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Sample records for additional structural details

  1. Aircraft empennage structural detail design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meholic, Greg; Brown, Rhonda; Hall, Melissa; Harvey, Robert; Singer, Michael; Tella, Gustavo

    1993-01-01

    This project involved the detailed design of the aft fuselage and empennage structure, vertical stabilizer, rudder, horizontal stabilizer, and elevator for the Triton primary flight trainer. The main design goals under consideration were to illustrate the integration of the control systems devices used in the tail surfaces and their necessary structural supports as well as the elevator trim, navigational lighting system, electrical systems, tail-located ground tie, and fuselage/cabin interface structure. Accommodations for maintenance, lubrication, adjustment, and repairability were devised. Weight, fabrication, and (sub)assembly goals were addressed. All designs were in accordance with the FAR Part 23 stipulations for a normal category aircraft.

  2. DETAIL OF PLAQUE WITH ADDITIONAL DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION INFORMATION, SOUTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF PLAQUE WITH ADDITIONAL DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION INFORMATION, SOUTHEAST ABUTMENT - Connecticut Avenue Bridge, Spans Rock Creek & Potomac Parkway at Connecticut Avenue, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  3. 12. INTERIOR EAST ADDITION DETAIL VIEW, FACING SOUTH. ROLLUP DOOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. INTERIOR EAST ADDITION DETAIL VIEW, FACING SOUTH. ROLL-UP DOOR ADDITION. ROLL-UP DOOR AND MECHANISM, OFFICE AND MAIN BUILDING SPACE ACCESS VISIBLE. - NASA Industrial Plant, Maintenance Facility, 12214 Lakewood Boulevard, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. 19. WINDOW DETAIL, NORTH WALL OF GARAGE ADDITION. VIEW SHOWS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. WINDOW DETAIL, NORTH WALL OF GARAGE ADDITION. VIEW SHOWS CONCRETE BLOCK CONSTRUCTION OF ADDITION. - Chollas Heights Naval Radio Transmitting Facility, Transmitter Building, 6410 Zero Road, San Diego, San Diego County, CA

  5. 14. INTERIOR DETAIL, FIRST FLOOR OF ADDITION AT SOUTH WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. INTERIOR DETAIL, FIRST FLOOR OF ADDITION AT SOUTH WALL OF TOILET ROOM, SHOWING ORNATE PAINTED RADIATOR AND TONGUE AND GROOVE WAINSCOTING. - Mills Hall, Mills College, 5000 MacArthur Boulevard, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  6. 4. DOWNSTREAM ELEVATION. DETAIL OF BUTTRESS ADDITION ON NORTHEAST WING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DOWNSTREAM ELEVATION. DETAIL OF BUTTRESS ADDITION ON NORTHEAST WING WALL. - Core Creek County Bridge, Spanning Core Creek, approximately 1 mile South of State Route 332 (Newtown Bypass), Newtown, Bucks County, PA

  7. 6. SIDE ELEVATION, DETAIL SHOWING ORIGINAL LOG CONSTRUCTION, CLAPBOARD ADDITION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. SIDE ELEVATION, DETAIL SHOWING ORIGINAL LOG CONSTRUCTION, CLAPBOARD ADDITION AND CHIMNEY STACK - Shinn-Curtis Log Cabin, 23 Washington Street (moved from Rancocas Boulevard), Mount Holly, Burlington County, NJ

  8. 10. DETAIL OF KITCHEN ADDITION, SHOWING SIDING COPED TO FIT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL OF KITCHEN ADDITION, SHOWING SIDING COPED TO FIT LOG WALL OF MAIN HOUSE - Whitcomb Cabin, BZ Corners, Glenwood County Road (Conboy Lake National Wildlife Refuge), Glenwood, Klickitat County, WA

  9. Detail, external parabolic antenna (later addition). Note how waveguide was ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, external parabolic antenna (later addition). Note how waveguide was cut to remove active portion of antenna. - Western Union Telegraph Company, Jennerstown Relay, Laurel Summit Road off U.S. 30, Laughlintown, Westmoreland County, PA

  10. 9. DETAIL OF FIXED SUPPORT (A RECENT ADDITION THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. DETAIL OF FIXED SUPPORT (A RECENT ADDITION -- THE BRIDGE IS NO LONGER MOVEABLE) AND LOWER CHORD OF THROUGH TRUSS, LOOKING SOUTH - Romeo Road, Sanitary & Ship Canal Bridge, Spanning Sanitary & Ship Canal, Romeoville, Will County, IL

  11. 7. Detail, window, northwest facade, addition, Engine Stores Building, Southern ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Detail, window, northwest facade, addition, Engine Stores Building, Southern Pacific Railroad Carlin Shops, view to southeast (135mm lens). - Southern Pacific Railroad, Carlin Shops, Engine Stores Building, Foot of Sixth Street, Carlin, Elko County, NV

  12. Aircraft empennage structural detail design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesnewski, David; Snow, Russ M.; Combs, Lisa M.; Paufler, David; Schnieder, George; Athousake, Roxanne

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to provide an empennage structural assembly that will withstand the operational loads defined in FAR Part 23, as well as those specified in the statement of work, i.e. snow, rain, humidity, tiedown forces, etc. The goal is to provide a simple yet durable lightweight structure that will transfer the aerodynamic forces produced by the tail surfaces through the most efficient load path to the airframe. The structure should be simple and cost-effective to manufacture and repair. All structures meet or exceed loading and fatigue criteria. The structure provides for necessary stiffness and ease of maintenance.

  13. Aircraft wing structure detail design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sager, Garrett L.; Roberts, Ron; Mallon, Bob; Alameri, Mohamed; Steinbach, Bill

    1993-01-01

    The provisions of this project call for the design of the structure of the wing and carry-through structure for the Viper primary trainer, which is to be certified as a utility category trainer under FAR part 23. The specific items to be designed in this statement of work were Front Spar, Rear Spar, Aileron Structure, Wing Skin, and Fuselage Carry-through Structure. In the design of these parts, provisions for the fuel system, electrical system, and control routing were required. Also, the total weight of the entire wing planform could not exceed 216 lbs. Since this aircraft is to be used as a primary trainer, and the SOW requires a useful life of 107 cycles, it was decided that all of the principle stresses in the structural members would be kept below 10 ksi. The only drawback to this approach is a weight penalty.

  14. 16. INTERIOR DETAIL, SECOND FLOOR OF ADDITION AT SOUTH WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. INTERIOR DETAIL, SECOND FLOOR OF ADDITION AT SOUTH WALL OF TOILET ROOM, SHOWING LARGER, DIFFERENT STYLE RADIATOR THAN AT FIRST FLOOR, AND TONGUE AND GROOVE WAINSCOTING WITH WOOD CAP TRIM. - Mills Hall, Mills College, 5000 MacArthur Boulevard, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  15. 4. DETAIL VIEW OF EAST CORNER, SHOWING RECENT ADDITION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL VIEW OF EAST CORNER, SHOWING RECENT ADDITION OF WINDOWS TO SOUTHEAST SIDE AND RECENT CLADDING IN CONTRAST TO ORIGINAL SHIPLAP SIDING INTACT ON NORTHEAST SIDE - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  16. 18. Interior detail, windows, original Library, addition, Engine Stores Building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Interior detail, windows, original Library, addition, Engine Stores Building, Southern Pacific Railroad Carlin Shops, view to north-northwest (90mm lens). Note the milled tongue-and-groove ceiling, and deterioration of bricks near floor level due to rising damp. - Southern Pacific Railroad, Carlin Shops, Engine Stores Building, Foot of Sixth Street, Carlin, Elko County, NV

  17. 15. DETAILED VIEW OF ENRICHED URANIUM STORAGE TANK. THE ADDITION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. DETAILED VIEW OF ENRICHED URANIUM STORAGE TANK. THE ADDITION OF THE GLASS RINGS SHOWN AT THE TOP OF THE TANK HELPS PREVENT THE URANIUM FROM REACHING CRITICALITY LIMITS. (4/12/62) - Rocky Flats Plant, General Manufacturing, Support, Records-Central Computing, Southern portion of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  18. 8. MACHINERY SHED STORAGE ROOM ADDITION DETAIL SHOWING MATRIX OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. MACHINERY SHED STORAGE ROOM ADDITION DETAIL SHOWING MATRIX OF NAILS USED TO ADHERE PORTLAND CEMENT PLASTER, SOUTH ADOBE WALL ADJACENT TO WINDOW Note: Photographs Nos. AZ-159-A-9 through AZ-159-A-10 are photocopies of photographs. The original prints and negatives are located in the SCS Tucson Plant Materials Center, Tucson, Arizona. Photographer Ted F. Spaller. - Tucson Plant Material Center, Machinery Shed, 3241 North Romero Road, Tucson, Pima County, AZ

  19. Structural concepts and details for seismic design

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    This manual discusses building and building component behavior during earthquakes, and provides suggested details for seismic resistance which have shown by experience to provide adequate performance during earthquakes. Special design and construction practices are also described which, although they might be common in some high-seismic regions, may not be common in low and moderate seismic-hazard regions of the United States. Special attention is given to describing the level of detailing appropriate for each seismic region. The UBC seismic criteria for all seismic zones is carefully examined, and many examples of connection details are given. The general scope of discussion is limited to materials and construction types common to Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Although the manual is primarily written for professional engineers engaged in performing seismic-resistant design for DOE facilities, the first two chapters, plus the introductory sections of succeeding chapters, contain descriptions which are also directed toward project engineers who authorize, review, or supervise the design and construction of DOE facilities. 88 refs., 188 figs.

  20. Interior detail of structural elements section; camera facing east. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior detail of structural elements section; camera facing east. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Supply Building, Walnut Avenue, southeast corner of Walnut Avenue & Fifth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  1. View south, wharf B, showing western docking structure, decking detail ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View south, wharf B, showing western docking structure, decking detail - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  2. INTERIOR; DETAIL OF ROOF FRAMING STRUCTURE, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. Naval ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR; DETAIL OF ROOF FRAMING STRUCTURE, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Naval Computer & Telecommunications Area Master Station, Eastern Pacific, Radio Transmitter Facility Lualualei, Helix House No. 2, Base of Radio Antenna Structure No. 427, Makaha, Honolulu County, HI

  3. A patch-based cross masking model for natural images with detail loss and additive defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yucheng; Allebach, Jan P.

    2015-03-01

    Visual masking is an effect that contents of the image reduce the detectability of a given target signal hidden in the image. The effect of visual masking has found its application in numerous image processing and vision tasks. In the past few decades, numerous research has been conducted on visual masking based on models optimized for artificial targets placed upon unnatural masks. Over the years, there is a tendency to apply masking model to predict natural image quality and detection threshold of distortion presented in natural images. However, to our knowledge few studies have been conducted to understand the generalizability of masking model to different types of distortion presented in natural images. In this work, we measure the ability of natural image patches in masking three different types of distortion, and analyse the performance of conventional gain control model in predicting the distortion detection threshold. We then propose a new masking model, where detail loss and additive defects are modeled in two parallel vision channels and interact with each other via a cross masking mechanism. We show that the proposed cross masking model has better adaptability to various image structures and distortions in natural scenes.

  4. 27. Old Crosscut Canal, Details for Drop Structures at Van ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Old Crosscut Canal, Details for Drop Structures at Van Buren Street and McDowell Road, Wingwall Footing Plan and Pipe Detail, February 1975. Source: City of Phoenix Engineering Department. - Old Crosscut Canal, North Side of Salt River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  5. 37. Roof Plan, Ground Floor Plan, Sections,and Details. Addition to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. Roof Plan, Ground Floor Plan, Sections,and Details. Addition to Bacteriology Laboratory at Letterman General Hospital, San Francisco, Cal. June 1915. BUILDING 1006. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 27, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  6. 31. LOWER CHORD / FLOOR STRUCTURE DETAIL OF THROUGH TRUSS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. LOWER CHORD / FLOOR STRUCTURE DETAIL OF THROUGH TRUSS. VIEW TO NORTH. - Abraham Lincoln Memorial Bridge, Spanning Missouri River on Highway 30 between Nebraska & Iowa, Blair, Washington County, NE

  7. 32. LOWER CHORD / FLOOR STRUCTURE DETAIL OF THROUGH TRUSS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. LOWER CHORD / FLOOR STRUCTURE DETAIL OF THROUGH TRUSS. VIEW TO NORTH. - Abraham Lincoln Memorial Bridge, Spanning Missouri River on Highway 30 between Nebraska & Iowa, Blair, Washington County, NE

  8. 9. Detail of viaduct's structural system with cattle pens beneath. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Detail of viaduct's structural system with cattle pens beneath. View to northeast. - South Omaha Union Stock Yards, Buckingham Road Viaduct, Twenty-ninth Street spanning Stockyard Cattle Pens, Omaha, Douglas County, NE

  9. Visitor center flight room, detail of twin structural piers at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Visitor center flight room, detail of twin structural piers at northeast corner supporting flight room dome - Wright Brothers National Memorial Visitor Center, Highway 158, Kill Devil Hills, Dare County, NC

  10. 40. Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, detail of escape ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, detail of escape hatch and decontamination shower VIEW WEST - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Launch Area, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  11. 12. Exterior detail view of roof structure at eave, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Exterior detail view of roof structure at eave, showing exposed rafter tails, skip sheathing and gutter - American Railway Express Company Freight Building, 1060 Northeast Division Street, Bend, Deschutes County, OR

  12. 14. DETAIL OF ROOF TRUSS STRUCTURE AND HAY HOOK CABLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DETAIL OF ROOF TRUSS STRUCTURE AND HAY HOOK CABLE AND PULLEY SYSTEM LOCATED ON WEST END OF BARN. CAMERA POINTED EAST. - James H. Lane Ranch, Barn, One Mile South of Richfield on Highway 26, Richfield, Lincoln County, ID

  13. Marguerite Arnet Residence, exterior roof structure detail, looking northwest. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Marguerite Arnet Residence, exterior roof structure detail, looking northwest. - Adam & Bessie Arnet Homestead, Marguerite Arnet Residence, 560 feet northeast of Adam & Bessie Arnet Residence, Model, Las Animas County, CO

  14. 4. DETAIL VIEW OF CROSS SECTION OF STRUCTURE, SHOWING EXTERIOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL VIEW OF CROSS SECTION OF STRUCTURE, SHOWING EXTERIOR FACINGS LINED WITH RUBBLE BACKING AND EARTH INFILL, LOOKING EAST - Rock Wall, North side of Battle Creek Canyon, Shingletown, Shasta County, CA

  15. 2. DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL SYSTEM FOR CANTILEVERED HOG RUN; BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL SYSTEM FOR CANTILEVERED HOG RUN; BUILDING 168 (1960 HOG KILL) IS BENEATH HOG RUN - Rath Packing Company, Cantilevered Hog Run, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  16. 7. Interior of Building 1015 (land plane hangar), structural detail, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Interior of Building 1015 (land plane hangar), structural detail, looking northeast - Naval Air Station Chase Field, Building 1015, Byrd Street, .82 mile South-southeast of intersection of Texas State Highway 202 & Independence Street, Beeville, Bee County, TX

  17. 8. Interior of Building 1015 (land plane hangar), structural detail, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Interior of Building 1015 (land plane hangar), structural detail, looking northeast - Naval Air Station Chase Field, Building 1015, Byrd Street, .82 mile South-southeast of intersection of Texas State Highway 202 & Independence Street, Beeville, Bee County, TX

  18. 15. Detail, cracks evidencing structural failure, northeast rear, view to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Detail, cracks evidencing structural failure, northeast rear, view to southwest, 90mm lens. - Benicia Arsenal, Powder Magazine No. 5, Junction of Interstate Highways 680 & 780, Benicia, Solano County, CA

  19. 14. Detail, crack evidencing structural failure, northeast rear, view to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Detail, crack evidencing structural failure, northeast rear, view to southwest, 90mm lens. Note failure of sandstone lintel above window. - Benicia Arsenal, Powder Magazine No. 5, Junction of Interstate Highways 680 & 780, Benicia, Solano County, CA

  20. 91. Virginia Route 608 grade separation structure. Detail of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    91. Virginia Route 608 grade separation structure. Detail of the scored wing walls and T beams. Looking southeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  1. 109. Detail view of structural frame supporting torch arm; cylindrical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    109. Detail view of structural frame supporting torch arm; cylindrical object in foreground is part of ventilating system. February 1984. - Statue of Liberty, Liberty Island, Manhattan, New York County, NY

  2. 5. Detail of tower bottom step and stairway structure, facing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Detail of tower bottom step and stairway structure, facing southeast - Cold Mountain Fire Lookout Station, Lookout Tower, Krassel District, Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, Dixie, Idaho County, ID

  3. INTERIOR STRUCTURAL DETAIL, INSIDE OF DRUM UNDER DOME ON STAIRS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR STRUCTURAL DETAIL, INSIDE OF DRUM UNDER DOME ON STAIRS, LOOKING SOUTH. - Colt Fire Arms Company, East Armory Building, 36-150 Huyshope Avenue, 17-170 Van Dyke Avenue, 49 Vredendale Avenue, Hartford, Hartford County, CT

  4. 35. MISCELLANEOUS ARCHITECTURAL AND STRUCTURAL DETAILS. INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200063300287106359. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. MISCELLANEOUS ARCHITECTURAL AND STRUCTURAL DETAILS. INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0633-00-287-106359. FLUOR NUMBER 5775-CPP-633-A-9. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. Interior detail of third level structural elements at south end; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior detail of third level structural elements at south end; camera facing west. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Supply Building, Walnut Avenue, southeast corner of Walnut Avenue & Fifth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  6. 16. DETAIL VIEW OF TYPICAL STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS; CROSSBAY 3 BETWEEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. DETAIL VIEW OF TYPICAL STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS; CROSSBAY 3 BETWEEN D & E BAYS; LOOKING WSW. (Ryan) - Watervliet Arsenal, Building No. 135, Gillespie Road, South of Parker Road, Watervliet, Albany County, NY

  7. 11. Detail, southeast corner, showing decorative elements of main structure, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Detail, southeast corner, showing decorative elements of main structure, and window at the second story of the hose tower. - Independent Hose Company No. 3, Nineteenth & Belmont Streets, Bellaire, Belmont County, OH

  8. 20. Detail of lantern roof structure, with revolving lens beneath. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Detail of lantern roof structure, with revolving lens beneath. (Blurred due to apparatus motion.) - Block Island Southeast Light, Spring Street & Mohegan Trail at Mohegan Bluffs, New Shoreham, Washington County, RI

  9. DETAIL VIEW OF THE STRUCTURE OF THE BASE OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF THE STRUCTURE OF THE BASE OF THE TEST STAND AND THE TAIL SECTION OF A REDSTONE (JUPITER) ROCKET. NOTE THE FLAME DEFLECTOR BEHIND THE STRUCTURE IN THE FOREGROUND. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  10. 12. DETAIL VIEW OF STRUCTURE, FROM BELOW. VIEW OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. DETAIL VIEW OF STRUCTURE, FROM BELOW. VIEW OF THE PARKER-MAYBERRY BRIDGE AND PART OF THE STRUCTURE OF THE COLORADO STREET BRIDGE, SEEN FROM THE ARROYO SECO BELOW THE COLORADO STREET BRIDGE - Colorado Street Bridge, Spanning Arroyo Seco at Colorado Boulevard, Pasadena, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. Battery Berry Observation Station, detail, frame structure meeting older masonry ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Battery Berry Observation Station, detail, frame structure meeting older masonry building on west side of structure; view east - Fort McKinley, Battery Berry Observation Station, North side of Wood Side Drive approximately 80 feet east of Spring Cove Lane, Great Diamond Island, Portland, Cumberland County, ME

  12. Hangar no. 2 structural details of west door at SW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Hangar no. 2 structural details of west door at SW corner. Note door tracks in underside of upper door structure. Looking 4 N. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Southern Lighter Than Air Ship Hangar, Near intersection of Windmill Road & Johnson Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  13. Investigating structural details of lipid-cholesterol-A β interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Durgesh; Anunciado, Divina; Heller, William; O'Neill, Hugh; Urban, Volker; Qian, Shuo

    2015-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia and is predicted to affect 1 in 85 people around the world by 2050. Amyloid beta (A β) -peptide, a peptide composed of 40- 42 amino acids that is the product of cleavage from the amyloid precursor protein (APP), is regarded to play a major role in the development of AD. In addition, accumulating evidence points to a positive association between cholesterol and AD. Here, we present results from our studies about A β-peptide and cholesterol in bilayer by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) using a combination of dimyristoyl, phosphocholine (DMPC) and partially deuterated cholesterol (cholesterol-d7) with and without A β. We compare the results using grazing incidence and transmission SANS on lipid bilayer films and unilamellar vesicles respectively. The structural details on vesicles and bilayers work in conjunction with the circular dichroism on peptide in solution and oriented circular dichroism in bilayer films. The studies confirm a positive association of A β with the membrane layers. The results from different studies will be compared and contrasted in presentation.

  14. 31. Detail of Southeast Light lens and roof structure of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. Detail of Southeast Light lens and roof structure of light gallery, 1985. Taken day after Hurricane Gloria, courtesy of Gerald F. Abbott and Block Island Historical Society. - Block Island Southeast Light, Spring Street & Mohegan Trail at Mohegan Bluffs, New Shoreham, Washington County, RI

  15. Section A, detail view at parking structure of heatblistered paint ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Section A, detail view at parking structure of heat-blistered paint on column J3/10. Level B2, looking west/southwest. (BH) - World Trade Center Site, Bounded by Vesey, Church, Liberty Streets, & Route 9A, New York County, NY

  16. 73. DETAIL OF 'A' FRAME STRUCTURE LOOKING NORTH SHOWING PROJECTILE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    73. DETAIL OF 'A' FRAME STRUCTURE LOOKING NORTH SHOWING PROJECTILE CAR, CAMERA TOWER, CANTILEVERED WALKWAYS AND ELECTRICAL GEAR, August 17, 1948. (Original photograph in possession of Dave Willis, San Diego, California.) - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. 5. STANDPIPE STRUCTURE DETAIL SHOWING CONNECTIONS TO PENSTOCKS, RIVETED SECTIONAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. STANDPIPE STRUCTURE DETAIL SHOWING CONNECTIONS TO PENSTOCKS, RIVETED SECTIONAL CONSTRUCTION OF TWO OF THE THREE ORIGINAL STANDPIPES (PHOTO RIGHT), WELDED SECTIONAL CONSTRUCTION OF FOURTH STANDPIPE, AND MODERN VENTILATION VALVES ON FIFTH PENSTOCK AT PHOTO LEFT CENTER BETWEEN FOURTH STANDPIPE AND ORIGINAL TWO. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Big Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse 3 Penstock Standpipes, Big Creek, Big Creek, Fresno County, CA

  18. Structure A, architectural sections & details. Drawing no. H2, revised ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Structure A, architectural sections & details. Drawing no. H2, revised as-built dated October 11, 1951. Original drawing by Black & Veatch, consulting engineers, Kansas City, Missouri, prepared for the U.S. Department of the Army, Office of Engineers, Military Construction Division, Washington, D.C. dated October 1. - Travis Air Force Base, Building No. 925, W Street, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  19. Hangar no. 2 interior detail of roof structures and interior ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Hangar no. 2 interior detail of roof structures and interior work spaces. Note concrete piers and cross bracing. Seen at trusses no. 42, 43, & 44. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Southern Lighter Than Air Ship Hangar, Near intersection of Windmill Road & Johnson Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  20. 60. DETAIL VIEW OF TWO STEEL STRUCTURAL COLUMNS THAT REPLACED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. DETAIL VIEW OF TWO STEEL STRUCTURAL COLUMNS THAT REPLACED THE ORIGINAL BRICK SUPPORTS FOR THE SOUTHERNMOST ARCH ON THE BUILDING'S W WALL WHEN THE S SECTION OF THE BUILDING WAS 'OPENED-UP' DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR; LOOKING NW. (Ceronie) - Watervliet Arsenal, Building No. 110, Hagner Road between Schull & Whittemore Roads, Watervliet, Albany County, NY

  1. 26. Old Crosscut Canal, Details for Drop Structures at Van ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Old Crosscut Canal, Details for Drop Structures at Van Buren Street and McDowell Road, Elevation, Plan and Section, February 1975. Source: city of Phoenix Engineering Department. - Old Crosscut Canal, North Side of Salt River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  2. 26. DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL COLLAPSE OF TOP FLOOR OF MILL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL COLLAPSE OF TOP FLOOR OF MILL, ABOVE ORE BIN, LOOKING WEST FROM TOP OF STAIRWAY IN CA-290-25. THE PIPE AT CENTER WAS USED TO SPREAD CRUSHED ORE COMING FROM THE JAW CRUSHER EVENLY TO ALL AREA OF THE ORE BIN BELOW. - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  3. 25. DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL TIMBERS, ORE BIN, AND STAIRWAY TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL TIMBERS, ORE BIN, AND STAIRWAY TO TOP FLOOR OF MILL, LOOKING SOUTH FROM SECOND FLOOR OF MILL. PORTION OF ORE BIN ON RIGHT, STAIRS ON LEFT. - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  4. Detail interior view of northeast stay tower at parking structure ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail interior view of northeast stay tower at parking structure in Section A showing graffiti, looking south between levels B3 and B4. Graffiti reads "God bless our local 3 brothers who gave their lives on 9-11-01 and all the rest! Amen" (BH) - World Trade Center Site, Bounded by Vesey, Church, Liberty Streets, & Route 9A, New York County, NY

  5. Detail Hframe structure about five and onefourth miles southwest of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail H-frame structure about five and one-fourth miles southwest of Morony Dam and Powerhouse showing one modern non-ceramic insulator and two historic porcelain suspension insulators - Morony Hydroelectric Facility, Morony-to-Rainbow 100 kV Transmission Line, West bank of the Missouri River, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  6. Detail of insulator array at first line structure showing historic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of insulator array at first line structure showing historic porcelain suspension insulators in strings of eight, porcelain jumper support insulators in strings of six, arch rings and ball weights - Morony Hydroelectric Facility, Morony-to-Rainbow 100 kV Transmission Line, West bank of the Missouri River, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  7. 16. STRUCTURAL DETAILS: CHANNEL, BIT & CLEAT, ANCHOR BOLTS & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. STRUCTURAL DETAILS: CHANNEL, BIT & CLEAT, ANCHOR BOLTS & PLATES FOR PIERS 4, 5, AND 6, DWG. NO. 97, 1-1/2" = 1', MADE BY A.F., JUNE 13, 1908 - Baltimore Inner Harbor, Pier 5, South of Pratt Street between Market Place & Concord Street, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  8. 10. Exterior view, showing the structural details and tanks above ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Exterior view, showing the structural details and tanks above at walk-in entry level (bottom) of Test Cell 7, Systems Integration Laboratory Building (T-28), looking west. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Systems Integration Laboratory Building, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  9. 6. Exterior view, showing structural details and instrumentation at the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Exterior view, showing structural details and instrumentation at the walk-in entry level (bottom) of Test Cell 6, Systems Integration Laboratory Building (T-28), looking southwest. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Systems Integration Laboratory Building, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  10. 10. KIDNER BRIDGE STRUCTURAL STEEL DETAIL SHEET (original plan sheet ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. KIDNER BRIDGE STRUCTURAL STEEL DETAIL SHEET (original plan sheet is in possession of Ball State University, Drawings and Documents Archive, COllege of Architecture and Planing, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana, 47306 - Kidner Bridge, Spanning Mississinewa River at County Road 700 South, Upland, Grant County, IN

  11. Detail of array structural elements through axis of array, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of array structural elements through axis of array, looking north-northeast - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Columbia Falls Radar Site Receive Sector Two Antenna Array, At the end of Shadagee Ridge Road, Columbia Falls, Washington County, ME

  12. Detailed Northern Anatolian Fault Zone crustal structure from receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornwell, D. G.; Kahraman, M.; Thompson, D. A.; Houseman, G. A.; Rost, S.; Turkelli, N.; Teoman, U.; Altuncu Poyraz, S.; Gülen, L.; Utkucu, M.

    2013-12-01

    We present high resolution images derived from receiver functions of the continental crust in Northern Turkey that is dissected by two fault strands of the Northern Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ). The NAFZ is a major continental strike-slip fault system that is comparable in length and slip rate to the San Andreas Fault Zone. Recent large earthquakes occurred towards the western end of the NAFZ in 1999 at Izmit (M7.5) and Düzce (M7.2). As part of the multi-disciplinary Faultlab project, we aim to develop a model of NAFZ crustal structure and locate deformation by constraining variations in seismic properties and anisotropy in the upper and lower crust. The crustal model will be an input to test deformation scenarios in order to match geodetic observations from different phases of the earthquake loading cycle. We calculated receiver functions from teleseismic earthquakes recorded by a rectangular seismometer array spanning the NAFZ with 66 stations at a nominal inter-station spacing of 7 km and 7 additional stations further afield. This Dense Array for North Anatolia (DANA) was deployed from May 2012 until September 2013 and we selected large events (Mw>5.5) from the high quality seismological dataset to analyze further. Receiver functions were calculated for different frequency bands then collected into regional stacks before being inverted for crustal S-wave velocity structure beneath the entire DANA array footprint. In addition, we applied common conversion point (CCP) migration using a regional velocity model to construct a migrated 3D volume of P-to-S converted and multiple energy in order to identify the major crustal features and layer boundaries. We also performed the CCP migration with transverse receiver functions in order to identify regions of anisotropy within the crustal layers. Our preliminary results show a heterogeneous crust above a flat Moho that is typically at a depth of 33 km. We do not observe a prominent step in the Moho beneath the surface

  13. 9. DETAIL OF DIVERSION STRUCTURE WEST OF DERBY LAKE (SECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. DETAIL OF DIVERSION STRUCTURE WEST OF DERBY LAKE (SECTION 2) SHOWING DIVERSION GATE TO LAKE LADORA. - Highline Canal, Sand Creek Lateral, Beginning at intersection of Peoria Street & Highline Canal in Arapahoe County (City of Aurora), Sand Creek lateral Extends 15 miles Northerly through Araphoe County, City & County of Denver, & Adams County to its end point, approximately 1/4 mile Southest of intersectioin of D Street & Ninth Avenue in Adams County (Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City Vicinity), Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  14. Detail View looking at the protected structure and landing gear ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail View looking at the protected structure and landing gear housing in the void created by the removal of the Forward Reaction Control System Module from the forward section of the Orbiter Discovery. This view was taken from the service platform in the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  15. 5. "TEST STAND 13, CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. "TEST STAND 1-3, CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. OC12-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-06; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/17, Rev. A. Stamped: AS BUILT; NO CHANGES. Date of Revision A: 11/1/50. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-3, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  16. 9. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; CABLE TUNNEL, PLAN, SECTIONS, DETAILS." Specifications ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; CABLE TUNNEL, PLAN, SECTIONS, DETAILS." Specifications No. OC1-55-72-(Rev.); Drawing No. 60-09-12; sheet 43 of 148; file no. AF 1320/94, Rev. A. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A Terminal Room, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  17. 12. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; DEFLECTOR PIT DETAILS, SHEET NO. 1." ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; DEFLECTOR PIT DETAILS, SHEET NO. 1." Specifications No. ENG-04-353-55-72; Drawing No. 60-09-12; sheet 41 of 148; file no. 1320/92, Rev. A. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A Terminal Room, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  18. Structural details, pathways, and energetics of unfolding apomyoglobin.

    PubMed

    Onufriev, Alexey; Case, David A; Bashford, Donald

    2003-01-17

    Protein folding is often difficult to characterize experimentally because of the transience of intermediate states, and the complexity of the protein-solvent system. Atomistic simulations, which could provide more detailed information, have had to employ highly simplified models or high temperatures, to cope with the long time scales of unfolding; direct simulation of folding is even more problematic. We report a fully atomistic simulation of the acid-induced unfolding of apomyoglobin in which the protonation of acidic side-chains to simulate low pH is sufficient to induce unfolding at room temperature with no added biasing forces or other unusual conditions; and the trajectory is validated by comparison to experimental characterization of intermediate states. Novel insights provided by their analysis include: characterization of a dry swollen globule state forming a barrier to initial unfolding or final folding; observation of cooperativity in secondary and tertiary structure formation and its explanation in terms of dielectric environments; and structural details of the intermediate and the completely unfolded states. These insights involve time scales and levels of structural detail that are presently beyond the range of experiment, but come within reach through the simulation methods described here. An implicit solvation model is used to analyze the energetics of protein folding at various pH and ionic strength values, and a reasonable estimate of folding free energy is obtained. Electrostatic interactions are found to disfavor folding. PMID:12498802

  19. Aircraft wing structural detail design (wing, aileron, flaps, and subsystems)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downs, Robert; Zable, Mike; Hughes, James; Heiser, Terry; Adrian, Kenneth

    1993-01-01

    The goal of this project was to design, in detail, the wing, flaps, and ailerons for a primary flight trainer. Integrated in this design are provisions for the fuel system, the electrical system, and the fuselage/cabin carry-through interface structure. This conceptual design displays the general arrangement of all major components in the wing structure, taking into consideration the requirements set forth by the appropriate sections of Federal Aviation Regulation Part 23 (FAR23) as well as those established in the statement of work.

  20. DETAIL VIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL STRUCTURE, LOOKING NORTHEAST TOWARD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL STRUCTURE, LOOKING NORTHEAST TOWARD THE REAR OF THE STRUCTURE. THE WHEELS AT THE TOP OF THE TRAM BUCKETS RODE OFF THE STATIONARY CABLES ONTO THE TRACK SUPPORTED BY THE "C" IRONS SUSPENDED FROM THE TOP TIMBERS, CLEARLY SEEN AT THE TOP OF THE FRAME. THE ANCHOR POINTS FOR THE TWO STATIONARY CABLES ARE AT BOTTOM CENTER, JUST BELOW THE CABLE WHEEL. THE MAIN CABLE WHEEL IS IN THE DISTANCE AT CENTER LEFT. THE ORE CHUTES COMING FROM THE ORE BIN ARE AT LEFT CENTER EDGE. TRAM BUCKETS WERE CHARGED HERE. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  1. Applications of GPR in Structural Detailing of the Medway Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alani, Amir M.; Faramarzi, Assad

    2013-04-01

    This investigation focuses on applications of GPR on structural detailing of a major tunnel under the River Medway in north Kent, UK. Construction of the tunnel was completed in 1996 and it carries a substantial volume of traffic between two major areas of Medway. The construction of the tunnel is an "immersed tube" tunnel type that connects a number of segments at immersion joint points. This investigation reports on utilisation of two separate GPR antenna systems at different frequencies in establishing structural details of the tunnel roof at immersion joints. The processed data compiled as a result of this investigation provided much needed information to tunnel engineers for forthcoming maintenance planning purposes. It also provided ample information in confirming rather doubted construction plans originally produced. The reported results are conclusive in terms of construction materials used (information was not originally available and needed confirmation) as well as establishing the required information on the formation of the tunnel roof joints. The presentation is complemented by providing detailed information of a complex process of adopting the GPR systems used in this endeavour.

  2. DETAIL VIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL STRUCTURE, LOOKING SOUTH TOWARD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL STRUCTURE, LOOKING SOUTH TOWARD THE FRONT OF THE STRUCTURE. THE WHEELS AT THE TOP OF THE TRAM BUCKETS RODE OFF THE STATIONARY CABLES ONTO THE TRACK SUPPORTED BY THE "C" IRONS SUSPENDED FROM THE TOP TIMBERS ON THE LEFT AND RIGHT. THE BUCKET OPENING MECHANISM IS ON THE LEFT, AND PART OF THE CLOSING MECHANISM ON THE RIGHT EDGE OF THE FRAME. THE TWO CABLES AT CENTER ARE THE STATIONARY TRAM CABLES THAT RUN ALONG THE TOP OF THE SUPPORT TOWERS ON WHICH THE WHEELS OF THE TRAM BUCKETS RODE. THEY ARE ANCHORED AT GROUND LEVEL JUST OFF FRAME TO THE LOWER LEFT. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  3. Detailed temporal structure of communication networks in groups of songbirds

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, David

    2016-01-01

    Animals in groups often exchange calls, in patterns whose temporal structure may be influenced by contextual factors such as physical location and the social network structure of the group. We introduce a model-based analysis for temporal patterns of animal call timing, originally developed for networks of firing neurons. This has advantages over cross-correlation analysis in that it can correctly handle common-cause confounds and provides a generative model of call patterns with explicit parameters for the influences between individuals. It also has advantages over standard Markovian analysis in that it incorporates detailed temporal interactions which affect timing as well as sequencing of calls. Further, a fitted model can be used to generate novel synthetic call sequences. We apply the method to calls recorded from groups of domesticated zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) individuals. We find that the communication network in these groups has stable structure that persists from one day to the next, and that ‘kernels’ reflecting the temporal range of influence have a characteristic structure for a calling individual's effect on itself, its partner and on others in the group. We further find characteristic patterns of influences by call type as well as by individual. PMID:27335223

  4. Detailed temporal structure of communication networks in groups of songbirds.

    PubMed

    Stowell, Dan; Gill, Lisa; Clayton, David

    2016-06-01

    Animals in groups often exchange calls, in patterns whose temporal structure may be influenced by contextual factors such as physical location and the social network structure of the group. We introduce a model-based analysis for temporal patterns of animal call timing, originally developed for networks of firing neurons. This has advantages over cross-correlation analysis in that it can correctly handle common-cause confounds and provides a generative model of call patterns with explicit parameters for the influences between individuals. It also has advantages over standard Markovian analysis in that it incorporates detailed temporal interactions which affect timing as well as sequencing of calls. Further, a fitted model can be used to generate novel synthetic call sequences. We apply the method to calls recorded from groups of domesticated zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) individuals. We find that the communication network in these groups has stable structure that persists from one day to the next, and that 'kernels' reflecting the temporal range of influence have a characteristic structure for a calling individual's effect on itself, its partner and on others in the group. We further find characteristic patterns of influences by call type as well as by individual. PMID:27335223

  5. Detailed glycan structural characterization by electronic excitation dissociation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiang; Jiang, Yan; Chen, Yajie; Huang, Yiqun; Costello, Catherine E; Lin, Cheng

    2013-11-01

    The structural complexity and diversity of glycans parallel their multilateral functions in living systems. To better understand the vital roles glycans play in biological processes, it is imperative to develop analytical tools that can provide detailed glycan structural information. This was conventionally achieved by multistage tandem mass spectrometry (MS(n)) analysis using collision-induced dissociation (CID) as the fragmentation method. However, the MS(n) approach lacks the sensitivity and throughput needed to analyze complex glycan mixtures from biological sources, often available in limited quantities. We define herein the critical parameters for a recently developed fragmentation technique, electronic excitation dissociation (EED), which can yield rich structurally informative fragment ions during liquid chromatographic (LC)-MS/MS analysis of glycans. We further demonstrate that permethylation, reducing end labeling and judicious selection of the metal charge carrier, can greatly facilitate spectral interpretation. With its high sensitivity, throughput, and compatibility with online chromatographic separation techniques, EED appears to hold great promise for large-scale glycomics studies. PMID:24080071

  6. Detailed Multidimensional Simulations of the Structure and Dynamics of Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, G.; Kailasanath, K.

    1999-01-01

    Numerical simulations in which the various physical and chemical processes can be independently controlled can significantly advance our understanding of the structure, stability, dynamics and extinction of flames. Therefore, our approach has been to use detailed time-dependent, multidimensional, multispecies numerical models to perform carefully designed computational experiments of flames on Earth and in microgravity environments. Some of these computational experiments are complementary to physical experiments performed under the Microgravity Program while others provide a fundamental understanding that cannot be obtained from physical experiments alone. In this report, we provide a brief summary of our recent research highlighting the contributions since the previous microgravity combustion workshop. There are a number of mechanisms that can cause flame instabilities and result in the formation of dynamic multidimensional structures. In the past, we have used numerical simulations to show that it is the thermo-diffusive instability rather than an instability due to preferential diffusion that is the dominant mechanism for the formation of cellular flames in lean hydrogen-air mixtures. Other studies have explored the role of gravity on flame dynamics and extinguishment, multi-step kinetics and radiative losses on flame instabilities in rich hydrogen-air flames, and heat losses on burner-stabilized flames in microgravity. The recent emphasis of our work has been on exploring flame-vortex interactions and further investigating the structure and dynamics of lean hydrogen-air flames in microgravity. These topics are briefly discussed after a brief discussion of our computational approach for solving these problems.

  7. Magnitude and detailed structure of residual oil saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Chatzis, I.; Morrow, N.R.; Lim, H.T.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental results are presented which demonstrate the effect on residual oil, under water-wet conditions, of particle size, particle size distribution, macroscopic and microscopic heterogeneities, microscopic dimensions such as ratio of pore body to pore throat size, and pore-to-pore coordination number. Experiments were performed in random packs of equal spheres, heterogeneous packs of spheres with microscopic and macroscopic heterogeneities, two-dimensional capillary networks having various pore geometries, and Berea sandstone. Detailed information on residual oil structure is presented, including blob size distributions of residual oil. Major conclusions are: (1) residual saturationds are independent of absolute pore size, per se, in systems of similar pore geometry; (2) well-mixed two-component aggregates of spheres gave virtually the same residual saturations as random packings of equal spheres; (3) clusters of large pores accessible through small pores will retain oil; (4) high aspect ratios tend to cause entrapment of oil as a large number of relatively small blobs, each held in single pores; and (5) the role of pore-to-pore coordination unber is generally secondary, hence correlations which have been proposed between residual oil and coordination number are unreliable.

  8. Magnitude and detailed structure of residual oil saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Chatzis, I.; Lim, H.T.; Morrow, N.R.

    1983-04-01

    Experimental results are presented that demonstrate the effect on residual oil, under water-wet conditions, of particle size, particle-size distribution, macroscopic and microscopic heterogeneities, microscopic dimensions such as ratio of pore-body to pore-throat size, and pore-to-pore coordination number. Experiments were performed in random packs of equal spheres, heterogeneous packs of spheres with microscopic and macroscopic heterogeneities, two-dimensional (2D) capillary networks having various pore geometries, and Berea sandstone. Detailed information on residual oil structure is presented, including blob-size distributions of residual oil. Major conclusions are: residual saturations are independent of absolute pore size, per se, in systems of similar pore geometry; well-mixed two-component aggregates of spheres gave virtually the same residual saturations as random packings of equal spheres; clusters of large pores accessible through small pores will retain oil; high aspect ratios tend to cause entrapment of oil as a large number of relatively small blobs, each held in single pores; and the role of pore-to-pore coordination number is generally secondary; hence, correlations that have been proposed between residual oil and coordination number are unreliable.

  9. Magnitude and detailed structure of residual oil saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Chatzis, I.; Lim, H.T.; Morrow, N.R.

    1983-04-01

    Experimental results are presented that demonstrate the effect on residual oil, under water-wet conditions, of particle size, particle-size distribution, macroscopic and microscopic heterogeneities, microscopic dimensions such as ratio of pore-body to pore-throat size, and pore-to-pore coordination number. Experiments were performed in random packs of equal spheres, heterogeneous packs of spheres with microscopic and macroscopic heterogeneities, two-dimensional (2D) capillary networks having various pore geometries, and Berea sandstone. Detailed information on residual oil structure is presented, including blob-size distributions of residual oil. Major conclusions are (1) residual saturations are independent of absolute pore size, per se, in systems of similar pore geometry; (2) well-mixed two-component aggregates of spheres gave virtually the same residual saturations as random packings of equal spheres; (3) clusters of large pores accessible through small pores will retain oil; (4) high aspect ratios tend to cause entrapment of oil as a large number of relatively small blobs, each held in single pores; and (5) the role of pore-to-pore coordination number is generally secondary; hence, correlations that have been proposed between residual oil and coordination number are unreliable.

  10. Detailed slab and mantle structure beneath westernmost Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, D.; Miller, M. S.; Bezada, M. J.; Humphreys, E.

    2013-12-01

    The geological evolution of the westernmost Mediterranean holds an important piece of the puzzle of how whole western Mediterranean evolved due to the convergence of Africa with Eurasia. Detailed upper mantle seismological images are crucial to test two controversial ideas about the dynamic process of the westernmost Mediterranean during the Cenozoic: slab rollback and lithosphere delamination. Recent tomographic images based on the dense seismic network in Spain and northern Morocco reveal a high-resolution continuous high-velocity anomaly to the transition zone depth under the Alboran domain [Bezada and Humphreys, 2013], which was used to support the slab roll back hypothesis for the westernmost Mediterranean tectonic evolution. However, the slab shape, width, and sharpness of its edges are not well resolved. Furthermore, the deep 2010 earthquake beneath Granada, Spain suggests possible oceanic crust material existing at ~ 600 km depth, which cannot be resolved by current tomography models. The study of multipathing and waveform broadening around sharp features has proven an efficient way to study those features. Here, we use both P and S waveform data from the PICASSO array to produce a detailed image. For the deep Granada earthquake, high frequency second arrivals and long coda after the P and S arrivals are shown on stations in the Rif Mountains of Morocco. By fitting both SH and P waveform data, we suggest that a low-velocity layer (LVL, 2 km thickness, δVs = -10%), possibly old oceanic crust, sits on top of the slab. The seismic waves travel through the LVL as guided waves preserving their high frequency energy. The strength of the second arrivals are very sensitive to the relative location between the deep earthquake and the LVL, which indicates the 2010 deep earthquake was most-likely within the subducted oceanic crust. Using both teleseismic and regional data, we conclude that the width of the sub-vertical slab is ~150 km, which is sharper than the

  11. Additive Manufacturing of a Microbial Fuel Cell—A detailed study

    PubMed Central

    Calignano, Flaviana; Tommasi, Tonia; Manfredi, Diego; Chiolerio, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    In contemporary society we observe an everlasting permeation of electron devices, smartphones, portable computing tools. The tiniest living organisms on Earth could become the key to address this challenge: energy generation by bacterial processes from renewable stocks/waste through devices such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs). However, the application of this solution was limited by a moderately low efficiency. We explored the limits, if any, of additive manufacturing (AM) technology to fabricate a fully AM-based powering device, exploiting low density, open porosities able to host the microbes, systems easy to fuel continuously and to run safely. We obtained an optimal energy recovery close to 3 kWh m−3 per day that can power sensors and low-power appliances, allowing data processing and transmission from remote/harsh environments. PMID:26611142

  12. Additive Manufacturing of a Microbial Fuel Cell--A detailed study.

    PubMed

    Calignano, Flaviana; Tommasi, Tonia; Manfredi, Diego; Chiolerio, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    In contemporary society we observe an everlasting permeation of electron devices, smartphones, portable computing tools. The tiniest living organisms on Earth could become the key to address this challenge: energy generation by bacterial processes from renewable stocks/waste through devices such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs). However, the application of this solution was limited by a moderately low efficiency. We explored the limits, if any, of additive manufacturing (AM) technology to fabricate a fully AM-based powering device, exploiting low density, open porosities able to host the microbes, systems easy to fuel continuously and to run safely. We obtained an optimal energy recovery close to 3 kWh m(-3) per day that can power sensors and low-power appliances, allowing data processing and transmission from remote/harsh environments. PMID:26611142

  13. Additive Manufacturing of a Microbial Fuel Cell—A detailed study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calignano, Flaviana; Tommasi, Tonia; Manfredi, Diego; Chiolerio, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    In contemporary society we observe an everlasting permeation of electron devices, smartphones, portable computing tools. The tiniest living organisms on Earth could become the key to address this challenge: energy generation by bacterial processes from renewable stocks/waste through devices such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs). However, the application of this solution was limited by a moderately low efficiency. We explored the limits, if any, of additive manufacturing (AM) technology to fabricate a fully AM-based powering device, exploiting low density, open porosities able to host the microbes, systems easy to fuel continuously and to run safely. We obtained an optimal energy recovery close to 3 kWh m-3 per day that can power sensors and low-power appliances, allowing data processing and transmission from remote/harsh environments.

  14. Structure Property Studies for Additively Manufactured Parts

    SciTech Connect

    Milenski, Helen M; Schmalzer, Andrew Michael; Kelly, Daniel

    2015-08-17

    Since the invention of modern Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes engineers and designers have worked hard to capitalize on the unique building capabilities that AM allows. By being able to customize the interior fill of parts it is now possible to design components with a controlled density and customized internal structure. The creation of new polymers and polymer composites allow for even greater control over the mechanical properties of AM parts. One of the key reasons to explore AM, is to bring about a new paradigm in part design, where materials can be strategically optimized in a way that conventional subtractive methods cannot achieve. The two processes investigated in my research were the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) process and the Direct Ink Write (DIW) process. The objectives of the research were to determine the impact of in-fill density and morphology on the mechanical properties of FDM parts, and to determine if DIW printed samples could be produced where the filament diameter was varied while the overall density remained constant.

  15. Laser Additive Manufacturing of Gas Permeable Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klahn, C.; Bechmann, F.; Hofmann, S.; Dinkel, M.; Emmelmann, C.

    Laser additive manufacturing offers a variety of new design possibilities. In mold making laser additive manufactured inserts with conformal cooling channels are already state of the art. Pneumatic ejectors for injection molds are a new application for laser additive manufacturing. The pneumatic ejectors require a durable gas permeable material. This material is produced by placing the scan vectors for the laser additive manufacturing process in a defined pattern. Trials with different plastics proofed the function and reliability of the pneumatic ejector concept in the injection molding cycle.

  16. Detailed analysis of the structural consequences of railgun augumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, G.W.; Schuler, K.W.

    1988-06-01

    The advantage of augmenting a plasma railgun is to provide the same driving force on the projectile as in an unaugmented railgun at a lower plasma arc current, thus producing less erosion and barrel damage. However, there are structural consequences to railgun augmentation which must be overcome before the advantages of lower plasma arc currents can be realized. To investigate these consequences, a bolted V-block supporting structure is considered with two cores; unaugmented (a single pair of conducting rails), and augmented (conducting rails augmented by a second tandem set of conductors). For each core, a two-dimensional dynamic finite element structural analysis is performed. The loadings, applied sequentially, consist of the static bolt preload, the plasma pressure behind the projectile, and the magnetic pressure induced by currents flowing in the rails or augmenting conductors. The magnetic pressure induced by currents flowing in the rails or augmenting conductors. A maximum rail current is found for which the unaugmented railgun can be fired without permanent deformation of the gun bore, thus allowing repeated firings. For the augmented railgun, at the same projectile acceleration, large permanent deformations are shown. 7 refs., 41 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Structure and fabrication details of an integrated modularized microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qingchang; Mu, Ying; Xu, Yanan; Song, Qi; Yu, Bingwen; Ma, Congcong; Jin, Wei; Jin, Qinhan

    2015-12-01

    This article contains schemes, original experimental data and figures for an integrated modularized microfluidic system described in "An integrated microfluidic system for bovine DNA purification and digital PCR detection [1]". In this data article, we described the structure and fabrication of the integrated modularized microfluidic system. This microfluidic system was applied to isolate DNA from ovine tissue lysate and detect the bovine DNA with digital PCR (dPCR). The DNA extraction efficiency of the microdevice was compared with the efficiency of benchtop protocol. PMID:26594657

  18. Additional developments regarding manifest dream structure and function.

    PubMed

    Wolowitz, H

    1998-06-01

    Detailed observation of manifest dream sequences indicated self-advocating occurrences facilitating the dreamer's self interests, opposed by self-adversarial interferences. Further examination of manifest dream syntactical structure additionally suggested a recurrent, four-step, algorithm for personal problem-solving within an interpersonal matrix consisting of the following cycle: (1) an opening scene setting the stage, (2) for the emergence of a self-concern, (3) which evokes a strategy to deal with dreamer's self-concern, (4) that eventuates in a consequence of the strategy. These steps repeat until the dream ends. Observing these manifest dream structural features, attributable to broadening past theorizing with "bottom-up" approaches, clarifies the dream's problem-solving process by providing an empirical, observable framework for dream interpretation and by contributing to their consensual validation. PMID:9656284

  19. Detailed analysis of surface asperity deformation mechanism in diffusion bonding of steel hollow structural components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Li, H.; Li, M. Q.

    2016-05-01

    This study focused on the detailed analysis of surface asperity deformation mechanism in similar diffusion bonding as well as on the fabrication of high quality martensitic stainless steel hollow structural components. A special surface with regular patterns was processed to be joined so as to observe the extent of surface asperity deformation under different bonding pressures. Results showed that an undamaged hollow structural component has been obtained with full interfacial contact and the same shear strength to that of base material. Fracture surface characteristic combined with surface roughness profiles distinctly revealed the enhanced surface asperity deformation as the applied pressure increases. The influence of surface asperity deformation mechanism on joint formation was analyzed: (a) surface asperity deformation not only directly expanded the interfacial contact areas, but also released deformation heat and caused defects, indirectly accelerating atomic diffusion, then benefits to void shrinkage; (b) surface asperity deformation readily introduced stored energy difference between two opposite sides of interface grain boundary, resulting in strain induced interface grain boundary migration. In addition, the influence of void on interface grain boundary migration was analyzed in detail.

  20. 1. Building #3, original structure and first addition, north side, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Building #3, original structure and first addition, north side, looking south. Photo shows (from left) the original 1911 structure, the 1939 infill addition, and the 1934 structure. - S. W. Shattuck Chemical Company, Incorporated, Building No. 3, 1805 South Bannock Street, Denver, Denver County, CO

  1. 46 CFR 72.01-25 - Additional structural requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional structural requirements. 72.01-25 Section 72.01-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Hull Structure § 72.01-25 Additional structural requirements. (a) Vessels required by part 171 of this chapter to have...

  2. Creating Imaginative Worlds: Unique Details and Structure in Norma Fox Mazer's Young Adult Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angel, Ann

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how writer Norma Fox Mazer has helped many readers make the leap between reality and imagination simply in the way she handles details in the lives of her characters. Explores the ideas of communicating with detail, experimenting with structure, and playing with time in crucial scenes. (SG)

  3. 36. ARCHITECTURAL AND STRUCTURAL DETAILS OF ELEVATOR HOUSING, NaK HEATER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. ARCHITECTURAL AND STRUCTURAL DETAILS OF ELEVATOR HOUSING, NaK HEATER STACK ROOF FLASHING, HOOD ELEVATION DETAIL. INCLUDES PARTIAL 'BILL OF MATERIAL.' INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0633-00-287-106361. FLUOR NUMBER 5775-CPP-633-A-11. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  4. Mass Spectrometric Characterization of Protein Structure Details Refines the Proteome Signature for Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röwer, Claudia; Koy, Cornelia; Hecker, Michael; Reimer, Toralf; Gerber, Bernd; Thiesen, Hans-Jürgen; Glocker, Michael O.

    2011-03-01

    Early diagnosis as well as individualized therapies are necessary to reduce the mortality of breast cancer, and personalized patient care strategies rely on novel prognostic or predictive factors. In this study, with six breast cancer patients, 2D gel analysis was applied for studying protein expression differences in order to distinguish invasive ductal breast carcinoma, the most frequent breast tumor subtype, from control samples. In total, 1203 protein spots were assembled in a 2D reference gel. Differentially abundant spots were subjected to peptide mass fingerprinting for protein identification. Twenty proteins with their corresponding 38 differentially expressed 2D gel spots were contained in our previously reported proteome signature, suggesting that distinct protein forms were contributing. In-depth MS/MS measurements enabled analyses of protein structure details of selected proteins. In protein spots that significantly contributed to our signature, we found that glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase was N-terminally truncated, pyruvate kinase M2 and nucleoside diphosphate kinase A but not other isoforms of these proteins were of importance, and nucleophosmin phosphorylation at serine residues 106 and 125 were clearly identified. Principle component analysis and hierarchical clustering with normalized quantitative data from the 38 spots resulted in accurate separation of tumor from control samples. Thus, separation of tissue samples as in our initial proteome signature could be confirmed even with a different proteome analysis platform. In addition, detailed protein structure investigations enabled refining our proteome signature for invasive ductal breast carcinoma, opening the way to structure-/function studies with respect to disease processes and/or therapeutic intervention.

  5. 22. U.S. Route 60 grade separation structure. Detail of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. U.S. Route 60 grade separation structure. Detail of the arch stones on the east elevation. View facing north. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  6. Detail of antenna tower structure, looking northnorthwest OvertheHorizon Backscatter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of antenna tower structure, looking north-northwest - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Tulelake Radar Site Receive Sector Five Antenna Array, Unnamed Road West of Double Head Road, Tulelake, Siskiyou County, CA

  7. Biobased extreme pressure additives: Structure-property considerations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extreme pressure additives are widely used in lubricant formulations for engine oils, hydraulic fluids, gear oils, metalworking fluids, and many others. Extreme pressure additives contain selected elements such as sulfur, phosphorus, and halogens in their structures. These elements, under extreme tr...

  8. Additive Manufacturing of Metal Cellular Structures: Design and Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Harrysson, Ola; Cormier, Denis; West, Harvey; Gong, Haijun; Stucker, Brent

    2015-03-01

    With the rapid development of additive manufacturing (AM), high-quality fabrication of lightweight design-efficient structures no longer poses an insurmountable challenge. On the other hand, much of the current research and development with AM technologies still focuses on material and process development. With the design for additive manufacturing in mind, this article explores the design issue for lightweight cellular structures that could be efficiently realized via AM processes. A unit-cell-based modeling approach that combines experimentation and limited-scale simulation was demonstrated, and it was suggested that this approach could potentially lead to computationally efficient design optimizations with the lightweight structures in future applications.

  9. AN ASSESSMENT OF SIMPLIFIED VS. DETAILED METHODOLOGIES FOR SSI ANALYSES OF DEEPLY EMBEDDED STRUCTURES.

    SciTech Connect

    XU,J.MILLER,C.HOFMAYER,C.GRAVES,H.

    2004-03-04

    Sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is carrying out a research program to develop a technical basis to support the safety evaluation of deeply embedded and/or buried (DEB) structures as proposed for advanced reactor designs. In this program, the methods and computer programs established for the assessment of soil-structure interaction (SSI) effects for the current generation of light water reactors are evaluated to determine their applicability and adequacy in capturing the seismic behavior of DEB structures. This paper presents an assessment of the simplified vs. detailed methodologies for seismic analyses of DEB structures. In this assessment, a lump-mass beam model is used for the simplified approach and a finite element representation is employed for the detailed method. A typical containment structure embedded in a soil profile representative of a typical nuclear power plant site was utilized, considering various embedment depths from shallow to full burial. BNL used the CARES program for the simplified model and the SASSI2000 program for the detailed analyses. The calculated response spectra at the key locations of the DEB structure are used for the performance assessment of the applied methods for different depths of burial. Included in the paper are: (1) the description of both the simplified and detailed models for the SSI analyses of the DEB structure, (2) the comparison of the analysis results for the different depths of burial between the two methods, and (3) the performance assessment of the analysis methodologies for SSI analyses of DEB structures. The resulting assessment from this study has indicated that simplified methods may be capable of capturing the seismic response for much deeper embedded structures than would be normally allowed by the standard practice.

  10. Detailed Studies on the Structure and Dynamics of Reacting Dusty Flows at Normal and Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andac, M. Gurhan; Cracchiola, Brad; Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.; Campbell, Charles S.

    1999-01-01

    Dusty reacting flows are of particular interest for a wide range of applications. Inert particles can alter the flammability and extinction limits of a combustible mixture. Reacting particles can release substantial amount of heat and can be used either for power generation or propulsion. Accumulation of combustible particles in air can result in explosions which, for example, can occur in grain elevators, during lumber milling and in mine galleries. Furthermore, inert particles are used as flow velocity markers in reacting flows, and their velocity is measured by non-intrusive laser diagnostic techniques. Despite their importance, dusty reacting flows have been less studied and understood compared to gas phase as well as sprays. The addition of solid particles in a flowing gas stream can lead to strong couplings between the two phases, which can be of dynamic, thermal, and chemical nature. The dynamic coupling between the two phases is caused by the inertia that causes the phases to move with different velocities. Furthermore, gravitational, thermophoretic, photophoretic, electrophoretic, diffusiophoretic, centrifugal, and magnetic forces can be exerted on the particles. In general, magnetic, electrophoretic, centrifugal, photophoretic, and diffusiophoretic can be neglected. On the other hand, thermophoretic forces, caused by steep temperature gradients, can be important. The gravitational forces are almost always present and can affect the dynamic response of large particles. Understanding and quantifying the chemical coupling between two phases is a challenging task. However, all reacting particles begin this process as inert particles, and they must be heated before they participate in the combustion process. Thus, one must first understand the interactions of inert particles in a combustion environment. The in-detail understanding of the dynamics and structure of dusty flows can be only advanced by considering simple flow geometries such as the opposed

  11. The detailed crystal and electronic structures of the cotunnite-type ZrO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Duan, Li; Ji, Vincent

    2016-07-01

    The detailed crystal and orbital-decomposed electronic structures of cotunnite-type ZrO2 have been investigated by using the first-principles projector augmented wave (PAW) potential within the generalized gradient approximation as well as taking into account on-site Coulomb repulsive interaction (GGA+U). The optimized structure shows that the OI and OII anions are surrounded by an arbitrary tetrahedron of four Zr cations and an arbitrary pentahedron of five Zr cations, respectively, in turn, the Zr cation is surrounded by an arbitrary tetrakaidecahedron formed by nine oxygen ligands. Although one more Zr cation is coordinated to OII, the larger bond lengths between OII and its adjacent five Zr cations (dOII-Zr) than those between OI and its adjacent four Zr cations (dOI-Zr) makes density of states (DOS) of s and three p (px , py and pz) states of the OII anion driving down in lower energy region and driving up in higher energy region. No crystal-field splitting is observed between three p (px , py and pz) states of anions OI and OII (between three p (px , py and pz) states and five d (dxy , dyz , dxz , dz2 and dx2-y2) states of cation Zr) is resulted from the arrangements of the surrounding cations (anions) do not have any symmetry. The additional covalent character upon Zr-O ionic bonds is attributed to the hybridization of itinerant Zr(5s) and less filled Zr(4d) states to the separated O(2s) and O(2p) states.

  12. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  13. Structure A, reinforcing details. Drawing No. H2302, as built, Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Structure A, reinforcing details. Drawing No. H2-302, as built, Original drawing by Black & Veatch, Consulting Engineers, Kansas City, Missouri, prepared for the U.S. Department of the Army, Office of Engineers, Military Construction Division, Washington, D.C. dated October 1, 1951. - Travis Air Force Base, Building No. 925, W Street, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  14. Detail of insulator array at Hframe structure on RyantoRainbow Line ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of insulator array at H-frame structure on Ryan-to-Rainbow Line 2 about three and one-fourth miles southwest of Ryan Dam. Array has three historic porcelain suspension insulators - Ryan Hydroelectric Facility, Ryan-to-Rainbow 100 kV Transmission Line, West bank of Missouri River, northeast of Great Falls, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  15. Detail of MoronytoRainbow Hframe structure just east of Ryan Dam ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of Morony-to-Rainbow H-frame structure just east of Ryan Dam Road showing three historic porcelain suspension insulators in strings of six. View to east - Morony Hydroelectric Facility, Morony-to-Rainbow 100 kV Transmission Line, West bank of the Missouri River, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  16. Detail of insulator array at Hframe structure on RyantoRainbow Line ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of insulator array at H-frame structure on Ryan-to-Rainbow Line 1 about three miles southwest of Ryan Dam. Array has one historic porcelain suspension insulator and two non-ceramic insulators - Ryan Hydroelectric Facility, Ryan-to-Rainbow 100 kV Transmission Line, West bank of Missouri River, northeast of Great Falls, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  17. 11. 22'X34' original blueprint, VariableAngle Launcher, 'CONTROL STATION STRUCTURAL DETAILS' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. 22'X34' original blueprint, Variable-Angle Launcher, 'CONTROL STATION STRUCTURAL DETAILS' drawn at 1 1/2'=1'-0'. (BUORD Sketch # 208401). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Control Station, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. STRUCTURAL DETAILS AND SECTIONS OF MAIN PROCESSING BUILDING (CPP601). INL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STRUCTURAL DETAILS AND SECTIONS OF MAIN PROCESSING BUILDING (CPP-601). INL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0601-00-291-103079. ALTERNATE ID NUMBER 542-11-B-73. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  19. Friction Stir Additive Manufacturing: Route to High Structural Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanivel, S.; Sidhar, H.; Mishra, R. S.

    2015-03-01

    Aerospace and automotive industries provide the next big opportunities for additive manufacturing. Currently, the additive industry is confronted with four major challenges that have been identified in this article. These challenges need to be addressed for the additive technologies to march into new frontiers and create additional markets. Specific potential success in the transportation sectors is dependent on the ability to manufacture complicated structures with high performance. Most of the techniques used for metal-based additive manufacturing are fusion based because of their ability to fulfill the computer-aided design to component vision. Although these techniques aid in fabrication of complex shapes, achieving high structural performance is a key problem due to the liquid-solid phase transformation. In this article, friction stir additive manufacturing (FSAM) is shown as a potential solid-state process for attaining high-performance lightweight alloys for simpler geometrical applications. To illustrate FSAM as a high-performance route, manufactured builds of Mg-4Y-3Nd and AA5083 are shown as examples. In the Mg-based alloy, an average hardness of 120 HV was achieved in the built structure and was significantly higher than that of the base material (97 HV). Similarly for the Al-based alloy, compared with the base hardness of 88 HV, the average built hardness was 104 HV. A potential application of FSAM is illustrated by taking an example of a simple stiffener assembly.

  20. 77 FR 8892 - Detailed Planning To Consider Additional Land Protection on the Missouri River From Fort Randall...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... old, wider river valley contains important habitat for at least 60 native and 26 sport fish. In addition, the riparian woodlands and island complexes are important for approximately 25 year-round bird..., important habitats still remain, for a rich diversity of plants and animals. The dynamic nature of...

  1. Probing the structural details of xylan degradation by real-time NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Bent Ole; Lok, Finn; Meier, Sebastian

    2014-11-01

    The biodegradation of abundantly available cell wall polysaccharides has recently received much attention, not least because cell wall polysaccharides are substrates for the human gut microbiota and for environmentally sustainable processes of biomass conversion to value-added compounds. A major fraction of cereal cell wall polysaccharides consists of arabinoxylans. Arabinoxylan and its degradation products are therefore present in a variety of agro-industrial residues and products. Here, we undertook to track the structural details of wheat arabinoxylan degradation with high resolution NMR spectroscopy. More than 15 carbohydrate residues were distinguished in the substrate and more than 20 residues in partially degraded samples without any sample cleanup. The resolution of a plethora of structural motifs in situ permits the readout of persisting structures in degradation processes and in products. Reaction progress was visualized for the biodegradation of arabinoxylan by different crude microbial enzyme preparations. The direct observation of structural details in complex mixtures containing arabinoxylan fragments is significant, as such structural details reportedly modulate the health-promoting functions of arabinoxylan fragments. PMID:25129786

  2. Detailed requirements document for the integrated structural analysis system, phase B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rainey, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The requirements are defined for a software system entitled integrated Structural Analysis System (ISAS) Phase B which is being developed to provide the user with a tool by which a complete and detailed analysis of a complex structural system can be performed. This software system will allow for automated interface with numerous structural analysis batch programs and for user interaction in the creation, selection, and validation of data. This system will include modifications to the 4 functions developed for ISAS, and the development of 25 new functions. The new functions are described.

  3. PROCESS WATER BUILDING, TRA605. BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN AND STRUCTURAL DETAILS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PROCESS WATER BUILDING, TRA-605. BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN AND STRUCTURAL DETAILS. SUMP TANK (DIAMETER 33 FEET; CAPACITY 100,000 GALLONS) LOCATION IN HIGH ROOF SECTION ON WEST SIDE. REPAIR SHOP AND STORAGE AREA IN LOW-ROOF AREA. WALL DETAILS: THICKNESS OF REINFORCED CONCRETE RANGES FROM 1'-6" TO 2' THICK. FOUNDATIONS FOR FIVE CELLS ENCLOSING PUMPS. BLAW-KNOX 3150-805-2, 12/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0605-62-098-100658, REV. 3. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  4. Detailed imaging of flowing structures at depth using microseismicity: a tool for site investigation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pytharouli, S.; Lunn, R. J.; Shipton, Z. K.

    2011-12-01

    Field evidence shows that faults and fractures can act as focused pathways or barriers for fluid migration. This is an important property for modern engineering problems, e.g., CO2 sequestration, geological radioactive waste disposal, geothermal energy exploitation, land reclamation and remediation. For such applications the detailed characterization of the location, orientation and hydraulic properties of existing fractures is necessary. These investigations are expensive, requiring the hire of expensive equipment (excavator or drill rigs), which incur standing charges when not in use. In addition, they only provide information for discrete sample 'windows'. Non-intrusive methods have the ability to gather information across an entire area. Methods including electrical resistivity/conductivity and ground penetrating radar (GRP), have been used as tools for site investigations. Their imaging ability is often restricted due to unfavourable on-site conditions e.g. GRP is not useful in cases where a layer of clay or reinforced concrete is present. Our research has shown that high quality seismic data can be successfully used in the detailed imaging of sub-surface structures at depth; using induced microseismicity data recorded beneath the Açu reservoir in Brazil we identified orientations and values of average permeability of open shear fractures at depths up to 2.5km. Could microseismicity also provide information on the fracture width in terms of stress drops? First results from numerical simulations showed that higher stress drop values correspond to narrower fractures. These results were consistent with geological field observations. This study highlights the great potential of using microseismicity data as a supplementary tool for site investigation. Individual large-scale shear fractures in large rock volumes cannot currently be identified by any other geophysical dataset. The resolution of the method is restricted by the detection threshold of the local

  5. OBSERVATIONS OF DETAILED STRUCTURE IN THE SOLAR WIND AT 1 AU WITH STEREO/HI-2

    SciTech Connect

    DeForest, C. E.; Howard, T. A.; Tappin, S. J. E-mail: howard@boulder.swri.edu

    2011-09-01

    We present images of solar wind electron density structures at distances of 1 AU, extracted from the STEREO/HI-2 data. Collecting the images requires separating the Thomson-scattered signal from the other background/foreground sources that are 10{sup 3} times brighter. Using a combination of techniques, we are able to generate calibrated imaging data of the solar wind with sensitivity of a few x 10{sup -17} B{sub sun}, compared to the background signal of a few x 10{sup -13} B{sub sun}, using only the STEREO/HI-2 Level 1 data as input. These images reveal detailed spatial structure in coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and the solar wind at projected solar distances in excess of 1 AU, at the instrumental motion-blur resolution limit of 1{sup 0}-3{sup 0}. CME features visible in the newly reprocessed data from 2008 December include leading-edge pileup, interior voids, filamentary structure, and rear cusps. 'Quiet' solar wind features include V-shaped structures centered on the heliospheric current sheet, plasmoids, and 'puffs' that correspond to the density fluctuations observed in situ. We compare many of these structures with in situ features detected near 1 AU. The reprocessed data demonstrate that it is possible to perform detailed structural analyses of heliospheric features with visible light imagery, at distances from the Sun of at least 1 AU.

  6. 12. "OBSERVATION POSTS, STRUCTURAL PLANS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. OC25572; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. "OBSERVATION POSTS, STRUCTURAL PLANS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. OC2-55-72; Drawing No. 60-09-12; sheet 89 of 148; file no. 1321/40, Rev. A. Very faint stamp above note reads: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  7. Toward Mapping the Detailed Density Structure of Classical Be Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisniewski, J. P.; Kowalski, A. F.; Bjorkman, K. S.; Bjorkman, J. E.

    2005-01-01

    We present the preliminary results of near contemporaneous optical and infrared spectroscopic observations of select classical Be stars. We find strong evidence of oppositely oriented V/R hydrogen line profiles in the optical versus infrared spectra of zeta Tau, and briefly discuss how sustained contemporaneous optical and infrared spectroscopic observations might enable us to trace the detailed density structure of classical Be circumstellar disks.

  8. Structure A, protective alarm installation details. Drawing no. H3709, revised ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Structure A, protective alarm installation details. Drawing no. H3-709, revised as-built dated August 28, 1952. Original drawing by Black & Veatch, consulting engineers, Kansas City, Missouri, prepared for the U.S. Department of the Army, Office of Engineers, Military Construction Division, Washington, D.C. dated October 1, 1951. - Travis Air Force Base, Building No. 925, W Street, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  9. A&M. TAN607. Construction detail showing structural steel framework with reinforcing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. TAN-607. Construction detail showing structural steel framework with reinforcing steel in place prior to pouring concrete for biparting doors between hot shop and special equipment service (SES) room. Facing north. Hot shop to left, SES room to right. slot for north half of door shows at upper left of view. Date: May 21, 1954. INEEL negative no. 10548 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. The design of impact absorbing structures for additive manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan-Craddock, J.; Brackett, D.; Wildman, R.; Hague, R.

    2012-08-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is increasingly becoming a viable manufacturing process due to dramatic advantages that it facilitates in the area of design complexity. This paper investigates the potential of additively manufactured lattice structures for the application of tailored impact absorption specifically for conformal body protection. It explores lattice cell types based on foam microstructures and assesses their suitability for impact absorption. The effect of varying the cell strut edge design is also investigated. The implications of scaling these cells up for AM are discussed as well as the design issues regarding the handling of geometric complexity and the requirement for body conformity. The suitability of AM materials for this application is also discussed.

  11. Structural details of light activation of the LOV2-based photoswitch PA-Rac1.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Andreas; Barends, Thomas R M; Udvarhelyi, Anikó; Lenherr-Frey, Daniel; Lomb, Lukas; Menzel, Andreas; Schlichting, Ilme

    2015-02-20

    Optical control of cellular processes is an emerging approach for studying biological systems, affording control with high spatial and temporal resolution. Specifically designed artificial photoswitches add an interesting extension to naturally occurring light-regulated functionalities. However, despite a great deal of structural information, the generation of new tools cannot be based fully on rational design yet; in many cases design is limited by our understanding of molecular details of light activation and signal transduction. Our biochemical and biophysical studies on the established optogenetic tool PA-Rac1, the photoactivatable small GTPase Rac1, reveal how unexpected details of the sensor-effector interface, such as metal coordination, significantly affect functionally important structural elements of this photoswitch. Together with solution scattering experiments, our results favor differences in the population of pre-existing conformations as the underlying allosteric activation mechanism of PA-Rac1, rather than the assumed release of the Rac1 domain from the caging photoreceptor domain. These results have implications for the design of new optogenetic tools and highlight the importance of including molecular details of the sensor-effector interface, which is however difficult to assess during the initial design of novel artificial photoswitches. PMID:25368973

  12. Detailed design of an SMA-actuated self-locking device for rotary feed structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoyu, Qin; Xiaojun, Yan; Xiaoyong, Zhang; Weibing, Wang; Lianghai, Li

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a detailed design of a locking device which is used to lock the rotary feed structure of a space-borne microwave radiometer during the launching stage. This locking device employs two redundant shape memory alloy (SMA) wires as the actuating elements, uses a self-locking structure to achieve the locking function and a step structure to ensure a safety clearance after release. Based on the design concept, preliminary design of the locking/release unit and the clamp unit are performed. Then, a more accurate simulation of the release process and the cyclic property of the device is carried out by using an improved Brinson’s SMA constitutive model and a heat transfer equation. After the design and simulation, four prototypes are fabricated and their performance tests are carried out to evaluate the self-locking property, lifetime and thermal tolerance.

  13. Resolving detailed molecular structures in complex organic mixtures and modeling their secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman-Rendall, Kevin A. S.; Zhuang, Yang R.; Amirav, Aviv; Chan, Arthur W. H.

    2016-03-01

    Characterization of unresolved complex mixtures (UCMs) remains an ongoing challenge towards developing detailed and accurate inputs for modeling secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. Traditional techniques based on gas chromatography/electron impact-mass spectrometry induce excessive fragmentation, making it difficult to speciate and quantify isomers precisely. The goal of this study is to identify individual organic isomers by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with supersonic molecular beam (SMB-GC/MS, also known as GC/MS with Cold EI) and to incorporate speciated isomers into an SOA model that accounts for the specific structures elucidated. Two samples containing atmospherically relevant UCMs are analyzed. The relative isomer distributions exhibit remarkably consistent trends across a wide range of carbon numbers. Constitutional isomers of different alkanes are speciated and individually quantified as linear, branched - for the first time by position of branching - multiply branched, or unsaturated - by degree of ring substitution and number of rings. Relative amounts of exact molecular structures are used as input parameters in an SOA box model to study the effects of molecular structures on SOA yields and volatility evolution. Highly substituted cyclic, mono-substituted cyclic, and linear species have the highest SOA yields while branched alkanes formed the least SOA. The rate of functionalization of a representative UCM is found to be in agreement with current volatility basis set (VBS) parameterizations based on detailed knowledge of composition and known oxidation mechanisms, confirming the validity of VBS parameters currently used in air quality models.

  14. Comprehension and retention: The effect of concrete details and causal structure in scientific narrative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcken, Wendi M.

    The purpose of this study was to examine two of the salient elements of instructional narratives as a guide to instructional practice. The literature summarized in this report discusses the theoretical basis for narrative impact on comprehension and retention, enumerates and defines possible salient narrative elements from the literature, and examines the instructional impact of two of these elements: concrete details and causal structure. This is intended to help provide guidance to instructional designers and teachers who desire to use narrative in science instruction. Participants included 94 high school physics students. An experimental research design of 2 (Gender) x 2 (Concreteness) x 2 (Causal Structure) x 2 (Comprehension as within-subjects) ANCOVA was used to analyze the effects of the narrative elements. It was found that concrete details improved comprehension and retention but that causal structure had no statistically significant impact on comprehension or retention. There were no significant gender differences in comprehension or retention though there were two- and three-way interactions between the independent variables.

  15. Bioinspired Cellular Structures: Additive Manufacturing and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stampfl, J.; Pettermann, H. E.; Liska, R.

    Biological materials (e.g., wood, trabecular bone, marine skeletons) rely heavily on the use of cellular architecture, which provides several advantages. (1) The resulting structures can bear the variety of "real life" load spectra using a minimum of a given bulk material, featuring engineering lightweight design principles. (2) The inside of the structures is accessible to body fluids which deliver the required nutrients. (3) Furthermore, cellular architectures can grow organically by adding or removing individual struts or by changing the shape of the constituting elements. All these facts make the use of cellular architectures a reasonable choice for nature. Using additive manufacturing technologies (AMT), it is now possible to fabricate such structures for applications in engineering and biomedicine. In this chapter, we present methods that allow the 3D computational analysis of the mechanical properties of cellular structures with open porosity. Various different cellular architectures including disorder are studied. In order to quantify the influence of architecture, the apparent density is always kept constant. Furthermore, it is shown that how new advanced photopolymers can be used to tailor the mechanical and functional properties of the fabricated structures.

  16. Structural order in additive processed bulk heterojunction organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, James Thomas

    Considerable academic and industrial efforts have been dedicated to resolving scientific and technological issues associated with the fabrication of efficient plastic solar cells via solution deposition techniques. The most successful strategy used to generate solution processable devices implements a two component donor-acceptor type system composed of a (p-type) narrow bandgap conjugated polymer donor blended with a (n-type) fullerene acceptor. Due to the limited exciton diffusion lengths (~10 nm) inherent to these materials, efficient photoinduced charge generation requires heterojunction formation (i.e. donor/acceptor interfaces) in close proximity to the region of exciton generation. Maximal charge extraction therefore requires that donor and acceptor components form nanoscale phase separated percolating pathways to their respective electrodes. Devices exhibiting these structural characteristics are termed bulk heterojunction devices (BHJ). Although the BHJ architecture highlights the basic characteristics of functional donor-acceptor type organic solar cells, device optimization requires internal order within each phase and proper organization relative to the substrate in order to maximize charge transport efficiencies and minimize charge carrier recombination losses. The economic viability of BHJ solar cells hinges upon the minimization of processing costs; thus, commercially relevant processing techniques should generate optimal structural characteristics during film formation, eliminating the need for additional post deposition processing steps. Empirical optimization has shown that solution deposition using high boiling point additives (e.g. octanedithiol (ODT)) provides a simple and widely used fabrication method for maximizing the power conversion efficiencies of BHJ solar cells. This work will show using x-ray scattering that a small percentage of ODT (~2%) in chlorobenzene induces the nucleation of polymeric crystallites within 2 min of deposition

  17. Tuning structure and mobility of solvation shells surrounding tracer additives

    SciTech Connect

    Carmer, James; Jain, Avni; Bollinger, Jonathan A.; Truskett, Thomas M.; Swol, Frank van

    2015-03-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations and a stochastic Fokker-Planck equation based approach are used to illuminate how position-dependent solvent mobility near one or more tracer particle(s) is affected when tracer-solvent interactions are rationally modified to affect corresponding solvation structure. For tracers in a dense hard-sphere fluid, we compare two types of tracer-solvent interactions: (1) a hard-sphere-like interaction, and (2) a soft repulsion extending beyond the hard core designed via statistical mechanical theory to enhance tracer mobility at infinite dilution by suppressing coordination-shell structure [Carmer et al., Soft Matter 8, 4083–4089 (2012)]. For the latter case, we show that the mobility of surrounding solvent particles is also increased by addition of the soft repulsive interaction, which helps to rationalize the mechanism underlying the tracer’s enhanced diffusivity. However, if multiple tracer surfaces are in closer proximity (as at higher tracer concentrations), similar interactions that disrupt local solvation structure instead suppress the position-dependent solvent dynamics.

  18. Tuning structure and mobility of solvation shells surrounding tracer additives.

    PubMed

    Carmer, James; Jain, Avni; Bollinger, Jonathan A; van Swol, Frank; Truskett, Thomas M

    2015-03-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations and a stochastic Fokker-Planck equation based approach are used to illuminate how position-dependent solvent mobility near one or more tracer particle(s) is affected when tracer-solvent interactions are rationally modified to affect corresponding solvation structure. For tracers in a dense hard-sphere fluid, we compare two types of tracer-solvent interactions: (1) a hard-sphere-like interaction, and (2) a soft repulsion extending beyond the hard core designed via statistical mechanical theory to enhance tracer mobility at infinite dilution by suppressing coordination-shell structure [Carmer et al., Soft Matter 8, 4083-4089 (2012)]. For the latter case, we show that the mobility of surrounding solvent particles is also increased by addition of the soft repulsive interaction, which helps to rationalize the mechanism underlying the tracer's enhanced diffusivity. However, if multiple tracer surfaces are in closer proximity (as at higher tracer concentrations), similar interactions that disrupt local solvation structure instead suppress the position-dependent solvent dynamics. PMID:25833590

  19. Additives Induced Structural Transformation of ABC Triblock Copolymer Particles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiangping; Yang, Yi; Wang, Ke; Li, Jingyi; Zhou, Huamin; Xie, Xiaolin; Zhu, Jintao

    2015-10-13

    Here we report the structural control of polystyrene-b-polyisoprene-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-PI-b-P2VP) asymmetric ABC triblock copolymer particles under 3D confinement by tuning the interactions among blocks. The additives, including 3-n-pentadecylphenol, homopolystyrene, and solvents, which can modulate the interactions among polymer blocks, play significant roles in the particle morphology. Moreover, the structured particles can be disassembled into isolated micellar aggregates with novel morphologies or mesoporous particles with tunable pore shape. Interestingly, the formed pupa-like PS-b-PI-b-P2VP particles display interesting dynamic stretch-retraction behavior when the solvent property is changed after partial cross-linking of the P2VP block. We further prove that such dynamic behavior is closely related to the density of cross-linking. The strategies presented here are believed to be promising routes to rationally design and fabricate block copolymer particles with desirable shape and internal structure. PMID:26388457

  20. Probing the Detailed Seismic Velocity Structure of Subduction Zones Using Advanced Seismic Tomography Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Thurber, C. H.

    2005-12-01

    Subduction zones are one of the most important components of the Earth's plate tectonic system. Knowing the detailed seismic velocity structure within and around subducting slabs is vital to understand the constitution of the slab, the cause of intermediate depth earthquakes inside the slab, the fluid distribution and recycling, and tremor occurrence [Hacker et al., 2001; Obara, 2002].Thanks to the ability of double-difference tomography [Zhang and Thurber, 2003] to resolve the fine-scale structure near the source region and the favorable seismicity distribution inside many subducting slabs, it is now possible to characterize the fine details of the velocity structure and earthquake locations inside the slab, as shown in the study of the Japan subduction zone [Zhang et al., 2004]. We further develop the double-difference tomography method in two aspects: the first improvement is to use an adaptive inversion mesh rather than a regular inversion grid and the second improvement is to determine a reliable Vp/Vs structure using various strategies rather than directly from Vp and Vs [see our abstract ``Strategies to solve for a better Vp/Vs model using P and S arrival time'' at Session T29]. The adaptive mesh seismic tomography method is based on tetrahedral diagrams and can automatically adjust the inversion mesh according to the ray distribution so that the inversion mesh nodes are denser where there are more rays and vice versa [Zhang and Thurber, 2005]. As a result, the number of inversion mesh nodes is greatly reduced compared to a regular inversion grid with comparable spatial resolution, and the tomographic system is more stable and better conditioned. This improvement is quite valuable for characterizing the fine structure of the subduction zone considering the highly uneven distribution of earthquakes within and around the subducting slab. The second improvement, to determine a reliable Vp/Vs model, lies in jointly inverting Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs using P, S, and S

  1. Detailed crustal structure of the North China and its implication for seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wenliang; Wang, Xin; Tian, Tian; Zhang, Jingfa; Wang, Donglei

    2014-02-01

    Since the Mesozoic-Cenozoic era the North China Craton has experienced an important tectonic transition and it has given rise to complicated crustal structure and strong earthquake activity. Based on the large-scale surface gravity data, we studied the detailed crustal structure and seismogenic mechanism of the North China. The results indicate that the North China presents typical characteristics of adjoining depression and uplift, alternating basins and hills, inhomogeneous density and also great differences in crustal structure and Moho topography. The upper and middle crustal structures are dominated by the NNE-striking tectonic units, with many faults cut down to the middle crust. The lower crust is characterized by the folding-structure, with high and low-density placed alternately from west to east, presenting lateral heterogeneous feature. Adjusted by the gravity isostasy, Moho topography of the North China fluctuates greatly. Compared with the North China Basin, crustal thickness in the Western Taihang, northern Yanshan and Luzhong areas are much thicker while those densities are lower than the North China Basin. The dominating tectonic direction of the Moho topography strikes NE to NNE and undulates alternately from west to east. The epicenters are mostly concentrated in the upper and middle crust, especially the transitional areas between the high and low-gravity anomalies. The Tancheng earthquake in 1668, Sanhe earthquake in 1673, Tangshan earthquake in 1976, and all other seismic tectonic zones of the North China are all distributed in area where magma moves strongly beneath the crust, which is considered to be related to the movement of the high density, unstable and heat flows along the deep passage from the uppermost and asthenosphere due to the subduction of the Pacific slab towards the Eurasian plate.

  2. Crystal structure of listeriolysin O reveals molecular details of oligomerization and pore formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köster, Stefan; van Pee, Katharina; Hudel, Martina; Leustik, Martin; Rhinow, Daniel; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Chakraborty, Trinad; Yildiz, Özkan

    2014-04-01

    Listeriolysin O (LLO) is an essential virulence factor of Listeria monocytogenes that causes listeriosis. Listeria monocytogenes owes its ability to live within cells to the pH- and temperature-dependent pore-forming activity of LLO, which is unique among cholesterol-dependent cytolysins. LLO enables the bacteria to cross the phagosomal membrane and is also involved in activation of cellular processes, including the modulation of gene expression or intracellular Ca2+ oscillations. Neither the pore-forming mechanism nor the mechanisms triggering the signalling processes in the host cell are known in detail. Here, we report the crystal structure of LLO, in which we identified regions important for oligomerization and pore formation. Mutants were characterized by determining their haemolytic and Ca2+ uptake activity. We analysed the pore formation of LLO and its variants on erythrocyte ghosts by electron microscopy and show that pore formation requires precise interface interactions during toxin oligomerization on the membrane.

  3. Porous electrode apparatus for electrodeposition of detailed metal structures or microelectronic interconnections

    DOEpatents

    Griffiths, Stewart K.; Nilson, Robert H.; Hruby, Jill M.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and procedure for performing microfabrication of detailed metal structures by electroforming metal deposits within small cavities. Two primary areas of application are: the LIGA process which manufactures complex three-dimensional metal parts and the damascene process used for electroplating line and via interconnections of microelectronic devices. A porous electrode held in contact or in close proximity with a plating substrate or mold top to ensure one-dimensional and uniform current flow into all mold cavities is used. Electrolyte is pumped over the exposed surface of the porous electrode to ensure uniform ion concentrations at this external surface. The porous electrode prevents electrolyte circulation within individual mold cavities, avoiding preferential enhancement of ion transport in cavities having favorable geometries. Both current flow and ion transport are one-dimensional and identical in all mold cavities, so all metal deposits grow at the same rate eliminating nonuniformities of the prior art.

  4. Detailed mapping of reservoir structural geometry in detached, shortened fold belts, Ortega (Aptian-Albian) field area, Girardot basin, Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, G.D. )

    1990-05-01

    Discovery and development of oil fields in shortened compressional fold belts require recognition that the largest reservoirs occur in intermediate or third-order scale folds. Third-order folds generally are preserved in the footwall of larger scale fold thrusts, and may be concealed beneath smaller, detached surface folds of nonreservoir condition. A successful reservoir mapping procedure involved (1) detailed surface mapping, (2) depth conversion of seismic data (3) construction of a network of true-scale balanced cross sections, and (4) contour mapping above and below the major zones of detachment. Structure at the 11 million bbl Ortega field consist of convergent third-order fold thrusts, with internal decollement. Tight flexural-slip folds imbricate and tectonically thicken upward on the west-verging Ortega anticline. The buried, east-vergent Salado anticline acts as a buttress to westward propagation at Ortega but retreats along strike to allow the Porvenir anticline to develop a low, broad, fault-bend fold geometry. At least four fault blocks in the Ortega field remain untested because balanced section analysis has not been employed to create additional control points for structure contour maps on the top of the reservoir. It is speculated that another 10-50 million bbl of primary recoverable reserves remain in the Ortega field. In addition, reservoirs like the Ortega field should occur elsewhere in the Girardot basin. These reservoirs likely will occur all along the footwall of fold-thrust structures on the flank of the intrabasin Pata high.

  5. Faxing Structures to the Moon: Freeform Additive Construction System (FACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, A. Scott; Wilcox, Brian; McQuin, Christopher; Townsend, Julie; Rieber, Richard; Barmatz, Martin; Leichty, John

    2013-01-01

    Using the highly articulated All-Terrain Hex-Limbed Extra-Terrestrial Explorer (ATHLETE) robotic mobility system as a precision positioning tool, a variety of print head technologies can be used to 3D print large-scale in-situ structures on planetary surfaces such as the moon or Mars. In effect, in the same way CAD models can be printed in a 3D printer, large-scale structures such as walls, vaults, domes, berms, paving, trench walls, and other insitu derived elements can be FAXed to the planetary surface and built in advance of the arrival of crews, supplementing equipment and materials brought from earth. This paper discusses the ATHLETE system as a mobility / positioning platform, and presents several options for large-scale additive print head technologies, including tunable microwave "sinterator" approaches and in-situ concrete deposition. The paper also discusses potential applications, such as sintered-in-place habitat shells, radiation shielding, road paving, modular bricks, and prefabricated construction components.

  6. Detailed structural and assembly model of the type II secretion pilus from sparse data.

    PubMed

    Campos, Manuel; Nilges, Michaël; Cisneros, David A; Francetic, Olivera

    2010-07-20

    Many gram-negative bacteria secrete specific proteins via the type II secretion systems (T2SS). These complex machineries share with the related archaeal flagella and type IV pilus (T4P) biogenesis systems the ability to assemble thin, flexible filaments composed of small, initially inner membrane-localized proteins called "pilins." In the T2SS from Klebsiella oxytoca, periplasmic pseudopili that are essential for pullulanase (PulA) secretion extend beyond the bacterial surface and form pili when the major pilin PulG is overproduced. Here, we describe the detailed, experimentally validated structure of the PulG pilus generated from crystallographic and electron microscopy data by a molecular modeling approach. Two intermolecular salt bridges crucial for function were demonstrated using single and complementary charge inversions. Double-cysteine substitutions in the transmembrane segment of PulG led to position-specific cross-linking of protomers in assembled pili. These biochemical data provided information on residue distances in the filament that were used to derive a refined model of the T2SS pilus at pseudoatomic resolution. PulG is organized as a right-handed helix of subunits, consistent with protomer organization in gonococcal T4P. The conserved character of residues involved in key hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions within the major pseudopilin family supports the general relevance of this model for T2SS pseudopilus structure. PMID:20616068

  7. Molecular Details of Olfactomedin Domains Provide Pathway to Structure-Function Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Shannon E.; Donegan, Rebecca K.; Nguyen, Elaine; Desai, Tanay M.; Lieberman, Raquel L.

    2015-01-01

    Olfactomedin (OLF) domains are found within extracellular, multidomain proteins in numerous tissues of multicellular organisms. Even though these proteins have been implicated in human disorders ranging from cancers to attention deficit disorder to glaucoma, little is known about their structure(s) and function(s). Here we biophysically, biochemically, and structurally characterize OLF domains from H. sapiens olfactomedin-1 (npoh-OLF, also called noelin, pancortin, OLFM1, and hOlfA), and M. musculus gliomedin (glio-OLF, also called collomin, collmin, and CRG-L2), and compare them with available structures of myocilin (myoc-OLF) recently reported by us and R. norvegicus glio-OLF and M. musculus latrophilin-3 (lat3-OLF) by others. Although the five-bladed β-propeller architecture remains unchanged, numerous physicochemical characteristics differ among these OLF domains. First, npoh-OLF and glio-OLF exhibit prominent, yet distinct, positive surface charges and copurify with polynucleotides. Second, whereas npoh-OLF and myoc-OLF exhibit thermal stabilities typical of human proteins near 55°C, and most myoc-OLF variants are destabilized and highly prone to aggregation, glio-OLF is nearly 20°C more stable and significantly more resistant to chemical denaturation. Phylogenetically, glio-OLF is most similar to primitive OLFs, and structurally, glio-OLF is missing distinguishing features seen in OLFs such as the disulfide bond formed by N- and C- terminal cysteines, the sequestered Ca2+ ion within the propeller central hydrophilic cavity, and a key loop-stabilizing cation-π interaction on the top face of npoh-OLF and myoc-OLF. While deciphering the explicit biological functions, ligands, and binding partners for OLF domains will likely continue to be a challenging long-term experimental pursuit, we used structural insights gained here to generate a new antibody selective for myoc-OLF over npoh-OLF and glio-OLF as a first step in overcoming the impasse in detailed

  8. Molecular Details of Olfactomedin Domains Provide Pathway to Structure-Function Studies.

    PubMed

    Hill, Shannon E; Donegan, Rebecca K; Nguyen, Elaine; Desai, Tanay M; Lieberman, Raquel L

    2015-01-01

    Olfactomedin (OLF) domains are found within extracellular, multidomain proteins in numerous tissues of multicellular organisms. Even though these proteins have been implicated in human disorders ranging from cancers to attention deficit disorder to glaucoma, little is known about their structure(s) and function(s). Here we biophysically, biochemically, and structurally characterize OLF domains from H. sapiens olfactomedin-1 (npoh-OLF, also called noelin, pancortin, OLFM1, and hOlfA), and M. musculus gliomedin (glio-OLF, also called collomin, collmin, and CRG-L2), and compare them with available structures of myocilin (myoc-OLF) recently reported by us and R. norvegicus glio-OLF and M. musculus latrophilin-3 (lat3-OLF) by others. Although the five-bladed β-propeller architecture remains unchanged, numerous physicochemical characteristics differ among these OLF domains. First, npoh-OLF and glio-OLF exhibit prominent, yet distinct, positive surface charges and copurify with polynucleotides. Second, whereas npoh-OLF and myoc-OLF exhibit thermal stabilities typical of human proteins near 55°C, and most myoc-OLF variants are destabilized and highly prone to aggregation, glio-OLF is nearly 20°C more stable and significantly more resistant to chemical denaturation. Phylogenetically, glio-OLF is most similar to primitive OLFs, and structurally, glio-OLF is missing distinguishing features seen in OLFs such as the disulfide bond formed by N- and C- terminal cysteines, the sequestered Ca2+ ion within the propeller central hydrophilic cavity, and a key loop-stabilizing cation-π interaction on the top face of npoh-OLF and myoc-OLF. While deciphering the explicit biological functions, ligands, and binding partners for OLF domains will likely continue to be a challenging long-term experimental pursuit, we used structural insights gained here to generate a new antibody selective for myoc-OLF over npoh-OLF and glio-OLF as a first step in overcoming the impasse in detailed

  9. Detailed Study of Emission Structures in the Vicinity of LkHα 198

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevorgyan, M. H.; Movsessian, T. A.; Andreasyan, H. R.; Magakian, T. Yu.

    2016-09-01

    Results from a study of collimated flows near the star LkHα 198 are reported. Observations were made using the VAGR multipupil spectrograph installed on the 2.6-m telescope at the Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory. The morphology and kinematics of emission structures in the vicinity of LkHα 198, including HH 161, were studied and electron density charts obtained. Besides the HH 161 object, our data revealed an arc-shaped emission structure with LkHα 198 at its apex. A shape of this kind is usually a direct indication of the presence of a cavity in a dark cloud blown out by a directed outflow. In addition, a faint "tail" extending in the direction of the central star is observed in HH 161. A comparison of these results with radio frequency observations shows that the probable source of HH 161 is the binary system LkHα 198.

  10. Possibility of supervision over detailed structure of ocean currents by MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklyarov, V. E.

    2008-02-01

    The report focuses on the analysis of the detail structure of ocean currents in areas of dust storms distribution or intensive phytoplankton's development. Dust storms represent the global phenomenon occurring regularly and, thus, atmospheric streams transfer a significant amount of the sand and dust (more than 2000 million tons) from deserts of Gobi, Sahara, Namibia, and Arabian Peninsula etc. The dust from Sahara achieves Caribbean Sea and southeast areas of USA for 5-7 days, and traces of the Asian dust storm, which have crossed Pacific Ocean, were found out in Great Lakes. For the purposes of our research the influence of sand and a dust dropping out from atmosphere on optical properties of the top layer of the ocean is represented especially significant. We shall note, that this question is poorly covered in the scientific literature. On our data, there are only separate certificates that return dispersion in green area of a spectrum for the top layer of the ocean is considerably increased after passage of a dust storm. It occurs due to saturation of the ocean top layer sand particles were sunlight diffusion is good. On the other hand, these particles, being a passive tracer, are easily involved by separate jets of currents in local circulation. These factors create a real basis for space observations on details mesoscale ocean circulation. As a trial experiment, author of the report have leaded the multispectral analysis data from MODIS (satellite AQUA), received on a northwest part Indian Ocean and Gulf of Aden. Results of the analysis confirm the made hypothesis.

  11. Simulating photon scattering effects in structurally detailed ventricular models using a Monte Carlo approach

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Martin J.; Plank, Gernot

    2014-01-01

    Light scattering during optical imaging of electrical activation within the heart is known to significantly distort the optically-recorded action potential (AP) upstroke, as well as affecting the magnitude of the measured response of ventricular tissue to strong electric shocks. Modeling approaches based on the photon diffusion equation have recently been instrumental in quantifying and helping to understand the origin of the resulting distortion. However, they are unable to faithfully represent regions of non-scattering media, such as small cavities within the myocardium which are filled with perfusate during experiments. Stochastic Monte Carlo (MC) approaches allow simulation and tracking of individual photon “packets” as they propagate through tissue with differing scattering properties. Here, we present a novel application of the MC method of photon scattering simulation, applied for the first time to the simulation of cardiac optical mapping signals within unstructured, tetrahedral, finite element computational ventricular models. The method faithfully allows simulation of optical signals over highly-detailed, anatomically-complex MR-based models, including representations of fine-scale anatomy and intramural cavities. We show that optical action potential upstroke is prolonged close to large subepicardial vessels than further away from vessels, at times having a distinct “humped” morphology. Furthermore, we uncover a novel mechanism by which photon scattering effects around vessels cavities interact with “virtual-electrode” regions of strong de-/hyper-polarized tissue surrounding cavities during shocks, significantly reducing the apparent optically-measured epicardial polarization. We therefore demonstrate the importance of this novel optical mapping simulation approach along with highly anatomically-detailed models to fully investigate electrophysiological phenomena driven by fine-scale structural heterogeneity. PMID:25309442

  12. Processing of Uav Based Range Imaging Data to Generate Detailed Elevation Models of Complex Natural Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohoutek, T. K.; Eisenbeiss, H.

    2012-07-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are more and more used in civil areas like geomatics. Autonomous navigated platforms have a great flexibility in flying and manoeuvring in complex environments to collect remote sensing data. In contrast to standard technologies such as aerial manned platforms (airplanes and helicopters) UAVs are able to fly closer to the object and in small-scale areas of high-risk situations such as landslides, volcano and earthquake areas and floodplains. Thus, UAVs are sometimes the only practical alternative in areas where access is difficult and where no manned aircraft is available or even no flight permission is given. Furthermore, compared to terrestrial platforms, UAVs are not limited to specific view directions and could overcome occlusions from trees, houses and terrain structures. Equipped with image sensors and/or laser scanners they are able to provide elevation models, rectified images, textured 3D-models and maps. In this paper we will describe a UAV platform, which can carry a range imaging (RIM) camera including power supply and data storage for the detailed mapping and monitoring of complex structures, such as alpine riverbed areas. The UAV platform NEO from Swiss UAV was equipped with the RIM camera CamCube 2.0 by PMD Technologies GmbH to capture the surface structures. Its navigation system includes an autopilot. To validate the UAV-trajectory a 360° prism was installed and tracked by a total station. Within the paper a workflow for the processing of UAV-RIM data is proposed, which is based on the processing of differential GNSS data in combination with the acquired range images. Subsequently, the obtained results for the trajectory are compared and verified with a track of a UAV (Falcon 8, Ascending Technologies) carried out with a total station simultaneously to the GNSS data acquisition. The results showed that the UAV's position using differential GNSS could be determined in the centimetre to the decimetre level. The RIM

  13. Unveiling the Detailed Density and Velocity Structures of the Protostellar Core B335

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurono, Yasutaka; Saito, Masao; Kamazaki, Takeshi; Morita, Koh-Ichiro; Kawabe, Ryohei

    2013-03-01

    We present an observational study of the protostellar core B335 harboring a low-mass Class 0 source. The observations of the H13CO+(J = 1-0) line emission were carried out using the Nobeyama 45 m telescope and Nobeyama Millimeter Array. Our combined image of the interferometer and single-dish data depicts detailed structures of the dense envelope within the core. We found that the core has a radial density profile of n(r)vpropr -p and a reliable difference in the power-law indices between the outer and inner regions of the core: p ≈ 2 for r >~ 4000 AU and p ≈ 1.5 for r <~ 4000 AU. The dense core shows a slight overall velocity gradient of ~1.0 km s-1 over the scale of 20, 000 AU across the outflow axis. We believe that this velocity gradient represents a solid-body-like rotation of the core. The dense envelope has a quite symmetrical velocity structure with a remarkable line broadening toward the core center, which is especially prominent in the position-velocity diagram across the outflow axis. The model calculations of position-velocity diagrams do a good job of reproducing observational results using the collapse model of an isothermal sphere in which the core has an inner free-fall region and an outer region conserving the conditions at the formation stage of a central stellar object. We derived a central stellar mass of ~0.1 M ⊙, and suggest a small inward velocity, v_{r ≥ r_inf}˜ 0 km s^{-1} in the outer core at >~ 4000 AU. We concluded that our data can be well explained by gravitational collapse with a quasi-static initial condition, such as Shu's model, or by the isothermal collapse of a marginally critical Bonnor-Ebert sphere.

  14. A Detailed Study of the Structure of the Nested Planetary Nebula, Hb 12, the Matryoshka Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. M.; López, J. A.; Edwards, M. L.; Winge, C.

    2014-11-01

    We present near-IR, integral field spectroscopic observations of the planetary nebula (PN) Hb 12 using Near-infrared Integral Field Spectrograph (NIFS) on Gemini-North. Combining NIFS with the adaptive optics system Altair, we provide a detailed study of the core and inner structure of this PN. We focus the analysis in the prominent emission lines [Fe II] (1.6436 μm), He I (2.0585 μm), H2 (2.1214 μm), and Brγ (2.16553 μm). We find that the [Fe II] emission traces a tilted system of bipolar lobes, with the northern lobe being redshifted and the southern lobe blueshifted. The [Fe II] emission is very faint at the core and only present close to the systemic velocity. There is no H2 emission in the core, whereas the core is prominent in the He I and Brγ recombination lines. The H2 emission is concentrated in equatorial arcs of emission surrounding the core and expanding at ~30 km s-1. These arcs are compared with Hubble Space Telescope images and shown to represent nested loops belonging to the inner sections of a much larger bipolar structure that replicates the inner one. The He I and Brγ emission from the core clearly show a cylindrical central cavity that seems to represent the inner walls of an equatorial density enhancement or torus. The torus is 0.''2 wide (≡200 AU radius at a distance of 2000 pc) and expanding at <=30 km s-1. The eastern wall of the inner torus is consistently more intense than the western wall, which could indicate the presence of an off-center star, such as is observed in the similar hourglass PN, MyCn 18. A bipolar outflow is also detected in Brγ emerging within 0.''1 from the core at ~ ± 40 km s-1.

  15. Detailed fault structure of the 2000 Western Tottori, Japan, earthquake sequence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fukuyama, E.; Ellsworth, W.L.; Waldhauser, F.; Kubo, A.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the faulting process of the aftershock region of the 2000 western Tottori earthquake (Mw 6.6) by combining aftershock hypocenters and moment tensor solutions. Aftershock locations were precisely determined by the double difference method using P- and S-phase arrival data of the Japan Meteorological Agency unified catalog. By combining the relocated hypocenters and moment tensor solutions of aftershocks by broadband waveform inversion of FREESIA (F-net), we successfully resolved very detailed fault structures activated by the mainshock. The estimated fault model resolves 15 individual fault segments that are consistent with both aftershock distribution and focal mechanism solutions. Rupture in the mainshock was principally confined to the three fault elements in the southern half of the zone, which is also where the earliest aftershocks concentrate. With time, the northern part of the zone becomes activated, which is also reflected in the postseismic deformation field. From the stress tensor analysis of aftershock focal mechanisms, we found a rather uniform stress field in the aftershock region, although fault strikes were scattered. The maximum stress direction is N107??E, which is consistent with the tectonic stress field in this region. In the northern part of the fault, where no slip occurred during the mainshock but postseismic slip was observed, the maximum stress direction of N130??E was possible as an alternative solution of stress tensor inversion.

  16. A global/local analysis method for treating details in structural design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aminpour, Mohammad A.; Mccleary, Susan L.; Ransom, Jonathan B.

    1993-01-01

    A method for analyzing global/local behavior of plate and shell structures is described. In this approach, a detailed finite element model of the local region is incorporated within a coarser global finite element model. The local model need not be nodally compatible (i.e., need not have a one-to-one nodal correspondence) with the global model at their common boundary; therefore, the two models may be constructed independently. The nodal incompatibility of the models is accounted for by introducing appropriate constraint conditions into the potential energy in a hybrid variational formulation. The primary advantage of this method is that the need for transition modeling between global and local models is eliminated. Eliminating transition modeling has two benefits. First, modeling efforts are reduced since tedious and complex transitioning need not be performed. Second, errors due to the mesh distortion, often unavoidable in mesh transitioning, are minimized by avoiding distorted elements beyond what is needed to represent the geometry of the component. The method is applied reduced to a plate loaded in tension and transverse bending. The plate has a central hole, and various hole sixes and shapes are studied. The method is also applied to a composite laminated fuselage panel with a crack emanating from a window in the panel. While this method is applied herein to global/local problems, it is also applicable to the coupled analysis of independently modeled components as well as adaptive refinement.

  17. Accuracy assessment of modeling architectural structures and details using terrestrial laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedzierski, M.; Walczykowski, P.; Orych, A.; Czarnecka, P.

    2015-08-01

    One of the most important aspects when performing architectural documentation of cultural heritage structures is the accuracy of both the data and the products which are generated from these data: documentation in the form of 3D models or vector drawings. The paper describes an assessment of the accuracy of modelling data acquired using a terrestrial phase scanner in relation to the density of a point cloud representing the surface of different types of construction materials typical for cultural heritage structures. This analysis includes the impact of the scanning geometry: the incidence angle of the laser beam and the scanning distance. For the purposes of this research, a test field consisting of samples of different types of construction materials (brick, wood, plastic, plaster, a ceramic tile, sheet metal) was built. The study involved conducting measurements at different angles and from a range of distances for chosen scanning densities. Data, acquired in the form of point clouds, were then filtered and modelled. An accuracy assessment of the 3D model was conducted by fitting it with the point cloud. The reflection intensity of each type of material was also analyzed, trying to determine which construction materials have the highest reflectance coefficients, and which have the lowest reflection coefficients, and in turn how this variable changes for different scanning parameters. Additionally measurements were taken of a fragment of a building in order to compare the results obtained in laboratory conditions, with those taken in field conditions.

  18. UNVEILING THE DETAILED DENSITY AND VELOCITY STRUCTURES OF THE PROTOSTELLAR CORE B335

    SciTech Connect

    Kurono, Yasutaka; Saito, Masao; Kamazaki, Takeshi; Morita, Koh-Ichiro; Kawabe, Ryohei

    2013-03-10

    We present an observational study of the protostellar core B335 harboring a low-mass Class 0 source. The observations of the H{sup 13}CO{sup +}(J = 1-0) line emission were carried out using the Nobeyama 45 m telescope and Nobeyama Millimeter Array. Our combined image of the interferometer and single-dish data depicts detailed structures of the dense envelope within the core. We found that the core has a radial density profile of n(r){proportional_to}r {sup -p} and a reliable difference in the power-law indices between the outer and inner regions of the core: p Almost-Equal-To 2 for r {approx}> 4000 AU and p Almost-Equal-To 1.5 for r {approx}< 4000 AU. The dense core shows a slight overall velocity gradient of {approx}1.0 km s{sup -1} over the scale of 20, 000 AU across the outflow axis. We believe that this velocity gradient represents a solid-body-like rotation of the core. The dense envelope has a quite symmetrical velocity structure with a remarkable line broadening toward the core center, which is especially prominent in the position-velocity diagram across the outflow axis. The model calculations of position-velocity diagrams do a good job of reproducing observational results using the collapse model of an isothermal sphere in which the core has an inner free-fall region and an outer region conserving the conditions at the formation stage of a central stellar object. We derived a central stellar mass of {approx}0.1 M{sub Sun }, and suggest a small inward velocity, v{sub r{>=}r{sub i{sub n{sub f}}}}{approx}0 km s{sup -1} in the outer core at {approx}> 4000 AU. We concluded that our data can be well explained by gravitational collapse with a quasi-static initial condition, such as Shu's model, or by the isothermal collapse of a marginally critical Bonnor-Ebert sphere.

  19. A detailed study of the structure of the nested planetary nebula, Hb 12, the Matryoshka nebula

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D. M.; López, J. A.; Edwards, M. L.; Winge, C. E-mail: jal@astrosen.unam.mx E-mail: cwinge@gemini.edu

    2014-11-01

    We present near-IR, integral field spectroscopic observations of the planetary nebula (PN) Hb 12 using Near-infrared Integral Field Spectrograph (NIFS) on Gemini-North. Combining NIFS with the adaptive optics system Altair, we provide a detailed study of the core and inner structure of this PN. We focus the analysis in the prominent emission lines [Fe II] (1.6436 μm), He I (2.0585 μm), H{sub 2} (2.1214 μm), and Br{sub γ} (2.16553 μm). We find that the [Fe II] emission traces a tilted system of bipolar lobes, with the northern lobe being redshifted and the southern lobe blueshifted. The [Fe II] emission is very faint at the core and only present close to the systemic velocity. There is no H{sub 2} emission in the core, whereas the core is prominent in the He I and Br{sub γ} recombination lines. The H{sub 2} emission is concentrated in equatorial arcs of emission surrounding the core and expanding at ∼30 km s{sup –1}. These arcs are compared with Hubble Space Telescope images and shown to represent nested loops belonging to the inner sections of a much larger bipolar structure that replicates the inner one. The He I and Br{sub γ} emission from the core clearly show a cylindrical central cavity that seems to represent the inner walls of an equatorial density enhancement or torus. The torus is 0.''2 wide (≡200 AU radius at a distance of 2000 pc) and expanding at ≤30 km s{sup –1}. The eastern wall of the inner torus is consistently more intense than the western wall, which could indicate the presence of an off-center star, such as is observed in the similar hourglass PN, MyCn 18. A bipolar outflow is also detected in Br{sub γ} emerging within 0.''1 from the core at ∼ ± 40 km s{sup –1}.

  20. Structural changes in gluten protein structure after addition of emulsifier. A Raman spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, Evelina G.; Gómez, Analía V.; Añón, María C.; Puppo, María C.

    2011-06-01

    Food protein product, gluten protein, was chemically modified by varying levels of sodium stearoyl lactylate (SSL); and the extent of modifications (secondary and tertiary structures) of this protein was analyzed by using Raman spectroscopy. Analysis of the Amide I band showed an increase in its intensity mainly after the addition of the 0.25% of SSL to wheat flour to produced modified gluten protein, pointing the formation of a more ordered structure. Side chain vibrations also confirmed the observed changes.

  1. A Detailed Derivation of Gaussian Orbital-Based Matrix Elements in Electron Structure Calculations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersson, T.; Hellsing, B.

    2010-01-01

    A detailed derivation of analytic solutions is presented for overlap, kinetic, nuclear attraction and electron repulsion integrals involving Cartesian Gaussian-type orbitals. It is demonstrated how s-type orbitals can be used to evaluate integrals with higher angular momentum via the properties of Hermite polynomials and differentiation with…

  2. Conductivity and structure of bilinear organic addition compounds

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    The relationship between crystal structures and metallic conductivities of linear organic materials such as tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane is explained in terms of strong lateral elastic interactions between chains. A microdomain model is presented in which at high temperatures there are, in general, two coexisting phases on each stacked molecular chain. The ordering of (in general, four) phases on two interacting chains leads to a variety of phase transitions at low temperatures. By examining temperature-dependent electrical conductivities and magnetic susceptibilities one can establish the character of each such transition. PMID:16592359

  3. Mechanistic Details of Glutathione Biosynthesis Revealed by Crystal Structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Glutamate Cysteine Ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Biterova, Ekaterina I.; Barycki, Joseph J.

    2009-12-01

    Glutathione is a thiol-disulfide exchange peptide critical for buffering oxidative or chemical stress, and an essential cofactor in several biosynthesis and detoxification pathways. The rate-limiting step in its de novo biosynthesis is catalyzed by glutamate cysteine ligase, a broadly expressed enzyme for which limited structural information is available in higher eukaryotic species. Structural data are critical to the understanding of clinical glutathione deficiency, as well as rational design of enzyme modulators that could impact human disease progression. Here, we have determined the structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae glutamate cysteine ligase (ScGCL) in the presence of glutamate and MgCl{sub 2} (2.1 {angstrom}; R = 18.2%, R{sub free} = 21.9%), and in complex with glutamate, MgCl{sub 2}, and ADP (2.7 {angstrom}; R = 19.0%, R{sub free} = 24.2%). Inspection of these structures reveals an unusual binding pocket for the {alpha}-carboxylate of the glutamate substrate and an ATP-independent Mg{sup 2+} coordination site, clarifying the Mg{sup 2+} dependence of the enzymatic reaction. The ScGCL structures were further used to generate a credible homology model of the catalytic subunit of human glutamate cysteine ligase (hGCLC). Examination of the hGCLC model suggests that post-translational modifications of cysteine residues may be involved in the regulation of enzymatic activity, and elucidates the molecular basis of glutathione deficiency associated with patient hGCLC mutations.

  4. Hybrid Residual Flexibility/Mass-Additive Method for Structural Dynamic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinker, M. L.

    2003-01-01

    A large fixture was designed and constructed for modal vibration testing of International Space Station elements. This fixed-base test fixture, which weighs thousands of pounds and is anchored to a massive concrete floor, initially utilized spherical bearings and pendulum mechanisms to simulate Shuttle orbiter boundary constraints for launch of the hardware. Many difficulties were encountered during a checkout test of the common module prototype structure, mainly due to undesirable friction and excessive clearances in the test-article-to-fixture interface bearings. Measured mode shapes and frequencies were not representative of orbiter-constrained modes due to the friction and clearance effects in the bearings. As a result, a major redesign effort for the interface mechanisms was undertaken. The total cost of the fixture design, construction and checkout, and redesign was over $2 million. Because of the problems experienced with fixed-base testing, alternative free-suspension methods were studied, including the residual flexibility and mass-additive approaches. Free-suspension structural dynamics test methods utilize soft elastic bungee cords and overhead frame suspension systems that are less complex and much less expensive than fixed-base systems. The cost of free-suspension fixturing is on the order of tens of thousands of dollars as opposed to millions, for large fixed-base fixturing. In addition, free-suspension test configurations are portable, allowing modal tests to be done at sites without modal test facilities. For example, a mass-additive modal test of the ASTRO-1 Shuttle payload was done at the Kennedy Space Center launch site. In this Technical Memorandum, the mass-additive and residual flexibility test methods are described in detail. A discussion of a hybrid approach that combines the best characteristics of each method follows and is the focus of the study.

  5. Structural Characterization by Cross-linking Reveals the Detailed Architecture of a Coatomer-related Heptameric Module from the Nuclear Pore Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yi; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Tjioe, Elina; Pellarin, Riccardo; Kim, Seung Joong; Williams, Rosemary; Schneidman-Duhovny, Dina; Sali, Andrej; Rout, Michael P.; Chait, Brian T.

    2014-01-01

    Most cellular processes are orchestrated by macromolecular complexes. However, structural elucidation of these endogenous complexes can be challenging because they frequently contain large numbers of proteins, are compositionally and morphologically heterogeneous, can be dynamic, and are often of low abundance in the cell. Here, we present a strategy for the structural characterization of such complexes that has at its center chemical cross-linking with mass spectrometric readout. In this strategy, we isolate the endogenous complexes using a highly optimized sample preparation protocol and generate a comprehensive, high-quality cross-linking dataset using two complementary cross-linking reagents. We then determine the structure of the complex using a refined integrative method that combines the cross-linking data with information generated from other sources, including electron microscopy, X-ray crystallography, and comparative protein structure modeling. We applied this integrative strategy to determine the structure of the native Nup84 complex, a stable hetero-heptameric assembly (∼600 kDa), 16 copies of which form the outer rings of the 50-MDa nuclear pore complex (NPC) in budding yeast. The unprecedented detail of the Nup84 complex structure reveals previously unseen features in its pentameric structural hub and provides information on the conformational flexibility of the assembly. These additional details further support and augment the protocoatomer hypothesis, which proposes an evolutionary relationship between vesicle coating complexes and the NPC, and indicates a conserved mechanism by which the NPC is anchored in the nuclear envelope. PMID:25161197

  6. Crump Geyser Exploration and Drilling Project. High Precision Geophysics and Detailed Structural Exploration and Slim Well Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Fairbank, Brian D.; Smith, Nicole

    2015-06-10

    The Crump Geyser Exploration and Drilling Project – High Precision Geophysics and Detailed Structural Exploration and Slim Well Drilling ran from January 29, 2010 to September 30, 2013. During Phase 1 of the project, collection of all geophysical surveys was completed as outlined in the Statement of Project Objectives. In addition, a 5000-foot full sized exploration well was drilled by Ormat, and preexisting drilling data was discovered for multiple temperature gradient wells within the project area. Three dimensional modeling and interpretation of results from the geophysical surveys and drilling data gave confidence to move to the project into Phase 2 drilling. Geological and geophysical survey interpretations combined with existing downhole temperature data provided an ideal target for the first slim-hole drilled as the first task in Phase 2. Slim-hole 35-34 was drilled in September 2011 and tested temperature, lithology, and permeability along the primary range-bounding fault zone near its intersection with buried northwest-trending faults that have been identified using geophysical methods. Following analysis of the results of the first slim-hole 35-34, the second slim hole was not drilled and subsequent project tasks, including flowing differential self-potential (FDSP) surveys that were designed to detail the affect of production and injection on water flow in the shallow aquifer, were not completed. NGP sold the Crump project to Ormat in August 2014, afterwards, there was insufficient time and interest from Ormat available to complete the project objectives. NGP was unable to continue managing the award for a project they did not own due to liability issues and Novation of the award was not a viable option due to federal award timelines. NGP submitted a request to mutually terminate the award on February 18, 2015. The results of all of the technical surveys and drilling are included in this report. Fault interpretations from surface geology, aeromag

  7. Detailed gravity mapping of the Panther Mountain circular structure, Catskill Mountains, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Isachsen, Y.W. ); Revetta, F.A. )

    1993-03-01

    The Panther Mountain circular structure is located in the Catskill Mountains near the eastern edge of the Allegheny Plateau where depth through the sedimentary section to basement is about 3200 m. The structure is distinguished from the rest of the Plateau only by its physiography. It is a circular mountain mass, 10 km in diameter, defined by an anomalous annular drainage pattern formed by Esopus Creek and its tributary Woodland Creek. Because of pervasive fluvial cross bedding in the sedimentary pile, the authors were unable to determine whether the structure is slightly domical, sightly basinal, or unwarped. North-south and east-west gravity profiles were next made and modeled to look for a subsurface explanation for the structure. The only computed profiles that matched the measured values were those for a shallowly-buried meteorite crater with its underlying breccia lens, lying beneath the Panther Mountain. Renewed interest in the structure led them to make 125 new gravity measurements, in a study that is continuing. Gravity values are corrected using the International Gravity Formula of 1967 and densities of 2.67 and 2.50 gms/cm[sup 3]. Terrain corrections were computed using an inner radius of .895 km and an outer radius of 166.70 km. The complete Bouguer gravity anomaly was separated into its regional and residual components to obtain a third order residual gravity map for computer modeling. The residual gravity map confirms the earlier detected gravity low and leaves the buried meteorite crater model as a viable model.

  8. CMB topography and electrical conductivity as additional constraints for the lowermost mantle thermo-chemical structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschamps, F.; Yin, Y.; Tackley, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    A variety of seismic observations, including tomographic models, indicate that the lowermost mantle is strongly heterogeneous. Seismic observations further support a thermo-chemical origin for the large scale heterogeneities. In particular, the large low-shear wave velocity provinces (LLSVP) observed by global tomographic images are better explained by a combination of thermal and chemical anomalies. Despite the accuracy of seismic information, uncertainties and trade-off still prevent the determination of a detailed lower mantle thermo-chemical structure. For instance, the nature of chemical heterogeneities and the exact role played by the post-perovskite phase transition are still debated. Additional constraints are needed to discriminate between the possible models of structure and dynamics of the lower mantle. Here, we consider two potential additional constraints, the electrical conductivity and the dynamic topography at the core-mantle boundary (CMB). Unlike density and seismic velocities, electrical conductivity increases with temperature. In addition, it strongly varies with the iron and silicate content. Using appropriate mineral physics data, we calculated a 3D distribution of electrical conductivity in lower mantle from the thermo-chemical structure inferred by probabilistic tomography, which maps iron and silicate excess in the LLSVP. In the lowermost mantle, we observe a belt of high conductivity, with maximum values around 20 S/m located in the LLSVP. Such a belt may trigger electric currents in the lowermost mantle and induce magnetic field variations with period of one year or more. It may thus be seen by global models of electrical conductivity. Unfortunately, such models do not sample yet regions deeper than 2000 km. A second, independent constraint we explored is the dynamic topography at the CMB. We used stagYY to calculate the dynamic topography associated with several models of thermo-chemical convection, and observe strong differences

  9. The effects of design details on cost and weight of fuselage structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, G. D.; Metschan, S. L.; Morris, M. R.; Kassapoglou, C.

    1993-01-01

    Crown panel design studies showing the relationship between panel size, cost, weight, and aircraft configuration are compared to aluminum design configurations. The effects of a stiffened sandwich design concept are also discussed. This paper summarizes the effect of a design cost model in assessing the cost and weight relationships for fuselage crown panel designs. Studies were performed using data from existing aircraft to assess the effects of different design variables on the cost and weight of transport fuselage crown panel design. Results show a strong influence of load levels, panel size, and material choices on the cost and weight of specific designs. A design tool being developed under the NASA ACT program is used in the study to assess these issues. The effects of panel configuration comparing postbuckled and buckle resistant stiffened laminated structure is compared to a stiffened sandwich concept. Results suggest some potential economy with stiffened sandwich designs for compression dominated structure with relatively high load levels.

  10. Detailed analysis of shake structures in the KLL Auger spectrum of H2S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Püttner, R.; Céolin, D.; Guillemin, R.; Kushawaha, R. K.; Marchenko, T.; Journel, L.; Piancastelli, M. N.; Simon, M.

    2016-04-01

    Shake processes of different origin are identified in the KLL Auger spectrum of H2S with unprecedented detail. The KLL Auger spectrum is presented together with the S 1 s-1 photoelectron spectrum including the S 1 s-1V-1n λ and S 1 s-12 p-1n λ shake-up satellites with V-1 and n λ indicating a hole in the valence shell and an unoccupied molecular orbital, respectively. By using different photon energies between 2476 and 4150 eV to record the KLL Auger spectra two different shake-up processes responsible for the satellite lines are identified. The first process is a shake-up during the Auger decay of the S 1 s-1 core hole and can be described by S 1 s-1→2 p-2V-1n λ . The second process is the Auger decay of the shake-up satellite in the ionization process leading to S 1 s-1V-1n λ →2 p-2V-1n λ transitions. By combining the results of photoelectron and Auger spectra the involved V-1n λ levels are assigned.

  11. Detailed Post-Soft Impact Progressive Damage Assessment for Hybrid Structure Jet Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siddens, Aaron; Bayandor, Javid; Celestina, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, certification of engine designs for resistance to bird strike is reliant on physical tests. Predictive modeling of engine structural damage has mostly been limited to evaluation of individual forward section components, such as fan blades within a fixed frame of reference, to direct impact with a bird. Such models must be extended to include interactions among engine components under operating conditions to evaluate the full extent of engine damage. This paper presents the results of a study aim to develop a methodology for evaluating bird strike damage in advanced propulsion systems incorporating hybrid composite/metal structures. The initial degradation and failure of individual fan blades struck by a bird were investigated. Subsequent damage to other fan blades and engine components due to resultant violent fan assembly vibrations and fragmentation was further evaluated. Various modeling parameters for the bird and engine components were investigated to determine guidelines for accurately capturing initial damage and progressive failure of engine components. Then, a novel hybrid structure modeling approach was investigated and incorporated into the crashworthiness methodology. Such a tool is invaluable to the process of design, development, and certification of future advanced propulsion systems.

  12. Detailed structure and stratigraphy of the eastern Marble Mountain terrane, Klamath Mountains, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.E.; Hacker, B.R. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Amphibolite-grade rocks in the eastern Marble Mountains (MM), N. California, consist of several fault-bounded, SSE-dipping lithotectonic units. Each unit is ca. 2 km thick and is characterized by differences in rock type, metamorphism, and structural style. The lowermost unit composed of well-foliated and lineated epidote amphibolite grading upward into clinopyroxene-bearing amphibolite with a consistent NE-SW lineation. Structurally overlying these rocks are andalusite- and staurolite-bearing, epidote-amphibolite facies rocks (Wright Lake assemblage (WLa)) that have variable foliation and lineation orientations. The WLa consists of meta-supracrustal rocks with well-preserved relict textures, and massive, meta-ultramafic rock. Supracrustal rocks include polymict conglomerate and breccia, fine- to medium-grained clastic rocks, alkalic pillow basalt, chert, and carbonate. Conglomerate clasts include partially recrystallized granitoids and quartzite. Previous studies have interpreted the WLa to represent a fragment of oceanic crust, but coeval coarse-grained sedimentation and alkalic volcanism, small volume of mafic volcanics, conglomerate composition, and lack of oceanic plutonic and hypabyssal rocks suggest deposition in an arc-related rift or transtensional basin. Previous studies have also described the terrane as melange, but recognition of local pseudostratigraphy allows mapping of multiply folded, isoclinal, nappe-like structures. Small-scale nappes are generally 100+ m thick and are imbricated with massive meta-ultramafic rocks along gently to steeply east-dipping shear zones. Shear zones are characterized by metamorphosed ultramafic fault rocks that suggest a range of brittle to ductile behavior. Regionally distributed, Ar/Ar hornblende ages of 149.9[+-]0.4, 150.3[+-]0.6, 152.1[+-]4.7, 152.5[+-]2.5 Ma and Ar/Ar biotite ages of 148.8[+-]2.6 and 149.9[+-]0.4 Ma indicate the MM terrane cooled rapidly through ca. 500--300 C in the Late Jurassic.

  13. A detailed study of nucleon structure function in nuclei in the valence quark region

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, N.

    1994-04-01

    The so called {open_quotes}EMC effect{close_quotes} discovered during the 1980`s, has caused a big controversy in the community of nuclear and high energy physicists; during the last ten years, five experiments have been performed in different laboratories and several hundreds of papers about the possible interpretation of the modification of the nucleon structure function inside nuclei have been published. However, from the experimental point of view, the main goal of four experiments (EMC, BCDMS, NMC, FNAL) has been to emphasize the region of low x{sub b}, where shadowing effects appear. In the region of valence quarks and nuclear effects (x{sub b} > 0.1 - 0.2) the most reliable data presently available are from the SLAC E139 experiment performed in 1983 with only 80 hours of beam time. New precise data in the valence quark region are necessary to measure separate structure functions F{sub 2}(x{sub b}, Q{sup 2}) and R{sup lt}(x{sub b},Q{sup 2}) = {sigma}{sub l}/{sigma}{sub t}, and to investigate the real A-dependence of the ratio between bound and free-nucleon structure functions which is not completely defined by the SLAC data. Moreover, from the nuclear physics point of view, a measurement on some unexplored nuclei, like {sup 3}He and {sup 48}Ca, would be of great interest. The intermediate scaling region (0.1 < x{sub b} < 0.7) would be accessible at CEBAF if the machine energy will reach 6-8 GeV, as suggested by all the tests performed on the RF cavities. This physics program has been already presented in two letter of intents.

  14. Genomic-scale comparison of sequence- and structure-based methods of function prediction: Does structure provide additional insight?

    PubMed Central

    Fetrow, Jacquelyn S.; Siew, Naomi; Di Gennaro, Jeannine A.; Martinez-Yamout, Maria; Dyson, H. Jane; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    A function annotation method using the sequence-to-structure-to-function paradigm is applied to the identification of all disulfide oxidoreductases in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. The method identifies 27 sequences as potential disulfide oxidoreductases. All previously known thioredoxins, glutaredoxins, and disulfide isomerases are correctly identified. Three of the 27 predictions are probable false-positives. Three novel predictions, which subsequently have been experimentally validated, are presented. Two additional novel predictions suggest a disulfide oxidoreductase regulatory mechanism for two subunits (OST3 and OST6) of the yeast oligosaccharyltransferase complex. Based on homology, this prediction can be extended to a potential tumor suppressor gene, N33, in humans, whose biochemical function was not previously known. Attempts to obtain a folded, active N33 construct to test the prediction were unsuccessful. The results show that structure prediction coupled with biochemically relevant structural motifs is a powerful method for the function annotation of genome sequences and can provide more detailed, robust predictions than function prediction methods that rely on sequence comparison alone. PMID:11316881

  15. Stochastic Kinetics of Viral Capsid Assembly Based on Detailed Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Hemberg, Martin; Yaliraki, Sophia N.; Barahona, Mauricio

    2006-01-01

    We present a generic computational framework for the simulation of viral capsid assembly which is quantitative and specific. Starting from PDB files containing atomic coordinates, the algorithm builds a coarse-grained description of protein oligomers based on graph rigidity. These reduced protein descriptions are used in an extended Gillespie algorithm to investigate the stochastic kinetics of the assembly process. The association rates are obtained from a diffusive Smoluchowski equation for rapid coagulation, modified to account for water shielding and protein structure. The dissociation rates are derived by interpreting the splitting of oligomers as a process of graph partitioning akin to the escape from a multidimensional well. This modular framework is quantitative yet computationally tractable, with a small number of physically motivated parameters. The methodology is illustrated using two different viruses which are shown to follow quantitatively different assembly pathways. We also show how in this model the quasi-stationary kinetics of assembly can be described as a Markovian cascading process, in which only a few intermediates and a small proportion of pathways are present. The observed pathways and intermediates can be related a posteriori to structural and energetic properties of the capsid oligomers. PMID:16473916

  16. Structural and Ferromagnetic Properties of an Orthorhombic Phase of MnBi Stabilized with Rh Additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taufour, Valentin; Thimmaiah, Srinivasa; March, Stephen; Saunders, Scott; Sun, Kewei; Lamichhane, Tej Nath; Kramer, Matthew J.; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-01

    The article addresses the possibility of alloy elements in MnBi which may modify the thermodynamic stability of the NiAs-type structure without significantly degrading the magnetic properties. The addition of small amounts of Rh and Mn provides an improvement in the thermal stability with some degradation of the magnetic properties. The small amounts of Rh and Mn additions in MnBi stabilize an orthorhombic phase whose structural and magnetic properties are closely related to the ones of the previously reported high-temperature phase of MnBi (HT MnBi). To date, the properties of the HT MnBi, which is stable between 613 and 719 K, have not been studied in detail because of its transformation to the stable low-temperature MnBi (LT MnBi), making measurements near and below its Curie temperature difficult. The Rh-stabilized MnBi with chemical formula Mn1.0625 -xRhx Bi [x =0.02 (1 ) ] adopts a new superstructure of the NiAs /Ni2In structure family. It is ferromagnetic below a Curie temperature of 416 K. The critical exponents of the ferromagnetic transition are not of the mean-field type but are closer to those associated with the Ising model in three dimensions. The magnetic anisotropy is uniaxial; the anisotropy energy is rather large, and it does not increase when raising the temperature, contrary to what happens in LT MnBi. The saturation magnetization is approximately 3 μB/f .u . at low temperatures. While this exact composition may not be application ready, it does show that alloying is a viable route to modifying the stability of this class of rare-earth-free magnet alloys.

  17. Structural and ferromagnetic properties of an orthorhombic phase of MnBi stabilized with Rh additions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Taufour, Valentin; Thimmaiah, Srinivasa; March, Stephen; Saunders, Scott; Sun, Kewei; Lamichhane, Tej Nath; Kramer, Matthew J.; Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-28

    The article addresses the possibility of alloy elements in MnBi which may modify the thermodynamic stability of the NiAs-type structure without significantly degrading the magnetic properties. The addition of small amounts of Rh and Mn provides an improvement in the thermal stability with some degradation of the magnetic properties. The small amounts of Rh and Mn additions in MnBi stabilize an orthorhombic phase whose structural and magnetic properties are closely related to the ones of the previously reported high-temperature phase of MnBi (HT MnBi). The properties of the HT MnBi, which is stable between 613 and 719 K, have notmore » been studied in detail because of its transformation to the stable low-temperature MnBi (LT MnBi), making measurements near and below its Curie temperature difficult. The Rh-stabilized MnBi with chemical formula Mn1.0625–xRhxBi [x=0.02(1)] adopts a new superstructure of the NiAs/Ni2In structure family. It is ferromagnetic below a Curie temperature of 416 K. The critical exponents of the ferromagnetic transition are not of the mean-field type but are closer to those associated with the Ising model in three dimensions. The magnetic anisotropy is uniaxial; the anisotropy energy is rather large, and it does not increase when raising the temperature, contrary to what happens in LT MnBi. The saturation magnetization is approximately 3μB/f.u. at low temperatures. Thus, while this exact composition may not be application ready, it does show that alloying is a viable route to modifying the stability of this class of rare-earth-free magnet alloys.« less

  18. Structural and ferromagnetic properties of an orthorhombic phase of MnBi stabilized with Rh additions

    SciTech Connect

    Taufour, Valentin; Thimmaiah, Srinivasa; March, Stephen; Saunders, Scott; Sun, Kewei; Lamichhane, Tej Nath; Kramer, Matthew J.; Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-28

    The article addresses the possibility of alloy elements in MnBi which may modify the thermodynamic stability of the NiAs-type structure without significantly degrading the magnetic properties. The addition of small amounts of Rh and Mn provides an improvement in the thermal stability with some degradation of the magnetic properties. The small amounts of Rh and Mn additions in MnBi stabilize an orthorhombic phase whose structural and magnetic properties are closely related to the ones of the previously reported high-temperature phase of MnBi (HT MnBi). The properties of the HT MnBi, which is stable between 613 and 719 K, have not been studied in detail because of its transformation to the stable low-temperature MnBi (LT MnBi), making measurements near and below its Curie temperature difficult. The Rh-stabilized MnBi with chemical formula Mn1.0625–xRhxBi [x=0.02(1)] adopts a new superstructure of the NiAs/Ni2In structure family. It is ferromagnetic below a Curie temperature of 416 K. The critical exponents of the ferromagnetic transition are not of the mean-field type but are closer to those associated with the Ising model in three dimensions. The magnetic anisotropy is uniaxial; the anisotropy energy is rather large, and it does not increase when raising the temperature, contrary to what happens in LT MnBi. The saturation magnetization is approximately 3μB/f.u. at low temperatures. Thus, while this exact composition may not be application ready, it does show that alloying is a viable route to modifying the stability of this class of rare-earth-free magnet alloys.

  19. Preliminary System Development and Detailed Structural Design and Analysis for the CanX-7 Nanosatellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singarayar, Fiona

    Satellites placed in LEO can remain there for an indefinite period of time. To reduce the density of this orbit so as to avoid potential collisions with other satellites, the IADC has published a report that suggests any satellite in LEO should de-orbit within 25 years. CanX-7 is a de-orbiting technology demonstration mission intended to help solve the global space debris problem. The work summarized in this thesis describes the author's contribution to the CanX-7 preliminary system development, as well as to the deployment detection and structural subsystems. Discussed herein are the challenges of carrying forward multiple designs in parallel and the factors and design trades that aid the decision-making process. This thesis not only presents the description of the final design of the nanosatellite, but also the evolution of the spacecraft from when it was initially envisioned in 2010 to its current state at the time of this writing.

  20. Detailed Analysis of the Structural Changes of Bone Matrix During the Demineralization Process Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timchenko, E. V.; Zherdeva, L. A.; Timchenko, P. E.; Volova, L. T.; Ponomareva, U. V.

    The results of experimental research of human cortical bone tissue depending on demineralization time were represented using Raman spectroscopy. Depending on demineralization time the ratio of the mineral (РO43- and CO32-) and organic components (amide I) of bone tissue, as well as changes in the spectral regions responsible for the structural integrity of the collagen fibers in bone tissue (1200-1460 cm-1 and 2880-3000 cm-1) were investigated. The observed changes show a decrease in mineral components: thus, the value of Raman band intensity at 956 and 1069 cm-1 for 5 minutes demineralization is 68.5 and 77.3%, for 20 minutes - 55.1 and 61.1%, for 120 minutes - 32.8 and 37% from Raman intensity values of not demineralized tissue objects respectively.

  1. Detailed Structural and Mechanical Response of Wet Foam to the Settling Particle.

    PubMed

    Jing, Zefeng; Wang, Shuzhong; Wang, Zhiguo

    2016-03-15

    Liquid foam, as a complex fluid, provides an observable prototype for studying a discrete fluid system. In this work, a numerical study on the settling behavior of a round particle in wet polydisperse foam has been conducted on the bubble scale. The local and nonuniform distribution of bubble pressure, as well as the localized plastic events, is presented. It shows a foam region of higher pressure in front of the settling particle due to the extrusion deformation of the bubbles applied by the particle. Additionally, the forces exerted on the particle by the disordered wet foam are measured during the sedimentation. It exhibits in particular a power-law dependence of the drag force caused by the bubble as a function of the foam quality. Moreover, sedimentation experiments are demonstrated to verify this power-law relation. The evolution of the components of drag force is demonstrated when a plastic event occurs in front of the settling particle. The result shows that both the contributions of the pulling force of foam films and the bubble pressure to the drag force decrease in that case. Likewise, the variation of both these contributions to the drag force is illustrated as well when a bubble in the wake detaches from the particle. These results assist in understanding the mesoscopic response of wet foam to a settling particle. PMID:26898137

  2. Contextual Land Use Classification: how Detailed can the Class Structure Be?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, L.; Rottensteiner, F.; Heipke, C.

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to investigate the maximum level of semantic resolution that can be achieved in an automated land use change detection process based on mono-temporal, multi-spectral, high-resolution aerial image data. For this purpose, we perform a step-wise refinement of the land use classes that follows the hierarchical structure of most object catalogues for land use databases. The investigation is based on our previous work for the simultaneous contextual classification of aerial imagery to determine land cover and land use. Land cover is determined at the level of small image segments. Land use classification is applied to objects from the geospatial database. Experiments are carried out on two test areas with different characteristics and are intended to evaluate the step-wise refinement of the land use classes empirically. The experiments show that a semantic resolution of ten classes still delivers acceptable results, where the accuracy of the results depends on the characteristics of the test areas used. Furthermore, we confirm that the incorporation of contextual knowledge, especially in the form of contextual features, is beneficial for land use classification.

  3. Insight into cyanobacterial circadian timing from structural details of the KaiB–KaiC interaction

    PubMed Central

    Snijder, Joost; Burnley, Rebecca J.; Wiegard, Anika; Melquiond, Adrien S. J.; Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J.; Axmann, Ilka M.; Heck, Albert J. R.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian timing in cyanobacteria is determined by the Kai system consisting of KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC. Interactions between Kai proteins change the phosphorylation status of KaiC, defining the phase of circadian timing. The KaiC–KaiB interaction is crucial for the circadian rhythm to enter the dephosphorylation phase but it is not well understood. Using mass spectrometry to characterize Kai complexes, we found that KaiB forms monomers, dimers, and tetramers. The monomer is the unit that interacts with KaiC, with six KaiB monomers binding to one KaiC hexamer. Hydrogen–deuterium exchange MS reveals structural changes in KaiC upon binding of KaiB in both the CI and CII domains, showing allosteric coupling upon KaiB binding. Based on this information we propose a model of the KaiB–KaiC complex and hypothesize that the allosteric changes observed upon complex formation relate to coupling KaiC ATPase activity with KaiB binding and to sequestration of KaiA dimers into KaiCBA complexes. PMID:24474762

  4. Insight into cyanobacterial circadian timing from structural details of the KaiB-KaiC interaction.

    PubMed

    Snijder, Joost; Burnley, Rebecca J; Wiegard, Anika; Melquiond, Adrien S J; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; Axmann, Ilka M; Heck, Albert J R

    2014-01-28

    Circadian timing in cyanobacteria is determined by the Kai system consisting of KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC. Interactions between Kai proteins change the phosphorylation status of KaiC, defining the phase of circadian timing. The KaiC-KaiB interaction is crucial for the circadian rhythm to enter the dephosphorylation phase but it is not well understood. Using mass spectrometry to characterize Kai complexes, we found that KaiB forms monomers, dimers, and tetramers. The monomer is the unit that interacts with KaiC, with six KaiB monomers binding to one KaiC hexamer. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange MS reveals structural changes in KaiC upon binding of KaiB in both the CI and CII domains, showing allosteric coupling upon KaiB binding. Based on this information we propose a model of the KaiB-KaiC complex and hypothesize that the allosteric changes observed upon complex formation relate to coupling KaiC ATPase activity with KaiB binding and to sequestration of KaiA dimers into KaiCBA complexes. PMID:24474762

  5. Solution Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Reveals Structural Details of Lipid Domains in Ternary Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, J.; Kiss, A; Pramudya, Y; Nguyen, L; Hirst, L

    2009-01-01

    The influence of cholesterol on lipid bilayer structure is significant and the effect of cholesterol on lipid sorting and phase separation in lipid-raft-forming model membrane systems has been well investigated by microscopy methods on giant vesicles. An important consideration however is the influence of fluorescence illumination on the phase state of these lipids and this effect must be carefully minimized. In this paper, we show that synchrotron x-ray scattering on solution lipid mixtures is an effective alternative technique for the identification and characterization of the l o (liquid ordered) and l d (liquid disordered) phases. The high intensity of synchrotron x rays allows the observation of up to 5 orders of diffraction from the l o phase, whereas only two are clearly visible when the l d phase alone is present. This data can be collected in approximately 1 min/sample, allowing rapid generation of phase data. In this paper, we measure the lamellar spacing in both the liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases simultaneously, as a function of cholesterol concentration in two different ternary mixtures. We also observe evidence of a third gel-phaselike population at 10-12 mol % cholesterol and determine the thickness of the bilayer for this phase. Importantly we are able to look at phase coexistence in the membrane independent of photoeffects.

  6. High-definition NMR structure of PED/PEA-15 death effector domain reveals details of key polar side chain interactions.

    PubMed

    Twomey, Edward C; Wei, Yufeng

    2012-07-20

    Death effector domain (DED) proteins constitute a subfamily of the large death domain superfamily that is primarily involved in apoptosis pathways. DED structures have characteristic side chain-side chain interactions among polar residues on the protein surface, forming a network of hydrogen bonds and salt bridges. The polar interaction network is functionally important in promoting protein-protein interactions by maintaining optimal side chain orientations. We have refined the solution DED structure of the PED/PEA-15 protein, a representative member of DED subfamily, using traditional NMR restraints with the addition of residual dipolar coupling (RDC) restraints from two independent alignment media, and employed the explicit solvent refinement protocol. The newly refined DED structure of PED/PEA-15 possesses higher structural quality as indicated by WHAT IF Z-scores, with most significant improvement in the backbone conformation normality quality factor. This higher quality DED structure of PED/PEA-15 leads to the identification of a number of key polar side chain interactions, which are not typically observed in NMR protein structures. The elucidation of polar side chain interactions is a key step towards the understanding of protein-protein interactions involving the death domain superfamily. The NMR structures with extensive details of protein structural features are thereby termed high-definition (HD) NMR structures. PMID:22732408

  7. Detailed seismic velocity structure beneath the Hokkaido corner, NE Japan: Collision process of the forearc sliver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, S.; Hasegawa, A.; Okada, T.; Nakajima, J.; Matsuzawa, T.; Katsumata, K.

    2010-12-01

    1. Introduction In south-eastern Hokkaido, the Kuril forearc sliver is colliding with the northeastern Japan arc due to the oblique subduction of the Pacific plate. This collision causes the formation of the Hidaka mountain range since the late Miocene (Kimura, 1986) and delamination of the lower-crust materials of the Kuril forearc sliver, which would be expected to descend into the mantle wedge below (e.g., Ito 2000; Ito and Iwasaki, 2002). In this study, we precisely investigated the three-dimensional seismic velocity structure beneath the Hokkaido corner to examine the collision of two forearcs in this area by using both of data from a dense temporary seismic network deployed in this area (Katsumata et al. [2006]) and those from the Kiban observation network, which covers the entire Japanese Islands with a station separation of 15-20 km. 2. Data and method The double-difference tomography method (Zhang and Thurber, 2003; 2006) was applied to a large number of arrival time data of 201,527 for P-waves and 150,963 for S-waves that were recorded at 125 stations from 10,971 earthquakes that occurred from 1999 to 2010. Grid intervals were set at 10 km in the along-arc direction, 12.5 km perpendicular to it, and 5-10 km in the vertical direction. 3. Results and discussion Inhomogeneous seismic velocity structure was clearly imaged in the Hokkaido corner at depths of 0-120 km. A high-velocity anomaly of P- and S- waves with a volume of 20 km x 90 km x 35km was detected just beneath the main zone of the Hidaka metamorphic belt at depths of 0-35 km. This high-velocity anomaly is continuously distributed from the depths of the mantle wedge to the surface. The western edge of the anomaly exactly corresponds to the Hidaka main thrust (HMT) at the surface. The highest velocity value in the anomaly corresponds to those of the uppermost mantle material (e.g. peridotite). The location of them at depths of 0-35km is also consistent with that of the Horoman-Peridotite belt, which

  8. Optimized murine lung preparation for detailed structural evaluation via micro-computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Vasilescu, Dragoş M.; Knudsen, Lars; Ochs, Matthias; Weibel, Ewald R.

    2012-01-01

    Utilizing micro-X-ray CT (μCT) imaging, we sought to generate an atlas of in vivo and intact/ex vivo lungs from normal murine strains. In vivo imaging allows visualization of parenchymal density and small airways (15–28 μm/voxel). Ex vivo imaging of the intact lung via μCT allows for improved understanding of the three-dimensional lung architecture at the alveolar level with voxel dimensions of 1–2 μm. μCT requires that air spaces remain air-filled to detect alveolar architecture while in vivo structural geometry of the lungs is maintained. To achieve these requirements, a fixation and imaging methodology that permits nondestructive whole lung ex vivo μCT imaging has been implemented and tested. After in vivo imaging, lungs from supine anesthetized C57Bl/6 mice, at 15, 20, and 25 cmH2O airway pressure, were fixed in situ via vascular perfusion using a two-stage flushing system while held at 20 cmH2O airway pressure. Extracted fixed lungs were air-dried. Whole lung volume was acquired at 1, 7, 21, and >70 days after the lungs were dried and served as validation for fixation stability. No significant shrinkage was observed: +8.95% change from in vivo to fixed lung (P = 0.12), −1.47% change from day 1 to day 7 (P = 0.07), −2.51% change from day 1 to day 21 (P = 0.05), and −4.90% change from day 1 to day 70 and thereafter (P = 0.04). μCT evaluation showed well-fixed alveoli and capillary beds correlating with histological analysis. A fixation and imaging method has been established for μCT imaging of the murine lung that allows for ex vivo morphometric analysis, representative of the in vivo lung. PMID:21817110

  9. Toward a detailed understanding of search trajectories in fragment assembly approaches to protein structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Kandathil, Shaun M; Handl, Julia; Lovell, Simon C

    2016-04-01

    Energy functions, fragment libraries, and search methods constitute three key components of fragment-assembly methods for protein structure prediction, which are all crucial for their ability to generate high-accuracy predictions. All of these components are tightly coupled; efficient searching becomes more important as the quality of fragment libraries decreases. Given these relationships, there is currently a poor understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the sampling approaches currently used in fragment-assembly techniques. Here, we determine how the performance of search techniques can be assessed in a meaningful manner, given the above problems. We describe a set of techniques that aim to reduce the impact of the energy function, and assess exploration in view of the search space defined by a given fragment library. We illustrate our approach using Rosetta and EdaFold, and show how certain features of these methods encourage or limit conformational exploration. We demonstrate that individual trajectories of Rosetta are susceptible to local minima in the energy landscape, and that this can be linked to non-uniform sampling across the protein chain. We show that EdaFold's novel approach can help balance broad exploration with locating good low-energy conformations. This occurs through two mechanisms which cannot be readily differentiated using standard performance measures: exclusion of false minima, followed by an increasingly focused search in low-energy regions of conformational space. Measures such as ours can be helpful in characterizing new fragment-based methods in terms of the quality of conformational exploration realized. PMID:26799916

  10. Detailed structure of the outer disk around HD 169142 with polarized light in H-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momose, Munetake; Morita, Ayaka; Fukagawa, Misato; Muto, Takayuki; Takeuchi, Taku; Hashimoto, Jun; Honda, Mitsuhiko; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Okamoto, Yoshiko K.; Kanagawa, Kazuhiro D.; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Grady, Carol A.; Sitko, Michael L.; Akiyama, Eiji; Currie, Thayne; Follette, Katherine B.; Mayama, Satoshi; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Abe, Lyu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph C.; Egner, Sebastian; Feldt, Markus; Goto, Miwa; Guyon, Olivier; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; Hayashi, Saeko S.; Henning, Thomas; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Ishii, Miki; Iye, Masanori; Janson, Markus; Kandori, Ryo; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Kwon, Jungmi; Matsuo, Taro; McElwain, Michael W.; Miyama, Shoken; Morino, Jun-Ichi; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Serabyn, Eugene; Suenaga, Takuya; Suto, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ryuji; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H.; Takami, Michihiro; Takato, Naruhisa; Terada, Hiroshi; Thalmann, Christian; Tomono, Daigo; Turner, Edwin L.; Watanabe, Makoto; Wisniewski, John; Yamada, Toru; Takami, Hideki; Usuda, Tomonori; Tamura, Motohide

    2015-10-01

    Coronagraphic imagery of the circumstellar disk around HD 169142 in H-band polarized intensity (PI) with Subaru/HiCIAO is presented. The emission scattered by dust particles at the disk surface in 0{^''.}2 ≤ r ≤ 1{^''.}2, or 29 ≤ r ≤ 174 au, is successfully detected. The azimuthally averaged radial profile of the PI shows a double power-law distribution, in which the PIs in r = 29-52 au and r = 81.2-145 au respectively show r-3 dependence. These two power-law regions are connected smoothly with a transition zone (TZ), exhibiting an apparent gap in r = 40-70 au. The PI in the inner power-law region shows a deep minimum whose location seems to coincide with the point source at λ = 7 mm. This can be regarded as another sign of a protoplanet in the TZ. The observed radial profile of the PI is reproduced by a minimally flaring disk with an irregular surface density distribution, an irregular temperature distribution, or with a combination of both. The depletion factor of surface density in the inner power-law region (r < 50 au) is derived to be ≥ 0.16 from a simple model calculation. The obtained PI image also shows small-scale asymmetries in the outer power-law region. Possible origins for these asymmetries include corrugation of the scattering surface in the outer region, and a shadowing effect by a puffed-up structure in the inner power-law region.

  11. Calculation of stellar structure. IV. Results using a detailed energy generation subroutine.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouse, C. A.

    1995-12-01

    The results from two solar model calculations using the "energy.for" energy generation and neutrino flux code (Bahcall & Pinsonneault 1992) are presented. The models of the present Sun were generated using the program described in the first three papers of this series and using only the helium abundance profile from the Bahcall & Ulrich (1988) (BU) standard model in the present model structure calculations. One model is a simulation of the BU model and yields a ^37^Cl solar neutrino counting rate of 7.0SNU (compared to 7.9SNU for the BU model) and a ^71^Ga neutrino experiment counting rate between 112 and 137SNU (compared to 132SNU for the BU model). The second model has a postulated small high-Z core (Rouse 1983) and yields a ^37^Cl neutrino experiment counting rate of 2.45SNU that is within one sigma of the Homestake Collaboration observed rate of (2.55+/-0.25)SNU (see Parke 1995). It yields a ^71^Ga neutrino experiment counting rate between 89 and 103SNU that is within one sigma of the GALLEX Collaboration neutrino experiment observed rate of (79+/-12)SNU (see Parke 1995). The theoretical ^8^B solar neutrino flux and the observed Kamiokande ^8^B flux (Hirata et al. 1989) are discussed regarding the puzzle of explaining both the chlorine experiment results and the Kamiokande results. The modification of the energy.for code for use in the current Rouse program is described. Consistency of a high-Z core solar model with theories of star formation from pre-stellar nuclei (Krat 1952; Urey 1956; Huang 1957) is suggested.

  12. Detailed electronic structure studies on superconducting MgB2 and related compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravindran, P.; Vajeeston, P.; Vidya, R.; Kjekshus, A.; Fjellvåg, H.

    2001-12-01

    In order to understand the unexpected superconducting behavior of MgB2 we have made electronic structure calculations for MgB2 and closely related systems. Our calculated Debye temperature from the elastic properties indicate that the average phonon frequency is very large in MgB2 compared with other superconducting intermetallics and its exceptionally higher Tc can be explained through a BCS mechanism only if phonon softening occurs or the phonon modes are highly anisotropic. We identified a doubly degenerate quasi-two-dimensional key-energy band in the vicinity of EF along the Γ-A direction of BZ (having equal amount of B px and py character) which plays an important role in deciding the superconducting behavior. Based on this result, we have searched for a similar electronic feature in isoelectronic compounds such as BeB2, CaB2, SrB2, LiBC, and MgB2C2 and found that hole doped LiBC and MgB2C2 are potential superconducting materials. We have found that EF in the closely related compound MgB4 is lying in a pseudogap with a negligibly small density of states at EF, which is not favorable for superconductivity. There are contradictory experimental results regarding the anisotropy in the elastic properties of MgB2 ranging from isotropic to moderately anisotropic to highly anisotropic. In order to settle this issue we have calculated the single-crystal elastic constants for MgB2 by the accurate full-potential method and derived the directional-dependent linear compressibility, Young's modulus, shear modulus, and relevant elastic properties from these results. We have observed large anisotropy in the elastic properties consistent with recent high-pressure findings. Our calculated polarized optical dielectric tensor shows highly anisotropic behavior even though it possesses isotropic transport property. MgB2 possesses a mixed bonding character and this has been verified from density of states, charge density, and crystal orbital Hamiltonian population analyses.

  13. High-Resolution AUV Mapping Reveals Structural Details of Submarine Inflated Lava Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paduan, J.; Clague, D. A.; Caress, D. W.; Thomas, H.; Thompson, D.; Conlin, D.

    2009-12-01

    The MBARI mapping AUV D. Allan B. has now been used to map volcanic terrain at mid-ocean ridges, back-arc spreading centers, and seamounts. These include the summit caldera and upper south rift zone at Axial Volcano, the summit of Davidson Seamount, the Endeavour hydrothermal fields, the Northeast Lau Spreading Center and West Mata Volcano, and, most recently, the CoAxial, North Cleft and North Gorda historic eruption sites on the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Ridges. ROV and submersible dives at most of these sites have provided groundtruth for the textures and features revealed in the roughly 1-m resolution maps. A prominent feature in the maps from four of the sites are inflated flows that did not deflate or drain. These resemble subaerial tumuli but differ in being located on level terrain, apparently atop or very near eruptive vents instead of being in the distal portions of flows. The largest inflated flow at Axial Volcano is on the caldera floor. The main part is 500 by 300 m, and up to 30 m high, with a lobe that extends another 750 m in a sinuous path. It and two nearby, medium-sized inflated flows were first described from sidescan imagery and a submersible dive by Appelgate and Embley (Bull. Volcanol., 54, 447-458, 1992). The AUV maps show clearly the smooth, gently domed relief of the large inflated flow and its sinuous shape on the seafloor, the medium-sized nearby inflated flows, and several additional smaller ones. Particularly striking is a network of 4 to 10 m deep cracks along the crest of each inflation. The cracks occur 30 to 50 m from the margins on all sides of the wider parts of the inflated flows, and become medial cracks along the entire length of the narrow parts, which are nearly triangular in cross-section. An inflation pit 35 m in diameter has a depth equal to the surrounding lava fields. ROV Doc Ricketts dove on these flows in August 2009 and photographed the deeply cracked, uplifted, once flat-lying lineated and ropy sheet flows that form

  14. Detailed fault structure of the Tarutung Pull-Apart Basin in Sumatra, Indonesia, derived from local earthquake data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muksin, Umar; Haberland, Christian; Nukman, Mochamad; Bauer, Klaus; Weber, Michael

    2014-12-01

    The Tarutung Basin is located at a right step-over in the northern central segment of the dextral strike-slip Sumatran Fault System (SFS). Details of the fault structure along the Tarutung Basin are derived from the relocations of seismicity as well as from focal mechanism and structural geology. The seismicity distribution derived by a 3D inversion for hypocenter relocation is clustered according to a fault-like seismicity distribution. The seismicity is relocated with a double-difference technique (HYPODD) involving the waveform cross-correlations. We used 46,904 and 3191 arrival differences obtained from catalogue data and cross-correlation analysis, respectively. Focal mechanisms of events were analyzed by applying a grid search method (HASH code). Although there is no significant shift of the hypocenters (10.8 m in average) and centroids (167 m in average), the application of the double difference relocation sharpens the earthquake distribution. The earthquake lineation reflects the fault system, the extensional duplex fault system, and the negative flower structure within the Tarutung Basin. The focal mechanisms of events at the edge of the basin are dominantly of strike-slip type representing the dextral strike-slip Sumatran Fault System. The almost north-south striking normal fault events along extensional zones beneath the basin correlate with the maximum principal stress direction which is the direction of the Indo-Australian plate motion. The extensional zones form an en-echelon pattern indicated by the presence of strike-slip faults striking NE-SW to NW-SE events. The detailed characteristics of the fault system derived from the seismological study are also corroborated by structural geology at the surface.

  15. Detailed seismic attenuation structure beneath Hokkaido, northeastern Japan: Arc-arc collision process, arc magmatism, and seismotectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Saeko; Nakajima, Junichi; Hasegawa, Akira; Okada, Tomomi; Katsumata, Kei; Asano, Youichi; Kimura, Takeshi

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we imaged a detailed seismic attenuation structure (frequency-independent Q-1) beneath Hokkaido, Japan, by merging waveform data from a dense permanent seismic network with those from a very dense temporary network. Corner frequency of each event used for t* estimation was determined by the S coda wave spectral ratio method. The seismic attenuation (Qp-1) structure is clearly imaged at depths down to about 120 km. For the fore-arc side of Hokkaido, high-Qp zones are imaged at depths of 10 to 80 km in the crust and mantle wedge above the Pacific slab. Low-Qp zones are clearly imaged in the mantle wedge beneath the back-arc areas of eastern and southern Hokkaido. These low-Qp zones, extending from deeper regions, extend to the Moho beneath volcanoes, the locations of which are consistent with those of seismic low-velocity regions. These results suggest that the mantle wedge upwelling flow occurs beneath Hokkaido, except in the area where there is a gap in the volcano chain. In contrast, an inhomogeneous seismic attenuation structure is clearly imaged beneath the Hokkaido corner. A broad low-Qp zone is located at depths of 0-60 km to the west of the Hidaka main thrust. The location almost corresponds to that of the seismic low-velocity zone in the collision zone. The fault planes of the 1970 M6.7 and 1982 M7.1 earthquakes are located at the edges of this broad low-Qp zone. Observations in this study indicate that our findings contribute to understanding the detailed arc-arc collision process, magmatism, and seismotectonics beneath Hokkaido.

  16. An atomic view of additive mutational effects in a protein structure

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, M.M.; Terwilliger, T.C.

    1996-04-01

    Substitution of a single amino acid in a protein will often lead to substantial changes in properties. If these properties could be altered in a rational way then proteins could be readily generated with functions tailored to specific uses. When amino acid substitutions are made at well-separated locations in a single protein, their effects are generally additive. Additivity of effects of amino acid substitutions is very useful because the properties of proteins with any combination of substitutions can be inferred directly from those of the proteins with single changes. It would therefore be of considerable interest to have a means of knowing whether substitutions at a particular pair of sites in a protein are likely to lead to additive effects. The structural basis for additivity of effects of mutations on protein function was examined by determining crystal structures of single and double mutants in the hydrophobic core of gene V protein. Structural effects of mutations were found to be cumulative when two mutations were made in a single protein. Additivity occurs in this case because the regions structurally affected by mutations at the two sites do not overlap even though the sites are separated by only 9 {angstrom}. Structural distortions induced by mutations in gene V protein decrease rapidly, but not isotropically, with distance from the site of mutation. It is anticipated that cases where structural and functional effects of mutations will be additive could be identified simply by examining whether the regions structurally affected by each component mutation overlap.

  17. A method for detailed analysis of the structure of mast cell secretory granules by negative contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Shotaro; Takakuwa, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Secretory granules (SGs) in mast cells contain various molecules that elicit allergy symptoms and are generally considered therapeutic targets. However, the biogenesis, maintenance, regulation, and recycling of these granules remain controversial, mainly due to the lack of suitable live-cell imaging methods. In this study, we applied negative contrast imaging with soluble green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressed in the cytoplasm as a method to validate structural information of mast cell SGs. We evaluated the accuracy of the method in detail, and we demonstrated that it can be used for quantitative analysis. Using this technique, secretory granules, the nucleus, mitochondria, and the cell body were visualized in individual RBL-2H3 mast cells without any influence. When combined with conventional multicolor fluorescence imaging, visualization of SG-associated proteins and SG–SG fusion was achieved. Moreover, 3D images were constructed based on this method, and detailed information on the number, size, and shape of individual SGs was obtained. We found that cell volume was correlated with SG number. In summary, the technique provides valuable and unique data, and will therefore advance SG research. PMID:26997316

  18. Understanding the structure of skill through a detailed analysis of Individuals' performance on the Space Fortress game.

    PubMed

    Towne, Tyler J; Boot, Walter R; Ericsson, K Anders

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we describe a novel approach to the study of individual differences in acquired skilled performance in complex laboratory tasks based on an extension of the methodology of the expert-performance approach (Ericsson & Smith, 1991) to shorter periods of training and practice. In contrast to more traditional approaches that study the average performance of groups of participants, we explored detailed behavioral changes for individual participants across their development on the Space Fortress game. We focused on dramatic individual differences in learning and skill acquisition at the individual level by analyzing the archival game data of several interesting players to uncover the specific structure of their acquired skill. Our analysis revealed that even after maximal values for game-generated subscores were reached, the most skilled participant's behaviors such as his flight path, missile firing, and mine handling continued to be refined and improved (Participant 17 from Boot et al., 2010). We contrasted this participant's behavior with the behavior of several other participants and found striking differences in the structure of their performance, which calls into question the appropriateness of averaging their data. For example, some participants engaged in different control strategies such as "world wrapping" or maintaining a finely-tuned circular flight path around the fortress (in contrast to Participant 17's angular flight path). In light of these differences, we raise fundamental questions about how skill acquisition for individual participants should be studied and described. Our data suggest that a detailed analysis of individuals' data is an essential step for generating a general theory of skill acquisition that explains improvement at the group and individual levels. PMID:27214790

  19. The Details of Glycolipid Glycan Hydrolysis by the Structural Analysis of a Family 123 Glycoside Hydrolase from Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Noach, Ilit; Pluvinage, Benjamin; Laurie, Cassandra; Abe, Kento T; Alteen, Matthew G; Vocadlo, David J; Boraston, Alisdair B

    2016-08-14

    Clostridium perfringens is an opportunistic pathogen of humans and animals whose genome encodes a wide variety of putative carbohydrate-hydrolyzing enzymes that are increasingly being shown to be directed toward the cleavage of host glycans. Among these putative enzymes is a member of glycoside hydrolase family 123. Here we show that the recombinant enzyme (referred to as CpNga123) encoded by the gene cloned from C. perfringens strain ATCC 13124 (locus tag CPF_1473) is a β-N-acetylgalactosaminidase, similar to NgaP from Paenibacillus sp. TS12. Like NgaP, CpNga123 was able to cleave the terminal β-D-GalNAc-(1→4)-D-Gal and β-D-GalNAc-(1→3)-D-Gal motifs that would be found in glycosphigolipids. The X-ray crystal structure of CpNga123 revealed it to have an N-terminal β-sandwich domain and a (β/α)8-barrel catalytic domain with a C-terminal α-helical elaboration. The structures determined in complex with reaction products provide details of the -1 subsite architecture, catalytic residues, and a structural change in the active site that is likely required to enable hydrolysis of the glycosidic bond by promoting engagement of the substrate by the catalytic residues. The features of the active site support the likelihood of a substrate-assisted catalytic mechanism for this enzyme. The structures of an inactive mutant of CpNga123 in complex with intact GA2 and Gb4 glycosphingolipid motifs reveal insight into aglycon recognition and suggest that the kinked or pleated conformation of GA2 caused by the β-1,4-linkage between N-acetylgalactosamine and galactose, and the accommodation of this conformation by the enzyme active site, may be responsible for greater activity on GA2. PMID:27038508

  20. Dynamism & Detail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    2004-01-01

    New material discovered in the study of cell research is presented for the benefit of biology teachers. Huge amounts of data are being generated in fields like cellular dynamics, and it is felt that people's understanding of the cell is becoming much more complex and detailed.

  1. Detailed structural study of β-artemether: Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of Infrared, Raman spectroscopy, and vibrational circular dichroism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Chen, Jianchao; Li, Linwei; Zhou, Zhixu; Geng, Yiding; Sun, Tiemin

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the experimental and theoretical studies on the structure of β-artemether are presented. The optimized molecular structure, Mulliken atomic charges, vibrational spectra (IR, Raman and vibrational circular dichroism), and molecular electrostatic potential have been calculated by density functional theory (DFT) using B3LYP method with the 6-311++G (2d, p) basis set. Reliable vibrational assignments for Artemether have been made on the basis of potential energy distribution (PED). The vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) has been explored by ab initio calculations, and then was used to compare with the experimental VCD. The consistence between them confirmed the absolute configuration of Artemether. In addition, HOMO-LUMO of the title compound as well as thermo-dynamical parameters has illustrated the stability of β-artemether.

  2. The Use of Additive Manufacturing for Fabrication of Multi-Function Small Satellite Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Horais, Brian J; Love, Lonnie J; Dehoff, Ryan R

    2013-01-01

    The use of small satellites in constellations is limited only by the growing functionality of smallsats themselves. Additive manufacturing provides exciting new design opportunities for development of multifunction CubeSat structures that integrate such functions as propulsion and thermal control into the satellite structures themselves. Manufacturing of these complex multifunction structures is now possible in lightweight, high strength, materials such as titanium by using existing electron beam melting additive manufacturing processes. However, the use of today's additive manufacturing capabilities is often cost-prohibitive for small companies due to the large capital investments required. To alleviate this impediment the U.S. Department of Energy has established a Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) at their Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Tennessee that provides industry access to a broad range of energy-efficient additive manufacturing equipment for collaborative use by both small and large organizations. This paper presents a notional CubeSat multifunction design that integrates the propulsion system into a three-unit (3U) CubeSat structure. The full-scale structure has been designed and fabricated at the ORNL MDF. The use of additive manufacturing for spacecraft fabrication is opening up many new possibilities in design and fabrication capabilities for what had previously been impossible structures to fabricate.

  3. Detailed Decomposition of Galaxy Images II: Fitting Spiral Arms, Bars, and Non-axisymmetric Structures in GALFIT 3.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chien Y.; Ho, L. C.; Impey, C. D.; Rix, H. W.

    2007-12-01

    The technique of fitting galaxy light profiles with analytic functions (e.g. de Vaucouleurs, exponential), also known as parametric fitting, has been a useful tool for studying galaxy structure and evolution. It is often used to quantify global properties of galaxies such as luminosity, size, ellipticity, and profile shape in a self-consistent manner. It also allows one to deblend multiple components of a galaxy, e.g. bulge/disk/bar/AGN, or to separate overlapping galaxies in a rigorous and robust way. However, the traditional method of fitting galaxies relies on using ellipsoid models, which is sometimes criticized to argue in favor of non-parametric techniques. In this study, we show that two dimensional image fitting is not fundamentally restricted to using axisymmetric ellipsoid shapes. By breaking from axisymmetry parametrically through the use of Fourier modes, one can better quantify the degree of galaxy irregularity in an intuitive and well-motivated manner. We also introduce a technique that allows one to fit spiral structures in late-type galaxies through the use of coordinate rotation. By comparing with more realistic models now possible, we find that the traditional use of simple ellipsoid models is robust even on irregular and spiral galaxies, because single component fits are by nature large scale averages. However, when it comes to quantifying sub-components of a galaxy, sometimes it is necessary to model structures in detail, such as when performing bulge-to-disk decomposition of galaxies with strong spiral arms, or quantifying the symmetry due to bright (e.g. bulge) and faint (e.g. disk) galaxy sub-components separately. These new techniques are implemented in GALFIT 3.0 (http://www.ociw.edu/ peng/work/galfit/galfit.html ). CYP gratefully acknowledges support from the Plaskett Fellowship (NRC-HIA) and the Institute/Giacconi Fellowship (STScI) programs.

  4. Telomere Capping Proteins are Structurally Related to RPA with an additional Telomere-Specific Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Gelinas, A.; Paschini, M; Reyes, F; Heroux, A; Batey, R; Lundblad, V; Wuttke, D

    2009-01-01

    Telomeres must be capped to preserve chromosomal stability. The conserved Stn1 and Ten1 proteins are required for proper capping of the telomere, although the mechanistic details of how they contribute to telomere maintenance are unclear. Here, we report the crystal structures of the C-terminal domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Stn1 and the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Ten1 proteins. These structures reveal striking similarities to corresponding subunits in the replication protein A complex, further supporting an evolutionary link between telomere maintenance proteins and DNA repair complexes. Our structural and in vivo data of Stn1 identify a new domain that has evolved to support a telomere-specific role in chromosome maintenance. These findings endorse a model of an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of DNA maintenance that has developed as a result of increased chromosomal structural complexity.

  5. The Hydrophobic Solvation Energies of Molecular-Scale Cavities Depend on the Detailed Structure of the Molecular Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Robert; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2015-03-01

    Both the energy (ΔGvdw) of inserting an uncharged molecular cavity into solution by turning on the Lennard-Jones interactions between the solute and solvent and the energy (ΔGrep) of inserting a nearly hard cavity into solution have often been assumed to increase linearly with the solvent-accessible surface area (A), in analogy with the energy of forming macroscopic cavities in solution. Because these energies are assumed to increase with A, they have often been assumed to drive protein collapse during folding. However we have shown that for molecular-scale cavities neither of these energies are simple linear functions of A. Additionally, for both alanine and glycine peptides we have shown that ΔGvdw decreases with A, implying that ΔGvdw opposes folding for these systems. We also show that assuming that ΔGrep is linear in A for large molecules but linear in the solvent-accessible volume (V) for small molecules is inconsistent with our findings. Any theory that can accurately predict ΔGvdw or ΔGrep will have to consider the details of the molecular shape rather than relying on coarse measures, such as A and V. The Robert A. Welch Foundation (H-0037), the National Science Foundation (CHE-1152876) and the National Institutes of Health (GM-037657) are thanked for partial support of this work. This research used XSEDE resources from TG-MCA93S001.

  6. Tectonic evolution of the eastern margin of the Thaumasia Plateau (Mars) as inferred from detailed structural mapping and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borraccini, F.; Di Achille, G.; Ori, G. G.; Wezel, F. C.

    2007-05-01

    The eastern margin of the Thaumasia Plateau (EMTP) is characterized by a diversity of tectonic features, which recorded its complex, and still controversial, tectonic history. A detailed structural survey and analyses have been carried out in order to assess the kinematics and relative age of the main deformational events. Combining results from statistics of lineament orientations and density of fault length for each geologic unit and taking into account crosscutting relationships among tectonic structures, three main deformational events have been recognized. The early stage of the tectonic evolution of EMTP is recorded by Noachian units at the southern edge of Melas Dorsa and is represented by N-S oriented grabens sutured by Early Hesperian formations. Starting from Late Noachian, the extensional stress field became NE-SW oriented and resulted in the formation of NW-SE striking sets of grabens. At the boundary between Noachian and Hesperian, the most important change in tectonic regime occurred. The Hesperian tectonics are characterized by an E-W shortening possibly related to an eastward motion of the Thaumasia Plateau. This tectonic phase likely produced a N-S-oriented wrinkle ridges as well as regional folds and thrust faults. E-W-oriented preexisting tectonic lineaments could have been reactivated forming regional transfer zones. In this scenario, Coprates Rise, Melas Dorsa, and Thaumasia Ridge could be interpreted as mountain belts resulting from buckling and thrust faulting of the eastern and southern margins of the Thaumasia plateau. The proto-Valles Marineris could have experienced a left-lateral component of displacement and played a role of a transfer shear zone.

  7. Functional and Structural Details about the Fabella: What the Important Stabilizer Looks Like in the Central European Population

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Nicole Helene; Hoechel, Sebastian; Toranelli, Mireille; Klaws, Joerg; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    The posterolateral corner of the knee accommodating the fabella complex is of importance in orthopaedic surgery. Unfortunately, there is a lack of data in literature for clinical routine. Therefore, we investigated the fabella's characteristics, biomechanical nature, and present histologic details. Of special interest were the fabella's occurrence and position, calcium concentration as long-term load intake indicator, and the histology. Within our analysis, fabellae were found in 30.0% of all datasets, located on the upper part of the posterolateral femoral condyle. The region of fabella contact on this condyle showed a significantly lower calcium concentration than its surroundings. Histologically, the fabella showed no articular cartilage but a clearly distinguishable fabellofibular ligament that consisted of two bundles: one, as already described in literature inserted at the fibular tip, and another part newly described on the top of the lateral meniscus. In its role of stabilizing the soft tissue structures of the posterolateral knee, the fabella seems to serve as suspension for the ligaments evolving from its base. Even though a joint formation of any kind is unlikely, the presence of a fabella needs to be kept in mind during knee examination and any surgical procedures. PMID:26413516

  8. Characterization of a bio-oil from pyrolysis of rice husk by detailed compositional analysis and structural investigation of lignin.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao; Wei, Xian-Yong; Cao, Jing-Pei; Li, Peng; Liu, Fang-Jing; Zhao, Yun-Peng; Fan, Xing; Zhao, Wei; Rong, Liang-Ce; Wei, Yan-Bin; Wang, Shou-Ze; Zhou, Jun; Zong, Zhi-Min

    2012-07-01

    Detailed compositional analysis of a bio-oil (BO) from pyrolysis of rice husk was carried out. The BO was extracted sequentially with n-hexane, CCl(4), CS(2), benzene and CH(2)Cl(2). In total, 167 organic species were identified with GC/MS in the extracts and classified into alkanes, alcohols, hydroxybenzenes, alkoxybenzenes, dioxolanes, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, nitrogen-containing organic compounds and other species. The benzene ring-containing species (BRCCs) were attributed to the degradation of lignin while most of the rests were derived from the degradation of cellulose and hemicellulose. Along with guaiacyl and p-hydroxyphenyl units as the main components, a new type of linkage was suggested, i.e., C(ar)-CH(2)-C(ar) in 4,4'-methylenebis(2,6-dimethoxyphenol). Based on the species identified, a possible macromolecular structure of the lignin and the mechanism for its pyrolysis are proposed. The BO was also extracted with petroleum ether in ca. 17.8% of the extract yield and about 82.1% of the extracted components are BRCCs. PMID:22609664

  9. Improved Catenated Structures of Bovine Peroxiredoxin III F190L Reveal Details of Ring-Ring Interactions and a Novel Conformational State

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhenbo; McGow, Donna P.; Shepherd, Colin; Lindsay, J. Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial 2-cys peroxiredoxin III (PrxIII) is a key player in antioxidant defence reducing locally-generated H2O2 to H2O. A Phe to Leu (F190L) mutation in the C-terminal α-helix of PrxIII, mimicking that found in some bacteria and parasites, increases its resistance to hyperoxidation but has no obvious influence on peroxidase activity. Here we report on the oxidized and reduced crystal structures of bovine PrxIII F190L at 2.4 Å and 2.2 Å, respectively. Both structures exist as two-ring catenanes with their dodecameric rings inclined at 55o to each other, similar to that previously reported for PrxIII C168S. The new higher-resolution structures reveal details of the complex network of H-bonds stabilising the inter-toroid contacts. In addition, Arg123, the key conserved residue, that normally interacts with the catalytic cys (Cp, cys 47) is found in a distinct conformation extending away from the Cp while the characteristic Arg-Glu-Arg network, underpinning the active-site geometry also displays a distinctive arrangement, not observed previously. This novel active-site organisation may provide new insights into the dynamics of the large-scale conformational changes occurring between oxidized and reduced states. PMID:25906064

  10. LASER BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE: Visualisation of details of a complicated inner structure of model objects by the method of diffusion optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tret'yakov, Evgeniy V.; Shuvalov, Vladimir V.; Shutov, I. V.

    2002-11-01

    An approximate algorithm is tested for solving the problem of diffusion optical tomography in experiments on the visualisation of details of the inner structure of strongly scattering model objects containing scattering and semitransparent inclusions, as well as absorbing inclusions located inside other optical inhomogeneities. The stability of the algorithm to errors is demonstrated, which allows its use for a rapid (2 — 3 min) image reconstruction of the details of objects with a complicated inner structure.

  11. Detailed structures of the subducted Philippine Sea Plate beneath northeast Taiwan: A new type of double seismic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Honn; Rau, Ruey-Juin

    1999-01-01

    We studied the detailed structure of the subducted Philippine Sea plate beneath northeast Taiwan where oblique subduction, regional collision, and back arc opening are all actively occurring. Simultaneous inversion for velocity structure and earthquake hypocenters are performed using the vast, high-quality data recorded by the Taiwan Seismic Network. We further supplement the inversion results with earthquake source parameters determined from inversion of teleseismic P and SH waveforms, a critical step to define the position of plate interface and the state of strain within the subducted slab. The most interesting feature is that relocated hypocenters tend to occur along a two-layered structure. The upper layer is located immediately below the plate interface and extends down to 70-80 km at a dip of 40°-50°. Below approximately 100 km, the dip increases dramatically to 70°-80°. The lower layer commences at 45-50 km and stays approximately parallel to the upper layer with a separation of 15±5 km in between down to 70-80 km. Below that the separation decreases and the two layers seem to gradually merge into one Wadati-Benioff Zone. We propose to term the classic double seismic zones observed beneath Japan and Kuril as "type I" and that we observed as "type II," respectively. A global survey indicates that type II double seismic zones are also observed in New Zealand near the southernmost North Island, Cascadia, just north of the Mendocino triple junction, and the Cook Inlet area of Alaska. All of them are located near the termini of subducted slabs in a tectonic setting of oblique subduction. We interpret the seismogenesis of type II double seismic zones as reflecting the lateral compressive stress between the subducted plate and the adjacent lithosphere (originating from oblique subduction) and the downdip extension (from slab pulling force). The upper seismic layer represents seismicity occurring in the upper crust of a subducted plate and/or along the plate

  12. On the structure and dynamics of Ellerman bombs. Detailed study of three events and modelling of Hα

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello González, N.; Danilovic, S.; Kneer, F.

    2013-09-01

    Aims: We study the structure and dynamics of three Ellerman bombs (EBs) observed in an evolving active region. Methods: The active region NOAA 11271 was observed with the Vacuum Tower Telescope at Observatorio del Teide/Tenerife on August 18, 2011. We used the two-dimensional Triple Etalon SOlar Spectrometer (TESOS) to obtain time sequences of the active region and of EBs in Hα at a cadence of 15 s. Simultaneously, we obtained full Stokes profiles with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP II) in the two magnetically sensitive Fe i infrared lines (IR) at 1.56 μ, scanning spatial sections of the area with cadences of 28-46 s. The Hα data were reconstructed with speckle methods to study the evolution of the atmospheric stratification. Two methods were used to extract magnetic field information from the IR Stokes profiles: 1) fitting of the (Q,U,V) profiles by Gaussians; and 2) applying the Milne-Eddington approximation, assuming two separate magnetic structures in the resolution element and fitting by trial and error some profiles from the EB areas. Data from SDO-HMI and -AIA were also used. We performed two-dimensional (2D) non-LTE radiative transfer calculations of Hα in parameterised models of EBs. Results: The three EBs studied in detail occurred in a complex active region near sunspots. They were very bright with a factor of 1.5-2.8 brighter than the nearby area. They lived for 1/2 h and longer. They were related to broadband faculae, but the latter were not the brightest features in the field of view. The EBs occurred in magnetic field configurations with opposite polarity close together. One EB was located at the outskirts of a penumbra of a complex sunspot and showed repeated "flaring" in SDO-AIA data. Another was close to a strong field patch and moved into this during the end of its lifetime. The third EB showed clear changes of field structure during the time it was observed. We obtained from the 2D modelling that heating and increase in Hα opacity

  13. Academic detailing.

    PubMed

    Shankar, P R; Jha, N; Piryani, R M; Bajracharya, O; Shrestha, R; Thapa, H S

    2010-01-01

    There are a number of sources available to prescribers to stay up to date about medicines. Prescribers in rural areas in developing countries however, may not able to access some of them. Interventions to improve prescribing can be educational, managerial, and regulatory or use a mix of strategies. Detailing by the pharmaceutical industry is widespread. Academic detailing (AD) has been classically seen as a form of continuing medical education in which a trained health professional such as a physician or pharmacist visits physicians in their offices to provide evidence-based information. Face-to-face sessions, preferably on an individual basis, clear educational and behavioural objectives, establishing credibility with respect to objectivity, stimulating physician interaction, use of concise graphic educational materials, highlighting key messages, and when possible, providing positive reinforcement of improved practices in follow-up visits can increase success of AD initiatives. AD is common in developed countries and certain examples have been cited in this review. In developing countries the authors have come across reports of AD in Pakistan, Sudan, Argentina and Uruguay, Bihar state in India, Zambia, Cuba, Indonesia and Mexico. AD had a consistent, small but potentially significant impact on prescribing practices. AD has much less resources at its command compared to the efforts by the industry. Steps have to be taken to formally start AD in Nepal and there may be specific hindering factors similar to those in other developing nations. PMID:21209521

  14. Structural evaluation of mixer pump installed in Tank 241-AN-107 for caustic addition project

    SciTech Connect

    Leshikar, G.A.

    1995-06-16

    This report documents the structural analysis and evaluation of a mixer pump and caustic addition system to be used in Tank 107-AN. This pump will be installed in the central pump pit of this double- shell tank for the purpose of bringing the hydroxide ion concentration into compliance with Tank Farm operating specifications.

  15. Ten-Structure as Strategy of Addition 1-20 by Involving Spatial Structuring Ability for First Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmah, Ummy; Putri, Ratu Ilma Indra; Somakim

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to design learning activities that can support students to develop strategies for the addition of number 1 to 20 in the first grade by involving students' spatial structuring ability. This study was conducted in Indonesia by involving 27 students. In this paper, one of three activities is discussed namely ten-box activity.…

  16. Herschel far-infrared observations of the Carina Nebula complex. III. Detailed cloud structure and feedback effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roccatagliata, V.; Preibisch, T.; Ratzka, T.; Gaczkowski, B.

    2013-06-01

    Context. The star formation process in large clusters/associations can be strongly influenced by the feedback from high-mass stars. Whether the resulting net effect of the feedback is predominantly negative (cloud dispersal) or positive (triggering of star formation due to cloud compression) is still an open question. Aims: The Carina Nebula complex (CNC) represents one of the most massive star-forming regions in our Galaxy. We use our Herschel far-infrared observations to study the properties of the clouds over the entire area of the CNC (with a diameter of ≈3.2°, which corresponds to ≈125 pc at a distance of 2.3 kpc). The good angular resolution (10''-36'') of the Herschel maps corresponds to physical scales of 0.1-0.4 pc, and allows us to analyze the small-scale (i.e., clump-size) structures of the clouds. Methods: The full extent of the CNC was mapped with PACS and SPIRE in the 70, 160, 250, 350, and 500 μm bands. We determined temperatures and column densities at each point in these maps by modeling the observed far-infrared spectral energy distributions. We also derived a map showing the strength of the UV radiation field. We investigated the relation between the cloud properties and the spatial distribution of the high-mass stars and computed total cloud masses for different density thresholds. Results: Our Herschel maps resolve for the first time the small-scale structure of the dense clouds over the entire spatial extent of the CNC. Several particularly interesting regions, including the prominent pillars south of η Car, are analyzed in detail. We compare the cloud masses derived from the Herschel data with previous mass estimates based on sub-mm and molecular line data. Our maps also reveal a peculiar wave-like pattern in the northern part of the Carina Nebula. Finally, we characterize two prominent cloud complexes at the periphery of our Herschel maps, which are probably molecular clouds in the Galactic background. Conclusions: We find that the

  17. Characterization of Effect of Support Structures in Laser Additive Manufacturing of Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järvinen, Jukka-Pekka; Matilainen, Ville; Li, Xiaoyun; Piili, Heidi; Salminen, Antti; Mäkelä, Ismo; Nyrhilä, Olli

    Laser additive manufacturing (LAM) of stainless steel is a layer wisetechnology for fabricating 3D parts from metal powder via selectively melting powder with laser beam. Support structures play a significant role in LAM process as they help to remove heat away from the process and on the other hand hold the work piece in its place. A successful design of support structures can help to achievea building process fast and inexpensive with high quality. Aimof this study was to characterize the usability of two types of support structures: web and tube supports. Purpose of this studywas also to analyze how suitable they are in two industrial application cases: case for dental application and case for jewelry application. It was concluded that the removability of web supports was much better than tube supports. It was noticed that support structures are an important part of LAM process and they strongly affect the manufacturability and the end quality of the part.

  18. Structural Implications of new Geologic Mapping and a Detailed Gravity Traverse in the Brooks Range Foothills, Chandler Lake Quadrangle, Northern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peapples, P. R.; Saltus, R. W.; Swenson, R.; Brown, P. J.

    2005-12-01

    A fold and thrust belt in northern Alaska occupies the structural transition from the imbricate thrust sheets (or allochthons) of the Brooks Range to the North Slope coastal plain. Understanding this complexly deformed zone is critical to hydrocarbon assessment in the state-owned lands south of Prudhoe Bay. New geologic mapping and geophysical studies are focused on this important region. Detailed (1:63,360 scale) geologic mapping along the drainages of Tiglukpuk Creek and the Siksikpuk River documents exposures of deep structural levels and provides important constraints for a structural model of this region. A south-to-north structural transect encompasses the transition from the highly deformed thrust sheets of the Endicott Mountains Allochthon (EMA) at the mountain front to the inferred triangle zone at the Tuktu Escarpment 45 miles to the north. Mississippian Carbonates to Triassic siliciclastics make up the EMA north of the mountain front where there is an abrupt transition in structural style from north-vergent asymmetric overturned folding to gentle warping above shallowly dipping fault ramps. Tiglukpuk Anticline represents a fenster where the EMA is overlain in thrust contact by a melange of more distal Ipnavik River Allochthon (IRA) rocks. Parallel synclinoria contain the Okpikruak siliciclastics of the IRA assemblage and the Brookian syntectonic siliciclastics of the Fortress Mountain formation, carried atop the EMA thrust sheets during the latest phase of deformation. This complex structural style abruptly ends at the Tuktu Escarpment which likely represents a backthrust/triangle zone that places shallow north dipping coarse clastics of the Nanushuk Formation over the less competent and highly deformed Torok shale. The structural complexity and associated steeply dipping strata in the foothills belt were not well imaged by existing conventional seismic data in this region. To provide additional subsurface control, we collected ground station gravity

  19. Addition of three-dimensional isoparametric elements to NASA structural analysis program (NASTRAN)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Field, E. I.; Johnson, S. E.

    1973-01-01

    Implementation is made of the three-dimensional family of linear, quadratic and cubic isoparametric solid elements into the NASA Structural Analysis program, NASTRAN. This work included program development, installation, testing, and documentation. The addition of these elements to NASTRAN provides a significant increase in modeling capability particularly for structures requiring specification of temperatures, material properties, displacements, and stresses which vary throughout each individual element. Complete program documentation is presented in the form of new sections and updates for direct insertion to the three NASTRAN manuals. The results of demonstration test problems are summarized. Excellent results are obtained with the isoparametric elements for static, normal mode, and buckling analyses.

  20. Structure of the full-length insecticidal protein Cry1Ac reveals intriguing details of toxin packaging into in vivo formed crystals

    PubMed Central

    Evdokimov, Artem G; Moshiri, Farhad; Sturman, Eric J; Rydel, Timothy J; Zheng, Meiying; Seale, Jeffrey W; Franklin, Sonya

    2014-01-01

    For almost half a century, the structure of the full-length Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal protein Cry1Ac has eluded researchers, since Bt-derived crystals were first characterized in 1965. Having finally solved this structure we report intriguing details of the lattice-based interactions between the toxic core of the protein and the protoxin domains. The structure provides concrete evidence for the function of the protoxin as an enhancer of native crystal packing and stability. PMID:25139047

  1. Structure/property (constitutive and dynamic strength/damage) characterization of additively manufactured 316L SS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, G. T., III; Livescu, V.; Rigg, P. A.; Trujillo, C. P.; Cady, C. M.; Chen, S. R.; Carpenter, J. S.; Lienert, T. J.; Fensin, S.

    2015-09-01

    For additive manufacturing (AM), the certification and qualification paradigm needs to evolve as there exists no "ASTM-type" additive manufacturing certified process or AM-material produced specifications. Accordingly, utilization of AM materials to meet engineering applications requires quantification of the constitutive properties of these evolving materials in comparison to conventionally-manufactured metals and alloys. Cylinders of 316L SS were produced using a LENS MR-7 laser additive manufacturing system from Optomec (Albuquerque, NM) equipped with a 1kW Yb-fiber laser. The microstructure of the AM-316L SS is detailed in both the as-built condition and following heat-treatments designed to obtain full recrystallization. The constitutive behavior as a function of strain rate and temperature is presented and compared to that of nominal annealed wrought 316L SS plate. The dynamic damage evolution and failure response of all three materials was probed using flyer-plate impact driven spallation experiments at a peak stress of 4.5 GPa to examine incipient spallation response. The spall strength of AM-produced 316L SS was found to be very similar for the peak shock stress studied to that of annealed wrought or AM-316L SS following recrystallization. The damage evolution as a function of microstructure was characterized using optical metallography.

  2. Investigation of detailed spatial structure of the Moscow urban heat island with application of the newest meteorological observations and regional climate modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varentsov, Mikhail; Pavel, Konstantinov; Timofey, Samsonov

    2016-04-01

    During the last years, the network of metrological observation in Moscow megacity and its neighborhoods, forming the biggest urban agglomeration in Europe, was significantly extended. Several new weather stations and completely new dense network of air-quality monitoring appears during the last decade. In addition, several microwave meteorological profilers MTP 5, which are available to measure temperature at the heights from 0 to 1000 meters with 50-m resolution, were installed in the city and its surrounding. All these measurements allow revealing undiscovered features of Moscow urban climate and urban heat island (UHI). In our research, bases on this data, we covered several topics related to urban climatology: - Investigation of detailed spatial structure of Moscow UHI and its relationships with building features, such as land use and morphology of the street canyons, obtained by GIS-algorithms according (Samsonov et. al, 2015); - Investigation of three-dimensional structure of the UHI, including its vertical extend and influence on the stratification of the atmosphere, and three-dimensional structure of the urban heat island advection and urban heat plumes; - Application of the newest data for validation of the regional climate model COSMO-CLM, coupled with TEB urban scheme (Masson, 2000; Trusilova et. al., 2013), launched for Moscow region with 1-km spatial resolution. References: 1. Masson V. A. Physically-Based Scheme for the Urban Energy Budget in Atmospheric models. Bound. Layer Meteor. 2000. V. 94 (3). P. 357-397. 2. Trusilova K., Früh B., Brienen S., Walter A., Masson V., Pigeon G., Becker P. Implementation of an Urban Parameterization Scheme into the Regional Climate Model COSMO-CLM. J. Appl. Meteor. Climatol. V. 52. P. 2296-2311. 3. Samsonov T.E., Konstantinov P.I., Varentsov M.I. Object-oriented approach to urban canyon analysis and its applications in meteorological modeling. Urban Climate. 2015. Vol. 13. P. 122-139.

  3. Revealing Structural Details of SiCO Ceramics with GIPAW Calculations of Model Structures and Analysis of Experimental 29Si Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, John; Kroll, Peter

    2015-03-01

    The occurrence of the various SiCxO4-x (1 <=x <=4) mixed tetrahedra in silicon oxycarbide (SiCO) is often quantified by means of experimental 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance. The structural centers are assigned to individual peaks in the spectrum, which can be integrated to give the relative populations. Using a recently-developed method, we show that is is also possible to recover information on the connectivity of these tetrahedra. By combining a huge library of model structures an GIPAW calculations, we show that simple relations exist between the Si-O-Si linking angles and the 29Si NMR chemical shift. In this work, we perform detailed analyses of SiCO 29Si NMR spectra available in literature. We extract angular distributions in agreement with the experimental X-ray and neutron diffraction data. Furthermore, in glasses with large amounts of so-called ``free'' carbon, we observe a significant portion of the {Si}O4 tetrahedra which have disproportionately large angles. These angles indicate the presence of internal SiO2 surfaces or cages-like voids, similar to those found in zeolites or clathrates. This analysis suggests that in SiCO, the ``free'' carbon is incorporated into these voids, which produces strain on the bonding angles of the surrounding host glass.

  4. Bispyrimidines as potent histamine H(4) receptor ligands: delineation of structure-activity relationships and detailed H(4) receptor binding mode.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Harald; Schultes, Sabine; de Graaf, Chris; Nijmeijer, Saskia; Vischer, Henry F; Zuiderveld, Obbe P; Dobler, Julia; Stachurski, Katharina; Mayer, Moriz; Arnhof, Heribert; Scharn, Dirk; Haaksma, Eric E J; de Esch, Iwan J P; Leurs, Rob

    2013-06-13

    The basic methylpiperazine moiety is considered a necessary substructure for high histamine H4 receptor (H4R) affinity. This moiety is however also the metabolic hot spot for various classes of H4R ligands (e.g., indolcarboxamides and pyrimidines). We set out to investigate whether mildly basic 2-aminopyrimidines in combination with the appropriate linker can serve as a replacement for the methylpiperazine moiety. In the series of 2-aminopyrimidines, the introduction of an additional 2-aminopyrimidine moiety in combination with the appropriate linker lead to bispyrimidines displaying pKi values for binding the human H4R up to 8.2. Furthermore, the methylpiperazine replacement results in compounds with improved metabolic properties. The attempt to transfer the knowledge generated in the class of bispyrimidines to the indolecarboxamides failed. Combining the derived structure-activity relationships with homology modeling leads to new detailed insights in the molecular aspects of ligand-H4R binding in general and the binding mode of the described bispyrimidines in specific. PMID:23668417

  5. Is the structural diversity of tripeptides sufficient for developing functional food additives with satisfactory multiple bioactivities?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-Hui; Liu, Yong-Le; Ning, Jing-Heng; Yu, Jian; Li, Xiang-Hong; Wang, Fa-Xiang

    2013-05-01

    Multifunctional peptides have attracted increasing attention in the food science community because of their therapeutic potential, low toxicity and rapid intestinal absorption. However, previous study demonstrated that the limited structural variations make it difficult to optimize dipeptide molecules in a good balance between desirable and undesirable properties (F. Tian, P. Zhou, F. Lv, R. Song, Z. Li, J. Pept. Sci. 13 (2007) 549-566). In the present work, we attempt to answer whether the structural diversity is sufficient for a tripeptide to have satisfactory multiple bioactivities. Statistical test, structural examination and energetic analysis confirm that peptides of three amino acids long can bind tightly to human angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and thus exert significant antihypertensive efficacy. Further quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling and prediction of all 8000 possible tripeptides reveal that their ACE-inhibitory potency exhibits a good (positive) relationship to antioxidative activity, but has only a quite modest correlation with bitterness. This means that it is possible to find certain tripeptide entities possessing the optimal combination of strong ACE-inhibitory potency, high antioxidative activity and weak bitter taste, which are the promising candidates for developing multifunctional food additives with satisfactory multiple bioactivities. The marked difference between dipeptide and tripeptide can be attributed to the fact that the structural diversity of peptides increases dramatically with a slight change in sequence length.

  6. Analysis of Gravity and Topographic/Bathymetric Data Over the Chicxulub Impact Structure: A Look at Details

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsland, G. L.; Hurtado, M.; Ceron, A.; Pope, K.; Ocampo, A.; Smythe, W.; Bedard, P.

    1996-03-01

    The Chicxulub impact feature, has been characterized as being relatively circular with a diameter of 180 Km, 240 Km, or 300 Km. To arrive at these characterizations the authors have relied for the most part upon gravity data, sparse well control, a few seismic lines and a ring of cenotes (sinkholes). We are better defining the feature by analysis of the details of the gravity and topographic/bathymetric data.

  7. A role of BNLT compound addition on structure and properties of PZT ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaita, P.; Watcharapasorn, A.; Jiansirisomboon, S.

    2010-09-01

    In this research, effects of lead-free bismuth sodium lanthanum titanate (BNLT) addition on structure and properties of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics were investigated. PZT ceramics with addition of 0.1-3.0 wt%BNLT were fabricated by a solid-state mixed oxide method and sintering at 1050-1200 °C for 2 h to obtain dense ceramics with at least 96% of theoretical density. X-ray diffraction indicated that complete solid solution occurred for all compositions. Phase identification showed both tetragonal and rhombohedral perovskite structure of PZT with no BNLT phase detected. Scanning electron micrographs of fractured PZT/BNLT ceramics showed equiaxed grain shape with both transgranular and intergranular fracture modes. Addition of BNLT was also found to reduce densification and effectively limited grain growth of PZT ceramic. Optimum Hv and KIC values were found to be 4.85 GPa and 1.56 MPa.m 1/2 for PZT/0.5 wt%BNLT sample. Among PZT/BNLT samples, room temperature dielectric constant seemed to be improved with increasing BNLT content. The maximum piezoelectric coefficient values were observed in pure PZT ceramic and were slightly decreased in BNLT-added samples. Small reduction of remanent polarization and coercive field in hysteresis loops was observed in BNLT-added samples, indicating a slightly suppressed ferroelectric interaction in this material system.

  8. Experiments to Populate and Validate a Processing Model for Polyurethane Foam: Additional Data for Structural Foams.

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Rekha R.; Celina, Mathias C.; Giron, Nicholas Henry; Long, Kevin Nicholas; Russick, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    We are developing computational models to help understand manufacturing processes, final properties and aging of structural foam, polyurethane PMDI. Th e resulting model predictions of density and cure gradients from the manufacturing process will be used as input to foam heat transfer and mechanical models. BKC 44306 PMDI-10 and BKC 44307 PMDI-18 are the most prevalent foams used in structural parts. Experiments needed to parameterize models of the reaction kinetics and the equations of motion during the foam blowing stages were described for BKC 44306 PMDI-10 in the first of this report series (Mondy et al. 2014). BKC 44307 PMDI-18 is a new foam that will be used to make relatively dense structural supports via over packing. It uses a different catalyst than those in the BKC 44306 family of foams; hence, we expect that the reaction kineti cs models must be modified. Here we detail the experiments needed to characteriz e the reaction kinetics of BKC 44307 PMDI-18 and suggest parameters for the model based on these experiments. In additi on, the second part of this report describes data taken to provide input to the preliminary nonlinear visco elastic structural response model developed for BKC 44306 PMDI-10 foam. We show that the standard cu re schedule used by KCP does not fully cure the material, and, upon temperature elevation above 150 o C, oxidation or decomposition reactions occur that alter the composition of the foam. These findings suggest that achieving a fully cured foam part with this formulation may be not be possible through therma l curing. As such, visco elastic characterization procedures developed for curing thermosets can provide only approximate material properties, since the state of the material continuously evolves during tests.

  9. An identification method for enclosed voids restriction in manufacturability design for additive manufacturing structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shutian; Li, Quhao; Chen, Wenjiong; Tong, Liyong; Cheng, Gengdong

    2015-06-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) technologies, such as selective laser sintering (SLS) and fused deposition modeling (FDM), have become the powerful tools for direct manufacturing of complex parts. This breakthrough in manufacturing technology makes the fabrication of new geometrical features and multiple materials possible. Past researches on designs and design methods often focused on how to obtain desired functional performance of the structures or parts, specific manufacturing capabilities as well as manufacturing constraints of AM were neglected. However, the inherent constraints in AM processes should be taken into account in design process. In this paper, the enclosed voids, one type of manufacturing constraints of AM, are investigated. In mathematics, enclosed voids restriction expressed as the solid structure is simplyconnected. We propose an equivalent description of simply-connected constraint for avoiding enclosed voids in structures, named as virtual temperature method (VTM). In this method, suppose that the voids in structure are filled with a virtual heating material with high heat conductivity and solid areas are filled with another virtual material with low heat conductivity. Once the enclosed voids exist in structure, the maximum temperature value of structure will be very high. Based upon this method, the simplyconnected constraint is equivalent to maximum temperature constraint. And this method can be easily used to formulate the simply-connected constraint in topology optimization. The effectiveness of this description method is illustrated by several examples. Based upon topology optimization, an example of 3D cantilever beam is used to illustrate the trade-off between manufacturability and functionality. Moreover, the three optimized structures are fabricated by FDM technology to indicate further the necessity of considering the simply-connected constraint in design phase for AM.

  10. Interactive effects between N addition and disturbance on boreal forest ecosystem structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordin, Annika; Strengbom, Joachim; From, Fredrik

    2014-05-01

    In management of boreal forests, nitrogen (N) enrichment from atmospheric deposition or from forest fertilization can appear in combination with land-use related disturbances, i.e. tree harvesting by clear-felling. Long-term interactive effects between N enrichment and disturbance on boreal forest ecosystem structure and function are, however, poorly known. We investigated effects of N enrichment by forest fertilization done > 25 years ago on forest understory species composition in old-growth (undisturbed) forests, and in forests clear-felled 10 years ago (disturbed). In clear-felled forests we also investigated effects of the previous N addition on growth of tree saplings. The results show that the N enrichment effect on the understory species composition was strongly dependent on the disturbance caused by clear-felling. In undisturbed forests, there were small or no effects on understory species composition from N addition. In contrast, effects were large in forests first exposed to N addition and subsequently disturbed by clear-felling. Effects of N addition differed among functional groups of plants. Abundance of graminoids increased (+232%) and abundance of dwarf shrubs decreased (-44%) following disturbance in N fertilized forests. For vascular plants, the two perturbations had contrasting effects on α-(within forests) and β-diversity (among forests): in disturbed forests, N addition reduced, or had no effect on α-diversity, while β-diversity increased. For bryophytes, negative effects of disturbance on α-diversity were smaller in N fertilized forests than in forests not fertilized, while neither N addition nor disturbance had any effects on β-diversity. Moreover, sapling growth in forests clear-felled 10 years ago was significantly higher in previously N fertilized forests than in forests not fertilized. Our study show that effects of N addition on plant communities may appear small, short-lived, or even absent until exposed to a disturbance. This

  11. Effect of boron addition on the structure and magnetic properties of CoPt nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Khemjeen, Yutthaya; Pinitsoontorn, Supree Chompoosor, Apiwat

    2015-05-07

    The effect of B addition on CoPt nanoparticles was investigated. The CoPt-B nanoparticles were synthesized by means of the polyol process. Transmission electron microscopy has shown that the as-synthesized particles have a spherical morphology with average size about 2–3 nm. The X-ray absorption spectroscopy and the X-ray diffraction technique showed the effect of B concentration on phase transformation. The addition of B at up to 60% promoted the formation of the L1{sub 0} phase when the nanoparticles were subjected to annealing at 600 °C. If the B content is higher than 60%, the phase transition is suppressed. The evidence of B addition on the structure of CoPt nanoparticles was further supported by the magnetic measurements. The results show that the coercivity of the annealed CoPt-B nanoparticles was enhanced by the B additions from 20% to 60%, with the maximum coercivity of 12 000 Oe for the CoPt-40%B sample.

  12. EBSD analysis of magnesium addition on inclusion formation in SS400 structural steel

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Sin-Jie; Su, Yen-Hao Frank; Lu, Muh-Jung; Kuo, Jui-Chao

    2013-08-15

    In this study, the effect of magnesium addition on the inclusion formation in SS400 steel was investigated. The experimental specimens with and without Mg addition treatment were compared. The microstructure was observed using optical microscopy after etching with 3% nital. The morphology and chemical composition of the inclusions were analyzed via scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry. The lattice structure and orientation of the inclusions were identified by electron backscattering diffraction. The average size of inclusions in SS400 was between 0.67 and 0.75 μm, and between 0.65 and 0.68 μm in SS400 + Mg. The 2 ppm Mg addition resulted in the oxide formation change from Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to MgO·Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and in the inclusion formation change from Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–MnS to MgO·Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–MnS. Moreover, a simple-phase MnS with an average grain size of 1 μm to 2 μm was observed in rod-like, globular, and polyhedron forms. - Highlights: • The effect of magnesium addition was investigated for SS400 steel. • 2 ppm Mg addition changes the inclusion formation from Al2O3-MnS to MgO·Al2O3-MnS. • MnS observed in inclusions exhibits rod-like, globular, and polyhedron forms.

  13. Soil microbial community structure and nitrogen cycling responses to agroecosystem management and carbon substrate addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthrong, S. T.; Buckley, D. H.; Drinkwater, L. E.

    2011-12-01

    Fertilizer application in conventional agriculture leads to N saturation and decoupled soil C and N cycling, whereas organic practices, e.g. complex rotations and legume incorporation, often results in increased SOM and tightly coupled cycles of C and N. These legacy effects of management on soils likely affect microbial community composition and microbial process rates. This project tested if agricultural management practices led to distinct microbial communities and if those communities differed in ability to utilize labile plant carbon substrates and to produce more plant available N. We addressed several specific questions in this project. 1) Do organic and conventional management legacies on similar soils produce distinct soil bacterial and fungal community structures and abundances? 2) How do these microbial community structures change in response to carbon substrate addition? 3) How do the responses of the microbial communities influence N cycling? To address these questions we conducted a laboratory incubation of organically and conventionally managed soils. We added C-13 labelled glucose either in one large dose or several smaller pulses. We extracted genomic DNA from soils before and after incubation for TRFLP community fingerprinting. We measured C in soil pools and respiration and N in soil extracts and leachates. Management led to different compositions of bacteria and fungi driven by distinct components in organic soils. Biomass did not differ across treatments indicating that differences in cycling were due to composition rather than abundance. C substrate addition led to convergence in bacterial communities; however management still strongly influenced the difference in communities. Fungal communities were very distinct between managements and plots with substrate addition not altering this pattern. Organic soils respired 3 times more of the glucose in the first week than conventional soils (1.1% vs 0.4%). Organic soils produced twice as much

  14. Biomechanical investigation into the structural design of porous additive manufactured cages using numerical and experimental approaches.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pei-I; Hsu, Ching-Chi; Chen, San-Yuan; Wu, Tsung-Han; Huang, Chih-Chieh

    2016-09-01

    Traditional solid cages have been widely used in posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) surgery. However, solid cages significantly affect the loading mechanism of the human spine due to their extremely high structural stiffness. Previous studies proposed and investigated porous additive manufactured (AM) cages; however, their biomechanical performances were analyzed using oversimplified bone-implant numerical models. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the outer shape and inner porous structure of the AM cages. The outer shape of the AM cages was discovered using a simulation-based genetic algorithm; their inner porous structure was subsequently analyzed parametrically using T10-S1 multilevel spine models. Finally, six types of the AM cages, which were manufactured using selective laser melting, were tested to validate the numerical outcomes. The subsidence resistance of the optimum design was superior to the conventional cage designs. A porous AM cage with a pillar diameter of 0.4mm, a pillar angle of 40°, and a porosity of between 69% and 80% revealed better biomechanical performances. Both the numerical and experimental outcomes can help surgeons to understand the biomechanics of PLIF surgery combined with the use of AM cages. PMID:27392226

  15. Combined analysis of passive and active seismic measurements using additional geologic data for the determination of shallow subsurface structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horstmann, Tobias; Brüstle, Andrea; Spies, Thomas; Schlittenhardt, Jörg; Schmidt, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    A detailed knowledge of subsurface structure is essential for geotechnical projects and local seismic hazard analyses. Passive seismic methods like microtremor measurements are widely used in geotechnical practice, but limitations and developments are still in focus of scientific discussion. The presentation outlines microtremor measurements in the context of microzonation in the scale of districts or small communities. H/V measurements are used to identify zones with similar underground properties. Subsequently a shear wave velocity (Vs) depth profile for each zone is determined by array measurements at selected sites. To reduce possible uncertainties in dispersion curve analyses of passive array measurements and ambiguities within the inversion process, we conducted an additional active seismic experiment and included available geological information. The presented work is realized in the framework of the research project MAGS2 ("Microseismic Activity of Geothermal Systems") and deals with the determination of seismic hazard analysis at sites near deep geothermal power plants in Germany. The measurements were conducted in the Upper Rhine Graben (URG) and the Bavarian molasses, where geothermal power plants are in operation. The results of the H/V- and array-measurements in the region of Landau (URG) are presented and compared to known geological-tectonic structures. The H/V measurements show several zones with similar H/V-curves which indicate homogenous underground properties. Additionally to the passive seismic measurements an active refraction experiment was performed and evaluated using the MASW method („Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves") to strengthen the determination of shear-wave-velocity depth profile. The dispersion curves for Rayleigh-waves of the active experiment support the Rayleigh-dispersion curves from passive measurements and therefore provide a valuable supplement. Furthermore, the Rayleigh-wave ellipticity was calculated to reduce

  16. Techniques for Rotating Two or More Loading Matrices to Optimal Agreement and Simple Structure: A Comparison and Some Technical Details.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiers, Henk A. L.

    1997-01-01

    Five techniques that combine the ideals of rotation of matrices of factor loadings to optimal agreement and rotation to simple structure are compared on the basis of empirical and contrived data. Combining a generalized Procrustes analysis with Varimax on the main of the matched loading matrices performed well on all criteria. (SLD)

  17. SMS crew station (C and D panels and forward structures). CEI part 1: Detail specification, type 1 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Established are the requirements for performance, design, test and qualification of one type of equipment identified as SMS C&D panels and forward structures. This CEI is used to provide all hardware and wiring necessary for the C&D panels to be properly interfaced with the computer complex/signal conversion equipment (SCE), crew station, and software requirements as defined in other CEI specifications.

  18. Properties of Inconel 625 Mesh Structures Grown by Electron Beam Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    List III, Frederick Alyious; Dehoff, Ryan R; Lowe, Larry E; Sames, William J

    2014-01-01

    Relationships between electron beam parameters (beam current, beam speed, and beam focus) and physical properties (mass, diameter, elastic modulus, and yield strength) have been investigated for Inconel 625 mesh cubes fabricated using an additive manufacturing technology based on electron beam melting. The elastic modulus and yield strength of the mesh cubes have been systematically varied by approximately a factor of ten by changing the electron beam parameters. Simple models have been used to understand better these relationships. Structural anisotropies of the mesh associated with the layered build architecture have been observed and may contribute, along with microstructural anisotropies, to the anisotropic mechanical properties of the mesh. Knowledge of this kind is likely applicable to other metal and alloy systems and is essential to rapidly realize the full potential of this burgeoning technology.

  19. Application and testing of additive manufacturing for mirrors and precision structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Michael; Acreman, Martyn; Vettese, Tom; Myatt, Ray; Thompson, Mike

    2015-09-01

    Additive Manufacturing (aka AM, and 3-D printing) is widely touted in the media as the foundation for the next industrial revolution. Beneath the hype, AM does indeed offer profound advantages in lead-time, dramatically reduced consumption of expensive raw materials, while enabling new and innovative design forms that cannot be produced by other means. General Dynamics and their industry partners have begun to embrace this technology for mirrors and precision structures used in the aerospace, defense, and precision optical instrumentation industries. Aggressively lightweighted, open and closed back test mirror designs, 75-150 mm in size, were first produced by AM from several different materials. Subsequent optical finishing and test experiments have exceeded expectations for density, surface finish, dimensional stability and isotropy of thermal expansion on the optical scale of measurement. Materials currently under examination include aluminum, titanium, beryllium, aluminum beryllium, Inconel 625, stainless steel/bronze, and PEKK polymer.

  20. Tailoring of Boehmite-Derived Aluminosilicate Aerogel Structure and Properties: Influence of Ti Addition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.; Guo, Haiquan; Sheets, Erik J.; Miller, Derek R.; Newlin, Katy N.

    2010-01-01

    Aluminosilicate aerogels offer potential for extremely low thermal conductivities at temperatures greater than 900 C, beyond where silica aerogels reach their upper temperature limits. Aerogels have been synthesized at various Al:Si ratios, including mullite compositions, using Boehmite (AlOOH) as the Al source, and tetraethoxy orthosilicate as the Si precursor. The Boehmite-derived aerogels are found to form by a self-assembly process of AlOOH crystallites, with Si-O groups on the surface of an alumina skeleton. Morphology, surface area and pore size varies with the crystallite size of the starting Boehmite powder, as well as with synthesis parameters. Ternary systems, including Al-Si-Ti aerogels incorporating a soluble Ti precursor, are possible with careful control of pH. The addition of Ti influences sol viscosity, gelation time pore structure and pore size distribution, as well as phase formation on heat treatment.

  1. A detailed examination of the growth of CdSe thin films through structural and optical characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Yükselici, M.H.; Aşıkoğlu Bozkurt, A.; Ömür, B. Can

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: ► Urbach tail width decreases by about 200 meV with the film thickness. ► A coefficient of strain of around 3 × 10{sup −3} along [0 0 2] axis was predicted. ► Compressive strain gives rise to about 11 meV red shift in the band gap energy. ► A relative shift of about 2 cm{sup −1} of LO{sub 1} phonon mode in Raman spectra was observed between different thickness films. - Abstract: Different thickness CdSe thin films were grown on glass substrates by physical vapor deposition and characterized by optical and structural investigations. Urbach energy related to the width of the optical absorption tail decreases from 430 meV for a film thickness of 50 nm to 200 meV for 450 nm. The film thickness dependent grain sizes were estimated by using effective mass model under quantum size effect from the shift of around 500 meV in the asymptotic absorption edge. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern is consistent with CdSe hexagonal crystal structure which indicates crystal growth mode along c axis. XRD peaks broaden and shift depending on film thicknesses which are presumably due to strain and size effect. We observe both blue and red shift depending on thickness in Longitudinal Optical phonon frequency in Raman spectra with respect to that of the source CdSe powder which could also be due to strain on thin films and/or finite crystallite size. In this work we combine the results of optical absorption, Raman and XRD spectroscopies to study the evolution of grain size, strain and structural disorder depending on film thickness.

  2. Micro- and nano-structural details of a spider's filter for substrate vibrations: relevance for low-frequency signal transmission

    PubMed Central

    Erko, Maxim; Younes-Metzler, Osnat; Rack, Alexander; Zaslansky, Paul; Young, Seth L.; Milliron, Garrett; Chyasnavichyus, Marius; Barth, Friedrich G.; Fratzl, Peter; Tsukruk, Vladimir; Zlotnikov, Igor; Politi, Yael

    2015-01-01

    The metatarsal lyriform organ of the Central American wandering spider Cupiennius salei is its most sensitive vibration detector. It is able to sense a wide range of vibration stimuli over four orders of magnitude in frequency between at least as low as 0.1 Hz and several kilohertz. Transmission of the vibrations to the slit organ is controlled by a cuticular pad in front of it. While the mechanism of high-frequency stimulus transfer (above ca 40 Hz) is well understood and related to the viscoelastic properties of the pad's epicuticle, it is not yet clear how low-frequency stimuli (less than 40 Hz) are transmitted. Here, we study how the pad material affects the pad's mechanical properties and thus its role in the transfer of the stimulus, using a variety of experimental techniques, such as X-ray micro-computed tomography for three-dimensional imaging, X-ray scattering for structural analysis, and atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy for surface imaging. The mechanical properties were investigated using scanning acoustic microscopy and nanoindentation. We show that large tarsal deflections cause large deformation in the distal highly hydrated part of the pad. Beyond this region, a sclerotized region serves as a supporting frame which resists the deformation and is displaced to push against the slits, with displacement values considerably scaled down to only a few micrometres. Unravelling the structural arrangement in such specialized structures may provide conceptual ideas for the design of new materials capable of controlling a technical sensor's specificity and selectivity, which is so typical of biological sensors. PMID:25631567

  3. Effect of calcium chloride addition on ice cream structure and quality.

    PubMed

    Costa, F F; Resende, J V; Abreu, L R; Goff, H D

    2008-06-01

    The influence of calcium fortification by the addition of calcium chloride on quality parameters of ice cream based on physical properties was investigated, as was the effect of kappa-carrageenan at modifying the effects of this calcium fortification. Four ice cream mixes of conventional composition, with added kappa-carrageenan (0 or 0.025%) and added calcium chloride (0 or 4.4 g L(-1) = 40 mM of added Ca(2+)), were prepared. Modulated temperature-differential scanning calorimetry was used to investigate the effect of calcium chloride on the nucleation temperature, enthalpy of melting, and freezing point depression. The protein composition of 15.4% (wt/wt) reconstituted skim milk powder solutions with or without 4.4 g L(-1) added CaCl(2) and in the supernatant after ultracentrifugation was determined. Fat particle size distributions in ice cream were characterized by light scattering. Ice crystal sizes before and after temperature cycling were determined by cold-stage light microscopy. The results demonstrated that the addition of calcium chloride led to a substantial increase in ice crystal sizes and in fat partial coalescence, which were exacerbated by the addition of kappa-carrageenan. These results can be explained by the interaction between Ca(2+) ions and casein micelles, rather than any effects on freezing point depression. The calcium ions led to a more compact micelle, less serum beta-casein, and high fat destabilization, all of which would be expected to reduce macromolecular structure and volume occupancy in the unfrozen phase, which led to increased rates of ice recrystallization. PMID:18487638

  4. Addition of cement to lime-based mortars: Effect on pore structure and vapor transport

    SciTech Connect

    Mosquera, M.J. . E-mail: mariajesus.mosquera@uca.es; Silva, B.; Prieto, B.; Ruiz-Herrera, E.

    2006-09-15

    The main focus of this work is to determine the effect of cement addition, a common practice in many restorations, on the pore structure of lime-based mortars. A second target is to establish correlations between microstructure and water vapor transport across the mortar, which is a key characteristic of building decay. In order to achieve these objectives, we prepared a set of mortars consisting of air-hardening lime with a progressively increasing cement content, as well as a mortar containing hydraulic lime. Several different techniques, most notably mercury intrusion porosimetry and scanning electron microscopy in the backscatter mode, were used to investigate the pore structure. The results from these procedures led to the conclusion that porosity and pore size are progressively reduced as cement content increases. Moreover, an excellent correlation between pore radius parameter and the vapor diffusion coefficient was established. Hydraulic lime mortar exhibited textural parameters and diffusivity values halfway between those of the different lime/cement mixes studied.

  5. Children's Understanding of the Additive Composition of Number and of the Decimal Structure: What Is the Relationship?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs, Georgina; Squire, Sarah; Bryant, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Nunes and Bryant (Children doing mathematics, Blackwell, Oxford, 1996) proposed that an understanding of the additive composition of number could be a precursor to an understanding of the decimal structure. If this is so, children should achieve an understanding of additive composition before they can handle the decimal structure. The aim of our…

  6. effect of hydrogen addition and burner diameter on the stability and structure of lean, premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Kelsey Leigh

    Low swirl burners (LSBs) have gained popularity in heating and gas power generation industries, in part due to their proven capacity for reducing the production of NOx, which in addition to reacting to form smog and acid rain, plays a central role in the formation of the tropospheric ozone layer. With lean operating conditions, LSBs are susceptible to combustion instability, which can result in flame extinction or equipment failure. Extensive work has been performed to understand the nature of LSB combustion, but scaling trends between laboratory- and industrial-sized burners have not been established. Using hydrogen addition as the primary method of flame stabilization, the current work presents results for a 2.54 cm LSB to investigate potential effects of burner outlet diameter on the nature of flame stability, with focus on flashback and lean blowout conditions. In the lean regime, the onset of instability and flame extinction have been shown to occur at similar equivalence ratios for both the 2.54 cm and a 3.81 cm LSB and depend on the resolution of equivalence ratios incremented. Investigations into flame structures are also performed. Discussion begins with a derivation for properties in a multicomponent gas mixture used to determine the Reynolds number (Re) to develop a condition for turbulent intensity similarity in differently-sized LSBs. Based on this requirement, operating conditions are chosen such that the global Reynolds number for the 2.54 cm LSB is within 2% of the Re for the 3.81 cm burner. With similarity obtained, flame structure investigations focus on flame front curvature and flame surface density (FSD). As flame structure results of the current 2.54 cm LSB work are compared to results for the 3.81 cm LSB, no apparent relationship is shown to exist between burner diameter and the distribution of flame surface density. However, burner diameter is shown to have a definite effect on the flame front curvature. In corresponding flow conditions, a

  7. Using cuttlefish ink as an additive to produce -non-iridescent structural colors of high color visibility.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yafeng; Dong, Biqin; Chen, Ang; Liu, Xiaohan; Shi, Lei; Zi, Jian

    2015-08-26

    Non-iridescent structural colors of high color visibility are produced by amorphous photonic structures, in which -natural cuttlefish ink is used as an additive to break down the long-range order of the structures. The color hue and its spectral purity can be tuned by adjusting the diameter of the polystyrene (PS) spheres and the proportion of ink particles. PMID:26175211

  8. Crowdsourcing detailed flood data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walliman, Nicholas; Ogden, Ray; Amouzad*, Shahrzhad

    2015-04-01

    Over the last decade the average annual loss across the European Union due to flooding has been 4.5bn Euros, but increasingly intense rainfall, as well as population growth, urbanisation and the rising costs of asset replacements, may see this rise to 23bn Euros a year by 2050. Equally disturbing are the profound social costs to individuals, families and communities which in addition to loss of lives include: loss of livelihoods, decreased purchasing and production power, relocation and migration, adverse psychosocial effects, and hindrance of economic growth and development. Flood prediction, management and defence strategies rely on the availability of accurate information and flood modelling. Whilst automated data gathering (by measurement and satellite) of the extent of flooding is already advanced it is least reliable in urban and physically complex geographies where often the need for precise estimation is most acute. Crowdsourced data of actual flood events is a potentially critical component of this allowing improved accuracy in situations and identifying the effects of local landscape and topography where the height of a simple kerb, or discontinuity in a boundary wall can have profound importance. Mobile 'App' based data acquisition using crowdsourcing in critical areas can combine camera records with GPS positional data and time, as well as descriptive data relating to the event. This will automatically produce a dataset, managed in ArcView GIS, with the potential for follow up calls to get more information through structured scripts for each strand. Through this local residents can provide highly detailed information that can be reflected in sophisticated flood protection models and be core to framing urban resilience strategies and optimising the effectiveness of investment. This paper will describe this pioneering approach that will develop flood event data in support of systems that will advance existing approaches such as developed in the in the UK

  9. Critical review of the safety assessment of nano-structured silica additives in food.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Hans Christian; Suter, Mark; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2016-01-01

    The development of nano-materials is viewed as one of the most important technological advances of the 21st century and new applications of nano-sized particles in the production, processing, packaging or storage of food are expected to emerge soon. This trend of growing commercialization of engineered nano-particles as part of modern diet will substantially increase oral exposure. Contrary to the proven benefits of nano-materials, however, possible adverse health effects have generally received less attention. This problem is very well illustrated by nano-structured synthetic amorphous silica (SAS), which is a common food additive since several decades although the relevant risk assessment has never been satisfactorily completed. A no observed adverse effect level of 2500 mg SAS particles/kg body weight per day was derived from the only available long-term administration study in rodents. However, extrapolation to a safe daily intake for humans is problematic due to limitations of this chronic animal study and knowledge gaps as to possible local intestinal effects of SAS particles, primarily on the gut-associated lymphoid system. This uncertainty is aggravated by digestion experiments indicating that dietary SAS particles preserve their nano-sized structure when reaching the intestinal lumen. An important aspect is whether food-borne particles like SAS alter the function of dendritic cells that, embedded in the intestinal mucosa, act as first-line sentinels of foreign materials. We conclude that nano-particles do not represent a completely new threat and that most potential risks can be assessed following procedures established for conventional chemical hazards. However, specific properties of food-borne nano-particles should be further examined and, for that purpose, in vitro tests with decision-making cells of the immune system are needed to complement existing in vivo studies. PMID:27287345

  10. Detailed quantification of delta subsidence, compaction and interaction with man-made structures: the case of the NCA airport, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalié, O.; Sladen, A.; Kelner, M.

    2015-09-01

    River deltas are dynamic coastal systems and their evolutions are closely monitored as it often concentrates vital natural resources for the surrounding areas. Many deltas worldwide experience subsidence due to geological processes (sediment loading and compaction) or human activities (groundwater or hydrocarbon extraction, land reclamation). This causes shoreline erosion or wetland loss which represent serious issues for the population. In this study we investigate the dynamic of the Var delta (France) where reclaimed lands over sea have been built to host the Nice côte d'Azur airport (NCA). Actually, the stability of this infrastructure is a permanent concern since, in 1979, a newly built extension of the runway platform collapsed in the sea, causing important damages. The project of land extension stopped, but the present airport platform is still located on reclaimed land. Factors that can trigger such catastrophic landslide are thought to be linked to the delta activity and the artificial airport platform load. We used, therefore, Envisat InSAR data to measure accurately the ground deformation of the area that includes the Var delta and NCA airport. Combining data from ascending and descending orbits, we estimated the east-west and vertical components of the deformation and obtained very accurate displacement rate (with a 1σ error of 0.25 mm yr-1). We found that nearly all the deformation is vertical and impacts the whole Var delta. The Var valley subsides at a very low rate (0.5-1 mm yr-1) but downstream the subsidence rate increases and a clear jump is observed at the transition with the reclaimed lands (1-2 mm yr-1). On average, the reclaimed lands subside at 3 mm yr-1. Since the subsidence rate increases in correlation with the sediment thickness, we interpret it as the compaction of the delta quaternary sedimentary wedge. In addition, three areas subside faster (between 5 and 10 mm yr-1), with one calling for more attention as it is the largest and

  11. Detailed quantification of delta subsidence, compaction and interaction with man-made structures: the case of the NCA airport, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalié, O.; Sladen, A.; Kelner, M.

    2015-06-01

    River deltas are dynamic costal systems and their evolutions are closely monitored as it often concentrates vital natural resources for the surrounding areas. Many deltas, worldwide, experience subsidence due to geological processes (sediment loading and compaction) or human activities (groundwater or hydrocarbon extraction, land reclamation). This causes shoreline erosion or wetland loss which represent serious issues for the population. In this study, we investigate the dynamic of the Var delta (France) where reclaimed lands over sea have been built to host the Nice côte d'Azur airport (NCA). Actually, the stability of this infrastructure is a permanent concern since, in 1979, a newly built extension of the runway platform collapsed in the sea, causing important damages. The project of land extension stopped, but the present airport platform is still located on reclaimed land. Factors that can trigger such catastrophic landslide are thought to be linked to the delta activity and the artificial airport platform load. We used, therefore, Envisat InSAR data to measure accurately the ground deformation of the area that includes the Var delta and NCA airport. Combining data from ascending and descending orbits, we estimated the east-west and vertical components of the deformation and obtained very accurate displacement rate (with a 1σ error of 0.25 mm yr-1). We found that nearly all the deformation is vertical and impacts the whole Var delta. The Var valley subsides at a very low rate (0.5-1 mm yr-1) but downstream the subsidence rate increases and a clear jump is observed at the transition with the reclaimed lands (1-2 mm yr-1). On average, the reclaimed lands subside at 3 mm yr-1. Since the subsidence rate increases in correlation with the sediment thickness, we interpret it as the compaction of the delta quaternary sedimentary wedge. In addition, three areas subsides faster (between 5 and 10 mm yr-1), with one calling for more attention as it is the largest and

  12. Detailed simulation of the role of functionalized polymer chains on the structural, dynamic and mechanical properties of polymer nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Shen, Jianxiang; Gao, Yangyang; Zhou, Huanhuan; Wu, Youping; Zhang, Liqun

    2014-11-28

    To systematically study the effect of functionalized chain groups on polymer nanocomposites, we perform our simulation work in the following two ways. In the case of dilute loading of nanoparticles (NPs) with different geometries (spherical, sheet-like, rod-like NPs), we adopt coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation to study the structural, dynamic and mechanical properties of polymer nanocomposites influenced by the terminal groups of linear polymer chains. We observe that the terminal groups have more probability to be adsorbed onto the surface of NPs with decreasing temperature, chain molecular weight and increasing chain stiffness. For all NPs with different geometries, more terminal groups segregate into the surface of NPs with increase in the interaction energy εf-n between the terminal groups and the NPs. We also notice that the attractive interaction between the terminal groups and the sheet-like NPs induces the appearance of a gradient of translational dynamics of polymer chains, and the relaxation at the chain length scale is evidently different for various adsorbed layers, whereas the segmental relaxation only becomes slightly slower nearby the sheet-like NPs. For both pure and filled systems with spherical NPs, it is found that the stress-strain curves and bond orientations are significantly enhanced with increase in the interaction strength between the terminal groups as well as terminal groups and NPs. In the case of concentrated loading of NPs, we construct the atomistic models of C60, CNT and graphene to accurately account for the "many body effect." We explore the influence of the functionalization position along the chain backbone on the dispersion kinetics, realizing that the end-functionalization is more effective. The end-groups effect on the chain configuration, chain packing and graphene equilibrium dispersibility is examined. The translational and rotational (segmental and terminal relaxation) dynamics influenced by the interactions

  13. Influencing the structure of block copolymer micelles with small molecule additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Megan; Singh, Avantika; Cooksey, Tyler; Kidd, Bryce; Piemonte, Rachele; Wang, Shu; Mai Le, Kim; Madsen, Louis

    Amphiphilic block copolymer micelles in water are under broad exploration for drug delivery applications due to their high loading capacity and targeted drug delivery. We aim to understand the kinetic and thermodynamic processes that underlie the self-assembly of diblock copolymer micelle systems. The present work focuses on diblock copolymers containing poly(ethylene oxide) (a hydrophilic polymer) and polycaprolactone (a hydrophobic polymer), which spontaneously self-assemble into spherical micelles in water. Addition of a common good solvent (a co-solvent) for both of the constituting blocks, such as tetrahydrofuran (THF), reduces the interfacial tension at the core-corona interface. We are currently investigating the effect of this phenomenon on the micelle structural properties, using small-angle scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance. We have characterized the hydrodynamic radius, core radius, corona thickness, aggregation number, degree of swelling of the micelle core with the co-solvent, and unimer (free chain) concentration, as a function of the co-solvent concentration. Fundamental knowledge from these studies will inform design of drug delivery systems by allowing us to tailor micelle properties for optimal cargo loading.

  14. Multiple rewards from a treasure trove of novel glycoside hydrolase and polysaccharide lyase structures: new folds, mechanistic details, and evolutionary relationships.

    PubMed

    Fushinobu, Shinya; Alves, Victor D; Coutinho, Pedro M

    2013-10-01

    Recent progress in three-dimensional structure analyses of glycoside hydrolases (GHs) and polysaccharide lyases (PLs), the historically relevant enzyme classes involved in the cleavage of glycosidic bonds of carbohydrates and glycoconjugates, is reviewed. To date, about 80% and 95% of the GH and PL families, respectively, have a representative crystal structure. New structures have been determined for enzymes acting on plant cell wall polysaccharides, sphingolipids, blood group antigens, milk oligosaccharides, N-glycans, oral biofilms and dietary seaweeds. Some GH enzymes have very unique catalytic residues such as the Asp-His dyad. New methods such as high-speed atomic force microscopy and computational simulation have opened up a path to investigate both the dynamics and the detailed molecular interactions displayed by these enzymes. PMID:23816329

  15. Phase Structure and Site Preference Behavior of Ternary Alloying Additions to PdTi and PtTi Shape-Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Mosca, Hugo O.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2006-01-01

    The phasc structure and concentration dependence of the lattice parameter and energy of formation of ternary Pd-'I-X and Pt-Ti-X alloys for a large number of ternary alloying additions X (X = Na, Mg, Al, Si, Sc. V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Ag, Cd, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir) are investigated with an atomistic modeling approach. In addition, a detailed description of the site preference behavior of such additions showing that the elements can be grouped according to their absolute preference for a specific site, regardless of concentration, or preference for available sites in the deficient sublattice is provided.

  16. Structured additive regression modeling of age of menarche and menopause in a breast cancer screening program.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Elisa; de Sousa, Bruno; Cadarso-Suarez, Carmen; Rodrigues, Vitor; Kneib, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Breast cancer risk is believed to be associated with several reproductive factors, such as early menarche and late menopause. This study is based on the registries of the first time a woman enters the screening program, and presents a spatio-temporal analysis of the variables age of menarche and age of menopause along with other reproductive and socioeconomic factors. The database was provided by the Portuguese Cancer League (LPCC), a private nonprofit organization dealing with multiple issues related to oncology of which the Breast Cancer Screening Program is one of its main activities. The registry consists of 259,652 records of women who entered the screening program for the first time between 1990 and 2007 (45-69-year age group). Structured Additive Regression (STAR) models were used to explore spatial and temporal correlations with a wide range of covariates. These models are flexible enough to deal with a variety of complex datasets, allowing us to reveal possible relationships among the variables considered in this study. The analysis shows that early menarche occurs in younger women and in municipalities located in the interior of central Portugal. Women living in inland municipalities register later ages for menopause, and those born in central Portugal after 1933 show a decreasing trend in the age of menopause. Younger ages of menarche and late menopause are observed in municipalities with a higher purchasing power index. The analysis performed in this study portrays the time evolution of the age of menarche and age of menopause and their spatial characterization, adding to the identification of factors that could be of the utmost importance in future breast cancer incidence research. PMID:24615881

  17. A Pilot Study to Examine the Effect of Additional Structured Outdoor Playtime on Preschoolers' Physical Activity Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alhassan, Sofiya; Nwaokelemeh, Ogechi; Lyden, Kate; Goldsby, TaShauna; Mendoza, Albert

    2013-01-01

    The impact of additional structured outdoor playtime on preschoolers'; physical activity (PA) level is unclear. The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the effects of increasing structured outdoor playtime on preschoolers'; PA levels. Eight full-day classrooms (n = 134 children) from two preschool programmes were randomised into a treatment…

  18. Effect of addition of pore expanding agent on changes of structure characteristics of ordered mesoporous silicas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derylo-Marczewska, A.; Marczewski, A. W.; Skrzypek, I.; Pikus, S.; Kozak, M.

    2008-12-01

    A series of mesoporous silica materials were synthesized by applying two types of Pluronic copolymers as pore creating agents. Differentiation of pore structure of the obtained sorbents was attained by changing the amount of trimethylbenzene as pore expander introduced to a reacting mixture. The parameters characterizing porous structure were estimated from nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms. The changes of pore arrangement in the synthesized materials were investigated by using X-ray diffraction. The structural transformations were found at the TMB/polymer ratio of 0.8 and 1. Correlations between the values of structure parameters and the content of TMB were found.

  19. Crystal Structures of Flax Rust Avirulence Proteins AvrL567-A and -D Reveal Details of the Structural Basis for Flax Disease Resistance Specificity[W

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ching-I A.; Gunčar, Gregor; Forwood, Jade K.; Teh, Trazel; Catanzariti, Ann-Maree; Lawrence, Gregory J.; Loughlin, Fionna E.; Mackay, Joel P.; Schirra, Horst Joachim; Anderson, Peter A.; Ellis, Jeffrey G.; Dodds, Peter N.; Kobe, Boštjan

    2007-01-01

    The gene-for-gene mechanism of plant disease resistance involves direct or indirect recognition of pathogen avirulence (Avr) proteins by plant resistance (R) proteins. Flax rust (Melampsora lini) AvrL567 avirulence proteins and the corresponding flax (Linum usitatissimum) L5, L6, and L7 resistance proteins interact directly. We determined the three-dimensional structures of two members of the AvrL567 family, AvrL567-A and AvrL567-D, at 1.4- and 2.3-Å resolution, respectively. The structures of both proteins are very similar and reveal a β-sandwich fold with no close known structural homologs. The polymorphic residues in the AvrL567 family map to the surface of the protein, and polymorphisms in residues associated with recognition differences for the R proteins lead to significant changes in surface chemical properties. Analysis of single amino acid substitutions in AvrL567 proteins confirm the role of individual residues in conferring differences in recognition and suggest that the specificity results from the cumulative effects of multiple amino acid contacts. The structures also provide insights into possible pathogen-associated functions of AvrL567 proteins, with nucleic acid binding activity demonstrated in vitro. Our studies provide some of the first structural information on avirulence proteins that bind directly to the corresponding resistance proteins, allowing an examination of the molecular basis of the interaction with the resistance proteins as a step toward designing new resistance specificities. PMID:17873095

  20. Impact of zeolite-based nanomodified additive on the structure and strength of the cement stone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, A. D.; Filippova, K. E.

    2015-01-01

    Portland cement is the main binder in the building materials industry; its properties strongly influence properties of mortars and concretes. Some regions experience difficulties with delivery and storage of Portland cement, raising the need to develop an effective additive from the available raw materials. Such materials for the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) are zeolite-containing rocks. Studies have shown that introducing of dibutylphthalate to the composition of modified additive during mechanochemical activation leads to achievement of up to 11% of total amount particles with the size of 3-30 nm. After introducing 0.5% of the obtained additives, the compressive strength of cement-sand slurry samples increases up to 28%. Positive effect of additives introduction is also observed at high flow rate of water (W / C = 0.7). Gaining strength reaches 23%, allowing the efficient use of additive for movable mixtures with enhanced strength properties. In general, the proposed supplement allows reducing the water flow in the solution without decreasing its mobility, and increasing strength properties, which makes it possible to obtain a whole class of solutions of modified cement binder. The market value of the developed additives is 18 rubles per 1 kg, making sound competition in the market of modifying additives.

  1. Effects of meat addition on pasta structure, nutrition and in vitro digestibility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Hamid, Nazimah; Kantono, Kevin; Pereira, Loveena; Farouk, Mustafa M; Knowles, Scott O

    2016-12-15

    In our study, semolina flour was substituted with beef emulsion (EM) at three different levels of 15, 30 and 45% (w/w) to develop a pasta with enhanced nutritional profile. The protein, fat, and water content significantly increased with addition of meat. The addition of meat enhanced the pasta gluten network. The redness and yellowness of cooked pasta increased with meat addition. Tensile strength increased from 0.018N/mm(2) in the control sample to 0.046N/mm(2) in 45% beef emulsion (45EM) sample. All meat-containing samples had significantly higher elasticity than control (0.039N/mm(2)). GI significantly decreased and IVPD value increased in 45EM sample. Five essential amino acids (leucine, lysine, methionine, threonine, tryptophan) in pasta digesta increased significantly with increasing meat addition. PMID:27451161

  2. B2 structure of high-entropy alloys with addition of Al

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.; Zhao, M.; Li, J. C.; Jiang, Q.

    2008-12-01

    A series of AlCrCoNiFe based alloys with equal percentage of principal components (high-entropy alloys or HE alloys) is fabricated. The related crystalline structures of the alloys are measured and calculated. Results show that the formed bcc phase is a compound based B2 structure where there is partial ionic bonding between Al and other transition metals. Thus, the bcc structure of the alloys should be a B2 instead of an A2 due to the large difference in electronegativities among the components consisting of the HE alloys.

  3. 13. DETAIL VIEW OF BRIDGE, LOOKING SOUTH FROM ROADWAY. DETAIL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. DETAIL VIEW OF BRIDGE, LOOKING SOUTH FROM ROADWAY. DETAIL VIEW OF THE PIERS AND LIGHTING FIXTURES ON THE COLORADO STREET BRIDGE. THIS VIEW SHOWS A PORTION OF THE BRIDGE ALONG THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE ROADWAY. EACH FIXTURE ALSO ORIGINALLY HAD FOUR ADDITIONAL GLOBES, WHICH EXTENDED FROM THE COLUMN BELOW THE MAIN GLOBE. THE 'REFUGE' SEATING AREAS ARE ORIGINAL, WHILE THE RAILING IS A LATER ADDITION. - Colorado Street Bridge, Spanning Arroyo Seco at Colorado Boulevard, Pasadena, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. The Crystal Structure of the Ivy delta4-16:0-ACP Desaturase Reveals Structural Details of the Oxidized Active Site and Potential Determinants of Regioselectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Guy,J.; Whittle, E.; Kumaran, D.; Lindqvist, Y.; Shanklin, J.

    2007-01-01

    The multifunctional acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase from Hedera helix (English ivy) catalyzes the {Delta}{sup 4} desaturation of 16:0-ACP and the{Delta}{sup 9} desaturation of 18:0-ACP and further desaturates{Delta}{sup 9}-16:1 or {Delta}{sup 9}-18:1 to the corresponding {Delta}{sup 4,9} dienes. The crystal structure of the enzyme has been solved to 1.95{angstrom} resolution, and both the iron-iron distance of 3.2{angstrom} and the presence of a {mu}-oxo bridge reveal this to be the only reported structure of a desaturase in the oxidized FeIII-FeIII form. Significant differences are seen between the oxidized active site and the reduced active site of the Ricinus communis (castor) desaturase; His{sup 227} coordination to Fe2 is lost, and the side chain of Glu{sup 224}, which bridges the two iron ions in the reduced structure, does not interact with either iron. Although carboxylate shifts have been observed on oxidation of other diiron proteins, this is the first example of the residue moving beyond the coordination range of both iron ions. Comparison of the ivy and castor structures reveal surface amino acids close to the annulus of the substrate-binding cavity and others lining the lower portion of the cavity that are potential determinants of their distinct substrate specificities. We propose a hypothesis that differences in side chain packing explains the apparent paradox that several residues lining the lower portion of the cavity in the ivy desaturase are bulkier than their equivalents in the castor enzyme despite the necessity for the ivy enzyme to accommodate three more carbons beyond the diiron site.

  5. Details of meiosis

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 18, discusses the details of meiosis, beginning with the structure and number of chiasmata, i.e., the cytological term for two homologous chromosomes forming a bivalent which begin to repel each other until they are held together only at the point of crossing-over. The synaptonemal complex which consists of two lateral elements which contain protein and RNA is also discussed. The chapter concludes with a description of meiosis in polyploids, human meiosis, and the behavior of X and Y chromosomes. 28 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Structural Studies of Medicago truncatula Histidinol Phosphate Phosphatase from Inositol Monophosphatase Superfamily Reveal Details of Penultimate Step of Histidine Biosynthesis in Plants.

    PubMed

    Ruszkowski, Milosz; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2016-05-01

    The penultimate enzyme in the histidine biosynthetic pathway catalyzes dephosphorylation of l-histidinol 1-phosphate (HOLP) into l-histidinol. The recently discovered in Arabidopsis thaliana plant-type histidinol phosphate phosphatase (HPP) shares no homology with the two other HPP superfamilies known previously in prokaryotes and resembles myo-inositol monophosphatases (IMPases). In this work, identification of an HPP enzyme from a model legume, Medicago truncatula (MtHPP) was based on the highest sequence identity to A. thaliana enzyme. Biochemical assays confirmed that MtHPP was able to cleave inorganic phosphate from HOLP but not from d-myo-inositol-1-phosphate, the main substrate of IMPases. Dimers of MtHPP, determined by size exclusion chromatography, in the presence of CO2 or formaldehyde form mutual, methylene-bridged cross-links between Lys(158) and Cys(245) residues. Four high resolution crystal structures, namely complexes with HOLP (substrate), l-histidinol (product), and PO4 (3-) (by-product) as well as the structure showing the cross-linking between two MtHPP molecules, provide detailed structural information on the enzyme. Based on the crystal structures, the enzymatic reaction mechanism of IMPases is accustomed to fit the data for MtHPP. The enzymatic reaction, which requires Mg(2+) cations, is catalyzed mainly by amino acid residues from the N-terminal domain. The C-terminal domain, sharing little identity with IMPases, is responsible for the substrate specificity (i.e. allows the enzyme to distinguish between HOLP and d-myo-inositol-1-phosphate). Structural features, mainly the presence of a conserved Asp(246), allow MtHPP to bind HOLP specifically. PMID:26994138

  7. Theoretical Study of L-Edge Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering in La2CuO4 on the Basis of Detailed Electronic Band Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Takuji

    2015-09-01

    We study theoretically resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the Cu L3-edge in a typical parent compound of high-Tc cuprate superconductors La2CuO4 on the basis of a detailed electronic band structure. We construct a realistic and precise tight-binding model by employing the maximally-localized Wannier functions derived from a first-principles electronic structure calculation, and then take account of the Coulomb repulsion between d electrons at each Cu site. The antiferromagnetic ground state is described within the Hartree-Fock approximation, and take account of electron correlations in the intermediate states of RIXS within the random-phase approximation (RPA). Calculated RIXS spectra agree well with the experimentally observed features including low-energy magnon excitation, d-d excitations, and charge-transfer excitations, over a wide excitation-energy range. In particular, we stress the importance of photon polarization dependence: the intensity of magnon excitation and the spectral structure of d-d excitations depend significantly not only on the polarization direction of incident incoming photons but also that of outgoing photons. It is demonstrated that the single-magnon excitation intensity is maximized when the polarization directions of incoming and outgoing photons are perpendicular to each other.

  8. Detailed Debunking of Denial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enting, I. G.; Abraham, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    The disinformation campaign against climate science has been compared to a guerilla war whose tactics undermine the traditional checks and balances of science. One comprehensive approach has to been produce archives of generic responses such as the websites of RealClimate and SkepticalScience. We review our experiences with an alternative approach of detailed responses to a small number of high profile cases. Our particular examples were Professor Ian Plimer and Christopher Monckton, the Third Viscount Monckton of Brenchley, each of whom has been taken seriously by political leaders in our respective countries. We relate our experiences to comparable examples such as John Mashey's analysis of the Wegman report and the formal complaints about Lomborg's "Skeptical Environmentalist" and Durkin's "Great Global Warming Swindle". Our two approaches used contrasting approaches: an on-line video of a lecture vs an evolving compendium of misrepresentations. Additionally our approaches differed in the emphasis. The analysis of Monckton concentrated on the misrepresentation of the science, while the analysis of Plimer concentrated on departures from accepted scientific practice: fabrication of data, misrepresentation of cited sources and unattributed use of the work of others. Benefits of an evolving compendium were the ability to incorporate contributions from members of the public who had identified additional errors and the scope for addressing new aspects as they came to public attention. `Detailed debunking' gives non-specialists a reference point for distinguishing non-science when engaging in public debate.

  9. Influence of Additive and Multiplicative Structure and Direction of Comparison on the Reversal Error

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    González-Calero, José Antonio; Arnau, David; Laserna-Belenguer, Belén

    2015-01-01

    An empirical study has been carried out to evaluate the potential of word order matching and static comparison as explanatory models of reversal error. Data was collected from 214 undergraduate students who translated a set of additive and multiplicative comparisons expressed in Spanish into algebraic language. In these multiplicative comparisons…

  10. Studies on the Food Additive Propyl Gallate: Synthesis, Structural Characterization, and Evaluation of the Antioxidant Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrido, Jorge; Garrido, E. Manuela; Borges, Fernanda

    2012-01-01

    Antioxidants are additives largely used in industry for delaying, retarding, or preventing the development of oxidative deterioration. Propyl gallate (E310) is a phenolic antioxidant extensively used in the food, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries. A series of lab experiments have been developed to teach students about the importance and…

  11. Factor analysis models for structuring covariance matrices of additive genetic effects: a Bayesian implementation

    PubMed Central

    de los Campos, Gustavo; Gianola, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Multivariate linear models are increasingly important in quantitative genetics. In high dimensional specifications, factor analysis (FA) may provide an avenue for structuring (co)variance matrices, thus reducing the number of parameters needed for describing (co)dispersion. We describe how FA can be used to model genetic effects in the context of a multivariate linear mixed model. An orthogonal common factor structure is used to model genetic effects under Gaussian assumption, so that the marginal likelihood is multivariate normal with a structured genetic (co)variance matrix. Under standard prior assumptions, all fully conditional distributions have closed form, and samples from the joint posterior distribution can be obtained via Gibbs sampling. The model and the algorithm developed for its Bayesian implementation were used to describe five repeated records of milk yield in dairy cattle, and a one common FA model was compared with a standard multiple trait model. The Bayesian Information Criterion favored the FA model. PMID:17897592

  12. Detailed structural analysis of epitaxial MBE-grown Fe/Cr superlattices by x-ray diffraction and transmission-electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, M.E.; Santamaria, J.; Kim, S.; Schuller, Ivan K.; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2005-03-15

    We have performed a detailed quantitative structural analysis of epitaxial [Fe(3 nm)/Cr(1.2 nm)]{sub 20} superlattices by low- and high-angle x-ray diffraction, and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy on cross-section samples. The interface roughness was changed systematically by varying the substrate temperature (150-250 deg. C) maintaining all other growth parameters fixed. Direct imaging of the interfaces allows examining the roughness of the individual interfaces and its evolution with thickness. A statistical analysis of the local interface width for the individual layers supplies the roughness static and dynamic exponents. High-temperature samples (250 deg. C) show roughness decreasing with thickness as a result of surface-diffusion-dominated growth. Low-temperature samples (150 deg. C) show anomalous non-self-affine roughness characterized by a time-dependent local interface width.

  13. Details of the structure determination of the sulfated steroids PSDS and PADS: new components of the sea lamprey (petromyzon marinus) migratory pheromone.

    PubMed

    Hoye, Thomas R; Dvornikovs, Vadims; Fine, Jared M; Anderson, Kari R; Jeffrey, Christopher S; Muddiman, David C; Shao, Feng; Sorensen, Peter W; Wang, Jizhou

    2007-09-28

    The discovery of two new components of the migratory pheromone used by sea lamprey to guide adults to spawning grounds was recently reported. These hold promise for use in a pheromone-based control program for this species, an invasive pest in the Great Lakes. Details of the structure determination of these steroidal bis-sulfates [petromyzosterol disulfate (PSDS, 2) and petromyzonamine disulfate (PADS, 3)] are described here. Pattern matching of 1H NMR data was particularly valuable. This involved comparison of spectra of the natural samples of 2 and 3 with those of appropriate steroidal analogues [e.g., petromyzonol sulfate (PS, 1, a previously known sea lamprey bile acid derivative that is a third component of the migratory pheromone), cholesterol sulfate (6), and squalamine (8)] and model compounds containing the unprecedented aminolactam substructure present in 3. The logic underlying the iterative analyses used is presented. PMID:17718505

  14. The electronic structure and second-order nonlinear optical properties of donor-acceptor acetylenes - A detailed investigation of structure-property relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiegman, A. E.; Graham, Eva; Khundkar, Lutfur R.; Perry, Joseph W.; Cheng, L.-T.; Perry, Kelly J.

    1991-01-01

    A series of donor-acceptor acetylene compounds was synthesized in which systematic changes in both the conjugation length and the donor-acceptor strength were made. The effect of these structural changes on the spectroscopic and electronic properties of the molecules and, ultimately, on the measured second-order molecular hyperpolarizabilities (beta) was investigated. It was found that increases in the donor-acceptor strength resulted in increases in the magnitude of beta. For this class of molecules, the increase is dominated by the energy of the intramolecular charge-transfer transition, while factors such as the ground to excited-state dipole moment change and the transition-moment integral are much less important. Increasing the conjugation length from one to two acetylene linkers did not result in an increase in the value of beta; however, beta increased sharply in going from two acetylenes to three. This increase is attributed to the superposition of several nearly isoenergetic excited states.

  15. Detailed structure of the Philippine Sea plate subducting along the Nankai Trough, western Japan, inferred from high-frequency seismic wave analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furumura, T.; Padhy, S.; Maeda, T.

    2012-12-01

    A detailed structure of the subducting Philippine Sea plate (PHP) along the Nankai trough in western Japan was studied by analyzing waveforms recorded at dense Hi-net stations in Japan. It is well recognized that the waveforms from intraplate earthquakes dominate in high-frequency (f >1 Hz) signals due to the waveguide effect of the subducting slab (Furumura and Kennett, 2005; 2008). This results in distorted pattern of intensity and peak ground acceleration (PGA) above the hypocenter with a substantial elongation of isoseismic contours correlated with the configuration of the isodepth contours of the subducting PHP beneath western Japan. A detailed analysis of the dense Hi-net waveform data from the intermediate-depth PHP event shows that the high-frequency S-wave signals suddenly disappear as the waves propagate the zone away from the Kii Channel to the boundary of Hyogo and Okayama prefectures and large S-to-P conversion occurs before the arrival of S-wave. Such anomalies do not occur for shallow and deep earthquakes occurring outside the PHP. These observations support the recent debate on the complexities of the configuration of the PHP subducting beneath western Japan such as that shown by Shiomi et al. (2008) based on receiver function images and the PHP-split model beneath the Kii channel shown by Ide et al.(2010) based on the analysis of comprehensive geophysical data. In order to explain the observations associated with sudden lateral change in the PHP structure, we conducted finite difference method (FDM) simulations of seismic wave propagation taking the detailed PHP model into account. It is confirmed that high-frequency guided wave energy decouple from waveguide where the shape of the PHP is suddenly deformed, which results in dramatic attenuation of high-frequency signals associating with large S-to-P conversions developed at sharp plate boundary. The present results also support the recently proposed complicated PHP-split model, however, further

  16. The first crystal structure of a dTTP-bound deoxycytidylate deaminase validates and details the allosteric-inhibitor binding site.

    PubMed

    Marx, Ailie; Alian, Akram

    2015-01-01

    Deoxycytidylate deaminase is unique within the zinc-dependent cytidine deaminase family as being allosterically regulated, activated by dCTP, and inhibited by dTTP. Here we present the first crystal structure of a dTTP-bound deoxycytidylate deaminase from the bacteriophage S-TIM5, confirming that this inhibitor binds to the same site as the dCTP activator. The molecular details of this structure, complemented by structures apo- and dCMP-bound, provide insights into the allosteric mechanism. Although the positioning of the nucleoside moiety of dTTP is almost identical to that previously described for dCTP, protonation of N3 in deoxythymidine and not deoxycytidine would facilitate hydrogen bonding of dTTP but not dCTP and may result in a higher affinity of dTTP to the allosteric site conferring its inhibitory activity. Further the functional group on C4 (O in dTTP and NH2 in dCTP) makes interactions with nonconserved protein residues preceding the allosteric motif, and the relative strength of binding to these residues appears to correspond to the potency of dTTP inhibition. The active sites of these structures are also uniquely occupied by dTMP and dCMP resolving aspects of substrate specificity. The methyl group of dTMP apparently clashes with a highly conserved tyrosine residue, preventing the formation of a correct base stacking shown to be imperative for deamination activity. The relevance of these findings to the wider zinc-dependent cytidine deaminase family is also discussed. PMID:25404739

  17. The First Crystal Structure of a dTTP-bound Deoxycytidylate Deaminase Validates and Details the Allosteric-Inhibitor Binding Site*

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Ailie; Alian, Akram

    2015-01-01

    Deoxycytidylate deaminase is unique within the zinc-dependent cytidine deaminase family as being allosterically regulated, activated by dCTP, and inhibited by dTTP. Here we present the first crystal structure of a dTTP-bound deoxycytidylate deaminase from the bacteriophage S-TIM5, confirming that this inhibitor binds to the same site as the dCTP activator. The molecular details of this structure, complemented by structures apo- and dCMP-bound, provide insights into the allosteric mechanism. Although the positioning of the nucleoside moiety of dTTP is almost identical to that previously described for dCTP, protonation of N3 in deoxythymidine and not deoxycytidine would facilitate hydrogen bonding of dTTP but not dCTP and may result in a higher affinity of dTTP to the allosteric site conferring its inhibitory activity. Further the functional group on C4 (O in dTTP and NH2 in dCTP) makes interactions with nonconserved protein residues preceding the allosteric motif, and the relative strength of binding to these residues appears to correspond to the potency of dTTP inhibition. The active sites of these structures are also uniquely occupied by dTMP and dCMP resolving aspects of substrate specificity. The methyl group of dTMP apparently clashes with a highly conserved tyrosine residue, preventing the formation of a correct base stacking shown to be imperative for deamination activity. The relevance of these findings to the wider zinc-dependent cytidine deaminase family is also discussed. PMID:25404739

  18. Structure alterations in Al-Y-based metallic glasses with La and Ni addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X. M.; Wang, X. D.; Yu, Q.; Cao, Q. P.; Zhang, D. X.; Zhang, J.; Hu, T. D.; Lai, L. H.; Xie, H. L.; Xiao, T. Q.; Jiang, J. Z.

    2016-03-01

    The atomic structures of Al89Y11, Al90Y6.5La3.5, and Al82.8Y6.07Ni8La3.13 metallic glasses have been studied by using high energy X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption fine structure combined with the ab initio molecular dynamics and reverse Monte Carlo simulations. It is demonstrated that the partial replacement of Y atoms by La has limited improvement of the glass forming ability (GFA), although La atoms reduce the ordering around Y atoms and also the fractions of icosahedron-like polyhedra centered by Al atoms. In contrast, Ni atoms can significantly improve the GFA, which are inclined to locate in the shell of polyhedra centered by Al, Y, and La atoms, mainly forming Ni-centered icosahedron-like polyhedra to enhance the spatial connectivity between clusters and suppress the crystallization.

  19. Structure-property effects of tantalum additions to nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckel, R. W.; Pletka, B. J.; Koss, D. A.; Jackson, M. R.

    1982-01-01

    The characterization of the effect of Ta on the structure of Ni base superalloys, the determination of the effects of Ta (structure) variations on the mechanical, thermal, and oxidation behavior, and the identification of alloying elements which have potential as substitutes for Ta are investigated. Mar M247 type alloys are emphasized; nominal and analyzed compositions of ten alloys under study are given. X-ray and composition analysis are being used to determine the partitioning of alloying elements between gamma, gamma primes, and MC (cubic) as a function of Ta content. The diffusional interactions of the Mar M247-type alloys with as cast beta + gamma alloys are studied to determine the effects of Ta on alloy/coating degradation.

  20. Effect of reduction of strategic Columbium addition in 718 Alloy on the structure and properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegler, K. R.; Wallace, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    A series of alloys was developed having a base composition similar to Inconel 718, with reduced Cb levels of 3.00 and 1.10 wt% Cb. Substitutions of 3.0% W, 3.0W + 0.9V or Mo increased from 3.0% to 5.8% were made for the Cb in these alloys. Two additional alloys, one containing 3.49% Cb and 1.10% Ti and another containing 3.89% Cb and 1.29% Ti were also studied. Tensile properties at rooom and elevated temperatures, stress-rupture tests, and an analysis of extracted phases were carried out for each of the alloys. Additions of solid solution elements to a reduced Cb alloy had no significant effect on the properties of the alloys under either process condition. The solution and age alloys with substitutions of 1.27% i at 3.89% Cb had tensile properties similar top hose of the original alloy and stress-rupture properties superior to the original alloy. The improved stress-rupture properties were the result of significant precipitation of Ni3Ti-gamma prime in the alloy, which is more stable than gamma' at the elevated temperatures. At lower temperatures, the new alloy benefits from gamma' strengthening. With more precise control and proper processing, the reduced Cb direct-age alloy could substitute for Alloy 718 in high strength applications.

  1. Characterization of embedded fiber optic strain sensors into metallic structures via ultrasonic additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schomer, John J.; Hehr, Adam J.; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2016-04-01

    Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors measure deviation in a reflected wavelength of light to detect in-situ strain. These sensors are immune to electromagnetic interference, and the inclusion of multiple FBGs on the same fiber allows for a seamlessly integrated sensing network. FBGs are attractive for embedded sensing in aerospace applications due to their small noninvasive size and prospect of constant, real-time nondestructive evaluation. In this study, FBG sensors are embedded in aluminum 6061 via ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM), a rapid prototyping process that uses high power ultrasonic vibrations to weld similar and dissimilar metal foils together. UAM was chosen due to the desire to embed FBG sensors at low temperatures, a requirement that excludes other additive processes such as selective laser sintering or fusion deposition modeling. In this paper, the embedded FBGs are characterized in terms of birefringence losses, post embedding strain shifts, consolidation quality, and strain sensing performance. Sensors embedded into an ASTM test piece are compared against an exterior surface mounted foil strain gage at both room and elevated temperatures using cyclic tensile tests.

  2. Influence of additives on the structure of surfactant-free microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Marcus, J; Touraud, D; Prévost, S; Diat, O; Zemb, T; Kunz, W

    2015-12-28

    We study the addition of electrolytes to surfactant-free microemulsions in the domain where polydisperse pre-Ouzo aggregates are present. As in previous studies, the microemulsion is the ternary system water/ethanol/1-octanol, where ethanol acts as co-solvent. Addition of electrolytes modifies the static X-ray and neutron scattering, and dynamic light scattering patterns, as well as the position of the miscibility gap, where spontaneous emulsification occurs upon dilution with water. All observations can be rationalized considering that electrolytes are either "salting out" the ethanol, which is the main component of the interface stabilizing the aggregates, or producing charge separation via the antagonistic ion effect discovered by Onuki et al. Amphiphilic electrolytes, such as sodium dodecylsulfate or sodium dietheylhexylphosphate, induce a gradual transition towards monodisperse ionic micelles with their characteristic broad scattering "peak". In these micelles the ethanol plays then the role of a cosurfactant. Dynamic light scattering can only be understood by combination of fluctuations of aggregate concentration due to the vicinity of a critical point and in-out fluctuations of ethanol. PMID:26593697

  3. Modifying structure-sensitive reactions by addition of Zn to Pd

    SciTech Connect

    Childers, David J.; Schweitzer, Neil M.; Kamali Shahari, Seyed Mehdi; Rioux, Robert M.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Meyer, Randall J.

    2014-10-01

    Silica-supported Pd and PdZn nanoparticles of a similar size were evaluated for neopentane hydrogenolysis/isomerization and propane hydrogenolysis/dehydrogenation. Monometallic Pd showed high neopentane hydrogenolysis selectivity. Addition of small amounts of Zn to Pd lead Pd–Zn scatters in the EXAFS spectrum and an increase in the linear bonded CO by IR. In addition, the neopentane turnover rate decreased by nearly 10 times with little change in the selectivity. Increasing amounts of Zn lead to greater Pd–Zn interactions, higher linear-to-bridging CO ratios by IR and complete loss of neopentane conversion. Pd NPs also had high selectivity for propane hydrogenolysis and thus were poorly selective for propylene. The PdZn bimetallic catalysts, however, were able to preferentially catalyze dehydrogenation, were not active for propane hydrogenolysis, and thus were highly selective for propylene formation. The decrease in hydrogenolysis selectivity was attributed to the isolation of active Pd atoms by inactive metallic Zn,demonstrating that hydrogenolysis requires a particular reactive ensemble whereas propane dehydrogenation does not.

  4. Highly Aligned Carbon Fiber in Polymer Composite Structures via Additive Manufacturing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tekinalp, Halil L; Kunc, Vlastimil; Velez-Garcia, Gregorio M; Duty, Chad E; Love, Lonnie J; Naskar, Amit K; Blue, Craig A; Ozcan, Soydan

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing, diverging from traditional manufacturing techniques, such as casting and machining materials, can handle complex shapes with great design flexibility without the typical waste. Although this technique has been mainly used for rapid prototyping, interest is growing in using this method to directly manufacture actual parts of complex shape. To use 3D-printing additive manufacturing in wide spread applications, the technique and the feedstock materials require improvements to meet the mechanical requirements of load-bearing components. Thus, we investigated the short fiber (0.2 mm to 0.4 mm) reinforced acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene composites as a feedstock for 3D-printing in terms of their processibility, microstructuremore » and mechanical performance; and also provided comparison with traditional compression molded composites. The tensile strength and modulus of 3D-printed samples increased ~115% and ~700%, respectively. 3D-printer yielded samples with very high fiber orientation in printing direction (up to 91.5 %), whereas, compression molding process yielded samples with significantly less fiber orientation. Microstructure-mechanical property relationships revealed that although the relatively high porosity is observed in the 3D-printed composites as compared to those produced by the conventional compression molding technique, they both exhibited comparable tensile strength and modulus. This phenomena is explained based on the changes in fiber orientation, dispersion and void formation.« less

  5. Unexpected Michael Additions on the Way to 2.3,8.9-Dibenzanthanthrenes with Interesting Structural Properties.

    PubMed

    Reus, Christian; Lechner, Marc P; Schulze, Matthias; Lungerich, Dominik; Diner, Colin; Gruber, Marco; Stryker, Jeffrey M; Hampel, Frank; Jux, Norbert; Tykwinski, Rik R

    2016-06-27

    The synthesis and properties of a new polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon containing eight annulated rings and based on the anthanthrene core is described. An unexpected, nucleophile-dependent Michael addition to a dibenzanthanthrene-1,7-dione is found, giving a product with three triisopropylsilylacetylene units and a remarkable solid-state structure (as determined by X-ray crystallography). PMID:27140668

  6. Modeling the Structure of Complex Aluminosilicate Glasses: The Effect of Zinc Addition.

    PubMed

    Bernasconi, Andrea; Dapiaggi, Monica; Pavese, Alessandro; Agostini, Giovanni; Bernasconi, Maurizio; Bowron, Daniel T

    2016-03-10

    An empirical potential structure refinement of neutron and X-ray diffraction data combined with extended absorption fine structure evidence has been applied to the investigation of two distinct sets of complex aluminosilicate glasses containing different quantities of zinc. Data come from (i) neutron and X-ray total scattering experiments, which have been performed at the ISIS neutron spallation source (SANDALS beamline) and at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ID11 beamline), and (ii) EXAFS experiments which have been performed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BM23 beamline). By careful examination of the modeled ensemble of atoms, a wide range of structural information has been extracted: coordination numbers, bond distances, cluster sizes, type of oxygen sharing, and the preference of large cations to adopt a charge-compensating role. The first series of glasses, which is characterized by a fixed network modifier element content (i.e., Na), shows how the introduction of Zn at the expense of Si and Al network forming elements does not significantly alter the polymerization degree, as a result of its dominant 4-fold coordination. In the case of the second series, which is characterized by fixed network forming element content (i.e., Si and Al), it is shown how the replacement of a network modifier element (i.e., Ca) with the introduction of Zn does not change the propensity of Zn to be mainly 4-fold coordinated by promoting the network. Where appropriate the experimental results have been compared with classical theoretical approaches such as stoichiometric models based on Zachariasen's rules and computational routines. PMID:26848740

  7. Structural Controls of the MacFarlane Geothermal System, Humboldt County, Nevada: New Insights Based on Detailed Geologic Mapping, Shallow Temperature Surveys, and Magnetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraushaar, Sabina M.

    Detailed geologic mapping, structural analysis, magnetic and two-meter temperature data, integrated with previous datasets, constrain the structural controls of the MacFarlane geothermal system. MacFarlane hot springs and the travertine fissure ridges lie within a relay ramp. The relay ramp is formed between two overlapping, north-northeast-striking, west-dipping Holocene normal faults exposed in Lake Lahontan sediments. Other mapped faults near the hot spring include a north-striking, west-dipping Tertiary fault east of MacFarlane hot springs. The highest temperature gradient is found at the projected intersection between the Tertiary and north-northeast-striking Quaternary fault, ˜2.5 km northeast of the hot spring (Sibbett et al., 1982; Swanberg and Bowers, 1982). Our new data suggest other controls involving the relay ramp geometry of the Holocene faults. The anomalous orientation of the travertine fissure ridge motivated this study of the structural controls of the geothermal system. MacFarlane hot spring is located on the eastern margin of the Black Rock Desert, ˜85 km west of Winnemucca, in Humboldt County, Nevada. The active hot spring emerges from the west end of an east-trending travertine fissure ridge, which is ˜180 m long. The travertine fissure ridge is up to ˜2 m tall and ˜5 m wide, and has a central fissure along its long axis. The orientation of the travertine fissure ridge indicates local north-south extension, which is inconsistent with the regional west-northwest extension of the northwestern Basin and Range province. The anomalous travertine orientation is due to fractures that occurred during formation of a relay ramp between two overlapping fault segments.

  8. The Purification of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast ClpP complex: additional subunits and structural features

    PubMed Central

    Derrien, Benoît; Majeran, Wojciech; Effantin, Grégory; Ebenezer, Joseph; Friso, Giulia; van Wijk, Klaas J.; Steven, Alasdair C.; Maurizi, Michael R.; Vallon, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    The ClpP peptidase is a major constituent of the proteolytic machinery of bacteria and organelles. The chloroplast ClpP complex is unusual, in that it associates a large number of subunits, one of which (ClpP1) is encoded in the chloroplast, the others in the nucleus. The complexity of these large hetero-oligomeric complexes has been a major difficulty in their overproduction and biochemical characterization. In this paper, we describe the purification of native chloroplast ClpP complex from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, using a strain that carries the Strep-tag II at the C-terminus of the ClpP1 subunit. Similar to land plants, the algal complex comprises active and inactive subunits (3 ClpP and 5 ClpR, respectively). Evidence is presented that a sub-complex can be produced by dissociation, comprising ClpP1 and ClpR1, 2, 3 and 4, similar to the ClpR-ring described in land plants. Our Chlamydomonas ClpP preparation also contains two ClpT subunits, ClpT3 and ClpT4, which like the land plant ClpT1 and ClpT2 show 2 Clp-N domains. ClpTs are believed to function in substrate binding and/or assembly of the two heptameric rings. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that ClpT subunits have appeared independently in Chlorophycean algae, in land plants and in dispersed cyanobacterial genomes. Negative staining electron microscopy shows that the Chlamydomonas complex retains the barrel-like shape of homo-oligomeric ClpPs, with 4 additional peripheral masses that we speculate represent either the additional IS1 domain of ClpP1 (a feature unique to algae) or ClpTs or extensions of ClpR subunits PMID:22772861

  9. Growth and Mycorrhizal Community Structure of Pinus sylvestris Seedlings following the Addition of Forest Litter▿

    PubMed Central

    Aučina, Algis; Rudawska, Maria; Leski, Tomasz; Skridaila, Audrius; Riepšas, Edvardas; Iwanski, Michal

    2007-01-01

    We report the effects of pine and oak litter on species composition and diversity of mycorrhizal fungi colonizing 2-year-old Pinus sylvestris L. seedlings grown in a bare-root nursery in Lithuania. A layer of pine or oak litter was placed on the surface of the nursery bed soil to mimic natural litter cover. Oak litter amendment appeared to be most favorable for seedling survival, with a 73% survival rate, in contrast to the untreated mineral bed soil (44%). The concentrations of total N, P, K, Ca, and Mg were higher in oak growth medium than in pine growth medium. Relative to the control (pH 6.1), the pH was lower in pine growth medium (5.8) and higher in oak growth medium (6.3). There were also twofold and threefold increases in the C content of growth medium with the addition of pine and oak litter, respectively. Among seven mycorrhizal morphotypes, eight different mycorrhizal taxa were identified: Suillus luteus, Suillus variegatus, Wilcoxina mikolae, a Tuber sp., a Tomentella sp., Cenococcum geophilum, Amphinema byssoides, and one unidentified ectomycorrhizal symbiont. Forest litter addition affected the relative abundance of mycorrhizal symbionts more than their overall representation. This was more pronounced for pine litter than for oak litter, with 40% and 25% increases in the abundance of suilloid mycorrhizae, respectively. Our findings provide preliminary evidence that changes in the supply of organic matter through litter manipulation may have far-reaching effects on the chemistry of soil, thus influencing the growth and survival of Scots pine seedlings and their mycorrhizal communities. PMID:17575001

  10. Development of Additive Construction Technologies for Application to Development of Lunar/Martian Surface Structures Using In-Situ Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werkheiser, Niki J.; Fiske, Michael R.; Edmunson, Jennifer E.; Khoshnevis, Berokh

    2015-01-01

    For long-duration missions on other planetary bodies, the use of in situ materials will become increasingly critical. As human presence on these bodies expands, so must the breadth of the structures required to accommodate them including habitats, laboratories, berms, radiation shielding for natural radiation and surface reactors, garages, solar storm shelters, greenhouses, etc. Planetary surface structure manufacturing and assembly technologies that incorporate in situ resources provide options for autonomous, affordable, pre-positioned environments with radiation shielding features and protection from micrometeorites, exhaust plume debris, and other hazards. The ability to use in-situ materials to construct these structures will provide a benefit in the reduction of up-mass that would otherwise make long-term Moon or Mars structures cost prohibitive. The ability to fabricate structures in situ brings with it the ability to repair these structures, which allows for the self-sufficiency and sustainability necessary for long-duration habitation. Previously, under the auspices of the MSFC In-Situ Fabrication and Repair (ISFR) project and more recently, under the jointly-managed MSFC/KSC Additive Construction with Mobile Emplacement (ACME) project, the MSFC Surface Structures Group has been developing materials and construction technologies to support future planetary habitats with in-situ resources. One such additive construction technology is known as Contour Crafting. This paper presents the results to date of these efforts, including development of novel nozzle concepts for advanced layer deposition using this process. Conceived initially for rapid development of cementitious structures on Earth, it also lends itself exceptionally well to the automated fabrication of planetary surface structures using minimally processed regolith as aggregate, and binders developed from in situ materials as well. This process has been used successfully in the fabrication of

  11. A new debate for Turkish physicians: e-detailing.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Keti; Baybars, Miray; Dedeoglu, Ayla Ozhan

    2012-01-01

    The study presents an empirical analysis of the attitudes of Turkish physicians towards e-detailing practices compared to face-to-face detailing. The findings reveal that although physicians have positive attitudes toward e-detailing, on some points they are still undecided and/or have doubts. The structural model revealed that affect, convenience, and informative content influence their attitude in a positive manner, whereas the personal interaction was found to be a negative factor. Physicians' age and frequency of calls received from representatives are moderators. The present study can be seen as an addition to pharmaceutical marketing, an underresearched study field in Turkey, and e-detailing particularly. PMID:23210675

  12. Alpine re-activation of pre-Alpine structures: details from a large-scale shear zone in the Aar massif (Central Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrens, Philip; Baumberger, Roland; Herwegh, Marco

    2013-04-01

    The Aar massif belongs to the external massifs of the Alps and is mainly composed of granitoids and gneisses. Post-Variscan granitoid rocks have intruded old gneisses belonging to the pre-Variscan basement. Despite numerous detailed studies in the past decades, the overall exhumation history and the associated massif internal deformation (internal strain distribution and its evolution in time, kinematics etc.) are largely unknown at present. In this project, we aim to investigate the role of shear zones in the deformation history at a variety of scales. In this context it is important to understand their microstructural evolution, the involved deformation processes, kinematics and relative ages as well as the associated changes in rheology. A detailed study was conducted along a major shear zone located at the southern margin of the Aar massif (running from Furka to Grimsel Pass and Oberaar Glacier), where the Grimsel Granodiorite (GrGr) is juxtapositioned to strongly foliated gneisses. Preliminary results show that a crenulation of these gneisses predates the age of the granitoid intrusion, meaning they must be older than 298 Ma. The crenulation and a related axial plane foliation (145/80°) define mechanical anisotropies within these Pre-Variscan rocks. The intruding granite has exploited these anisotropies a first time during its emplacement in post-Variscan times. The lithological boundary between the intruded GrGr and Pre-Variscan rocks causes strain again to localize during Alpine deformation and results in a 40 m wide large-scale shear zone. The older part of the shear zone shows cm-scale shear zones with vertical lineations shearing off the aforementioned pre-Alpine axial plane foliation. Hence the contact is reactivated, now as Alpine normal/ reverse fault, a second time. Towards the youngest parts of the shear zone the stretching lineation on the shear surfaces turns from vertical towards a subhorizontal position, indicating a change from initial vertical

  13. Numerical simulation of the fatigue behavior of additive manufactured titanium porous lattice structures.

    PubMed

    Zargarian, A; Esfahanian, M; Kadkhodapour, J; Ziaei-Rad, S

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the effects of cell geometry and relative density on the high-cycle fatigue behavior of Titanium scaffolds produced by selective laser melting and electron beam melting techniques were numerically investigated by finite element analysis. The regular titanium lattice samples with three different unit cell geometries, namely, diamond, rhombic dodecahedron and truncated cuboctahedron, and the relative density range of 0.1-0.3 were analyzed under uniaxial cyclic compressive loading. A failure event based algorithm was employed to simulate fatigue failure in the cellular material. Stress-life approach was used to model fatigue failure of both bulk (struts) and cellular material. The predicted fatigue life and the damage pattern of all three structures were found to be in good agreement with the experimental fatigue investigations published in the literature. The results also showed that the relationship between fatigue strength and cycles to failure obeyed the power law. The coefficient of power function was shown to depend on relative density, geometry and fatigue properties of the bulk material while the exponent was only dependent on the fatigue behavior of the bulk material. The results also indicated the failure surface at an angle of 45° to the loading direction. PMID:26706539

  14. LASER Additive Manufacturing of Titanium-Tantalum Alloy Structured Interfaces for Modular Orthopedic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuerst, Jacob; Medlin, Dana; Carter, Michael; Sears, James; Vander Voort, George

    2015-04-01

    Tantalum is recognized to have better biocompatibility and osseointegrative properties than other more commonly used orthopedic grade alloys. There are several novel methods that tantalum or tantalum-titanium could be used to augment orthopedic implants. A tantalum or tantalum-titanium alloy at the bone/implant or modular component interfaces would substantially increase the longevity and performance of modular devices. Bonding a functional tantalum coating to a titanium orthopedic device is inherently difficult because of the small difference between the melting temperature of tantalum, 3017°C, and the boiling point of titanium, 3287°C. LASER powder deposition (LPD) is a fusion operation using an Nd:YAG to melt a small volume of substrate into which metal powder is sprayed achieving high temperature with a high solidification rate. LPD of Ti-Ta onto a Ti-6Al-4V substrate produced both a solid surface and structured coating with a pore size in the optimal 350-500 μm range.

  15. Effects of Boron Addition to the Atomic Structure and Soft Magnetic Properties of FeCoB Films

    SciTech Connect

    Yang,A.; Imrane, H.; Lou, J.; Kirkland, J.; Vittoria, C.; Sun, N.; Harris, V.

    2008-01-01

    The magnetic, microwave, and the atomic structure properties of (Fe0.7Co0.3)1?xBx sputtered films on glass substrates were investigated. The addition of boron induced a decrease in coercivity and ferromagnetic resonance linewidth. The amorphous structure was formed at x ? 0.075. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of Fe and Co showed the reduced Fourier transform (FT) amplitude, and increased Debye-Waller factors as x was increased, indicating the increased disorder due to the thermal and structural displacements. Possible Fe-B bonding was observed with a reduced bond length, which indicates boron atoms' preference for staying in the interstitial sites in bcc unit cell.

  16. Effects of boron addition to the atomic structure and soft magnetic properties of FeCoB films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Aria; Imrane, Hassan; Lou, Jing; Kirkland, Johnny; Vittoria, Carmine; Sun, Nian; Harris, Vincent G.

    2008-04-01

    The magnetic, microwave, and the atomic structure properties of (Fe0.7Co0.3)1-xBx sputtered films on glass substrates were investigated. The addition of boron induced a decrease in coercivity and ferromagnetic resonance linewidth. The amorphous structure was formed at x ˜0.075. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of Fe and Co showed the reduced Fourier transform (FT) amplitude, and increased Debye-Waller factors as x was increased, indicating the increased disorder due to the thermal and structural displacements. Possible Fe-B bonding was observed with a reduced bond length, which indicates boron atoms' preference for staying in the interstitial sites in bcc unit cell.

  17. Feasibility Study on 3-D Printing of Metallic Structural Materials with Robotized Laser-Based Metal Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yaoyu; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2016-05-01

    Metallic structural materials continue to open new avenues in achieving exotic mechanical properties that are naturally unavailable. They hold great potential in developing novel products in diverse industries such as the automotive, aerospace, biomedical, oil and gas, and defense. Currently, the use of metallic structural materials in industry is still limited because of difficulties in their manufacturing. This article studied the feasibility of printing metallic structural materials with robotized laser-based metal additive manufacturing (RLMAM). In this study, two metallic structural materials characterized by an enlarged positive Poisson's ratio and a negative Poisson's ratio were designed and simulated, respectively. An RLMAM system developed at the Research Center for Advanced Manufacturing of Southern Methodist University was used to print them. The results of the tensile tests indicated that the printed samples successfully achieved the corresponding mechanical properties.

  18. Feasibility Study on 3-D Printing of Metallic Structural Materials with Robotized Laser-Based Metal Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yaoyu; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2016-07-01

    Metallic structural materials continue to open new avenues in achieving exotic mechanical properties that are naturally unavailable. They hold great potential in developing novel products in diverse industries such as the automotive, aerospace, biomedical, oil and gas, and defense. Currently, the use of metallic structural materials in industry is still limited because of difficulties in their manufacturing. This article studied the feasibility of printing metallic structural materials with robotized laser-based metal additive manufacturing (RLMAM). In this study, two metallic structural materials characterized by an enlarged positive Poisson's ratio and a negative Poisson's ratio were designed and simulated, respectively. An RLMAM system developed at the Research Center for Advanced Manufacturing of Southern Methodist University was used to print them. The results of the tensile tests indicated that the printed samples successfully achieved the corresponding mechanical properties.

  19. Detailed magnetic and structural analysis mapping a robust magnetic C4 dome in Sr1 -xNaxFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddei, K. M.; Allred, J. M.; Bugaris, D. E.; Lapidus, S.; Krogstad, M. J.; Stadel, R.; Claus, H.; Chung, D. Y.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Rosenkranz, S.; Osborn, R.; Chmaissem, O.

    2016-04-01

    The recently discovered C4 tetragonal magnetic phase in hole-doped members of the iron-based superconductors provides insights into the origin of unconventional superconductivity. Previously observed in Ba1-xNaxFe2As2 (with A = K, Na), the C4 magnetic phase exists within the well-studied C2 spin-density-wave dome, arising just before the complete suppression of antiferromagnetic order but after the onset of superconductivity. Here, we present detailed x-ray and neutron diffraction studies of Sr1-xNaxFe2As2 (0.10 ≤x ≤0.60 ) to determine their structural evolution and the extent of the C4 phase. Spanning Δ x ˜0.14 in composition, the C4 phase is found to extend over a larger range of compositions, and to exhibit a significantly higher transition temperature, Tr˜65 K, than in either of the other systems in which it has been observed. The onset of this phase is seen near a composition (x ˜0.30 ) where the bonding angles of the Fe2As2 layers approach the perfect 109 .46∘ tetrahedral angle. We discuss the possible role of this return to a higher symmetry environment for the magnetic iron site in triggering the magnetic reorientation and the coupled reentrance to the tetragonal structure. Finally, we present a phase diagram, complete with the C4 phase, and use its observation in a third hole-doped 122 system to suggest the universality of this phase.

  20. A detailed staging scheme for late larval development in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus focused on readily-visible juvenile structures within the rudiment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, has long been the focus of developmental and ecological studies, and its recently-sequenced genome has spawned a diversity of functional genomics approaches. S. purpuratus has an indirect developmental mode with a pluteus larva that transforms after 1–3 months in the plankton into a juvenile urchin. Compared to insects and frogs, mechanisms underlying the correspondingly dramatic metamorphosis in sea urchins remain poorly understood. In order to take advantage of modern techniques to further our understanding of juvenile morphogenesis, organ formation, metamorphosis and the evolution of the pentameral sea urchin body plan, it is critical to assess developmental progression and rate during the late larval phase. This requires a staging scheme that describes developmental landmarks that can quickly and consistently be used to identify the stage of individual living larvae, and can be tracked during the final two weeks of larval development, as the juvenile is forming. Results Notable structures that are easily observable in developing urchin larvae are the developing spines, test and tube feet within the juvenile rudiment that constitute much of the oral portion of the adult body plan. Here we present a detailed staging scheme of rudiment development in the purple urchin using soft structures of the rudiment and the primordia of these juvenile skeletal elements. We provide evidence that this scheme is robust and applicable across a range of temperature and feeding regimes. Conclusions Our proposed staging scheme provides both a useful method to study late larval development in the purple urchin, and a framework for developing similar staging schemes across echinoderms. Such efforts will have a high impact on evolutionary developmental studies and larval ecology, and facilitate research on this important deuterostome group. PMID:24886415

  1. SHOULD THE REORGANIZATION OF ADDICTION-RELATED RESEARCH ACROSS ALL THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH BE STRUCTURAL?—THE DEVIL IS TRULY IN THE DETAILS

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Bankole A.; Messing, Robert O.; Charness, Michael E.; Crabbe, John C.; Goldman, Mark S.; Harris, R. Adron; Kranzler, Henry R.; Mitchell, Mack C.; Nixon, Sara Jo; Riley, Edward P.; Schuckit, Marc A.; Sher, Kenneth J.; Thomas, Jennifer D.

    2011-01-01

    The recent proposal to dissolve the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and National Institute on Drug Abuse and create a new institute for substance use, abuse, and addiction will require significant effort by the staff of both institutes, the Advisory Councils, and outside experts to overcome complex challenges that could threaten its success. Although integration of the grants portfolios can be achieved, harmonization of goals and policies related to legal use of alcohol versus illegal consumption of drugs will present serious challenges. Consolidating the infrastructure of the two existing institutes would entail avoiding encroachment on grant funding. A new institute for substance use, abuse, and addiction would require an enormous amount of cooperation from other institutes since the portfolios of research on alcohol, tobacco, and other drug abuse should logically be transferred to the new institute. In the near term, a structural reorganization would be less efficient and more costly than the individual institutes are currently. Increasing efficiency and reducing costs over time will necessitate careful strategic planning. Success in this difficult task would be made easier and less costly by first implementing carefully placed building blocks of increasing functional reorganization. The newly created institute should increase opportunities for specialization within disorders of addiction, attract new leadership, and build a novel strategic plan that will energize scientists and staff and incorporate ideas of stakeholders to advance the public good in preventing and treating alcohol, tobacco, and all addictions. Attention must be paid to the devil in the details. PMID:21443646

  2. Detailed structure and tectonics of the Ninetyeast Ridge near Site ODP 758 (on new geophysical data from KNOX06RR cruise of R/V Roger Revelle)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levchenko, O.; Eisin, A. E.; Ivanenko, A. N.; Marinova, J. G.; Paul, C. F.; Sborshchikov, I. M.; Sager, W. W.

    2008-12-01

    Detailed geophysical survey was carried out during the NSF-funded KNOX06RR cruise of R/V Roger Revelle in July 2007 over the ~70×70 km area near ODP Site 758, the northern Ninetyeast Ridge (NER). In addition to multibeam echo-sounder bathymetry, 3.5 kHz echo-sounder profiles, magnetic, and gravity data, high-resolution multichannel seismic reflection data were collected on eight orthogonal profiles of total length ~270 km. Large NE-trending depressions with complicated horst and graben morphology dominate the whole detailed survey area. The numerous basement faults extend upward into overlying sediments filling out these depressions. Thickness of the sedimentary fill is highly variable due to very rough basement topography, and is up to 800 m maximum. This fill is divided in two clear sedimentary layers: transparent pelagic sediments above and stratified shallow-water ones below. Two high ~400-450 m isometric seamounts extend from the surrounding NER seafloor. High-resolution seismic records show that these igneous basement highs are covered by thin transparent pelagic sediments which hamper the dredging of volcanic rocks. Seismic stratigraphy analyses for sedimentary cover over the seamounts buried slopes suggest that they seem to be recent volcanoes superimposed on the main NER edifice. Both volcanoes are clearly delineated in the constructed map of total anomaly magnetic field. Since water depths are ~2.5 km above these seamounts, the lower edge of the magnetic body in these volcanoes is situated deep at ~7 km under sea level. That appears to represent deep roots of the volcanoes. Preliminary magnetic modeling shows that they were generated during negative chron of the geomagnetic scale rather not long ago and not far from their present location, seeming to confirm the inference that these volcanoes are recent in origin. In general, one may assume a secondary phase of magmatic activity on the NER. It is important to reveal, any recent phase of tectonic and

  3. Effect of Nano-Particle Addition on Grain Structure Evolution of Friction Stir-Processed Al 6061 During Postweld Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Junfeng; Lee, Bing Yang; Du, Zhenglin; Bi, Guijun; Tan, Ming Jen; Wei, Jun

    2016-06-01

    The fabrication of nano-composites is challenging because uniform dispersion of nano-sized reinforcements in metallic substrate is difficult to achieve using powder metallurgy or liquid processing methods. In the present study, Al-based nano-composites reinforced with Al2O3 particles have been successfully fabricated using friction stir processing. The effects of nano-Al2O3 particle addition on grain structure evolution of friction stir-processed Al matrix during post-weld annealing were investigated. It was revealed that the pinning effect of Al2O3 particles retarded grain growth and completely prevented abnormal grain growth during postweld annealing at 470°C. However, abnormal grain growth can still occur when the composite material was annealed at 530°C. The mechanism involved in the grain structure evolution and the effect of nano-sized particle addition on the mechanical properties were discussed therein.

  4. The effect of additional design parameters on the LQR based design of a control/structural system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bainum, Peter M.; Xu, Jianke

    1990-01-01

    A multiobjective cost function that includes a form of the standard LQR regulator cost and its partial variation with respect to the additional design parameters is presented in connection with the design of an orbiting control/structural system. Simple models of uniform solid and tubular beams are demonstrated with two typical additional payload masses, i.e., symmetrically distributed and asymmetrically distributed, with respect to the center of the beam. By regarding the transient response of pitch angle and free-free beam deformations in the orbital plane, the optimal outer diameter of the beam and all feedback control can be determined by numerical analysis with this multicriterial approach. It is concluded that the multicriteria design approach should give better results from both the structural designer's and the control designer's standpoints.

  5. Routing Corners of Building Structures - by the Method of Vector Addition - Measured with RTN GNSS Surveying Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzyżek, Robert

    2015-12-01

    The paper deals with the problem of surveying buildings in the RTN GNSS mode using modernized indirect methods of measurement. As a result of the classical realtime measurements using indirect methods (intersection of straight lines or a point on a straight line), we obtain a building structure (a building) which is largely deformed. This distortion is due to the inconsistency of the actual dimensions of the building (tie distances) relative to the obtained measurement results. In order to eliminate these discrepancies, and thus to ensure full consistency of the building geometric structure, an innovative solution was applied - the method of vector addition - to modify the linear values (tie distances) of the external face of the building walls. A separate research problem tackled in the article, although not yet fully solved, is the issue of coordinates of corners of a building obtained after the application of the method of vector addition.

  6. Geological Features and Crustal Structure of the Cretaceous Middle Benue Trough, Nigeria: Insights from Detailed Analysis and Modelling of Magnetic and Gravity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anudu, G. K.; Stephenson, R.; Macdonald, D.

    2015-12-01

    The middle Benue Trough is the middle (central) segment of the Nigerian Benue Trough, an intra-continental rift that developed during the second phase of rifting of the Gondwana supercontinent that resulted in the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Guinea and separation of South America from Africa in the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous. Airborne magnetic and terrestrial gravity data from the area have been analysed and modelled in detail. Results obtained using a variety of edge enhancement (derivative) methods applied to high-resolution, airborne magnetic data reveal widespread magmatic intrusions (mainly volcanic/sub-volcanic rocks, with an areal extent greater than 12000 km2) and numerous geological structures. Rose (azimuth frequency) plots show that the geological structural trends are predominantly NE - SW, NW - SE and ESE - WNW with minor ENE -WSW/N - S trends and thus suggest that the area has undergone several phases of tectonic deformation at different geological times. Integrated two-dimensional (2-D) gravity and magnetic modelling along five profiles constrained by 2-D magnetic depth-to-source estimates and available seismological velocity models indicates the presence of a number of distinct crustal bodies and thin crust. Moho depth varies from ca. 21 - 29 km, while the crustal thickness ranges between ca. 19 and 29 km. Shallower Moho and thinner crust are observed along the trough axis. Results from the study also reveal that the amount of crustal thinning and crustal stretching factor (β) across the area varies from 3.3 - 14.5 km and 1.11 - 1.78, respectively. Broad positive to near positive Bouguer gravity anomalies in the region of the trough axis are due to the combined effects of dense (intermediate to basic) magmatic intrusions (both intra-sedimentary and intra-basement/crustal ones), shallow basement horsts (basement uplift zones) and thin crust replaced by dense abnormal upper mantle bodies. Reactivated intra-basement structures

  7. Fault structure and detailed evolution of a slow spreading ridge segment: the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 29°N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searle, R. C.; Cowie, P. A.; Mitchell, N. C.; Allerton, S.; MacLeod, C. J.; Escartin, J.; Russell, S. M.; Slootweg, P. A.; Tanaka, T.

    1998-01-01

    We present preliminary results of a detailed near-bottom study of the morphology and tectonics of the 29°N "Broken Spur" segment on the slow spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge, using principally the TOBI deep-towed instrument. The survey covered two-thirds of the segment length, including all of its southern non-transform boundary, and extended off-axis of 40 km (3.3 Ma) on either side. We obtained nearly complete near-bottom sidescan sonar coverage and deep-towed three-component magnetic observations along 2-km-spaced E-W tracks. Sidescan data reveal new details of fault structure and evolution. Faults grow by along-axis linkage. In the inside corner, they also link in the axis-normal direction by curving to meet the next outer (older) fault; this leads to wider-spaced faults compared to segment centre or outside corner. Outward facing faults exist but are rare. The non-transform offset is characterised by faults that are highly oblique, not parallel, to the spreading direction, and show cross-cutting relations with ridge-parallel faults to the north, suggesting along-axis migration of the offset. Almost all volcanic activity occurs within 5 km of the axis. Most fault growth is complete within 15 km of the axis (1.2 Ma), though large scarps continue to be degraded by mass-wasting beyond there. Crustal magnetisation is strongly three-dimensional. The current neovolcanic zone is slightly oblique to earlier reversal boundaries, and its magnetisation rises to a maximum of 30 A m -1 near its southern tip. The central magnetisation high tapers southwards and is asymmetric, with a sharp western but gradual eastern boundary. We infer a highly asymmetric accretion of layer 2 near the segment end. Older magnetic anomalies are kinked and sometimes missing. We interpret these observations as evidence of a rapid, 18 km southward migration of the segment boundary during the past 1.8 Ma, and present a series of reconstructions illustrating this tectonic history.

  8. Fault structure and detailed evolution of a slow spreading ridge segment: the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 29°N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.; Slootweg, P. A.; Russell, S. M.; Escartin, J.; MacLeod, C. J.; Allerton, S.; Mitchell, N. C.; Cowie, P. A.; Searle, R. C.

    1998-01-01

    We present preliminary results of a detailed near-bottom study of the morphology and tectonics of the 29°N ``Broken Spur'' segment on the slow spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge, using principally the TOBI deep-towed instrument. The survey covered two-thirds of the segment length, including all of its southern non-transform boundary, and extended off-axis of 40 km (3.3 Ma) on either side. We obtained nearly complete near-bottom sidescan sonar coverage and deep-towed three-component magnetic observations along 2-km-spaced E-W tracks. Sidescan data reveal new details of fault structure and evolution. Faults grow by along-axis linkage. In the inside corner, they also link in the axis-normal direction by curving to meet the next outer (older) fault; this leads to wider-spaced faults compared to segment centre or outside corner. Outward facing faults exist but are rare. The non-transform offset is characterised by faults that are highly oblique, not parallel, to the spreading direction, and show cross-cutting relations with ridge-parallel faults to the north, suggesting along-axis migration of the offset. Almost all volcanic activity occurs within 5 km of the axis. Most fault growth is complete within 15 km of the axis (1.2 Ma), though large scarps continue to be degraded by mass-wasting beyond there. Crustal magnetisation is strongly three-dimensional. The current neovolcanic zone is slightly oblique to earlier reversal boundaries, and its magnetisation rises to a maximum of 30 A m-1 near its southern tip. The central magnetisation high tapers southwards and is asymmetric, with a sharp western but gradual eastern boundary. We infer a highly asymmetric accretion of layer 2 near the segment end. Older magnetic anomalies are kinked and sometimes missing. We interpret these observations as evidence of a rapid, 18 km southward migration of the segment boundary during the past 1.8 Ma, and present a series of reconstructions illustrating this tectonic history.

  9. Supramolecular polymerisation in water; elucidating the role of hydrophobic and hydrogen-bond interactions† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, characterization by IR and UV spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering, video files of optical microscopy imaging. See DOI: 10.1039/c5sm02843d Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Leenders, Christianus M. A.; Baker, Matthew B.; Pijpers, Imke A. B.; Lafleur, René P. M.; Albertazzi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the self-assembly of small molecules in water is crucial for the development of responsive, biocompatible soft materials. Here, a family of benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide (BTA) derivatives that comprise a BTA moiety connected to an amphiphilic chain is synthesised with the aim to elucidate the role of hydrophobic and hydrogen-bonding interactions in the self-assembly of these BTAs. The amphiphilic chain consists of an alkyl chain with a length of 10, 11, or 12 methylene units, connected to a tetraethylene glycol (at the periphery). The results show that an undecyl spacer is the minimum length required for these BTAs to self-assemble into supramolecular polymers. Interestingly, exchange studies reveal only minor differences in exchange rates between BTAs containing undecyl or dodecyl spacers. Additionally, IR spectroscopy provides the first experimental evidence that hydrogen-bonding is operative and contributes to the stabilisation of the supramolecular polymers in water. PMID:26892482

  10. Exploring details about structure requirements based on novel CGRP receptor antagonists urethanamide, aspartate, succinate and pyridine derivatives by in silico methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; He, Haoran; Wang, Jinghui; Han, Chunxiao; Feng, Jiaqi; Zhang, Shuwei; Yang, Ling

    2014-09-01

    The migraine never fails to afflict individuals in the world that knows no lack of such cases. CGRP (calcitonin gene-related peptide) is found closely related to migraine and olcegepant (BIBN4096) is effective in alleviating the pain. In our work, the combination of ligand- and receptor-based three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) studies along with molecular docking was applied to provide us insights about how urethanamide, pyridine and aspartate and succinate derivatives (novel CGRP receptor antagonists) play a part in inhibiting the activity of CGRP receptor. The optimal CoMSIA model shows the Q2 of 0.505, R2ncv of 0.992 and its accurate predictive ability was confirmed by checking out an independent test set which gave R2pred value of 0.885. Besides, the 3D contour maps help us identify how different groups affect the antagonist activity while connecting to some key positions. In addition, the docking analysis shows the binding site emerging as the distorted “V” shape and including two binding pockets: one of them is hydrophobic, fixing the structural part 3 of compound 80, the other anchors the part 1 of compound 80. The docking analysis also shows the interaction mechanism between compound 80 and CGRP receptor, similar to the interaction between olcegepant and CGRP receptor. The findings derived from this work reveal the mechanism of related antagonists and facilitate the future rational design of novel antagonists with higher potency.

  11. Detailed relationship between local structure, polarons, and magnetizationfor La1-xCaxMnO3 (0.21≤x≤0.45)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, F.; Downward, L.; Neumeier, J. J.; Tyson, T. A.

    2010-05-01

    We present detailed local structure measurements (using the extended x-ray absorption fine structure technique) for the colossal magnetoresistive material La1-xCaxMnO3 (0.21

  12. A Detailed 3D Seismic Velocity Structure of the Subducting Pacific Slab Beneath Hokkaido, Tohoku and Kanto, Japan, by Double-Difference Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Y.; Nakajima, J.; Kita, S.; Okada, T.; Matsuzawa, T.; Hasegawa, A.

    2007-12-01

    Three-dimensional heterogeneous structure beneath northeastern (NE) Japan has been investigated by previous studies and an inclined seismic low-velocity zone is imaged in the mantle wedge sub-parallel to the down-dip direction of the subducting slab (Zhao et al., 1992, Nakajima et al., 2001). However, the heterogeneous structure within the slab has not been well studied even though it is very important to understand the whole process of water transportation from the slab to the surface. Here we show a detailed 3D seismic velocity structure within the subducted Pacific slab around Japan and propose a water-transportation path from the slab to the mantle wedge. In this study, we estimated 3D velocity structure within the Pacific slab by the double-difference tomography (Zhang and Thurber, 2003). We divided the study area, from Hokkaido to Kanto, into 6 areas due to the limitation of memory and computation time. In each area, arrival-time data of 7,500-17,000 events recorded at 70-170 stations were used in the analysis. The total number of absolute travel-time data was about 140,000-312,000 for P wave and 123,000-268,000 for S wave, and differential data were about 736,000-1,920,000 for P wave and 644,000-1,488,000 for S wave. Horizontal and vertical grid separations are 10-25 km and 6.5 km, respectively. RMS residuals of travel times for P wave decreased from 0.23s to 0.09s and for S wave from 0.35s to 0.13s. The obtained results are as follows: (1) a remarkable low-Vs zone exists in the uppermost part of the subducting slab, (2) it extends down to a depth of about 80 km, (3) the termination of this low-Vs zone almost corresponds to the "seismic belt" recently detected in the upper plane of the double seismic zone (Kita et al.,2006; Hasegawa et al., 2007), (4) at depths deeper than 80 km, a low-Vs and high-Vp/Vs zone is apparently distributed in the mantle wedge, immediately above the slab crust. We consider that these features reflect water-transportation processes

  13. Aerosol based direct-write micro-additive fabrication method for sub-mm 3D metal-dielectric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Taibur; Renaud, Luke; Heo, Deuk; Renn, Michael; Panat, Rahul

    2015-10-01

    The fabrication of 3D metal-dielectric structures at sub-mm length scale is highly important in order to realize low-loss passives and GHz wavelength antennas with applications in wearable and Internet-of-Things (IoT) devices. The inherent 2D nature of lithographic processes severely limits the available manufacturing routes to fabricate 3D structures. Further, the lithographic processes are subtractive and require the use of environmentally harmful chemicals. In this letter, we demonstrate an additive manufacturing method to fabricate 3D metal-dielectric structures at sub-mm length scale. A UV curable dielectric is dispensed from an Aerosol Jet system at 10-100 µm length scale and instantaneously cured to build complex 3D shapes at a length scale  <1 mm. A metal nanoparticle ink is then dispensed over the 3D dielectric using a combination of jetting action and tilted dispense head, also using the Aerosol Jet technique and at a length scale 10-100 µm, followed by the nanoparticle sintering. Simulation studies are carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of using such structures as mm-wave antennas. The manufacturing method described in this letter opens up the possibility of fabricating an entirely new class of custom-shaped 3D structures at a sub-mm length scale with potential applications in 3D antennas and passives.

  14. Atomistic Simulations and Experimental Analysis of the Effect of Ti Additions on the Structure of NiAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Noebe, Ronald D.; Ferrante, John; Garg, Anita; Amador, Carlos

    1997-01-01

    The Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) semiempirical method for alloy energetics is applied to the study of ternary additions to NiAl alloys. A detailed description of the method and its application to alloy design is given. Two different approaches are used in the analysis of the effect of Ti additions to NiAl. First, a thorough analytical study is performed, where the energy of formation, lattice parameter and bulk modulus are calculated for hundreds of possible atomic distributions of Ni, Al and Ti. Substitutional site preference schemes and formation of precipitates are thus predicted and analyzed. The second approach used consists of the determination of temperature effects on the final results, as obtained by performing a number of large scale numerical simulations using the Monte Carlo - Metropolis procedure and BFS for the calculation of the energy at every step in the simulation. The results indicate a sharp preference of Ti for Al sites in Ni-rich NiAl alloys and the formation of ternary Heusler precipitates beyond the predicted solubility limit of 5 at. % Ti. Experimental analysis of three NiAl+Ti alloys confirms the theoretical predictions.

  15. A study of internal structure in components made by additive manufacturing process using 3 D X-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raguvarun, K.; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Rajagopal, Prabhu; Palanisamy, Suresh; Nagarajah, Romesh; Hoye, Nicholas; Curiri, Dominic; Kapoor, Ajay

    2015-03-01

    Additive manufacturing methods are gaining increasing popularity for rapidly and efficiently manufacturing parts and components in the industrial context, as well as for domestic applications. However, except when used for prototyping or rapid visualization of components, industries are concerned with the load carrying capacity and strength achievable by additive manufactured parts. In this paper, the wire-arc additive manufacturing (AM) process based on gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) has been examined for the internal structure and constitution of components generated by the process. High-resolution 3D X-ray tomography is used to gain cut-views through wedge-shaped parts created using this GTAW additive manufacturing process with titanium alloy materials. In this work, two different control conditions for the GTAW process are considered. The studies reveal clusters of porosities, located in periodic spatial intervals along the sample cross-section. Such internal defects can have a detrimental effect on the strength of the resulting AM components, as shown in destructive testing studies. Closer examination of this phenomenon shows that defect clusters are preferentially located at GTAW traversal path intervals. These results highlight the strong need for enhanced control of process parameters in ensuring components with minimal defects and higher strength.

  16. A study of internal structure in components made by additive manufacturing process using 3 D X-ray tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Raguvarun, K. Balasubramaniam, Krishnan Rajagopal, Prabhu; Palanisamy, Suresh; Nagarajah, Romesh; Kapoor, Ajay; Hoye, Nicholas; Curiri, Dominic

    2015-03-31

    Additive manufacturing methods are gaining increasing popularity for rapidly and efficiently manufacturing parts and components in the industrial context, as well as for domestic applications. However, except when used for prototyping or rapid visualization of components, industries are concerned with the load carrying capacity and strength achievable by additive manufactured parts. In this paper, the wire-arc additive manufacturing (AM) process based on gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) has been examined for the internal structure and constitution of components generated by the process. High-resolution 3D X-ray tomography is used to gain cut-views through wedge-shaped parts created using this GTAW additive manufacturing process with titanium alloy materials. In this work, two different control conditions for the GTAW process are considered. The studies reveal clusters of porosities, located in periodic spatial intervals along the sample cross-section. Such internal defects can have a detrimental effect on the strength of the resulting AM components, as shown in destructive testing studies. Closer examination of this phenomenon shows that defect clusters are preferentially located at GTAW traversal path intervals. These results highlight the strong need for enhanced control of process parameters in ensuring components with minimal defects and higher strength.

  17. Influence of the NaCl/LiF additives on structure, phasetransitions and dielectric properties of BSPT ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubko, N. V.; Kaleva, G. M.; Mosunov, A. V.; Politova, E. D.; Segalla, A. H.

    2016-04-01

    Influence of the NaCl/LiF additives (with ratio 60:40) on structure parameters, phase transitions and dielectric properties of solid solutions close to the Morphotropic Phase Boundary in the system (1-x)BiScO3 - xPbTiO3 (x=0.635, 0.645) has been studied. Using as initial the BSPT powders prepared from nitrate solutions, dense single phase ceramic samples doped by 5, 10 and 15 w. % of NaCl/LiF have been prepared at 1313 - 1323 K (2 h). Shift of the BSPT compositions phase content from initial mixtures of Rhombohedral and Tetragonal phases to the region of Tetragonal phase was stimulated by addition of the NaCl/LiF additives. This effect is accompanied by decrease of the unit sell volume, increase in the c/a ratio and increase in the Curie temperature value from 668 to 730 K for x=0.635 and from 672 to 724 K for x=0.645 in compositions doped by 10 w. % of the NaCl/LiF additive.

  18. Structural consequences of two methyl additions in the E. coli trp repressor L-tryptophan binding pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, C.L.

    1995-12-01

    The flexibility and specificity of the L-tryptophan corepressor binding pocket of E coli trp repressor are being investigated by high-resolution crystallographic examination of aporepressor/corepressor analog complexes. While addition of a methyl group on the corepressor indole (5-methyl-tryptophan) results in a small but measurable shift in the position of that functional group introduction of a methyl group on a nearby residue in the binding pocket (Val 58 {yields} Ile) leaves the indole position of L-tryptophan essentially unchanged. Careful alignment of these structures with aporepressor/L-tryptophan/operator-DNA complexes reveal why 5-methyltryptophan is a better corepressor than L-tryptophan.

  19. Structure-property relationships in addition polyimides. 1: Resins from four-ring aromatic diamines containing carbonyl and methylene groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delvigs, Peter; Klopotek, David L.; Cavano, Paul J.

    1994-01-01

    In an effort to improve the processing characteristics of addition-type polyimide resins the use of flexibilized four-ring aromatic diamine moieties was investigated. A series of 12 diamines containing carbonyl and methylene, as well as oxo and thio bridging groups, was synthesized. The diamines were polymerized with the dimethyl ester of 3.3', 4.4' - benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid (BTDE), using the monomethyl ester of nadic acid (NE) as an end-cap. The effect of diamine structure on the solubility and rheological properties during cure was determined. This paper also describes the effect of diamine structure and formulated molecular weight on the glass transition temperature and thermo-oxidative stability at elevated temperatures after various post-cure regimes. The results indicate that polyimides from some of the diamines containing methylene connecting groups have potential as matrix resins for long-term applications at temperatures up to 300 C.

  20. Research Summary of an Additive Manufacturing Technology for the Fabrication of 3D Composites with Tailored Internal Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Larry R.; Riddick, Jaret C.

    2014-01-01

    A novel additive manufacturing technology is used to create micro-composites, which can be tailored for specific end-use applications. The Field-Aided Laminar Composite (FALCom) process uses specifically focused electric fields to align nano- to micro-sized particles into chain-like structures, which are referred to as pseudo-fibers. These pseudo-fibers are then immediately frozen into place by incident ultraviolet radiation on the photopolymer matrix. The pseudo-fibers are arranged by design, and they are used to create three-dimensional composite structures. Multiple filler materials have been evaluated for use in the FALCom system; however, this report describes aluminum micro-particles that are aligned and oriented in an acrylic photopolymer matrix. A description of the technology and a review of experimental processing are shown, and conclusions, as well as, future work are discussed.

  1. Nitrogen addition and harvest frequency rather than initial plant species composition determine vertical structure and light interception in grasslands.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Ute; Isselstein, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    In biodiversity experiments based on seeded experimental communities, species richness and species composition exert a strong influence on canopy structure and can lead to an improved use of aboveground resources. In this study, we want to explore whether these findings are applicable to agriculturally managed permanent grassland. Vertical layered profiles of biomass, leaf area (LA) and light intensity were measured in a removal-type biodiversity experiment (GrassMan) to compare the canopy structure in grassland vegetation of different plant species composition (called sward types). Additionally, the altered sward types were subjected to four different management regimes by a combination of the factors fertilization (unfertilized, NPK fertilized) and cutting frequency (one late cut or three cuts). In spite of large compositional differences (ratio grasses : non-leguminous forbs : leguminous forbs ranging from 93 : 7 : 0 to 39 : 52 : 9), the vegetation of the same management regime hardly differed in its canopy structure, whereas the different management regimes led to distinct vertical profiles in the vegetation. However, the allocation of biomass in response to cutting and fertilization differed among the sward types. Vegetation dominated by grasses was denser and had more LA when fertilized compared with vegetation rich in dicots which merely grew taller. In functionally more diverse vegetation, light interception was not increased compared with vegetation consisting of more than 90 % of grasses in terms of biomass. Management had a much stronger influence on structure and light interception than plant species composition in this grassland experiment. PMID:26199402

  2. The refined 1.9-A X-ray crystal structure of D-Phe-Pro-Arg chloromethylketone-inhibited human alpha-thrombin: structure analysis, overall structure, electrostatic properties, detailed active-site geometry, and structure-function relationships.

    PubMed Central

    Bode, W.; Turk, D.; Karshikov, A.

    1992-01-01

    Thrombin is a multifunctional serine proteinase that plays a key role in coagulation while exhibiting several other key cellular bioregulatory functions. The X-ray crystal structure of human alpha-thrombin was determined in its complex with the specific thrombin inhibitor D-Phe-Pro-Arg chloromethylketone (PPACK) using Patterson search methods and a search model derived from trypsinlike proteinases of known spatial structure (Bode, W., Mayr, I., Baumann, U., Huber, R., Stone, S.R., & Hofsteenge, J., 1989, EMBO J. 8, 3467-3475). The crystallographic refinement of the PPACK-thrombin model has now been completed at an R value of 0.156 (8 to 1.92 A); in particular, the amino- and the carboxy-termini of the thrombin A-chain are now defined and all side-chain atoms localized; only proline 37 was found to be in a cis-peptidyl conformation. The thrombin B-chain exhibits the characteristic polypeptide fold of trypsinlike serine proteinases; 195 residues occupy topologically equivalent positions with residues in bovine trypsin and 190 with those in bovine chymotrypsin with a root-mean-square (r.m.s.) deviation of 0.8 A for their alpha-carbon atoms. Most of the inserted residues constitute novel surface loops. A chymotrypsinogen numbering is suggested for thrombin based on the topological equivalences. The thrombin A-chain is arranged in a boomeranglike shape against the B-chain globule opposite to the active site; it resembles somewhat the propeptide of chymotrypsin(ogen) and is similarly not involved in substrate and inhibitor binding. Thrombin possesses an exceptionally large proportion of charged residues. The negatively and positively charged residues are not distributed uniformly over the whole molecule, but are clustered to form a sandwichlike electrostatic potential; in particular, two extended patches of mainly positively charged residues occur close to the carboxy-terminal B-chain helix (forming the presumed heparin-binding site) and on the surface of loop segment 70

  3. Insights into the Electronic Structure of Ozone and Sulfur Dioxide from Generalized Valence Bond Theory: Addition of Hydrogen Atoms.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Beth A; Takeshita, Tyler Y; Dunning, Thom H

    2016-05-01

    Ozone (O3) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) are valence isoelectronic species, yet their properties and reactivities differ dramatically. In particular, O3 is highly reactive, whereas SO2 is chemically relatively stable. In this paper, we investigate serial addition of hydrogen atoms to both the terminal atoms of O3 and SO2 and to the central atom of these species. It is well-known that the terminal atoms of O3 are much more amenable to bond formation than those of SO2. We show that the differences in the electronic structure of the π systems in the parent triatomic species account for the differences in the addition of hydrogen atoms to the terminal atoms of O3 and SO2. Further, we find that the π system in SO2, which is a recoupled pair bond dyad, facilitates the addition of hydrogen atoms to the sulfur atom, resulting in stable HSO2 and H2SO2 species. PMID:27070292

  4. Structural Insights into an Oxalate-producing Serine Hydrolase with an Unusual Oxyanion Hole and Additional Lyase Activity.

    PubMed

    Oh, Juntaek; Hwang, Ingyu; Rhee, Sangkee

    2016-07-15

    In Burkholderia species, the production of oxalate, an acidic molecule, is a key event for bacterial growth in the stationary phase. Oxalate plays a central role in maintaining environmental pH, which counteracts inevitable population-collapsing alkaline toxicity in amino acid-based culture medium. In the phytopathogen Burkholderia glumae, two enzymes are responsible for oxalate production. First, the enzyme oxalate biosynthetic component A (ObcA) catalyzes the formation of a tetrahedral C6-CoA adduct from the substrates acetyl-CoA and oxaloacetate. Then the ObcB enzyme liberates three products from the C6-CoA adduct: oxalate, acetoacetate, and CoA. Interestingly, these two stepwise reactions are catalyzed by a single bifunctional enzyme, Obc1, from Burkholderia thailandensis and Burkholderia pseudomallei Obc1 has an ObcA-like N-terminal domain and shows ObcB activity in its C-terminal domain despite no sequence homology with ObcB. We report the crystal structure of Obc1 in its apo and glycerol-bound form at 2.5 Å and 2.8 Å resolution, respectively. The Obc1 N-terminal domain is essentially identical both in structure and function to that of ObcA. Its C-terminal domain has an α/β hydrolase fold that has a catalytic triad for oxalate production and a novel oxyanion hole distinct from the canonical HGGG motif in other α/β hydrolases. Functional analyses through mutagenesis studies suggested that His-934 is an additional catalytic acid/base for its lyase activity and liberates two additional products, acetoacetate and CoA. These results provide structural and functional insights into bacterial oxalogenesis and an example of divergent evolution of the α/β hydrolase fold, which has both hydrolase and lyase activity. PMID:27226606

  5. The shallow structure of the 2009 Mw 6.1 L'Aquila earthquake fault-system (Italy): new insights from integrated high-resolution refraction tomography and detailed geologic mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villani, Fabio; Improta, Luigi; Pucci, Stefano; Civico, Riccardo; Pantosti, Daniela

    2015-04-01

    The 6 April 2009 Mw 6.1 L'Aquila earthquake (central Italy) was caused by the Paganica Fault, which belongs to a ~20 km long network of normal faults (Paganica-San Demetrio Fault System, PSDFS). The hangingwall of the PSDFS hosts a wide Quaternary continental basin (Middle Aterno valley) with complex geometry, structural setting and sedimentary evolution. Before the 2009 earthquake, the shallow crustal structure in the epicentral area was poorly known. Here, we report results of a 2-D high-resolution seismic investigation carried out in 2010 in the NE portion of the basin, across the Paganica Fault, in a challenging urban environment. The survey consisted of 5 dense wide-aperture seismic profiles that run NE-SW for a total length of 8 km. Around 80,000 hand-picked first-arrival traveltimes were input to a non-linear multi-scale tomographic inversion. The merged profiles allow depicting a reliable cross-section of the Middle Aterno basin down to ~300 m depth. In addition, we show for the first time P-wave velocity images across the causative fault of the 6 April 2009 earthquake. Interpretation of the Vp tomograms is constrained by a few drillings and by results of a detailed geologic survey. We interpret low-Vp regions (1500-2000 m/s) as lacustrine sediments and higher Vp bodies (Vp up to 3000 m/s) as coarse fluvial and alluvial fan deposits sited above a Meso-Cenozoic carbonate substratum (Vp >3500-4000 m/s) that shows a very irregular morphology. The improved knowledge of the Middle Aterno valley geological setting together with new tomographic Vp images yield new insights on the buried structure and long-term evolution of two small basins (Bazzano and Paganica basins) crossed by the seismic lines. In particular, the Paganica basin developed since Early-Middle Pleistocene due to the Paganica SW-dipping master fault and its splays. Seismic imaging revealed that the basin infill consists almost exclusively of coarse alluvial fan deposits. We were able to detect 2

  6. NOSS Altimeter Detailed Algorithm specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, D. W.; Mcmillan, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    The details of the algorithms and data sets required for satellite radar altimeter data processing are documented in a form suitable for (1) development of the benchmark software and (2) coding the operational software. The algorithms reported in detail are those established for altimeter processing. The algorithms which required some additional development before documenting for production were only scoped. The algorithms are divided into two levels of processing. The first level converts the data to engineering units and applies corrections for instrument variations. The second level provides geophysical measurements derived from altimeter parameters for oceanographic users.

  7. Response of Mg Addition on the Dendritic Structures and Mechanical Properties of Hypoeutectic Al-10Si (Wt Pct) Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaköse, Ercan; Yildiz, Mehmet; Keskin, Mustafa

    2016-08-01

    Rapidly solidified hypoeutectic Al-10Si- xMg ( x = 0, 5, 10 wt pct) alloys were produced by the melt-spinning method. The phase composition was identified by X-ray diffractometry, and the microstructures of the alloys were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The melting characteristics were studied by differential scanning calorimetry and differential thermal analysis under an Ar atmosphere. The mechanical properties of the melt-spun and conventionally solidified alloys were tested by tensile-strength and Vickers microhardness tests. The results illustrate that the cooling rate and solidification time of 89 μm thick melt-spun ribbon were estimated to be 2.97 × 107 K s-1 and 9.31 × 10-6 s, respectively. Nanoscale Si spot particles were observed growing on the surface of the dendritic α-Al matrix and the average sizes of these spots ranged from 10 to 50 nm. The improvement in the tensile properties and microhardness was related to structural refinement and the supersaturated α-Al solid solution; the nanoscale-dispersed Si spot particles made a significant improvement to the mechanical properties of the melt-spun ribbon. Detailed electrical resistivity tests of the ribbons were carried out at temperatures of 300 K to 800 K (27 °C to 527 °C).

  8. Response of Mg Addition on the Dendritic Structures and Mechanical Properties of Hypoeutectic Al-10Si (Wt Pct) Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaköse, Ercan; Yildiz, Mehmet; Keskin, Mustafa

    2016-05-01

    Rapidly solidified hypoeutectic Al-10Si-xMg (x = 0, 5, 10 wt pct) alloys were produced by the melt-spinning method. The phase composition was identified by X-ray diffractometry, and the microstructures of the alloys were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The melting characteristics were studied by differential scanning calorimetry and differential thermal analysis under an Ar atmosphere. The mechanical properties of the melt-spun and conventionally solidified alloys were tested by tensile-strength and Vickers microhardness tests. The results illustrate that the cooling rate and solidification time of 89 μm thick melt-spun ribbon were estimated to be 2.97 × 107 K s-1 and 9.31 × 10-6 s, respectively. Nanoscale Si spot particles were observed growing on the surface of the dendritic α-Al matrix and the average sizes of these spots ranged from 10 to 50 nm. The improvement in the tensile properties and microhardness was related to structural refinement and the supersaturated α-Al solid solution; the nanoscale-dispersed Si spot particles made a significant improvement to the mechanical properties of the melt-spun ribbon. Detailed electrical resistivity tests of the ribbons were carried out at temperatures of 300 K to 800 K (27 °C to 527 °C).

  9. Detailed Geological Modelling in Urban Areas focused on Structures relevant to the Near Surface Groundwater Flow in the context of Climatic Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, T.; Pallesen, T. M.; Jensen, N. P.; Mielby, S.; Sandersen, P.; Kristensen, M.

    2015-12-01

    This case demonstrates a practical example from the city of Odense (DK) where new geological modeling techniques has been developed and used in the software GeoScene3D, to create a detailed voxel model of the anthropogenic layer. The voxel model has been combined with a regional hydrostratigraphic layer model. The case is part of a pilot project partly financed by VTU (Foundation for Development of Technology in the Danish Water Sector) and involves many different datatypes such as borehole information, geophysical data, human related elements (landfill, pipelines, basements, roadbeds etc). In the last few years, there has been increased focus on detailed geological modeling in urban areas. The models serve as important input to hydrological models. This focus is partly due to climate changes as high intensity rainfalls are seen more often than in the past, and water recharge is a topic too. In urban areas, this arises new challenges. There is a need of a high level of detailed geological knowledge for the uppermost zone of the soil, which typically are problematic due to practically limitations, especially when using geological layer models. Furthermore, to accommodate the need of a high detail, all relevant available data has to be used in the modeling process. Human activity has deeply changed the soil layers, e.g. by constructions as roadbeds, buildings with basements, pipelines, landfill etc. These elements can act as barriers or pathways regarding surface near groundwater flow and can attribute to local flooding or mobilization and transport of contaminants etc. A geological voxel model is built by small boxes (a voxel). Each box can contain several parameters, ex. lithology, transmissivity or contaminant concentration. Human related elements can be implemented using tools, which gives the modeler advanced options for making detailed small-scale models. This case demonstrates the workflow and the resulting geological model for the pilot area.

  10. Effects of Ti additives on structural and electric properties of Cr- and Ti-codoped ZnO layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sejoon; Lee, Youngmin; Young Kim, Deuk; Won Kang, Tae

    2013-08-01

    We investigate the effects of Ti-codoping on the structural and electrical properties of the ZnCrTiO layers grown on the Pt (111)/Ti/Al2O3 (0001) substrates by co-sputtering of ZnCrO and Ti. The ZnCrTiO layers with the Ti contents of 0.2-0.3 at. % reveal the enhanced disorder-activated Raman modes, attributing to increased lattice-displacement-induced phonon scattering due to the incorporation of Ti additives. In comparison with ZnCrO, the ZnCrTiO layers exhibit the improved ferroelectric properties with one order of magnitude-increased remnant polarization. This causes a polarization-dependent asymmetric hysteresis behavior in the Pt/ZnCrTiO/Pt top-to-bottom metal-ferroelectric-metal device, suggesting potential applications for two-terminal ferroelectric-tunneling resistive memories.

  11. Imaging Magma Under St. Helens (iMUSH): Details of passive-source seismic deployment and preliminary 3-D velocity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulberg, C. W.; Creager, K. C.; Moran, S. C.; Abers, G. A.; Denlinger, R. P.; Hotovec-Ellis, A. J.; Vidale, J. E.; Kiser, E.; Levander, A.; Schultz, A.

    2014-12-01

    The imaging Magma Under St. Helens (iMUSH) experiment aims to delineate the extent of the magmatic system beneath Mount St. Helens (MSH) in Washington State. The experiment involves active- and passive-source seismology, magnetotellurics, and geochemistry/petrology. Seventy passive-source broadband seismometers were deployed in a 100-km-diameter array centered on MSH, with an average spacing of 10 km, and a planned duration of two years. The deployment over two weeks in June 2014 involved a group of 18 people split into 6 teams. Approximately half of the seismic stations have aircell batteries and/or pole-mounted solar panels in order to maintain power through deep snow at higher elevations during the winter months. Data will be retrieved 2-4 times a year throughout the duration of the experiment. The first service run performed in mid-July 2014 had a 98.4% data recovery. This is one of the largest wide-aperture two-dimensional arrays covering a volcano anywhere. The active-source portion of the experiment successfully set off 23 shots in late-July 2014. These were recorded clearly at permanent stations run by the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network up to 200 km away, and are expected to be well-recorded on many of the 70 broadband seismometers in addition to the 2500 Reftek "Texans" deployed temporarily for this purpose. For the 2-4 weeks of broadband data collected in July, local earthquakes down to magnitude 0 are recorded across the array, with clear P- and S- arrivals. Earthquakes of this size occur daily within 50 km of MSH. We are keeping a careful catalog of all activity in the region for the duration of the iMUSH experiment. We will pick P- and S-wave travel times at the 70 broadband stations from local earthquakes and active shots, for available data from between June and October 2014. We will also use a tomographic code (Preston et al, 2003, Science) to invert the travel times to obtain preliminary earthquake location and 3-D velocity structure.

  12. Additive technology of soluble mold tooling for embedded devices in composite structures: A study on manufactured tolerances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Madhuparna

    Composite textiles have found widespread use and advantages in various industries and applications. The constant demand for high quality products and services requires companies to minimize their manufacturing costs, and delivery time in order to compete in general and niche marketplaces. Advanced manufacturing methods aim to provide economical methods of mold production. Creation of molding and tooling options for advanced composites encompasses a large portion of the fabrication time, making it a costly process and restraining factor. This research discusses a preliminary investigation into the use of soluble polymer compounds and additive manufacturing to fabricate soluble molds. These molds suffer from dimensional errors due to several factors, which have also been characterized. The basic soluble mold of a composite is 3D printed to meet the desired dimensions and geometry of holistic structures or spliced components. The time taken to dissolve the mold depends on the rate of agitation of the solvent. This process is steered towards enabling the implantation of optoelectronic devices within the composite to provide sensing capability for structural health monitoring. The shape deviation of the 3D printed mold is also studied and compared to its original dimensions to optimize the dimensional quality to produce dimensionally accurate parts. Mechanical tests were performed on compact tension (CT) resin samples prepared from these 3D printed molds and revealed crack propagation towards an embedded intact optical fiber.

  13. Structure and properties of PVDF membrane with PES-C addition via thermally induced phase separation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lishun; Sun, Junfen

    2014-12-01

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane and PVDF membrane with phenolphthalein polyethersulfone (PES-C) addition were prepared via thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) method by using diphenyl carbonate (DPC) and dimethyl acetamide (DMAc) as mixed diluents. The effects of coagulation temperature and pre-evaporation time on structure and properties of membranes were studied. The changes of sewage flux in MBR and the attenuation coefficient of sewage flux were investigated. The resistance distributions of PVDF and PVDF/PES-C membranes were compared by resistance analysis. Membrane composition and structure were characterized by ATR-FTIR, TGA, SEM and AFM. The foulant on membranes was analyzed by FTIR. The contact angle of PVDF/PES-C membrane was lower than that of PVDF membrane. A thinner skin layer and a porous cellular support layer formed in PVDF/PES-C membrane and resulted in a higher porosity and pure water flux. The pure water flux and porosity of PVDF/PES-C membrane increased with rising coagulation temperature and decreased with extending pre-evaporation time. The flux attenuation coefficient, the cake layer resistance and internal fouling resistance of PVDF/PES-C membrane in MBR were smaller than those of PVDF membrane in MBR. The FTIR spectrum of foulant on membrane indicated that the foulant on PVDF/PES-C membrane was mostly composed of protein and polysaccharide, while the foulant on pure PVDF membrane included biopolymer clusters besides protein and polysaccharide.

  14. The Effect of Emphasizing Mathematical Structure in the Acquisition of Whole Number Computation Skills (Addition and Subtraction) By Seven- and Eight-Year Olds: A Clinical Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uprichard, A. Edward; Collura, Carolyn

    This investigation sought to determine the effect of emphasizing mathematical structure in the acquisition of computational skills by seven- and eight-year-olds. The meaningful development-of-structure approach emphasized closure, commutativity, associativity, and the identity element of addition; the inverse relationship between addition and…

  15. Effects of additions of small amounts of fourth elements on structure, crystal structure and shape recovery of Cu-Zn-Al shape memory alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, M.R. |; Yang, D.Z.; Tadaki, T.; Hirotsu, Y.

    1997-01-15

    Cu-based shape memory alloys (SMAs) are particularly interesting, compared to Ni-Ti SMAs because of their low cost and relatively ease process. However, there are important problems to be solved, such as intergranular fracture due to large grain size, stabilization of martensite, etc. In the present work, the influences of additions only less than 1 mass% of several fourth elements, such as Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Y, to two kinds of Cu-Zn-Al SMAs, i.e., Cu-30Zn-4Al and Cu-25Zn-7Al on their structure, crystal structure and shape recovery have been examined in order to know what elements are the most effective for the thermal stability of the parent and martensite phases and the shape memory capacity.

  16. Response of Functional Structure of Soil Microbial Community to Multi-level Nitrogen Additions on the Central Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Yuan, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The use of fossil fuels and fertilizers has increased the amount of biologically reactive nitrogen in the atmosphere over the past century. Tibet is the one of the most threatened regions by nitrogen deposition, thus understanding how its microbial communities function maybe of high importance to predicting microbial responses to nitrogen deposition. Here we describe a short-time nitrogen addition conducted in an alpine steppe ecosystem to investigate the response of functional structure of soil microbial community to multi-level nitrogen addition. Using a GeoChip 4.0, we showed that functional diversities and richness of functional genes were unchanged at low level of nitrogen fertilizer inputs (<20 kg N ha-1 yr-1), but significantly decreased at higher nitrogen fertilizer inputs (>=40 kg N ha-1 yr-1). Detrended correspondence analysis indicated that the functional structure of microbial communities was markedly different across the nitrogen gradients. Most C degradation genes whose abundances significantly increased under elevated N fertilizer were those involved in the degradation of relatively labile C (starch, hemicellulose, cellulose), whereas the abundance of certain genes involved in the degradation of recalcitrant C (i.e. lignin) was largely decreased (such as manganese peroxidase, mnp). The results suggest that the elevated N fertilization rates might significantly accelerate the labile C degradation, but might not spur recalcitrant C degradation. The combined effect of gdh and ureC genes involved in N cycling appeared to shift the balance between ammonia and organic N toward organic N ammonification and hence increased the N mineralization potential. Moreover, Urease directly involved in urea mineralization significantly increased. Lastly, Canonical correspondence analysis showed that soil (TOC+NH4++NO3-+NO2-+pH) and plant (Aboveground plant productivity + Shannon Diversity) variables could explain 38.9% of the variation of soil microbial community

  17. Structure and high-temperature properties of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} with interstitial additions

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Jason

    1999-12-01

    This study was motivated by the fact that previous research on the structure and properties of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} showed unacceptably inconsistent results. The primary reason for these inconsistencies was interstitial contamination of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} by carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. Thus, this study measured the effects that these interstitial atoms have on some of the previously reported properties. These properties include crystalline structure, thermal expansion anisotropy, electronic structure and bonding, and high temperature oxidation resistance. In Chapter 2 of this study, the lattice parameters and atomic positions of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} as a function of carbon, nitrogen or oxygen content were measured via x-ray and neutron diffraction. Comparing these lattice parameters to those reported in other studies on supposedly pure Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} confirmed that the majority of the previous studies had samples with a considerable amount of interstitial impurities. In fact, the lattice parameter trends given in Chapter 2 can be used to estimate the types and level of impurities in these studies. Furthermore, Chapter 2 discusses how atomic positions change as interstitial atoms are incorporated into the lattice. These changes in atomic separations suggest that strong bonds form between the interstitial atoms and the surrounding titanium atoms. This is in full agreement with the electronic structure calculations given in Chapter 4. These calculations show that bonding does occur between titanium d-states and interstitial atom p-states at the expense of bonding between some of the titanium and silicon atoms. In addition, carbon seems to be the most strongly bonded interstitial atom. Knowledge of the exact interstitial content and its effect on bonding is important because Chapters 3 and 5 have shown that interstitial atoms have a marked effect on the thermal expansion and oxidation resistance. As discussed in Chapter 3, all interstitial atoms lower the thermal

  18. Characterization of the structural details of residual austenite in the weld metal of a 9Cr1MoNbV welded rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xia; Ji, Hui-jun; Liu, Peng; Wang, Peng; Lu, Feng-gui; Gao, Yu-lai

    2014-06-01

    The existence of residual austenite in weld metal plays an important role in determining the properties and dimensional accuracy of welded rotors. An effective corrosive agent and the metallographic etching process were developed to clearly reveal the characteristics of residual austenite in the weld metal of a 9Cr1MoNbV welded rotor. Moreover, the details of the distribution, shape, length, length-to-width ratio, and the content of residual austenite were systematically characterized using the Image-Pro Plus image analysis software. The results revealed that the area fraction of residual austenite was approximately 6.3% in the observed weld seam; the average area, length, and length-to-width ratio of dispersed residual austenite were quantitatively evaluated to be (5.5 ± 0.1) μm2, (5.0 ± 0.1) μm, and (2.2 ± 0.1), respectively. The newly developed corrosive agent and etching method offer an appropriate approach to characterize residual austenite in the weld metal of welded rotors in detail.

  19. Crystal Structures of GII.10 and GII.12 Norovirus Protruding Domains in Complex with Histo-Blood Group Antigens Reveal Details for a Potential Site of Vulnerability

    SciTech Connect

    Hansman, Grant S.; Biertümpfel, Christian; Georgiev, Ivelin; McLellan, Jason S.; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Tongqing; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Kwong, Peter D.

    2011-10-10

    Noroviruses are the dominant cause of outbreaks of gastroenteritis worldwide, and interactions with human histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) are thought to play a critical role in their entry mechanism. Structures of noroviruses from genogroups GI and GII in complex with HBGAs, however, reveal different modes of interaction. To gain insight into norovirus recognition of HBGAs, we determined crystal structures of norovirus protruding domains from two rarely detected GII genotypes, GII.10 and GII.12, alone and in complex with a panel of HBGAs, and analyzed structure-function implications related to conservation of the HBGA binding pocket. The GII.10- and GII.12-apo structures as well as the previously solved GII.4-apo structure resembled each other more closely than the GI.1-derived structure, and all three GII structures showed similar modes of HBGA recognition. The primary GII norovirus-HBGA interaction involved six hydrogen bonds between a terminal {alpha}fucose1-2 of the HBGAs and a dimeric capsid interface, which was composed of elements from two protruding subdomains. Norovirus interactions with other saccharide units of the HBGAs were variable and involved fewer hydrogen bonds. Sequence analysis revealed a site of GII norovirus sequence conservation to reside under the critical {alpha}fucose1-2 and to be one of the few patches of conserved residues on the outer virion-capsid surface. The site was smaller than that involved in full HBGA recognition, a consequence of variable recognition of peripheral saccharides. Despite this evasion tactic, the HBGA site of viral vulnerability may provide a viable target for small molecule- and antibody-mediated neutralization of GII norovirus.

  20. Detailed structure of the low-energy magnetic dispersion of the diagonal incommensurate phase in La1.975Sr0.025CuO4

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Masaaki; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A; Fujita, M.; Yamada, K.; Tranquada, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering experiments have been performed on lightly doped La{sub 1.975}Sr{sub 0.025}CuO{sub 4}, which contains a hole concentration slightly higher than the critical concentration for three-dimensional long-range antiferromagnetic order. We previously found that the magnetic excitation spectrum in the insulating phase with a diagonal incommensurate spin modulation has similarities to that in the superconducting regime, where the spin modulation is bond parallel. In this study, we investigate the excitations in detail around E{sub cross}, at which the excitations become most nearly commensurate. It is found that both the magnitude and the anisotropy of the momentum width of the excitations change abruptly at E{sub cross}. Our experimental results suggest that the magnetic excitations rising from the pair of (diagonally) incommensurate wave vectors merge at E{sub cross} into isotropic excitations.

  1. Program for establishing long time flight service performance of composite materials in the central wing structure of C-130 aircraft. Phase 2: Detailed design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvill, W. E.; Duhig, J. J.; Spencer, B. R.

    1973-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and evaluation of boron-epoxy reinforced C-130 center wing boxes are discussed. Design drawings, static strength, fatigue endurance, flutter, and weight analyses required for the wing box fabrication are presented. Additional component testing to verify the design for panel buckling and to evaluate specific local design areas are reported.

  2. Effect of additional elements on compositional modulated atomic layered structure of hexagonal Co80Pt20 alloy films with superlattice diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinata, Shintaro; Yamane, Akira; Saito, Shin

    2016-05-01

    The effect of additional element on compositionally modulated atomic layered structure of hexagonal Co80Pt20 alloy films with superlattice diffraction was investigated. In this study it is found that the addition of Cr or W element to Co80Pt20 alloy film shows less deterioration of hcp stacking structure and compositionally modulated atomic layer stacking structure as compared to Si or Zr or Ti with Ku of around 1.4 or 1.0 × 107 erg/cm3 at 5 at.% addition. Furthermore, for O2 addition of O2 ≥ 5.0 × 10-3 Pa to CoPt alloy, compositionally modulated atomic layer stacking structure will be deteriorated with enhancement of formation of hcp stacking structure which leads higher Ku of 1.0 × 107 erg/cm3.

  3. Crystal structure of the HIV-1 integrase core domain in complex with sucrose reveals details of an allosteric inhibitory binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Wielens, Jerome; Headey, Stephen J.; Jeevarajah, Dharshini; Rhodes, David I.; Deadman, John; Chalmers, David K.; Scanlon, Martin J.; Parker, Michael W.

    2010-04-19

    HIV integrase (IN) is an essential enzyme in HIV replication and an important target for drug design. IN has been shown to interact with a number of cellular and viral proteins during the integration process. Disruption of these important interactions could provide a mechanism for allosteric inhibition of IN. We present the highest resolution crystal structure of the IN core domain to date. We also present a crystal structure of the IN core domain in complex with sucrose which is bound at the dimer interface in a region that has previously been reported to bind integrase inhibitors.

  4. Additive Manufacturing of a Photo-Cross-Linkable Polymer via Direct Melt Electrospinning Writing for Producing High Strength Structures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Hochleitner, Gernot; Woodfield, Tim; Groll, Juergen; Dalton, Paul D; Amsden, Brian G

    2016-01-11

    Melt electrospinning writing (MEW) is an emerging additive manufacturing technique that enables the design and fabrication of micrometer-thin fibrous scaffolds made of biocompatible and biodegradable polymers. By using a computer-aided deposition process, a unique control over pore size and interconnectivity of the resulting scaffolds is achieved, features highly interesting for tissue engineering applications. However, MEW has been mainly used to process low melting point thermoplastics such as poly(ε-caprolactone). Since this polymer exhibits creep and a reduction in modulus upon hydration, we manufactured scaffolds of poly(L-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone-co-acryloyl carbonate) (poly(LLA-ε-CL-AC)), a photo-cross-linkable and biodegradable polymer, for the first time. We show that the stiffness of the scaffolds increases significantly (up to ∼10-fold) after cross-linking by UV irradiation at room temperature, compared with un-cross-linked microfiber scaffolds. The preservation of stiffness and high average fiber modulus (370 ± 166 MPa) within the cross-linked hydrated scaffolds upon repetitive loading (10% strain at 1 Hz up to 200,000 cycles) suggests that the prepared scaffolds may be of potential interest for soft connective tissue engineering applications. Moreover, the approach can be readily adapted through manipulation of polymer properties and scaffold geometry to prepare structures with mechanical properties suitable for other tissue engineering applications. PMID:26620885

  5. Effects of plasmochemical treatments and cerium additions on the structural characteristics and activity of copper catalyst particles in isopropanol dehydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platonov, E. A.; Lobanov, N. N.; Galimova, N. A.; Protasova, I. A.; Yagodovskii, V. D.

    2012-08-01

    The effect of the treatment of the 5 wt % Cu/SiO2 (I) and (5 wt % Cu + 0.5 wt % Ce)/SiO2 (II) catalysts with glow discharge plasma in O2, H2, and Ar on their structural characteristics was studied by X-ray phase analysis; the influence of cerium additions and plasmochemical treatments on the catalyst activity in isopropanol dehydrogenation was also investigated. Under the plasmochemical treatment, the diameters of Cu particles in catalyst I nearly doubled and microstresses in the metal particles also changed. Catalyst II was X-ray amorphous both before and after plasmochemical treatments. The activity of I after plasmochemical treatment increased because of the increase in the number of centers and changes in their composition. Growth of the activity of I compared with the activity of II was explained by the formation of new catalytic centers due to positive charging of the Ce+α adatom on the surface of the copper particle.

  6. Detail One Half of Wood Truss, Detail One Quarter Plan ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail One Half of Wood Truss, Detail One Quarter Plan of Floor Beams & Bottom Truss Cord, Detail at A Plan, Detail at B Plan - Covered Bridge, Spanning Darby Creek, North Lewisburg, Champaign County, OH

  7. Chord Splicing & Joining Detail; Chord & CrossBracing Joint Details; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Chord Splicing & Joining Detail; Chord & Cross-Bracing Joint Details; Cross Bracing Center Joint Detail; Chord & Diagonal Joint Detail - Vermont Covered Bridge, Highland Park, spanning Kokomo Creek at West end of Deffenbaugh Street (moved to), Kokomo, Howard County, IN

  8. Arch & Chord Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Arch & Chord Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie & Crossbracing Joint Detail - Dunlapsville Covered Bridge, Spanning East Fork Whitewater River, Dunlapsville, Union County, IN

  9. Detailed Study of the Influence of InGaAs Matrix on the Strain Reduction in the InAs Dot-In-Well Structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Chen, Qimiao; Wu, Xiaoyan; Cao, Chunfang; Wang, Shumin; Gong, Qian

    2016-12-01

    InAs/InGaAs dot-in-well (DWELL) structures have been investigated with the systematically varied InGaAs thickness. Both the strained buffer layer (SBL) below the dot layer and the strain-reducing layer (SRL) above the dot layer were found to be responsible for the redshift in photoluminescence (PL) emission of the InAs/InGaAs DWELL structure. A linear followed by a saturation behavior of the emission redshift was observed as a function of the SBL and SRL thickness, respectively. The PL intensity is greatly enhanced by applying both of the SRL and SBL. Finite element analysis simulation and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurement were carried out to analyze the strain distribution in the InAs QD and the InGaAs SBL. The results clearly indicate the strain reduction in the QD induced by the SBL, which are likely the main cause for the emission redshift. PMID:26932758

  10. Details of regional particle deposition and airflow structures in a realistic model of human tracheobronchial airways: two-phase flow simulation.

    PubMed

    Rahimi-Gorji, Mohammad; Gorji, Tahereh B; Gorji-Bandpy, Mofid

    2016-07-01

    In the present investigation, detailed two-phase flow modeling of airflow, transport and deposition of micro-particles (1-10µm) in a realistic tracheobronchial airway geometry based on CT scan images under various breathing conditions (i.e. 10-60l/min) was considered. Lagrangian particle tracking has been used to investigate the particle deposition patterns in a model comprising mouth up to generation G6 of tracheobronchial airways. The results demonstrated that during all breathing patterns, the maximum velocity change occurred in the narrow throat region (Larynx). Due to implementing a realistic geometry for simulations, many irregularities and bending deflections exist in the airways model. Thereby, at higher inhalation rates, these areas are prone to vortical effects which tend to entrap the inhaled particles. According to the results, deposition fraction has a direct relationship with particle aerodynamic diameter (for dp=1-10µm). Enhancing inhalation flow rate and particle size will largely increase the inertial force and consequently, more particle deposition is evident suggesting that inertial impaction is the dominant deposition mechanism in tracheobronchial airways. PMID:27160637

  11. Bridged bis(amidinate) lanthanide aryloxides: syntheses, structures, and catalytic activity for addition of amines to carbodiimides.

    PubMed

    Tu, Jing; Li, Wenbo; Xue, Mingqiang; Zhang, Yong; Shen, Qi

    2013-04-28

    Various lanthanide aryloxide complexes supported by bridged bis(amidinate) ligand L, LLnOAr(DME) (L = Me3SiNC(Ph)N(CH2)3NC(Ph)NSiMe3, DME = dimethoxyethane, Ln = Y, Ar = 2,6-(Me)2C6H3 (1), 2,6-((i)Pr)2C6H3 (2), 2,6-((t)Bu)2-4-(Me)C6H2 (3); Ar = 2,6-((t)Bu)2-4-(Me)C6H2, Ln = Nd (4), Sm (5), Yb (6)) were synthesized, and complexes 1, 2 and 4–6 were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. All the complexes are efficient precatalysts for catalytic addition of amines to carbodiimides. The catalytic activity is influenced by lanthanide metals and the aryloxide groups (Nd (4) Sm (5) < Y (3) Yb (6) and -2,6-(Me)2C6H3 < -2,6-((i)Pr)2C6H3 < -2,6-((t)Bu)2-4-(Me)C6H2). The catalytic addition reaction with 3 showed a good scope of substrates. The mechanism investigation revealed the real active intermediate being the monoguanidinate complexes supported by an aryloxide and an amidine-functionalized amidinate group, L′Ln[O2,6-((t)Bu)2-4-(Me)C6H2][RNCNHRN(Ar′)] (L′ = Me3SiNHC(Ph)N(CH2)3NC(Ph)NSiMe3, R = (i)Pr, Ar′ = phenyl, Ln = Yb (8), Y (11); R = Cy, Ar′ = phenyl, Ln = Yb (10), Y (12); R = (i)Pr, Ar′ = 4-ClC6H4, Ln = Yb (9)), which were isolated from the reactions of 6 (or 3) with amine and carbodiimide in a molar ratio of 1:1:1 and structurally characterized. The Ln-active group in the present precatalyst is a Ln–amidinate species, not the Ln–OAr group. PMID:23459864

  12. Detailed Shallow Structure and Seismic Catalog Based on Data of a Spatially-Dense Array on the San Jacinto Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zion, Y.

    2015-12-01

    I review results on imaging the shallow structure of San Jacinto fault zone and detection/location of seismic energy sources using data of a spatially-dense Nodal array centered on the Clark branch of the fault. The array operated at the Sage Brush site south of Anza for about 4 weeks in 2014 with 1108 vertical (10 Hz) geophones in about 650 m x 700 m box configuration. Continuous waveforms with signals generated by the ambient seismic noise, earthquakes, and Betsy gunshots were recorded with useable frequencies up to 200 Hz. Imaging the shallow structure is done with surface and body waves extracted from the ambient noise, arrivals from local and teleseismic earthquakes, and waves generated by the gunshots. The results reveal shallow material with very low seismic velocities and attenuation coefficients, strong lateral and vertical variations, seismic trapping structure, local sedimentary basin, and overall lithology contrast across the fault. The detection/location techniques include stacking, beamforming, matched field processing, and templates generated by these methods. The analysis uncovers many hundred of daily earthquakes not detected by the regional networks and several different types of surface noise sources.

  13. Crystal structures of two bacterial HECT-like E3 ligases in complex with a human E2 reveal atomic details of pathogen-host interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, David Yin-wei; Diao, Jianbo; Chen, Jue

    2012-12-10

    In eukaryotes, ubiquitination is an important posttranslational process achieved through a cascade of ubiquitin-activating (E1), conjugating (E2), and ligase (E3) enzymes. Many pathogenic bacteria deliver virulence factors into the host cell that function as E3 ligases. How these bacterial 'Trojan horses' integrate into the eukaryotic ubiquitin system has remained a mystery. Here we report crystal structures of two bacterial E3s, Salmonella SopA and Escherichia coli NleL, both in complex with human E2 UbcH7. These structures represent two distinct conformational states of the bacterial E3s, supporting the necessary structural rearrangements associated with ubiquitin transfer. The E2-interacting surface of SopA and NleL has little similarity to those of eukaryotic E3s. However, both bacterial E3s bind to the canonical surface of E2 that normally interacts with eukaryotic E3s. Furthermore, we show that a glutamate residue on E3 is involved in catalyzing ubiquitin transfer from E3 to the substrate, but not from E2 to E3. Together, these results provide mechanistic insights into the ubiquitin pathway and a framework for understanding molecular mimicry in bacterial pathogenesis.

  14. Rossby-wave driven stirring of the UTLS - a detailed view on the intricately layered structure by the 3-D imaging limb-sounder GLORIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungermann, J.; Friedl-Vallon, F.; Hoepfner, M.; Oelhaf, H.; Preusse, P.; Riese, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Gimballed Limb Radiance Imager of the Atmosphere (GLORIA) is a new instrument that combines a classical Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) with a 2-D detector array. Imaging allows the spatial sampling to be improved by up to an order of magnitude when compared to a limb scanning instrument. GLORIA is designed to operate on various high altitude research platforms. The instrument is a joint development of the German Helmholtz Large Research Facilities Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and Research Centre Juelich (FZJ). GLORIA builds upon the heritage of KIT and FZJ in developing and operating IR limb sounders (MIPAS, CRISTA). In Summer 2012, GLORIA was an integral part of the first large missions for the German research aircraft HALO dedicated to atmospheric research, TACTS and ESMVAL. The data span latitudes from 80°N to 65°S and include several tomographic flight patterns that allow the 3-D reconstruction of observed air masses. We provide an overview of the heterogeneous structure of the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS) as observed over Europe. Retrieved water vapor and ozone are used to identify the tropospheric or stratospheric character of air masses and can thus be used to visualize the multi-species 2-D (and partly 3-D) chemical structure of the UTLS. A highly intricate structure is found consisting often of fine-scale layers extending only several hundred meters in the vertical. These horizontally large-scale structures are thus below the typical vertical resolution of current chemistry climate models. Trajectory studies reveal the origin of the filaments to be Rossby wave-breaking events over the Pacific and Atlantic that cause tropical air stemming from the general area of the Asian monsoon to be mixed across the jet-stream into the subtropical lowermost stratosphere. These results demonstrate a rich spatial structure of the UTLS region at the subtropical jet, where the tropopause break is perturbed by breaking Rossby waves. The

  15. LF460 detail design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    This is the final technical report documenting the detail design of the LF460, and advanced turbotip lift fan intended for application with the YJ97-GE-100 turbojet jet generator to a V/STOL transport research aircraft. Primary objective of the design was to achieve a low noise level while maintaining the high thrust/weight ratio capability of a high pressure ratio lift fan. Report covers design requirements and summarizes activities and final results in the areas of aerodynamic and mechanical design, component and system performance, acoustic features and final noise predictions.

  16. We Built This House; It's Time to Move in: Leveraging Existing DICOM Structure to More Completely Utilize Readily Available Detailed Contrast Administration Information.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Jeffrey D; Siegel, Eliot L; Balasubramanian, Sridhar; Wang, Kenneth C

    2015-08-01

    The Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standard is the universal format for interoperability in medical imaging. In addition to imaging data, DICOM has evolved to support a wide range of imaging metadata including contrast administration data that is readily available from many modern contrast injectors. Contrast agent, route of administration, start and stop time, volume, flow rate, and duration can be recorded using DICOM attributes [1]. While this information is sparsely and inconsistently recorded in routine clinical practice, it could potentially be of significant diagnostic value. This work will describe parameters recorded by automatic contrast injectors, summarize the DICOM mechanisms available for tracking contrast injection data, and discuss the role of such data in clinical radiology. PMID:25700615

  17. Fucosylated haptoglobin is a novel marker for pancreatic cancer: a detailed analysis of the oligosaccharide structure and a possible mechanism for fucosylation.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Noriko; Ide, Yoshihito; Nakano, Miyako; Nakagawa, Tsutomu; Yamanaka, Kanako; Moriwaki, Kenta; Murata, Kohei; Ohigashi, Hiroaki; Yokoyama, Shigekazu; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Ishikawa, Osamu; Ito, Toshifumi; Kato, Michio; Kasahara, Akinori; Kawano, Sunao; Gu, Jianguo; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Miyoshi, Eiji

    2006-06-01

    Changes in oligosaccharide structures have been reported in certain types of malignant transformations and, thus, could be used for tumor markers in certain types of cancer. In the case of pancreatic cancer cell lines, a variety of fucosylated proteins are secreted into their conditioned media. To identify fucosylated proteins in the serum of patients with pancreatic cancer, we performed western blot analyses using Aleuria Aurantica Lectin (AAL), which is specific for fucosylated structures. An approximately 40 kD protein was found to be highly fucosylated in pancreatic cancer and an N-terminal analysis revealed that it was the beta chain of haptoglobin. While the appearance of fucosylated haptoglobin has been reported in other diseases such as hepatocellular carcinoma, liver cirrhosis, gastric cancer and colon cancer, the incidence was significantly higher in the case of pancreatic cancer. Fucosylated haptoglobin was observed more frequently at the advanced stage of pancreatic cancer and disappeared after an operation. A mass spectrometry analysis of haptoglobin purified from the serum of patients with pancreatic cancer and the medium from a pancreatic cancer cell line, PSN-1, showed that the alpha 1-3/alpha 1-4/alpha 1-6 fucosylation of haptoglobin was increased in pancreatic cancer. When a hepatoma cell line, Hep3B, was cultured with the conditioned media from pancreatic cancer cells, haptoglobin secretion was dramatically increased. These findings suggest that fucosylated haptoglobin could serve as a novel marker for pancreatic cancer. Two possibilities were considered in terms of the fucosylation of haptoglobin. One is that pancreatic cancer cells, themselves, produce fucosylated haptoglobin; the other is that pancreatic cancer produces a factor, which induces the production of fucosylated haptoglobin in the liver. PMID:16385567

  18. Detailed Evaluation of the Geometric and Electronic Structures of One-electron Oxidized Group 10 (Ni, Pd, and Pt) Metal(II)-(Disalicylidene)diamine Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Stack, T. Daniel P.

    2009-01-01

    The geometric and electronic structures of a series of one-electron oxidized group 10 metal salens (Ni, Pd, Pt) have been investigated in solution and in the solid state. Ni (1) and Pd (2) complexes of the tetradentate salen ligand N,N’-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylidene)-1,2-cyclohexanediamine (H2Salcn) have been examined along with the Pt (3) complex of the salen ligand N,N’-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylidene)-1,2-ethylenediamine (H2Salen). All three oxidized compounds exist as ligand radical species in solution and in the solid state. The solid state structures of [1]+ and [3]+ exhibit a symmetric coordination sphere contraction relative to the neutral forms. By contrast, the coordination sphere of the Pd derivative [2]+ exhibits a pronounced asymmetry in the solid state. In solution, the oxidized derivatives display intense low-energy NIR transitions consistent with their classification as ligand radical compounds. Interestingly, the degree of communication between the phenolate moieties depends strongly on the central metal ion, within the Ni, Pd, and Pt series. Electrochemical measurements and UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy, in conjunction with DFT calculations provide insights into the degree of delocalization of the one-electron hole in these systems. The Pd complex [2]+ is the least delocalized and is best described as a borderline Class II/III intervalence complex based on the Robin-Day classification system. The Ni [1]+ and Pt [3]+ analogues are Class III (fully delocalized) intervalence compounds. Delocalization is dependent on the electronic coupling between the redox-active phenolate ligands, mediated by overlap between the formally filled metal dxz orbital and the appropriate ligand molecular orbital. The degree of coupling increases in the order Pd < Ni < Pt for the one-electron oxidized group 10 metal salens. PMID:19639970

  19. Detail of Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This color photo of Neptune's large satellite Triton was obtained on Aug. 24 1989 at a range of 530,000 kilometers (330,000 miles). The resolution is about 10 kilometers (6.2 miles), sufficient to begin to show topographic detail. The image was made from pictures taken through the green, violet and ultraviolet filters. In this technique, regions that are highly reflective in the ultraviolet appear blue in color. In reality, there is no part of Triton that would appear blue to the eye. The bright southern hemisphere of Triton, which fills most of this frame, is generally pink in tone as is the even brighter equatorial band. The darker regions north of the equator also tend to be pink or reddish in color. JPL manages the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

  20. Cydonia Region - detail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Detail cut out of PIA01235, Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image of a 4.42 by 82.94 km area of the Cydonia Region. The left image is raw, the right has been filtered and contrast enhanced.

    Orbit: 220

    Range: 444.21 km

    Resolution: 4.32 m/pixel

    Emission angle: 44.66 degrees

    Incidence angle: 64.96 degrees

    Phase angle: 61.97 degrees

    Scan rate: 0.1 degree/sec

    Start time: periapsis + 375 sec

    Sequence submitted to JPL: Sat 04/04/98 15:15 PST

    Image acquired by MOC: Sun 04/05/98 00:39:37 PST

    Data retrieved from JPL: Mon 04/06/98 09:05 PDT

  1. South Polar Details

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    22 September 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows details among some of the eroded layer outcrops of the martian south polar region. Much of the south polar region of Mars is covered by a thick unit of layered material. For decades, the layers have been assumed to consist of a mixture of dust and ice, but it is equally possible that the materials are sedimentary rocks. This image was captured during southern spring, at a time when some of the surface was still covered by seasonal carbon dioxide (CO2) frost.

    Location near: 86.5oS, 116.6oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  2. The Devil is in the Details: Using X-Ray Computed Tomography to Develop Accurate 3D Grain Characteristics and Bed Structure Metrics for Gravel Bed Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voepel, H.; Hodge, R. A.; Leyland, J.; Sear, D. A.; Ahmed, S. I.

    2014-12-01

    Uncertainty for bedload estimates in gravel bed rivers is largely driven by our inability to characterize the arrangement and orientation of the sediment grains within the bed. The characteristics of the surface structure are produced by the water working of grains, which leads to structural differences in bedforms through differential patterns of grain sorting, packing, imbrication, mortaring and degree of bed armoring. Until recently the technical and logistical difficulties of characterizing the arrangement of sediment in 3D have prohibited a full understanding of how grains interact with stream flow and the feedback mechanisms that exist. Micro-focus X-ray CT has been used for non-destructive 3D imaging of grains within a series of intact sections of river bed taken from key morphological units (see Figure 1). Volume, center of mass, points of contact, protrusion and spatial orientation of individual surface grains are derived from these 3D images, which in turn, facilitates estimates of 3D static force properties at the grain-scale such as pivoting angles, buoyancy and gravity forces, and grain exposure. By aggregating representative samples of grain-scale properties of localized interacting sediment into overall metrics, we can compare and contrast bed stability at a macro-scale with respect to stream bed morphology. Understanding differences in bed stability through representative metrics derived at the grain-scale will ultimately lead to improved bedload estimates with reduced uncertainty and increased understanding of interactions between grain-scale properties on channel morphology. Figure 1. CT-Scans of a water worked gravel-filled pot. a. 3D rendered scan showing the outer mesh, and b. the same pot with the mesh removed. c. vertical change in porosity of the gravels sampled in 5mm volumes. Values are typical of those measured in the field and lab. d. 2-D slices through the gravels at 20% depth from surface (porosity = 0.35), and e. 75% depth from

  3. Structural insights into the active-ready form of [FeFe]-hydrogenase and mechanistic details of its inhibition by carbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Greco, Claudio; Bruschi, Maurizio; Heimdal, Jimmy; Fantucci, Piercarlo; De Gioia, Luca; Ryde, Ulf

    2007-09-01

    [FeFe]-hydrogenases harbor a {2Fe3S} assembly bearing two CO and two CN- groups, a mu-CO ligand, and a vacant coordination site trans to the mu-CO group. Recent theoretical results obtained studying the isolated {2Fe3S} subsite indicated that one of the CN- ligands can easily move from the crystallographic position to the coordination site trans to the mu-CO group; such an isomerization would have a major impact on substrates and inhibitors binding regiochemistry and, consequently, on the catalytic mechanism. To shed light on this crucial issue, we have carried out hybrid QM/MM and free energy perturbation calculations on the whole enzyme, which demonstrate that the protein environment plays a crucial role and maintains the CN- group fixed in the position observed in the crystal structure; these results strongly support the hypothesis that the vacant coordination site trans to the mu-CO group has a crucial functional relevance both in the context of CO-mediated inhibition of the enzyme and in dihydrogen oxidation/evolution catalysis. PMID:17676838

  4. Crystal structure details of La- and Bi-substituted hydroxyapatites: Evidence for LaO+ and BiO+ with a very short metal-oxygen bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazin, Pavel E.; Pogosova, Mariam A.; Trusov, Lev A.; Kolesnik, Irina V.; Magdysyuk, Oxana V.; Dinnebier, Robert E.

    2016-05-01

    Crystal structures of substituted apatites with general formula Ca10-xMx(PO4)6(OH1-δ)2-xOx, where M=La, Bi, 0≤x<2, were refined using high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction patterns. Individual positions for Ca2+ and M3+-ions localized near Ca2-site were determined. The M3+-ion was found shifted toward the hexagonal channel center with respect to the Ca2+-ion, forming very short bond with the intrachannel O2-, while leaving considerably longer distances to other oxygen atoms, which suggested the existence of a MO+ ion. Distinct bands of stretching M-O modes were observed in the Raman and FT-IR spectra of the compounds. The bond lengths for BiO+ and LaO+ were estimated to be 2.05(1) and 2.09(1) Å correspondingly. The latter was almost 0.3 Å lower than the shortest La-O bond in La2O3. The realization of such a strong lanthanide-oxygen bond in a crystal lattice could provide a very high axial ligand field and might be implemented to develop high-energy-barrier single-molecule magnets as well as to tune properties of lanthanide-based luminophores.

  5. Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross Bracing Joint, Vertical Cross Bracing End Detail - Ceylon Covered Bridge, Limberlost Park, spanning Wabash River at County Road 900 South, Geneva, Adams County, IN

  6. Mapping hydrogeophysical structures with time--domain electromagnetic methods: Resolving small-scale details with large loops and three--component measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, C. J.; Li, Y.; Nabighian, M.

    2004-12-01

    One of the outstanding problems in managing water resources in geologically complex aquifers is to develop improved techniques for mapping compartmentalization due to faulting. And although the role of faults in aquifer dynamics can vary considerably, knowledge of their location is key to understanding aquifer recharge and developing a sensible model for predicting aquifer response due to anthropogenic loads. We have explored the application of time--domain electromagnetic methods for mapping shallow aquifer faults on the western flanks of the Estancia Basin, central New Mexico. The field site is underlain by massive Pennsylvanian limestones (Madera Group) subsequently faulted by Laramide tectonics of the Ancestral Rockies and Neogene extension of the Rio Grande Rift. Two experimental configurations were deployed: a large 50 × 40 m transmitter loop with receiver stations located on a 5 m grid over the loop's interior; and an azimuthal survey consisting of a smaller fixed transmitter with receiver stations at ˜2 m intervals along a 30 m radius circle centered on the transmitter. Three--component transients of magnetic field due to a fast linear ramp--off in the transmitter were recorded at each station. As a rapid reconnaisance tool, the azimuthal experiment is well--suited for identification of subsurface fault planes since symmetry constraints require a vanishing azimuthal ̂ φ component of magnetic field when the electrical strike, or fault plane, lies in the ̂ φ direction. However, each of the experimental configurations revealed that the site's electrical structure is far more three--dimensional than previously believed and is not dominated by the response of a previously identified fault plane. Instead, we have observed spatially coherent transient signals which may indicate compartmentalization over length scales as small as a few tens of meters. Sections of this work were performed at Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia is a multi--program laboratory

  7. In situ mapping of the effect of additional mutations on starch granule structure in amylose-extender (ae) maize kernels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongli; Wellner, Nikolaus; Parker, Mary L; Morris, Victor J; Cheng, Fang

    2015-03-15

    Optical (KI/I2-staining, polarised) and FTIR microscopy has been used to monitor starch granule structure within wild-type (wt), GEMS-0067 and waxy-amylose-extender (wx-ae) maize mutant kernels. In the GEMS-0067 mutant containing the high amylose modifier (HAM) gene(s) plus the recessive ae gene, structural heterogeneity characteristic of the ae mutation was reduced markedly. However, enhanced variation in granule shape and size was observed distributed spatially within the kernel, which appears to be related to new heterogeneity in internal starch granule structure. In wx-ae starch mutants the ae gene led to heterogeneity of starch granule structure equivalent to that in single ae mutants, plus new structural heterogeneity coincident with novel induced variation in granule size and shape. PMID:25542125

  8. roof truss detail, historic strap hinge detail Chopawamsic Recreational ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    roof truss detail, historic strap hinge detail - Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area - Cabin Camp 1, Main Arts and Crafts Lodge, Prince William Forest Park, Triangle, Prince William County, VA

  9. double hung window details, hall window details, entrance door profiles ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    double hung window details, hall window details, entrance door profiles - Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area - Cabin Camp 1, Help's Quarters, Prince William Forest Park, Triangle, Prince William County, VA

  10. Effects of nitrogen and phosphorus additions on soil microbial biomass and community structure in two reforested tropical forests.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Gundersen, Per; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Hao; Mo, Jiangming

    2015-01-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition may aggravate phosphorus (P) deficiency in forests in the warm humid regions of China. To our knowledge, the interactive effects of long-term N deposition and P availability on soil microorganisms in tropical replanted forests remain unclear. We conducted an N and P manipulation experiment with four treatments: control, N addition (15 g N m(-2)·yr(-1)), P addition (15 g P m(-2)·yr(-1)), and N and P addition (15 + 15 g N and P m(-2)·yr(-1), respectively) in disturbed (planted pine forest with recent harvests of understory vegetation and litter) and rehabilitated (planted with pine, but mixed with broadleaf returning by natural succession) forests in southern China. Nitrogen addition did not significantly affect soil microbial biomass, but significantly decreased the abundance of gram-negative bacteria PLFAs in both forest types. Microbial biomass increased significantly after P addition in the disturbed forest but not in the rehabilitated forest. No interactions between N and P additions on soil microorganisms were observed in either forest type. Our results suggest that microbial growth in replanted forests of southern China may be limited by P rather than by N, and this P limitation may be greater in disturbed forests. PMID:26395406

  11. Effects of nitrogen and phosphorus additions on soil microbial biomass and community structure in two reforested tropical forests

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Gundersen, Per; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Hao; Mo, Jiangming

    2015-01-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition may aggravate phosphorus (P) deficiency in forests in the warm humid regions of China. To our knowledge, the interactive effects of long-term N deposition and P availability on soil microorganisms in tropical replanted forests remain unclear. We conducted an N and P manipulation experiment with four treatments: control, N addition (15 g N m−2·yr−1), P addition (15 g P m−2·yr−1), and N and P addition (15 + 15 g N and P m−2·yr−1, respectively) in disturbed (planted pine forest with recent harvests of understory vegetation and litter) and rehabilitated (planted with pine, but mixed with broadleaf returning by natural succession) forests in southern China. Nitrogen addition did not significantly affect soil microbial biomass, but significantly decreased the abundance of gram-negative bacteria PLFAs in both forest types. Microbial biomass increased significantly after P addition in the disturbed forest but not in the rehabilitated forest. No interactions between N and P additions on soil microorganisms were observed in either forest type. Our results suggest that microbial growth in replanted forests of southern China may be limited by P rather than by N, and this P limitation may be greater in disturbed forests. PMID:26395406

  12. Effects of nitrogen and phosphorus additions on soil microbial biomass and community structure in two reforested tropical forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Gundersen, Per; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Hao; Mo, Jiangming

    2015-09-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition may aggravate phosphorus (P) deficiency in forests in the warm humid regions of China. To our knowledge, the interactive effects of long-term N deposition and P availability on soil microorganisms in tropical replanted forests remain unclear. We conducted an N and P manipulation experiment with four treatments: control, N addition (15 g N m-2·yr-1), P addition (15 g P m-2·yr-1), and N and P addition (15 + 15 g N and P m-2·yr-1, respectively) in disturbed (planted pine forest with recent harvests of understory vegetation and litter) and rehabilitated (planted with pine, but mixed with broadleaf returning by natural succession) forests in southern China. Nitrogen addition did not significantly affect soil microbial biomass, but significantly decreased the abundance of gram-negative bacteria PLFAs in both forest types. Microbial biomass increased significantly after P addition in the disturbed forest but not in the rehabilitated forest. No interactions between N and P additions on soil microorganisms were observed in either forest type. Our results suggest that microbial growth in replanted forests of southern China may be limited by P rather than by N, and this P limitation may be greater in disturbed forests.

  13. The effect of Ni addition on the structure of Pt–Sn/C nanoparticles by electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Beyhan, Seden; Pronier, Stéphane

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • A typical Pt/SnO{sub 2} core–shell structure is present in Pt–Sn. • The most of SnO{sub 2} species are likely clustered in Pt–Sn. • SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles prefer to locate close to Pt–Sn–Ni nanoclusters. • Main crystallographic structures are either cubic Pt or PtSn{sub 2}. - Abstract: Carbon supported bimetallic Pt–Sn and trimetallic Pt–Sn–Ni nanoparticles were synthesized by Bönnemann's colloidal precursor method and characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) techniques. HR-TEM and EDX results demonstrated that SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles tend to form clusters in Pt–Sn/C; however, the presence of Ni in the Pt–Sn/C gives rise to an induced interaction between SnO{sub 2} and Pt nanoparticles. Electron diffraction patterns of Pt–Sn–Ni/C showed that either cubic Pt or PtSn{sub 2} structures are present. From the selected area EDX analysis, it was found that both of these structures contain Sn. This suggests that Pt–Sn–Ni/C nanoparticles may be partially covered by Sn-richer PtSn{sub 2} alloyed structure.

  14. Effect of various additives on morphological and structural characteristics of pulse electrodeposited tin coatings from stannous sulfate electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ashutosh; Das, Karabi; Fecht, Hans-J.; Das, Siddhartha

    2014-09-01

    The pulse electrodeposited tin coatings are synthesized from an acidic electrolyte (stannous sulfate, SnSO430 g/L and sulfuric acid, H2SO4-200 g/L) containing various additives (polyethylene glycol (PEG), thiourea and Triton X-100). The effect of the additives on surface morphology, preferred orientation of grains, grain size, and surface roughness has been studied. The final coatings are characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and surface profilometry. In the absence of additives, tin deposition is associated with prominent hydrogen evolution reaction giving rise to rough deposits. Both PEG and thiourea act as grain refiner while Triton X-100 acts as a brightener in the electrolyte. The cathodic polarization on the reduction of the tin (II) ions is more pronounced when a combination of additives is used and further, fine-grained, smooth and shiny electrodeposits of tin are obtained due to a synergistic effect of the adsorbed species.

  15. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    Food additives are substances that become part of a food product when they are added during the processing or making of that food. "Direct" food additives are often added during processing to: Add nutrients ...

  16. 11. Detail of the interior, looking through an interior doorway ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Detail of the interior, looking through an interior doorway toward the front and east window. Note: This photograph shows that the building had been converted to a residence following its use as a school. In addition, the hazardous condition of the structure's interior is evident. Two ceilings which are visible in the photograph, (the upper, probably original plastered ceiling, and a secondary, adapted ceiling) as well as ceiling joists in the southernmost rooms have collapsed. Because of the dangerous condition of the interior of the building, additional interior photography was not attempted at this time. - Perry Township School No. 3, Middle Mount Vernon & Eickhoff Roads, Evansville, Vanderburgh County, IN

  17. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  18. Water Retention and Structure Stability in Smectitic or Kaolinitic Loam and Clay Soils Affected by Polyacrylamide Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamedov, Amirakh; Levy, Guy

    2015-04-01

    Studying the effects of polyacrylamide (PAM) on soil aggregate and structure stability is important in developing effective soil and water conservation practices and in sustaining soil and water quality. Five concentrations of an anionic PAM (0, 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg L-1) with a high molecular weight were tested on loam and clay soils having either a predominant smectitic or kaolinitic clay mineralogy. The effects of the PAM and of soil texture on soil water retention at near saturation and on aggregate and structure stability were investigated using the high energy moisture characteristic (HEMC) method. The S-shaped water retention curves obtained by the HEMC method were characterized by the modified van Genuchten (1980) model that provided: (i) the model parameters α and n, which represent the location of the inflection point and the steepness of the water retention curve, respectively; and (ii) the soil structure index, SI =VDP/MS, where VDP is the volume of drainable pores, an indicator of the quantity of water released by a soil over the range of applied suctions (0-5 J kg-1), and MS is the modal suction representing the most frequent pore sizes (> 60 μm). In general, the treatments tested (clay mineralogy, soil type and PAM concentration) resulted in: (i) a considerable modification of the shape of the water retention curves as indicated by the changes in the α and n values; and; (ii) substantial effects on the stability indices and other model parameters. The contribution of PAM concentration to soil structure stability depended on the clay mineralogy, being more effective in the smectitic soils than in the kaolinitic ones. Although kaolinitic soils are usually more stable than smectitic soils, when the latter were treated with PAM (25-200 mg L-1) the opposite trend was observed. In the loam soils, increasing the PAM concentration notably decreased the differences between values of the stability indices of the smectitic and kaolinitic samples. The

  19. Detonation of highly dilute porous explosives; II: Influence of inert additives on the structure of the front, the parameters, and the reaction time

    SciTech Connect

    Shvedov, K.K.; Aniskin, A.I.; Dremin, A.N.; Il'in, A.N.

    1982-06-01

    For the detonation of porous explosives with inert additives, as for the detonation of individual porous explosives, the basic postulates and conclusions of the modern gasdynamic theory of detonation are valid. The influence of solid, refractory inert additives on the decomposition mechanism of porous explosives depends on the individual properties of the explosives and mainly on the dispersity of the additives. With the elimination of pronounced heating of the additives in mixtures with TNT, a certain positive influence on the appearance of decomposition sources and the total reaction time is observed. In cases with hexogen, no such influence is observed, which is evidently the result of physical inhomogeneity of the porous structure of the charge and the sufficiently high detonation pressures of the mixtures. The basic influence of inert additives on the critical diameter, front structure, detonation parameters, and reaction time of porous explosives is exerted through processes of energy absorption in the reaction region and factors leading to energy losses may lead to ambiguity of the detonation conditions in a system with specified chemical potential energy. The state of the additive in the reaction region must be taken into account for reliable theoretical description of the detonation conditions of porous explosives with a large content of inert additives.

  20. Effect of Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} addition on structure and ionic conductivity of lithium borosilicotitanate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Satpute, N. S.; Deshpande, A. V.

    2014-04-24

    Lithium borosilicotitanate glasses containing Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} were prepared by melt quenching technique. Electrical conductivity, density, molar volume and glass transition temperature T{sub g} for all the glass samples were measured. IR spectroscopy was used for structural studies of these glasses in the range from 400 to 2000 cm{sub −1}. The conductivity of the Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} containing glasses was found to be half an order higher than the base glass. The electrical conductivity was interpreted from the point of view of glass structure which suggests that an enhancement in conductivity is due to the incorporation of Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in the macromolecular network. The molar volume and glass transition temperature T{sub g} results are found to be in good correlation with conductivity results.

  1. Azasugar inhibitors as pharmacological chaperones for Krabbe disease† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of IGF, AGF, IGL and DIL syntheses including NMR spectra. Table containing X-ray data collection and refinement statistics. Dose dependence of thermal stabilization of GALC. Controls for DSF assays. IGF- and AGF-mediated stabilization of GALC is buffer and pH dependent. See DOI: 10.1039/c5sc00754b Click here for additional data file. ‡ ‡Data deposition: the atomic coordinates and structure factors have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank, http://www.pdb.org [PDB ID codes 4UFH (IGF), 4UFI (AGF), 4UFJ (IGL), 4UFK (DIL), 4UFL (DGN) and 4UFM (DGJ)].

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Chris H.; Viuff, Agnete H.; Spratley, Samantha J.; Salamone, Stéphane; Christensen, Stig H.; Read, Randy J.; Moriarty, Nigel W.

    2015-01-01

    Krabbe disease is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by rapid demyelination of nerve fibers. This disease is caused by defects in the lysosomal enzyme β-galactocerebrosidase (GALC), which hydrolyzes the terminal galactose from glycosphingolipids. These lipids are essential components of eukaryotic cell membranes: substrates of GALC include galactocerebroside, the primary lipid component of myelin, and psychosine, a cytotoxic metabolite. Mutations of GALC that cause misfolding of the protein may be responsive to pharmacological chaperone therapy (PCT), whereby small molecules are used to stabilize these mutant proteins, thus correcting trafficking defects and increasing residual catabolic activity in cells. Here we describe a new approach for the synthesis of galacto-configured azasugars and the characterization of their interaction with GALC using biophysical, biochemical and crystallographic methods. We identify that the global stabilization of GALC conferred by azasugar derivatives, measured by fluorescence-based thermal shift assays, is directly related to their binding affinity, measured by enzyme inhibition. X-ray crystal structures of these molecules bound in the GALC active site reveal which residues participate in stabilizing interactions, show how potency is achieved and illustrate the penalties of aza/iminosugar ring distortion. The structure–activity relationships described here identify the key physical properties required of pharmacological chaperones for Krabbe disease and highlight the potential of azasugars as stabilizing agents for future enzyme replacement therapies. This work lays the foundation for new drug-based treatments of Krabbe disease. PMID:26029356

  2. Phosphonium-Organophosphate Ionic Liquids as Lubricant Additives: Effects of Cation Structure on Physicochemical and Tribological Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhill, William C.; Qu, Jun; Luo, Huimin; Meyer III, Harry M.; Ma, Cheng; Chi, Miaofang; Papke, Brian L.

    2014-11-17

    In our previous work we suggest great potential for a phosphonium-organophosphate ionic liquid (IL) as an antiwear lubricant additive. In this study, a set of five ILs were carefully designed and synthesized, with identical organophosphate anions but dissimilar phosphonium cations, to allow systematic investigation of the effects of cation alkyl chain length and symmetry on physicochemical and tribological properties. Symmetric cations with shorter alkyl chains seem to increase the density and thermal stability due to closer packing. On the other hand, either higher cation symmetry or longer alkyl moieties induce a higher viscosity, though the viscosity index is dependent more on molecular mass than on symmetry. While a larger cation size generally increases an IL’s solubility in nonpolar hydrocarbon oils, six-carbon seems to be the critical minimum alkyl chain length for high oil miscibility. Both the two ILs, that are mutually oil miscible, have demonstrated promising lubricating performance at 1.04% treat rate, though the symmetric-cation IL moderately outperformed the asymmetric-cation IL. Moreover, characterizations on the tribofilm formed by the best-performing symmetric-cation IL revealed the film thickness, nanostructure, and chemical composition. Our results provide fundamental insights for future molecular design in developing oil-soluble ILs as lubricant additives.

  3. Linking process, structure, property, and performance for metal-based additive manufacturing: computational approaches with experimental support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jacob; Xiong, Wei; Yan, Wentao; Lin, Stephen; Cheng, Puikei; Kafka, Orion L.; Wagner, Gregory J.; Cao, Jian; Liu, Wing Kam

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) methods for rapid prototyping of 3D materials (3D printing) have become increasingly popular with a particular recent emphasis on those methods used for metallic materials. These processes typically involve an accumulation of cyclic phase changes. The widespread interest in these methods is largely stimulated by their unique ability to create components of considerable complexity. However, modeling such processes is exceedingly difficult due to the highly localized and drastic material evolution that often occurs over the course of the manufacture time of each component. Final product characterization and validation are currently driven primarily by experimental means as a result of the lack of robust modeling procedures. In the present work, the authors discuss primary detrimental hurdles that have plagued effective modeling of AM methods for metallic materials while also providing logical speculation into preferable research directions for overcoming these hurdles. The primary focus of this work encompasses the specific areas of high-performance computing, multiscale modeling, materials characterization, process modeling, experimentation, and validation for final product performance of additively manufactured metallic components.

  4. BFS Simulation and Experimental Analysis of the Effect of Ti Additions on the Structure of NiAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Noebe, Ronald D.; Ferrante,John; Garg, Anita; Honecy, Frank S.; Amador, Carlos

    1999-01-01

    The Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) method for alloy energetics is applied to the study of ternary additions to NiAl. A description of the method and its application to alloy design is given. Two different approaches are used in the analysis of the effect of Ti additions to NiAl. First, a thorough analytical study is performed, where the energy of formation, lattice parameter and bulk modulus are calculated for a large number of possible atomic distributions of Ni, Al and Ti. Substitutional site preference schemes and formation of precipitates are thus predicted and analyzed. The second approach used consists of the determination of temperature effects on the final results, as obtained by performing a number of large scale numerical simulations using the Monte Carlo-Metropolis procedure and BFS for the calculation of the energy at every step in the simulation. The results indicate a sharp preference of Ti for Al sites in Ni-rich NiAl alloys and the formation of ternary Heusler precipitates beyond the predicted solubility limit of 5 at. % Ti. Experimental analysis of three Ni-Al-Ti alloys confirms the theoretical predictions.

  5. Shifts in the phylogenetic structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in response to experimental nitrogen and carbon dioxide additions.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Rebecca C; Bohannan, Brendan J M

    2015-09-01

    Global N inputs and atmospheric CO2 concentrations have increased as a result of human activities, and are predicted to increase along with population growth, with potentially negative effects on biodiversity. Using taxonomic and phylogenetic measures, we examined the response of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) to experimental manipulations of N and CO2 at the Jasper Ridge Global Change Experiment. No significant interactions between N and CO2 were observed, but individual effects of N and CO2 were found. Elevated CO2 resulted in changes in phylogenetic similarity, and a shift to phylogenetic clustering of AMF communities. N addition resulted in higher phylogenetic diversity and evenness, with no shifts in community composition and no significant signal for phylogenetic clustering. N addition resulted in an increase in both available N and the N:P ratio in N-amended plots, which suggests that changing patterns of nutrient limitation could have lead to altered species interactions. These findings suggest that elevated levels of N and CO2 altered patterns of AMF community assembly, with potential effects on ecosystem function. PMID:25990297

  6. Phosphonium-Organophosphate Ionic Liquids as Lubricant Additives: Effects of Cation Structure on Physicochemical and Tribological Characteristics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Barnhill, William C.; Qu, Jun; Luo, Huimin; Meyer III, Harry M.; Ma, Cheng; Chi, Miaofang; Papke, Brian L.

    2014-11-17

    In our previous work we suggest great potential for a phosphonium-organophosphate ionic liquid (IL) as an antiwear lubricant additive. In this study, a set of five ILs were carefully designed and synthesized, with identical organophosphate anions but dissimilar phosphonium cations, to allow systematic investigation of the effects of cation alkyl chain length and symmetry on physicochemical and tribological properties. Symmetric cations with shorter alkyl chains seem to increase the density and thermal stability due to closer packing. On the other hand, either higher cation symmetry or longer alkyl moieties induce a higher viscosity, though the viscosity index is dependent moremore » on molecular mass than on symmetry. While a larger cation size generally increases an IL’s solubility in nonpolar hydrocarbon oils, six-carbon seems to be the critical minimum alkyl chain length for high oil miscibility. Both the two ILs, that are mutually oil miscible, have demonstrated promising lubricating performance at 1.04% treat rate, though the symmetric-cation IL moderately outperformed the asymmetric-cation IL. Moreover, characterizations on the tribofilm formed by the best-performing symmetric-cation IL revealed the film thickness, nanostructure, and chemical composition. Our results provide fundamental insights for future molecular design in developing oil-soluble ILs as lubricant additives.« less

  7. Modification of the Structure of Ti-Bearing Mold Flux by the Simultaneous Addition of B2O3 and Na2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhongmin; Sun, Yongqi; Liu, Lili; Zhang, Zuotai

    2016-03-01

    The present paper mainly focused on how B2O3 and Na2O additions influenced the structure of the Ti-bearing fluoride-free mold flux and investigated how the boron-related units were affected by Na2O. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, 11B magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were utilized to identify different structural units and to analyze the overall modification of the network by additives. It was found that BO3 was more abundant than BO4 in the flux. In addition, the addition of B2O3 and Na2O was proved to promote conversion from non-ring BO3 to tetrahedral BO4, and this was confirmed by FTIR and 11B MAS NMR analysis. BO3 was a two-dimensional structure unit and contributed to construct a less stable network. With increasing B2O3 content, degree of polymerization of the flux was increased as confirmed by increased fraction of Q 3 in Raman spectra and non-bridging oxygen in XPS. By contrast, the addition of Na2O, which is a strong network breaker, brought about more non-bridging oxygen by breaking the Si-O-Si linkage which was verified by XPS results. Consequently, a less polymerized network was observed by decreasing content of Q 3 from Raman spectra.

  8. Detail, Scandia Hotel, view to southwest showing details of balloon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, Scandia Hotel, view to southwest showing details of balloon framing, including full two-story studs notched to carry girts supporting second story floor joists (210mm lens) - Scandia Hotel, 225 First Street, Eureka, Humboldt County, CA

  9. 56. DETAIL OF SOUTH SIDE OF WINDING SHEAVES: Detail of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. DETAIL OF SOUTH SIDE OF WINDING SHEAVES: Detail of south side of the winding sheaves. These sheaves drive the California Street cable. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  10. Detail view of ornamental lighting detail of southwest corner of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of ornamental lighting detail of southwest corner of Sixth Street Bridge. Looking northeast - Sixth Street Bridge, Spanning 101 Freeway at Sixth Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. Detail of pumps in troughs, detail of truss attachment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of pumps in troughs, detail of truss - attachment to the wall - as well as the troughs themselves. Interior of the main hatchery building, view to the east. - Prairie Creek Fish Hatchery, Hwy. 101, Orick, Humboldt County, CA

  12. 22. PIER NO. IV DETAIL, WITH DETAIL OF SOUTHWEST PORTAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. PIER NO. IV DETAIL, WITH DETAIL OF SOUTHWEST PORTAL AND SOUTHEAST WEB OF THROUGH TRUSS; VIEW TO NORTH - Nebraska City Bridge, Spanning Missouri River near Highway 2 between Nebraska & Iowa, Nebraska City, Otoe County, NE

  13. 'The effect of inulin addition on structural and textural properties of extruded products under several extrusion conditions': The effect of inulin addition on structural and textural properties of rice flour extrudates.

    PubMed

    Tsokolar-Tsikopoulos, Konstantinos C; Katsavou, Ioanna D; Krokida, Magdalini K

    2015-10-01

    The growing consumer demand for healthy snacks has turned the interest of industry and research in the development of new ready-to-eat products, enriched with dietary fibers. Inulin is a soluble fiber with a neutral taste that promotes the good function of the intestine. Rice flour extrudates were produced under various extrusion temperatures, screw speeds, feed moisture concentrations and inulin replacement levels. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the material characteristics and the extrusion conditions on the structural and textural properties of the extrudates. Simple mathematical models were used for properties correlation with process conditions and through regression analysis it was revealed that there is a significant effect of extrusion temperature, screw speed, feed moisture content and inulin concentration on the final properties. Both density and maximum stress increased when moisture content and inulin concentration increased, while they decreased when extrusion temperature and screw speed increased. These results were also strengthened by scanning electron microscopy. The highest expansion ratio was presented when decreasing all process conditions apart from screw speed. PMID:26396364

  14. Nucleotide sequence and characterization of four additional genes of the hydrogenase structural operon from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae.

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, E; Palacios, J M; Murillo, J; Ruiz-Argüeso, T

    1992-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 2.5-kbp region following the hydrogenase structural genes (hupSL) in the H2 uptake gene cluster from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae UPM791 was determined. Four closely linked genes encoding peptides of 27.9 (hupC), 22.1 (hupD), 19.0 (hupE), and 10.4 (hupF) kDa were identified immediately downstream of hupL. Proteins with comparable apparent molecular weights were detected by heterologous expression of these genes in Escherichia coli. The six genes, hupS to hupF, are arranged as an operon, and by mutant complementation analysis, it was shown that genes hupSLCD are cotranscribed. A transcription start site preceded by the -12 to -24 consensus sequence characteristic of NtrA-dependent promoters was identified upstream of hupS. On the basis of the lack of oxygen-dependent H2 uptake activity of a hupC::Tn5 mutant and on structural characteristics of the protein, we postulate that HupC is a b-type cytochrome involved in electron transfer from hydrogenase to oxygen. The product from hupE, which is needed for full hydrogenase activity, exhibited characteristics typical of a membrane protein. The features of HupC and HupE suggest that they form, together with the hydrogenase itself, a membrane-bound protein complex involved in hydrogen oxidation. Images PMID:1597428

  15. Clarifying the chemical state of additives in membranes for polymer electrolyte fuel cells by X-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanuma, Toshihiro; Itoh, Takanori

    2016-02-01

    Cerium and manganese compounds are used in the membrane for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) as radical scavengers to mitigate chemical degradation of the membrane. The chemical states of cerium and manganese in the membrane were investigated using a fluorescence X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) technique. Membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were subjected to open circuit voltage (OCV) condition, under which hydroxyl radicals attack the membrane; a shift in absorption energy in X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra was compared between Ce- and Mn-containing membranes before and after OCV testing. In the case of the Ce-containing MEA, there was no significant difference in XANES spectra before and after OCV testing, whereas in the case of the Mn-containing MEA, there was an obvious shift in XANES absorption energy after OCV testing, indicating that Mn atoms with higher valence state than 2+ exist in the membrane after OCV testing. This can be attributed to the difference in the rate of reduction; the reaction of Ce4+ with ·OOH is much faster than that of Mn3+ with ·OOH, leaving some of the Mn atoms with higher valence state. It was confirmed that cerium and manganese redox couples reduced the attack from radicals, mitigating membrane degradation.

  16. Effect of Additional 3d Elements M (M = Fe and Ni) on Atomic Ordered Structure in Cu-M-Pd alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Naseeb; Takahashi, Miwako; Bashir Ziya, Amer; Ohshima, Ken-ichi

    X-ray diffraction measurements were performed to elucidate the effect of ternary addition of Fe and Ni elements to Cu-rich Cu-Pd binary alloy system on the structure and an atomic ordering. X-ray polycrystalline diffraction patterns of the specimens quenched from 900 °C have shown that a single phase with face-centered cubic (fcc) structure is formed in all the specimens for Ni system and in specimens with Pd composition xPd (at. %) more than 10 for Fe system. After appropriate heat treatment, the Fe system a fcc single phase forms fcc-based Cu3Au-type ordered structure for xPd around 20, and body-centered-cubic based CsCl-type ordered structure xPd for around 40. Assuming that Fe atoms simply substitute for Cu atoms in the ordered structures, the atomic phase coincides well with that of Cu-Pd alloys for the Cu3Au-type structure, but there is a discrepancy for the CsCl-type structure on that it does not appear as a single phase in Cu-Fe-Pd alloys. As for Ni system, no ordered structures are formed except for the alloys with xPd more than 35, in which fcc and CsCl-type structures are found to coexist.

  17. Clinical professional governance for detailed clinical models.

    PubMed

    Goossen, William; Goossen-Baremans, Anneke

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes the need for Detailed Clinical Models for contemporary Electronic Health Systems, data exchange and data reuse. It starts with an explanation of the components related to Detailed Clinical Models with a brief summary of knowledge representation, including terminologies representing clinic relevant "things" in the real world, and information models that abstract these in order to let computers process data about these things. Next, Detailed Clinical Models are defined and their purpose is described. It builds on existing developments around the world and accumulates in current work to create a technical specification at the level of the International Standards Organization. The core components of properly expressed Detailed Clinical Models are illustrated, including clinical knowledge and context, data element specification, code bindings to terminologies and meta-information about authors, versioning among others. Detailed Clinical Models to date are heavily based on user requirements and specify the conceptual and logical levels of modelling. It is not precise enough for specific implementations, which requires an additional step. However, this allows Detailed Clinical Models to serve as specifications for many different kinds of implementations. Examples of Detailed Clinical Models are presented both in text and in Unified Modelling Language. Detailed Clinical Models can be positioned in health information architectures, where they serve at the most detailed granular level. The chapter ends with examples of projects that create and deploy Detailed Clinical Models. All have in common that they can often reuse materials from earlier projects, and that strict governance of these models is essential to use them safely in health care information and communication technology. Clinical validation is one point of such governance, and model testing another. The Plan Do Check Act cycle can be applied for governance of Detailed Clinical Models

  18. Toughening by the addition of phosphorus to a high-strength steel with ultrafine elongated grain structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, Meysam; Kimura, Yuuji; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki

    2013-02-01

    Phosphorus-doped high-strength steels are typically brittle at room temperature. In contrast to the non-hardening embrittlement of body-centred cubic (bcc) steels which decreases toughness without increasing strength, we observed an increase in toughness of about 20% by adding a large amount (0.053 wt%) of phosphorus (P) to a high-strength bcc steel with an ultrafine elongated ferrite grain structure processed by warm calibre rolling at 500 °C which produced a 91% reduction in area. The enhanced toughness is attributed to P segregation, which causes grain boundaries to become feasible crack propagation paths, thereby enhancing delamination toughening. The 0.053% P steel showed a microstructure and tensile properties similar to those of 0.001% P steel (reference steel).

  19. Turbulence structure of drag-reducing surfactant solution in two-dimensional channel with additional heat transfer enhancement method

    SciTech Connect

    Li, P.W.; Daisaka, H.; Kawaguchi, Y.; Yabe, A.; Hishida, K.; Maeda, M.

    1999-07-01

    The turbulent characteristics of a surfactant water solution in changing from drag-reducing flow to turbulent flow inside a two-dimensional smooth channel and in changing from turbulent flow to drag-reducing flow in the same channel with a mesh plug were investigated through LDV measurement in this study. The mesh plug was used to exert high shear stress to destroy micelle structures in the surfactant solution so that turbulence could be produced for better heat transfer. The two-component LDV system was installed on a movable platform, which could be moved streamwise of the flow to measure the two-dimensional velocity at different stations downstream from the mesh plug. The surfactant tested was Cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (C{sub 16}H{sub 33}N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}Cl, abbreviated as CTAC). Local tap water was used as solvent and same weight concentration of sodium salicylate was used as the counter-ion material. The investigation of turbulent parameters for the drag-reducing flow with increasing Reynolds number showed that when the Reynolds number exceeded the drag-reducing region, the turbulent character was the same as that of water. The turbulent parameters of surfactant flow downstream the mesh plug showed that the high heat transfer region had the same turbulent intensity as that of water flow. As the critical Reynolds number was approached, it became easier to obtain such a turbulent region by mesh plug. In such cases, the mesh helped to create high wall shear stress and therefore to destroy the super-ordered structures of rod-like micelles for introducing turbulence. However, it was found that the turbulent intensities of the velocity gradually decreased to the same as those of drag-reducing flow downstream from the mesh because the mesh plug only produced a local high shear stress.

  20. The fine details of evolution.

    PubMed

    Laskowski, Roman A; Thornton, Janet M; Sternberg, Michael J E

    2009-08-01

    Charles Darwin's theory of evolution was based on studies of biology at the species level. In the time since his death, studies at the molecular level have confirmed his ideas about the kinship of all life on Earth and have provided a wealth of detail about the evolutionary relationships between different species and a deeper understanding of the finer workings of natural selection. We now have a wealth of data, including the genome sequences of a wide range of organisms, an even larger number of protein sequences, a significant knowledge of the three-dimensional structures of proteins, DNA and other biological molecules, and a huge body of information about the operation of these molecules as systems in the molecular machinery of all living things. This issue of Biochemical Society Transactions contains papers from oral presentations given at a Biochemical Society Focused Meeting to commemorate the 200th Anniversary of Charles Darwin's birth, held on 26-27 January 2009 at the Wellcome Trust Conference Centre, Cambridge. The talks reported on some of the insights into evolution which have been obtained from the study of protein sequences, structures and systems. PMID:19614583

  1. Influences on physicians' adoption of electronic detailing (e-detailing).

    PubMed

    Alkhateeb, Fadi M; Doucette, William R

    2009-01-01

    E-detailing means using digital technology: internet, video conferencing and interactive voice response. There are two types of e-detailing: interactive (virtual) and video. Currently, little is known about what factors influence physicians' adoption of e-detailing. The objectives of this study were to test a model of physicians' adoption of e-detailing and to describe physicians using e-detailing. A mail survey was sent to a random sample of 2000 physicians practicing in Iowa. Binomial logistic regression was used to test the model of influences on physician adoption of e-detailing. On the basis of Rogers' model of adoption, the independent variables included relative advantage, compatibility, complexity, peer influence, attitudes, years in practice, presence of restrictive access to traditional detailing, type of specialty, academic affiliation, type of practice setting and control variables. A total of 671 responses were received giving a response rate of 34.7%. A total of 141 physicians (21.0%) reported using of e-detailing. The overall adoption model for using either type of e-detailing was found to be significant. Relative advantage, peer influence, attitudes, type of specialty, presence of restrictive access and years of practice had significant influences on physician adoption of e-detailing. The model of adoption of innovation is useful to explain physicians' adoption of e-detailing. PMID:19306198

  2. Revealing the Effect of Additives with Different Solubility on the Morphology and the Donor Crystalline Structures of Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiao; Zhao, Suling; Xu, Zheng; Qiao, Bo; Huang, Di; Zhao, Ling; Li, Yang; Zhu, Youqin; Wang, Peng

    2016-07-20

    The impact of two kinds of additives, such as 1,8-octanedithiol (ODT), 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO), diphenylether (DPE), and 1-chloronaphthalene (CN), on the performance of poly[(5,6-difluoro-2,1,3-benzothiadiazol-4,7-diyl)-alt-(3,3‴-di(2-octyldodecyl)2,2';5',2″;5″,2‴-quaterthiophen-5,5‴-diyl)] (PffBT4T-2OD):[6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) based polymer solar cell are investigated. The polymer solar cells (PSCs) of PffBT4T-2OD:PC71BM by using CN show a more improved PCE of 10.23%. The solubility difference of PffBT4T-2OD in DIO and CN creates the fine transformation in phase separation and favorable nanoscale morphology. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) data clearly shows molecular stacking and orientation of the active layer. Interestingly, DIO and CN have different functions on the effect of the molecular orientation. These interesting studies provide important guidance to optimize and control complicated molecular orientations and nanoscale morphology of PffBT4T-2OD based thick films for the application in PSCs. PMID:27328855

  3. Optimal welding parameters for very high power ultrasonic additive manufacturing of smart structures with aluminum 6061 matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolcott, Paul J.; Hehr, Adam; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) is a recent solid state manufacturing process that combines ad- ditive joining of thin metal tapes with subtractive milling operations to generate near net shape metallic parts. Due to the minimal heating during the process, UAM is a proven method of embedding Ni-Ti, Fe-Ga, and PVDF to create active metal matrix composites. Recently, advances in the UAM process utilizing 9 kW very high power (VHP) welding has improved bonding properties, enabling joining of high strength materials previously unweldable with 1 kW low power UAM. Consequently, a design of experiments study was conducted to optimize welding conditions for aluminum 6061 components. This understanding is critical in the design of UAM parts containing smart materials. Build parameters, including weld force, weld speed, amplitude, and temperature were varied based on a Taguchi experimental design matrix and tested for me- chanical strength. Optimal weld parameters were identi ed with statistical methods including a generalized linear model for analysis of variance (ANOVA), mean e ects plots, and interaction e ects plots.

  4. From the Arctic to fetal life: physiological importance and structural basis of an 'additional' chloride-binding site in haemoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    De Rosa, M Cristina; Castagnola, Massimo; Bertonati, Claudia; Galtieri, Antonio; Giardina, Bruno

    2004-01-01

    Haemoglobins from mammals of sub-Arctic and Arctic species, as well as fetal human Hb, are all characterized by a significantly lower Delta H of oxygenation compared with the majority of mammalian haemoglobins from temperate species (exceptions are represented by some cold-resistant species, such as cow, horse and pig). This has been interpreted as an adaptive mechanism of great importance from a physiological point of view. To date, the molecular basis of this thermodynamic characteristic is still not known. In the present study, we show that binding of extra chloride (with respect to adult human Hb) ions to Hb would significantly contribute to lowering the overall heat of oxygenation, thus providing a molecular basis for the low effect of temperature on the oxygenation-deoxygenation cycle. To this aim, the oxygen binding properties of bovine Hb, bear (Ursus arctos) Hb and horse Hb, which are representative of this series of haemoglobins, have been studied with special regard to the effect of heterotropic ligands, such as organic phosphates (namely 2,3-diphosphoglycerate) and chloride. Functional results are consistent with a mechanism for ligand binding that involves an additional binding site for chloride ion. Analysis of computational chemistry results, obtained by the GRID program, further confirm the hypothesis that the reason for the lower Delta H of oxygenation is mainly due to an increase in the number of the oxygen-linked chloride-binding sites. PMID:14979874

  5. Addition of MgO Nanoparticles to Carbon Structural Steel and the Effect on Inclusion Characteristics and Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiangzhou; Yang, Shufeng; Li, Jingshe; Liao, Hang; Gao, Wei; Wu, Tuo

    2016-04-01

    An innovative approach for pre-dispersing MgO nanoparticles with AlSi alloy nanoparticles was established, and the nanoparticles were dispersed well in carbon structural steel. After adding different mass fractions of MgO nanoparticles in steel, the majority of inclusions contained MgO·Al2O3 spinel and MgO-Al2O3-bearing hybrid inclusion, and these inclusions promoted acicular ferrite (AF) formation. With increasing amount of added nanoparticles, the average inclusion size increased from 0.90 to 1.50 μm and the inclusion size was considerably refined, but the ability of inclusions to induce AF was greatly declined. It was revealed that the inclusion size was the decisive factor influencing the inducing ability of inclusions for AF, which also got a solid support from the nucleation thermomechanical and dynamic analyses. When the mass fraction of MgO nanoparticles reached 0.05 pct, the proportion of AF in microstructure is relatively larger and the degree of interlocking of the AF within the microstructure was optimized. The ferrite grains also got refined and the average grain size decreased by more than 94 pct compared with that of the original steel.

  6. An Empirically Derived Approach to the Latent Structure of the Adult Attachment Interview: Additional Convergent and Discriminant Validity Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Haydon, Katherine C.; Roisman, Glenn I.; Marks, Michael J.; Fraley, R. Chris

    2011-01-01

    Building on studies examining the latent structure of attachment-related individual differences as assessed by the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) via Principal Components Analysis, the current report further explores the validity of four AAI dimensions reported by Haydon, Roisman, and Burt (in press): dismissing states of mind, preoccupied states of mind, and inferred negative experience with maternal and paternal caregivers. Study 1 reports evidence of distinctive cognitive correlates of dismissing v. preoccupied states of mind with reaction time in an attachment Stroop task and the valence of endorsed self-descriptors, respectively. Study 2 replicates prior meta-analytic findings of generally trivial convergence between state of mind dimensions and self-reported avoidance and anxiety (i.e., Roisman, Holland, et al., 2007). Study 3 contrastively demonstrates moderate empirical overlap between inferred experience—but not state of mind—AAI scales and self-reported avoidance and anxiety when the latter were assessed at the level of specific caregivers. Taken together, these findings add to accumulating evidence that an empirically-driven approach to scaling adults on AAI dimensions (Haydon et al., in press; Roisman et al., 2007) aids in identifying theoretically anticipated and distinctive affective, behavioral, and cognitive correlates of dismissing versus preoccupied states of mind. PMID:21838649

  7. Influences of porous structurization and Pt addition on the improvement of photocatalytic performance of WO3 particles.

    PubMed

    Arutanti, Osi; Nandiyanto, Asep Bayu Dani; Ogi, Takashi; Kim, Tae Oh; Okuyama, Kikuo

    2015-02-11

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) displays excellent performance in solar-related material applications. However, this material is rare and expensive. Therefore, developing efficient materials using smaller amounts of WO3 is inevitable. In this study, we investigated how to create high photocatalytic performance of WO3 particles containing platinum (Pt, as a co-catalyst) and homogeneously spherical macropores (as a medium to enable access of large molecules and light penetration into the remote internal regions of the catalyst). The present particles were prepared by spray drying of a precursor solution containing WO3 nanoparticles, Pt solution, and polystyrene (PS) spheres (as a colloidal template). Photocatalytic studies showed that changes in particle morphology (from dense with smooth surfaces, to dense with rough surfaces, to porous structures) and added Pt effectively improved the photocatalytic performance over WO3 nanoparticles. Our results showed that the best precursor (prepared using a PS/WO3 mass ratio of 0.32 and containing Pt co-catalyst) provided WO3 particles with a photocatalytic rate of more than 5 times that of pure 10 nm WO3 nanoparticles. Moreover, the catalyst can be effectively recycled without an apparent decrease in its photocatalytic activity. The experimental results were also supported by a proposal mechanism of the photocatalytic reaction phenomenon. PMID:25608579

  8. Structure of a Microbial Community in Soil after Prolonged Addition of Low Levels of Simulated Acid Rain

    PubMed Central

    Pennanen, Taina; Fritze, Hannu; Vanhala, Pekka; Kiikkilä, Oili; Neuvonen, Seppo; Bååth, Erland

    1998-01-01

    Humus samples were collected 12 growing seasons after the start of a simulated acid rain experiment situated in the subarctic environment. The acid rain was simulated with H2SO4, a combination of H2SO4 and HNO3, and HNO3 at two levels of moderate acidic loads close to the natural anthropogenic pollution levels of southern Scandinavia. The higher levels of acid applications resulted in acidification, as defined by humus chemistry. The concentrations of base cations decreased, while the concentrations of exchangeable H+, Al, and Fe increased. Humus pH decreased from 3.83 to 3.65. Basal respiration decreased with decreasing humus pH, and total microbial biomass, measured by substrate-induced respiration and total amount of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA), decreased slightly. An altered PLFA pattern indicated a change in the microbial community structure at the higher levels of acid applications. In general, branched fatty acids, typical of gram-positive bacteria, increased in the acid plots. PLFA analysis performed on the bacterial community growing on agar plates also showed that the relative amount of PLFA specific for gram-positive bacteria increased due to the acidification. The changed bacterial community was adapted to the more acidic environment in the acid-treated plots, even though bacterial growth rates, estimated by thymidine and leucine incorporation, decreased with pH. Fungal activity (measured as acetate incorporation into ergosterol) was not affected. This result indicates that bacteria were more affected than fungi by the acidification. The capacity of the bacterial community to utilize 95 different carbon sources was variable and only showed weak correlations to pH. Differences in the toxicities of H2SO4 and HNO3 for the microbial community were not found. PMID:9603831

  9. Food additives.

    PubMed

    Berglund, F

    1978-01-01

    The use of additives to food fulfils many purposes, as shown by the index issued by the Codex Committee on Food Additives: Acids, bases and salts; Preservatives, Antioxidants and antioxidant synergists; Anticaking agents; Colours; Emulfifiers; Thickening agents; Flour-treatment agents; Extraction solvents; Carrier solvents; Flavours (synthetic); Flavour enhancers; Non-nutritive sweeteners; Processing aids; Enzyme preparations. Many additives occur naturally in foods, but this does not exclude toxicity at higher levels. Some food additives are nutrients, or even essential nutritents, e.g. NaCl. Examples are known of food additives causing toxicity in man even when used according to regulations, e.g. cobalt in beer. In other instances, poisoning has been due to carry-over, e.g. by nitrate in cheese whey - when used for artificial feed for infants. Poisonings also occur as the result of the permitted substance being added at too high levels, by accident or carelessness, e.g. nitrite in fish. Finally, there are examples of hypersensitivity to food additives, e.g. to tartrazine and other food colours. The toxicological evaluation, based on animal feeding studies, may be complicated by impurities, e.g. orthotoluene-sulfonamide in saccharin; by transformation or disappearance of the additive in food processing in storage, e.g. bisulfite in raisins; by reaction products with food constituents, e.g. formation of ethylurethane from diethyl pyrocarbonate; by metabolic transformation products, e.g. formation in the gut of cyclohexylamine from cyclamate. Metabolic end products may differ in experimental animals and in man: guanylic acid and inosinic acid are metabolized to allantoin in the rat but to uric acid in man. The magnitude of the safety margin in man of the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) is not identical to the "safety factor" used when calculating the ADI. The symptoms of Chinese Restaurant Syndrome, although not hazardous, furthermore illustrate that the whole ADI

  10. Efficient eco-friendly inverted quantum dot sensitized solar cells† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: TEM images of QDs, XPS spectra, UV-vis and PL spectra of the sensitized electrodes, details about photophysical characterization and IPCE spectra interpretation. See DOI: 10.1039/c5ta06769c Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jinhyung; Sajjad, Muhammad T.; Jouneau, Pierre-Henri; Ruseckas, Arvydas; Faure-Vincent, Jérôme; Reiss, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in quantum dot (QD) sensitized solar cells has demonstrated the possibility of low-cost and efficient photovoltaics. However, the standard device structure based on n-type materials often suffers from slow hole injection rate, which may lead to unbalanced charge transport. We have fabricated efficient p-type (inverted) QD sensitized cells, which combine the advantages of conventional QD cells with p-type dye sensitized configurations. Moreover, p-type QD sensitized cells can be used in highly promising tandem configurations with n-type ones. QDs without toxic Cd and Pb elements and with improved absorption and stability were successfully deposited onto mesoporous NiO electrode showing good coverage and penetration according to morphological analysis. Detailed photophysical charge transfer studies showed that high hole injection rates (108 s–1) observed in such systems are comparable with electron injection in conventional n-type QD assemblies. Inverted solar cells fabricated with various QDs demonstrate excellent power conversion efficiencies of up to 1.25%, which is 4 times higher than the best values for previous inverted QD sensitized cells. Attempts to passivate the surface of the QDs show that traditional methods of reduction of recombination in the QD sensitized cells are not applicable to the inverted architectures. PMID:27478616

  11. Synthesis and characterization of high-surface-area millimeter-sized silica beads with hierarchical multi-modal pore structure by the addition of agar

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yosep; Choi, Junhyun; Tong, Meiping; Kim, Hyunjung

    2014-04-01

    Millimeter-sized spherical silica foams (SSFs) with hierarchical multi-modal pore structure featuring high specific surface area and ordered mesoporous frameworks were successfully prepared using aqueous agar addition, foaming and drop-in-oil processes. The pore-related properties of the prepared spherical silica (SSs) and SSFs were systematically characterized by field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small-angle X-ray diffraction (SAXRD), Hg intrusion porosimetry, and N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption isotherm measurements. Improvements in the BET surface area and total pore volume were observed at 504 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} and 5.45 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1}, respectively, after an agar addition and foaming process. Despite the increase in the BET surface area, the mesopore wall thickness and the pore size of the mesopores generated from the block copolymer with agar addition were unchanged based on the SAXRD, TEM, and BJH methods. The SSFs prepared in the present study were confirmed to have improved BET surface area and micropore volume through the agar loading, and to exhibit interconnected 3-dimensional network macropore structure leading to the enhancement of total porosity and BET surface area via the foaming process. - Highlights: • Millimeter-sized spherical silica foams (SSFs) are successfully prepared. • SSFs exhibit high BET surface area and ordered hierarchical pore structure. • Agar addition improves BET surface area and micropore volume of SSFs. • Foaming process generates interconnected 3-D network macropore structure of SSFs.

  12. Structural and rate studies of the 1,2-additions of lithium phenylacetylide to lithiated quinazolinones: influence of mixed aggregates on the reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Timothy F; Winemiller, Mark D; Collum, David B; Parsons, Rodney L; Davulcu, Akin H; Harris, Gregory D; Fortunak, Joseph M; Confalone, Pat N

    2004-05-01

    The 1,2-addition of lithium phenylacetylide (PhCCLi) to quinazolinones was investigated using a combination of structural and rate studies. (6)Li, (13)C, and (19)F NMR spectroscopies show that deprotonation of quinazolinones and phenylacetylene in THF/pentane solutions with lithium hexamethyldisilazide affords a mixture of lithium quinazolinide/PhCCLi mixed dimer and mixed tetramer along with PhCCLi dimer. Although the mixed tetramer dominates at high mixed aggregate concentrations and low temperatures used for the structural studies, the mixed dimer is the dominant form at the low total mixed aggregate concentrations, high THF concentrations, and ambient temperatures used to investigate the 1,2-addition. Monitoring the reaction rates using (19)F NMR spectroscopy revealed a first-order dependence on mixed dimer, a zeroth-order dependence on THF, and a half-order dependence on the PhCCLi concentration. The rate law is consistent with the addition of a disolvated PhCCLi monomer to the mixed dimer. Investigation of the 1,2-addition of PhCCLi to an O-protected quinazolinone implicates reaction via trisolvated PhCCLi monomers. PMID:15113214

  13. A Honeycomb-Structured Ti-6Al-4V Oil-Gas Separation Rotor Additively Manufactured by Selective Electron Beam Melting for Aero-engine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, H. P.; Wang, Q. B.; Yang, G. Y.; Gu, J.; Liu, N.; Jia, L.; Qian, M.

    2016-03-01

    Oil -gas separation is a key process in an aero-engine lubrication system. This study reports an innovative development in oil -gas separation. A honeycomb-structured rotor with hexagonal cone-shaped pore channels has been designed, additively manufactured from Ti-6Al-4V using selective electron beam melting (SEBM) and assessed for oil -gas separation for aero-engine application. The Ti-6Al-4V honeycomb structure showed a high compressive strength of 110 MPa compared to less than 20 MPa for metal foam structures. The oil -gas separation efficiency of the honeycomb-structured separation rotor achieved 99.8% at the rotation speed of 6000 rpm with much lower ventilation resistance (17.3 kPa) than that of the separator rotor constructed using a Ni-Cr alloy foam structure (23.5 kPa). The honeycomb-structured Ti-6Al-4V separator rotor produced by SEBM provides a promising solution to more efficient oil -gas separation in the aero-engine lubrication system.

  14. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  15. Phosphazene additives

    SciTech Connect

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  16. Amyloid β-peptide 25-35 self-assembly and its inhibition: a model undecapeptide system to gain atomistic and secondary structure details of the Alzheimer's disease process and treatment.

    PubMed

    Naldi, Marina; Fiori, Jessica; Pistolozzi, Marco; Drake, Alex F; Bertucci, Carlo; Wu, Rongliang; Mlynarczyk, Krzysztof; Filipek, Slawomir; De Simone, Angela; Andrisano, Vincenza

    2012-11-21

    Combined results of theoretical molecular dynamic simulations and in vitro spectroscopic (circular dichroism and fluorescence) studies are presented, providing the atomistic and secondary structure details of the process by which a selected small molecule may destabilize the β-sheet ordered "amyloid" oligomers formed by the model undecapeptide of amyloid β-peptide 25-35 [Aβ(25-35)]. Aβ(25-35) was chosen because it is the shortest fragment capable of forming large β-sheet fibrils and retaining the toxicity of the full length Aβ(1-40/42) peptides. The conformational transition, that leads to the formation of β-sheet fibrils from soluble unordered structures, was found to depend on the environmental conditions, whereas the presence of myricetin destabilizes the self-assembly and antagonizes this conformational shift. In parallel, we analyzed several molecular dynamics trajectories describing the evolution of five monomer fragments, without inhibitor as well as in the presence of myricetin. Other well-known inhibitors (curcumin and (-)-tetracycline), found to be stronger and weaker Aβ(1-42) aggregation inhibitors, respectively, were also studied. The combined in vitro and theoretical studies of the Aβ(25-35) self-assembly and its inhibition contribute to understanding the mechanism of action of well-known inhibitors and the peptide amino acid residues involved in the interaction leading to a rational drug design of more potent new molecules able to antagonize the self-assembly process. PMID:23173074

  17. Nonlinear responses to nitrogen and strong interactions with nitrogen and phosphorus additions drastically alter the structure and function of a high arctic ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arens, Seth J. T.; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Welker, Jeffrey M.

    2008-09-01

    Significant changes in ecosystem CO2 exchange and vegetation characteristics were observed following multiple additions of nitrogen (N) and factorial additions of N and phosphorus (P) to prostrate dwarf-shrub, herb tundra in Northwest Greenland. Ecosystem CO2 exchange and vegetation cover and composition were very sensitive to low rates of N inputs (0.5 g m-2 y-1), indicating that even low rates of atmospheric N deposition may alter high arctic ecosystem structure and function. Increasing N addition from 1 to 5 g N m-2 y-1 did not alter CO2 exchange or vegetation characteristics, suggesting the ecosystem had become N saturated. Factorial additions of both N and P released the ecosystem from N saturation and dramatically increased gross ecosystem photosynthesis (+500%) and ecosystem respiration (+250%), such that the ecosystem switched from a small source of CO2 to a small sink for CO2 at midday during the 2005 growing season. Changes in the component fluxes of CO2 exchange were largely explained by a doubling of the normalized difference vegetation index, a 100% increase in vascular plant cover and dramatic increases in the abundance of several previously rare grass species. Our results clearly demonstrate that high arctic prostrate dwarf-shrub, herb tundra is highly sensitive to low levels of N addition and that future increases in N deposition or N mineralization will likely lead to change in carbon cycling and vegetation characteristics, but the magnitude of the response will be constrained by P availability.

  18. Effects of frit addition on the surface morphology and structural properties of ZnO-Bi2O3-Mn2O3 discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahardin, Ahmad Hajidi; Mahmud, Shahrom; Sendi, Rabab Khalid

    2015-04-01

    ZnO-Bi2O3-Mn2O3 discs were prepared using conventional ceramic processing method and sintered at 1000°C. The different percentages of frit on the ZnO-Bi2O3-Mn2O3 discs were 0.0%, 0.5%, 1.0% and 3.0%. From FESEM observation, the grain structure and grain growth were more uniformly constructed and well distributed. Frit addition was found to cause a big drop in the average grain size from 4.59 µm to 2.76 µm even with an addition of 0.5 mol%. The Si and Al content in the frit recipe might have played a role as inhibiting agents in grain growth during sintering. RAMAN intensity and phase shifting were not affected by frit addition except at 3 mol%. Frit addition did not affect the formation of secondary phases. Frit addition below 3 mol% in ZnO-Bi2O3-Mn2O3 varistor discs can be used as a method in controlling grain size without affecting other properties.

  19. 9. Detail view of columns on first floor. This row ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Detail view of columns on first floor. This row of columns indicates the former location of the exterior mill wall before World War II era expansion. The unusual column and beam connection was a key part of the mill structural system patented by Providence, Rhode Island engineers Charles Praray and Charles Makepeace in 1894. Each column was originally located in the apex of triangular window bay, but not connected to the exterior wall. Modifications on the right side of each column support the beams of the addition. - Dixie Cotton Mill, 710 Greenville Street, La Grange, Troup County, GA

  20. The Finer Details: Climate Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    If you want to know whether you will need sunscreen or an umbrella for tomorrow's picnic, you can simply read the local weather report. However, if you are calculating the impact of gas combustion on global temperatures, or anticipating next year's rainfall levels to set water conservation policy, you must conduct a more comprehensive investigation. Such complex matters require long-range modeling techniques that predict broad trends in climate development rather than day-to-day details. Climate models are built from equations that calculate the progression of weather-related conditions over time. Based on the laws of physics, climate model equations have been developed to predict a number of environmental factors, for example: 1. Amount of solar radiation that hits the Earth. 2. Varying proportions of gases that make up the air. 3. Temperature at the Earth's surface. 4. Circulation of ocean and wind currents. 5. Development of cloud cover. Numerical modeling of the climate can improve our understanding of both the past and, the future. A model can confirm the accuracy of environmental measurements taken. in, the past and can even fill in gaps in those records. In addition, by quantifying the relationship between different aspects of climate, scientists can estimate how a future change in one aspect may alter the rest of the world. For example, could an increase in the temperature of the Pacific Ocean somehow set off a drought on the other side of the world? A computer simulation could lead to an answer for this and other questions. Quantifying the chaotic, nonlinear activities that shape our climate is no easy matter. You cannot run these simulations on your desktop computer and expect results by the time you have finished checking your morning e-mail. Efficient and accurate climate modeling requires powerful computers that can process billions of mathematical calculations in a single second. The NCCS exists to provide this degree of vast computing capability.

  1. Computed tomography:the details.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-07-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is a well established technique, particularly in medical imaging, but also applied in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging. Basic CT imaging via back-projection is treated in many texts, but often with insufficient detail to appreciate subtleties such as the role of non-uniform sampling densities. Herein are given some details often neglected in many texts.

  2. Occupation Competency Profile: Steel Detailer Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Learning, Edmonton. Apprenticeship and Industry Training.

    This document presents information about the apprenticeship training program of Alberta, Canada, in general and the steel detailer program in particular. The first part of the document discusses the following items: Alberta's apprenticeship and industry training system; the apprenticeship and industry training committee structure; local…

  3. The potential of operando XAFS for determining the role and structure of noble metal additives in metal oxide based gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Hübner, Michael; Koziej, Dorota; Barsan, Nicolae; Weimar, Udo

    2013-04-01

    Noble metal additives significantly improve the performance of SnO2 based sensors. Recently, it has been found that X-ray absorption spectroscopy is an excellent tool to identify their structure under sensing conditions, despite of the low concentrations and the rather thin (50 μm) and highly porous layers. For this purpose a new in situ approach has been established and here we highlight the potential with an overview on the results of Pd-, Pt-, and Au-additives in SnO2-based sensors at work. Emphasis was laid on recording the structure (by XANES and EXAFS) and performance at the same time. In contrast to earlier studies, Pd- and Pt-additives were observed to be in oxidized and finely dispersed state under sensing conditions excluding a spillover from metallic noble metal particles. However, Au was mainly present as metallic particles in the sensing SnO2-layer. For the Pt- and Au-doped SnO2-layers high energy-resolved fluorescence detected X-ray absorption spectra (HERFD-XAS) were recorded not only to minimize the lifetime-broadening but also to eliminate the Au- and Pt-fluorescence effectively and to record range-extended EXAFS.

  4. Studies on sintering additives for hydroxyapatite, and controlled porosity structures of calcium aluminates and polypropylene-tricalcium phosphate for bone graft applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, Samar Jyoti

    Tissue engineering has made a significant contribution in developing new biomaterials that can restore the structural features and physiological functions of natural tissues. Various materials, such as metals, ceramics, polymers and composites have been developed for their use in hard tissue engineering applications. Part A of this thesis describes my research on HAp ceramics. HAp, a bioactive ceramic, is known for its osteoconductivity, but shows poor mechanical performance. This program aimed at improving mechanical performance of synthetic HAp by introducing small quantities of various sintering additives. A range of oxide-based sintering additives were selected and prepared. Dense compacts were prepared using a uniaxial press with an average green density of 1.6 g/cc. Results showed that some of these sintering additives improved densification, hardness and compression strength of synthetic HAp compared to the pure composition. A maximum bulk density of 3.06 g/cc was achieved for 2.5 wt% addition of MgO. A Microhardness of 4.9 GPa (505 HV) was measured for 2.5 wt% addition of BaO, and the highest compression strength (220MPa) was reported for 2.5 wt% addition of CaO. Cytotoxicity and cell proliferation studies with a modified human osteoblast (HOB) cell-line (OPC1) proved most of these materials non-toxic and biocompatible. Microscopic observation revealed that bone cells were attached and grew well on most of these ceramic matrices. Part B describes my work on development of controlled porosity polypropylene-tricalcium phosphate composite scaffolds via the fused deposition modeling (FDM) process. Hg-porosimetry was performed to determine pore size and their distribution. Uniaxial compression testing performed on samples with 36 vol% porosity and pore size of 160 mum showed the best compressive strength of 12.7 MPa. Part C includes my research on development of "3-D honeycomb" porous calcium aluminate structures via the indirect FDM process. Samples of 29% and

  5. Refined 1.2 A crystal structure of the complex formed between subtilisin Carlsberg and the inhibitor eglin c. Molecular structure of eglin and its detailed interaction with subtilisin.

    PubMed Central

    Bode, W; Papamokos, E; Musil, D; Seemueller, U; Fritz, H

    1986-01-01

    The crystal structure of the complex formed between eglin c, an elastase inhibitor from the medical leech, and subtilisin Carlsberg has been determined at 1.2 A resolution by a combination of Patterson search methods and isomorphous replacement techniques. The structure has been refined to a crystallographic R-value of 0.18 (8-1.2 A). Eglin consists of a four-stranded beta-sheet with an alpha-helical segment and the protease-binding loop fixed on opposite sides. This loop, which contains the reactive site Leu45I--Asp46I, is mainly held in its conformation by unique electrostatic/hydrogen bond interactions of Thr44I and Asp46I with the side chains of Arg53I and Arg51I which protrude from the hydrophobic core of the molecule. The conformation around the reactive site is similar to that found in other proteinase inhibitors. The nine residues of the binding loop Gly40I--Arg48I are involved in direct contacts with subtilisin. In this interaction, eglin segment Pro42I--Thr44I forms a three-stranded anti-parallel beta-sheet with subtilisin segments Gly100--Gly102 and Ser125--Gly127. The reactive site peptide bond of eglin is intact, and Ser221 OG of the enzyme is 2.81 A apart from the carbonyl carbon. PMID:3519213

  6. Effect of non-solvent additives on the morphology, pore structure, and direct contact membrane distillation performance of PVDF-CTFE hydrophobic membranes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Libing; Wu, Zhenjun; Zhang, Yong; Wei, Yuansong; Wang, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Four common types of additives for polymer membrane preparation including organic macromolecule and micromolecule additives, inorganic salts and acids, and the strong non-solvent H2O were used to prepare poly (vinylidene fluoride-co-chlorotrifluoroethylene) (PVDF-CTFE) hydrophobic flat-sheet membranes. Membrane properties including morphology, porosity, hydrophobicity, pore size and pore distribution were investigated, and the permeability was evaluated via direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) of 3.5g/L NaCl solution in a DCMD configuration. Both inorganic and organic micromolecule additives were found to slightly influence membrane hydrophobicity. Polyethylene glycol (PEG), organic acids, LiCl, MgCl2, and LiCl/H2O mixtures were proved to be effective additives to PVDF-CTFE membranes due to their pore-controlling effects and the capacity to improve the properties and performance of the resultant membranes. The occurrence of a pre-gelation process showed that when organic and inorganic micromolecules were added to PVDF-CTFE solution, the resultant membranes presented a high interconnectivity structure. The membrane prepared with dibutyl phthalate (DBP) showed a nonporous surface and symmetrical cross-section. When H2O and LiCl/H2O mixtures were also used as additives, they were beneficial for solid-liquid demixing, especially when LiCl/H2O mixed additives were used. The membrane prepared with 5% LiCl+2% H2O achieved a flux of 24.53kg/(m(2)·hr) with 99.98% salt rejection. This study is expected to offer a reference not only for PVDF-CTFE membrane preparation but also for other polymer membranes. PMID:27372116

  7. Effect of glycine addition on the structural, thermal, optical, mechanical and electrical properties of Sr (HCOO)2·2H2O crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthupoongodi, S.; Theodore David Manickam, S.; Mahadevan, C. K.; Angel Mary Greena, J.; Balakumar, S.; Sahaya Shajan, X.

    2015-10-01

    Pure and glycine doped strontium formate dihydrate (SFD) single crystals were grown by the free evaporation method to understand the effect of glycine addition on the structural, thermal, optical, mechanical and electrical properties of SFD crystal. The grown crystals were characterized by carrying out powder X-ray diffraction, high resolution X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectral, Raman spectral, UV-vis-NIR spectral, thermogravimetric (TG/DTA), second harmonic generation (SHG), microhardness and DC electrical conductivity measurements. Results obtained in the present study indicate improvement in crystalline perfection, optical transmittance, and SHG efficiency, and change in microhardness, and DC electrical conductivity on doping SFD with glycine. In addition, a large size (~1.9 cm length, ~1.2 cm breath and ~0.6 cm height) SFD crystal with good optical quality could be grown successfully by the seeded free evaporation method.

  8. On The Development of Additive Construction Technologies for Application to Development of Lunar/Martian Surface Structures Using In-Situ Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werkheiser, Niki; Fiske, Michael; Edmunson, Jennifer; Khoshnevis, Behrokh

    2015-01-01

    For long-duration missions on other planetary bodies, the use of in-situ materials will become increasingly critical. As man's presence on these bodies expands, so must the breadth of the structures required to accommodate them including habitats, laboratories, berms, radiation shielding for natural radiation and surface reactors, garages, solar storm shelters, greenhouses, etc. Planetary surface structure manufacturing and assembly technologies that incorporate in-situ resources provide options for autonomous, affordable, pre-positioned environments with radiation shielding features and protection from micrometeorites, exhaust plume debris, and other hazards. This is important because gamma and particle radiation constitute a serious but reducible threat to long-term survival of human beings, electronics, and other materials in space environments. Also, it is anticipated that surface structures will constitute the primary mass element of lunar or Martian launch requirements. The ability to use in-situ materials to construct these structures will provide a benefit in the reduction of up-mass that would otherwise make long-term Moon or Mars structures cost prohibitive. The ability to fabricate structures in situ brings with it the ability to repair these structures, which allows for self-sufficiency necessary for long-duration habitation. Previously, under the auspices of the MSFC In Situ Fabrication and Repair (ISFR) project and more recently, under the joint MSFC/KSC Additive Construction with Mobile Emplacement (ACME) project, the MSFC Surface Structures Group has been developing materials and construction technologies to support future planetary habitats with in situ resources. One such technology, known as Contour Crafting (additive construction), is shown in Figure 1, along with a typical structure fabricated using this technology. This paper will present the results to date of these efforts, including development of novel nozzle concepts for advanced layer

  9. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects. PMID:24772784

  10. Terrestrial gamma ray flashes from electron avalanches in thunderstorms - the detailed structure and time evolution of electron, photon, optical and radio emission - results from a new simulation software package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, P. H.

    2013-12-01

    To design the MXGS coded mask imager of the ASIM mission to the ISS, to detect and locate TGF gamma-rays, a first order software package was written at UV to simulate the vertical expansion of gamma-ray photons from 15-20 km altitudes up to 300-600 km orbital altitudes, to make some estimate of the probable TGF spectra and diffuse beam structure that might be observed by MXGS. A new software package includes the simulation of the Runaway Electron Avalanche (REA) origin of TGFs by electron ionization and Bremsstrahlung scattering and photon emission. It uses the standard KeV-MeV scattering physics of electron and photon interactions, close range Moller electron ionization, Binary-Electron-Bethe models of electron scattering, positron Bhabha scattering and annihilation, electron excitation and photon emission. It also uses a super particle spatial mesh system to control particle-momentum flux densities, electric field evolution and exponential avalanche growth and falloff. The package takes care of all high energy scattering physics, leaving the user free to concentrate on defining the three components of scattering medium, electric-magnetic field geometry, and free electron flux field geometry whose details are the main unknown in TGF research. Results will be presented from TGF simulations using realistic electric fields expected within and above storm clouds, and will include video displays showing the evolving ionization structure of electron trajectories, the time evolution of photon flux fields, electron-positron flux fields, their important circular feedback movement in the local earth magnetic field, local molecular ion densities, and the dielectric effect of induced local electric fields. The second aim of the package is as a step in creating open source software which could evolve into a standard research software package approved by the REA-TGF research community to correctly simulate all the relevant physical processes involved in the complex phenomenon

  11. Influence of the geometrical detail in the description of DNA and the scoring method of ionization clustering on nanodosimetric parameters of track structure: a Monte Carlo study using Geant4-DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, M.; Schulte, R.; Meylan, S.; Villagrasa, C.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the geometrical detail of the DNA on nanodosimetric parameters of track structure induced by protons and alpha particles of different energies (LET values ranging from 1 to 162.5~\\text{keV}~μ {{\\text{m}}-1} ) as calculated by Geant4-DNA Monte Carlo simulations. The first geometry considered consisted of a well-structured placement of a realistic description of the DNA double helix wrapped around cylindrical histones (GeomHist) forming a 18 kbp-long chromatin fiber. In the second geometry considered, the DNA was modeled as a total of 1800 ten bp-long homogeneous cylinders (2.3 nm diameter and 3.4 nm height) placed in random positions and orientations (GeomCyl). As for GeomHist, GeomCyl contained a DNA material equivalent to 18 kbp. Geant4-DNA track structure simulations were performed and ionizations were counted in the scoring volumes. For GeomCyl, clusters were defined as the number of ionizations (ν) scored in each 10 bp-long cylinder. For GeomHist, clusters of ionizations scored in the sugar-phosphate groups of the double-helix were revealed by the DBSCAN clustering algorithm according to a proximity criteria among ionizations separated by less than 10 bp. The topology of the ionization clusters formed using GeomHist and GeomCyl geometries were compared in terms of biologically relevant nanodosimetric quantities. The discontinuous modeling of the DNA for GeomCyl led to smaller cluster sizes than for GeomHist. The continuous modeling of the DNA molecule for GeomHist allowed the merging of ionization points by the DBSCAN algorithm giving rise to larger clusters, which were not detectable within the GeomCyl geometry. Mean cluster size (m1) was found to be of the order of 10% higher for GeomHist compared to GeomCyl for LET <15~\\text{keV}~μ {{\\text{m}}-1} . For higher LETs, the difference increased with LET similarly for protons and alpha particles. Both geometries showed the same relationship

  12. Influence of the geometrical detail in the description of DNA and the scoring method of ionization clustering on nanodosimetric parameters of track structure: a Monte Carlo study using Geant4-DNA.

    PubMed

    Bueno, M; Schulte, R; Meylan, S; Villagrasa, C

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the geometrical detail of the DNA on nanodosimetric parameters of track structure induced by protons and alpha particles of different energies (LET values ranging from 1 to 162.5 keV µm-1) as calculated by Geant4-DNA Monte Carlo simulations.The first geometry considered consisted of a well-structured placement of a realistic description of the DNA double helix wrapped around cylindrical histones (GeomHist) forming a 18 kbp-long chromatin fiber. In the second geometry considered, the DNA was modeled as a total of 1800 ten bp-long homogeneous cylinders (2.3 nm diameter and 3.4 nm height) placed in random positions and orientations (GeomCyl). As for GeomHist, GeomCyl contained a DNA material equivalent to 18 kbp. Geant4-DNA track structure simulations were performed and ionizations were counted in the scoring volumes. For GeomCyl, clusters were defined as the number of ionizations (ν) scored in each 10 bp-long cylinder. For GeomHist, clusters of ionizations scored in the sugar-phosphate groups of the double-helix were revealed by the DBSCAN clustering algorithm according to a proximity criteria among ionizations separated by less than 10 bp. The topology of the ionization clusters formed using GeomHist and GeomCyl geometries were compared in terms of biologically relevant nanodosimetric quantities.The discontinuous modeling of the DNA for GeomCyl led to smaller cluster sizes than for GeomHist. The continuous modeling of the DNA molecule for GeomHist allowed the merging of ionization points by the DBSCAN algorithm giving rise to larger clusters, which were not detectable within the GeomCyl geometry. Mean cluster size (m1) was found to be of the order of 10% higher for GeomHist compared to GeomCyl for LET < 15 keV µm-1. For higher LETs, the difference increased with LET similarly for protons and alpha particles. Both geometries showed the same relationship between m1 and the cumulative relative frequency of

  13. Oxidative addition of allylic halides to ruthenium(II) compounds. Preparation, reactions, and X-ray crystallographic structure of ruthenium(IV)-allyl complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Nagashima, Hideo; Mukai, Katsunori; Shiota, Yusuke; Yamaguchi, Keitaro; Ara, Kenichi; Fukahori, Takahiko; Itoh, Kenji ); Suzuki, Hiroharu; Akita, Munetaka; Moro-oka, Yoshihiko )

    1990-03-01

    The oxidative addition of allylic halides to (C{sub 5}R{sub 5})RuL{sub 2}X (R = H, Me; L = CO, PPh{sub 3}) gave new Ru(IV)-{eta}{sup 3}-allyl complexes, (C{sub 5}R{sub 5})RuX{sub 2}({eta}{sup 3}-allyl). An X-ray structure determination was carried out on (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5})RuBr{sub 2}({eta}{sup 3}-C{sub 3}H{sub 5}), indicating a pseudo-piano-stool structure having two Br atoms and two terminal carbons of the endo-{eta}{sup 3}-allyl ligand located at the basal positions. There is a crystal mirror plane bisecting the pentamethylcyclopentadienyl and the {pi}-allyl ligands. Crystal data: orthorhombic, space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, a = 22.738 (1) {angstrom}, b = 13.367 (7) {angstrom}, c = 9.383 (1) {angstrom}, Z = 4., data refined to R = 0.0695. Its {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectra showed symmetric allyl signals, supporting that the above-described piano-stool structure is maintained even in solution.

  14. Effect of build geometry on the β-grain structure and texture in additive manufacture of Ti-6Al-4V by selective electron beam melting

    SciTech Connect

    Antonysamy, A.A.; Meyer, J.; Prangnell, P.B.

    2013-10-15

    With titanium alloys, the solidification conditions in Additive Manufacturing (AM) frequently lead to coarse columnar β-grain structures. The effect of geometry on the variability in the grain structure and texture, seen in Ti-6Al-4V alloy components produced by Selective Electron Beam Melting (SEBM), has been investigated. Reconstruction of the primary β-phase, from α-phase EBSD data, has confirmed that in bulk sections where in-fill “hatching” is employed growth selection favours columnar grains aligned with an <001> {sub β} direction normal to the deposited powder layers; this results in a coarse β-grain structure with a strong < 001 > {sub β} fibre texture (up 8 x random) that can oscillate between a near random distribution around the fibre axis and cube reinforcement with build height. It is proposed that this behaviour is related to the highly elongated melt pool and the raster directions alternating between two orthogonal directions every layer, which on average favours grains with cube alignment. In contrast, the outline, or “contour”, pass produces a distinctly different grain structure and texture resulting in a skin layer on wall surfaces, where nucleation occurs off the surrounding powder and growth follows the curved surface of the melt pool. This structure becomes increasingly important in thin sections. Local heterogeneities have also been found within different section transitions, resulting from the growth of skin grain structures into thicker sections. Texture simulations have shown that the far weaker α-texture (∼ 3 x random), seen in the final product, arises from transformation on cooling occurring with a near random distribution of α-plates across the 12 variants possible from the Burgers relationship. - Highlights: • Distinctly different skin and bulk structures are produced by the contour and hatching passes. • Bulk sections contain coarse β-grains with a < 001 > fibre texture in the build direction. • This

  15. The influence of Si addition in 55AlZn bath on the coating structures obtained in the batch hot-dip metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendala, J.

    2011-05-01

    One of the methods of increasing the corrosion resistance of zinc coatings is the application of zinc and aluminium alloy baths in the metallization process. The coatings obtained are characterized by much better corrosion resistance thanks to the combination of aluminium properties, i.e. the barrier protection provided by naturally created aluminium oxides, with the capacity to protect the steel substrate, which is characteristic of zinc coatings. Zinc coatings with 55 wt. % Al and an addition of Si have gained industrial importance. The introduction of a third alloying component into the metallization bath is a technological addition, the aim of which is to reduce and possibly inhibit the aluminium diffusion towards the substrate. The article presents the results of the examination of coatings obtained in a 55AlZn bath at varied parameters of the technological process, as well as the specification of silicon addition influence on the structure and chemical composition of the coatings, and on the kinetics of growth. The coatings were obtained in three temperatures: 620, 640 and 660°C, and the process was conducted in a 55 wt. % Al bath with Si content of 0, 0.8 and 1.6 wt. % respectively, the remaining content was Zn. For the purposes of evaluating the microstructure and thickness of the coatings obtained, examinations on a light microscope were conducted. In order to determine the chemical composition of the coatings obtained, an EDS analysis was conducted. Quantitative examination of the chemical composition was carried out on the selected cross-sections of samples with coatings considered to be representative ones, using a SEM with a microanalysis system. Moreover, the linear distribution of elements on the cross-sections of the chosen coatings was determined. It is possible to state that the addition of silicon to 55AlZn baths allows reducing the uncontrolled growth of a layer. The layers obtained are more uniform, continuous and they show good adhesion to

  16. Preservation potential of subtle glacial landforms based on detailed mapping of recently exposed proglacial areas: application of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and structure-from-motion (SfM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewertowski, Marek; Evans, David; Roberts, David; Tomczyk, Aleksandra; Ewertowski, Wojciech

    2016-04-01

    Ongoing glacier retreat results in the continuous exposure of proglacial areas. Such areas contain invaluable information about glacial process-form relationships manifest in specific landform assemblages. However, preservation potential of freshly exposed glacial landforms is very low, as proglacial terrains are one of the most dynamic parts of the landscape. Therefore, rapid mapping and geomorphological characterisation of such areas is important from a glaciological and geomorphological point of view for proper understanding and reconstruction of glacier-landform dynamics and chronology of glacial events. Annual patterns of recession and relatively small areas exposed every year, mean that the performing of regular aerial or satellite survey is expensive and therefore impractical. Recent advances in technology enables the development of low-cost alternatives for traditional aerial surveys. Small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) can be used to acquire high-resolution (several cm) low-altitude photographs. The UAV-based photographs can be subsequently processed through the structure-from-motion process to generate detailed orthophotomaps and digital elevation models. In this study we present case studies from the forelands of various glaciers on Iceland and Svalbard representing different types of proglacial landscapes: Fláajökull (annual push moraines); Hofellsjökul (bedrock bedforms and push moraines); Fjallsjökull (marginal drainage network); Rieperbreen (crevasse squeeze ridges and longitudinal debris stripes); Ayerbreen (transverse debris ridges); Foxfonna (longitudinal debris stripes);Hørbyebreen (geometric ridge network); Nordenskiöldbreen (fluted till surface); Ebbabreen (controlled moraine complex). UAV campaigns were conducted using a low-cost quadcopter platform. Resultant orthophotos and DEMs enabled mapping and assessment of recent glacial landscape development in different types of glacial landsystems. Results of our study indicate that

  17. 64. DETAIL OF CONNECTIONS FOR SIXTEEN CABLES AT THE CARRIAGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    64. DETAIL OF CONNECTIONS FOR SIXTEEN CABLES AT THE CARRIAGE SUPPORT STRUCTURE, STRUCTURE. April 20, 1948. 1048. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. Seductive Details in Multimedia Messages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rey, Gunter Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The seductive detail principle asserts that people learn more deeply from a multimedia presentation when interesting but irrelevant adjuncts are excluded rather than included. However, critics could argue that studies about this principle contain methodological problems. The recent experiment attempts to overcome these problems. Students (N = 108)…

  19. Effect of Li addition on crystal structure and phase separation of highly defective (La,Li)TaO 3 solid electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chien-Ying; Fung, Kuan-Zong

    2002-08-01

    La 1/3TaO 3 was found to exhibit a perovskite structure in which two-thirds of A-cation sites are vacant. An ordered arrangement of vacancies causes the formation of a superstructure with doubled c-axis compared with a perovskite subcell. With small amount of Li addition, a superstructure with vacancies located at the (002) plane was still present. When Li ions were added into more than 20% of A-cation sites, the superstructure disappeared and the perovskite structure also changed from tetragonal to near cubic. When more than 60% of A-cation sites were incorporated by Li ions, a phase separation of cubic La 0.166Li 0.5TaO 3 perovskite and rhombohedral LiTaO 3 was observed. The phase separation was caused by the big difference of ionic radius between La and Li ions. The microstructure and microchemical analysis of (La,Li)TaO 3 were examined using scanning electron microscopy and EDX.

  20. The construction of graph models for calculations of the properties of substitution isomers of basis structures on the basis of additivity of energy contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilov, D. Yu.; Smolyakov, V. M.

    2012-05-01

    A method for the construction of additive models for calculations of the properties of substitution isomers of basis structures is described for the example of a series of X-substituted methylsilanes CH3 - k X k -SiH3 - l X l (where X = CH3, F, Cl, …, k, l = 0, 1, 2, 3). The method is based on similarity of subgraphs in graphs of several molecules and the arrangement of polygonal numbers (triangular, tetrahedral) of the Pascal triangle. Parameters taking into account multiple nonvalence interactions (-C-Si<, >C-Si<, …) through two atoms along the molecular chain of an X-substituted methylsilane (X = CH3) were for the first time explicitly included in the calculation scheme. Taking these interactions into account allows us to completely differentiate all the structural isomers of certain molecules and obtain numerical parameter values for predicting properties P under consideration in various approximations. Numerical calculations of Δf H {g,298/K o} were performed for 16 alkylsilanes (as X-substituted methylsilanes), including 7 compounds not studied experimentally.

  1. Changes in microbial community structure in two anaerobic systems to treat bagasse spraying wastewater with and without addition of molasses alcohol wastewater.

    PubMed

    Shen, Peihong; Zhang, Junya; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Chengjian; Tang, Xianlai; Li, Junfang; Zhang, Min; Wu, Bo

    2013-03-01

    This study investigates the microbial community and structure in the internal circulation (IC) reactors that treat wastewater from bagasse spraying, with (reactor B) and without (reactor A) addition of molasses alcohol wastewater (MAW). The V3 regions in the 16S rRNA of bacteria were sequenced using illumina sequencing to characterize the microbial community structures. The results showed that there were approximately 34.8% more microorganisms were reduced, while the proportions of the three most predominant bacterial populations especially some sulfate-reducing bacteria increased in reactor B. The archaeal community composition was measured by PCR-DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) analysis and sequencing some clones from the 16S rRNA gene library. The results showed that numerous, mostly uncharacterized, archaeal genera are present in reactors A and B; the genus Methanomethylovorans was only detected in the samples that received MAW. This study demonstrated the significant effect of MAW on microbial communities in the wastewater treatment bioreactor. PMID:23370216

  2. Conserved intron positions in FGFR genes reflect the modular structure of FGFR and reveal stepwise addition of domains to an already complex ancestral FGFR.

    PubMed

    Rebscher, Nicole; Deichmann, Christina; Sudhop, Stefanie; Fritzenwanker, Jens Holger; Green, Stephen; Hassel, Monika

    2009-10-01

    We have analyzed the evolution of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) tyrosine kinase genes throughout a wide range of animal phyla. No evidence for an FGFR gene was found in Porifera, but we tentatively identified an FGFR gene in the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens. The gene encodes a protein with three immunoglobulin-like domains, a single-pass transmembrane, and a split tyrosine kinase domain. By superimposing intron positions of 20 FGFR genes from Placozoa, Cnidaria, Protostomia, and Deuterostomia over the respective protein domain structure, we identified ten ancestral introns and three conserved intron groups. Our analysis shows (1) that the position of ancestral introns correlates to the modular structure of FGFRs, (2) that the acidic domain very likely evolved in the last common ancestor of triploblasts, (3) that splicing of IgIII was enabled by a triploblast-specific insertion, and (4) that IgI is subject to substantial loss or duplication particularly in quickly evolving genomes. Moreover, intron positions in the catalytic domain of FGFRs map to the borders of protein subdomains highly conserved in other serine/threonine kinases. Nevertheless, these introns were introduced in metazoan receptor tyrosine kinases exclusively. Our data support the view that protein evolution dating back to the Cambrian explosion took place in such a short time window that only subtle changes in the domain structure are detectable in extant representatives of animal phyla. We propose that the first multidomain FGFR originated in the last common ancestor of Placozoa, Cnidaria, and Bilateria. Additional domains were introduced mainly in the ancestor of triploblasts and in the Ecdysozoa. PMID:20016912

  3. Soil microbial biomass and community structure affected by repeated additions of sewage sludge in four Swedish long-term field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börjesson, G.; Kätterer, T.; Kirchmann, H.

    2012-04-01

    Soil organic matter is a key attribute of soil fertility. The pool of soil organic C can be increased, either by mineral fertilisers or by adding organic amendments such as sewage sludge. Sewage sludge has positive effects on agricultural soils through the supply of organic matter and essential plant nutrients, but sludge may also contain unwanted heavy metals, xenobiotic substances and pathogens. One obvious effect of long-term sewage sludge addition is a decrease in soil pH, caused by N mineralisation followed by nitrification, sulphate formation and presence of organic acids with the organic matter added. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of sewage sludge on the microbial biomass and community structure. Materials and methods We analysed soil samples from four sites where sewage sludge has been repeatedly applied in long-term field experiments situated in different parts of Sweden; Ultuna (59°49'N, 17°39'E, started 1956), Lanna (58°21'N, 13°06'E, started 1997-98), Petersborg (55°32'N, 13°00'E, started 1981) and Igelösa (55°45'N, 13°18'E, started 1981). In these four experiments, at least one sewage sludge treatment is included in the experimental design. In the Ultuna experiment, all organic fertilisers, including sewage sludge, are applied every second year, corresponding to 4 ton C ha-1. The Lanna experiment has a similar design, with 8 ton dry matter ha-1 applied every second year. Lanna also has an additional treatment in which metal salts (Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn) are added together with sewage sludge. At Petersborg and Igelösa, two levels of sewage sludge (4 or 12 ton dry matter ha-1 every 4th year) are compared with three levels of NPK fertiliser (0 N, ½ normal N and normal N). Topsoil samples (0-20 cm depth) from the four sites were analysed for total C, total N, pH and PLFAs (phospholipid fatty acids). In addition, crop yields were recorded. Results At all four sites, sewage sludge has had a positive effect on crop yields

  4. Ligand binding studies, preliminary structure-activity relationship and detailed mechanistic characterization of 1-phenyl-6,6-dimethyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine derivatives as inhibitors of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Bharath; Tonddast-Navaei, Sam; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2015-10-20

    Gram-negative bacteria are implicated in the causation of life-threatening hospital-acquired infections. They acquire rapid resistance to multiple drugs and available antibiotics. Hence, there is the need to discover new antibacterial agents with novel scaffolds. For the first time, this study explores the 1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine and 1,2,4-triazine-2,4-diamine group of compounds as potential inhibitors of Escherichia coli DHFR, a pivotal enzyme in the thymidine and purine synthesis pathway. Using differential scanning fluorimetry, DSF, fifteen compounds with various substitutions on either the 3rd or 4th positions on the benzene group of 6,6-dimethyl-1-(benzene)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine were shown to bind to the enzyme with varying affinities. Then, the dose dependence of inhibition by these compounds was determined. Preliminary quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis and docking studies implicate the alkyl linker group and the sulfonyl fluoride group in increasing the potency of inhibition. 4-[4-[3-(4,6-diamino-2,2-dimethyl-1,3,5-triazin-1-yl)phenyl]butyl]benzenesulfonyl fluoride (NSC120927), the best hit from the study and a molecule with no reported inhibition of E. coli DHFR, potently inhibits the enzyme with a Ki value of 42.50 ± 5.34 nM, followed by 4-[6-[4-(4,6-diamino-2,2-dimethyl-1,3,5-triazin-1-yl)phenyl]hexyl]benzenesulfonyl fluoride (NSC132279), with a Ki value of 100.9 ± 12.7 nM. Detailed kinetic characterization of the inhibition brought about by five small-molecule hits shows that these inhibitors bind to the dihydrofolate binding site with preferential binding to the NADPH-bound binary form of the enzyme. Furthermore, in search of novel diaminotriazine scaffolds, it is shown that lamotrigine, a 1,2,4-triazine-3,5-diamine and a sodium-ion channel blocker class of antiepileptic drug, also inhibits E. coli DHFR. This is the first comprehensive study on the binding and inhibition brought about by diaminotriazines of a gram

  5. Selective syntheses of leuconolam, leuconoxine, and mersicarpine alkaloids from a common intermediate through regiocontrolled cyclizations by Staudinger reactions† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details and procedures, compound characterization data, copies of 1H and 13C NMR spectra for new compounds. See DOI: 10.1039/c4qo00312h Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zining; Geng, Qian; Lv, Zhe; Pritchett, Beau P.; Baba, Katsuaki; Numajiri, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    Selective syntheses of leuconolam, leuconoxine, and mersicarpine alkaloids bearing distinctive core structures were achieved through Staudinger reactions using a common intermediate. In the key cyclization step, water functioned like a switch to control which core structure to produce. The chemistry allowed for selective syntheses of the group of alkaloids from a simple intermediate through straightforward chemical operations. PMID:25717379

  6. Effect of Ag addition on the thermal characteristics and structural evolution of Ag-Cu-Ni ternary alloy nanoclusters: Atomistic simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subbaraman, Ram; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S.

    2011-08-01

    Atomic-scale compositional variation in Ag contents across Ag-Cu-Ni alloy upon being subjected to repeated annealing cycles is shown to result in significant differences in the structure and the thermal stability of ternary alloy nanoclusters. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations employing quantum Sutton-Chen potentials were used to investigate the effect of Ag addition on the thermal characteristics of Ag-Cu-Ni ternary alloy nanoclusters of 4-nm diameter. The initial configurations were generated using Monte Carlo simulations and comprise surface-segregated structures with the lowest surface energy component, Ag, occupying low coordination sites such as corners, edges, and faces. A compositional oscillation between the Cu and Ni atoms was observed for layers beneath the surface which transitions into a bulk alloy composition at the core. We find that the Cu-Ni binary alloys on being subjected to annealing schedules demonstrated an increase in thermal stability, as indicated by the increase in melting points. The annealed configurations of the Ag-Cu-Ni ternary alloy, on the other hand, showed a nonmonotonic behavior. For Ag compositions less than 20%, we observe an initial increase in melting point followed by a decrease in the third cycle. For higher Ag compositions (>20%), we observe a decrease in melting point with annealing; the rate of decrease is strongly correlated to the Ag composition in the alloy. Cu-Ni nanoclusters having 50% Cu showed a transition from an initial icosahedral to a cuboctahedron-like structure whereas Ag-rich Ag-Cu-Ni ternary alloys showed a transition from icosahedral to an amorphous structure. Compositional analysis based on radial distribution functions and density profiles indicate that these transitions were dependent on the distribution of the alloying elements in the nanocluster. Calculated root-mean-square displacements and diffusion coefficients indicate that the rate of mixing of Ag increases with Ag content in the Ag

  7. Siloxane containing addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maudgal, S.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Addition polyimide oligomers have been synthesized from bis(gamma-aminopropyl) tetramethyldisiloxane and 3, 3', 4, 4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride using a variety of latent crosslinking groups as endcappers. The prepolymers were isolated and characterized for solubility (in amide, chlorinated and ether solvents), melt flow and cure properties. The most promising systems, maleimide and acetylene terminated prepolymers, were selected for detailed study. Graphite cloth reinforced composites were prepared and properties compared with those of graphite/Kerimid 601, a commercially available bismaleimide. Mixtures of the maleimide terminated system with Kerimid 601, in varying proportions, were also studied.

  8. Change in structural morphology on addition of ZnO and its effect on fluorescence of Yb3+/Er3+ doped Y2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, R. V.; Verma, R. K.; Kaur, G.; Rai, S. B.

    2013-02-01

    Yb3+/Er3+ codoped Y2O3 phosphor and its composite with ZnO have been synthesized by combustion method. Morphology of the materials has been investigated using X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. XRD confirms the constituents as Y2O3 and ZnO, with average crystallite size of 112 nm. On addition of ZnO, a small shifting in XRD pattern of Y2O3 is observed. SEM pattern suggests that the average particle size lies in micro-range (0.5 μm). A dumble like structure is observed for hybrid material on annealing at 1473 K. A strong green (525, 546 nm) with weak blue (411 nm) and red (657 nm) emissions through upconversion has been observed from the phosphor on excitation with 976 nm diode laser. The observed emissions involve 2H9/2 → 4I15/2, 2H11/2 → 4I15/2, 4S3/2 → 4I15/2 and 4F9/2 → 4I15/2 electronic transitions, respectively. The upconversion process has been confirmed by power dependence measurements and its slope value was found to be 1.85, 1.72 for green and red emissions, respectively. On addition of ZnO, the intensity of these emissions is enhanced several times. The reason behind the enhancement is discussed with the help of the emitting level lifetime. An interesting dual mode property (upconversion and downconversion) to the same material has been observed on excitation with 532 nm laser source.

  9. Detailed mechanism of benzene oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, David A.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed quantitative mechanism for the oxidation of benzene in both argon and nitrogen diluted systems is presented. Computed ignition delay time for argon diluted mixtures are in satisfactory agreement with experimental results for a wide range of initial conditions. An experimental temperature versus time profile for a nitrogen diluted oxidation was accurately matched and several concentration profiles were matched qualitatively. Application of sensitivity analysis has given approximate rate constant expressions for the two dominant heat release reactions, the oxidation of C6H5 and C5H5 radicals by molecular oxygen.

  10. "Influence Method". Detailed mathematical description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, I. J.; Mayer, R. E.

    2015-07-01

    A new method for the absolute determination of nuclear particle flux in the absence of known detector efficiency, the "Influence Method", was recently published (I.J. Rios and R.E. Mayer, Nuclear Instruments & Methods in Physics Research A 775 (2015) 99-104). The method defines an estimator for the population and another estimator for the efficiency. In this article we present a detailed mathematical description which yields the conditions for its application, the probability distributions of the estimators and their characteristic parameters. An analysis of the different cases leads to expressions of the estimators and their uncertainties.

  11. Towards a detailed soot model for internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Mosbach, Sebastian; Celnik, Matthew S.; Raj, Abhijeet; Kraft, Markus; Zhang, Hongzhi R.; Kubo, Shuichi; Kim, Kyoung-Oh

    2009-06-15

    In this work, we present a detailed model for the formation of soot in internal combustion engines describing not only bulk quantities such as soot mass, number density, volume fraction, and surface area but also the morphology and chemical composition of soot aggregates. The new model is based on the Stochastic Reactor Model (SRM) engine code, which uses detailed chemistry and takes into account convective heat transfer and turbulent mixing, and the soot formation is accounted for by SWEEP, a population balance solver based on a Monte Carlo method. In order to couple the gas-phase to the particulate phase, a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism describing the combustion of Primary Reference Fuels (PRFs) is extended to include small Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) such as pyrene, which function as soot precursor species for particle inception in the soot model. Apart from providing averaged quantities as functions of crank angle like soot mass, volume fraction, aggregate diameter, and the number of primary particles per aggregate for example, the integrated model also gives detailed information such as aggregate and primary particle size distribution functions. In addition, specifics about aggregate structure and composition, including C/H ratio and PAH ring count distributions, and images similar to those produced with Transmission Electron Microscopes (TEMs), can be obtained. The new model is applied to simulate an n-heptane fuelled Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine which is operated at an equivalence ratio of 1.93. In-cylinder pressure and heat release predictions show satisfactory agreement with measurements. Furthermore, simulated aggregate size distributions as well as their time evolution are found to qualitatively agree with those obtained experimentally through snatch sampling. It is also observed both in the experiment as well as in the simulation that aggregates in the trapped residual gases play a vital role in the soot

  12. Influence of Ni nanoparticle addition and spark plasma sintering on the TiNiSn–Ni system: Structure, microstructure, and thermoelectric properties

    SciTech Connect

    Birkel, Christina S.; Douglas, Jason E.; Lettiere, Bethany R.; Seward, Gareth; Zhang, Yichi; Pollock, Tresa M.; Seshadri, Ram; Stucky, Galen D.

    2013-12-01

    The electronic and thermal properties of thermoelectric materials are highly dependent on their microstructure and therefore on the preparation conditions, including the initial synthesis and, if applicable, densification of the obtained powders. Introduction of secondary phases on the nano- and/or microscale is widely used to improve the thermoelectric figure of merit by reduction of the thermal conductivity. In order to understand the effect of the preparation technique on structure and properties, we have studied the thermoelectric properties of the well-known half-Heusler TiNiSn with addition of a small amount of nickel nanoparticles. The different parameters are the initial synthesis (levitation melting and microwave heating), the amount of nickel nanoparticles added and the exact pressing profile using spark plasma sintering. The resulting materials have been characterized by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and microprobe measurements and their thermoelectric properties are investigated. We found the lowest (lattice) thermal conductivity in samples with full-Heusler TiNi2Sn and Ni3Sn4 as secondary phases.

  13. Data indicating temperature response of Ti–6Al–4V thin-walled structure during its additive manufacture via Laser Engineered Net Shaping

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Garrett J.; Thompson, Scott M.; Shamsaei, Nima

    2016-01-01

    An OPTOMEC Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™) 750 system was retrofitted with a melt pool pyrometer and in-chamber infrared (IR) camera for nondestructive thermal inspection of the blown-powder, direct laser deposition (DLD) process. Data indicative of temperature and heat transfer within the melt pool and heat affected zone atop a thin-walled structure of Ti–6Al–4V during its additive manufacture are provided. Melt pool temperature data were collected via the dual-wavelength pyrometer while the dynamic, bulk part temperature distribution was collected using the IR camera. Such data are provided in Comma Separated Values (CSV) file format, containing a 752×480 matrix and a 320×240 matrix of temperatures corresponding to individual pixels of the pyrometer and IR camera, respectively. The IR camera and pyrometer temperature data are provided in blackbody-calibrated, raw forms. Provided thermal data can aid in generating and refining process-property-performance relationships between laser manufacturing and its fabricated materials. PMID:27054180

  14. Data indicating temperature response of Ti-6Al-4V thin-walled structure during its additive manufacture via Laser Engineered Net Shaping.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Garrett J; Thompson, Scott M; Shamsaei, Nima

    2016-06-01

    An OPTOMEC Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS(™)) 750 system was retrofitted with a melt pool pyrometer and in-chamber infrared (IR) camera for nondestructive thermal inspection of the blown-powder, direct laser deposition (DLD) process. Data indicative of temperature and heat transfer within the melt pool and heat affected zone atop a thin-walled structure of Ti-6Al-4V during its additive manufacture are provided. Melt pool temperature data were collected via the dual-wavelength pyrometer while the dynamic, bulk part temperature distribution was collected using the IR camera. Such data are provided in Comma Separated Values (CSV) file format, containing a 752×480 matrix and a 320×240 matrix of temperatures corresponding to individual pixels of the pyrometer and IR camera, respectively. The IR camera and pyrometer temperature data are provided in blackbody-calibrated, raw forms. Provided thermal data can aid in generating and refining process-property-performance relationships between laser manufacturing and its fabricated materials. PMID:27054180

  15. A Generalized Detailed Balance Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruelle, David

    2016-06-01

    Given a system M in a thermal bath we obtain a generalized detailed balance relation for the ratio r=π _τ (K→ J)/π _τ (J→ K) of the transition probabilities M:J→ K and M:K→ J in time τ . We assume an active bath, containing solute molecules in metastable states. These molecules may react with M and the transition J→ K occurs through different channels α involving different reactions with the bath. We find that r=sum p^α r^α , where p^α is the probability that channel α occurs, and r^α depends on the amount of heat (more precisely enthalpy) released to the bath in channel α.

  16. Revealing Small-Scale Details

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Ken

    Astrophotographers face amazing challenges in their pursuit of acquiring high quality data and then turn that data into beautiful images that viewers admire. We carefully set up our imaging systems with amazing precision so each exposure contains well focused sharp sub frames. For every exposure there exist a myriad of variables that can work against us to potentially degrade the details of the celestial objects we record. Some of these variables are within our control and some are not. Even the variables beyond our control can often be compensated for by processing adjustments for maximizing the potential of our images. My goal is to share some of the methods I have found useful in recovering those elements that bring clarity to our pictures.

  17. Detailed fuel spray analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mularz, E. J.; Bosque, M. A.; Humenik, F. M.

    1983-01-01

    Detailed fuel spray analyses are a necessary input to the analytical modeling of the complex mixing and combustion processes which occur in advanced combustor systems. It is anticipated that by controlling fuel-air reaction conditions, combustor temperatures can be better controlled, leading to improved combustion system durability. Thus, a research program is underway to demonstrate the capability to measure liquid droplet size, velocity, and number density throughout a fuel spray and to utilize this measurement technique in laboratory benchmark experiments. The research activities from two contracts and one grant are described with results to data. The experiment to characterize fuel sprays is also described. These experiments and data should be useful for application to and validation of turbulent flow modeling to improve the design systems of future advanced technology engines.

  18. A Generalized Detailed Balance Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruelle, David

    2016-08-01

    Given a system M in a thermal bath we obtain a generalized detailed balance relation for the ratio r=π _τ (K→ J)/π _τ (J→ K) of the transition probabilities M:J→ K and M:K→ J in time τ . We assume an active bath, containing solute molecules in metastable states. These molecules may react with M and the transition J→ K occurs through different channels α involving different reactions with the bath. We find that r=sum p^α r^α , where p^α is the probability that channel α occurs, and r^α depends on the amount of heat (more precisely enthalpy) released to the bath in channel α.

  19. Morphological details in bloodstain particles.

    PubMed

    De Wael, K; Lepot, L

    2015-01-01

    During the commission of crimes blood can be transferred to the clothing of the offender or on other crime related objects. Bloodstain particles are sub-millimetre sized flakes that are lost from dried bloodstains. The nature of these red particles is easily confirmed using spectroscopic methods. In casework, bloodstain particles showing highly detailed morphological features were observed. These provided a rationale for a series of experiments described in this work. It was found that the "largest" particles are shed from blood deposited on polyester and polyamide woven fabrics. No particles are lost from the stains made on absorbent fabrics and from those made on knitted fabrics. The morphological features observed in bloodstain particles can provide important information on the substrates from which they were lost. PMID:25437904

  20. Detail view of redwood spline joinery of woodframe section against ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of redwood spline joinery of wood-frame section against adobe addition (measuring tape denotes plumb line from center of top board) - First Theatre in California, Southwest corner of Pacific & Scott Streets, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  1. 11. SOUTH AND EAST SIDE, THREEQUARTER VIEW, DETAIL SHOWING SIXTHFLOOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. SOUTH AND EAST SIDE, THREE-QUARTER VIEW, DETAIL SHOWING SIXTH-FLOOR BRICK ADDITION AND ORIGINAL BRICK PILASTERS; LOOKING NORTHWEST - Crown Roller Mill, 105 Fifth Avenue, South, West Side Milling District, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  2. 7. Detail of the Grant Locomotive Works Erecting Shop looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Detail of the Grant Locomotive Works Erecting Shop looking southwest showing ruined wall and entrance of a single story addition. - Grant Locomotive Works, Market & Spruce Streets, Paterson, Passaic County, NJ

  3. 3. Exterior, detail view of north elevation, from northeast, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Exterior, detail view of north elevation, from northeast, showing joint of addition. Sept. 12, 1940. Mixon. - Upper Swedish Log Cabin, Darby Creek vicinity, Clifton Heights (Upper Darby Township), Darby, Delaware County, PA

  4. 7. NORTHEAST CORNER DETAIL SHOWING LOG JOINERY. AT RIGHT IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. NORTHEAST CORNER DETAIL SHOWING LOG JOINERY. AT RIGHT IS REAR SHED ROOM ADDITION (copy negative, original 35 mm negative in field records) - Thomas Jefferson Walling Log Cabin, Henderson, Rusk County, TX

  5. 5. INTERIOR DETAIL OF 'BATTLESHIP DECK' WALL PARTITION AND CEILING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. INTERIOR DETAIL OF 'BATTLESHIP DECK' WALL PARTITION AND CEILING OF FIRST FLOOR OF 1930 ADDITION TO OFFICE BUILDING - Midwest Steel & Iron Works Company, 25 Larimer Street, Denver, Denver County, CO

  6. 3. MAIN ELEVATION, DETAIL SHOWING HEWN LOGS WITH HALFDOVETAIL JOINTS; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. MAIN ELEVATION, DETAIL SHOWING HEWN LOGS WITH HALF-DOVETAIL JOINTS; LATHE AND PLASTER ADDITION; AND CLAPBOARD SIDING - Shinn-Curtis Log Cabin, 23 Washington Street (moved from Rancocas Boulevard), Mount Holly, Burlington County, NJ

  7. PAINT SHOP, DETAIL OF FABRICATED COLUMN AT JUNCTION OF WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PAINT SHOP, DETAIL OF FABRICATED COLUMN AT JUNCTION OF WEST BAY (ORIGINAL) AND CENTER BAYS (SECOND ADDITION), LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Southern Pacific, Sacramento Shops, Paint Shop, 111 I Street, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  8. 7. DETAIL INTERIOR VIEW TO SOUTHWEST OF REAR ORIGINAL SECOND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL INTERIOR VIEW TO SOUTHWEST OF REAR ORIGINAL SECOND FLOOR, WITH PASSAGEWAY LEADING TO c1944-1950 POST-U.S. RADIUM ADDITION - United States Radium Corporation, Paint Application Building, 422 Alden Street, Orange, Essex County, NJ

  9. 11. Detail of horse lamp fixture in original Clubhouse bar. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Detail of horse lamp fixture in original Clubhouse bar. Fixture is at north end of bar. Camera pointed up and NW. (July 1993) - Longacres, Clubhouse & Additions, 1621 Southwest Sixteenth Street, Renton, King County, WA

  10. Detailed structural characterization of the grafting of [Ta(=CHtBu)(CH2tBu)3] and [Cp*TaMe4] on silica partially dehydroxylated at 700 C and the activity of the grafted complexes toward alkane metathesis

    SciTech Connect

    Le Roux, Erwan; Chabanas, Mathieu; Baudouin, Anne; de Mallmann, Aimery; Coperet, Christophe; Quadrelli, E. Allesandra; Thivolle-Cazat, Jean; Basset, Jean-Marie; Lukens, Wayne; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Sunley, Glenn J.

    2004-08-30

    The reaction of [Ta({double_bond}CHtBu)(CH{sub 2}tBu){sub 3}] or [Cp*Ta(CH{sub 3}){sub 4}] with a silica partially dehydroxylated at 700 C gives the corresponding monosiloxy surface complexes [({triple_bond}SiO)Ta({double_bond}CHtBu)(CH{sub 2}tBu){sub 2}] and [({triple_bond}SiO)Ta(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}Cp*] by eliminating a {sigma}-bonded ligand as the corresponding alkane (H-CH{sub 2}tBu or H-CH{sub 3}). EXAFS data show that an adjacent siloxane bridge of the surface plays the role of an extra surface ligand, which most likely stabilizes these complexes as in [({triple_bond}SiO)Ta({double_bond}CHtBu)(CH{sub 2}tBu){sub 2}({triple_bond}SiOSi{triple_bond})] (1a') and [({triple_bond}SiO)Ta(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}Cp*({triple_bond}SiOSi{triple_bond})] (2a'). In the case of [({triple_bond}SiO)Ta({double_bond}CHtBu)(CH{sub 2}tBu){sub 2}({triple_bond}SiOSi{triple_bond})], the structure is further stabilized by an additional interaction: a C-H agostic bond as evidenced by the small J coupling constant for the carbenic C-H (H{sub C-H} = 80 Hz), which was measured by J-resolved 2D solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The product selectivity in propane metathesis in the presence of [({triple_bond}SiO)Ta({double_bond}CHtBu)-(CH{sub 2}tBu){sub 2}({triple_bond}SiOSi{triple_bond})] (1a') as a catalyst precursor and the inactivity of the surface complex [({triple_bond}SiO)Ta-(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}Cp*({triple_bond}SiOSi{triple_bond})] (2a') show that the active site is required to be highly electrophilic and probably involves a metallacyclobutane intermediate.

  11. Recovery of the Candidate Protoplanet HD 100546 b with Gemini/NICI and Detection of Additional (Planet-induced?) Disk Structure at Small Separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, Thayne; Muto, Takayuki; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Honda, Mitsuhiko; Brandt, Timothy D.; Grady, Carol; Fukagawa, Misato; Burrows, Adam; Janson, Markus; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; McElwain, Michael W.; Follette, Katherine; Hashimoto, Jun; Henning, Thomas; Kandori, Ryo; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Kwon, Jungmi; Mede, Kyle; Morino, Jun-ichi; Nishikawa, Jun; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Serabyn, Gene; Suenaga, Takuya; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Wisniewski, John; Tamura, Motohide

    2014-12-01

    We report the first independent, second epoch (re-)detection of a directly imaged protoplanet candidate. Using L' high-contrast imaging of HD 100546 taken with the Near-Infrared Coronagraph and Imager on Gemini South, we recover "HD 100546 b" with a position and brightness consistent with the original Very Large Telescope/NAos-COnica detection from Quanz et al., although data obtained after 2013 will be required to decisively demonstrate common proper motion. HD 100546 b may be spatially resolved, up to ≈12-13 AU in diameter, and is embedded in a finger of thermal IR-bright, polarized emission extending inward to at least 0.''3. Standard hot-start models imply a mass of ≈15 MJ . However, if HD 100546 b is newly formed or made visible by a circumplanetary disk, both of which are plausible, its mass is significantly lower (e.g., 1-7 MJ ). Additionally, we discover a thermal IR-bright disk feature, possibly a spiral density wave, at roughly the same angular separation as HD 100546 b but 90° away. Our interpretation of this feature as a spiral arm is not decisive, but modeling analyses using spiral density wave theory implies a wave launching point exterior to ≈0.''45 embedded within the visible disk structure: plausibly evidence for a second, hitherto unseen, wide-separation planet. With one confirmed protoplanet candidate and evidence for one to two others, HD 100546 is an important evolutionary precursor to intermediate-mass stars with multiple super-Jovian planets at moderate/wide separations like HR 8799.

  12. Easy oxidative addition of the carbon-halogen bond by dimethylplatinum(II) complexes containing a related series of diimine ligands: Synthesis, spectral characterization and crystal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeni, Badri Z.; Fathi, Nastaran; Mohagheghi, Arezoo

    2015-01-01

    Dimethylplatinum(II) complexes [PtMe2(NN)] {NN = 4,4‧-Me2bpy (4,4‧-dimethyl-2,2‧-bipyridine); 5,5‧-Me2bpy (5,5‧-dimethyl-2,2‧-bipyridine)} were reacted with alkyl halides (RX = EtI, EtBr) to yield the organoplatinum(IV) complexes [PtMe2RX(NN)]. On the basis of NMR data, the platinum(IV) product of each reaction contains almost exclusively the trans isomer but small traces of the cis isomers are also observed. On the other hand, the reaction of [PtMe2(NN)] {NN = bu2bpy (4,4‧-di-tert-butyl-2,2‧-bipyridine); 4,4‧-Me2bpy; 5,5‧-Me2bpy} with CH2Br2 gave a mixture of cis and trans-[PtMe2(CH2Br)Br(NN)] formed by the oxidative addition of one of the C-Br bonds. The formation of the cis isomer increases in the order of 5,5‧-Me2bpy > bu2bpy > 4,4‧-Me2bpy. The reaction of [PtMe2(NN)] {NN = bpy (2,2‧-bipyridine), phen (1,10-phenanthroline)} with 1,8-dibromooctane or 1,9-dibromononane afforded the mononuclear complexes [PtMe2{(CH2)nBr}Br(NN)] (n = 8-9). The products were fully characterized by elemental analysis, 1H, 13C, HH COSY, HMQC, DEPT and DEPTQ-135 NMR spectroscopy. The crystal structure of [PtMe2EtI(4,4‧-Me2bpy)] reveals that Pt(IV) atom is six-coordinated in a slightly distorted octahedral geometry with the ethyl group trans to iodide.

  13. RECOVERY OF THE CANDIDATE PROTOPLANET HD 100546 b WITH GEMINI/NICI AND DETECTION OF ADDITIONAL (PLANET-INDUCED?) DISK STRUCTURE AT SMALL SEPARATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, Thayne; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Muto, Takayuki; Honda, Mitsuhiko; Brandt, Timothy D.; Grady, Carol; Fukagawa, Misato; Burrows, Adam; Janson, Markus; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; McElwain, Michael W.; Follette, Katherine; Hashimoto, Jun; Henning, Thomas; Kandori, Ryo; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Morino, Jun-ichi; Nishikawa, Jun; Kwon, Jungmi; Mede, Kyle; and others

    2014-12-01

    We report the first independent, second epoch (re-)detection of a directly imaged protoplanet candidate. Using L' high-contrast imaging of HD 100546 taken with the Near-Infrared Coronagraph and Imager on Gemini South, we recover ''HD 100546 b'' with a position and brightness consistent with the original Very Large Telescope/NAos-COnica detection from Quanz et al., although data obtained after 2013 will be required to decisively demonstrate common proper motion. HD 100546 b may be spatially resolved, up to ≈12-13 AU in diameter, and is embedded in a finger of thermal IR-bright, polarized emission extending inward to at least 0.''3. Standard hot-start models imply a mass of ≈15 M{sub J} . However, if HD 100546 b is newly formed or made visible by a circumplanetary disk, both of which are plausible, its mass is significantly lower (e.g., 1-7 M{sub J} ). Additionally, we discover a thermal IR-bright disk feature, possibly a spiral density wave, at roughly the same angular separation as HD 100546 b but 90° away. Our interpretation of this feature as a spiral arm is not decisive, but modeling analyses using spiral density wave theory implies a wave launching point exterior to ≈0.''45 embedded within the visible disk structure: plausibly evidence for a second, hitherto unseen, wide-separation planet. With one confirmed protoplanet candidate and evidence for one to two others, HD 100546 is an important evolutionary precursor to intermediate-mass stars with multiple super-Jovian planets at moderate/wide separations like HR 8799.

  14. Structural-functional characterization of the cathodic haemoglobin of the conger eel Conger conger: molecular modelling study of an additional phosphate-binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini, Mariagiuseppina; Giardina, Bruno; Verde, Cinzia; Carratore, Vito; Olianas, Alessandra; Sollai, Luigi; Sanna, Maria T; Castagnola, Massimo; di Prisco, Guido

    2003-01-01

    The protein sequence data for the alpha- and beta-chains have been deposited in the SWISS-PROT and TrEMBL protein knowledgebase under the accession numbers P83479 and P83478 respectively. The Conger conger (conger eel) haemoglobin (Hb) system is made of three components, one of which, the so-called cathodic Hb, representing approx. 20% of the total pigment, has been purified and characterized from both a structural and functional point of view. Stripped Hb showed a reverse Bohr effect, high oxygen affinity and slightly low cooperativity in the absence of any effector. Addition of saturating GTP strongly influences the pH dependence of the oxygen affinity, since the reverse Bohr effect, observed under stripped conditions, is converted into a small normal Bohr effect. A further investigation of the GTP effect on oxygen affinity, carried out by fitting its titration curve, demonstrated the presence of two independent binding sites. Therefore, on the basis of the amino acid sequence of the alpha- and beta-chains, which have been determined, a computer modelling study has been performed. The data suggest that C. conger cathodic Hb may bind organic phosphates at two distinct binding sites located along the central cavity of the tetramer by hydrogen bonds and/or electrostatic interactions with amino acid residues of both chains, which have been identified. Among these residues, the two Lys-alpha(G6) (where the letter refers to the haemoglobin helix and the number to the amino acid position in the helix) appear to have a key role in the GTP movement from the external binding region to the internal central cavity of the tetrameric molecule. PMID:12646043

  15. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  16. A simple approach to hybrid inorganic–organic step-growth hydrogels with scalable control of physicochemical properties and biodegradability† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details and characterization data as mentioned in the text. See DOI: 10.1039/c4py01789g Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Alves, F.

    2015-01-01

    We prepared new and scalable, hybrid inorganic–organic step-growth hydrogels with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) network knot construction elements and hydrolytically degradable poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) di-ester macromonomers by in situ radical-mediated thiol–ene photopolymerization. The physicochemical properties of the gels are fine-tailored over orders of magnitude including functionalization of their interior, a hierarchical gel structure, and biodegradability. PMID:25821524

  17. A diversity-oriented synthesis strategy enabling the combinatorial-type variation of macrocyclic peptidomimetic scaffolds† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedures, characterization data and details of the computational analyses. See DOI: 10.1039/c5ob00371g Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Isidro-Llobet, Albert; Hadje Georgiou, Kathy; Galloway, Warren R. J. D.; Giacomini, Elisa; Hansen, Mette R.; Méndez-Abt, Gabriela; Tan, Yaw Sing; Carro, Laura; Sore, Hannah F.

    2015-01-01

    Macrocyclic peptidomimetics are associated with a broad range of biological activities. However, despite such potentially valuable properties, the macrocyclic peptidomimetic structural class is generally considered as being poorly explored within drug discovery. This has been attributed to the lack of general methods for producing collections of macrocyclic peptidomimetics with high levels of structural, and thus shape, diversity. In particular, there is a lack of scaffold diversity in current macrocyclic peptidomimetic libraries; indeed, the efficient construction of diverse molecular scaffolds presents a formidable general challenge to the synthetic chemist. Herein we describe a new, advanced strategy for the diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS) of macrocyclic peptidomimetics that enables the combinatorial variation of molecular scaffolds (core macrocyclic ring architectures). The generality and robustness of this DOS strategy is demonstrated by the step-efficient synthesis of a structurally diverse library of over 200 macrocyclic peptidomimetic compounds, each based around a distinct molecular scaffold and isolated in milligram quantities, from readily available building-blocks. To the best of our knowledge this represents an unprecedented level of scaffold diversity in a synthetically derived library of macrocyclic peptidomimetics. Cheminformatic analysis indicated that the library compounds access regions of chemical space that are distinct from those addressed by top-selling brand-name drugs and macrocyclic natural products, illustrating the value of our DOS approach to sample regions of chemical space underexploited in current drug discovery efforts. An analysis of three-dimensional molecular shapes illustrated that the DOS library has a relatively high level of shape diversity. PMID:25778821

  18. Picornavirus uncoating intermediate captured in atomic detail

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jingshan; Wang, Xiangxi; Hu, Zhongyu; Gao, Qiang; Sun, Yao; Li, Xuemei; Porta, Claudine; Walter, Thomas S.; Gilbert, Robert J.; Zhao, Yuguang; Axford, Danny; Williams, Mark; McAuley, Katherine; Rowlands, David J.; Yin, Weidong; Wang, Junzhi; Stuart, David I.; Rao, Zihe; Fry, Elizabeth E.

    2013-01-01

    It remains largely mysterious how the genomes of non-enveloped eukaryotic viruses are transferred across a membrane into the host cell. Picornaviruses are simple models for such viruses, and initiate this uncoating process through particle expansion, which reveals channels through which internal capsid proteins and the viral genome presumably exit the particle, although this has not been clearly seen until now. Here we present the atomic structure of an uncoating intermediate for the major human picornavirus pathogen CAV16, which reveals VP1 partly extruded from the capsid, poised to embed in the host membrane. Together with previous low-resolution results, we are able to propose a detailed hypothesis for the ordered egress of the internal proteins, using two distinct sets of channels through the capsid, and suggest a structural link to the condensed RNA within the particle, which may be involved in triggering RNA release. PMID:23728514

  19. HUBBLE CAPTURES DETAILED IMAGE OF URANUS' ATMOSPHERE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope has peered deep into Uranus' atmosphere to see clear and hazy layers created by a mixture of gases. Using infrared filters, Hubble captured detailed features of three layers of Uranus' atmosphere. Hubble's images are different from the ones taken by the Voyager 2 spacecraft, which flew by Uranus 10 years ago. Those images - not taken in infrared light - showed a greenish-blue disk with very little detail. The infrared image allows astronomers to probe the structure of Uranus' atmosphere, which consists of mostly hydrogen with traces of methane. The red around the planet's edge represents a very thin haze at a high altitude. The haze is so thin that it can only be seen by looking at the edges of the disk, and is similar to looking at the edge of a soap bubble. The yellow near the bottom of Uranus is another hazy layer. The deepest layer, the blue near the top of Uranus, shows a clearer atmosphere. Image processing has been used to brighten the rings around Uranus so that astronomers can study their structure. In reality, the rings are as dark as black lava or charcoal. This false color picture was assembled from several exposures taken July 3, 1995 by the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2. CREDIT: Erich Karkoschka (University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Lab) and NASA

  20. Novel nonadride, heptadride and maleic acid metabolites from the byssochlamic acid producer Byssochlamys fulva IMI 40021 – an insight into the biosynthesis of maleidrides† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of any supplementary information available should be included here. See DOI: 10.1039/c5cc06988b Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Szwalbe, Agnieszka J.; Williams, Katherine; O'Flynn, Daniel E.; Bailey, Andrew M.; Mulholland, Nicholas P.; Vincent, Jason L.; Willis, Christine L.

    2015-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Byssochlamys fulva strain IMI 40021 produces (+)-byssochlamic acid 1, its novel dihydroanalogue 2 and four related secondary metabolites. Agnestadrides A, 17 and B, 18 constitute a novel class of seven-membered ring, maleic anhydride-containing (hence termed heptadride) natural products. The putative maleic anhydride precursor 5 for both nonadride and heptadride biosynthesis was isolated as a fermentation product for the first time and its structure confirmed by synthesis. Acid 5 undergoes facile decarboxylation to anhydride 6. The generic term maleidrides is proposed to encompass biosynthetically-related compounds containing maleic anhydride moieties fused to an alicyclic ring, varying in size and substituents. PMID:26452099

  1. 5. DETAIL OF MUD INFILL (MIXED WITH STRAW), LATHS AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL OF MUD INFILL (MIXED WITH STRAW), LATHS AND STRUCTURAL COMPONENTS (CORNER POST, SILL AND STUD), SOUTHEAST CORNER OF EAST SIDE OF ORIGINAL SECTION. - Thomas Threlkeld House, Benson Pike, Shelbyville, Shelby County, KY

  2. 6. DETAIL OF ENTRY ON NORTH ELEVATION OF BUILDING 260 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL OF ENTRY ON NORTH ELEVATION OF BUILDING 260 (STORAGE STRUCTURE) IN STORAGE AREA. - Loring Air Force Base, Weapons Storage Area, Northeastern corner of base at northern end of Maine Road, Limestone, Aroostook County, ME

  3. 36. VAL, DETAIL OF TYPICAL INTERIOR OF CONCRETE 'A' FRAME ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. VAL, DETAIL OF TYPICAL INTERIOR OF CONCRETE 'A' FRAME STRUCTURE SHOWING PAINTED CONCRETE WALLS, CONCRETE STAIRS AND INTERIOR WOOD DOOR. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. 15. DETAIL, UNDERSIDE OF DECK, FROM BELOW AND WEST, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. DETAIL, UNDERSIDE OF DECK, FROM BELOW AND WEST, SHOWING STRUCTURAL CONFIGURATION, INCLUDING FLOOR BEAMS, STRINGERS, BRACING, AND STEEL MESH DECK - Glendale Road Bridge, Spanning Deep Creek Lake on Glendale Road, McHenry, Garrett County, MD

  5. 45. UPPER CHORD / END POST DETAIL OF WEST DECK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. UPPER CHORD / END POST DETAIL OF WEST DECK TRUSS APPROACH SPAN, SHOWING FLOOR STRUCTURE. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - MacArthur Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River on Highway 34 between IA & IL, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  6. View south, wharf B, timber framing, detail of cross bracing, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View south, wharf B, timber framing, detail of cross bracing, recent galvanized straps, bolts and washers - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  7. View northwest, wharf B, timber framing, detail of cross bracing, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View northwest, wharf B, timber framing, detail of cross bracing, charred piers, recent galvanized fastenings - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  8. 6. TIP TOP MINE. DETAIL OF SIDING. SOUTHWEST CORNER OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. TIP TOP MINE. DETAIL OF SIDING. SOUTHWEST CORNER OF STRUCTURE. CAMERA POINTED NORTHEAST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Tip Top Mine, West face Florida Mountain, approximately 150 feet below summit, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  9. 12. Detail, typical window with fireproof shutters open, northeast rear, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Detail, typical window with fireproof shutters open, northeast rear, view to southwest, 135mm lens. Note cracks evidencing structural failure. - Benicia Arsenal, Powder Magazine No. 5, Junction of Interstate Highways 680 & 780, Benicia, Solano County, CA

  10. View southwest, wharf A, detail of rebuilt section failure ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View southwest, wharf A, detail of rebuilt section failure - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  11. 13. Detail, typical window with fireproof shutters closed, northeast rear, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Detail, typical window with fireproof shutters closed, northeast rear, view to southwest, 135mm lens. Note cracks evidencing structural failure. - Benicia Arsenal, Powder Magazine No. 5, Junction of Interstate Highways 680 & 780, Benicia, Solano County, CA

  12. 9. DETAIL OF UMBILICAL MAST BASE WITH STEEL STOPS AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. DETAIL OF UMBILICAL MAST BASE WITH STEEL STOPS AT EAST END OF MOBILE SERVICE STRUCTURE RAIL; VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Cape Canaveral Air Station, Launch Complex 17, Facility 28501, East end of Lighthouse Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  13. DETAIL OF THE UNDERSIDE OF THE BRIDGE, SHOWING IBEAMS AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF THE UNDERSIDE OF THE BRIDGE, SHOWING I-BEAMS AND WOODEN CROSS BEAMS. 110 - Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad, Cajon Subdivision, Structure No. 62.7, between Cajon Summit and Keenbrook, Devore, San Bernardino County, CA

  14. ANOTHER DETAIL OF THE BRIDGE UNDERSIDE, IBEAM AND WOODEN CROSS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ANOTHER DETAIL OF THE BRIDGE UNDERSIDE, I-BEAM AND WOODEN CROSS BEAM CONSTRUCTION. 69 - Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad, Cajon Subdivision, Structure No. 66.4, Between Cajon Summit and Keenbrook, Devore, San Bernardino County, CA

  15. DETAIL OF UNDERSIDE OF BRIDGE SHOWING IBEAMS, WOODEN CROSS BEAMS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF UNDERSIDE OF BRIDGE SHOWING I-BEAMS, WOODEN CROSS BEAMS, AND PART OF WING WALL. 68 - Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad, Cajon Subdivision, Structure No. 66.4, Between Cajon Summit and Keenbrook, Devore, San Bernardino County, CA

  16. 44. Detail, bridge land span outboard girder brackets carrying utility ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. Detail, bridge land span outboard girder brackets carrying utility conduit. Structure rests on granite blocks mounted on granite piers. - Broadway Bridge, Spanning Foundry Street, MBTA Yard, Fort Point Channel, & Lehigh Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  17. INTERIOR; DETAIL OF ANTENNA TRUNK OPENING, LOOKING EAST. Naval ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR; DETAIL OF ANTENNA TRUNK OPENING, LOOKING EAST. - Naval Computer & Telecommunications Area Master Station, Eastern Pacific, Radio Transmitter Facility Lualualei, Helix House No. 2, Base of Radio Antenna Structure No. 427, Makaha, Honolulu County, HI

  18. 13. Detail view into the interior of the pediment of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Detail view into the interior of the pediment of the vertical sign showing structure and neon lighting system used for name "ABC-Great States" - Chicago Theater, 175 North State Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  19. 26. Southern approach span showing detail plan, elevation, and existing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Southern approach span showing detail plan, elevation, and existing views for pier and abutment structural changes required after flood of December 1955. - Moody Bridge, Spanning South Fork Eel River, Garberville, Humboldt County, CA

  20. 10. Detail view of pendant lamps, laminated arch beams and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Detail view of pendant lamps, laminated arch beams and ceiling structure, facing north - Mountain Home Air Force Base, Base Chapel, 350 Willow Street, Cantonment Area, Mountain Home, Elmore County, ID