, distance from source to site, local average shear-wave velocity, and fault type. Our equations are for peak ground acceleration (PGA), peak ground velocity (PGV), and 5%-damped pseudo-absolute-acceleration spectra (PSA) at periods between 0.01 s and 10 s. They were derived by empirical regression of an extensive strong-motion database compiled by the 'PEER NGA' (Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center's Next Generation Attenuation) project. For periods less than 1 s, the analysis used 1,574 records from 58 mainshocks in the distance range from 0 km to 400 km (the number of available data decreased as period increased). The primary predictor variables are moment magnitude (M), closest horizontal distance to the surface projection of the fault plane (RJB), and the time-averaged shear-wave velocity from the surface to 30 m (VS30). The equations are applicable for M=5-8, RJB<200 km, and VS30= 180-1300 m/s. ?? 2008, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  11. Incorporating Endmember Variability into Spectral Mixture Analysis Through Endmember Bundles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bateson, C. Ann; Asner, Gregory P.; Wessman, Carol A.

    1998-01-01

    Variation in canopy structure and biochemistry induces a concomitant variation in the top-of-canopy spectral reflectance of a vegetation type. Hence, the use of a single endmember spectrum to track the fractional abundance of a given vegetation cover in a hyperspectral image may result in fractions with considerable error. One solution to the problem of endmember variability is to increase the number of endmembers used in a spectral mixture analysis of the image. For example, there could be several tree endmembers in the analysis because of differences in leaf area index (LAI) and multiple scatterings between leaves and stems. However, it is often difficult in terms of computer or human interaction time to select more than six or seven endmembers and any non-removable noise, as well as the number of uncorrelated bands in the image, limits the number of endmembers that can be discriminated. Moreover, as endmembers proliferate, their interpretation becomes increasingly difficult and often applications simply need the aerial fractions of a few land cover components which comprise most of the scene. In order to incorporate endmember variability into spectral mixture analysis, we propose representing a landscape component type not with one endmember spectrum but with a set or bundle of spectra, each of which is feasible as the spectrum of an instance of the component (e.g., in the case of a tree component, each spectrum could reasonably be the spectral reflectance of a tree canopy). These endmember bundles can be used with nonlinear optimization algorithms to find upper and lower bounds on endmember fractions. This approach to endmember variability naturally evolved from previous work in deriving endmembers from the data itself by fitting a triangle, tetrahedron or, more generally, a simplex to the data cloud reduced in dimension by a principal component analysis. Conceptually, endmember variability could make it difficult to find a simplex that both surrounds the data

  12. Triatomic Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 117 Triatomic Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 55 triatomic molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.

  13. Hydrocarbon Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 115 Hydrocarbon Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 91 hydrocarbon molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.

  14. Diatomic Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 114 Diatomic Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 121 diatomic molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty, and reference are given for each transition reported.

  15. Spectral collocation methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussaini, M. Y.; Kopriva, D. A.; Patera, A. T.

    1987-01-01

    This review covers the theory and application of spectral collocation methods. Section 1 describes the fundamentals, and summarizes results pertaining to spectral approximations of functions. Some stability and convergence results are presented for simple elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic equations. Applications of these methods to fluid dynamics problems are discussed in Section 2.

  16. A practical approach to spectral volume rendering.

    PubMed

    Bergner, Steven; Möller, Torsten; Tory, Melanie; Drew, Mark S

    2005-01-01

    To make a spectral representation of color practicable for volume rendering, a new low-dimensional subspace method is used to act as the carrier of spectral information. With that model, spectral light material interaction can be integrated into existing volume rendering methods at almost no penalty. In addition, slow rendering methods can profit from the new technique of postillumination-generating spectral images in real-time for arbitrary light spectra under a fixed viewpoint. Thus, the capability of spectral rendering to create distinct impressions of a scene under different lighting conditions is established as a method of real-time interaction. Although we use an achromatic opacity in our rendering, we show how spectral rendering permits different data set features to be emphasized or hidden as long as they have not been entirely obscured. The use of postillumination is an order of magnitude faster than changing the transfer function and repeating the projection step. To put the user in control of the spectral visualization, we devise a new widget, a "light-dial," for interactively changing the illumination and include a usability study of this new light space exploration tool. Applied to spectral transfer functions, different lights bring out or hide specific qualities of the data. In conjunction with postillumination, this provides a new means for preparing data for visualization and forms a new degree of freedom for guided exploration of volumetric data sets.

  17. Augmented Classical Least Squares Multivariate Spectral Analysis

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.; Melgaard, David K.

    2005-01-11

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  18. Augmented Classical Least Squares Multivariate Spectral Analysis

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.; Melgaard, David K.

    2005-07-26

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  19. Augmented classical least squares multivariate spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.; Melgaard, David K.

    2004-02-03

    A method of multivariate spectral analysis, termed augmented classical least squares (ACLS), provides an improved CLS calibration model when unmodeled sources of spectral variation are contained in a calibration sample set. The ACLS methods use information derived from component or spectral residuals during the CLS calibration to provide an improved calibration-augmented CLS model. The ACLS methods are based on CLS so that they retain the qualitative benefits of CLS, yet they have the flexibility of PLS and other hybrid techniques in that they can define a prediction model even with unmodeled sources of spectral variation that are not explicitly included in the calibration model. The unmodeled sources of spectral variation may be unknown constituents, constituents with unknown concentrations, nonlinear responses, non-uniform and correlated errors, or other sources of spectral variation that are present in the calibration sample spectra. Also, since the various ACLS methods are based on CLS, they can incorporate the new prediction-augmented CLS (PACLS) method of updating the prediction model for new sources of spectral variation contained in the prediction sample set without having to return to the calibration process. The ACLS methods can also be applied to alternating least squares models. The ACLS methods can be applied to all types of multivariate data.

  20. Spectral topography of histopathological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Jeremy M.; Lu, Thomas T.; Vari, Sandor G.

    1998-06-01

    The goal of imaging spectroscopy is to obtain independent spectra from individual objects in a field-of-view. In the case of biological materials, such as histopathology samples, it has been well established that spectral characteristic can be indicative of specific diseases including cancer. Diagnosis can be enhanced by the use of probes and stains to indicate the presence of individual genome or other biologically active cell components or substances. To assess a specimen through a microscope is directly analogous to serving the Earth from space to assess natural features. This paper describes a simple and inexpensive imaging spectrometer, with an origin in remote sensing, that demonstrates that it is possible to rapidly identify evidence of disease in histopathology samples using spatially resolved spectral data. The PARISS imaging spectrometer enables a researcher to acquire multi-spectral images that yield functional maps, showing what and where biological molecules are located within a structure. It is the powerful combination of imaging and spectroscopy that provides the tools not readily available to the Life Sciences. The PARISS system incorporates a powerful hybrid neural network analysis to break the data logjam that is often associated with the acquisition and processing of multiple spectra.

  1. Weighted compression of spectral color information.

    PubMed

    Laamanen, Hannu; Jetsu, Tuija; Jaaskelainen, Timo; Parkkinen, Jussi

    2008-06-01

    Spectral color information is used nowadays in many different applications. Accurate spectral images are usually very large files, but a proper compression method can reduce needed storage space remarkably with a minimum loss of information. In this paper we introduce a principal component analysis (PCA) -based compression method of spectral color information. In this approach spectral data is weighted with a proper weight function before forming the correlation matrix and calculating the eigenvector basis. First we give a general framework for how to use weight functions in compression of relevant color information. Then we compare the weighted compression method with the traditional PCA compression method by compressing and reconstructing the Munsell data set consisting of 1,269 reflectance spectra and the Pantone data set consisting of 922 reflectance spectra. Two different weight functions are proposed and tested. We show that weighting clearly improves retention of color information in the PCA-based compression process. PMID:18516149

  2. A quadtree-adaptive spectral wave model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popinet, Stéphane; Gorman, Richard M.; Rickard, Graham J.; Tolman, Hendrik L.

    A spectral wave model coupling a quadtree-adaptive discretisation of the two spatial dimensions with a standard discretisation of the two spectral dimensions is described. The implementation is greatly simplified by reusing components of the Gerris solver (for spatial advection on quadtrees) and WAVEWATCH III (for spectral advection and source terms). Strict equivalence between the anisotropic diffusion and spatial filtering methods for alleviation of the Garden Sprinkler Effect (GSE) is demonstrated. This equivalence facilitates the generalisation of GSE alleviation techniques to quadtree grids. For the case of a cyclone-generated wave field, the cost of the adaptive method increases linearly with spatial resolution compared to quadratically for constant-resolution methods. This leads to decrease in runtimes of one to two orders of magnitude for practical spatial resolutions. Similar efficiency gains are shown to be possible for global spectral wave forecasting.

  3. Digital staining for histopathology multispectral images by the combined application of spectral enhancement and spectral transformation.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Pinky A; Yagi, Yukako

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduced a digital staining method for histopathology images captured with an n-band multispectral camera. The method consisted of two major processes: enhancement of the original spectral transmittance and the transformation of the enhanced transmittance to its target spectral configuration. Enhancement is accomplished by shifting the original transmittance with the scaled difference between the original transmittance and the transmittance estimated with m dominant principal component (PC) vectors;the m-PC vectors were determined from the transmittance samples of the background image. Transformation of the enhanced transmittance to the target spectral configuration was done using an nxn transformation matrix, which was derived by applying a least square method to the enhanced and target spectral training data samples of the different tissue components. Experimental results on the digital conversion of a hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained multispectral image to its Masson's trichrome stained (MT) equivalent shows the viability of the method.

  4. Effects of a recombinant complement component C3b functional fragment α2MR (α2-macroglobulin receptor) additive on the immune response of juvenile orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) after the exposure to cold shock challenge.

    PubMed

    Luo, Sheng-Wei; Cai, Luo; Qi, Zeng-Hua; Wang, Cong; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Wei-Na

    2015-08-01

    The effects of Ec-α2MR (Epinephelus coiodes-α2-macroglobulin receptor) on growth performance, enzymatic activity, respiratory burst, MDA level, total antioxidant capacity, DPPH radical scavenging percentage and immune-related gene expressions of the juvenile orange-spotted grouper were evaluated. The commercial diet supplemented with α2MR additive was used to feed the orange-spotted grouper for six weeks. Although a slight increase was observed in the specific growth rate, survival rate and weight gain, no significance was observed among different group. After the feeding trial, the groupers were exposed to cold stress. Respiratory burst activity and MDA level decreased significantly in α2MR additive group by comparing with the control and additive control group, while a sharp increase of ACP activity, ALP activity, total antioxidant capacity and DPPH radial scavenging percentage was observed in α2MR additive group. qRT-PCR analyses confirmed that the up-regulated mRNA expressions of C3, TNF1, TNF2, IL-6, CTL, LysC, SOD1 and SOD2 were observed in α2MR additive group at 20 °C. These results showed that α2MR additive may moderate the immune response in grouper following cold shock challenge. PMID:25917969

  5. Effects of a recombinant complement component C3b functional fragment α2MR (α2-macroglobulin receptor) additive on the immune response of juvenile orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) after the exposure to cold shock challenge.

    PubMed

    Luo, Sheng-Wei; Cai, Luo; Qi, Zeng-Hua; Wang, Cong; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Wei-Na

    2015-08-01

    The effects of Ec-α2MR (Epinephelus coiodes-α2-macroglobulin receptor) on growth performance, enzymatic activity, respiratory burst, MDA level, total antioxidant capacity, DPPH radical scavenging percentage and immune-related gene expressions of the juvenile orange-spotted grouper were evaluated. The commercial diet supplemented with α2MR additive was used to feed the orange-spotted grouper for six weeks. Although a slight increase was observed in the specific growth rate, survival rate and weight gain, no significance was observed among different group. After the feeding trial, the groupers were exposed to cold stress. Respiratory burst activity and MDA level decreased significantly in α2MR additive group by comparing with the control and additive control group, while a sharp increase of ACP activity, ALP activity, total antioxidant capacity and DPPH radial scavenging percentage was observed in α2MR additive group. qRT-PCR analyses confirmed that the up-regulated mRNA expressions of C3, TNF1, TNF2, IL-6, CTL, LysC, SOD1 and SOD2 were observed in α2MR additive group at 20 °C. These results showed that α2MR additive may moderate the immune response in grouper following cold shock challenge.

  6. Spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Fred C.; Mcdowell, Jonathan C.; Freese, Katherine; Levin, Janna

    1989-01-01

    Recent experiments indicate that the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background deviates from a pure blackbody; here, spectral distortions produced by cosmic dust are considered. The main result is that cosmic dust in conjunction with an injected radiation field (perhaps produced by an early generation of very massive stars) can explain the observed spectral distortions without violating existing cosmological constraints. In addition, it is shown that Compton y-distortions can also explain the observed spectral shape, but the energetic requirements are more severe.

  7. Doppler imaging using spectrally-encoded endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yelin, Dvir; Bouma, B. E.; Rosowsky, J. J.; Tearney, G. J.

    2009-01-01

    The capability to image tissue motion such as blood flow through an endoscope could have many applications in medicine. Spectrally encoded endoscopy (SEE) is a recently introduced technique that utilizes a single optical fiber and miniature diffractive optics to obtain endoscopic images through small diameter probes. Using spectral-domain interferometry, SEE is furthermore capable of three-dimensional volume imaging at video rates. Here we show that by measuring relative spectral phases, this technology can additionally measure Doppler shifts. Doppler SEE is demonstrated in flowing Intralipid phantoms and vibrating middle ear ossicles. PMID:18795020

  8. Hyperspectral image classification by a variable interval spectral average and spectral curve matching combined algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthil Kumar, A.; Keerthi, V.; Manjunath, A. S.; Werff, Harald van der; Meer, Freek van der

    2010-08-01

    Classification of hyperspectral images has been receiving considerable attention with many new applications reported from commercial and military sectors. Hyperspectral images are composed of a large number of spectral channels, and have the potential to deliver a great deal of information about a remotely sensed scene. However, in addition to high dimensionality, hyperspectral image classification is compounded with a coarse ground pixel size of the sensor for want of adequate sensor signal to noise ratio within a fine spectral passband. This makes multiple ground features jointly occupying a single pixel. Spectral mixture analysis typically begins with pixel classification with spectral matching techniques, followed by the use of spectral unmixing algorithms for estimating endmembers abundance values in the pixel. The spectral matching techniques are analogous to supervised pattern recognition approaches, and try to estimate some similarity between spectral signatures of the pixel and reference target. In this paper, we propose a spectral matching approach by combining two schemes—variable interval spectral average (VISA) method and spectral curve matching (SCM) method. The VISA method helps to detect transient spectral features at different scales of spectral windows, while the SCM method finds a match between these features of the pixel and one of library spectra by least square fitting. Here we also compare the performance of the combined algorithm with other spectral matching techniques using a simulated and the AVIRIS hyperspectral data sets. Our results indicate that the proposed combination technique exhibits a stronger performance over the other methods in the classification of both the pure and mixed class pixels simultaneously.

  9. Classical least squares multivariate spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Haaland, David M.

    2002-01-01

    An improved classical least squares multivariate spectral analysis method that adds spectral shapes describing non-calibrated components and system effects (other than baseline corrections) present in the analyzed mixture to the prediction phase of the method. These improvements decrease or eliminate many of the restrictions to the CLS-type methods and greatly extend their capabilities, accuracy, and precision. One new application of PACLS includes the ability to accurately predict unknown sample concentrations when new unmodeled spectral components are present in the unknown samples. Other applications of PACLS include the incorporation of spectrometer drift into the quantitative multivariate model and the maintenance of a calibration on a drifting spectrometer. Finally, the ability of PACLS to transfer a multivariate model between spectrometers is demonstrated.

  10. Spectrum slicer for snapshot spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamamitsu, Miu; Kitagawa, Yutaro; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Horisaki, Ryoichi; Oishi, Yu; Morita, Shin-ya; Yamagata, Yutaka; Motohara, Kentaro; Goda, Keisuke

    2015-12-01

    We propose and demonstrate an optical component that overcomes critical limitations in our previously demonstrated high-speed multispectral videography-a method in which an array of periscopes placed in a prism-based spectral shaper is used to achieve snapshot multispectral imaging with the frame rate only limited by that of an image-recording sensor. The demonstrated optical component consists of a slicing mirror incorporated into a 4f-relaying lens system that we refer to as a spectrum slicer (SS). With its simple design, we can easily increase the number of spectral channels without adding fabrication complexity while preserving the capability of high-speed multispectral videography. We present a theoretical framework for the SS and its experimental utility to spectral imaging by showing real-time monitoring of a dynamic colorful event through five different visible windows.

  11. Spectral Redundancy in Tissue Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Tomy

    1995-01-01

    Ultrasonic backscattered signals from material comprised of quasi-periodic scatterers exhibit redundancy over both its phase and magnitude spectra. This dissertation addresses the problem of estimating the mean scatterer spacing and scatterer density from the backscattered ultrasound signal using spectral redundancy characterized by the spectral autocorrelation (SAC) function. The SAC function exploits characteristic differences between the phase spectrum of the resolvable quasi-periodic (regular) scatterers and the unresolvable uniformly distributed (diffuse) scatterers to improve estimator performance over other estimators that operate directly on the magnitude spectrum. Analytical, simulation, and experimental results (liver and breast tissue) indicate the potential of utilizing phase information using the SAC function. A closed form analytical expression for the SAC function is derived for gamma distributed scatterer spacings. The theoretical expression for the SAC function demonstrate the increased regular-to-diffuse scatterer signal ratio in the off-diagonal components of the SAC function, since the diffuse component contributes only to the diagonal components (power spectrum). The A-scan is modelled as a cyclostationary signal whose statistical parameters vary in time with single or multiple periodicities. A-scan models consist of a collection of regular scatterers with gamma distributed spacings embedded in diffuse scatterers with uniform distributed spacings. The model accounts for attenuation by convolving the frequency dependent backscatter coefficients of the scatterer centers with a time-varying system response. Simulation results show that SAC-based estimates converge more reliably over smaller amounts of data than previously used cepstrum-based estimates. A major reason for the performance advantage is the use of phase information by the SAC function, while the cepstnun uses a phaseless power spectral density, that is directly affected by the system

  12. Discrimination among Panax species using spectral fingerprinting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spectral fingerprints of samples of three Panax species (P. quinquefolius L., P. ginseng, and P. notoginseng) were acquired using UV, NIR, and MS spectrometry. With principal components analysis (PCA), all three methods allowed visual discrimination between all three species. All three methods wer...

  13. Spectrally nonselective holographic objective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardosanidze, Zurab V.

    1991-10-01

    Reflection holograms and holographic optical elements fabricated by the Denisyuk method are spectrally selective. In certain applications there may be a need for the development of holographic structures that are not selective in terms of the spectral composition of the reconstructing light. This paper describes the possibility of creating spectral nonselective optical elements and reflection holograms on a dichromate gelatin layer (DGL). The essential condition for achieving nonselectivity in this case is a strong absorption of actinic radiation in the initial emulsion layer conditioning the strongly damping character of the summary field in thickness.

  14. Spectral abundance fraction estimation of materials using Kalman filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Su; Chang, Chein; Jensen, Janet L.; Jensen, James O.

    2004-12-01

    Kalman filter has been widely used in statistical signal processing for parameter estimation. Although a Kalman filter approach has been recently developed for spectral unmixing, referred to as Kalman filter-based linear unmixing (KFLU), its applicability to spectral characterization within a single pixel vector has not been explored. This paper presents a new application of Kalman filtering in spectral estimation and quantification. It develops a Kalman filter-based spectral signature esimator (KFSSE) which is different from the KFLU in the sense that the former performs a Kalman filter wavelength by wavelength across a spectral signature as opposed to the latter which implements a Kalman filter pixel vector by pixel vector in an image cube. The idea of the KFSSE is to implement the state equation to characterize the true spectral signature, while the measurement equation is being used to describe the spectral signature to be processed. Additionally, since a Kalman filter can accurately estimate spectral abundance fraction of a signature, our proposed KFSSE can further used for spectral quantification for subpixel targets and mixed pixel vectors, called Kalman filter-based spectral quantifier (KFSQ). Such spectral quantification is particularly important for chemical/biological defense which requires quantification of detected agents for damage control assessment. Several different types of hyperspectral data are used for experiments to demonstrate the ability of the KFSSE in estimation of spectral signature and the utility of the KFSQ in spectral quantification.

  15. Soil spectral characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoner, E. R.; Baumgardner, M. F.

    1981-01-01

    The spectral characterization of soils is discussed with particular reference to the bidirectional reflectance factor as a quantitative measure of soil spectral properties, the role of soil color, soil parameters affecting soil reflectance, and field characteristics of soil reflectance. Comparisons between laboratory-measured soil spectra and Landsat MSS data have shown good agreement, especially in discriminating relative drainage conditions and organic matter levels in unvegetated soils. The capacity to measure both visible and infrared soil reflectance provides information on other soil characteristics and makes it possible to predict soil response to different management conditions. Field and laboratory soil spectral characterization helps define the extent to which intrinsic spectral information is available from soils as a consequence of their composition and field characteristics.

  16. Thermophotovoltaic Spectral Control

    SciTech Connect

    DM DePoy; PM Fourspring; PF Baldasaro; JF Beausang; EJ Brown; MW Dashiel; KD Rahner; TD Rahmlow; JE Lazo-Wasem; EJ Gratrix; B Wemsman

    2004-06-09

    Spectral control is a key technology for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) direct energy conversion systems because only a fraction (typically less than 25%) of the incident thermal radiation has energy exceeding the diode bandgap energy, E{sub g}, and can thus be converted to electricity. The goal for TPV spectral control in most applications is twofold: (1) Maximize TPV efficiency by minimizing transfer of low energy, below bandgap photons from the radiator to the TPV diode. (2) Maximize TPV surface power density by maximizing transfer of high energy, above bandgap photons from the radiator to the TPV diode. TPV spectral control options include: front surface filters (e.g. interference filters, plasma filters, interference/plasma tandem filters, and frequency selective surfaces), back surface reflectors, and wavelength selective radiators. System analysis shows that spectral performance dominates diode performance in any practical TPV system, and that low bandgap diodes enable both higher efficiency and power density when spectral control limitations are considered. Lockheed Martin has focused its efforts on front surface tandem filters which have achieved spectral efficiencies of {approx}83% for E{sub g} = 0.52 eV and {approx}76% for E{sub g} = 0.60 eV for a 950 C radiator temperature.

  17. Spectrally selective glazings

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    Spectrally selective glazing is window glass that permits some portions of the solar spectrum to enter a building while blocking others. This high-performance glazing admits as much daylight as possible while preventing transmission of as much solar heat as possible. By controlling solar heat gains in summer, preventing loss of interior heat in winter, and allowing occupants to reduce electric lighting use by making maximum use of daylight, spectrally selective glazing significantly reduces building energy consumption and peak demand. Because new spectrally selective glazings can have a virtually clear appearance, they admit more daylight and permit much brighter, more open views to the outside while still providing the solar control of the dark, reflective energy-efficient glass of the past. This Federal Technology Alert provides detailed information and procedures for Federal energy managers to consider spectrally selective glazings. The principle of spectrally selective glazings is explained. Benefits related to energy efficiency and other architectural criteria are delineated. Guidelines are provided for appropriate application of spectrally selective glazing, and step-by-step instructions are given for estimating energy savings. Case studies are also presented to illustrate actual costs and energy savings. Current manufacturers, technology users, and references for further reading are included for users who have questions not fully addressed here.

  18. Component fragility research program

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, N.C.; Mochizuki, G.L.; Holman, G.S.; Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA )

    1989-11-01

    To demonstrate how high-level'' qualification test data can be used to estimate the ultimate seismic capacity of nuclear power plant equipment, we assessed in detail various electrical components tested by the Pacific Gas Electric Company for its Diablo Canyon plant. As part of our Phase I Component Fragility Research Program, we evaluated seismic fragility for five Diablo Canyon components: medium-voltage (4kV) switchgear; safeguard relay board; emergency light battery pack; potential transformer; and station battery and racks. This report discusses our Phase II fragility evaluation of a single Westinghouse Type W motor control center column, a fan cooler motor controller, and three local starters at the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant. These components were seismically qualified by means of biaxial random motion tests on a shaker table, and the test response spectra formed the basis for the estimate of the seismic capacity of the components. The seismic capacity of each component is referenced to the zero period acceleration (ZPA) and, in our Phase II study only, to the average spectral acceleration (ASA) of the motion at its base. For the motor control center, the seismic capacity was compared to the capacity of a Westinghouse Five-Star MCC subjected to actual fragility tests by LLNL during the Phase I Component Fragility Research Program, and to generic capacities developed by the Brookhaven National Laboratory for motor control center. Except for the medium-voltage switchgear, all of the components considered in both our Phase I and Phase II evaluations were qualified in their standard commercial configurations or with only relatively minor modifications such as top bracing of cabinets. 8 refs., 67 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. Spectral Analysis of Vector Magnetic Field Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Robert L.; OBrien, Michael S.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the power spectra and cross spectra derived from the three components of the vector magnetic field measured on a straight horizontal path above a statistically stationary source. All of these spectra, which can be estimated from the recorded time series, are related to a single two-dimensional power spectral density via integrals that run in the across-track direction in the wavenumber domain. Thus the measured spectra must obey a number of strong constraints: for example, the sum of the two power spectral densities of the two horizontal field components equals the power spectral density of the vertical component at every wavenumber and the phase spectrum between the vertical and along-track components is always pi/2. These constraints provide powerful checks on the quality of the measured data; if they are violated, measurement or environmental noise should be suspected. The noise due to errors of orientation has a clear characteristic; both the power and phase spectra of the components differ from those of crustal signals, which makes orientation noise easy to detect and to quantify. The spectra of the crustal signals can be inverted to obtain information about the cross-track structure of the field. We illustrate these ideas using a high-altitude Project Magnet profile flown in the southeastern Pacific Ocean.

  20. Spectral Methods for Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, R. L.; Gee, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    Spectral methods, that is, those based in the Fourier transform, have long been employed in the analysis of magnetic anomalies. For example, Schouten and MaCamy's Earth filter is used extensively to map patterns to the pole, and Parker's Fourier transform series facilitates forward modeling and provides an efficient algorithm for inversion of profiles and surveys. From a different, and perhaps less familiar perspective, magnetic anomalies can be represented as the realization of a stationary stochastic process and then statistical theory can be brought to bear. It is vital to incorporate the full 2-D power spectrum, even when discussing profile data. For example, early analysis of long profiles failed to discover the small-wavenumber peak in the power spectrum predicted by one-dimensional theory. The long-wavelength excess is the result of spatial aliasing, when energy leaks into the along-track spectrum from the cross-track components of the 2-D spectrum. Spectral techniques may be used to improve interpolation and downward continuation of survey data. They can also evaluate the reliability of sub-track magnetization models both across and and along strike. Along-strike profiles turn out to be surprisingly good indicators of the magnetization directly under them; there is high coherence between the magnetic anomaly and the magnetization over a wide band. In contrast, coherence is weak at long wavelengths on across-strike lines, which is naturally the favored orientation for most studies. When vector (or multiple level) measurements are available, cross-spectral analysis can reveal the wavenumber interval where the geophysical signal resides, and where noise dominates. One powerful diagnostic is that the phase spectrum between the vertical and along-path components of the field must be constant 90 degrees. To illustrate, it was found that on some very long Project Magnetic lines, only the lowest 10% of the wavenumber band contain useful geophysical signal. In this

  1. Remote application for spectral collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cone, Shelli R.; Steele, R. J.; Tzeng, Nigel H.; Firpi, Alexer H.; Rodriguez, Benjamin M.

    2016-05-01

    In the area of collecting field spectral data using a spectrometer, it is common to have the instrument over the material of interest. In certain instances it is beneficial to have the ability to remotely control the spectrometer. While several systems have the ability to use a form of connectivity to capture the measurement it is essential to have the ability to control the settings. Additionally, capturing reference information (metadata) about the setup, system configuration, collection, location, atmospheric conditions, and sample information is necessary for future analysis leading towards material discrimination and identification. This has the potential to lead to cumbersome field collection and a lack of necessary information for post processing and analysis. The method presented in this paper describes a capability to merge all parts of spectral collection from logging reference information to initial analysis as well as importing information into a web-hosted spectral database. This allows the simplification of collecting, processing, analyzing and storing field spectra for future analysis and comparisons. This concept is developed for field collection of thermal data using the Designs and Prototypes (D&P) Hand Portable FT-IR Spectrometer (Model 102). The remote control of the spectrometer is done with a customized Android application allowing the ability to capture reference information, process the collected data from radiance to emissivity using a temperature emissivity separation algorithm and store the data into a custom web-based service. The presented system of systems allows field collected spectra to be used for various applications by spectral analysts in the future.

  2. In vitro analysis of the cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory effects of antioxidant compounds used as additives in ultra high-molecular weight polyethylene in total joint replacement components.

    PubMed

    Bladen, C L; Tzu-Yin, L; Fisher, J; Tipper, J L

    2013-04-01

    Ultra high-molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) remains the most commonly used material in modern joint replacement prostheses. However, UHMWPE wear particles, formed as the bearing articulates, are one of the main factors leading to joint replacement failure via the induction of osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening. Previous studies have shown that the addition of antioxidants such as vitamin E to UHMWPE can improve wear resistance of the polymer and reduce oxidative fatigue. However, little is known regarding the biological consequences of such antioxidant chemicals. This study investigated the cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory effects of a variety of antioxidant compounds currently being tested experimentally for use in hip and knee prostheses, including nitroxides, hindered phenols, and lanthanides on U937 human histocyte cells and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) in vitro. After addition of the compounds, cell viability was determined by dose response cytotoxicity studies. Anti-inflammatory effects were determined by quantitation of TNF-α release in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated cells. This study has shown that many of these compounds were cytotoxic to U937 cells and PBMNCs, at relatively low concentrations (micromolar), specifically the hindered phenol 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyhydrocinnamate (HPAO1), and the nitroxide 2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPO). Lanthanides were only cytotoxic at very high concentrations and were well tolerated by the cells at lower concentrations. Cytotoxic compounds also showed reduced anti-inflammatory effects, particularly in PBMNCs. Careful consideration should therefore be given to the use of any of these compounds as potential additives to UHMWPE.

  3. A geometric approach to spectral subtraction

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yang; Loizou, Philipos C.

    2008-01-01

    The traditional power spectral subtraction algorithm is computationally simple to implement but suffers from musical noise distortion. In addition, the subtractive rules are based on incorrect assumptions about the cross terms being zero. A new geometric approach to spectral subtraction is proposed in the present paper that addresses these shortcomings of the spectral subtraction algorithm. A method for estimating the cross terms involving the phase differences between the noisy (and clean) signals and noise is proposed. Analysis of the gain function of the proposed algorithm indicated that it possesses similar properties as the traditional MMSE algorithm. Objective evaluation of the proposed algorithm showed that it performed significantly better than the traditional spectral subtractive algorithm. Informal listening tests revealed that the proposed algorithm had no audible musical noise. PMID:19122867

  4. Brain components

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3 major components of the brain are the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brain stem. The cerebrum is divided into left and right hemispheres, each ... gray matter) is the outside portion of the cerebrum and provides us with functions associated with conscious ...

  5. Glue Film Thickness Measurements by Spectral Reflectance

    SciTech Connect

    B. R. Marshall

    2010-09-20

    Spectral reflectance was used to determine the thickness of thin glue layers in a study of the effect of the glue on radiance and reflectance measurements of shocked-tin substrates attached to lithium fluoride windows. Measurements based on profilometry of the components were found to be inaccurate due to flatness variations and deformation of the tin substrate under pressure during the gluing process. The accuracy of the spectral reflectance measurements were estimated to be ±0.5 μm, which was sufficient to demonstrate a convincing correlation between glue thickness and shock-generated light.

  6. Multipurpose spectral imager.

    PubMed

    Sigernes, F; Lorentzen, D A; Heia, K; Svenøe, T

    2000-06-20

    A small spectral imaging system is presented that images static or moving objects simultaneously as a function of wavelength. The main physical principle is outlined and demonstrated. The instrument is capable of resolving both spectral and spatial information from targets throughout the entire visible region. The spectral domain has a bandpass of 12 A. One can achieve the spatial domain by rotating the system's front mirror with a high-resolution stepper motor. The spatial resolution range from millimeters to several meters depends mainly on the front optics used and whether the target is fixed (static) or movable relative to the instrument. Different applications and examples are explored, including outdoor landscapes, industrial fish-related targets, and ground-level objects observed in the more traditional way from an airborne carrier (remote sensing). Through the examples, we found that the instrument correctly classifies whether a shrimp is peeled and whether it can disclose the spectral and spatial microcharacteristics of targets such as a fish nematode (parasite). In the macroregime, we were able to distinguish a marine vessel from the surrounding sea and sky. A study of the directional spectral albedo from clouds, mountains, snow cover, and vegetation has also been included. With the airborne experiment, the imager successfully classified snow cover, leads, and new and rafted ice, as seen from 10.000 ft (3.048 m). PMID:18345245

  7. Multipurpose spectral imager.

    PubMed

    Sigernes, F; Lorentzen, D A; Heia, K; Svenøe, T

    2000-06-20

    A small spectral imaging system is presented that images static or moving objects simultaneously as a function of wavelength. The main physical principle is outlined and demonstrated. The instrument is capable of resolving both spectral and spatial information from targets throughout the entire visible region. The spectral domain has a bandpass of 12 A. One can achieve the spatial domain by rotating the system's front mirror with a high-resolution stepper motor. The spatial resolution range from millimeters to several meters depends mainly on the front optics used and whether the target is fixed (static) or movable relative to the instrument. Different applications and examples are explored, including outdoor landscapes, industrial fish-related targets, and ground-level objects observed in the more traditional way from an airborne carrier (remote sensing). Through the examples, we found that the instrument correctly classifies whether a shrimp is peeled and whether it can disclose the spectral and spatial microcharacteristics of targets such as a fish nematode (parasite). In the macroregime, we were able to distinguish a marine vessel from the surrounding sea and sky. A study of the directional spectral albedo from clouds, mountains, snow cover, and vegetation has also been included. With the airborne experiment, the imager successfully classified snow cover, leads, and new and rafted ice, as seen from 10.000 ft (3.048 m).

  8. Noncomputable Spectral Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teutsch, Jason

    2007-01-01

    It is possible to enumerate all computer programs. In particular, for every partial computable function, there is a shortest program which computes that function. f-MIN is the set of indices for shortest programs. In 1972, Meyer showed that f-MIN is Turing equivalent to 0'', the halting set with halting set oracle. This paper generalizes the notion of shortest programs, and we use various measures from computability theory to describe the complexity of the resulting "spectral sets." We show that under certain Godel numberings, the spectral sets are exactly the canonical sets 0', 0'', 0''', ... up to Turing equivalence. This is probably not true in general, however we show that spectral sets always contain some useful information. We show that immunity, or "thinness" is a useful characteristic for distinguishing between spectral sets. In the final chapter, we construct a set which neither contains nor is disjoint from any infinite arithmetic set, yet it is 0-majorized and contains a natural spectral set. Thus a pathological set becomes a bit more friendly. Finally, a number of interesting open problems are left for the inspired reader.

  9. Variables separation of the spectral BRDF for better understanding color variation in special effect pigment coatings.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Alejandro; Rabal, Ana María; Campos, Joaquín; Pons, Alicia; Hernanz, María Luisa

    2012-06-01

    A type of representation of the spectral bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) is proposed that distinctly separates the spectral variable (wavelength) from the geometrical variables (spherical coordinates of the irradiation and viewing directions). Principal components analysis (PCA) is used in order to decompose the spectral BRDF in decorrelated spectral components, and the weight that they have at every geometrical configuration of irradiation/viewing is established. This method was applied to the spectral BRDF measurement of a special effect pigment sample, and four principal components with relevant variance were identified. These four components are enough to reproduce the great diversity of spectral reflectances observed at different geometrical configurations. Since this representation is able to separate spectral and geometrical variables, it facilitates the interpretation of the color variation of special effect pigments coatings versus the geometrical configuration of irradiation/viewing.

  10. Feature Transformation Detection Method with Best Spectral Band Selection Process for Hyper-spectral Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hai-Wen; McGurr, Mike; Brickhouse, Mark

    2015-11-01

    We present a newly developed feature transformation (FT) detection method for hyper-spectral imagery (HSI) sensors. In essence, the FT method, by transforming the original features (spectral bands) to a different feature domain, may considerably increase the statistical separation between the target and background probability density functions, and thus may significantly improve the target detection and identification performance, as evidenced by the test results in this paper. We show that by differentiating the original spectral, one can completely separate targets from the background using a single spectral band, leading to perfect detection results. In addition, we have proposed an automated best spectral band selection process with a double-threshold scheme that can rank the available spectral bands from the best to the worst for target detection. Finally, we have also proposed an automated cross-spectrum fusion process to further improve the detection performance in lower spectral range (<1000 nm) by selecting the best spectral band pair with multivariate analysis. Promising detection performance has been achieved using a small background material signature library for concept-proving, and has then been further evaluated and verified using a real background HSI scene collected by a HYDICE sensor.

  11. Photovoltaic spectral responsivity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, K.; Dunlavy, D.; Field, H.; Moriarty, T.

    1998-09-01

    This paper discusses the various elemental random and nonrandom error sources in typical spectral responsivity measurement systems. The authors focus specifically on the filter and grating monochrometer-based spectral responsivity measurement systems used by the Photovoltaic (PV) performance characterization team at NREL. A variety of subtle measurement errors can occur that arise from a finite photo-current response time, bandwidth of the monochromatic light, waveform of the monochromatic light, and spatial uniformity of the monochromatic and bias lights; the errors depend on the light source, PV technology, and measurement system. The quantum efficiency can be a function of he voltage bias, light bias level, and, for some structures, the spectral content of the bias light or location on the PV device. This paper compares the advantages and problems associated with semiconductor-detector-based calibrations and pyroelectric-detector-based calibrations. Different current-to-voltage conversion and ac photo-current detection strategies employed at NREL are compared and contrasted.

  12. Parametric Explosion Spectral Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2012-01-19

    Small underground nuclear explosions need to be confidently detected, identified, and characterized in regions of the world where they have never before occurred. We develop a parametric model of the nuclear explosion seismic source spectrum derived from regional phases that is compatible with earthquake-based geometrical spreading and attenuation. Earthquake spectra are fit with a generalized version of the Brune spectrum, which is a three-parameter model that describes the long-period level, corner-frequency, and spectral slope at high-frequencies. Explosion spectra can be fit with similar spectral models whose parameters are then correlated with near-source geology and containment conditions. We observe a correlation of high gas-porosity (low-strength) with increased spectral slope. The relationship between the parametric equations and the geologic and containment conditions will assist in our physical understanding of the nuclear explosion source.

  13. Terzan 5 transient IGR J17480-2446: variation of burst and spectral properties with spectral states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Manoneeta; Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Mukherjee, Arunava

    2011-11-01

    We study the spectral-state evolution of the Terzan 5 transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary IGR J17480-2446, and how the best-fitting spectral parameters and burst properties evolved with these states, using the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer data. As reported by other authors, this is the second source that showed transitions between atoll state and 'Z' state. We find large-scale hysteresis in the almost 'C'-like hardness-intensity track of the source in the atoll state. This discovery is likely to provide a missing piece of the jigsaw puzzle involving various types of hardness-intensity tracks from 'q' shaped for Aquila X-1, 4U 1608-52 and many black holes to 'C' shaped for many atoll sources. Furthermore, the regular pulsations, a diagonal transition between soft and hard states, and the large-scale hysteresis observed from IGR J17480-2446 argue against some of the previous suggestions involving magnetic field about atolls and millisecond pulsars. Our results also suggest that the nature of spectral evolution throughout an outburst does not, at least entirely, depend on the peak luminosity of the outburst. Besides, the source took at least a month to trace the softer banana state, as opposed to a few hours to a day, which is typical for an atoll source. In addition, while the soft colour usually increases with intensity in the softer portion of an atoll source, IGR J17480-2446 showed an opposite behaviour. From the detailed spectral fitting, we conclude that a blackbody+power-law model is the simplest one, which describes the source continuum spectra well throughout the outburst. We find that these two spectral components were plausibly connected to each other, and they worked together to cause the source-state evolution. Spectral parameters smoothly changed as IGR J17480-2446 transitioned between the atoll state and 'Z' state, and thermonuclear bursts disappeared in the softer parts of 'Z' tracks. Finally, based on the burst properties, we suggest that IGR

  14. Shortwave spectral radiative forcing of cumulus clouds from surface observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassianov, E.; Barnard, J.; Berg, L. K.; Long, C. N.; Flynn, C.

    2011-04-01

    The spectral changes of the shortwave total, direct and diffuse cloud radiative forcing (CRF) at surface are examined for the first time using spectrally resolved all-sky flux observations and clear-sky fluxes. The latter are computed applying a physically based approach, which accounts for the spectral changes of aerosol optical properties and surface albedo. Application of this approach to 13 summertime days with single-layer continental cumuli demonstrates: (i) the substantial contribution of the diffuse component to the total CRF, (ii) the well-defined spectral variations of total CRF in the visible spectral region, and (iii) the strong statistical relationship between spectral (500 nm) and shortwave broadband values of total CRF. Our results suggest that the framework based on the visible narrowband fluxes can provide important radiative quantities for rigorous evaluation of radiative transfer parameterizations and also can be applied for estimation of the shortwave broadband CRF.

  15. Retrieval of spheroid particle size distribution from spectral extinction data in the independent mode using PCA approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hong; Lin, Jian-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    An improved anomalous diffraction approximation (ADA) method is presented for calculating the extinction efficiency of spheroids firstly. In this approach, the extinction efficiency of spheroid particles can be calculated with good accuracy and high efficiency in a wider size range by combining the Latimer method and the ADA theory, and this method can present a more general expression for calculating the extinction efficiency of spheroid particles with various complex refractive indices and aspect ratios. Meanwhile, the visible spectral extinction with varied spheroid particle size distributions and complex refractive indices is surveyed. Furthermore, a selection principle about the spectral extinction data is developed based on PCA (principle component analysis) of first derivative spectral extinction. By calculating the contribution rate of first derivative spectral extinction, the spectral extinction with more significant features can be selected as the input data, and those with less features is removed from the inversion data. In addition, we propose an improved Tikhonov iteration method to retrieve the spheroid particle size distributions in the independent mode. Simulation experiments indicate that the spheroid particle size distributions obtained with the proposed method coincide fairly well with the given distributions, and this inversion method provides a simple, reliable and efficient method to retrieve the spheroid particle size distributions from the spectral extinction data.

  16. Vinyl capped addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D. (Inventor); Malarik, Diane C. (Inventor); Delvigs, Peter (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimide resins (PMR) are generally useful where high strength and temperature capabilities are required (at temperatures up to about 700 F). Polyimide resins are particularly useful in applications such as jet engine compressor components, for example, blades, vanes, air seals, air splitters, and engine casing parts. Aromatic vinyl capped addition polyimides are obtained by reacting a diamine, an ester of tetracarboxylic acid, and an aromatic vinyl compound. Low void materials with improved oxidative stability when exposed to 700 F air may be fabricated as fiber reinforced high molecular weight capped polyimide composites. The aromatic vinyl capped polyimides are provided with a more aromatic nature and are more thermally stable than highly aliphatic, norbornenyl-type end-capped polyimides employed in PMR resins. The substitution of aromatic vinyl end-caps for norbornenyl end-caps in addition polyimides results in polymers with improved oxidative stability.

  17. Adaptation to spectrally-rotated speech.

    PubMed

    Green, Tim; Rosen, Stuart; Faulkner, Andrew; Paterson, Ruth

    2013-08-01

    Much recent interest surrounds listeners' abilities to adapt to various transformations that distort speech. An extreme example is spectral rotation, in which the spectrum of low-pass filtered speech is inverted around a center frequency (2 kHz here). Spectral shape and its dynamics are completely altered, rendering speech virtually unintelligible initially. However, intonation, rhythm, and contrasts in periodicity and aperiodicity are largely unaffected. Four normal hearing adults underwent 6 h of training with spectrally-rotated speech using Continuous Discourse Tracking. They and an untrained control group completed pre- and post-training speech perception tests, for which talkers differed from the training talker. Significantly improved recognition of spectrally-rotated sentences was observed for trained, but not untrained, participants. However, there were no significant improvements in the identification of medial vowels in /bVd/ syllables or intervocalic consonants. Additional tests were performed with speech materials manipulated so as to isolate the contribution of various speech features. These showed that preserving intonational contrasts did not contribute to the comprehension of spectrally-rotated speech after training, and suggested that improvements involved adaptation to altered spectral shape and dynamics, rather than just learning to focus on speech features relatively unaffected by the transformation.

  18. Spectral Analyses of the Nearest Persistent Ultraluminous X-Ray Source M 33 X-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Shan-Shan; Wang, Jun-Xian; Gu, Wei-Min; Lu, Ju-Fu

    2009-12-01

    We provide a detailed analysis of 12 XMM observations of the nearest persistent extragalactic ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX), M 33 X-8. No significant spectral evolution has been detected for the period of the observations, and therefore we combine the individual observations to increase the signal-to-noise ratio for a spectral fitting. The combined spectra are best fitted by a self-consistent p-free disk plus power-law component model with p = 0.571+0.032-0.030, kTin (inner disk temperature) = 1.38+0.09-0.08 keV, and the flux ratio of the p-free disk component to the power-law component being 0.63 : 0.37 in the 0.3-10 keV band. The fitting indicates that the black hole in M 33 X-8 is of ˜10odot, and accretes at a super-Eddington rate (˜1.5LEdd); also, the phase of the accretion disk is close to that of a slim disk (p = 0.5). We report, for the first time, that an extra power-law component is required in addition to the p-free disk model for ULXs. In super-Eddington cases, the power-law component may possibly result from an optically thin inner region of the disk or a Comptonized corona, similar to that of a standard thin disk.

  19. Estimating photoreceptor excitations from spectral outputs of a personal light exposure measurement device.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dingcai; Barrionuevo, Pablo A

    2015-03-01

    The intrinsic circadian clock requires photoentrainment to synchronize the 24-hour solar day. Therefore, light stimulation is an important component of chronobiological research. Currently, the chronobiological research field overwhelmingly uses photopic illuminance that is based on the luminous efficiency function, V(λ), to quantify light levels. However, recent discovery of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs), which are activated by self-contained melanopsin photopigment and also by inputs from rods and cones, makes light specification using a one-dimensional unit inadequate. Since the current understanding of how different photoreceptor inputs contribute to the circadian system through ipRGCs is limited, it is recommended to specify light in terms of the excitations of five photoreceptors (S-, M-, L-cones, rods and ipRGCs; Lucas et al., 2014). In the current study, we assessed whether the spectral outputs from a commercially available spectral watch (i.e. Actiwatch Spectrum) could be used to estimate photoreceptor excitations. Based on the color sensor spectral sensitivity functions from a previously published work, as well as from our measurements, we computed spectral outputs in the long-wavelength range (R), middle-wavelength range (G), short-wavelength range (B) and broadband range (W) under 52 CIE illuminants (25 daylight illuminants, 27 fluorescent lights). We also computed the photoreceptor excitations for each illuminant using human photoreceptor spectral sensitivity functions. Linear regression analyses indicated that the Actiwatch spectral outputs could predict photoreceptor excitations reliably, under the assumption of linear responses of the Actiwatch color sensors. In addition, R, G, B outputs could classify illuminant types (fluorescent versus daylight illuminants) satisfactorily. However, the assessment of actual Actiwatch recording under several testing light sources showed that the spectral outputs were subject to

  20. LCLS Spectral Flux Viewer

    2005-10-25

    This application (FluxViewer) is a tool for displaying spectral flux data for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). This tool allows the user to view sliced spatial and energy distributions of the photons selected for specific energies and positions transverse to the beam axis.

  1. Microwave spectral line listing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. F., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The frequency, intensity, and identification of 9615 spectral lines belonging to 75 molecules are tabulated in order of increasing frequency. Measurements for all 75 molecules were made in the frequency range from 26500 to 40000 MHz by a computer controlled spectrometer. Measurements were also made in the 18000 to 26500 MHz range for some of the molecules.

  2. Large Spectral Library Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Chilton, Lawrence K.; Walsh, Stephen J.

    2008-10-03

    Hyperspectral imaging produces a spectrum or vector at each image pixel. These spectra can be used to identify materials present in the image. In some cases, spectral libraries representing atmospheric chemicals or ground materials are available. The challenge is to determine if any of the library chemicals or materials exist in the hyperspectral image. The number of spectra in these libraries can be very large, far exceeding the number of spectral channels collected in the ¯eld. Suppose an image pixel contains a mixture of p spectra from the library. Is it possible to uniquely identify these p spectra? We address this question in this paper and refer to it as the Large Spectral Library (LSL) problem. We show how to determine if unique identi¯cation is possible for any given library. We also show that if p is small compared to the number of spectral channels, it is very likely that unique identi¯cation is possible. We show that unique identi¯cation becomes less likely as p increases.

  3. Solar Spectral Irradiance Changes During Cycle 24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchenko, Sergey; Deland, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    We use solar spectra obtained by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on board the Aura satellite to detect and follow long-term (years) and short-term (weeks) changes in the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) in the 265-500 nm spectral range. During solar Cycle 24, in the relatively line-free regions the SSI changed by approximately 0.6% +/- 0.2% around 265 nm. These changes gradually diminish to 0.15% +/- 0.20% at 500 nm. All strong spectral lines and blends, with the notable exception of the upper Balmer lines, vary in unison with the solar "continuum." Besides the lines with strong chromospheric components, the most involved species include Fe I blends and all prominent CH, NH, and CN spectral bands. Following the general trend seen in the solar "continuum," the variability of spectral lines also decreases toward longer wavelengths. The long-term solar cycle SSI changes are closely, to within the quoted 0.1%-0.2% uncertainties, matched by the appropriately adjusted short-term SSI variations derived from the 27 day rotational modulation cycles. This further strengthens and broadens the prevailing notion about the general scalability of the UV SSI variability to the emissivity changes in the Mg II 280 nm doublet on timescales from weeks to years. We also detect subtle deviations from this general rule: the prominent spectral lines and blends at lambda approximately or greater than 350 nm show slightly more pronounced 27 day SSI changes when compared to the long-term (years) trends. We merge the solar data from Cycle 21 with the current Cycle 24 OMI and GOME-2 observations and provide normalized SSI variations for the 170-795 nm spectral region.

  4. Solar spectral irradiance changes during cycle 24

    SciTech Connect

    Marchenko, S. V.; DeLand, M. T.

    2014-07-10

    We use solar spectra obtained by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on board the Aura satellite to detect and follow long-term (years) and short-term (weeks) changes in the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) in the 265-500 nm spectral range. During solar Cycle 24, in the relatively line-free regions the SSI changed by ∼0.6% ± 0.2% around 265 nm. These changes gradually diminish to 0.15% ± 0.20% at 500 nm. All strong spectral lines and blends, with the notable exception of the upper Balmer lines, vary in unison with the solar 'continuum'. Besides the lines with strong chromospheric components, the most involved species include Fe I blends and all prominent CH, NH, and CN spectral bands. Following the general trend seen in the solar 'continuum', the variability of spectral lines also decreases toward longer wavelengths. The long-term solar cycle SSI changes are closely, to within the quoted 0.1%-0.2% uncertainties, matched by the appropriately adjusted short-term SSI variations derived from the 27 day rotational modulation cycles. This further strengthens and broadens the prevailing notion about the general scalability of the UV SSI variability to the emissivity changes in the Mg II 280 nm doublet on timescales from weeks to years. We also detect subtle deviations from this general rule: the prominent spectral lines and blends at λ ≳ 350 nm show slightly more pronounced 27 day SSI changes when compared to the long-term (years) trends. We merge the solar data from Cycle 21 with the current Cycle 24 OMI and GOME-2 observations and provide normalized SSI variations for the 170-795 nm spectral region.

  5. Spectral imaging using forward-viewing spectrally encoded endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Zeidan, Adel; Yelin, Dvir

    2016-02-01

    Spectrally encoded endoscopy (SEE) enables miniature, small-diameter endoscopic probes for minimally invasive imaging; however, using the broadband spectrum to encode space makes color and spectral imaging nontrivial and challenging. By careful registration and analysis of image data acquired by a prototype of a forward-viewing dual channel spectrally encoded rigid probe, we demonstrate spectral and color imaging within a narrow cylindrical lumen. Spectral imaging of calibration cylindrical test targets and an ex-vivo blood vessel demonstrates high-resolution spatial-spectral imaging with short (10 μs/line) exposure times. PMID:26977348

  6. Spectral imaging using forward-viewing spectrally encoded endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zeidan, Adel; Yelin, Dvir

    2016-01-01

    Spectrally encoded endoscopy (SEE) enables miniature, small-diameter endoscopic probes for minimally invasive imaging; however, using the broadband spectrum to encode space makes color and spectral imaging nontrivial and challenging. By careful registration and analysis of image data acquired by a prototype of a forward-viewing dual channel spectrally encoded rigid probe, we demonstrate spectral and color imaging within a narrow cylindrical lumen. Spectral imaging of calibration cylindrical test targets and an ex-vivo blood vessel demonstrates high-resolution spatial-spectral imaging with short (10 μs/line) exposure times. PMID:26977348

  7. Modeling the spectral solar irradiance in the SOTERIA Project Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Luis Eduardo; Dudok de Wit, Thierry; Kretzschmar, Matthieu; Cessateur, Gaël

    The evolution of the radiative energy input is a key element to understand the variability of the Earth's neutral and ionized atmospheric components. However, reliable observations are limited to the last decades, when observations realized above the Earth's atmosphere became possible. These observations have provide insights about the variability of the spectral solar irradiance on time scales from days to years, but there is still large uncertainties on the evolu-tion on time scales from decades to centuries. Here we discuss the physics-based modeling of the ultraviolet solar irradiance under development in the Solar-Terrestrial Investigations and Archives (SOTERIA) project framework. In addition, we compare the modeled solar emission with variability observed by LYRA instrument onboard of Proba2 spacecraft.

  8. Analyzing rocket plume spectral data with neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Kevin W.; Krishnakumar, K. S.; Benzing, Daniel A.

    1995-01-01

    The Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD) system is under development to provide early-warning failure detection in support of ground-level testing of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Failure detection is to be achieved through the acquisition of spectrally resolved plume emissions and subsequent identification of abnormal levels indicative of engine corrosion or component failure. Two computer codes (one linear and the other non-linear) are used by the OPAD system to iteratively determine specific element concentrations in the SSME plume, given emission intensity and wavelength information. Since this analysis is extremely labor intensive, a study was initiated to develop neural networks that would model the 'inverse' of these computer codes. Optimally connected feed-forward networks with imperceptible prediction error have been developed for each element modeled by the linear code, SPECTRA4. Radial basis function networks were developed for the non-linear code, SPECTRA5, and predict combustion temperature in addition to element concentrations.

  9. Spectral observations of the extreme ultraviolet astronomical background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labov, S.; Bowyer, S.

    1988-01-01

    Observations in the FUV and soft X-ray bands suggest that the ISM contains several components of high-temperature gas (100,000-1 million K). If large volumes of local interstellar space are filled with this hot plasma, emission lines will be produced in the EUV. Diffuse EUV radiation, however, has only been detected with photometric instruments; no spectral measurements exist below 520 A. A unique grazing-incidence spectrometer to study the diffuse emission between 80 and 650 A with resolution 10-30 A was successfully flown on a sounding rocket in April 1986, and a preliminary analysis reveals several features. In addition to the expected interplanetary He I 584 A emission and the geocoronal He II 304 A emission, other features appear which may orginate in the hot ionized interstellar gas.

  10. [Standardization of technical methods for apple fluorescence canopy spectral detection].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xi-Cun; Zhao, Geng-Xing; Lei, Tong; Wang, Ling; Dong, Fang; Wang, Jing-An

    2010-06-01

    Aiming at spectral detection of apple fluorescence canopy, the present paper carried out spectral detection tests under different weather conditions, different detection times, and different detection heights and angles to apple canopy in the two years of 2008 and 2009, so as to analyze impacts of these factors on apple canopy spectral characteristics and explore standardized spectral detection methods for apple fluorescence canopy. The results indicated the regularity in spectral reflectance of apple fluorescence canopy to a certain degree under different conditions, especially in the 760-1 350 nm near-infrared bands. The authors found that canopy spectral reflectance declined along with the decrease in sunshine and it is appropriate to detect canopy spectrum in sunny days with few clouds. In addition, spectral reflectance tended to be stable when the wind scale was below grade 2. The discrepancy of canopy spectra is small during the time period from 10:00 to 15:00 of a day compared to that of other times. For maintaining stable spectral curves, the height of detector to apple canopy needed to be adjusted to cover the whole canopy within the field of view according to detection angle of the detector. The vertical or approximately vertical detection was the best for canopy spectral reflectance acquisition. The standardization of technical methods of spectral detection for apple fluorescence canopy was proposed accordingly, which provided theoretical references for spectral detection and information extraction of apple tree canopy.

  11. A comparative study of the thematic mapper and Landsat spectral bands from field measurement data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Henderson, K. E.

    1982-01-01

    Principal component and factor analysis techniques were applied to the spectral data collected over 27 field plots of various crops under varying agronomic conditions. The spectral data was integrated over the proposed thematic mapper bands and Landsat MSS spectral bands. The results were examined to compare the discrimination power of the thematic mapper. Previously announced in STAR as N81-33549

  12. Hyperfrequency components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-09-01

    The document has a collection of 19 papers (11 on technologies, 8 on applications) by 26 authors and coauthors. Technological topics include: evolution from conventional HEMT's double heterojunction and planar types of pseudomorphic HEMT's; MMIC R&D and production aspects for very-low-noise, low-power, and very-low-noise, high-power applications; hyperfrequency CAD tools; parametric measurements of hyperfrequency components on plug-in cards for design and in-process testing uses; design of Class B power amplifiers and millimetric-wave, bigrid-transistor mixers, exemplifying combined use of three major types of physical simulation in electrical modeling of microwave components; FET's for power amplification at up to 110 GHz; production, characterization, and nonlinear applications of resonant tunnel diodes. Applications topics include: development of active modules for major European programs; tubes versus solid-state components in hyperfrequency applications; status and potentialities of national and international cooperative R&D on MMIC's and CAD of hyperfrequency circuitry; attainable performance levels in multifunction MMIC applications; state of the art relative of MESFET power amplifiers (Bands S, C, X, Ku); creating a hyperfrequency functions library, of parametrizable reference cells or macrocells; and design of a single-stage, low-noise, band-W amplifier toward development of a three-stage amplifier.

  13. Component separations.

    PubMed

    Heller, Lior; McNichols, Colton H; Ramirez, Oscar M

    2012-02-01

    Component separation is a technique used to provide adequate coverage for midline abdominal wall defects such as a large ventral hernia. This surgical technique is based on subcutaneous lateral dissection, fasciotomy lateral to the rectus abdominis muscle, and dissection on the plane between external and internal oblique muscles with medial advancement of the block that includes the rectus muscle and its fascia. This release allows for medial advancement of the fascia and closure of up to 20-cm wide defects in the midline area. Since its original description, components separation technique underwent multiple modifications with the ultimate goal to decrease the morbidity associated with the traditional procedure. The extensive subcutaneous lateral dissection had been associated with ischemia of the midline skin edges, wound dehiscence, infection, and seroma. Although the current trend is to proceed with minimally invasive component separation and to reinforce the fascia with mesh, the basic principles of the techniques as described by Ramirez et al in 1990 have not changed over the years. Surgeons who deal with the management of abdominal wall defects are highly encouraged to include this technique in their collection of treatment options.

  14. Spectral Fingerprinting: The potential of VNIR-SWIR spectral characteristics for tracing sediment sources in a Spanish mesoscale catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosinsky, Arlena; Foerster, Saskia; Segl, Karl; Bronstert, Axel; Kaufmann, Hermann; Lopéz-Tarazón, José-Andrés

    2014-05-01

    Knowledge on the origin of suspended sediment can greatly facilitate erosion prevention and thus sustainable watershed management. One approach providing information on the origin of suspended sediments is the fingerprinting technique. It is based on the assumption that potential sediment sources can be discriminated and that the contribution of these sources to the sediment can be determined on the basis of distinctive characteristics (fingerprints). Recent studies indicate that VNIR-SWIR reflectance characteristics of soil may be a rapid, inexpensive alternative to traditional fingerprinting properties such as e.g. geochemical composition. In this study, we aim at further assessing the potential of this innovative sediment tracing technique, specifically whether (a) potential sediment sources can be reliably identified based on spectral features, (b) field derived source information (more rapid) is sufficient for spectral fingerprinting, (c) spectral fingerprints permit the quantification of source contribution, and (d) to examine changes in the relative contributions from different sources both, between and within individual storm events. Therefore, samples were collected in the Isábena catchment (445 km²) in the central Spanish Pyrenees: 1) soil samples from the main potential source areas and 2) suspended sediment samples during four flood events in autumn 2011 and spring 2012 at the catchment outlet and at several subcatchment outlets. In addition, 3) artificial mixtures of known proportions were produced from soil samples for testing of key assumptions in a controlled environment. Soil samples (1) were spectrally measured in the field using an ASD spectrometer and subsequently all samples (1-3) were dried and spectrally measured in the laboratory using the same equipment. Colour parameters and physically based features with relation to organic carbon, iron oxide and clay content were calculated from field- and laboratory spectra. Principal component

  15. Automated eXpert Spectral Image Analysis

    2003-11-25

    AXSIA performs automated factor analysis of hyperspectral images. In such images, a complete spectrum is collected an each point in a 1-, 2- or 3- dimensional spatial array. One of the remaining obstacles to adopting these techniques for routine use is the difficulty of reducing the vast quantities of raw spectral data to meaningful information. Multivariate factor analysis techniques have proven effective for extracting the essential information from high dimensional data sets into a limtedmore » number of factors that describe the spectral characteristics and spatial distributions of the pure components comprising the sample. AXSIA provides tools to estimate different types of factor models including Singular Value Decomposition (SVD), Principal Component Analysis (PCA), PCA with factor rotation, and Alternating Least Squares-based Multivariate Curve Resolution (MCR-ALS). As part of the analysis process, AXSIA can automatically estimate the number of pure components that comprise the data and can scale the data to account for Poisson noise. The data analysis methods are fundamentally based on eigenanalysis of the data crossproduct matrix coupled with orthogonal eigenvector rotation and constrained alternating least squares refinement. A novel method for automatically determining the number of significant components, which is based on the eigenvalues of the crossproduct matrix, has also been devised and implemented. The data can be compressed spectrally via PCA and spatially through wavelet transforms, and algorithms have been developed that perform factor analysis in the transform domain while retaining full spatial and spectral resolution in the final result. These latter innovations enable the analysis of larger-than core-memory spectrum-images. AXSIA was designed to perform automated chemical phase analysis of spectrum-images acquired by a variety of chemical imaging techniques. Successful applications include Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, X

  16. Experiments on turbulent flows in rough pipes: Spectral scaling laws and the spectral link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuniga Zamalloa, Carlo Cesar

    Motivated by a recently proposed theory that entails the existence of a "spectral link" between the turbulent energy spectra and the attendant turbulent mean velocity profile in a pipe flow, we establish new scaling laws for the turbulent energy spectra of pipe flows. These new scaling laws--- an inner scaling law and an outer scaling law---differ from the scaling laws that were predicated on Townsend's attached-eddy hypothesis in that they are proper analogues (or spectral counterparts) of the classical scaling properties of the turbulent mean velocity profile. To test the new scaling laws, we have recourse to (1) published computational data from direct numerical simulations and (2) new experimental data from unprecedented measurements, carried out in our laboratory, of the streamwise component of the turbulent energy spectrum on numerous locations along the radii of three rough-walled pipes, for flows spanning a decade in Reynolds number. We show that the new scaling laws are consistent with the turbulent energy spectra of both smooth- and rough- walled flows. In addition, we use the new experimental data to probe the spatial distribution of the streamwise turbulent kinetic energy u 2, the longitudinal integral length scale L 11, and the Kolmogorov length scale eta in turbulent rough-walled pipe flows. We document in our rough- pipe flows a striking phenomenon recently discovered in smooth-pipe flows: the occurrence of an outer peak in u+2 (y+), whose magnitude is an increasing function of the Reynolds number, but the Reynolds number where the outer peak emerges is an order of magnitude smaller than the corresponding Reynolds number in smooth pipes. Last, we carry out a comparative study of the three canonical wall-bounded turbulent flows: pipe flow, channel flow, and boundary layer flow. We are able to trace the similarities and disparities among the turbulent mean velocity profiles of the three canonical flows to corresponding similarities and disparities

  17. Spectral properties of ghost Neumann matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Bonora, L.; Santos, R. J. Scherer; Tolla, D. D.

    2008-05-15

    We continue the analysis of the ghost wedge states in the oscillator formalism by studying the spectral properties of the ghost matrices of Neumann coefficients. We show that the traditional spectral representation is not valid for these matrices and propose a new heuristic formula that allows one to reconstruct them from the knowledge of their eigenvalues and eigenvectors. It turns out that additional data, which we call boundary data, are needed in order to actually implement the reconstruction. In particular our result lends support to the conjecture that there exists a ghost three strings vertex with properties parallel to those of the matter three strings vertex.

  18. KADATH: A spectral solver for theoretical physics

    SciTech Connect

    Grandclement, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    KADATH is a library that implements spectral methods in a very modular manner. It is designed to solve a wide class of problems that arise in the context of theoretical physics. Several types of coordinates are implemented and additional geometries can be easily encoded. Partial differential equations of various types are discretized by means of spectral methods. The resulting system is solved using a Newton-Raphson iteration. Doing so, KADATH is able to deal with strongly non-linear situations. The algorithms are validated by applying the library to four different problems of contemporary physics, in the fields of gauge field theory and general relativity.

  19. Additional Insights into the Obtusallene Family: Components of Laurencia marilzae.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Cepeda, Adrián; Fernández, José J; Norte, Manuel; López-Rodríguez, Matías; Brito, Iván; Muller, Christian D; Souto, María L

    2016-04-22

    The obtusallenes are a significant subset of C15-halogenated acetogenins that incorporate 12-membered cyclic ethers. We have recently reported the isolation from Laurencia marilzae of 12-epoxyobtusallene IV (1) and its related α,β-unsaturated carboxylate ester (2), both of special biogenetic relevance. Here we describe the final step of our study, the isolation of three new analogues (3-5), among these, the first bromopropargylic derivative (3) of this class of macrocyclic C15-acetogenins. The structures were elucidated by analysis of NMR and X-ray data. 12-Epoxyobtusallene IV (1), its new isomer 4, and known obtusallene IV (6) were evaluated for their apoptosis-inducing activities in a human hepatocarcinoma cell line.

  20. 40 CFR 141.719 - Additional filtration toolbox components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... using the following equation: LRV = LOG10(Cf)−LOG10(Cp) Where: LRV = log removal value demonstrated during challenge testing; Cf = the feed concentration measured during the challenge test; and Cp = the... filtrate, then the term Cp must be set equal to the detection limit. (8) Each filter tested must...

  1. 40 CFR 141.719 - Additional filtration toolbox components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... using the following equation: LRV = LOG10(Cf)−LOG10(Cp) Where: LRV = log removal value demonstrated during challenge testing; Cf = the feed concentration measured during the challenge test; and Cp = the... filtrate, then the term Cp must be set equal to the detection limit. (8) Each filter tested must...

  2. 40 CFR 141.719 - Additional filtration toolbox components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... using the following equation: LRV = LOG10(Cf)−LOG10(Cp) Where: LRV = log removal value demonstrated during challenge testing; Cf = the feed concentration measured during the challenge test; and Cp = the... filtrate, then the term Cp must be set equal to the detection limit. (8) Each filter tested must...

  3. 40 CFR 141.719 - Additional filtration toolbox components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... using the following equation: LRV = LOG10(Cf)−LOG10(Cp) Where: LRV = log removal value demonstrated during challenge testing; Cf = the feed concentration measured during the challenge test; and Cp = the... filtrate, then the term Cp must be set equal to the detection limit. (8) Each filter tested must...

  4. 40 CFR 141.719 - Additional filtration toolbox components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... using the following equation: LRV = LOG10(Cf)−LOG10(Cp) Where: LRV = log removal value demonstrated during challenge testing; Cf = the feed concentration measured during the challenge test; and Cp = the... filtrate, then the term Cp must be set equal to the detection limit. (8) Each filter tested must...

  5. DSDEPROJ: Direct Spectral Deprojection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Jeremy; Russell, Helen

    2016-10-01

    Deprojection of X-ray data by methods such as PROJCT, which are model dependent, can produce large and unphysical oscillating temperature profiles. Direct Spectral Deprojection (DSDEPROJ) solves some of the issues inherent to model-dependent deprojection routines. DSDEPROJ is a model-independent approach, assuming only spherical symmetry, which subtracts projected spectra from each successive annulus to produce a set of deprojected spectra.

  6. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online.

  7. Principal components analysis of Jupiter VIMS spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bellucci, G.; Formisano, V.; D'Aversa, E.; Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Bibring, J.-P.; Buratti, B.J.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R.N.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; McCord, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, C.; Chamberlain, M.C.; Hansen, G.; Hibbits, K.; Showalter, M.; Filacchione, G.

    2004-01-01

    During Cassini - Jupiter flyby occurred in December 2000, Visual-Infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) instrument took several image cubes of Jupiter at different phase angles and distances. We have analysed the spectral images acquired by the VIMS visual channel by means of a principal component analysis technique (PCA). The original data set consists of 96 spectral images in the 0.35-1.05 ??m wavelength range. The product of the analysis are new PC bands, which contain all the spectral variance of the original data. These new components have been used to produce a map of Jupiter made of seven coherent spectral classes. The map confirms previously published work done on the Great Red Spot by using NIMS data. Some other new findings, presently under investigation, are presented. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  8. Spectral tailoring device

    DOEpatents

    Brager, H.R.; Schenter, R.E.; Carter, L.L.; Karnesky, R.A.

    1987-08-05

    A spectral tailoring device for altering the neutron energy spectra and flux of neutrons in a fast reactor thereby selectively to enhance or inhibit the transmutation rate of a target metrical to form a product isotope. Neutron moderators, neutron filters, neutron absorbers and neutron reflectors may be used as spectral tailoring devices. Depending on the intended use for the device, a member from each of these four classes of materials could be used singularly, or in combination, to provide a preferred neutron energy spectra and flux of the neutrons in the region of the target material. In one embodiment of the invention, an assembly is provided for enhancing the production of isotopes, such as cobalt 60 and gadolinium 153. In another embodiment of the invention, a spectral tailoring device is disposed adjacent a target material which comprises long lived or volatile fission products and the device is used to shift the neutron energy spectra and flux of neutrons in the region of the fission products to preferentially transmute them to produce a less volatile fission product inventory. 6 figs.

  9. Spectral and geometrical variation of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function of diffuse reflectance standards.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Alejandro; Rabal, Ana María; Campos, Joaquín; Pons, Alicia; Hernanz, María Luisa

    2012-12-20

    A study on the variation of the spectral bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of four diffuse reflectance standards (matte ceramic, BaSO(4), Spectralon, and white Russian opal glass) is accomplished through this work. Spectral BRDF measurements were carried out and, using principal components analysis, its spectral and geometrical variation respect to a reference geometry was assessed from the experimental data. Several descriptors were defined in order to compare the spectral BRDF variation of the four materials.

  10. Spectral analysis for automated exploration and sample acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberlein, Susan; Yates, Gigi

    1992-01-01

    Future space exploration missions will rely heavily on the use of complex instrument data for determining the geologic, chemical, and elemental character of planetary surfaces. One important instrument is the imaging spectrometer, which collects complete images in multiple discrete wavelengths in the visible and infrared regions of the spectrum. Extensive computational effort is required to extract information from such high-dimensional data. A hierarchical classification scheme allows multispectral data to be analyzed for purposes of mineral classification while limiting the overall computational requirements. The hierarchical classifier exploits the tunability of a new type of imaging spectrometer which is based on an acousto-optic tunable filter. This spectrometer collects a complete image in each wavelength passband without spatial scanning. It may be programmed to scan through a range of wavelengths or to collect only specific bands for data analysis. Spectral classification activities employ artificial neural networks, trained to recognize a number of mineral classes. Analysis of the trained networks has proven useful in determining which subsets of spectral bands should be employed at each step of the hierarchical classifier. The network classifiers are capable of recognizing all mineral types which were included in the training set. In addition, the major components of many mineral mixtures can also be recognized. This capability may prove useful for a system designed to evaluate data in a strange environment where details of the mineral composition are not known in advance.

  11. Spectral analysis for automated exploration and sample acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberlein, Susan; Yates, Gigi

    1992-05-01

    Future space exploration missions will rely heavily on the use of complex instrument data for determining the geologic, chemical, and elemental character of planetary surfaces. One important instrument is the imaging spectrometer, which collects complete images in multiple discrete wavelengths in the visible and infrared regions of the spectrum. Extensive computational effort is required to extract information from such high-dimensional data. A hierarchical classification scheme allows multispectral data to be analyzed for purposes of mineral classification while limiting the overall computational requirements. The hierarchical classifier exploits the tunability of a new type of imaging spectrometer which is based on an acousto-optic tunable filter. This spectrometer collects a complete image in each wavelength passband without spatial scanning. It may be programmed to scan through a range of wavelengths or to collect only specific bands for data analysis. Spectral classification activities employ artificial neural networks, trained to recognize a number of mineral classes. Analysis of the trained networks has proven useful in determining which subsets of spectral bands should be employed at each step of the hierarchical classifier. The network classifiers are capable of recognizing all mineral types which were included in the training set. In addition, the major components of many mineral mixtures can also be recognized. This capability may prove useful for a system designed to evaluate data in a strange environment where details of the mineral composition are not known in advance.

  12. Spectral methods for discontinuous problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abarbanel, S.; Gottlieb, D.; Tadmor, E.

    1985-01-01

    Spectral methods yield high-order accuracy even when applied to problems with discontinuities, though not in the sense of pointwise accuracy. Two different procedures are presented which recover pointwise accurate approximations from the spectral calculations.

  13. A spectral mimetic least-squares method

    SciTech Connect

    Bochev, Pavel; Gerritsma, Marc

    2014-09-01

    We present a spectral mimetic least-squares method for a model diffusion–reaction problem, which preserves key conservation properties of the continuum problem. Casting the model problem into a first-order system for two scalar and two vector variables shifts material properties from the differential equations to a pair of constitutive relations. We also use this system to motivate a new least-squares functional involving all four fields and show that its minimizer satisfies the differential equations exactly. Discretization of the four-field least-squares functional by spectral spaces compatible with the differential operators leads to a least-squares method in which the differential equations are also satisfied exactly. Additionally, the latter are reduced to purely topological relationships for the degrees of freedom that can be satisfied without reference to basis functions. Furthermore, numerical experiments confirm the spectral accuracy of the method and its local conservation.

  14. Automated spectral classification and the GAIA project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasala, Jerry; Kurtz, Michael J.

    1995-01-01

    Two dimensional spectral types for each of the stars observed in the global astrometric interferometer for astrophysics (GAIA) mission would provide additional information for the galactic structure and stellar evolution studies, as well as helping in the identification of unusual objects and populations. The classification of the large quantity generated spectra requires that automated techniques are implemented. Approaches for the automatic classification are reviewed, and a metric-distance method is discussed. In tests, the metric-distance method produced spectral types with mean errors comparable to those of human classifiers working at similar resolution. Data and equipment requirements for an automated classification survey, are discussed. A program of auxiliary observations is proposed to yield spectral types and radial velocities for the GAIA-observed stars.

  15. A spectral mimetic least-squares method

    DOE PAGES

    Bochev, Pavel; Gerritsma, Marc

    2014-09-01

    We present a spectral mimetic least-squares method for a model diffusion–reaction problem, which preserves key conservation properties of the continuum problem. Casting the model problem into a first-order system for two scalar and two vector variables shifts material properties from the differential equations to a pair of constitutive relations. We also use this system to motivate a new least-squares functional involving all four fields and show that its minimizer satisfies the differential equations exactly. Discretization of the four-field least-squares functional by spectral spaces compatible with the differential operators leads to a least-squares method in which the differential equations are alsomore » satisfied exactly. Additionally, the latter are reduced to purely topological relationships for the degrees of freedom that can be satisfied without reference to basis functions. Furthermore, numerical experiments confirm the spectral accuracy of the method and its local conservation.« less

  16. Evolution of the spectral index after inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Asgari, A.A.; Abbassi, A.H. E-mail: ahabbasi@modares.ac.ir

    2014-09-01

    In this article we investigate the time evolution of the adiabatic (curvature) and isocurvature (entropy) spectral indices after inflation era for all cosmological scales with two different initial conditions. For this purpose, we first extract an explicit equation for the time evolution of the comoving curvature perturbation (which may be known as the generalized Mukhanov-Sasaki equation). It would be cleared that the evolution of adiabatic spectral index severely depends on the initial conditions moreover, as expected it is constant only for the super-Hubble scales and adiabatic initial conditions. Additionally, the adiabatic spectral index after recombination approaches a constant value for the isocurvature perturbations. Finally, we re-investigate the Sachs-Wolfe effect and show that the fudge factor  1/3 in the adiabatic ordinary Sachs-Wolfe formula must be replaced by 0.4.

  17. Spectral evolution of young stellar objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Fred C.; Lada, Charles J.; Shu, Frank H.

    1987-01-01

    An evolutionary sequence, from protostars to pre-main sequence stars, for the classification of young stellar objects is derived by comparing the predictions of the theoretical protostar models of Adams and Shu (AS, 1986) with the morphological classification scheme of Lada and Wilking (1984). It is shown that the AS models adequately explain the emergent spectral energy distributions of unidentified objects with negative spectral indices in the mid-IR and near-IR in both Taurus and Ophiuchus. If the infalling dust envelope is then completely removed, the spectra of the underlying stars and nebular disks used by AS provide a natural explanation for the near-IR and mid-IR excesses and the positive spectral indices of embedded T Tauri stars. It is found that the addition of a simple physical model for residual dust envelopes can reproduce the far-IR excesses found in some of these T Tauri stars.

  18. High-resolution spectrally-resolved fiber optic sensor interrogation system based on a standard DWDM laser module.

    PubMed

    Njegovec, Matej; Donlagic, Denis

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents a spectrally-resolved integration system suitable for the reading of Bragg grating, all-fiber Fabry-Perot, and similar spectrally-resolved fiber-optic sensors. This system is based on a standard telecommunication dense wavelength division multiplexing transmission module that contains a distributed feedback laser diode and a wavelength locker. Besides the transmission module, only a few additional opto-electronic components were needed to build an experimental interrogation system that demonstrated over a 2 nm wide wavelength interrogation range, and a 1 pm wavelength resolution. When the system was combined with a typical Bragg grating sensor, a strain resolution of 1 με and temperature resolution of 0.1 °C were demonstrated experimentally. The proposed interrogation system relies entirely on Telecordia standard compliant photonic components and can thus be straightforwardly qualified for use within the range of demanding applications.

  19. Modern spectral transmissometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgerson, Mark J.; Bartz, Robert; Zaneveld, J. Ronald V.; Kitchen, James C.

    1990-09-01

    We have evaluated a number of spectral attenuation meter designs based on constraints related to power consumption, spectral bandwidth, sampling time, accuracy and stability . Our fmal instrument design employs a unique optical bridge deve1oped1r Sea Tech with ONR support, a tungsten light source and a holographic grating monochromatorThe instrument design is summarized as follows: White light from a 10-Watt tungsten lamp with a 1mm2 filament is collected by a condensing lens and then spatially filtered by a 1mm diameter pinhole which is placed at the entrance port of a monochromator. The monochromator has a 45°, 1200 lines/mm, holographic grating 37 mm in diameter with a 91 mm focal length. The grating is rotated about its vertical axis with a sine arm driven by a stepping motor, allowing wavelength to be selected from 400 to 800 nm. At the exit port of the monochromator we use a 1mm diameter pinhole which spectrally filters the output light, resulting in a spectral bandwidth of 9. 1 nm. This nearly monochromatic light is then measured by a unique reference detector with a 0.5mm diameter pinhole at its center, allowing light to be transmitted through the center of the detector. The transmitted light has a bandwidth of 4.5 nm. The monochromatic light is then collimated by a 50mm focal length achromatic lens and stopped down to a beam 1 cm in diameter. This light then enters the sample chamber. After passing through the sample the light is received by a 61mm focal length achromatic lens and is focused onto a signal detector with a diameter of 1.25mm. Digitized ratios ofreference detector to signal detector voltages allow transmission to be measured with an accuracy of 0.05% and a resolution of 0.01%. By monitoring temperature we were able to temperature compensate the instrument to within 0.05% transmission from 00 C to 25° C. Based on these results it is now possible to construct a spectral attenuation meter with the required sensitivity and accuracy to measure

  20. SWOC: Spectral Wavelength Optimization Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruchti, G. R.

    2016-06-01

    SWOC (Spectral Wavelength Optimization Code) determines the wavelength ranges that provide the optimal amount of information to achieve the required science goals for a spectroscopic study. It computes a figure-of-merit for different spectral configurations using a user-defined list of spectral features, and, utilizing a set of flux-calibrated spectra, determines the spectral regions showing the largest differences among the spectra.

  1. Spectral decomposition of AVIRIS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddis, Lisa; Soderblom, Laurence; Kieffer, Hugh; Becker, Kris; Torson, Jim; Mullins, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    A set of techniques is presented that uses only information contained within a raw Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) scene to estimate and to remove additive components such as multiple scattering and instrument dark current. Multiplicative components (instrument gain, topographic modulation of brightness, atmospheric transmission) can then be normalized, permitting enhancement, extraction, and identification of relative reflectance information related to surface composition and mineralogy. The technique for derivation of additive-component spectra from a raw AVIRIS scene is an adaption of the 'regression intersection method' of Crippen. This method uses two surface units that are spatially extensive, and located in rugged terrain. For a given wavelength pair, subtraction of the derived additive component from individual band values will remove topography in both regions in a band/band ratio image. Normalization of all spectra in the scene to the average scene spectrum then results in cancellation of multiplicative components and production of a relative-reflectance scene. The resulting AVIRIS product contains relative-reflectance features due to mineral absorption that depart from the average spectrum. These features commonly are extremely weak and difficult to recognize, but they can be enhanced by using two simple 3-D image-processing tools. The validity of these techniques will be demonstrated by comparisons between relative-reflectance AVIRIS spectra and those derived by using JPL standard calibrations. The AVIRIS data used in this analysis were acquired over the Kelso Dunes area (34 deg 55' N, 115 deg 43' W) of the eastern Mojave Desert, CA (in 1987) and the Upheaval Dome area (38 deg 27' N, 109 deg 55' W) of the Canyonlands National Park, UT (in 1991).

  2. Spectral element method and the delayed feedback control of chaos.

    PubMed

    Tweten, Dennis J; Mann, Brian P

    2012-10-01

    A spectral element approach is introduced to determine the Floquet exponents (FEs) of unstable periodic orbits (UPOs) stabilized by extended delayed feedback control (EDFC). The spectral approach does not require solving time-dependent eigenproblems that existing methods require. Instead, the spectral approach determines the stability of the delay differential equations of the system by numerical approximation. The method is capable of analyzing systems whose UPOs arise from bifurcations other than period-doubling. Results are presented for stabilizing UPOs in Duffing systems. The FEs calculated by the spectral approach are compared to published results for two examples. In both cases, the spectral method results agree well with those determined by previous methods. In addition, the spectral method was used to analyze a high-dimensional, asymmetrical system with a UPO in chaos arising from tori doubling following a Hopf bifurcation. PMID:23214670

  3. Curvature of the spectral energy distributions of blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Liang

    2014-06-20

    In this paper, spectral energy distributions (SED) of both synchrotron and inverse Compton (IC) components of a sample of Fermi bright blazars are fitted by a log-parabolic law. The second-degree term of the log parabola measures the curvature of an SED. We find a statistically significant correlation between the synchrotron peak frequency and its curvature. This result is in agreement with the theoretical prediction and confirms previous studies that dealt with a single source with observations at various epochs or a small sample. If a broken power law is employed to fit the SED, the difference between the two spectral indices (i.e., |α{sub 2} – α{sub 1}|) can be considered a 'surrogate' of the SED curvature. We collect data from the literature and find a correlation between the synchrotron peak frequency and the spectral difference. We do not find a significant correlation between the IC peak frequency and its curvature, which may be caused by a complicated seed photon field. It is also found that the synchrotron curvatures are on average larger than those of IC curvatures, and there is no correlation between these two parameters. As suggested by previous works, both the log-parabolic law of the SED and the above correlation can be explained by statistical and/or stochastic particle accelerations. Based on a comparison of the slops of the correlation, our result seems to favor stochastic acceleration mechanisms and emission processes. Additional evidence, including SED modeling, particle acceleration simulation, and comparisons between some predictions and empirical relations/correlations, also seems to support the idea that the electron energy distribution (and/or synchrotron SED) may be log-parabolic.

  4. On the Detection of Spectral Ripples from the Recombination Epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyanarayana Rao, Mayuri; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Udaya Shankar, N.; Chluba, Jens

    2015-09-01

    Photons emitted during cosmological hydrogen (500≲ z≲ 1600) and helium recombination (1600≲ z≲ 3500 for He ii \\to He i, 5000≲ z≲ 8000 for He iii \\to He ii) are predicted to appear as broad, weak spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background. We present a feasibility study for a ground-based detection of these recombination lines, which would uniquely probe astrophysical cosmology beyond the last scattering surface and provide observational constraints on the thermal history of the universe. We find that including sufficient signal spectral structure and maximizing signal-to-noise ratio, an octave band in the 2-6 GHz window is optimal; in this band the predicted signal appears as an additive quasi-sinusoidal component with amplitude about 8 nK embedded in a sky spectrum some nine orders of magnitude brighter. We discuss algorithms to detect these tiny spectral fluctuations in the sky spectrum by foreground modeling and introduce a maximally smooth function capable of describing the foreground spectrum and distinguishing the signal of interest. We conclude that detection is in principle feasible in realistic observing times provided that radio frequency interference and instrument bandpass calibration are controlled in this band at the required level; using Bayesian tests and mock data, we show that 90% confidence detection is possible with an array of 128 radiometers observing for 255 days of effective integration time. We propose APSERa—Array of Precision Spectrometers for the Epoch of Recombination—a dedicated radio telescope to detect these recombination lines.

  5. What Do Millimeter Continuum and Spectral Line Observations Tell Us about Solar System Bodies?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, Stefanie N.

    2013-01-01

    Solar system objects are generally cold and radiate at low frequencies and tend to have strong molecular rotational transitions. Millimeter continuum and spectral line observations provide detailed information for nearly all solar system bodies. At these wavelengths, details of the bulk physical composition of icy surfaces, the size and albedo of small objects, the composition of planetary atmospheres can be measured as well as monitoring of time variable phenomena for extended periods (not restricted to nighttime observations), etc. Major issues in solar system science can be addressed by observations in the millimeter/sub-millimeter regime such as the origin of the solar system (isotope ratios, composition) and the evolution of solar system objects (dynamics, atmospheric constituents, etc). ALMA s exceptional sensitivity, large spectral bandwidth, high spectral resolution, and angular resolution (down to 10 milliarcsec) will enable researchers for the first time to better resolve the smallest bodies in the solar system and provide detailed maps of the larger objects. Additionally, measurements with nearly 8 GHz of instantaneous bandwidth to fully characterize solar system object s spectrum and detect trace species. The spatial information and line profiles can be obtained over 800 GHz of bandwidth in 8 receiver bands to not only assist in the identification of spectral lines and emission components for a given species but also to help elucidate the chemistry of the extraterrestrial bodies closest to us.

  6. GMES Space Component: Programme overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschbacher, J.; Milagro-Perez, M. P.

    2012-04-01

    The European Union (EU) and the European Space Agency (ESA) have developed the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) programme as Europe's answer to the vital need for joined-up data about our climate, environment and security. Through a unique combination of satellite, atmospheric and Earth-based monitoring systems, the initiative will provide new insight into the state of the land, sea and air, providing policymakers, scientists, businesses and the public with accurate and timely information. GMES capabilities include monitoring and forecasting of climatic change, flood risks, soil and coastal erosion, crop and fish resources, air pollution, greenhouse gases, iceberg distribution and snow cover, among others. To accomplish this, GMES has been divided into three main components: Space, In-situ and Services. The Space Component, led by ESA, comprises five types of new satellites called Sentinels that are being developed by ESA specifically to meet the needs of GMES, the first of which to be launched in 2013. These missions carry a range of technologies, such as radar and multi-spectral imaging instruments for land, ocean and atmospheric monitoring. In addition, access to data from the so-called Contributing Missions guarantees that European space infrastructure is fully used for GMES. An integrated Ground Segment ensures access to Sentinels and Contributing Missions data. The in-situ component, under the coordination of the European Environment Agency (EEA), is composed of atmospheric and Earth based monitoring systems, and based on established networks and programmes at European and international levels. The European Commission is in charge of implementing the services component of GMES and of leading GMES overall. GMES services, fed with data from the Space and In-situ components, will provide essential information in five main domains, atmosphere, ocean and land monitoring as well as emergency response and security. Climate change has been added

  7. Calibration and characterization of spectral imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polder, Gerrit; van der Heijden, Gerie W.

    2001-09-01

    Spectral image sensors provide images with a large umber of contiguous spectral channels per pixel. This paper describes the calibration of spectrograph based spectral imaging systems. The relation between pixel position and measured wavelength was determined using three different wavelength calibration sources. Results indicate that for spectral calibration a source with very small peaks,such as a HgAr source, is preferred to arrow band filters. A second order polynomial model gives a better fit than a linear model for the pixel to wavelength mapping. The signal to noise ratio (SNR)is determined per wavelength. In the blue part of the spectrum,the SNR was lower than in the green and red part.This is due to a decreased quantum efficiency of the CCD,a smaller transmission coefficient of the spectrograph,as well as poor performance of the illuminant. Increasing the amount of blue light,using additional Fluorescent tube with special coating increased the SNR considerably. Furthermore, the spatial and spectral resolution of the system are determined.These can be used to choose appropriate binning factors to decrease the image size without losing information.

  8. Spectral reflectance measurements in the genus Sphagnum

    SciTech Connect

    Vogelmann, J.E.; Moss, D.M. . Complex Systems/Institute for the Study of Earth Oceans and Space)

    1993-09-01

    High-spectral resolution reflectance data were acquired in the laboratory for four species of Sphagnum (peat moss): S. cuspidatum, S. papillosum, S. fallax, and S. capillifolium. All four species had different spectral reflectance properties. Species differences were noted especially in the visible portion of the spectrum from 0.45 [mu]m to 0.70 [mu]m; some major spectral differences were also noted in the near infrared. Samples analyzed had much lower reflectance than typical green vegetation in the midinfrared region of the spectrum from 1.30 [mu]m to 2.40 [mu]m. In addition, Sphagnum had very pronounced water-related absorption features at about 1.00m [mu] and 1.20 [mu]m, unlike typical green vegetation. Spectral data acquired as samples were dried indicated large spectral increases with increasing dryness, especially in the midinfrared. Simulated Landsat Thematic Mapper 5/4 band ratio data were linearly related to the log of wet weight/dry weight. Reflectance from vegetation in the midinfrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum is strongly modified by water content. Peatlands are major sources of global methane and it has been found that methane evolution within these peatlands is related to water status within these peatlands is related to water status within the wetland. It may be possible to indirectly estimate methane flux using remote sensing data.

  9. Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Impacts on Silicon Photodiode Radiometers: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D. R.

    2011-04-01

    Inexpensive broadband pyranometers with silicon photodiode detectors have a non-uniform spectral response over the spectral range of 300-1100 nm. The response region includes only about 70% to 75% of the total energy in the terrestrial solar spectral distribution from 300 nm to 4000 nm. The solar spectrum constantly changes with solar position and atmospheric conditions. Relative spectral distributions of diffuse hemispherical irradiance sky radiation and total global hemispherical irradiance are drastically different. This analysis convolves a typical photodiode response with SMARTS 2.9.5 spectral model spectra for different sites and atmospheric conditions. Differences in solar component spectra lead to differences on the order of 2% in global hemispherical and 5% or more in diffuse hemispherical irradiances from silicon radiometers. The result is that errors of more than 7% can occur in the computation of direct normal irradiance from global hemispherical irradiance and diffuse hemispherical irradiance using these radiometers.

  10. Eliminating spectral distinguishability in ultrafast spontaneous parametric down-conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Poh, Hou Shun; Lim, Jiaqing; Lamas-Linares, Antia; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Marcikic, Ivan

    2009-10-15

    Generation of polarization-entangled photon pairs with a precise timing through down-conversion of femtosecond pulses is often faced with a degraded polarization entanglement quality. In a previous experiment, we have shown that this degradation is induced by spectral distinguishability between the two decay paths, in accordance with theoretical predictions. Here, we present an experimental study of the spectral compensation scheme proposed and first implemented by Kim and Grice [J. Mod. Opt. 49, 2309 (2002)]. By measuring the joint spectral properties of the polarization correlations of the photon pairs, we show that the spectral distinguishability between the down-converted components is eliminated. This scheme results in a polarization visibility of 97.9{+-}0.5% without any spectral filtering.

  11. Scientific Software Component Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, S.; Dykman, N.; Kumfert, G.; Smolinski, B.

    2000-02-16

    We are developing new software component technology for high-performance parallel scientific computing to address issues of complexity, re-use, and interoperability for laboratory software. Component technology enables cross-project code re-use, reduces software development costs, and provides additional simulation capabilities for massively parallel laboratory application codes. The success of our approach will be measured by its impact on DOE mathematical and scientific software efforts. Thus, we are collaborating closely with library developers and application scientists in the Common Component Architecture forum, the Equation Solver Interface forum, and other DOE mathematical software groups to gather requirements, write and adopt a variety of design specifications, and develop demonstration projects to validate our approach. Numerical simulation is essential to the science mission at the laboratory. However, it is becoming increasingly difficult to manage the complexity of modern simulation software. Computational scientists develop complex, three-dimensional, massively parallel, full-physics simulations that require the integration of diverse software packages written by outside development teams. Currently, the integration of a new software package, such as a new linear solver library, can require several months of effort. Current industry component technologies such as CORBA, JavaBeans, and COM have all been used successfully in the business domain to reduce software development costs and increase software quality. However, these existing industry component infrastructures will not scale to support massively parallel applications in science and engineering. In particular, they do not address issues related to high-performance parallel computing on ASCI-class machines, such as fast in-process connections between components, language interoperability for scientific languages such as Fortran, parallel data redistribution between components, and massively

  12. Spectral signature verification using statistical analysis and text mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCoster, Mallory E.; Firpi, Alexe H.; Jacobs, Samantha K.; Cone, Shelli R.; Tzeng, Nigel H.; Rodriguez, Benjamin M.

    2016-05-01

    In the spectral science community, numerous spectral signatures are stored in databases representative of many sample materials collected from a variety of spectrometers and spectroscopists. Due to the variety and variability of the spectra that comprise many spectral databases, it is necessary to establish a metric for validating the quality of spectral signatures. This has been an area of great discussion and debate in the spectral science community. This paper discusses a method that independently validates two different aspects of a spectral signature to arrive at a final qualitative assessment; the textual meta-data and numerical spectral data. Results associated with the spectral data stored in the Signature Database1 (SigDB) are proposed. The numerical data comprising a sample material's spectrum is validated based on statistical properties derived from an ideal population set. The quality of the test spectrum is ranked based on a spectral angle mapper (SAM) comparison to the mean spectrum derived from the population set. Additionally, the contextual data of a test spectrum is qualitatively analyzed using lexical analysis text mining. This technique analyzes to understand the syntax of the meta-data to provide local learning patterns and trends within the spectral data, indicative of the test spectrum's quality. Text mining applications have successfully been implemented for security2 (text encryption/decryption), biomedical3 , and marketing4 applications. The text mining lexical analysis algorithm is trained on the meta-data patterns of a subset of high and low quality spectra, in order to have a model to apply to the entire SigDB data set. The statistical and textual methods combine to assess the quality of a test spectrum existing in a database without the need of an expert user. This method has been compared to other validation methods accepted by the spectral science community, and has provided promising results when a baseline spectral signature is

  13. Spectral variability on Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erard, Stéphane

    2015-04-01

    Older ground-based observations are reprocessed in order to assess the spectral variability of Ceres surface before the beginning of observations by the Dawn spacecraft. Ceres was observed with NACO on the VLT in 2004 and 2005, producing resolved spectra of the disk under different attitudes. The data cover the range from 0.91-3.80 µm (J, H, K, and L bands), except in the telluric regions. They consist in spectral scans of the dayside, typically with 15 lines of 20 samples, an actual resolution of ~ 100 km, and a spectral resolution R~500 to 1500. A specific calibration scheme has been applied to preprocess the data and to evidence small compositional variations at the surface of Ceres. The major signatures observed are two bands centered at 3.06 and 3.30 µm, which exhibit significant spatial variations at this scale (5 to 10%). These features are best fit by ammoniated minerals (phyllosilicates or feldspars), although the lack of secondary hydration bands seems to rule out phyllosilicates. No significant absorption or variation is observed in J, H and K bands, consistently with [1]. No presence of ices (H2O, C02…) is detected, even at the poles. If Ceres was once rich in ices (e.g., [2]), this suggests a global resurfacing with melting of ices in the subsurface, and alteration under the influence of H2O and perhaps NH3, with reduced production of phyllosilicates. References [1] Carry et al (2012) Icarus 217, 20 [2] McCord, T. B. and C. Sotin (2005) JGR 110, 05009.

  14. Low-Cost Spectral Sensor Development Description.

    SciTech Connect

    Armijo, Kenneth Miguel; Yellowhair, Julius

    2014-11-01

    Solar spectral data for all parts of the US is limited due in part to the high cost of commercial spectrometers. Solar spectral information is necessary for accurate photovoltaic (PV) performance forecasting, especially for large utility-scale PV installations. A low-cost solar spectral sensor would address the obstacles and needs. In this report, a novel low-cost, discrete- band sensor device, comprised of five narrow-band sensors, is described. The hardware is comprised of commercial-off-the-shelf components to keep the cost low. Data processing algorithms were developed and are being refined for robustness. PV module short-circuit current ( I sc ) prediction methods were developed based on interaction-terms regression methodology and spectrum reconstruction methodology for computing I sc . The results suggest the computed spectrum using the reconstruction method agreed well with the measured spectrum from the wide-band spectrometer (RMS error of 38.2 W/m 2 -nm). Further analysis of computed I sc found a close correspondence of 0.05 A RMS error. The goal is for ubiquitous adoption of the low-cost spectral sensor in solar PV and other applications such as weather forecasting.

  15. Spectral Data Reduction via Wavelet Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaewpijit, S.; LeMoigne, J.; El-Ghazawi, T.; Rood, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The greatest advantage gained from hyperspectral imagery is that narrow spectral features can be used to give more information about materials than was previously possible with broad-band multispectral imagery. For many applications, the new larger data volumes from such hyperspectral sensors, however, present a challenge for traditional processing techniques. For example, the actual identification of each ground surface pixel by its corresponding reflecting spectral signature is still one of the most difficult challenges in the exploitation of this advanced technology, because of the immense volume of data collected. Therefore, conventional classification methods require a preprocessing step of dimension reduction to conquer the so-called "curse of dimensionality." Spectral data reduction using wavelet decomposition could be useful, as it does not only reduce the data volume, but also preserves the distinctions between spectral signatures. This characteristic is related to the intrinsic property of wavelet transforms that preserves high- and low-frequency features during the signal decomposition, therefore preserving peaks and valleys found in typical spectra. When comparing to the most widespread dimension reduction technique, the Principal Component Analysis (PCA), and looking at the same level of compression rate, we show that Wavelet Reduction yields better classification accuracy, for hyperspectral data processed with a conventional supervised classification such as a maximum likelihood method.

  16. Atmospheric parameters, spectral indexes and their relation to CPV spectral performance

    SciTech Connect

    Núñez, Rubén Antón, Ignacio Askins, Steve Sala, Gabriel

    2014-09-26

    Air Mass and atmosphere components (basically aerosol (AOD) and precipitable water (PW)) define the absorption of the sunlight that arrive to Earth. Radiative models such as SMARTS or MODTRAN use these parameters to generate an equivalent spectrum. However, complex and expensive instruments (as AERONET network devices) are needed to obtain AOD and PW. On the other hand, the use of isotype cells is a convenient way to characterize spectrally a place for CPV considering that they provide the photocurrent of the different internal subcells individually. Crossing data from AERONET station and a Tri-band Spectroheliometer, a model that correlates Spectral Mismatch Ratios and atmospheric parameters is proposed. Considering the amount of stations of AERONET network, this model may be used to estimate the spectral influence on energy performance of CPV systems close to all the stations worldwide.

  17. Nonlinear Spectral-Spatial Control and Localization of Supercontinuum Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neshev, Dragomir N.; Sukhorukov, Andrey A.; Dreischuh, Alexander; Fischer, Robert; Ha, Sangwoo; Bolger, Jeremy; Bui, Lam; Krolikowski, Wieslaw; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Mitchell, Arnan; Austin, Michael W.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2007-09-01

    We present the first observation of spatiospectral control and localization of supercontinuum light through the nonlinear interaction of spectral components in extended periodic structures. We use an array of optical waveguides in a LiNbO3 crystal and employ the interplay between diffraction and nonlinearity to dynamically control the output spectrum of the supercontinuum radiation. This effect presents an efficient scheme for optically tunable spectral filtering of supercontinua.

  18. Forest Species Identification with High Spectral Resolution Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, C. E., Jr.; Zhu, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Data collected over the Sleeping Bear Sand Dunes Test Site and the Saginaw Forest Test Site (Michigan) with the JPL Airborne Imaging Spectrometer and the Collins' Airborne Spectroradiometer are being used for forest species identification. The linear discriminant function has provided higher identification accuracies than have principal components analyses. Highest identification accuracies are obtained in the 450 to 520 nm spectral region. Spectral bands near 1,300, 1,685 and 2,220 nm appear to be important, also.

  19. Characterization of spectral irradiance system based on a filter radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, M. S.; Silva, T. F.; Duarte, I.; Correa, J. S.; Viana, D.; Sousa, W. A.; Almeida, G. B.; Couceiro, I. B.

    2016-07-01

    The spectral irradiance scale has been realized recently. It is based on a filter radiometer that was mounted and characterized. The optical system was assembled and the procedures of the methodology were defined, including the mounting of FEL lamp jig, alignment of the optical system, calibration of the instruments and optical devices used on the experimental system. The main uncertainty components were evaluated and the preliminary uncertainty budget of the spectral irradiance system is presented.

  20. Black Hole Spectral States and Physical Connections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomsick, John A.

    2006-01-01

    The dramatic changes seen in the X-ray spectral and timing properties of accreting black hole candidates (BHCs) provide important clues about the accretion and jet formation processes that occur in these systems. Dividing the different source behaviors into spectral states provides a framework for studying BHCs. To date, there have been three main classification schemes with Luminosity-based, Component-based, or Transition-based criteria. The canonical, Luminosity-based criteria and physical models that are based on this concept do not provide clear explanations for several phenomena, including hysteresis of spectral states and the presence of jets. I discuss the re-definitions of states, focusing on an application of the Component-based states to more than 400 RXTE observations of the recurrent BHC 4U 1630^17. We compare the X-ray properties for the recent 2002-2004 outburst to those of an earlier (1998) outburst, during which radio jets were observed. The results suggest a connection between hysteresis of states and major jet ejections, and it is possible that both of these are related to the evolution of the inner radius of the optically thick accretion disk.

  1. Black Hole Spectral States and Physical Connections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomsick, John A.

    2005-01-01

    The dramatic changes seen in the X-ray spectral and timing properties of accreting black hole candidates (BHCs) provide important clues about the accretion and jet formation processes that occur in these systems. Dividing the different source behaviors into spectral states provides a framework for studying BHCs. To date, there have been three main classification schemes with Luminosity-based, Component-based, or Transition-based criteria. The canonical, Luminosity-based criteria and physical models that are based on this concept do not provide clear explanations for several phenomena, including hysteresis of spectral states and the presence of jets. I discuss the re-definitions of states, focusing on an application of the Component-based states to more than 400 RXTE observations of the recurrent BHC 4U 1630-47. We compare the X-ray properties for the recent 2002-2004 outburst to those of an earlier (1998) outburst, during which radio jets were observed. The results suggest a connection between hysteresis of states and major jet ejections, and it is possible that both of these are related to the evolution of the inner radius of the optically thick accretion disk.

  2. Influence of magnetic-field-caused modifications of trajectories of plasma electrons on spectral line shapes: Applications to magnetic fusion and white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oks, E.

    2016-03-01

    A general framework for calculating shapes of hydrogen (or deuterium) spectral lines in strongly-magnetized plasmas with the allowance for spiraling trajectories of perturbing electrons has been developed. It has been shown that in this situation the first order term Φ(1)(B) of the Dyson expansion of the electron broadening operator does not vanish - in distinction to the case of rectilinear trajectories, where the first non-vanishing term appeared only in the second order. An example of the Lyα line has been used to illustrate the effects of the spiraling trajectories. It has been shown that the shape of each of the two σ-components can become a doublet: in addition to the shifted component, there can appear also an unshifted component. Moreover, the shape of each of the two σ-components can also become a triplet: in addition to the shifted and unshifted component, there can appear also a component shifted to the opposite wing of the line. Both the positions and the intensities of the shifted components depend strongly on the magnitude of Φ(1)(B). The primary effect in the entire spectral line is a significant increase of the ratio of the intensity of the central peak to the intensity of any of the two lateral peaks. As practical examples, magnetic fusion plasmas and plasmas of DA white dwarfs have been considered. It is shown that for both of these, physically very different objects, the allowance for the spiraling trajectories of perturbing electrons can be important.

  3. Methods for spectral image analysis by exploiting spatial simplicity

    DOEpatents

    Keenan, Michael R.

    2010-05-25

    Several full-spectrum imaging techniques have been introduced in recent years that promise to provide rapid and comprehensive chemical characterization of complex samples. One of the remaining obstacles to adopting these techniques for routine use is the difficulty of reducing the vast quantities of raw spectral data to meaningful chemical information. Multivariate factor analysis techniques, such as Principal Component Analysis and Alternating Least Squares-based Multivariate Curve Resolution, have proven effective for extracting the essential chemical information from high dimensional spectral image data sets into a limited number of components that describe the spectral characteristics and spatial distributions of the chemical species comprising the sample. There are many cases, however, in which those constraints are not effective and where alternative approaches may provide new analytical insights. For many cases of practical importance, imaged samples are "simple" in the sense that they consist of relatively discrete chemical phases. That is, at any given location, only one or a few of the chemical species comprising the entire sample have non-zero concentrations. The methods of spectral image analysis of the present invention exploit this simplicity in the spatial domain to make the resulting factor models more realistic. Therefore, more physically accurate and interpretable spectral and abundance components can be extracted from spectral images that have spatially simple structure.

  4. Methods for spectral image analysis by exploiting spatial simplicity

    DOEpatents

    Keenan, Michael R.

    2010-11-23

    Several full-spectrum imaging techniques have been introduced in recent years that promise to provide rapid and comprehensive chemical characterization of complex samples. One of the remaining obstacles to adopting these techniques for routine use is the difficulty of reducing the vast quantities of raw spectral data to meaningful chemical information. Multivariate factor analysis techniques, such as Principal Component Analysis and Alternating Least Squares-based Multivariate Curve Resolution, have proven effective for extracting the essential chemical information from high dimensional spectral image data sets into a limited number of components that describe the spectral characteristics and spatial distributions of the chemical species comprising the sample. There are many cases, however, in which those constraints are not effective and where alternative approaches may provide new analytical insights. For many cases of practical importance, imaged samples are "simple" in the sense that they consist of relatively discrete chemical phases. That is, at any given location, only one or a few of the chemical species comprising the entire sample have non-zero concentrations. The methods of spectral image analysis of the present invention exploit this simplicity in the spatial domain to make the resulting factor models more realistic. Therefore, more physically accurate and interpretable spectral and abundance components can be extracted from spectral images that have spatially simple structure.

  5. Spectral Element Agglomerate AMGe

    SciTech Connect

    Chartier, T; Falgout, R; Henson, V E; Jones, J E; Vassilevski, P S; Manteuffel, T A; McCormick, S F; Ruge, J W

    2005-05-20

    The purpose of this note is to describe an algorithm resulting from the uniting of two ideas introduced and applied elsewhere. For many problems, AMG has always been difficult due to complexities whose natures are difficult to discern from the entries of matrix A alone. Element-based interpolation has been shown to be an effective method for some of these problems, but it requires access to the element matrices on all levels. One way to obtain these has been to perform element agglomeration to form coarse elements, but in complicated situations defining the coarse degrees of freedom (dofs) is not easy. The spectral approach to coarse dof selection is very attractive due to its elegance and simplicity. The algorithm presented here combines the robustness of element interpolation, the ease of coarsening by element agglomeration, and the simplicity of defining coarse dofs through the spectral approach. As demonstrated in the numerical results, the method does yield a reasonable solver for the problems described. It can, however, be an expensive method due to the number and cost of the local, small dense linear algebra problems; making it a generally competitive method remains an area for further research.

  6. OSSE spectral analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purcell, W. R.; Brown, K. M.; Grabelsky, D. A.; Johnson, W. N.; Jung, G. V.; Kinzer, R. L.; Kroeger, R. A.; Kurfess, J. D.; Matz, S. M.; Strickman, M. S.

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of the spectra from the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) is complicated because of the typically low signal to noise (approx. 0.1 percent) and the large background variability. The OSSE instrument was designed to address these difficulties by periodically offset-pointing the detectors from the source to perform background measurements. These background measurements are used to estimate the background during each of the source observations. The resulting background-subtracted spectra can then be accumulated and fitted for spectral lines and/or continua. Data selection based on various environmental parameters can be performed at various stages during the analysis procedure. In order to achieve the instrument's statistical sensitivity, however, it will be necessary for investigators to develop a detailed understanding of the instrument operation, data collection, and the background spectrum and its variability. A brief description of the major steps in the OSSE spectral analysis process is described, including a discussion of the OSSE background spectrum and examples of several observational strategies.

  7. Refining spectral library searching.

    PubMed

    Rudnick, Paul A

    2013-11-01

    Spectral library searching has many advantages over sequence database searching, yet it has not been widely adopted. One possible reason for this is that users are unsure exactly how to interpret the similarity scores (e.g., "dot products" are not probability-based scores). Methods to create decoys have been proposed, but, as developers caution, may produce proxies that are not equivalent to reversed sequences. In this issue, Shao et al. (Proteomics 2013, 13, 3273-3283) report advances in spectral library searching where the focus is not on improving the performance of their search engine, SpectraST, but is instead on improving the statistical meaningfulness of its discriminant score and removing the need for decoys. The results in their paper indicate that by "standardizing" the input and library spectra, sensitivity is not lost but is, surprisingly, gained. Their tests also show that false discovery rate (FDR) estimates, derived from their new score, track better with "ground truth" than decoy searching. It is possible that their work strikes a good balance between the theory of library searching and its application. And as such, they hope to have removed a major entrance barrier for some researchers previously unwilling to try library searching.

  8. WHAT DO SPECTRAL LINE PROFILE ASYMMETRIES TELL US ABOUT THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE?

    SciTech Connect

    MartInez-Sykora, Juan; De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo; McIntosh, Scott W.

    2011-05-10

    Recently, analysis of solar spectra obtained with the EUV Imaging Spectrograph (EIS) onboard the Hinode satellite has revealed the ubiquitous presence of asymmetries in transition region (TR) and coronal spectral line profiles. These asymmetries have been observed especially at the footpoints of coronal loops and have been associated with strong upflows that may play a significant role in providing the corona with hot plasma. Here, we perform a detailed study of the various processes that can lead to spectral line asymmetries, using both simple forward models and state-of-the-art three-dimensional radiative MHD simulations of the solar atmosphere using the Bifrost code. We describe a novel technique to determine the presence and properties of faint secondary components in the wings of spectral line profiles. This method is based on least-squares fitting of observed so-called R(ed)B(lue) asymmetry profiles with pre-calculated RB asymmetry profiles for a wide variety of secondary component properties. We illustrate how this method could be used to perform reliable double Gaussian fits that are not over- or under-constrained. We also find that spectral line asymmetries appear in TR and coronal lines that are synthesized from our three-dimensional MHD simulations. Our models show that the spectral asymmetries are a sensitive measure of the velocity gradient with height in the TR of coronal loops. The modeled TR shows a large gradient of velocity that increases with height: this occurs as a consequence of ubiquitous, episodic heating at low heights in the model atmosphere. We show that the contribution function of spectral lines as a function of temperature is critical for sensitivity to velocity gradients and thus line asymmetries: lines that are formed over a temperature range that includes most of the TR are the most sensitive. As a result, lines from lithium-like ions (e.g., O VI) are found to be the most sensitive to line asymmetries. We compare the simulated line

  9. Out of bounds additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    Holshouser, Chris; Newell, Clint; Palas, Sid; Love, Lonnie J.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Lind, Randall F.; Lloyd, Peter D.; Rowe, John C.; Blue, Craig A.; Duty, Chad E.; et al

    2013-03-01

    Lockheed Martin and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working on an additive manufacturing system capable of manufacturing components measured not in terms of inches or feet, but multiple yards in all dimensions with the potential to manufacture parts that are completely unbounded in size.

  10. [Design of a Component and Transmission Imaging Spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Sun, Bao-peng; Zhang, Yi; Yue, Jiang; Han, Jing; Bai, Lian-fa

    2015-05-01

    In the reflection-based imaging spectrometer, multiple reflection(diffraction) produces stray light and it is difficult to assemble. To address that, a high performance transmission spectral imaging system based on general optical components was developed. On the basis of simple structure, the system is easy to assemble. And it has wide application and low cost compared to traditional imaging spectrometers. All components in the design can be replaced according to different application situations, having high degree of freedom. In order to reduce the influence of stray light, a method based on transmission was introduced. Two sets of optical systems with different objective lenses were simulated; the parameters such as distortion, MTF and aberration.were analyzed and optimized in the ZEMAX software. By comparing the performance of system with different objective len 25 and 50 mm, it can be concluded that the replacement of telescope lens has little effect on imaging quality of whole system. An imaging spectrometer is developed successfully according design parameters. The telescope lens uses double Gauss structures, which is beneficial to reduce field curvature and distortion. As the craftsmanship of transmission-type plane diffraction grating is mature, it can be used without modification and it is easy to assemble, so it is used as beam-split. component of the imaging spectrometer. In addition, the real imaging spectrometer was tested for spectral resolution and distortion. The result demonstrates that the system has good ability in distortion control, and spectral resolution is 2 nm. These data satisfy the design requirement, and obtained spectrum of deuterium lamp through calibrated system are ideal results.

  11. Heterodyne detection using spectral line pairing for spectral phase encoding optical code division multiple access and dynamic dispersion compensation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Foster, Mark; Khurgin, Jacob B; Cooper, A Brinton

    2012-07-30

    A novel coherent optical code-division multiple access (OCDMA) scheme is proposed that uses spectral line pairing to generate signals suitable for heterodyne decoding. Both signal and local reference are transmitted via a single optical fiber and a simple balanced receiver performs sourceless heterodyne detection, canceling speckle noise and multiple-access interference (MAI). To validate the idea, a 16 user fully loaded phase encoded system is simulated. Effects of fiber dispersion on system performance are studied as well. Both second and third order dispersion management is achieved by using a spectral phase encoder to adjust phase shifts of spectral components at the optical network unit (ONU).

  12. Interpreting the spectral behavior of MWC 314

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasca, A.; Miroshnichenko, A. S.; Rossi, C.; Friedjung, M.; Marilli, E.; Muratorio, G.; Busà, I.

    2016-01-01

    Context. MWC 314 is one of the most luminous stars in the Milky Way. Its fundamental parameters are similar to those of luminous blue variables (LBVs), although no large photometric variations have been recorded. Moreover, it shows no evidence of either a dust shell or a relevant spectral variability. Aims: The main purpose of this work is to clarify the origin of the radial velocity and line profile variations exhibited by absorption and emission lines. Methods: We analyzed the radial velocity (RV) variations displayed by the absorption lines from the star's atmosphere using high-resolution optical spectra and fitting the RV curve with an eccentric orbit model. We also studied the RV and profile variations of some permitted and forbidden emission lines of metallic ions with a simple geometric model. The behavior of the Balmer and He i lines has also been investigated. Results: Fourier analysis applied to the RV of the absorption lines clearly shows a 60-day periodicity. A dense coverage of the RV curve allowed us to derive accurate orbital parameters. The RV of the Fe ii emission lines varies in the same way, but with a smaller amplitude. Additionally, the intensity ratio of the blue/red peaks of these emission lines correlates with the RV variations. The first three members of the Balmer series as well as [N ii] lines display a nearly constant RV and no profile variations in phase with the orbital motion instead. The He i λ5876 Å line shows a strongly variable profile with broad and blue-shifted absorption components that reach velocities of ≤-1000 km s-1 in some specific orbital phases. Conclusions: Our data and analysis provide strong evidence that the object is a binary system composed of a supergiant B[e] star and an undetected companion. The emission lines with a non-variable RV could originate in a circumbinary region. For the Fe ii emission lines, we propose a simple geometrical two-component model where a compact source of Fe ii emission, moving

  13. Spectral and morphological analysis of the remnant of supernova 1987A with ALMA and ATCA

    SciTech Connect

    Zanardo, Giovanna; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Indebetouw, Remy; Chevalier, Roger A.; Matsuura, Mikako; Barlow, Michael J.; Gaensler, Bryan M.; Fransson, Claes; Lundqvist, Peter; Manchester, Richard N.; Baes, Maarten; Kamenetzky, Julia R.; Lakićević, Maša; Marcaide, Jon M.; Meixner, Margaret; Ng, C.-Y.; Park, Sangwook; and others

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive spectral and morphological analysis of the remnant of supernova (SN) 1987A with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The non-thermal and thermal components of the radio emission are investigated in images from 94 to 672 GHz (λ 3.2 mm to 450 μm), with the assistance of a high-resolution 44 GHz synchrotron template from the ATCA, and a dust template from ALMA observations at 672 GHz. An analysis of the emission distribution over the equatorial ring in images from 44 to 345 GHz highlights a gradual decrease of the east-to-west asymmetry ratio with frequency. We attribute this to the shorter synchrotron lifetime at high frequencies. Across the transition from radio to far infrared, both the synchrotron/dust-subtracted images and the spectral energy distribution (SED) suggest additional emission beside the main synchrotron component (S {sub ν}∝ν{sup –0.73}) and the thermal component originating from dust grains at T ∼ 22 K. This excess could be due to free-free flux or emission from grains of colder dust. However, a second flat-spectrum synchrotron component appears to better fit the SED, implying that the emission could be attributed to a pulsar wind nebula (PWN). The residual emission is mainly localized west of the SN site, as the spectral analysis yields –0.4 ≲ α ≲ –0.1 across the western regions, with α ∼ 0 around the central region. If there is a PWN in the remnant interior, these data suggest that the pulsar may be offset westward from the SN position.

  14. Spectral Investigation of Binary Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birlan, Mirel; Nedelcu, D.; Descamps, P.; Berthier, J.; Marchis, F.; Merouane, S.

    2008-09-01

    The number of binary asteroids increased in a significant manner during the last years. Multiple types of observations obtained in adaptive optics, photometry, and radar, allow the rethinking not only the dynamics of the asteroids, but also their physics. The spectroscopy of a binary system can play a key role for establish the mineralogical composition of components, and implicitly the range of their density. By the application of these considerations to the physical and dynamical models, the physical parameters such as the macro-porosity or the "rubble pile” structures could be derived. Observations of binary asteroid (854) Frostia, and binary candidates (1333) Cevenola, and (3632) Chaplin were carried out in the 0.8-2.5 µm spectral range using SpeX/IRTF in LowRes mode. The asteroids present features in both 1 and 2 µm regions, suggesting the presence of silicates in the surface composition. The analysis of slopes, band strengths, and the most probable mineralogical models will be presented.

  15. Spectrophotometric study of complexation equilibria with H-point standard addition and H-point curve isolation methods.

    PubMed

    Abdollahi, H; Zeinali, S

    2004-01-01

    The use of H-point curve isolation (HPCIM) and H-point standard addition methods (HPSAM) for spectrophotometric studies of complex formation equilibria are proposed. One step complex formation, two successive stepwise and mononuclear complex formation systems, and competitive complexation systems are studied successfully by the proposed methods. HPCIM is used for extracting the spectrum of complex or sum of complex species and HPSAM is used for calculation of equilibrium concentrations of ligand for each sample. The outputs of these procedures are complete concentration profiles of equilibrium system, spectral profile of intermediate components, and good estimation of conditional formation constants. The reliability of the method is evaluated using model data. Spectrophotometric studies of murexide-calcium, dithizone-nickel, methyl thymol blue (MTB)-copper, and competition of murexide and sulfate ions for complexation with zinc, are used as experimental model systems with different complexation stoichiometries and spectral overlapping of involved components.

  16. Separating Fractal and Oscillatory Components in the Power Spectrum of Neurophysiological Signal.

    PubMed

    Wen, Haiguang; Liu, Zhongming

    2016-01-01

    Neurophysiological field-potential signals consist of both arrhythmic and rhythmic patterns indicative of the fractal and oscillatory dynamics arising from likely distinct mechanisms. Here, we present a new method, namely the irregular-resampling auto-spectral analysis (IRASA), to separate fractal and oscillatory components in the power spectrum of neurophysiological signal according to their distinct temporal and spectral characteristics. In this method, we irregularly resampled the neural signal by a set of non-integer factors, and statistically summarized the auto-power spectra of the resampled signals to separate the fractal component from the oscillatory component in the frequency domain. We tested this method on simulated data and demonstrated that IRASA could robustly separate the fractal component from the oscillatory component. In addition, applications of IRASA to macaque electrocorticography and human magnetoencephalography data revealed a greater power-law exponent of fractal dynamics during sleep compared to wakefulness. The temporal fluctuation in the broadband power of the fractal component revealed characteristic dynamics within and across the eyes-closed, eyes-open and sleep states. These results demonstrate the efficacy and potential applications of this method in analyzing electrophysiological signatures of large-scale neural circuit activity. We expect that the proposed method or its future variations would potentially allow for more specific characterization of the differential contributions of oscillatory and fractal dynamics to distributed neural processes underlying various brain functions.

  17. Power Spectral Density Analysis of Electrodermal Activity for Sympathetic Function Assessment.

    PubMed

    Posada-Quintero, Hugo F; Florian, John P; Orjuela-Cañón, Alvaro D; Aljama-Corrales, Tomas; Charleston-Villalobos, Sonia; Chon, Ki H

    2016-10-01

    Time-domain features of electrodermal activity (EDA), the measurable changes in conductance at the skin surface, are typically used to assess overall activation of the sympathetic system. These time domain features, the skin conductance level (SCL) and the nonspecific skin conductance responses (NS.SCRs), are consistently elevated with sympathetic nervous arousal, but highly variable between subjects. A novel frequency-domain approach to quantify sympathetic function using the power spectral density (PSD) of EDA is proposed. This analysis was used to examine if some of the induced stimuli invoke the sympathetic nervous system's dynamics which can be discernible as a large spectral peak, conjectured to be present in the low frequency band. The resulting indices were compared to the power of low-frequency components of heart rate variability (HRVLF) time series, as well as to time-domain features of EDA. Twelve healthy subjects were subjected to orthostatic, physical and cognitive stress, to test these techniques. We found that the increase in the spectral powers of the EDA was largely confined to 0.045-0.15 Hz, which is in the prescribed band for HRVLF. These low frequency components are known to be, in part, influenced by the sympathetic nervous dynamics. However, we found an additional 5-10% of the spectral power in the frequency range of 0.15-0.25 Hz with all three stimuli. Thus, dynamics of the normalized sympathetic component of the EDA, termed EDASympn, are represented in the frequency band 0.045-0.25 Hz; only a small amount of spectral power is present in frequencies higher than 0.25 Hz. Our results showed that the time-domain indices (the SCL and NS.SCRs), and EDASympn, exhibited significant increases under orthostatic, physical, and cognitive stress. However, EDASympn was more responsive than the SCL and NS.SCRs to the cold pressor stimulus, while the latter two were more sensitive to the postural and Stroop tests. Additionally, EDASympn exhibited an

  18. Galileo 243 Ida System Spectral Observations Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granahan, J. C.

    2001-11-01

    On August 28, 1993 the Galileo spacecraft encountered the asteroid 243 Ida and its moon Dactyl. A variety of observations of this asteroid system were collected including visible wavelength (0.4-1.0 microns) imagery with the Solid State Imager (SSI) instrument and infrared wavelength (0.7-5.2 microns) with the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS). A new analysis of these observations has been conducted using band area analysis, band center measurement, and spectral similarity value measurement using the BAE SYSTEMS Hyperspectral Tool Kit. This abstract reports the initial results of this research effort. These data indicate that 243 Ida has an orthopyroxene/(orthopyroxene + olivine) ratio of about 0.28, a value consistent with that of LL chondrites. The ratio does not vary significantly for the portions of 243 Ida observed by the Galileo NIMS instrument. 243 Ida is a SIV subtype of the S type asteroid population. At least two spectral units were identified in a combined SSI and NIMS spectral data set. The primary difference is the amount of red slope present in the two spectral units. A larger red slope corresponds to regions of 243 Ida where ejecta from the crater Azurra are present. This evidence suggests that impacts enhance the red components of the 243 Ida spectrum, perhaps enhancing the NiFe content. Dactyl has a relatively deep absorption centered approximately at 0.97 microns with no significant two micron absorption features. This is a possible indicator of clinopyroxene and suggests partial melting or fractional crystallization processes occurred on Dactyl. Dactyl appears to be an SII subtype S type asteroid and is spectrally different from 243 Ida. Dactyl may have been produced by partial melting within the Koronis parent body while the 243 Ida region escaped such igneous processing. This study was made possible through support from NASA's Planetary Geology and Geophysics program.

  19. Demonstration of spectral calibration for stellar interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demers, Richard T.; An, Xin; Tang, Hong; Rud, Mayer; Wayne, Leonard; Kissil, Andrew; Kwack, Eug-Yun

    2006-01-01

    A breadboard is under development to demonstrate the calibration of spectral errors in microarcsecond stellar interferometers. Analysis shows that thermally and mechanically stable hardware in addition to careful optical design can reduce the wavelength dependent error to tens of nanometers. Calibration of the hardware can further reduce the error to the level of picometers. The results of thermal, mechanical and optical analysis supporting the breadboard design will be shown.

  20. Spectral monitoring of toluene and ethanol in gasoline blends using Fourier-Transform Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega Clavero, Valentin; Weber, Andreas; Schröder, Werner; Curticapean, Dan; Meyrueis, Patrick; Javahiraly, Nicolas

    2013-04-01

    The combination of fossil-derived fuels with ethanol and methanol has acquired relevance and attention in several countries in recent years. This trend is strongly affected by market prices, constant geopolitical events, new sustainability policies, new laws and regulations, etc. Besides bio-fuels these materials also include different additives as anti-shock agents and as octane enhancer. Some of the chemical compounds in these additives may have harmful properties for both environment and public health (besides the inherent properties, like volatility). We present detailed Raman spectral information from toluene (C7H8) and ethanol (C2H6O) contained in samples of ElO gasoline-ethanol blends. The spectral information has been extracted by using a robust, high resolution Fourier-Transform Raman spectrometer (FT-Raman) prototype. This spectral information has been also compared with Raman spectra from pure additives and with standard Raman lines in order to validate its accuracy in frequency. The spectral information is presented in the range of 0 cm-1 to 3500 cm-1 with a resolution of 1.66cm-1. This allows resolving tight adjacent Raman lines like the ones observed around 1003cm-1 and 1030cm-1 (characteristic lines of toluene). The Raman spectra obtained show a reduced frequency deviation when compared to standard Raman spectra from different calibration materials. The FT-Raman spectrometer prototype used for the analysis consist basically of a Michelson interferometer and a self-designed photon counter cooled down on a Peltier element arrangement. The light coupling is achieved with conventional62.5/125μm multi-mode fibers. This FT-Raman setup is able to extract high resolution and frequency precise Raman spectra from the additives in the fuels analyzed. The proposed prototype has no additional complex hardware components or costly software modules. The mechanical and thermal disturbances affecting the FT-Raman system are mathematically compensated by accurately

  1. Additive Manufacturing of Hybrid Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; Clem, Paul G.; Keicher, David; Hirschfeld, Deidre; Hall, Aaron C.; Bell, Nelson S.

    2016-07-01

    There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming hybrid circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer hybrid circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects. Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (AD), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. Finally, we show examples of hybrid circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or AD processes and conventional, established processes.

  2. Spectral ensemble ghost imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Nandan

    2015-07-01

    In the last few years, the field of ghost imaging has seen many new developments. From computational ghost imaging to 3D gh.ost imaging, this field has shown many interesting applications. But the method of obtaining an image in ghost imaging experiments still requires data to be recorded over a long duration of time due to averaging over many shots of data. We propose a method to get the intensity correlated images in one shot by averaging over different wavelength components rather than different time components. We derive the maximum number of wavelength components that can be used for a given multi-wavelength source. The applicability of this scheme is finally verified by numerical simulations.

  3. Diffusion bonding aeroengine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, G. A.; Broughton, T.

    1988-10-01

    The use of diffusion bonding processes at Rolls-Royce for the manufacture of titanium-alloy aircraft engine components and structures is described. A liquid-phase diffusion bonding process called activated diffusion bonding has been developed for the manufacture of the hollow titanium wide chord fan blade. In addition, solid-state diffusion bonding is being used in the manufacture of hollow vane/blade airfoil constructions mainly in conjunction with superplastic forming and hot forming techniques.

  4. Multi Spectral Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiering, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An optical imaging system provides automatic co-registration of a plurality of multi spectral images of an object which are generated by a plurality of video cameras or other optical detectors. The imaging system includes a modular assembly of beam splitters, lens tubes, camera lenses and wavelength selective filters which facilitate easy reconfiguration and adjustment of the system for various applications. A primary lens assembly generates a real image of an object to be imaged on a reticle which is positioned at a fixed length from a beam splitter assembly. The beam splitter assembly separates a collimated image beam received from the reticle into multiple image beams, each of which is projected onto a corresponding one of a plurality of video cameras. The lens tubes which connect the beam splitter assembly to the cameras are adjustable in length to provide automatic co-registration of the images generated by each camera.

  5. Spectral Domain Phase Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendargo, Hansford C.; Ellerbee, Audrey K.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    Spectral domain phase microscopy (SDPM) is a functional extension of optical coherence tomography (OCT) using common-path interferometry to produce phase-referenced images of dynamic samples. Like OCT, axial resolution in SDPM is determined by the source coherence length, while lateral resolution is limited by diffraction in the microscope optics. However, the quantitative phase information SDPM generates is sensitive to nanometer-scale displacements of scattering structures. The use of a common-path optical geometry yields an imaging system with high phase stability. Due to coherence gating, SDPM can achieve full depth discrimination, allowing for independent motion resolution of subcellular structures throughout the sample volume. Here we review the basic theory of OCT and SDPM along with applications of SDPM in cellular imaging to measure topology, Doppler flow in single-celled organisms, time-resolved motions, rheological information of the cytoskeleton, and optical signaling of neural activation. Phase imaging limitations, artifacts, and sensitivity considerations are discussed.

  6. Broadband ringdown spectral photography.

    PubMed

    Scherer, J J; Paul, J B; Jiao, H; O'Keefe, A

    2001-12-20

    A new technique that enables frequency-resolved cavity ringdown absorption spectra to be obtained over a large optical bandwidth by a single laser shot is described. The technique, ringdown spectral photography (RSP), simultaneously employs two key principles to record the time and frequency response of an optical cavity along orthogonal axes of a CCD array detector. Previously, the principles employed in RSP were demonstrated with narrow-band laser light that was scanned in frequency [Chem. Phys. Lett. 292, 143 (1998)]. Here, the RSP method is demonstrated using single pulses of broadband visible laser light. The ability to obtain broad as well as rotationally resolved spectra over a large bandwidth with high sensitivity is demonstrated. PMID:18364983

  7. Miniature spectrally selective dosimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, R. R.; Macconochie, I. O.; Poole, B. D., Jr. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A miniature spectrally selective dosimeter capable of measuring selected bandwidths of radiation exposure on small mobile areas is described. This is achieved by the combination of photovoltaic detectors, electrochemical integrators (E-cells) and filters in a small compact case which can be easily attached in close proximity to and substantially parallel to the surface being measured. In one embodiment two photovoltaic detectors, two E-cells, and three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a safety pin. In another embodiment, two detectors, one E-cell, three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a clip to clip over a side piece of an eye glass frame.

  8. Spectral tripartitioning of networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Thomas; Mucha, Peter J.; Porter, Mason A.

    2009-09-01

    We formulate a spectral graph-partitioning algorithm that uses the two leading eigenvectors of the matrix corresponding to a selected quality function to split a network into three communities in a single step. In so doing, we extend the recursive bipartitioning methods developed by Newman [M. E. J. Newman, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103, 8577 (2006); Phys. Rev. E 74, 036104 (2006)] to allow one to consider the best available two-way and three-way divisions at each recursive step. We illustrate the method using simple “bucket brigade” examples and then apply the algorithm to examine the community structures of the coauthorship graph of network scientists and of U. S. Congressional networks inferred from roll call voting similarities.

  9. Structural and Spectral Characteristics of Amorphous Iron Sulfates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklute, E.; Jensen, H. B.; Rogers, D.; Reeder, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Substantial evidence points to the existence of hydrated sulfate phases on the Martian surface1-3. In addition, the discovery of recurring slope lineae could point to an active brine hydrologic cycle on the surface4,5. The rapid dehydration of both hydrated sulfates and sulfate-rich brines can lead to the formation of amorphous sulfates. Evidence suggests that the Rocknest soil target and the Sheepbed mudstone interrogated by the Mars Science Laboratory at Gale crater contain ~30 wt.% XRD amorphous material that is rich in both sulfur and iron6. These factors have led us to consider hydrated amorphous iron sulfates as possible components in Martian surface materials. Amorphous iron sulfates were created through multiple synthesis routes, and then characterized with total x-ray scattering, TGA, SEM, visible/near-infrared (VNIR), thermal infrared (TIR), and Mössbauer techniques. We synthesized amorphous ferric sulfates (Fe(III)2(SO4)3•~5-8H2O) from sulfate-saturated fluids via two pathways: vacuum dehydration and exposure to low relative humidity (<11%) using a LiCl buffer. Amorphous ferrous sulfate (Fe(II)SO4•~1H2O) was synthesized via vacuum dehydration of melanterite (Fe(II) SO4•7H2O). We find that both the ferric and ferrous sulfates synthesized from these methods lack long-range (>10Å) order, and thus are truly amorphous. VNIR and TIR spectral data for the amorphous sulfates display broad, muted features consistent with structural disorder and are spectrally distinct from all crystalline sulfates considered for comparison. Mössbauer spectra are also distinct from all crystalline phase spectra available for comparison. The amorphous sulfates should be distinguishable based on the position of their Fe-related absorptions in the visible range and their spectral characteristics in the TIR. In the NIR, which is the spectral range that has primarily been used to detect sulfates on Mars, the bands associated with hydration at ~1.4 and 1.9 μm are significantly

  10. Singular value decomposition based regularization prior to spectral mixing improves crosstalk in dynamic imaging using spectral diffuse optical tomography.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yuxuan; Eggebrecht, Adam T; Culver, Joseph P; Dehghani, Hamid

    2012-09-01

    The spectrally constrained diffuse optical tomography (DOT) method relies on incorporating spectral prior information directly into the image reconstruction algorithm, thereby correlating the underlying optical properties across multiple wavelengths. Although this method has been shown to provide a solution that is stable, the use of conventional Tikhonov-type regularization techniques can lead to additional crosstalk between parameters, particularly in linear, single-step dynamic imaging applications. This is due mainly to the suboptimal regularization of the spectral Jacobian matrix, which smoothes not only the image-data space, but also the spectral mapping space. In this work a novel regularization technique based on the singular value decomposition (SVD) is presented that preserves the spectral prior information while regularizing the Jacobian matrix, leading to dramatically reduced crosstalk between the recovered parameters. Using simulated data, images of changes in oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin concentrations are reconstructed via the SVD-based approach and compared with images reconstructed by using non-spectral and conventional spectral methods. In a 2D, two wavelength example, it is shown that the proposed approach provides a 98% reduction in crosstalk between recovered parameters as compared with conventional spectral reconstruction algorithms, and 60% as compared with non-spectrally constrained algorithms. Using a subject specific multilayered model of the human head, a noiseless dynamic simulation of cortical activation is performed to further demonstrate such improvement in crosstalk. However, with the addition of realistic noise in the data, both non-spectral and proposed algorithms perform similarly, indicating that the use of spectrally constrained reconstruction algorithms in dynamic DOT may be limited by the contrast of the signal as well as the noise characteristics of the system.

  11. Spectral Automorphisms in Quantum Logics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Alexandru; Caragheorgheopol, Dan

    2010-12-01

    In quantum mechanics, the Hilbert space formalism might be physically justified in terms of some axioms based on the orthomodular lattice (OML) mathematical structure (Piron in Foundations of Quantum Physics, Benjamin, Reading, 1976). We intend to investigate the extent to which some fundamental physical facts can be described in the more general framework of OMLs, without the support of Hilbert space-specific tools. We consider the study of lattice automorphisms properties as a “substitute” for Hilbert space techniques in investigating the spectral properties of observables. This is why we introduce the notion of spectral automorphism of an OML. Properties of spectral automorphisms and of their spectra are studied. We prove that the presence of nontrivial spectral automorphisms allow us to distinguish between classical and nonclassical theories. We also prove, for finite dimensional OMLs, that for every spectral automorphism there is a basis of invariant atoms. This is an analogue of the spectral theorem for unitary operators having purely point spectrum.

  12. Method of multivariate spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Keenan, Michael R.; Kotula, Paul G.

    2004-01-06

    A method of determining the properties of a sample from measured spectral data collected from the sample by performing a multivariate spectral analysis. The method can include: generating a two-dimensional matrix A containing measured spectral data; providing a weighted spectral data matrix D by performing a weighting operation on matrix A; factoring D into the product of two matrices, C and S.sup.T, by performing a constrained alternating least-squares analysis of D=CS.sup.T, where C is a concentration intensity matrix and S is a spectral shapes matrix; unweighting C and S by applying the inverse of the weighting used previously; and determining the properties of the sample by inspecting C and S. This method can be used to analyze X-ray spectral data generated by operating a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with an attached Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS).

  13. [Thermal spectral property of prism in hyper spectral imager].

    PubMed

    Liang, Jiu-Sheng; Wu, Qing-Wen; Li, Ze-Xue; Chen, Li-Heng; Guo, Liang

    2010-06-01

    Prism is one of the most key parts in the hyper spectral imager (HSI). Consequently, to set thermal control target and make thermal control design, the thermal spectral property of prism in the HSI was studied. The working principle of the HSI and the definition of its thermal spectral property were introduced. The working environment of prism and its thermal effect were analyzed; also the study contents and technical route of the prism's thermal spectral property were discussed. The effects of different uniform temperature field on deflexion angle and angular dispersion of the prism in the HSI were deduced, and the changes in displacement of the spectra and the spectral bandwidth under different uniform temperature were obtained. For one instance, the thermal spectral property of the K9 prism and the fused silica prism were compared based on FEM and combined experiments, furthermore, its thermal control target was ascertained and a thermal spectral property test was carried out to validate the rationality of the thermal spectral property analysis. The results of analysis indicated that the changes in spectral bandwidth and spectrum resolution brought by thermal distortions can be ignored according to current fixing mode, and the displacement of the spectra is mainly determined by thermal coefficient of material refractive index; because of it's the lower thermal coefficient of material refractive index, the displacement of the spectra of the K9 prism is smaller under the same temperature changes; the material deflexion changes (dn/dlambda) of prism are not sensitive to the temperature, so the changes in spectral bandwidth caused by them are not obvious. And the results of test proved that the studied method of thermal spectral property is reasonable and essential, and the results are authentic and credible. So it can provide some guidance for setting thermal control target and optimizing thermal control design. PMID:20707180

  14. Spectrally tunable magnetic nanoparticles designed for distribution/recollection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowall, Nicholas B.; Wilkins, James R.; Carroll, Kyler J.; Edwards, Jarrod D.; Nelson, Jean D.; Carpenter, Everett E.; Glaspell, Garry P.

    2010-05-01

    The comprehensive goal of this research is the synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials that are spectrally tunable in terms of their electromagnetic signal, are robust, magnetic (allowing their piloted movement), and have the potential to be functionalized for the detection of CBRNE threats. Various chemical methods were utilized for synthesis of magnetic (iron) and luminescent rare earth (RE) components, and their mixtures. Effects of integrating an iron core into RE luminescent lattices (excited by UV, emit in the VIS) were investigated. The determination of the optimum balances between magnetic and luminescent components such that the magnetism was maximized while maintaining acceptable fluorescence integrity will be discussed. The emphasis of this work is focused on developing a distributed sensor suitable for use in the terrestrial environment. The robust properties of using a RE luminescent shell would allow the particles to be resistant to photobleaching. Additionally the chemical stability of the RE shell would allow operation in a variety of pH conditions. The magnetic core will ultimately allow the distributed particles to be recollected.

  15. Spectral distribution of solar radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mecherikunnel, A. T.; Richmond, J.

    1980-01-01

    Available quantitative data on solar total and spectral irradiance are examined in the context of utilization of solar irradiance for terrestrial applications of solar energy. The extraterrestrial solar total and spectral irradiance values are also reviewed. Computed values of solar spectral irradiance at ground level for different air mass values and various levels of atmospheric pollution or turbidity are presented. Wavelengths are given for computation of solar, absorptance, transmittance and reflectance by the 100 selected-ordinate method and by the 50 selected-ordinate method for air mass 1.5 and 2 solar spectral irradiance for the four levels of atmospheric pollution.

  16. Self-association of acetic acid in dilute deuterated chloroform. Wide-range spectral reconstructions and analysis using FTIR spectroscopy, BTEM, and DFT.

    PubMed

    Tjahjono, Martin; Cheng, Shuying; Li, Chuanzhao; Garland, Marc

    2010-11-25

    The binary solution of acetic acid in CDCl(3) was studied at room pressure on the interval T = 293-313 K with a series of acetic acid concentrations up to 0.16 M. In-situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy measurements on the interval of 400-3800 cm(-1) were utilized as the analytical method to monitor the spectral changes due to self-association of acetic acid. The band-target entropy minimization (BTEM) algorithm was employed to reconstruct the underlying pure component spectra. Analysis successfully provided two major spectral estimates of acetic acid, namely, the monomer (primarily in the form of monomer-CDCl(3) complex) and the centrosymmetric cyclic dimer. In addition, analysis provided one minor spectral estimate containing signals from both noncyclic dimers and higher aggregates. Also, spectral estimates were obtained for phosgene and water which were present at trace levels even though considerable precaution was taken to conduct the experiments under anhydrous and anaerobic conditions. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation was performed to assign the acetic acid structures corresponding to the BTEM spectral estimates. Since the structure of dilute acetic acid has been the subject of numerous studies, the present investigation helps to resolve some issues concerning the speciation of acetic acid at low concentrations in low polarity solvents. In particular, the present study provides for the first time, wide-range spectral reconstructions of the species present.

  17. Lithologic variation within bright material on Vesta revealed by linear spectral unmixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambon, F.; Tosi, F.; Carli, C.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Blewett, D. T.; Palomba, E.; Longobardo, A.; Frigeri, A.; Ammannito, E.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.

    2016-07-01

    Vesta's surface is mostly composed of pyroxene-rich lithologies compatible with howardite, eucrite and diogenite (HED) meteorites (e.g., McCord et al. [1970] Science, 168, 1445-1447; Feierberg & Drake [1980] Science, 209, 805-807). Data provided by the Visible and Infrared (VIR) spectrometer, onboard the NASA Dawn spacecraft, revealed that all Vesta reflectance spectra show absorption bands at ∼0.9 and ∼1.9 μm, which are typical of iron-bearing pyroxenes (De Sanctis et al. [2012] Science, 336, 697-700). Other minerals may be present in spectrally significant concentrations; these include olivine and opaque phases like those found in carbonaceous chondrites. These additional components modify the dominant pyroxene absorptions. We apply linear spectral unmixing on bright material (BM) units of Vesta to identify HEDs and non-HED phases. We explore the limits of applicability of linear spectral unmixing, testing it on laboratory mixtures. We find that the linear method is applicable at the VIR pixel resolution and it is useful when the surface is composed of pyroxene-rich lithologies containing moderate quantities of carbonaceous chondrite, olivine, and plagioclase. We found three main groups of BM units: eucrite-rich, diogenite-rich, and olivine-rich. For the non-HED spectral endmember, we choose either olivine or a featureless component. Our work confirms that Vesta's surface contains a high content of pyroxenes mixed with a lower concentration of other phases. In many cases, the non-HED endmember that gives the best fit is the featureless phase, which causes a reduction in the strength of both bands. The anticorrelation between albedo and featureless endmember indicates that this phase is associated with low-albedo, CC-like opaque material. Large amounts of olivine have been detected in Bellicia, Arruntia and BU14 BM units. Other sites present low olivine content (<30%) mostly with a high concentration of diogenite.

  18. A coarse-grained spectral signature generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, K. P.; Austin, J. C.; Day, C. R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates the method for object fingerprinting in the context of element specific x-ray imaging. In particular, the use of spectral descriptors that are illumination invariant and viewpoint independent for pattern identification was examined in some detail. To improve generating the relevant "signature", the spectral descriptor constructed is enhanced with a differentiator which has built-in noise filtration capability and good localisation properties, thus facilitating the extraction of element specific features at a coarse-grained level. In addition to the demonstrable efficacy in identifying significant image intensity transitions that are associated with the underlying physical process of interest, the method has the distinct advantage of being conceptually simple and computationally efficient. These latter properties allow the descriptor to be further utilised by an intelligent system capable of performing a fine-grained analysis of the extracted pattern signatures. The performance of the spectral descriptor has been studied in terms of the quality of the signature vectors that it generated, quantitatively based on the established framework of Spectral Information Measure (SIM). Early results suggested that such a multiscale approach of image sequence analysis offers a considerable potential for real-time applications.

  19. Fluorescence Spectral Dynamics of Single LHCII Trimers

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Tjaart P.J.; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I.; Ilioaia, Cristian; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Single-molecule spectroscopy was employed to elucidate the fluorescence spectral heterogeneity and dynamics of individual, immobilized trimeric complexes of the main light-harvesting complex of plants in solution near room temperature. Rapid reversible spectral shifts between various emitting states, each of which was quasi-stable for seconds to tens of seconds, were observed for a fraction of the complexes. Most deviating states were characterized by the appearance of an additional, red-shifted emission band. Reversible shifts of up to 75 nm were detected. By combining modified Redfield theory with a disordered exciton model, fluorescence spectra with peaks between 670 nm and 705 nm could be explained by changes in the realization of the static disorder of the pigment-site energies. Spectral bands beyond this wavelength window suggest the presence of special protein conformations. We attribute the large red shifts to the mixing of an excitonic state with a charge-transfer state in two or more strongly coupled chlorophylls. Spectral bluing is explained by the formation of an energy trap before excitation energy equilibration is completed. PMID:20550923

  20. Quantitative subpixel spectral detection of targets in multispectral images. [terrestrial and planetary surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabol, Donald E., Jr.; Adams, John B.; Smith, Milton O.

    1992-01-01

    The conditions that affect the spectral detection of target materials at the subpixel scale are examined. Two levels of spectral mixture analysis for determining threshold detection limits of target materials in a spectral mixture are presented, the cases where the target is detected as: (1) a component of a spectral mixture (continuum threshold analysis) and (2) residuals (residual threshold analysis). The results of these two analyses are compared under various measurement conditions. The examples illustrate the general approach that can be used for evaluating the spectral detectability of terrestrial and planetary targets at the subpixel scale.

  1. White light spectral interferometry as a spectrometer calibration tool.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Raúl

    2014-01-01

    For this paper, we used a white light interferometer in combination with spectral lamps to perform the wavelength calibration of a dispersive spectrometer. Illuminating the spectrometer with suitable spectral lamps gives the wavelength-pixel number relationship at discrete positions of the spectrometer detector array, and the wavelength-dependent phase difference at the output of the white light interferometer allows for a complete spectral calibration at any point on the detector (i.e., for every wavelength in the spectral range of the spectrometer). The details of this new calibration procedure are discussed, and two practical examples exhibiting the robustness of the method are presented. In addition, certain issues relating to minimizing the number of spectral lines used in the calibration procedure are examined.

  2. The development of a robust, efficient solver for spectral and spectral-element time discretizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundis, Nathan L.

    shown that many if not most periodic problems can be solved more quickly and more precisely (utilizing the current FGMRES solver) using the time-spectral method than the currently state-of-the-art second-order accurate time-implicit methods. Additionally, the potential efficiency gains of the quasi-periodic time-spectral method for strongly-periodic problems, over time-implicit methods for these same types of problems, is demonstrated. Problems with strong, moving shock waves, high reduced frequencies, and/or content in high harmonics (higher than the 20th harmonic) are particularly difficult to solve efficiently using TS, BDFTS, and SEMT, and future work should focus on solver improvements to address these types of problems in particular.

  3. Sparse-view spectral CT reconstruction using spectral patch-based low-rank penalty.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyungsang; Ye, Jong Chul; Worstell, William; Ouyang, Jinsong; Rakvongthai, Yothin; El Fakhri, Georges; Li, Quanzheng

    2015-03-01

    Spectral computed tomography (CT) is a promising technique with the potential for improving lesion detection, tissue characterization, and material decomposition. In this paper, we are interested in kVp switching-based spectral CT that alternates distinct kVp X-ray transmissions during gantry rotation. This system can acquire multiple X-ray energy transmissions without additional radiation dose. However, only sparse views are generated for each spectral measurement; and the spectra themselves are limited in number. To address these limitations, we propose a penalized maximum likelihood method using spectral patch-based low-rank penalty, which exploits the self-similarity of patches that are collected at the same position in spectral images. The main advantage is that the relatively small number of materials within each patch allows us to employ the low-rank penalty that is less sensitive to intensity changes while preserving edge directions. In our optimization formulation, the cost function consists of the Poisson log-likelihood for X-ray transmission and the nonconvex patch-based low-rank penalty. Since the original cost function is difficult to minimize directly, we propose an optimization method using separable quadratic surrogate and concave convex procedure algorithms for the log-likelihood and penalty terms, which results in an alternating minimization that provides a computational advantage because each subproblem can be solved independently. We performed computer simulations and a real experiment using a kVp switching-based spectral CT with sparse-view measurements, and compared the proposed method with conventional algorithms. We confirmed that the proposed method improves spectral images both qualitatively and quantitatively. Furthermore, our GPU implementation significantly reduces the computational cost.

  4. SHJAR Jet Noise Data and Power Spectral Laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Bridges, James

    2009-01-01

    High quality jet noise spectral data measured at the Aeroacoustic Propulsion Laboratory at the NASA Glenn Research Center is used to examine a number of jet noise scaling laws. Configurations considered in the present study consist of convergent and convergent-divergent axisymmetric nozzles. The measured spectral data are shown in narrow band and cover 8193 equally spaced points in a typical Strouhal number range of 0.0 to 10.0. The measured data are reported as lossless (i.e., atmospheric attenuation is added to measurements), and at 24 equally spaced angles (50deg to 165deg) on a 100-diameter (200-in.) arc. Following the work of Viswanathan, velocity power factors are evaluated using a least squares fit on spectral power density as a function of jet temperature and observer angle. The goodness of the fit and the confidence margins for the two regression parameters are studied at each angle, and alternative relationships are proposed to improve the spectral collapse when certain conditions are met. As an immediate application of the velocity power laws, spectral density in shockcontaining jets are decomposed into components attributed to jet mixing noise and shock noise. From this analysis, jet noise prediction tools can be developed with different spectral components derived from different physics.

  5. Time-resolved spectral imaging: better photon economy, higher accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fereidouni, Farzad; Reitsma, Keimpe; Blab, Gerhard A.; Gerritsen, Hans C.

    2015-03-01

    Lifetime and spectral imaging are complementary techniques that offer a non-invasive solution for monitoring metabolic processes, identifying biochemical compounds, and characterizing their interactions in biological tissues, among other tasks. Newly developed instruments that perform time-resolved spectral imaging can provide even more information and reach higher sensitivity than either modality alone. Here we report a multispectral lifetime imaging system based on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA), capable of operating at high photon count rates (12 MHz) per spectral detection channel, and with time resolution of 200 ps. We performed error analyses to investigate the effect of gate width and spectral-channel width on the accuracy of estimated lifetimes and spectral widths. Temporal and spectral phasors were used for analysis of recorded data, and we demonstrated blind un-mixing of the fluorescent components using information from both modalities. Fractional intensities, spectra, and decay curves of components were extracted without need for prior information. We further tested this approach with fluorescently doubly-labeled DNA, and demonstrated its suitability for accurately estimating FRET efficiency in the presence of either non-interacting or interacting donor molecules.

  6. Coefficient of variation spectral analysis: An application to underwater acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herstein, P. D.; Laplante, R. F.

    1983-05-01

    Acoustic noise in the ocean is often described in terms of its power spectral density. Just as in other media, this noise consists of both narrowband and broadband frequency components. A major problem in the analysis of power spectral density measurements is distinguishing between narrowband spectral components of interest and contaminating narrowband components. In this paper, the use of coefficient of variation (Cv) spectrum is examined as an adjunct to the conventional power spectrum to distinguish narrowband components of interest from contaminating components. The theory of the Cv is presented. Coefficients for several classical input distributions are developed. It is shown that Cv spectra can be easily implemented as an adjunct procedure during the computation of the ensemble of averaged power spectra. Power and Cv spectra derived from actual at-sea sonobuoy measurements of deep ocean ambient noise separate narrowband components from narrowband lines of interest in the ensemble of averaged power spectra, these acoustic components of interest can be distinguished in the Cv spectra.

  7. Evidence of differentiated near-surface plutons on Vesta in integrated Dawn color images and spectral datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheek, L.; Sunshine, J.

    2014-07-01

    resembling pyroxenes, one of which has a subtle ˜600-nm absorption; one spectrum that resembles a pyroxene but displays a somewhat distorted 1000-nm band shape that may be indicative of residual calibration issues in the VIR data; and one spectrum strongly resembling a pure olivine. The olivine-like calculated end member spectrum provides important validation of the interpretation that the spectral character of VIR data in the Bellicia/Arruntia region is due to the spectral influence of an olivine component. In addition, the ˜600-nm feature in one of the calculated pyroxene end members is an unexpected and compelling result. Coordinated petrologic and spectral analyses of unbrecciated eucrites by [8] indicate that a similar ˜600-nm absorption is observable in relatively primitive, Cr-rich pyroxenes. This observation suggested that the presence of a ˜600-nm absorption in remote-sensing data for Dawn may be a straightforward indicator of the presence of primitive materials - a prediction that is borne out in these results. Evaluation of the hyperspectral projected cube reveals that discrete regions of spectrally pure olivine are indeed present throughout the walls of Bellicia and, to a lesser extent, Arruntia. Spectra of the Arruntia ejecta in the projected cube contain less of an olivine component than the walls, but important spatial variations are apparent. In particular, the proximal Arruntia ejecta (< 1 crater radius) appear to contain very little olivine, whereas spectra of the more distal ejecta (> 1 crater radius) do display an apparent olivine component. This observation strongly suggests that the Arruntia impact has revealed a compositionally stratified subsurface, with an enhanced olivine component occurring at slightly deeper levels. Projected spectra displaying pyroxene bands with a superimposed ˜600-nm feature occur primarily on crater walls, often in association with olivine- dominated spectra. The co-occurrence of Cr-rich pyroxene and olivine in this

  8. Short-Term EEG Spectral Pattern as a Single Event in EEG Phenomenology

    PubMed Central

    Fingelkurts, Al. A; Fingelkurts, An. A

    2010-01-01

    Spectral decomposition, to this day, still remains the main analytical paradigm for the analysis of EEG oscillations. However, conventional spectral analysis assesses the mean characteristics of the EEG power spectra averaged out over extended periods of time and/or broad frequency bands, thus resulting in a “static” picture which cannot reflect adequately the underlying neurodynamic. A relatively new promising area in the study of EEG is based on reducing the signal to elementary short-term spectra of various types in accordance with the number of types of EEG stationary segments instead of using averaged power spectrum for the whole EEG. It is suggested that the various perceptual and cognitive operations associated with a mental or behavioural condition constitute a single distinguishable neurophysiological state with a distinct and reliable spectral pattern. In this case, one type of short-term spectral pattern may be considered as a single event in EEG phenomenology. To support this assumption the following issues are considered in detail: (a) the relations between local EEG short-term spectral pattern of particular type and the actual state of the neurons in underlying network and a volume conduction; (b) relationship between morphology of EEG short-term spectral pattern and the state of the underlying neurodynamical system i.e. neuronal assembly; (c) relation of different spectral pattern components to a distinct physiological mechanism; (d) relation of different spectral pattern components to different functional significance; (e) developmental changes of spectral pattern components; (f) heredity of the variance in the individual spectral pattern and its components; (g) intra-individual stability of the sets of EEG short-term spectral patterns and their percent ratio; (h) discrete dynamics of EEG short-term spectral patterns. Functional relevance (consistency) of EEG short-term spectral patterns in accordance with the changes of brain functional state

  9. Spectral methods on arbitrary grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Mark H.; Gottlieb, David

    1995-01-01

    Stable and spectrally accurate numerical methods are constructed on arbitrary grids for partial differential equations. These new methods are equivalent to conventional spectral methods but do not rely on specific grid distributions. Specifically, we show how to implement Legendre Galerkin, Legendre collocation, and Laguerre Galerkin methodology on arbitrary grids.

  10. Method of photon spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Gehrke, Robert J.; Putnam, Marie H.; Killian, E. Wayne; Helmer, Richard G.; Kynaston, Ronnie L.; Goodwin, Scott G.; Johnson, Larry O.

    1993-01-01

    A spectroscopic method to rapidly measure the presence of plutonium in soils, filters, smears, and glass waste forms by measuring the uranium L-shell x-ray emissions associated with the decay of plutonium. In addition, the technique can simultaneously acquire spectra of samples and automatically analyze them for the amount of americium and .gamma.-ray emitting activation and fission products present. The samples are counted with a large area, thin-window, n-type germanium spectrometer which is equally efficient for the detection of low-energy x-rays (10-2000 keV), as well as high-energy .gamma. rays (>1 MeV). A 8192- or 16,384 channel analyzer is used to acquire the entire photon spectrum at one time. A dual-energy, time-tagged pulser, that is injected into the test input of the preamplifier to monitor the energy scale, and detector resolution. The L x-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a linear-least-squares spectral fitting technique. The .gamma.-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a standard Ge .gamma.-ray analysis program. This method can be applied to any analysis involving x- and .gamma.-ray analysis in one spectrum and is especially useful when interferences in the x-ray region can be identified from the .gamma.-ray analysis and accommodated during the x-ray analysis.

  11. Method of photon spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Gehrke, R.J.; Putnam, M.H.; Killian, E.W.; Helmer, R.G.; Kynaston, R.L.; Goodwin, S.G.; Johnson, L.O.

    1993-04-27

    A spectroscopic method to rapidly measure the presence of plutonium in soils, filters, smears, and glass waste forms by measuring the uranium L-shell x-ray emissions associated with the decay of plutonium. In addition, the technique can simultaneously acquire spectra of samples and automatically analyze them for the amount of americium and [gamma]-ray emitting activation and fission products present. The samples are counted with a large area, thin-window, n-type germanium spectrometer which is equally efficient for the detection of low-energy x-rays (10-2,000 keV), as well as high-energy [gamma] rays (>1 MeV). A 8,192- or 16,384 channel analyzer is used to acquire the entire photon spectrum at one time. A dual-energy, time-tagged pulser, that is injected into the test input of the preamplifier to monitor the energy scale, and detector resolution. The L x-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a linear-least-squares spectral fitting technique. The [gamma]-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a standard Ge [gamma]-ray analysis program. This method can be applied to any analysis involving x- and [gamma]-ray analysis in one spectrum and is especially useful when interferences in the x-ray region can be identified from the [gamma]-ray analysis and accommodated during the x-ray analysis.

  12. Spectral State Evolution of 4U 1820-30: The Stability of the Spectral Index of the Comptonization Tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titarchuk, Lev; Seifina, Elena; Frontera, Filippo

    2013-04-01

    We analyze the X-ray spectra and their timing properties of the compact X-ray binary 4U 1820-30. We establish spectral transitions in this source seen with BeppoSAX and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). During the RXTE observations (1996-2009), the source was in the soft state approximately ~75% of the time making the lower banana and upper banana transitions combined with long-term low-high state transitions. We reveal that all of the X-ray spectra of 4U 1820-30 are fit by a combination of a thermal (Blackbody) component, a Comptonization component (COMPTB), and a Gaussian-line component. Thus, using this spectral analysis, we find that the photon power-law index Γ of the Comptonization component is almost unchangeable (Γ ~ 2), while the electron temperature kTe changes from 2.9 to 21 keV during these spectral events. We also establish that for these spectral events the normalization of the COMPTB component (which is proportional to the mass accretion rate \\dot{M}) increases by a factor of eight when kTe decreases from 21 keV to 2.9 keV. Previously, this index stability effect was also found analyzing X-ray data for the Z-source GX 340+0 and for the atolls 4U 1728-34 and GX 3+1. Thus, we can suggest that this spectral stability property is a spectral signature of an accreting neutron star source. On the other hand, in a black hole binary Γ monotonically increases with \\dot{M} and ultimately its value saturates at large \\dot{M}.

  13. SPECTRAL STATE EVOLUTION OF 4U 1820-30: THE STABILITY OF THE SPECTRAL INDEX OF THE COMPTONIZATION TAIL

    SciTech Connect

    Titarchuk, Lev; Frontera, Filippo; Seifina, Elena E-mail: lev@milkyway.gsfc.nasa.gov E-mail: seif@sai.msu.ru

    2013-04-20

    We analyze the X-ray spectra and their timing properties of the compact X-ray binary 4U 1820-30. We establish spectral transitions in this source seen with BeppoSAX and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). During the RXTE observations (1996-2009), the source was in the soft state approximately {approx}75% of the time making the lower banana and upper banana transitions combined with long-term low-high state transitions. We reveal that all of the X-ray spectra of 4U 1820-30 are fit by a combination of a thermal (Blackbody) component, a Comptonization component (COMPTB), and a Gaussian-line component. Thus, using this spectral analysis, we find that the photon power-law index {Gamma} of the Comptonization component is almost unchangeable ({Gamma} {approx} 2), while the electron temperature kT{sub e} changes from 2.9 to 21 keV during these spectral events. We also establish that for these spectral events the normalization of the COMPTB component (which is proportional to the mass accretion rate M-dot ) increases by a factor of eight when kT{sub e} decreases from 21 keV to 2.9 keV. Previously, this index stability effect was also found analyzing X-ray data for the Z-source GX 340+0 and for the atolls 4U 1728-34 and GX 3+1. Thus, we can suggest that this spectral stability property is a spectral signature of an accreting neutron star source. On the other hand, in a black hole binary {Gamma} monotonically increases with M-dot and ultimately its value saturates at large M-dot .

  14. Spectral State Evolution of 4U 1820-30: the Stability of the Spectral Index of Comptonization Tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titarchuk, Lev G.; Seifina, Elena; Frontera, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the X-ray spectra and their timing properties of the compact Xray binary 4U 1820-30. We establish spectral transitions in this source seen with BeppoSAX and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). During the RXTE observations (1996 - 2009), the source were approximately approximately 75% of its time in the soft state making the lower banana and upper banana transitions combined with long-term low-high state transitions. We reveal that all of the X-ray spectra of 4U 1820-30 are fit by a composition of a thermal (blackbody) component, a Comptonization component (COMPTB) and a Gaussian-line component. Thus using this spectral analysis we find that the photon power-law index Gamma of the Comptonization component is almost unchangeable (Gamma approximately 2) while the electron temperature kTe changes from 2.9 to 21 keV during these spectral events. We also establish that for these spectral events the normalization of COMPTB component (which is proportional to mass accretion rate ?M) increases by factor 8 when kTe decreases from 21 keV to 2.9 keV. Before this index stability effect was also found analyzing X-ray data for Z-source GX 340+0 and for atolls, 4U 1728-34, GX 3+1. Thus, we can suggest that this spectral stability property is a spectral signature of an accreting neutron star source. On the other hand in a black hole binary G monotonically increases with ?Mand ultimately its value saturates at large ?M.

  15. [Research on spectral reflectance characteristics for Glycyrrhizae Radix].

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Xie, Cai-Xiang; Li, Xiao-Jin; Wen, Mei-Jia; Jia, Guang-Lin; Shi, Ming-Hui; Guo, Bao-Lin; Jia, Xiao-Guang

    2014-02-01

    In order to study the spectral reflectance differences of Glycyrrhizae Radix under different growth conditions and lay the foundation for quantitative monitoring of Glycyrrhizae Radix remote sensing images, spectra of Glycyrrhiza species under different growth period and different varieties and different regions were measured by a portable spectrometer. The results showed that the reflectivity of annual G. uralensis was obviously higher than that of the two years plant in the visible light band own to the contents of crown layer chlorophyll. The reflectivity of two years G. pallidiflora was higher than that of G. uralensis in the near infrared band own to the leaf area index and the content of leaf water. The red edge spectrum of annual plant fluctuated largely than that of two years plant due to vegetation coverage and leaf area index. G. pallidiflora grew well than G. uralensis. Under different regions of the Glycyrrhiza species, spectral data analysis showed that within a certain range, the average annual precipitation and average annual evaporation were the major factors to affect the differences of Glycyrrhiza species spectral data under different regions owe to the leaf water content, the higher leaf water content, the lower spectral reflectance. The principal component analysis and continuum-removed method of the spectral data under different regions found that, within a certain range, the average annual precipitation and average annual evaporation were the major factors caused by the differences of Glycyrrhiza species spectral data under the different regions, Glycyrrhiza species spectral similarity related to the spatial distance. PMID:24946542

  16. Design of visible/infrared double-band spectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tianjin, Tang; Zhuo, Zhang; Bao-hua, Wang

    2016-01-01

    OFFNER hyperspectral imager using convex grating as spectral splitting component has many merits including large relative aperture, no smile, small key stone, compact construction and easier assembly and etc, has widely used in many occasions of various fields. Design of double-band hyperspectral imager using OFFNER structure is presented in this paper. SHAFER fore telescope system and convex grating imaging are adopted, groove etching density is different in different region on the same substrate for different spectral band, and different diffractive order is used respectively to split the two spectral bands. The optical system achieves good image quality in wide spectral range, compact construction and small volume. And all the reflective curved face are sphere, moderate tolerances are good for the processing and alignment.

  17. Spectral image reconstruction by a tunable LED illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Meng-Chieh; Tsai, Chen-Wei; Tien, Chung-Hao

    2013-09-01

    Spectral reflectance estimation of an object via low-dimensional snapshot requires both image acquisition and a post numerical estimation analysis. In this study, we set up a system incorporating a homemade cluster of LEDs with spectral modulation for scene illumination, and a multi-channel CCD to acquire multichannel images by means of fully digital process. Principal component analysis (PCA) and pseudo inverse transformation were used to reconstruct the spectral reflectance in a constrained training set, such as Munsell and Macbeth Color Checker. The average reflectance spectral RMS error from 34 patches of a standard color checker were 0.234. The purpose is to investigate the use of system in conjunction with the imaging analysis for industry or medical inspection in a fast and acceptable accuracy, where the approach was preliminary validated.

  18. ULTRAVIOLET RAMAN SPECTRAL SIGNATURE ACQUISITION: UV RAMAN SPECTRAL FINGERPRINTS.

    SciTech Connect

    SEDLACEK,III, A.J.FINFROCK,C.

    2002-09-01

    As a member of the science-support part of the ITT-lead LISA development program, BNL is tasked with the acquisition of UV Raman spectral fingerprints and associated scattering cross-sections for those chemicals-of-interest to the program's sponsor. In support of this role, the present report contains the first installment of UV Raman spectral fingerprint data on the initial subset of chemicals. Because of the unique nature associated with the acquisition of spectral fingerprints for use in spectral pattern matching algorithms (i.e., CLS, PLS, ANN) great care has been undertaken to maximize the signal-to-noise and to minimize unnecessary spectral subtractions, in an effort to provide the highest quality spectral fingerprints. This report is divided into 4 sections. The first is an Experimental section that outlines how the Raman spectra are performed. This is then followed by a section on Sample Handling. Following this, the spectral fingerprints are presented in the Results section where the data reduction process is outlined. Finally, a Photographs section is included.

  19. Spectral confocal reflection microscopy using a white light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, M.; Juškaitis, R.; Wilson, T.

    2008-08-01

    We present a reflection confocal microscope incorporating a white light supercontinuum source and spectral detection. The microscope provides images resolved spatially in three-dimensions, in addition to spectral resolution covering the wavelength range 450-650nm. Images and reflection spectra of artificial and natural specimens are presented, showing features that are not normally revealed in conventional microscopes or confocal microscopes using discrete line lasers. The specimens include thin film structures on semiconductor chips, iridescent structures in Papilio blumei butterfly scales, nacre from abalone shells and opal gemstones. Quantitative size and refractive index measurements of transparent beads are derived from spectral interference bands.

  20. Laboratory goniometer approach for spectral polarimetric directionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furey, John; Zahniser, Shellie; Morgan, Cliff

    2016-05-01

    A two meter inner diameter goniometer provides approximately 0.1° angular positioning precision for a series of spectral and polarimetric instruments to enable measurements of the directionality of polarized reflectance from soils in the laboratory, at 10° increments along the azimuth and zenith. Polarimetric imaging instruments to be mounted on the goniometer, with linear polarizers in rotators in front of each instrument, include broadband focal plane array imagers in the Visible band (Vis), Near InfraRed (NIR), Short Wave InfraRed (SWIR), and Long Wave InfraRed (LWIR) spectral bands, as well as a hyperspectral imager in the Vis through NIR. Two additional hyperspectral polarimetric imagers in the Vis through NIR, and SWIR, are to be mounted separately with angles measured by laser on the goniometer frame.

  1. Plasmonic spectral tunability of conductive ternary nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassavetis, S.; Bellas, D. V.; Abadias, G.; Lidorikis, E.; Patsalas, P.

    2016-06-01

    Conductive binary transition metal nitrides, such as TiN and ZrN, have emerged as a category of promising alternative plasmonic materials. In this work, we show that ternary transition metal nitrides such as TixTa1-xN, TixZr1-xN, TixAl1-xN, and ZrxTa1-xN share the important plasmonic features with their binary counterparts, while having the additional asset of the exceptional spectral tunability in the entire visible (400-700 nm) and UVA (315-400 nm) spectral ranges depending on their net valence electrons. In particular, we demonstrate that such ternary nitrides can exhibit maximum field enhancement factors comparable with gold in the aforementioned broadband range. We also critically evaluate the structural features that affect the quality factor of the plasmon resonance and we provide rules of thumb for the selection and growth of materials for nitride plasmonics.

  2. Spectral Fingerprints of Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltenegger, L.; Selsis, F.

    2010-01-01

    The emerging field of extrasolar planet search has shown an extraordinary ability to combine research by astrophysics, chemistry, biology and geophysics into a new and exciting interdisciplinary approach to understand our place in the universe. Are there other worlds like ours? How can we characterize those planets and assess if they are habitable? After a decade rich in giant exoplanet detections, observation techniques have now reached the ability to find planets of less than 10 M_Earth (so called Super-Earths) that may potentially be habitable. The detection and characterization of Earth-like planet is approaching rapidly with dedicated space observatories already in operation (Corot) or in development phase (Kepler, James Webb Space Telescope, Extremely Large Telescope (ELT), Darwin/TPF). Space missions like CoRoT (CNES, Rouan et al. 1998) and Kepler (NASA, Borucki et al. 1997) will give us statistics on the number, size, period and orbital distance of planets, extending to terrestrial planets on the lower mass range end as a first step, while missions like Darwin/TPF are designed to characterize their atmospheres. In this chapter we discuss how we can read a planet's spectral fingerprint and characterize if it is potentially habitable. We discuss the first steps to detect a habitable planet and set biomarker detection in context in Section 1. In Section 2 we focus on biomarkers, their signatures at different wavelengths, abiotic sources and cryptic photosynthesis - using Earth as our primary example - the only habitable planet we know of so far. Section 3 concentrates on planets around different stars, and Section 4 summarizes the chapter.

  3. CCN Spectral Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, James G.

    2009-02-27

    Detailed aircraft measurements were made of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra associated with extensive cloud systems off the central California coast in the July 2005 MASE project. These measurements include the wide supersaturation (S) range (2-0.01%) that is important for these polluted stratus clouds. Concentrations were usually characteristic of continental/anthropogenic air masses. The most notable feature was the consistently higher concentrations above the clouds than below. CCN measurements are so important because they provide a link between atmospheric chemistry and cloud-climate effects, which are the largest climate uncertainty. Extensive comparisons throughout the eleven flights between two CCN spectrometers operated at different but overlapping S ranges displayed the precision and accuracy of these difficult spectral determinations. There are enough channels of resolution in these instruments to provide differential spectra, which produce more rigorous and precise comparisons than traditional cumulative presentations of CCN concentrations. Differential spectra are also more revealing than cumulative spectra. Only one of the eleven flights exhibited typical maritime concentrations. Average below cloud concentrations over the two hours furthest from the coast for the 8 flights with low polluted stratus was 614?233 at 1% S, 149?60 at 0.1% S and 57?33 at 0.04% S cm-3. Immediately above cloud average concentrations were respectively 74%, 55%, and 18% higher. Concentration variability among those 8 flights was a factor of two. Variability within each flight excluding distances close to the coast ranged from 15-56% at 1% S. However, CN and probably CCN concentrations sometimes varied by less than 1% over distances of more than a km. Volatility and size-critical S measurements indicated that the air masses were very polluted throughout MASE. The aerosol above the clouds was more polluted than the below cloud aerosol. These high CCN concentrations from

  4. Compressive Spectral Method for the Simulation of the Nonlinear Gravity Waves.

    PubMed

    Bayındır, Cihan

    2016-02-25

    In this paper an approach for decreasing the computational effort required for the spectral simulations of the fully nonlinear ocean waves is introduced. The proposed approach utilizes the compressive sampling algorithm and depends on the idea of using a smaller number of spectral components compared to the classical spectral method. After performing the time integration with a smaller number of spectral components and using the compressive sampling technique, it is shown that the ocean wave field can be reconstructed with a significantly better efficiency compared to the classical spectral method. For the sparse ocean wave model in the frequency domain the fully nonlinear ocean waves with Jonswap spectrum is considered. By implementation of a high-order spectral method it is shown that the proposed methodology can simulate the linear and the fully nonlinear ocean waves with negligible difference in the accuracy and with a great efficiency by reducing the computation time significantly especially for large time evolutions.

  5. Characterizing Intra-Die Spatial Correlation Using Spectral Density Fitting Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qiang; Luk, Wai-Shing; Tao, Jun; Yan, Changhao; Zeng, Xuan

    In this paper, a spectral domain method named the SDF (Spectral Density Fitting) method for intra-die spatial correlation function extraction is presented. Based on theoretical analysis of random field, the spectral density, as the spectral domain counterpart of correlation function, is employed to estimate the parameters of the correlation function effectively in the spectral domain. Compared with the existing extraction algorithm in the original spatial domain, the SDF method can obtain the same quality of results in the spectral domain. In actual measurement process, the unavoidable measurement error with arbitrary frequency components would greatly confound the extraction results. A filtering technique is further developed to diminish the high frequency components of the measurement error and recover the data from noise contamination for parameter estimation. Experimental results have shown that the SDF method is practical and stable.

  6. Compressive Spectral Method for the Simulation of the Nonlinear Gravity Waves.

    PubMed

    Bayındır, Cihan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper an approach for decreasing the computational effort required for the spectral simulations of the fully nonlinear ocean waves is introduced. The proposed approach utilizes the compressive sampling algorithm and depends on the idea of using a smaller number of spectral components compared to the classical spectral method. After performing the time integration with a smaller number of spectral components and using the compressive sampling technique, it is shown that the ocean wave field can be reconstructed with a significantly better efficiency compared to the classical spectral method. For the sparse ocean wave model in the frequency domain the fully nonlinear ocean waves with Jonswap spectrum is considered. By implementation of a high-order spectral method it is shown that the proposed methodology can simulate the linear and the fully nonlinear ocean waves with negligible difference in the accuracy and with a great efficiency by reducing the computation time significantly especially for large time evolutions. PMID:26911357

  7. Compressive Spectral Method for the Simulation of the Nonlinear Gravity Waves

    PubMed Central

    Bayındır, Cihan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper an approach for decreasing the computational effort required for the spectral simulations of the fully nonlinear ocean waves is introduced. The proposed approach utilizes the compressive sampling algorithm and depends on the idea of using a smaller number of spectral components compared to the classical spectral method. After performing the time integration with a smaller number of spectral components and using the compressive sampling technique, it is shown that the ocean wave field can be reconstructed with a significantly better efficiency compared to the classical spectral method. For the sparse ocean wave model in the frequency domain the fully nonlinear ocean waves with Jonswap spectrum is considered. By implementation of a high-order spectral method it is shown that the proposed methodology can simulate the linear and the fully nonlinear ocean waves with negligible difference in the accuracy and with a great efficiency by reducing the computation time significantly especially for large time evolutions. PMID:26911357

  8. Carrier Estimation Using Classic Spectral Estimation Techniques for the Proposed Demand Assignment Multiple Access Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scaife, Bradley James

    1999-01-01

    In any satellite communication, the Doppler shift associated with the satellite's position and velocity must be calculated in order to determine the carrier frequency. If the satellite state vector is unknown then some estimate must be formed of the Doppler-shifted carrier frequency. One elementary technique is to examine the signal spectrum and base the estimate on the dominant spectral component. If, however, the carrier is spread (as in most satellite communications) this technique may fail unless the chip rate-to-data rate ratio (processing gain) associated with the carrier is small. In this case, there may be enough spectral energy to allow peak detection against a noise background. In this thesis, we present a method to estimate the frequency (without knowledge of the Doppler shift) of a spread-spectrum carrier assuming a small processing gain and binary-phase shift keying (BPSK) modulation. Our method relies on an averaged discrete Fourier transform along with peak detection on spectral match filtered data. We provide theory and simulation results indicating the accuracy of this method. In addition, we will describe an all-digital hardware design based around a Motorola DSP56303 and high-speed A/D which implements this technique in real-time. The hardware design is to be used in NMSU's implementation of NASA's demand assignment, multiple access (DAMA) service.

  9. Optimum strategies for mapping vegetation using multiple-endmember spectral mixture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Dar A.; Gardner, Margaret E.; Church, Rick; Ustin, Susan L.; Green, Robert O.

    1997-10-01

    Improved vegetation maps are required for fire management and biodiversity assessment, from critical inputs for hydrological and biogeochemical models and represent a means for scaling-up point measurements. At scales greater than 10 meters, vegetation communities are typically mixed consisting of leaves, branches, exposed soil and shadows. To map mixed vegetation, many researchers employ spectral mixture analysis (SMA). In most SMA applications, a single set of spectra consisting of green vegetation, soil, non- photosynthetic vegetation and shade are used to 'unmix' images. However, because most scenes contain more than four components, this simple approach leads to fraction errors and may fail to differentiate many vegetation types. In this work, we apply a new approach called multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis, in which the number and types of endmembers vary per-pixel. Using this approach, hundreds of unique models are generated that account for community specific differences in plant chemistry, physical attributes and phenology. Additionally, we describe a new strategy for developing and organizing regionally specific spectral libraries. We present result from a study in the Santa Monica Mountains using AVIRIS data, in which we map grassland and chaparral communities, mapping species dominance in some cases to a high degree of accuracy.

  10. A Mössbauer Spectral Study of the Hull Steel and Rusticles Recovered from the Titanic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Gary J.; Hautot, Dimitri; Grandjean, Fernande; Vandormael, D.; Leighly, H. P.

    2004-09-01

    The recent recovery of steel from the Titanic has permitted a 295 K conversion electron Mössbauer spectral study of the Titanic hull plate steel oriented with the gamma-ray direction either perpendicular or parallel to the microstructural banding directions. The two spectra reveal virtually identical average orientations of the magnetization close to the plane of the plate. The hyperfine parameters are virtually identical to those of α-iron, a finding which agrees with the chemical analysis which reveals at most 0.21 wt% carbon corresponding to 3 wt% of cementite in pearlite. A 4.2 to 295 K transmission Mössbauer spectral study of the rusticles reveals small particles of geothite undergoing superparamagnetic relaxation with a blocking temperature of ca. 300 K. In addition approximately two percent of the Mössbauer spectral absorption area corresponds to a quadrupole doublet with hyperfine parameters typical of green rust. The identified iron containing components in the rusticles agree with the powder X-ray diffraction results which reveal the predominant presence of small particles of poorly crystallized goethite and traces of quartz and green rust. An average size of 20±5 nm for the goethite particles is obtained from both the average hyperfine field and the broadening of the X-ray diffraction peaks. The magnetic anisotropy constant of the goethite particles deduced from the hyperfine field and the particle size is 8×103 J/m3.

  11. Velocity and Temperature Measurement in Supersonic Free Jets Using Spectrally Resolved Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Seasholtz, R. G.

    2004-01-01

    The flow fields of unheated, supersonic free jets from convergent and convergent-divergent nozzles operating at M = 0.99, 1.4, and 1.6 were measured using spectrally resolved Rayleigh scattering technique. The axial component of velocity and temperature data as well as density data obtained from a previous experiment are presented in a systematic way with the goal of producing a database useful for validating computational fluid dynamics codes. The Rayleigh scattering process from air molecules provides a fundamental means of measuring flow properties in a non-intrusive, particle free manner. In the spectrally resolved application, laser light scattered by the air molecules is collected and analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI). The difference between the incident laser frequency and the peak of the Rayleigh spectrum provides a measure of gas velocity. The temperature is measured from the spectral broadening caused by the random thermal motion and density is measured from the total light intensity. The present point measurement technique uses a CW laser, a scanning FPI and photon counting electronics. The 1 mm long probe volume is moved from point to point to survey the flow fields. Additional arrangements were made to remove particles from the main as well as the entrained flow and to isolate FPI from the high sound and vibration levels produced by the supersonic jets. In general, velocity is measured within +/- 10 m/s accuracy and temperature within +/- 10 K accuracy.

  12. H{sub α} SPECTRAL DIVERSITY OF TYPE II SUPERNOVAE: CORRELATIONS WITH PHOTOMETRIC PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; Hamuy, Mario; González-Gaitán, Santiago; Anderson, Joseph P.; Folatelli, Gastón; Morrell, Nidia I.; Phillips, Mark M.; Thomas-Osip, Joanna; Stritzinger, Maximilian D.; McCarthy, Patrick; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.

    2014-05-10

    We present a spectroscopic analysis of the H{sub α} profiles of hydrogen-rich Type II supernovae. A total of 52 Type II supernovae having well-sampled optical light curves and spectral sequences were analyzed. Concentrating on the H{sub α} P-Cygni profile we measure its velocity from the FWHM of the emission and the ratio of absorption to emission (a/e) at a common epoch at the start of the recombination phase, and search for correlations between these spectral parameters and photometric properties of the V-band light curves. Testing the strength of various correlations we find that a/e appears to be the dominant spectral parameter in terms of describing the diversity in our measured supernova properties. It is found that supernovae with smaller a/e have higher H{sub α} velocities, more rapidly declining light curves from maximum during the plateau and radioactive tail phase, are brighter at maximum light, and have shorter optically thick phase durations. We discuss possible explanations of these results in terms of physical properties of Type II supernovae, speculating that the most likely parameters that influence the morphologies of H{sub α} profiles are the mass and density profile of the hydrogen envelope, together with additional emission components due to circumstellar interaction.

  13. [Colorimetric characterization of LCD based on wavelength partition spectral model].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao-Xue; Cui, Gui-Hua; Huang, Min; Wu, Bing; Xu, Yan-Fang; Luo, Ming

    2013-10-01

    To establish a colorimetrical characterization model of LCDs, an experiment with EIZO CG19, IBM 19, DELL 19 and HP 19 LCDs was designed and carried out to test the interaction between RGB channels, and then to test the spectral additive property of LCDs. The RGB digital values of single channel and two channels were given and the corresponding tristimulus values were measured, then a chart was plotted and calculations were made to test the independency of RGB channels. The results showed that the interaction between channels was reasonably weak and spectral additivity property was held well. We also found that the relations between radiations and digital values at different wavelengths varied, that is, they were the functions of wavelength. A new calculation method based on piecewise spectral model, in which the relation between radiations and digital values was fitted by a cubic polynomial in each piece of wavelength with measured spectral radiation curves, was proposed and tested. The spectral radiation curves of RGB primaries with any digital values can be found out with only a few measurements and fitted cubic polynomial in this way and then any displayed color can be turned out by the spectral additivity property of primaries at given digital values. The algorithm of this method was discussed in detail in this paper. The computations showed that the proposed method was simple and the number of measurements needed was reduced greatly while keeping a very high computation precision. This method can be used as a colorimetrical characterization model. PMID:24409730

  14. Spectral ellipsometry of GaSb: Experiment and modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Charache, G.W.; Mu {tilde n}oz, M.; Wei, K.; Pollak, F.H.; Freeouf, J.L.

    1999-05-01

    The optical constants {epsilon}(E)[{equals}{epsilon}{sub 1}(E) + i{epsilon}{sub 2}(E)] of single crystal GaSb at 300K have been measured using spectral ellipsometry in the range of 0.3--5.3 eV. The {epsilon}(E) spectra displayed distinct structures associated with critical points (CPs) at E{sub 0}(direct gap), spin-orbit split E{sub 0} + {Delta}{sub 0} component, spin-orbit split (E{sub 1}), E{sub 1} + {Delta}{sub 1} and (E{sub 0}{prime}), E{sub 0}{prime} + {Delta}{sub 0}{prime} doublets, as well as E{sub 2}. The experimental data over the entire measured spectral range (after oxide removal) has been fit using the Holden model dielectric function [Phys.Rev.B 56, 4037 (1997)] based on the electronic energy-band structure near these CPs plus excitonic and band-to-band Coulomb enhancement effects at E{sub 0}, E{sub 0} + {Delta}{sub 0}and the E{sub 1}, E{sub 1} + {Delta}{sub 1} doublet. In addition to evaluating the energies of these various band-to-band CPs, information about the binding energy (R{sub 1}) of the two-dimensional exciton related to the E{sub 1}, E{sub 1} + {Delta}{sub 1} CPS was obtained. The value of R{sub 1} was in good agreement with effective mass/{rvec k} {center_dot} {rvec p} theory. The ability to evaluate R{sub 1} has important ramifications for recent first-principles band structure calculations which include exciton effects at E{sub 0}, E{sub 1}, and E{sub 2}.

  15. Spectral behavior of gravel dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jie; Wu, Teng; Zhong, Deyu

    2015-02-01

    Spectral behavior of gravel dunes formed under different flow discharges is analyzed with an attempt to verify the '- 3' spectral law that has been confirmed extensively for sand dunes. A schematic spectrum of gravel dunes is proposed based on the spectral analysis as well as results from the literature. The results of spectral analysis show a significant deviation from the '- 3' spectral law for gravel dunes, and the magnitude of deviation correlates with flow discharge. Possible explanations for the deviation from the '- 3' spectral law, being associated with kinetic and geometrical characteristics, have been explored. To investigate the kinetic characteristics of gravel dunes, a wavelet-based method that calculates the celerity of dunes based on a pair of elevational time series is quantitatively tested. Our results suggest that (1) the kinetic explanation based on the relationship between dune celerity and dune length cannot fully explain the spectral behavior of gravel dunes; (2) the geometrical explanation based on the self-similarity hypothesis is confirmed by the relationship between dune length and dune height; and (3) the development of gravel sheets accounts for the differences in kinetic and geometrical characteristics between gravel dunes and sand dunes.

  16. Spectral similarity of unbound asteroid pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolters, Stephen D.; Weissman, Paul R.; Christou, Apostolis; Duddy, Samuel R.; Lowry, Stephen C.

    2014-04-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy between 0.8 and 2.5 μ has been obtained for both components of three unbound asteroid pairs, using the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility with the SpeX instrument. Pair primary (2110) Moore-Sitterly is classified as an S-type following the Bus-DeMeo taxonomy; the classification for secondary (44612) 1999 RP27 is ambiguous: S/Sq/Q/K/L-type. Primary (10484) Hecht and secondary (44645) 1999 RC118 are classified as V-types. IR spectra for Moore-Sitterly and Hecht are each linked with available visual photometry. The classifications for primary (88604) 2001 QH293 and (60546) 2000 EE85 are ambiguous: S/Sq/Q/K/L-type. Subtle spectral differences between them suggest that the primary may have more weathered material on its surface. Dynamical integrations have constrained the ages of formation: 2110-44612 > 782 kyr; 10484-44645 = 348 (+823,-225) kyr; 88604-60546 = 925 (+842,-754) kyr. The spectral similarity of seven complete pairs is ranked in comparison with nearby background asteroids. Two pairs, 17198-229056 and 19289-278067, have significantly different spectra between the components, compared to the similarity of spectra in the background population. The other pairs are closer than typical, supporting an interpretation of each pair's formation from a common parent body.

  17. Neutron Characterization for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Thomas; Bilheux, Hassina; An, Ke; Payzant, Andrew; DeHoff, Ryan; Duty, Chad; Peter, William; Blue, Craig; Brice, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is leveraging decades of experience in neutron characterization of advanced materials together with resources such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) shown in Fig. 1 to solve challenging problems in additive manufacturing (AM). Additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3-D) printing, is a rapidly maturing technology wherein components are built by selectively adding feedstock material at locations specified by a computer model. The majority of these technologies use thermally driven phase change mechanisms to convert the feedstock into functioning material. As the molten material cools and solidifies, the component is subjected to significant thermal gradients, generating significant internal stresses throughout the part (Fig. 2). As layers are added, inherent residual stresses cause warping and distortions that lead to geometrical differences between the final part and the original computer generated design. This effect also limits geometries that can be fabricated using AM, such as thin-walled, high-aspect- ratio, and overhanging structures. Distortion may be minimized by intelligent toolpath planning or strategic placement of support structures, but these approaches are not well understood and often "Edisonian" in nature. Residual stresses can also impact component performance during operation. For example, in a thermally cycled environment such as a high-pressure turbine engine, residual stresses can cause components to distort unpredictably. Different thermal treatments on as-fabricated AM components have been used to minimize residual stress, but components still retain a nonhomogeneous stress state and/or demonstrate a relaxation-derived geometric distortion. Industry, federal laboratory, and university collaboration is needed to address these challenges and enable the U.S. to compete in the global market. Work is currently being conducted on AM technologies at the ORNL

  18. spectral-cube: Read and analyze astrophysical spectral data cubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robitaille, Thomas; Ginsburg, Adam; Beaumont, Chris; Leroy, Adam; Rosolowsky, Erik

    2016-09-01

    Spectral-cube provides an easy way to read, manipulate, analyze, and write data cubes with two positional dimensions and one spectral dimension, optionally with Stokes parameters. It is a versatile data container for building custom analysis routines. It provides a uniform interface to spectral cubes, robust to the wide range of conventions of axis order, spatial projections, and spectral units that exist in the wild, and allows easy extraction of cube sub-regions using physical coordinates. It has the ability to create, combine, and apply masks to datasets and is designed to work with datasets too large to load into memory, and provide basic summary statistic methods like moments and array aggregates.

  19. Spectral neighbor analysis method for automated generation of quantum-accurate interatomic potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A.P.; Swiler, L.P.; Trott, C.R.; Foiles, S.M.; Tucker, G.J.

    2015-03-15

    We present a new interatomic potential for solids and liquids called Spectral Neighbor Analysis Potential (SNAP). The SNAP potential has a very general form and uses machine-learning techniques to reproduce the energies, forces, and stress tensors of a large set of small configurations of atoms, which are obtained using high-accuracy quantum electronic structure (QM) calculations. The local environment of each atom is characterized by a set of bispectrum components of the local neighbor density projected onto a basis of hyperspherical harmonics in four dimensions. The bispectrum components are the same bond-orientational order parameters employed by the GAP potential [1]. The SNAP potential, unlike GAP, assumes a linear relationship between atom energy and bispectrum components. The linear SNAP coefficients are determined using weighted least-squares linear regression against the full QM training set. This allows the SNAP potential to be fit in a robust, automated manner to large QM data sets using many bispectrum components. The calculation of the bispectrum components and the SNAP potential are implemented in the LAMMPS parallel molecular dynamics code. We demonstrate that a previously unnoticed symmetry property can be exploited to reduce the computational cost of the force calculations by more than one order of magnitude. We present results for a SNAP potential for tantalum, showing that it accurately reproduces a range of commonly calculated properties of both the crystalline solid and the liquid phases. In addition, unlike simpler existing potentials, SNAP correctly predicts the energy barrier for screw dislocation migration in BCC tantalum.

  20. Remotely sensed and laboratory spectral signatures of an ocean-dumped acid waste

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. W.; Collins, V. G.

    1977-01-01

    An ocean-dumped acid waste plume was studied by using a rapid scanning spectrometer to remotely measure ocean radiance from a helicopter. The results of these studies are presented and compared with results from sea truth samples and laboratory experiments. An ocean spectral reflectance signature and a laboratory spectral transmission signature were established for the iron-acid waste pollutant. The spectrally and chemically significant component of the acid waste pollutant was determined to be ferric iron.

  1. Auditory Evoked Fields Elicited by Spectral, Temporal, and Spectral–Temporal Changes in Human Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Hidehiko; Teismann, Henning; Kakigi, Ryusuke; Pantev, Christo

    2012-01-01

    Natural sounds contain complex spectral components, which are temporally modulated as time-varying signals. Recent studies have suggested that the auditory system encodes spectral and temporal sound information differently. However, it remains unresolved how the human brain processes sounds containing both spectral and temporal changes. In the present study, we investigated human auditory evoked responses elicited by spectral, temporal, and spectral–temporal sound changes by means of magnetoencephalography. The auditory evoked responses elicited by the spectral–temporal change were very similar to those elicited by the spectral change, but those elicited by the temporal change were delayed by 30–50 ms and differed from the others in morphology. The results suggest that human brain responses corresponding to spectral sound changes precede those corresponding to temporal sound changes, even when the spectral and temporal changes occur simultaneously. PMID:22593751

  2. Canopy spectral and chemical diversity from lowland to tree line in the Western Amazon using CAO-VSWIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R. E.; Asner, G. P.

    2012-12-01

    Canopy chemistry and spectroscopy offer insight into community assembly and ecosystem processes in high-diversity tropical forests. Results from one lowland site in the Peruvian Amazon suggests both an environmental and an evolutionary component of canopy trait development however, the degree to which larger environmental differences influence diversity in canopy traits and their respective spectroscopic signatures across remains poorly understood. The spectranomics approach explicitly connects phylogenetic, chemical and spectral patterns in tropical canopies providing the basis for analysis, while high-fidelity, airborne remote sensing measurements extend plot-level data to landscape-scale, achieving a comprehensive view of the region. In 2011, the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO) was used to sample a large region of the Western Amazon Basin in southeastern Peru, extending from lowlands to tree line in the Andean mountains. The CAO Visible-Shortwave Imaging Spectrometer (VSWIR) collected 480-band high-fidelity imaging spectroscopy data of the forest canopy, while its high-resolution LiDAR captured information on canopy structure and the underlying terrain. The data were used to quantify relationships between environmental gradients and canopy chemical and spectral diversity. Results suggest strong environmental control with additional phylogenetic influence over canopy spectral and chemical properties, particularly those related to structure, defense and metabolic function. Data from CAO-VSWIR extends the large range in canopy chemical and spectral diversity related to environmental factors across the Western Amazon Basin.

  3. Comparison of Spectral and Image Morphological Analysis for Egg Early Hatching Property Detection Based on Hyperspectral Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Pan, Leiqing; Tu, Kang; Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Ming

    2014-01-01

    The use of non-destructive methods to detect egg hatching properties could increase efficiency in commercial hatcheries by saving space, reducing costs, and ensuring hatching quality. For this purpose, a hyperspectral imaging system was built to detect embryo development and vitality using spectral and morphological information of hatching eggs. A total of 150 green shell eggs were used, and hyperspectral images were collected for every egg on day 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4 of incubation. After imaging, two analysis methods were developed to extract egg hatching characteristic. Firstly, hyperspectral images of samples were evaluated using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and only one optimal band with 822 nm was selected for extracting spectral characteristics of hatching egg. Secondly, an image segmentation algorithm was applied to isolate the image morphologic characteristics of hatching egg. To investigate the applicability of spectral and image morphological analysis for detecting egg early hatching properties, Learning Vector Quantization neural network (LVQNN) was employed. The experimental results demonstrated that model using image morphological characteristics could achieve better accuracy and generalization than using spectral characteristic parameters, and the discrimination accuracy for eggs with embryo development were 97% at day 3, 100% at day 4. In addition, the recognition results for eggs with weak embryo development reached 81% at day 3, and 92% at day 4. This study suggested that image morphological analysis was a novel application of hyperspectral imaging technology to detect egg early hatching properties. PMID:24551130

  4. Development of Jet Noise Power Spectral Laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Bridges, James

    2011-01-01

    High-quality jet noise spectral data measured at the Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory (AAPL) at NASA Glenn is used to develop jet noise scaling laws. A FORTRAN algorithm was written that provides detailed spectral prediction of component jet noise at user-specified conditions. The model generates quick estimates of the jet mixing noise and the broadband shock-associated noise (BBSN) in single-stream, axis-symmetric jets within a wide range of nozzle operating conditions. Shock noise is emitted when supersonic jets exit a nozzle at imperfectly expanded conditions. A successful scaling of the BBSN allows for this noise component to be predicted in both convergent and convergent-divergent nozzles. Configurations considered in this study consisted of convergent and convergent- divergent nozzles. Velocity exponents for the jet mixing noise were evaluated as a function of observer angle and jet temperature. Similar intensity laws were developed for the broadband shock-associated noise in supersonic jets. A computer program called sJet was developed that provides a quick estimate of component noise in single-stream jets at a wide range of operating conditions. A number of features have been incorporated into the data bank and subsequent scaling in order to improve jet noise predictions. Measurements have been converted to a lossless format. Set points have been carefully selected to minimize the instability-related noise at small aft angles. Regression parameters have been scrutinized for error bounds at each angle. Screech-related amplification noise has been kept to a minimum to ensure that the velocity exponents for the jet mixing noise remain free of amplifications. A shock-noise-intensity scaling has been developed independent of the nozzle design point. The computer program provides detailed narrow-band spectral predictions for component noise (mixing noise and shock associated noise), as well as the total noise. Although the methodology is confined to single

  5. Spectral bandwidth and ocular accommodation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwala, Karan R.; Kruger, Ekaterina S.; Mathews, Steven; Kruger, Philip B.

    1995-03-01

    Previous studies have suggested that targets illuminated by monochromatic (narrow-band) light are less effective in stimulating the eye to change its focus than are black-white (broadband) targets. The present study investigates the influence of target spectral bandwidth on the dynamic accommodation response in eight subjects. The fixation target was a 3.5-cycle / deg square-wave grating illuminated by midspectral light of various bandwidths [10, 40, and 80 nm and white (CIE Illuminant B)]. The target was moved sinusoidally toward and away from the eye, and accommodation responses were recorded and Fourier analyzed. Accommodative gain increases, and phase lag decreases, with increasing spectral bandwidth. Thus the eye focuses more accurately on targets of wider spectral bandwidth. The visual system appears to have the ability to analyze polychromatic blur to determine the state of focus of the eye for the purpose of guiding the accommodation response. blur, chromatic, focus, retinal image, spectral, wavelength

  6. Development of tunable Fabry-Perot spectral camera and light source for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaarre, M.; Kivi, S.; Panouillot, P. E.; Saari, H.; Mäkynen, J.; Sorri, I.; Juuti, M.

    2013-05-01

    VTT has developed a fast, tunable Fabry-Perot (FP) filter component and applied it in making small, lightweight spectral cameras and light sources. One application field where this novel technology is now tested is medical field. A demonstrator has been made to test the applicability of FP based spectral filtering in the imaging of retina in visible light wavelength area.

  7. A linear spectral matching technique for retrieving equivalent water thickness and biochemical constituents of green vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Bo-Cai; Goetz, Alexander F. H.

    1992-01-01

    Over the last decade, technological advances in airborne imaging spectrometers, having spectral resolution comparable with laboratory spectrometers, have made it possible to estimate biochemical constituents of vegetation canopies. Wessman estimated lignin concentration from data acquired with NASA's Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) over Blackhawk Island in Wisconsin. A stepwise linear regression technique was used to determine the single spectral channel or channels in the AIS data that best correlated with measured lignin contents using chemical methods. The regression technique does not take advantage of the spectral shape of the lignin reflectance feature as a diagnostic tool nor the increased discrimination among other leaf components with overlapping spectral features. A nonlinear least squares spectral matching technique was recently reported for deriving both the equivalent water thicknesses of surface vegetation and the amounts of water vapor in the atmosphere from contiguous spectra measured with the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). The same technique was applied to a laboratory reflectance spectrum of fresh, green leaves. The result demonstrates that the fresh leaf spectrum in the 1.0-2.5 microns region consists of spectral components of dry leaves and the spectral component of liquid water. A linear least squares spectral matching technique for retrieving equivalent water thickness and biochemical components of green vegetation is described.

  8. Caustic addition system operability test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Parazin, R.E.

    1994-11-01

    This test procedure provides instructions for performing operational testing of the major components of the 241-AN-107 Caustic Addition System by WHC and Kaiser personnel at the Rotating Equipment Shop run-in pit (Bldg. 272E).

  9. Spectral Intensities of Antiprotons and the Nested Leaky-box Model for Cosmic Rays in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowsik, R.; Madziwa-Nussinov, T.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we note that the spectral intensities of antiprotons observed in Galactic cosmic rays in the energy range ˜1–300 GeV by BESS, PAMELA, and AMS instruments display nearly the same spectral shape as that generated by primary cosmic rays through their interaction with matter in the interstellar medium, without any significant modifications. More importantly, a constant residence time of ˜2.3 ± 0.7 million years in the Galactic volume, independent of the energy of cosmic rays, matches the observed intensities. A small additional component of secondary antiprotons in the energy range below 10 GeV, generated in cocoon-like regions surrounding the cosmic-ray sources, seems to be present. We discuss this result in the context of observations of other secondary components such as positrons and boron, and the bounds on anisotropy of cosmic rays. In the nested leaky-box model the spectral intensities of antiprotons and positrons can be interpreted as secondary products of cosmic-ray interactions.

  10. Least-Squares Neutron Spectral Adjustment with STAYSL PNNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, L. R.; Johnson, C. D.

    2016-02-01

    The STAYSL PNNL computer code, a descendant of the STAY'SL code [1], performs neutron spectral adjustment of a starting neutron spectrum, applying a least squares method to determine adjustments based on saturated activation rates, neutron cross sections from evaluated nuclear data libraries, and all associated covariances. STAYSL PNNL is provided as part of a comprehensive suite of programs [2], where additional tools in the suite are used for assembling a set of nuclear data libraries and determining all required corrections to the measured data to determine saturated activation rates. Neutron cross section and covariance data are taken from the International Reactor Dosimetry File (IRDF-2002) [3], which was sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), though work is planned to update to data from the IAEA's International Reactor Dosimetry and Fusion File (IRDFF) [4]. The nuclear data and associated covariances are extracted from IRDF-2002 using the third-party NJOY99 computer code [5]. The NJpp translation code converts the extracted data into a library data array format suitable for use as input to STAYSL PNNL. The software suite also includes three utilities to calculate corrections to measured activation rates. Neutron self-shielding corrections are calculated as a function of neutron energy with the SHIELD code and are applied to the group cross sections prior to spectral adjustment, thus making the corrections independent of the neutron spectrum. The SigPhi Calculator is a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet used for calculating saturated activation rates from raw gamma activities by applying corrections for gamma self-absorption, neutron burn-up, and the irradiation history. Gamma self-absorption and neutron burn-up corrections are calculated (iteratively in the case of the burn-up) within the SigPhi Calculator spreadsheet. The irradiation history corrections are calculated using the BCF computer code and are inserted into the SigPhi Calculator

  11. Pattern recognition in volcano seismology - Reducing spectral dimensionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unglert, K.; Radic, V.; Jellinek, M.

    2015-12-01

    Variations in the spectral content of volcano seismicity can relate to changes in volcanic activity. Low-frequency seismic signals often precede or accompany volcanic eruptions. However, they are commonly manually identified in spectra or spectrograms, and their definition in spectral space differs from one volcanic setting to the next. Increasingly long time series of monitoring data at volcano observatories require automated tools to facilitate rapid processing and aid with pattern identification related to impending eruptions. Furthermore, knowledge transfer between volcanic settings is difficult if the methods to identify and analyze the characteristics of seismic signals differ. To address these challenges we evaluate whether a machine learning technique called Self-Organizing Maps (SOMs) can be used to characterize the dominant spectral components of volcano seismicity without the need for any a priori knowledge of different signal classes. This could reduce the dimensions of the spectral space typically analyzed by orders of magnitude, and enable rapid processing and visualization. Preliminary results suggest that the temporal evolution of volcano seismicity at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i, can be reduced to as few as 2 spectral components by using a combination of SOMs and cluster analysis. We will further refine our methodology with several datasets from Hawai`i and Alaska, among others, and compare it to other techniques.

  12. Spectral Monitoring of NGC 1365: Nucleus and Variable ULX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Fabbiano, G.

    2004-01-01

    A letter has been submitted to ApJ, and is in the final stages of revision on the spectral variability of the nuclear source. We presented multiple Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of the Seyfert Galaxy NGC 1365, which shows the most dramatic X-ray spectral changes observed so far in an AGN: the source switched from reflection dominated to Compton- thin and back in just 6 weeks. During this time the soft thermal component, arising from a 1-kpc region around the center, remained constant. The reflection component is constant at all timescales, and its flux is a fraction of 5% or higher of the direct 2-10 keV emission, implying the presence of thick gas covering a big fraction of the solid angle. The presence of this gas, and the hst variability time scale, suggest that the Compton-thick to Compton thin change is due to variation in the line-of-sight absorber, rather than to extreme intrinsic emission variability. We discuss a structure of the circumnuclear absorbed reflector which can explain the observed X-ray spectral and temporal properties. But these important results come only from scratching the surface of the data, since we did not need any detailed spectral analysis to distinguish between the Compton thick and Compton thin states of the source, the difference in both spectral shape and flux being huge.

  13. Anomalous Spectral Types and Intrinsic Colors of Young Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecaut, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    We highlight differences in spectral types and intrinsic colors observed in pre-main sequence (pre-MS) stars. Spectral types of pre-MS stars are wavelength-dependent, with near-infrared spectra being 3-5 spectral sub-classes later than the spectral types determined from optical spectra. In addition, the intrinsic colors of young stars differ from that of main-sequence stars at a given spectral type. We caution observers to adopt optical spectral types over near-infrared types, since Hertzsprung-Russell (H-R) diagram positions derived from optical spectral types provide consistency between dynamical masses and theoretical evolutionary tracks. We also urge observers to deredden pre-MS stars with tabulations of intrinsic colors specifically constructed for young stars, since their unreddened colors differ from that of main sequence dwarfs. Otherwise, V-band extinctions as much as ~0.6 mag erroneously higher than the true extinction may result, which would introduce systematic errors in the H-R diagram positions and thus bias the inferred ages.

  14. Undecidability of the spectral gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubitt, Toby S.; Perez-Garcia, David; Wolf, Michael M.

    2015-12-01

    The spectral gap—the energy difference between the ground state and first excited state of a system—is central to quantum many-body physics. Many challenging open problems, such as the Haldane conjecture, the question of the existence of gapped topological spin liquid phases, and the Yang-Mills gap conjecture, concern spectral gaps. These and other problems are particular cases of the general spectral gap problem: given the Hamiltonian of a quantum many-body system, is it gapped or gapless? Here we prove that this is an undecidable problem. Specifically, we construct families of quantum spin systems on a two-dimensional lattice with translationally invariant, nearest-neighbour interactions, for which the spectral gap problem is undecidable. This result extends to undecidability of other low-energy properties, such as the existence of algebraically decaying ground-state correlations. The proof combines Hamiltonian complexity techniques with aperiodic tilings, to construct a Hamiltonian whose ground state encodes the evolution of a quantum phase-estimation algorithm followed by a universal Turing machine. The spectral gap depends on the outcome of the corresponding ‘halting problem’. Our result implies that there exists no algorithm to determine whether an arbitrary model is gapped or gapless, and that there exist models for which the presence or absence of a spectral gap is independent of the axioms of mathematics.

  15. Undecidability of the spectral gap.

    PubMed

    Cubitt, Toby S; Perez-Garcia, David; Wolf, Michael M

    2015-12-10

    The spectral gap--the energy difference between the ground state and first excited state of a system--is central to quantum many-body physics. Many challenging open problems, such as the Haldane conjecture, the question of the existence of gapped topological spin liquid phases, and the Yang-Mills gap conjecture, concern spectral gaps. These and other problems are particular cases of the general spectral gap problem: given the Hamiltonian of a quantum many-body system, is it gapped or gapless? Here we prove that this is an undecidable problem. Specifically, we construct families of quantum spin systems on a two-dimensional lattice with translationally invariant, nearest-neighbour interactions, for which the spectral gap problem is undecidable. This result extends to undecidability of other low-energy properties, such as the existence of algebraically decaying ground-state correlations. The proof combines Hamiltonian complexity techniques with aperiodic tilings, to construct a Hamiltonian whose ground state encodes the evolution of a quantum phase-estimation algorithm followed by a universal Turing machine. The spectral gap depends on the outcome of the corresponding 'halting problem'. Our result implies that there exists no algorithm to determine whether an arbitrary model is gapped or gapless, and that there exist models for which the presence or absence of a spectral gap is independent of the axioms of mathematics.

  16. Remote Sensing of Landscapes with Spectral Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, John B.; Gillespie, Alan R.

    2006-05-01

    Remote Sensing of Landscapes with Spectral Images describes how to process and interpret spectral images using physical models to bridge the gap between the engineering and theoretical sides of remote-sensing and the world that we encounter when we venture outdoors. The emphasis is on the practical use of images rather than on theory and mathematical derivations. Examples are drawn from a variety of landscapes and interpretations are tested against the reality seen on the ground. The reader is led through analysis of real images (using figures and explanations); the examples are chosen to illustrate important aspects of the analytic framework. This textbook will form a valuable reference for graduate students and professionals in a variety of disciplines including ecology, forestry, geology, geography, urban planning, archeology and civil engineering. It is supplemented by a web-site hosting digital color versions of figures in the book as well as ancillary images (www.cambridge.org/9780521662214). Presents a coherent view of practical remote sensing, leading from imaging and field work to the generation of useful thematic maps Explains how to apply physical models to help interpret spectral images Supplemented by a website hosting digital colour versions of figures in the book, as well as additional colour figures

  17. Unique spectral markers discern recurrent Glioblastoma cells from heterogeneous parent population.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Ekjot; Sahu, Aditi; Hole, Arti R; Rajendra, Jacinth; Chaubal, Rohan; Gardi, Nilesh; Dutt, Amit; Moiyadi, Aliasgar; Krishna, C Murali; Dutt, Shilpee

    2016-05-25

    An inability to discern resistant cells from bulk tumour cell population contributes to poor prognosis in Glioblastoma. Here, we compared parent and recurrent cells generated from patient derived primary cultures and cell lines to identify their unique molecular hallmarks. Although morphologically similar, parent and recurrent cells from different samples showed variable biological properties like proliferation and radiation resistance. However, total RNA-sequencing revealed transcriptional landscape unique to parent and recurrent populations. These data suggest that global molecular differences but not individual biological phenotype could differentiate parent and recurrent cells. We demonstrate that Raman Spectroscopy a label-free, non-invasive technique, yields global information about biochemical milieu of recurrent and parent cells thus, classifying them into distinct clusters based on Principal-Component-Analysis and Principal-Component-Linear-Discriminant-Analysis. Additionally, higher lipid related spectral peaks were observed in recurrent population. Importantly, Raman spectroscopic analysis could further classify an independent set of naïve primary glioblastoma tumour tissues into non-responder and responder groups. Interestingly, spectral features from the non-responder patient samples show a considerable overlap with the in-vitro generated recurrent cells suggesting their similar biological behaviour. This feasibility study necessitates analysis of a larger cohort of naïve primary glioblastoma samples to fully envisage clinical utility of Raman spectroscopy in predicting therapeutic response.

  18. Unique spectral markers discern recurrent Glioblastoma cells from heterogeneous parent population

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Ekjot; Sahu, Aditi; Hole, Arti R.; Rajendra, Jacinth; Chaubal, Rohan; Gardi, Nilesh; Dutt, Amit; Moiyadi, Aliasgar; Krishna, C. Murali; Dutt, Shilpee

    2016-01-01

    An inability to discern resistant cells from bulk tumour cell population contributes to poor prognosis in Glioblastoma. Here, we compared parent and recurrent cells generated from patient derived primary cultures and cell lines to identify their unique molecular hallmarks. Although morphologically similar, parent and recurrent cells from different samples showed variable biological properties like proliferation and radiation resistance. However, total RNA-sequencing revealed transcriptional landscape unique to parent and recurrent populations. These data suggest that global molecular differences but not individual biological phenotype could differentiate parent and recurrent cells. We demonstrate that Raman Spectroscopy a label-free, non-invasive technique, yields global information about biochemical milieu of recurrent and parent cells thus, classifying them into distinct clusters based on Principal-Component-Analysis and Principal-Component-Linear-Discriminant-Analysis. Additionally, higher lipid related spectral peaks were observed in recurrent population. Importantly, Raman spectroscopic analysis could further classify an independent set of naïve primary glioblastoma tumour tissues into non-responder and responder groups. Interestingly, spectral features from the non-responder patient samples show a considerable overlap with the in-vitro generated recurrent cells suggesting their similar biological behaviour. This feasibility study necessitates analysis of a larger cohort of naïve primary glioblastoma samples to fully envisage clinical utility of Raman spectroscopy in predicting therapeutic response. PMID:27221528

  19. Colorimetric-spectral clustering: a tool for multispectral image compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprian, R.; Carbucicchio, M.

    2011-11-01

    In this work a new compression method for multispectral images has been proposed: the 'colorimetric-spectral clustering'. The basic idea arises from the well-known cluster analysis, a multivariate analysis which finds the natural links between objects grouping them into clusters. In the colorimetric-spectral clustering compression method, the objects are the spectral reflectance factors of the multispectral images that are grouped into clusters on the basis of their colour difference. In particular two spectra can belong to the same cluster only if their colour difference is lower than a threshold fixed before starting the compression procedure. The performance of the colorimetric-spectral clustering has been compared to the k-means cluster analysis, in which the Euclidean distance between spectra is considered, to the principal component analysis and to the LabPQR method. The colorimetric-spectral clustering is able to preserve both the spectral and the colorimetric information of a multispectral image, allowing this information to be reproduced for all pixels of the image.

  20. A tool for manual endmember selection and spectral unmixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bateson, C. Ann; Curtiss, Brian

    1993-01-01

    Sampling a continuous radiance spectrum in many narrow contiguous spectral bands results in a high covariance between the bands. Hence, the true dimensionality of imaging spectrometer data is not determined by the number of spectral bands, but by the number of spectrally unique signatures whose mixtures reproduce the spectral variance observed in an image. Methods to unmix high dimensional multispectral data use principal components analysis to reduce the dimensionality. The variance of the spectral data is modeled as a linear combination of a finite set of endmembers in the space of the eigen-vectors that account for most of the variance. The number and characteristics of these endmembers are determined not only by the number and characteristics of the spectrally unique materials on the surface but also by processes (e.g., illumination, atmospheric scattering and absorption) affecting the signal received by the sensor. Selection of endmember spectra has typically been from a library. However, since most libraries are incomplete and do not account for the processes mentioned above, we have devised a computer display that allows researchers to explore interactively the eigenvector space of a representative and mean-corrected subset of the image data in search of extreme spectra to designate as endmembers. This display, which is based on parallel coordinates, is unique in the area of multidimensional visualization in that it includes not only a passive view of higher dimensional data but also the capability to interact and move geometrical objects in higher dimensional spaces.

  1. Quantitative method to assess caries via fluorescence imaging from the perspective of autofluorescence spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q. G.; Zhu, H. H.; Xu, Y.; Lin, B.; Chen, H.

    2015-08-01

    A quantitative method to discriminate caries lesions for a fluorescence imaging system is proposed in this paper. The autofluorescence spectral investigation of 39 teeth samples classified by the International Caries Detection and Assessment System levels was performed at 405 nm excitation. The major differences in the different caries lesions focused on the relative spectral intensity range of 565-750 nm. The spectral parameter, defined as the ratio of wavebands at 565-750 nm to the whole spectral range, was calculated. The image component ratio R/(G + B) of color components was statistically computed by considering the spectral parameters (e.g. autofluorescence, optical filter, and spectral sensitivity) in our fluorescence color imaging system. Results showed that the spectral parameter and image component ratio presented a linear relation. Therefore, the image component ratio was graded as <0.66, 0.66-1.06, 1.06-1.62, and >1.62 to quantitatively classify sound, early decay, established decay, and severe decay tissues, respectively. Finally, the fluorescence images of caries were experimentally obtained, and the corresponding image component ratio distribution was compared with the classification result. A method to determine the numerical grades of caries using a fluorescence imaging system was proposed. This method can be applied to similar imaging systems.

  2. Multi-component ground motion response spectra for coupled horizontal, vertical, angular accelerations, and tilt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalkan, E.; Graizer, V.

    2007-01-01

    Rotational and vertical components of ground motion are almost always ignored in design or in the assessment of structures despite the fact that vertical motion can be twice as much as the horizontal motion and may exceed 2g level, and rotational excitation may reach few degrees in the proximity of fault rupture. Coupling of different components of ground excitation may significantly amplify the seismic demand by introducing additional lateral forces and enhanced P-?? effects. In this paper, a governing equation of motion is postulated to compute the response of a SDOF oscillator under a multi-component excitation. The expanded equation includes secondary P-?? components associated with the combined impacts of tilt and vertical excitations in addition to the inertial forcing terms due to the angular and translational accelerations. The elastic and inelastic spectral ordinates traditionally generated considering the uniaxial input motion are compared at the end with the multi-component response spectra of coupled horizontal, vertical and tilting motions. The proposed multi-component response spectrum reflects kinematic characteristics of the ground motion that are not identifiable by the conventional spectrum itself, at least for the near-fault region where high intensity vertical shaking and rotational excitation are likely to occur.

  3. The Spectral Energy Distributions of Fermi Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J. H.; Yang, J. H.; Liu, Y.; Luo, G. Y.; Lin, C.; Yuan, Y. H.; Xiao, H. B.; Zhou, A. Y.; Hua, T. X.; Pei, Z. Y.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, multiwavelength data are compiled for a sample of 1425 Fermi blazars to calculate their spectral energy distributions (SEDs). A parabolic function, {{log}}{(ν {F}ν )={P}1({{log}}ν -{P}2)}2+{P}3, is used for SED fitting. Synchrotron peak frequency ({log}{ν }{{p}}), spectral curvature (P1), peak flux ({ν }{{p}}{F}{ν {{p}}}), and integrated flux (ν {F}ν ) are successfully obtained for 1392 blazars (461 flat-spectrum radio quasars [FSRQs], 620 BL Lacs [BLs], and 311 blazars of uncertain type [BCUs]; 999 sources have known redshifts). Monochromatic luminosity at radio 1.4 GHz, optical R band, X-ray at 1 keV and γ-ray at 1 GeV, peak luminosity, integrated luminosity, and effective spectral indices of radio to optical ({α }{{RO}}) and optical to X-ray ({α }{{OX}}) are calculated. The “Bayesian classification” is employed to log {ν }{{p}} in the rest frame for 999 blazars with available redshift, and the results show that three components are enough to fit the log {ν }{{p}} distribution; there is no ultra-high peaked subclass. Based on the three components, the subclasses of blazars using the acronyms of Abdo et al. are classified, and some mutual correlations are also studied. Conclusions are finally drawn as follows: (1) SEDs are successfully obtained for 1392 blazars. The fitted peak frequencies are compared with common sources from available samples. (2) Blazars are classified as low synchrotron peak sources if log {ν }{{p}}({Hz})≤slant 14.0, intermediate synchrotron peak sources if 14.0\\lt {log} {ν }{{p}}({Hz})≤slant 15.3, and high synchrotron peak sources if {log} {ν }{{p}}({Hz})\\gt 15.3. (3) Gamma-ray emissions are strongly correlated with radio emissions. Gamma-ray luminosity is also correlated with synchrotron peak luminosity and integrated luminosity. (4) There is an anticorrelation between peak frequency and peak luminosity within the whole blazar sample. However, there is a marginally positive correlation for high

  4. Spectral action models of gravity on packed swiss cheese cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Adam; Marcolli, Matilde

    2016-06-01

    We present a model of (modified) gravity on spacetimes with fractal structure based on packing of spheres, which are (Euclidean) variants of the packed swiss cheese cosmology models. As the action functional for gravity we consider the spectral action of noncommutative geometry, and we compute its expansion on a space obtained as an Apollonian packing of three-dimensional spheres inside a four-dimensional ball. Using information from the zeta function of the Dirac operator of the spectral triple, we compute the leading terms in the asymptotic expansion of the spectral action. They consist of a zeta regularization of the divergent sum of the leading terms of the spectral actions of the individual spheres in the packing. This accounts for the contribution of points 1 and 3 in the dimension spectrum (as in the case of a 3-sphere). There is an additional term coming from the residue at the additional point in the real dimension spectrum that corresponds to the packing constant, as well as a series of fluctuations coming from log-periodic oscillations, created by the points of the dimension spectrum that are off the real line. These terms detect the fractality of the residue set of the sphere packing. We show that the presence of fractality influences the shape of the slow-roll potential for inflation, obtained from the spectral action. We also discuss the effect of truncating the fractal structure at a certain scale related to the energy scale in the spectral action.

  5. Spectral characteristics of ventricular response to atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Hayano, J; Yamasaki, F; Sakata, S; Okada, A; Mukai, S; Fujinami, T

    1997-12-01

    To investigate the spectral characteristics of the fluctuation in ventricular response during atrial fibrillation (AF), R-R interval time series obtained from ambulatory electrocardiograms were analyzed in 45 patients with chronic AF and in 30 age-matched healthy subjects with normal sinus rhythm (SR). Although the 24-h R-R interval spectrum during SR showed a 1/f noise-like downsloping linear pattern when plotted as log power against log frequency, the spectrum during AF showed an angular shape with a breakpoint at a frequency of 0.005 +/- 0.002 Hz, by which the spectrum was separated into long-term and short-term components with different spectral characteristics. The short-term component showed a white noise-like flat spectrum with a spectral exponent (absolute value of the regression slope) of 0.05 +/- 0.08 and an intercept at 10(-2) Hz of 4.9 +/- 0.3 log(ms2/Hz). The long-term component had a 1/f noise-like spectrum with a spectral exponent of 1.26 +/- 0.40 and an intercept at 10(-4) Hz of 7.0 +/- 0.3 log(ms2/Hz), which did not differ significantly from those for the spectrum during SR in the same frequency range [spectral exponent, 1.36 +/- 0.06; intercept at 10(-4) Hz, 7.1 +/- 0.3 log(ms2/Hz)]. The R-R intervals during AF may be a sequence of uncorrelated values over the short term (within several minutes). Over the longer term, however, the R-R interval fluctuation shows the long-range negative correlation suggestive of underlying regulatory processes, and spectral characteristics indistinguishable from those for SR suggest that the long-term fluctuations during AF and SR may originate from similar dynamics of the cardiovascular regulatory systems. PMID:9435618

  6. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects.

  7. Spectral signature verification using statistical analysis and text mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCoster, Mallory E.; Firpi, Alexe H.; Jacobs, Samantha K.; Cone, Shelli R.; Tzeng, Nigel H.; Rodriguez, Benjamin M.

    2016-05-01

    In the spectral science community, numerous spectral signatures are stored in databases representative of many sample materials collected from a variety of spectrometers and spectroscopists. Due to the variety and variability of the spectra that comprise many spectral databases, it is necessary to establish a metric for validating the quality of spectral signatures. This has been an area of great discussion and debate in the spectral science community. This paper discusses a method that independently validates two different aspects of a spectral signature to arrive at a final qualitative assessment; the textual meta-data and numerical spectral data. Results associated with the spectral data stored in the Signature Database1 (SigDB) are proposed. The numerical data comprising a sample material's spectrum is validated based on statistical properties derived from an ideal population set. The quality of the test spectrum is ranked based on a spectral angle mapper (SAM) comparison to the mean spectrum derived from the population set. Additionally, the contextual data of a test spectrum is qualitatively analyzed using lexical analysis text mining. This technique analyzes to understand the syntax of the meta-data to provide local learning patterns and trends within the spectral data, indicative of the test spectrum's quality. Text mining applications have successfully been implemented for security2 (text encryption/decryption), biomedical3 , and marketing4 applications. The text mining lexical analysis algorithm is trained on the meta-data patterns of a subset of high and low quality spectra, in order to have a model to apply to the entire SigDB data set. The statistical and textual methods combine to assess the quality of a test spectrum existing in a database without the need of an expert user. This method has been compared to other validation methods accepted by the spectral science community, and has provided promising results when a baseline spectral signature is

  8. Accretion Flow Dynamics of MAXI J1659-152 from the Spectral Evolution Study of its 2010 Outburst using the TCAF Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Dipak; Molla, Aslam Ali; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Mondal, Santanu

    2015-04-01

    Transient black hole candidates are interesting objects to study in X-rays as these sources show rapid evolutions in their spectral and temporal properties. In this paper, we study the spectral properties of the Galactic transient X-ray binary MAXI J1659-152 during its very first outburst after discovery with the archival data of RXTE Proportional Counter Array instruments. We make a detailed study of the evolution of accretion flow dynamics during its 2010 outburst through spectral analysis using the Chakrabarti-Titarchuk two-component advective flow (TCAF) model as an additive table model in XSPEC. Accretion flow parameters (Keplerian disk and sub-Keplerian halo rates, shock location, and shock strength) are extracted from our spectral fits with TCAF. We studied variations of these fit parameters during the entire outburst as it passed through three spectral classes: hard, hard-intermediate, and soft-intermediate. We compared our TCAF fitted results with standard combined disk blackbody (DBB) and power-law (PL) model fitted results and found that variations of disk rate with DBB flux and halo rate with PL flux are generally similar in nature. There appears to be an absence of the soft state, unlike what is seen in other similar sources.

  9. SPECTRAL OPTICAL MONITORING OF THE NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXY Ark 564

    SciTech Connect

    Shapovalova, A. I.; Burenkov, A. N.; Popovic, L. C.; Kovacevic, J.; Chavushyan, V. H.; Valdes, J. R.; Torrealba, J.; Carrasco, L.; Ilic, D.; Kovacevic, A.; Kollatschny, W.; Bochkarev, N. G.; Leon-Tavares, J.; Mercado, A.; Benitez, E.; Dultzin, D.; De la Fuente, E.

    2012-09-15

    We present the results of a long-term (1999-2010) spectral optical monitoring campaign of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) Ark 564, which shows a strong Fe II line emission in the optical. This AGN is a narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxy, a group of AGNs with specific spectral characteristics. We analyze the light curves of the permitted H{alpha}, H{beta}, optical Fe II line fluxes, and the continuum flux in order to search for a time lag between them. Additionally, in order to estimate the contribution of iron lines from different multiplets, we fit the H{beta} and Fe II lines with a sum of Gaussian components. We find that during the monitoring period the spectral variation (F{sub max}/F{sub min}) of Ark 564 is between 1.5 for H{alpha} and 1.8 for the Fe II lines. The correlation between the Fe II and H{beta} flux variations is of higher significance than that of H{alpha} and H{beta} (whose correlation is almost absent). The permitted-line profiles are Lorentzian-like and do not change shape during the monitoring period. We investigate, in detail, the optical Fe II emission and find different degrees of correlation between the Fe II emission arising from different spectral multiplets and the continuum flux. The relatively weak and different degrees of correlations between permitted lines and continuum fluxes indicate a rather complex source of ionization of the broad-line emission region.

  10. Spectral Cytopathology of Cervical Samples: Detecting Cellular Abnormalities in Cytologically Normal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Jennifer M.; Bird, Benjamin; Papamarkakis, Kostas; Miljković, Miloš; Bedrossian, Kristi; Laver, Nora; Diem, Max

    2010-01-01

    Aim Spectral Cytopathology (SCP) is a novel spectroscopic method for objective and unsupervised classification of individual exfoliated cells. The limitations of conventional cytopathology are well-recognized within the pathology community. In SCP, cellular differentiation is made by observing molecular changes in the nucleus and the cytoplasm, which may or may not produce morphological changes detectable by conventional cytopathology. This proof of concept study demonstrates SCP’s potential as an enhancing tool for cytopathologists by aiding in the accurate and reproducible diagnosis of cells in all states of disease. Method Infrared spectra are collected from cervical cells deposited onto reflectively coated glass slides. Each cell has a corresponding infrared spectrum that describes its unique biochemical composition. Spectral data are processed and analyzed by an unsupervised chemometric algorithm, Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Results In this blind study, cervical samples are classified by analyzing the spectra of morphologically normal looking squamous cells from normal samples and samples diagnosed by conventional cytopathology with low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL). SCP discriminated cytopathological diagnoses amongst twelve different cervical samples with a high degree of specificity and sensitivity. SCP also correlated two samples with abnormal spectral changes: these samples had a normal cytopathological diagnosis but had a history of abnormal cervical cytology. The spectral changes observed in the morphologically normal looking cells are most likely due to an infection with human papillomavirus, HPV. HPV DNA testing was conducted on five additional samples, and SCP accurately differentiated these samples by their HPV status. Conclusions SCP tracks biochemical variations in cells that are consistent with the onset of disease. HPV has been implicated as the cause of these changes detected spectroscopically. SCP does not depend on

  11. Multi-Component Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2008-11-01

    We explore multi-component dark matter models where the dark sector consists of multiple stable states with different mass scales, and dark forces coupling these states further enrich the dynamics. The multi-component nature of the dark matter naturally arises in supersymmetric models, where both R parity and an additional symmetry, such as a Z{sub 2}, is preserved. We focus on a particular model where the heavier component of dark matter carries lepton number and annihilates mostly to leptons. The heavier component, which is essentially a sterile neutrino, naturally explains the PAMELA, ATIC and synchrotron signals, without an excess in antiprotons which typically mars other models of weak scale dark matter. The lighter component, which may have a mass from a GeV to a TeV, may explain the DAMA signal, and may be visible in low threshold runs of CDMS and XENON, which search for light dark matter.

  12. Additive manufacturing of hybrid circuits

    DOE PAGES

    Bell, Nelson S.; Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; Clem, Paul G.; Keicher, David M.; Hirschfeld, Deidre; Hall, Aaron Christopher

    2016-03-26

    There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming hybrid circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer hybrid circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects.more » Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (AD), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. As a result, we show examples of hybrid circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or AD processes and conventional, established processes.« less

  13. Breast tissue decomposition with spectral distortion correction: A postmortem study

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Huanjun; Zhao, Bo; Baturin, Pavlo; Behroozi, Farnaz; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of an accurate measurement of water, lipid, and protein composition of breast tissue using a photon-counting spectral computed tomography (CT) with spectral distortion corrections. Methods: Thirty-eight postmortem breasts were imaged with a cadmium-zinc-telluride-based photon-counting spectral CT system at 100 kV. The energy-resolving capability of the photon-counting detector was used to separate photons into low and high energy bins with a splitting energy of 42 keV. The estimated mean glandular dose for each breast ranged from 1.8 to 2.2 mGy. Two spectral distortion correction techniques were implemented, respectively, on the raw images to correct the nonlinear detector response due to pulse pileup and charge-sharing artifacts. Dual energy decomposition was then used to characterize each breast in terms of water, lipid, and protein content. In the meantime, the breasts were chemically decomposed into their respective water, lipid, and protein components to provide a gold standard for comparison with dual energy decomposition results. Results: The accuracy of the tissue compositional measurement with spectral CT was determined by comparing to the reference standard from chemical analysis. The averaged root-mean-square error in percentage composition was reduced from 15.5% to 2.8% after spectral distortion corrections. Conclusions: The results indicate that spectral CT can be used to quantify the water, lipid, and protein content in breast tissue. The accuracy of the compositional analysis depends on the applied spectral distortion correction technique.

  14. Spectral methods and cluster structure in correlation-based networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimo, Tapio; Tibély, Gergely; Saramäki, Jari; Kaski, Kimmo; Kertész, János

    2008-10-01

    We investigate how in complex systems the eigenpairs of the matrices derived from the correlations of multichannel observations reflect the cluster structure of the underlying networks. For this we use daily return data from the NYSE and focus specifically on the spectral properties of weight W=|-δ and diffusion matrices D=W/sj-δ, where C is the correlation matrix and si=∑jW the strength of node j. The eigenvalues (and corresponding eigenvectors) of the weight matrix are ranked in descending order. As in the earlier observations, the first eigenvector stands for a measure of the market correlations. Its components are, to first approximation, equal to the strengths of the nodes and there is a second order, roughly linear, correction. The high ranking eigenvectors, excluding the highest ranking one, are usually assigned to market sectors and industrial branches. Our study shows that both for weight and diffusion matrices the eigenpair analysis is not capable of easily deducing the cluster structure of the network without a priori knowledge. In addition we have studied the clustering of stocks using the asset graph approach with and without spectrum based noise filtering. It turns out that asset graphs are quite insensitive to noise and there is no sharp percolation transition as a function of the ratio of bonds included, thus no natural threshold value for that ratio seems to exist. We suggest that these observations can be of use for other correlation based networks as well.

  15. Spectral and spectral-polarization characteristics of potato leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, B. I.; Belyaev, Yu. V.; Chumakov, A. V.; Nekrasov, V. P.; Shuplyak, V. I.

    2000-07-01

    The results of laboratory investigations of the spectral and spectral-polarization characteristics of radiation reflected from the leaves of potato (Solanum tuberosum) of different varieties are discussed. During the vegetation season of 1997, the angular dependence of the degree and azimuth of polarization of radiation reflected from potato leaves as well as the scattering indicatrices in the range 380 1080 nm were determined by a specially developed method with the use of a laboratory goniometric setup. The relationship between the spectral polarization characteristics of radiation and biological parameters of the potato has been obtained with the help of different methods of statistical analysis and explained on the basis of the known physical mechanisms.

  16. MEAN SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS AND BOLOMETRIC CORRECTIONS FOR LUMINOUS QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Krawczyk, Coleman M.; Richards, Gordon T.; Mehta, Sajjan S.; Vogeley, Michael S.; Gallagher, S. C.; Leighly, Karen M.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Schneider, Donald P.

    2013-05-01

    We explore the mid-infrared (mid-IR) through ultraviolet (UV) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 119,652 luminous broad-lined quasars with 0.064 < z < 5.46 using mid-IR data from Spitzer and WISE, near-infrared data from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and UKIDSS, optical data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and UV data from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The mean SED requires a bolometric correction (relative to 2500 A) of BC{sub 2500A} =2.75 {+-} 0.40 using the integrated light from 1 {mu}m-2 keV, and we further explore the range of bolometric corrections exhibited by individual objects. In addition, we investigate the dependence of the mean SED on various parameters, particularly the UV luminosity for quasars with 0.5 {approx}< z {approx}< 3 and the properties of the UV emission lines for quasars with z {approx}> 1.6; the latter is a possible indicator of the strength of the accretion disk wind, which is expected to be SED-dependent. Luminosity-dependent mean SEDs show that, relative to the high-luminosity SED, low-luminosity SEDs exhibit a harder (bluer) far-UV spectral slope ({alpha}{sub UV}), a redder optical continuum, and less hot dust. Mean SEDs constructed instead as a function of UV emission line properties reveal changes that are consistent with known Principal Component Analysis trends. A potentially important contribution to the bolometric correction is the unseen extreme UV (EUV) continuum. Our work suggests that lower-luminosity quasars and/or quasars with disk-dominated broad emission lines may require an extra continuum component in the EUV that is not present (or much weaker) in high-luminosity quasars with strong accretion disk winds. As such, we consider four possible models and explore the resulting bolometric corrections. Understanding these various SED-dependent effects will be important for accurate determination of quasar accretion rates.

  17. Comparisons of a Constrained Least Squares Model Versus Human-in-the-Loop for Spectral Unmixing to Determine Material Type of GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, Jason; Abercromby, Kira J.; Bedard, Donald; Seitzer, Patrick; Cardona, Tommaso; Cowardin, Heather; Barker, Ed; Lederer, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Spectral reflectance data through the visible regime was collected at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile using an imaging spectrograph on one of the twin 6.5-m Magellan telescopes. The data were obtained on 1-2 May 2012 on the 'Landon Clay' telescope with the LDSS3 (Low Dispersion Survey Spectrograph 3). Five pieces of Geosynchronous Orbit (GEO) or near-GEO debris were identified and observed with an exposure time of 30 seconds on average. In addition, laboratory spectral reflectance data was collected using an Analytical Spectral Device (ASD) field spectrometer at California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo on several typical common spacecraft materials including solar cells, circuit boards, various Kapton materials used for multi-layer insulation, and various paints. The remotely collected data and the laboratory-acquired data were then incorporated in a newly developed model that uses a constrained least squares method to unmix the spectrum in specific material components. The results of this model are compared to the previous method of a human-in-the-loop (considered here the traditional method) that identifies possible material components by varying the materials and percentages until a spectral match is obtained. The traditional model was found to match the remotely collected spectral data after it had been divided by the continuum to remove the space weathering effects, or a "reddening" of the materials. The constrained least-squares model also used the de-reddened spectra as inputs and the results were consistent with those obtained through the traditional method. For comparison, a first-order examination of including reddening effects into the constrained least-squares model will be explored and comparisons to the remotely collected data will be examined. The identification of each object's suspected material component will be discussed herein.

  18. Comparisons of a Constrained Least Squares Model versus Human-in-the-Loop for Spectral Unmixing to Determine Material Type of GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abercromby, Kira J.; Rapp, Jason; Bedard, Donald; Seitzer, Patrick; Cardona, Tommaso; Cowardin, Heather; Barker, Ed; Lederer, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Spectral reflectance data through the visible regime was collected at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile using an imaging spectrograph on one of the twin 6.5-m Magellan telescopes. The data were obtained on 1-2 May 2012 on the 'Landon Clay' telescope with the LDSS3 (Low Dispersion Survey Spectrograph 3). Five pieces of Geosynchronous Orbit (GEO) or near-GEO debris were identified and observed with an exposure time of 30 seconds on average. In addition, laboratory spectral reflectance data was collected using an Analytical Spectral Device (ASD) field spectrometer at California Polytechnic State University (Cal Poly) in San Luis Obispo on several typical common spacecraft materials including solar cells, circuit boards, various Kapton materials used for multi-layer insulation, and various paints. The remotely collected data and the laboratory-acquired data were then incorporated in a newly developed model that uses a constrained least squares method to unmix the spectrum in specific material components. The results of this model are compared to the previous method of a human-in-the-loop (considered here the traditional method) that identifies possible material components by varying the materials and percentages until a spectral match is obtained. The traditional model was found to match the remotely collected spectral data after it had been divided by the continuum to remove the space weathering effects, or a reddening of the materials. The constrained least-squares model also used the de-reddened spectra as inputs and the results were consistent with those obtained through the traditional method. For comparison, a first-order examination of including reddening effects into the constrained least-squares model will be explored and comparisons to the remotely collected data will be examined. The identification of each object s suspected material component will be discussed herein.

  19. [Full-field and automatic methodology of spectral calibration for PGP imaging spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Sun, Ci; Bayanheshig; Cui, Ji-cheng; Pan, Ming-zhong; Li, Xiao-tian; Tang, Yu-guo

    2014-08-01

    In order to analyze spectral data quantitatively which is obtained by prism-grating-prism imaging spectrometer, spectral calibration is required in order to determine spectral characteristics of PGP imaging spectrometer, such as the center wavelength of every spectral channel, spectral resolution and spectral bending. A spectral calibration system of full field based on collimated monochromatic light method is designed. Spherical mirror is used to provide collimated light, and a freely sliding and rotating folding mirror is adopted to change the angle of incident light in order to realize full field and automatic calibration of imaging spectrometer. Experiments of spectral calibration have been done for PGP imaging spectrometer to obtain parameters of spectral performance, and accuracy analysis combined with the structural features of the entire spectral calibration system have been done. Analysis results indicate that spectral calibration accuracy of the calibration system reaches 0.1 nm, and the bandwidth accuracy reaches 1.3%. The calibration system has merits of small size, better commonality, high precision and so on, and because of adopting the control of automation, the additional errors which are caused by human are avoided. The calibration system can be used for spectral calibration of other imaging spectrometers whose structures are similar to PGP.

  20. Methods of foreign fiber detecting based on PCA analyzing of infrared spectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, LiXun; Fu, WeiSen; Liu, JieYu; Zhang, HongBo; Pan, Jin; Wang, YaPeng; Tong, Fei

    2014-02-01

    A set of near infrared high resolution spectral imaging system is set up, the infrared absorption properties of raw cotton and colorless foreign are analyzed through the system, and scheme of polypropylene fiber detection based on the near infrared spectral image is proposed; On this basis, reduce dimensions the spectral images through the principal component analysis, further improve the efficiency of colorless foreign detection. The experimental results show that the spectral images after reducing dimensions can be used to detect colorless or light color raw cotton fiber effectively.

  1. GX 3+1: The Stability of Spectral Index as a Function of Mass Accretion Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifina, Elena; Titarchuk, Lev

    2012-03-01

    We present an analysis of the spectral and timing properties observed in X-rays from neutron star (NS) binary GX 3+1 (4U 1744-26) during long-term transitions between the faint and bright phases superimposed on short-term transitions between lower banana (LB) and upper banana (UB) branches in terms of its color-color diagram. We analyze all observations of this source obtained with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer and Beppo SAX satellites. We find that the X-ray broadband energy spectra during these spectral transitions can be adequately reproduced by a composition of a low-temperature blackbody component, a Comptonized component (COMPTB), and a Gaussian component. We argue that the electron temperature kTe of the Compton cloud monotonically increases from 2.3 keV to 4.5 keV, when GX 3+1 makes a transition from UB to LB. We also detect an evolution of noise components (a very low frequency noise and a high-frequency noise) during these LB-UB transitions. Using a disk seed photon normalization of COMPTB, which is proportional to the mass accretion rate, we find that the photon power-law index Γ is almost constant (Γ = 2.00 ± 0.02) when mass accretion rate changes by a factor of four. In addition, we find that the emergent spectrum is dominated by the strong Comptonized component. We interpret this quasi-stability of the index Γ and a particular form of the spectrum in the framework of a model in which the energy release in the transition layer located between the accretion disk and NS surface dominates that in the disk. Moreover, this index stability effect now established for GX 3+1 was previously found in the atoll source 4U 1728-34 and suggested for a number of other low-mass X-ray NS binaries (see Farinelli & Titarchuk). This intrinsic behavior of NSs, in particular for atoll sources, is fundamentally different from that seen in black hole binary sources where the index monotonically increases during spectral transition from the low state to the high state

  2. GX 3+1: THE STABILITY OF SPECTRAL INDEX AS A FUNCTION OF MASS ACCRETION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Seifina, Elena; Titarchuk, Lev E-mail: titarchuk@fe.infn.it

    2012-03-10

    We present an analysis of the spectral and timing properties observed in X-rays from neutron star (NS) binary GX 3+1 (4U 1744-26) during long-term transitions between the faint and bright phases superimposed on short-term transitions between lower banana (LB) and upper banana (UB) branches in terms of its color-color diagram. We analyze all observations of this source obtained with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer and Beppo SAX satellites. We find that the X-ray broadband energy spectra during these spectral transitions can be adequately reproduced by a composition of a low-temperature blackbody component, a Comptonized component (COMPTB), and a Gaussian component. We argue that the electron temperature kT{sub e} of the Compton cloud monotonically increases from 2.3 keV to 4.5 keV, when GX 3+1 makes a transition from UB to LB. We also detect an evolution of noise components (a very low frequency noise and a high-frequency noise) during these LB-UB transitions. Using a disk seed photon normalization of COMPTB, which is proportional to the mass accretion rate, we find that the photon power-law index {Gamma} is almost constant ({Gamma} = 2.00 {+-} 0.02) when mass accretion rate changes by a factor of four. In addition, we find that the emergent spectrum is dominated by the strong Comptonized component. We interpret this quasi-stability of the index {Gamma} and a particular form of the spectrum in the framework of a model in which the energy release in the transition layer located between the accretion disk and NS surface dominates that in the disk. Moreover, this index stability effect now established for GX 3+1 was previously found in the atoll source 4U 1728-34 and suggested for a number of other low-mass X-ray NS binaries (see Farinelli and Titarchuk). This intrinsic behavior of NSs, in particular for atoll sources, is fundamentally different from that seen in black hole binary sources where the index monotonically increases during spectral transition from the low

  3. GX 3+1: The Stability of Spectral Index as a Function of Mass Accretion Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seifana, Elena; Titarchuk, Lev

    2012-01-01

    We present an analysis of the spectral and timing properties observed in X-rays from neutron star (NS) binary GX 3+1 (4U 1744-26) during long-term transitions between the faint and bright phases superimposed on short-term transitions between lower banana (LB) and upper banana (UB) branches in terms of its color-color diagram, We analyze all observations of this source obtained with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer and BeppoSAX satellites, We find that the X-ray broadband energy spectra during these spectral transitions can be adequately reproduced by a composition of a low-temperature blackbody component, a Comptonized component (COMPTB), and Gaussian component We argue that the electron temperature kTe of the Compton cloud monotonically increases from 2.3 keY to 4.5 keY, when GX 3+1 makes a transition from UB to LB. We also detect an evolution of noise components (a very low frequency noise and a high-frequency noise) during these LB-UB transitions. Using a disk seed photon normalization of COMPTB, which is proportional to the mass accretion rate, we find that the photon power-law index Gamma is almost constant (Gamma = 2.00 +/- 0.02) when mass accretion rate changes by factor four. In addition, we find that the emergent spectrum is dominated by the strong Comptonized component We interpret this quasi-stability of the index Gamma and a particular form of the spectrum in the framework of a model in which the energy release in the transition layer located between the accretion disk and NS surface dominates that in the disk. Moreover, this index stability effect now established for GX 3+ I was previously found in the atoll source 4U 1728-34 and suggested for a number of other low-mass X-ray NS binaries. This intrinsic behavior of NSs, in particular for atoll sources, is fundamentally different from that seen in black hole binary sources where the index monotonically increases during spectral transition from the low state to the high state and then finally saturates at

  4. Solar Spectral Irradiance and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilewskie, P.; Woods, T.; Cahalan, R.

    2012-01-01

    Spectrally resolved solar irradiance is recognized as being increasingly important to improving our understanding of the manner in which the Sun influences climate. There is strong empirical evidence linking total solar irradiance to surface temperature trends - even though the Sun has likely made only a small contribution to the last half-century's global temperature anomaly - but the amplitudes cannot be explained by direct solar heating alone. The wavelength and height dependence of solar radiation deposition, for example, ozone absorption in the stratosphere, absorption in the ocean mixed layer, and water vapor absorption in the lower troposphere, contribute to the "top-down" and "bottom-up" mechanisms that have been proposed as possible amplifiers of the solar signal. New observations and models of solar spectral irradiance are needed to study these processes and to quantify their impacts on climate. Some of the most recent observations of solar spectral variability from the mid-ultraviolet to the near-infrared have revealed some unexpected behavior that was not anticipated prior to their measurement, based on an understanding from model reconstructions. The atmospheric response to the observed spectral variability, as quantified in climate model simulations, have revealed similarly surprising and in some cases, conflicting results. This talk will provide an overview on the state of our understanding of the spectrally resolved solar irradiance, its variability over many time scales, potential climate impacts, and finally, a discussion on what is required for improving our understanding of Sun-climate connections, including a look forward to future observations.

  5. The radio-ultraviolet spectral energy distribution of the jet in 3C 273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jester, S.; Röser, H.-J.; Meisenheimer, K.; Perley, R.

    2005-02-01

    We present deep VLA and HST observations of the large-scale jet in 3C 273 matched to 0.3 arcsec resolution. The observed spectra show a significant flattening in the infrared-ultraviolet wavelength range. The jet's emission cannot therefore be assumed to arise from a single electron population and requires the presence of an additional emission component. The observed smooth variations of the spectral indices along the jet imply that the physical conditions vary correspondingly smoothly. We determine the maximum particle energy for the optical jet using synchrotron spectral fits. The slow decline of the maximum energy along the jet implies particle reacceleration acting along the entire jet. In addition to the already established global anti-correlation between maximum particle energy and surface brightness, we find a weak positive correlation between small-scale variations in maximum particle energy and surface brightness. The origin of these conflicting global and local correlations is unclear, but they provide tight constraints for reacceleration models. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. under NASA contract No. NAS5-26555. These observations are associated with proposals #5980 and #7848. Also based on observations obtained at the NRAO's VLA. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  6. Spectral luminescence analysis of amniotic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slobozhanina, Ekaterina I.; Kozlova, Nataly M.; Kasko, Leonid P.; Mamontova, Marina V.; Chernitsky, Eugene A.

    1997-12-01

    It is shown that the amniotic fluid has intensive ultra-violet luminescence caused by proteins. Along with it amniotic fluid radiated in the field of 380 - 650 nm with maxima at 430 - 450 nm and 520 - 560 nm. The first peak of luminescence ((lambda) exc equals 350 nm; (lambda) em equals 430 - 440 nm) is caused (most probably) by the presence in amniotic fluid of some hormones, NADH2 and NADPH2. A more long-wave component ((lambda) exc equals 460 nm; (lambda) em equals 520 - 560 nm) is most likely connected with the presence in amniotic fluid pigments (bilirubin connected with protein and other). It is shown that intensity and maximum of ultra-violet luminescence spectra of amniotic fluid in normality and at pathology are identical. However both emission spectra and excitation spectra of long-wave ((lambda) greater than 450 nm) luminescence of amniotic fluid from pregnant women with such prenatal abnormal developments of a fetus as anencephaly and spina bifida are too long-wave region in comparison with the norm. Results of research testify that spectral luminescent analysis of amniotic fluid can be used for screening of malformations of the neural tube. It is very difficult for a practical obstetrician to reveal pregnant women with a high risk of congenital malformations of the fetus. Apart from ultrasonic examination, cytogenetic examination of amniotic fluid and defumination of concentrations of alpha-fetoprotein and acetylcholin-esterases in the amniotic fluid and blood plasma are the most widely used diagnostic approaches. However, biochemical and cytogenetic diagnostic methods are time-consuming. In the present work spectral luminescence properties of the amniotic fluid are investigated to determine spectral parameters that can be used to reveal pregnant women with a high risk of congenital malformations of their offsprings.

  7. Spectrally based mapping of riverbed composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legleiter, Carl J.; Stegman, Tobin K.; Overstreet, Brandon T.

    2016-07-01

    Remote sensing methods provide an efficient means of characterizing fluvial systems. This study evaluated the potential to map riverbed composition based on in situ and/or remote measurements of reflectance. Field spectra and substrate photos from the Snake River, Wyoming, USA, were used to identify different sediment facies and degrees of algal development and to quantify their optical characteristics. We hypothesized that accounting for the effects of depth and water column attenuation to isolate the reflectance of the streambed would enhance distinctions among bottom types and facilitate substrate classification. A bottom reflectance retrieval algorithm adapted from coastal research yielded realistic spectra for the 450 to 700 nm range; but bottom reflectance-based substrate classifications, generated using a random forest technique, were no more accurate than classifications derived from above-water field spectra. Additional hypothesis testing indicated that a combination of reflectance magnitude (brightness) and indices of spectral shape provided the most accurate riverbed classifications. Convolving field spectra to the response functions of a multispectral satellite and a hyperspectral imaging system did not reduce classification accuracies, implying that high spectral resolution was not essential. Supervised classifications of algal density produced from hyperspectral data and an inferred bottom reflectance image were not highly accurate, but unsupervised classification of the bottom reflectance image revealed distinct spectrally based clusters, suggesting that such an image could provide additional river information. We attribute the failure of bottom reflectance retrieval to yield more reliable substrate maps to a latent correlation between depth and bottom type. Accounting for the effects of depth might have eliminated a key distinction among substrates and thus reduced discriminatory power. Although further, more systematic study across a broader range

  8. Spectrally based mapping of riverbed composition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Legleiter, Carl; Stegman, Tobin K.; Overstreet, Brandon T.

    2016-01-01

    Remote sensing methods provide an efficient means of characterizing fluvial systems. This study evaluated the potential to map riverbed composition based on in situ and/or remote measurements of reflectance. Field spectra and substrate photos from the Snake River, Wyoming, USA, were used to identify different sediment facies and degrees of algal development and to quantify their optical characteristics. We hypothesized that accounting for the effects of depth and water column attenuation to isolate the reflectance of the streambed would enhance distinctions among bottom types and facilitate substrate classification. A bottom reflectance retrieval algorithm adapted from coastal research yielded realistic spectra for the 450 to 700 nm range; but bottom reflectance-based substrate classifications, generated using a random forest technique, were no more accurate than classifications derived from above-water field spectra. Additional hypothesis testing indicated that a combination of reflectance magnitude (brightness) and indices of spectral shape provided the most accurate riverbed classifications. Convolving field spectra to the response functions of a multispectral satellite and a hyperspectral imaging system did not reduce classification accuracies, implying that high spectral resolution was not essential. Supervised classifications of algal density produced from hyperspectral data and an inferred bottom reflectance image were not highly accurate, but unsupervised classification of the bottom reflectance image revealed distinct spectrally based clusters, suggesting that such an image could provide additional river information. We attribute the failure of bottom reflectance retrieval to yield more reliable substrate maps to a latent correlation between depth and bottom type. Accounting for the effects of depth might have eliminated a key distinction among substrates and thus reduced discriminatory power. Although further, more systematic study across a broader

  9. Retrieval of the atmospheric compounds using a spectral optical thickness information

    SciTech Connect

    Ioltukhovski, A.A.

    1995-03-01

    A spectral inversion technique for retrieval of the atmospheric gases and aerosols contents is proposed. This technique based upon the preliminary measurement or retrieval of the spectral optical thickness. The existence of a priori information about the spectral cross sections for some of the atmospheric components allows to retrieve the relative contents of these components in the atmosphere. Method of smooth filtration makes possible to estimate contents of atmospheric aerosols with known cross sections and to filter out other aerosols; this is done independently from their relative contribution to the optical thickness.

  10. The Coordination of Components for Educational Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education and Science, London (England).

    The coordination of the building components of educational facilities is discussed. The resulting components will be used for a wide range of building types in addition to schools and the recommendation should therefore be seen as part of a widespread move toward establishing a national British 'pool' of dimensionally related components. The two…

  11. Spectral characteristics of Shuttle glow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viereck, R. A.; Mende, S. B.; Murad, E.; Swenson, G. R.; Pike, C. P.; Culbertson, F. L.; Springer, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    The glowing cloud near the ram surfaces of the Space Shuttle was observed with a hand-held, intensified spectrograph operated by the astronauts from the aft-flight-deck of the Space Shuttle. The spectral measurements were made between 400 and 800 nm with a resolution of 3 nm. Analysis of the spectral response of the instrument and the transmission of the Shuttle window was performed on orbit using earth-airglow OH Meinel bands. This analysis resulted in a correction of the Shuttle glow intensity in the spectral region between 700 and 800 nm. The data presented in this report is in better agreement with laboratory measurements of the NO2 continuum.

  12. Hyper-spectral scanner design and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.; Moses, J.; Smith, R.

    1996-06-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). An earlier project produced rough designs for key components of a compact hyper-spectral sensor for environmental and ecological measurements. Such sensors could be deployed on unmanned vehicles, aircraft, or satellites for measurements important to agriculture, the environment, and ecologies. This represents an important advance in remote sensing. Motorola invited us to propose an add-on, proof-of-principle sensor for their Comet satellite, whose primary mission is to demonstrate a channel of the IRIDIUM satellite communications system. Our project converted the preliminary designs from the previous effort into final designs for the telescope, camera, computer and interfaces that constitute the hyper-spectral scanning sensor. The work concentrated on design, fabrication, preliminary integration, and testing of the electronic circuit boards for the computer, data compression board, and interface board for the camera-computer and computer-modulator (transmitter) interfaces.

  13. Spectral analysis of the turbulent mixing of two fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkamp, M.J.

    1995-09-01

    We describe a spectral approach to the investigation of fluid instability, generalized turbulence, and the interpenetration of fluids across an interface. The Technique also applies to a single fluid with large variations in density. Departures of fluctuating velocity components from the local mean are far subsonic, but the mean Mach number can be large. Validity of the description is demonstrated by comparisons with experiments on turbulent mixing due to the late stages of Rayleigh-Taylor instability, when the dynamics become approximately self-similar in response to a constant body force. Generic forms for anisotropic spectral structure are described and used as a basis for deriving spectrally integrated moment equations that can be incorporated into computer codes for scientific and engineering analyses.

  14. Spectral analysis of the turbulent mixing of two fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkamp, M.J.

    1996-02-01

    The authors describe a spectral approach to the investigation of fluid instability, generalized turbulence, and the interpenetration of fluids across an interface. The technique also applies to a single fluid with large variations in density. Departures of fluctuating velocity components from the local mean are far subsonic, but the mean Mach number can be large. Validity of the description is demonstrated by comparisons with experiments on turbulent mixing due to the late stages of Rayleigh-Taylor instability, when the dynamics become approximately self-similar in response to a constant body force. Generic forms for anisotropic spectral structure are described and used as a basis for deriving spectrally integrated moment equations that can be incorporated into computer codes for scientific and engineering analyses.

  15. Longwave thermal infrared spectral variability in individual rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Balick, Lee K; Gillespie, Alan; French, Andrew; Danilina, Iryna

    2008-01-01

    A hyperspectral imaging spectrometer measuring in the longwave thermal infrared (7.6-11.6 {micro}m) with a spatial resolution less than 4 mm was used in the field to observe the variability of emissivity spectra within individual rocks. The rocks were obtained commercially, were on the order of 20 cm in size and were selected to have distinct spectral features: they include alabaster (gypsum), soapstone (steatite with talc), obsidian (volcanic glass), norite (plagioclase and orthopyroxene), and 'jasper' (silica with iron oxides). The advantages of using an imaging spectrometer to spectrally characterize these rocks are apparent. Large spectral variations were observed within individual rocks that may be attributed to roughness, surface geometry, and compositional variation. Non-imaging spectrometers would normally miss these variations as would small samples used in laboratory measurements, spatially averaged spectra can miss the optimum spectra for identification materials and spatially localized components of the rock can be obscured.

  16. Spatially resolved spectral-imaging device

    DOEpatents

    Bloom, Joshua Simon; Tyson, John Anthony

    2016-02-09

    A spatially resolved spectral device comprising a dispersive array to receive an incident light comprising a principal ray. The dispersive array comprising a plurality of dichroic layers, each of the plurality of dichroic layers disposed in a path of a direction of the principal ray. Each of the plurality of dichroic layers configured to at least one of reflect or transmit a different wavelength range of the incident light. The device further comprising a detection array operatively coupled with the dispersive array. The detection array comprising a photosensitive component including a plurality of detection pixels, each of the plurality of detection pixels having a light-receiving surface disposed parallel to the direction of the principal ray to detect a respective one of the different wavelength ranges of incident light reflected from a corresponding one of the plurality of dichroic layers.

  17. 3D high spectral and spatial resolution imaging of ex vivo mouse brain

    SciTech Connect

    Foxley, Sean Karczmar, Gregory S.; Domowicz, Miriam; Schwartz, Nancy

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Widely used MRI methods show brain morphology both in vivo and ex vivo at very high resolution. Many of these methods (e.g., T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted imaging, phase-sensitive imaging, or susceptibility-weighted imaging) are sensitive to local magnetic susceptibility gradients produced by subtle variations in tissue composition. However, the spectral resolution of commonly used methods is limited to maintain reasonable run-time combined with very high spatial resolution. Here, the authors report on data acquisition at increased spectral resolution, with 3-dimensional high spectral and spatial resolution MRI, in order to analyze subtle variations in water proton resonance frequency and lineshape that reflect local anatomy. The resulting information compliments previous studies based on T{sub 2}{sup *} and resonance frequency. Methods: The proton free induction decay was sampled at high resolution and Fourier transformed to produce a high-resolution water spectrum for each image voxel in a 3D volume. Data were acquired using a multigradient echo pulse sequence (i.e., echo-planar spectroscopic imaging) with a spatial resolution of 50 × 50 × 70 μm{sup 3} and spectral resolution of 3.5 Hz. Data were analyzed in the spectral domain, and images were produced from the various Fourier components of the water resonance. This allowed precise measurement of local variations in water resonance frequency and lineshape, at the expense of significantly increased run time (16–24 h). Results: High contrast T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted images were produced from the peak of the water resonance (peak height image), revealing a high degree of anatomical detail, specifically in the hippocampus and cerebellum. In images produced from Fourier components of the water resonance at −7.0 Hz from the peak, the contrast between deep whi