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Sample records for additional structural details

  1. Aircraft empennage structural detail design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meholic, Greg; Brown, Rhonda; Hall, Melissa; Harvey, Robert; Singer, Michael; Tella, Gustavo

    1993-01-01

    This project involved the detailed design of the aft fuselage and empennage structure, vertical stabilizer, rudder, horizontal stabilizer, and elevator for the Triton primary flight trainer. The main design goals under consideration were to illustrate the integration of the control systems devices used in the tail surfaces and their necessary structural supports as well as the elevator trim, navigational lighting system, electrical systems, tail-located ground tie, and fuselage/cabin interface structure. Accommodations for maintenance, lubrication, adjustment, and repairability were devised. Weight, fabrication, and (sub)assembly goals were addressed. All designs were in accordance with the FAR Part 23 stipulations for a normal category aircraft.

  2. DETAIL OF PLAQUE WITH ADDITIONAL DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION INFORMATION, SOUTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF PLAQUE WITH ADDITIONAL DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION INFORMATION, SOUTHEAST ABUTMENT - Connecticut Avenue Bridge, Spans Rock Creek & Potomac Parkway at Connecticut Avenue, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  3. 19. WINDOW DETAIL, NORTH WALL OF GARAGE ADDITION. VIEW SHOWS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. WINDOW DETAIL, NORTH WALL OF GARAGE ADDITION. VIEW SHOWS CONCRETE BLOCK CONSTRUCTION OF ADDITION. - Chollas Heights Naval Radio Transmitting Facility, Transmitter Building, 6410 Zero Road, San Diego, San Diego County, CA

  4. 12. INTERIOR EAST ADDITION DETAIL VIEW, FACING SOUTH. ROLLUP DOOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. INTERIOR EAST ADDITION DETAIL VIEW, FACING SOUTH. ROLL-UP DOOR ADDITION. ROLL-UP DOOR AND MECHANISM, OFFICE AND MAIN BUILDING SPACE ACCESS VISIBLE. - NASA Industrial Plant, Maintenance Facility, 12214 Lakewood Boulevard, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. Detail, external parabolic antenna (later addition). Note how waveguide was ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, external parabolic antenna (later addition). Note how waveguide was cut to remove active portion of antenna. - Western Union Telegraph Company, Jennerstown Relay, Laurel Summit Road off U.S. 30, Laughlintown, Westmoreland County, PA

  6. 13. INTERIOR DETAIL, FIRST FLOOR OF ADDITION AT STAIRWAY, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. INTERIOR DETAIL, FIRST FLOOR OF ADDITION AT STAIRWAY, SHOWING BANNISTER, HANDRAIL AND NEWEL POSTS AND TONGUE AND GROOVE WAINSCOTING. - Mills Hall, Mills College, 5000 MacArthur Boulevard, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  7. 14. INTERIOR DETAIL, FIRST FLOOR OF ADDITION AT SOUTH WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. INTERIOR DETAIL, FIRST FLOOR OF ADDITION AT SOUTH WALL OF TOILET ROOM, SHOWING ORNATE PAINTED RADIATOR AND TONGUE AND GROOVE WAINSCOTING. - Mills Hall, Mills College, 5000 MacArthur Boulevard, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  8. 10. DETAIL OF KITCHEN ADDITION, SHOWING SIDING COPED TO FIT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL OF KITCHEN ADDITION, SHOWING SIDING COPED TO FIT LOG WALL OF MAIN HOUSE - Whitcomb Cabin, BZ Corners, Glenwood County Road (Conboy Lake National Wildlife Refuge), Glenwood, Klickitat County, WA

  9. Aircraft empennage structural detail design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesnewski, David; Snow, Russ M.; Combs, Lisa M.; Paufler, David; Schnieder, George; Athousake, Roxanne

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to provide an empennage structural assembly that will withstand the operational loads defined in FAR Part 23, as well as those specified in the statement of work, i.e. snow, rain, humidity, tiedown forces, etc. The goal is to provide a simple yet durable lightweight structure that will transfer the aerodynamic forces produced by the tail surfaces through the most efficient load path to the airframe. The structure should be simple and cost-effective to manufacture and repair. All structures meet or exceed loading and fatigue criteria. The structure provides for necessary stiffness and ease of maintenance.

  10. 18. Interior detail, windows, original Library, addition, Engine Stores Building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Interior detail, windows, original Library, addition, Engine Stores Building, Southern Pacific Railroad Carlin Shops, view to north-northwest (90mm lens). Note the milled tongue-and-groove ceiling, and deterioration of bricks near floor level due to rising damp. - Southern Pacific Railroad, Carlin Shops, Engine Stores Building, Foot of Sixth Street, Carlin, Elko County, NV

  11. 16. INTERIOR DETAIL, SECOND FLOOR OF ADDITION AT SOUTH WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. INTERIOR DETAIL, SECOND FLOOR OF ADDITION AT SOUTH WALL OF TOILET ROOM, SHOWING LARGER, DIFFERENT STYLE RADIATOR THAN AT FIRST FLOOR, AND TONGUE AND GROOVE WAINSCOTING WITH WOOD CAP TRIM. - Mills Hall, Mills College, 5000 MacArthur Boulevard, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  12. 15. DETAILED VIEW OF ENRICHED URANIUM STORAGE TANK. THE ADDITION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. DETAILED VIEW OF ENRICHED URANIUM STORAGE TANK. THE ADDITION OF THE GLASS RINGS SHOWN AT THE TOP OF THE TANK HELPS PREVENT THE URANIUM FROM REACHING CRITICALITY LIMITS. (4/12/62) - Rocky Flats Plant, General Manufacturing, Support, Records-Central Computing, Southern portion of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  13. 8. MACHINERY SHED STORAGE ROOM ADDITION DETAIL SHOWING MATRIX OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. MACHINERY SHED STORAGE ROOM ADDITION DETAIL SHOWING MATRIX OF NAILS USED TO ADHERE PORTLAND CEMENT PLASTER, SOUTH ADOBE WALL ADJACENT TO WINDOW Note: Photographs Nos. AZ-159-A-9 through AZ-159-A-10 are photocopies of photographs. The original prints and negatives are located in the SCS Tucson Plant Materials Center, Tucson, Arizona. Photographer Ted F. Spaller. - Tucson Plant Material Center, Machinery Shed, 3241 North Romero Road, Tucson, Pima County, AZ

  14. Structural concepts and details for seismic design

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    This manual discusses building and building component behavior during earthquakes, and provides suggested details for seismic resistance which have shown by experience to provide adequate performance during earthquakes. Special design and construction practices are also described which, although they might be common in some high-seismic regions, may not be common in low and moderate seismic-hazard regions of the United States. Special attention is given to describing the level of detailing appropriate for each seismic region. The UBC seismic criteria for all seismic zones is carefully examined, and many examples of connection details are given. The general scope of discussion is limited to materials and construction types common to Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Although the manual is primarily written for professional engineers engaged in performing seismic-resistant design for DOE facilities, the first two chapters, plus the introductory sections of succeeding chapters, contain descriptions which are also directed toward project engineers who authorize, review, or supervise the design and construction of DOE facilities. 88 refs., 188 figs.

  15. Interior detail of structural elements section; camera facing east. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior detail of structural elements section; camera facing east. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Supply Building, Walnut Avenue, southeast corner of Walnut Avenue & Fifth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  16. View south, wharf B, showing western docking structure, decking detail ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View south, wharf B, showing western docking structure, decking detail - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  17. INTERIOR; DETAIL OF ROOF FRAMING STRUCTURE, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. Naval ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR; DETAIL OF ROOF FRAMING STRUCTURE, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Naval Computer & Telecommunications Area Master Station, Eastern Pacific, Radio Transmitter Facility Lualualei, Helix House No. 2, Base of Radio Antenna Structure No. 427, Makaha, Honolulu County, HI

  18. 91. Virginia Route 608 grade separation structure. Detail of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    91. Virginia Route 608 grade separation structure. Detail of the scored wing walls and T beams. Looking southeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  19. 15. Detail, cracks evidencing structural failure, northeast rear, view to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Detail, cracks evidencing structural failure, northeast rear, view to southwest, 90mm lens. - Benicia Arsenal, Powder Magazine No. 5, Junction of Interstate Highways 680 & 780, Benicia, Solano County, CA

  20. 14. Detail, crack evidencing structural failure, northeast rear, view to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Detail, crack evidencing structural failure, northeast rear, view to southwest, 90mm lens. Note failure of sandstone lintel above window. - Benicia Arsenal, Powder Magazine No. 5, Junction of Interstate Highways 680 & 780, Benicia, Solano County, CA

  1. Interior detail of third level structural elements at south end; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior detail of third level structural elements at south end; camera facing west. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Supply Building, Walnut Avenue, southeast corner of Walnut Avenue & Fifth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  2. 2. DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL SYSTEM FOR CANTILEVERED HOG RUN; BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL SYSTEM FOR CANTILEVERED HOG RUN; BUILDING 168 (1960 HOG KILL) IS BENEATH HOG RUN - Rath Packing Company, Cantilevered Hog Run, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  3. Visitor center flight room, detail of twin structural piers at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Visitor center flight room, detail of twin structural piers at northeast corner supporting flight room dome - Wright Brothers National Memorial Visitor Center, Highway 158, Kill Devil Hills, Dare County, NC

  4. 43. Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, detail of air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, detail of air vent VIEW NORTHWEST - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Launch Area, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  5. 42. Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, detail of escape ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, detail of escape hatch, elevator and air vent VIEW SOUTH - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Launch Area, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  6. 36. Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, detail showing elevator, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, detail showing elevator, air ventilators and personnel entrance VIEW SOUTHEAST - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Launch Area, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  7. 37. Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, detail of personnel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, detail of personnel entrance VIEW NORTH - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Launch Area, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  8. 40. Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, detail of escape ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, detail of escape hatch and decontamination shower VIEW WEST - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Launch Area, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  9. 38. Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, detail of conduit ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, detail of conduit service junction - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Launch Area, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  10. 41. Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, detail of elevator ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, detail of elevator and air vents VIEW NORTHEAST - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Launch Area, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  11. 16. DETAIL VIEW OF TYPICAL STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS; CROSSBAY 3 BETWEEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. DETAIL VIEW OF TYPICAL STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS; CROSSBAY 3 BETWEEN D & E BAYS; LOOKING WSW. (Ryan) - Watervliet Arsenal, Building No. 135, Gillespie Road, South of Parker Road, Watervliet, Albany County, NY

  12. 20. Detail of lantern roof structure, with revolving lens beneath. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Detail of lantern roof structure, with revolving lens beneath. (Blurred due to apparatus motion.) - Block Island Southeast Light, Spring Street & Mohegan Trail at Mohegan Bluffs, New Shoreham, Washington County, RI

  13. 8. Interior of Building 1015 (land plane hangar), structural detail, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Interior of Building 1015 (land plane hangar), structural detail, looking northeast - Naval Air Station Chase Field, Building 1015, Byrd Street, .82 mile South-southeast of intersection of Texas State Highway 202 & Independence Street, Beeville, Bee County, TX

  14. 7. Interior of Building 1015 (land plane hangar), structural detail, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Interior of Building 1015 (land plane hangar), structural detail, looking northeast - Naval Air Station Chase Field, Building 1015, Byrd Street, .82 mile South-southeast of intersection of Texas State Highway 202 & Independence Street, Beeville, Bee County, TX

  15. Detail of roof trusses showing phoenix columns. Note structural phoenix ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of roof trusses showing phoenix columns. Note structural phoenix column in foreground. - Phoenix Iron Company, Rolling Mill, North of French Creek, west of Fairview Avenue, Phoenixville, Chester County, PA

  16. 30. DETAIL OF COLLAPSED BRIDGE NO. 14 SUSPENSION STRUCTURE. LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. DETAIL OF COLLAPSED BRIDGE NO. 14 SUSPENSION STRUCTURE. LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Greenville Yard, Transfer Bridge System, Port of New York/New Jersey, Upper New York Bay, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  17. 21. DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL BAY ON NORTH ELEVATION OF BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL BAY ON NORTH ELEVATION OF BUILDING 216 (AMMUNITION MAINTENANCE SHOP) IN ASSEMBLY AREA. - Loring Air Force Base, Weapons Storage Area, Northeastern corner of base at northern end of Maine Road, Limestone, Aroostook County, ME

  18. Detail of east side, showing roof structure and open racks ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of east side, showing roof structure and open racks for building materials storage - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Storage Sheds, Northeast Corner of West Pennington Avenue & North Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  19. 15. DETAIL OF LANTERN ON DAM STRUCTURE WHICH IS IDENTICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. DETAIL OF LANTERN ON DAM STRUCTURE WHICH IS IDENTICAL TO THE ORIGINAL LIGHT FIXTURES ON THE BRIDGE WHICH ARE NO LONGER EXTANT, VIEW NORTHEAST - Menominee River Bridge, Spanning Menominee River at County Truck Higway "K", Amberg, Marinette County, WI

  20. 9. Detail of viaduct's structural system with cattle pens beneath. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Detail of viaduct's structural system with cattle pens beneath. View to northeast. - South Omaha Union Stock Yards, Buckingham Road Viaduct, Twenty-ninth Street spanning Stockyard Cattle Pens, Omaha, Douglas County, NE

  1. 7. STRUCTURAL DETAILS AT ENTRANCE OF LOCOMOTIVE ROUNDHOUSE, SHEET NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. STRUCTURAL DETAILS AT ENTRANCE OF LOCOMOTIVE ROUNDHOUSE, SHEET NO. 1-9-2/89.1 (DRAWING DATED 1942). - Oakland Army Base, Railroad Engine Shop, Engineer Road & Wake Avenue, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  2. 4. DETAIL VIEW OF CROSS SECTION OF STRUCTURE, SHOWING EXTERIOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL VIEW OF CROSS SECTION OF STRUCTURE, SHOWING EXTERIOR FACINGS LINED WITH RUBBLE BACKING AND EARTH INFILL, LOOKING EAST - Rock Wall, North side of Battle Creek Canyon, Shingletown, Shasta County, CA

  3. INTERIOR VIEW, DETAIL OF BARREL ROOF STRUCTURE, FACING NORTHEAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, DETAIL OF BARREL ROOF STRUCTURE, FACING NORTHEAST. - Southern Branch of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Building 13, Harris Avenue at its intersection of Black Avenue and Woodfin Street, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  4. 11. DETAIL VIEW OF DAM 87, SHOWING STOPLOG STRUCTURE (PARTIALLY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. DETAIL VIEW OF DAM 87, SHOWING STOPLOG STRUCTURE (PARTIALLY HIDDEN BY MARSH GRASSES IN LOWER PART OF PHOTO) AT RIGHT (WEST) END OF SPILLWAY - Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge, Dam 87, Souris River Basin, Foxholm, Surrey (England), ND

  5. 35. MISCELLANEOUS ARCHITECTURAL AND STRUCTURAL DETAILS. INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200063300287106359. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. MISCELLANEOUS ARCHITECTURAL AND STRUCTURAL DETAILS. INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0633-00-287-106359. FLUOR NUMBER 5775-CPP-633-A-9. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  6. 15. Photocopy of Engineering Drawing, Structural Steel Details (from City ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Photocopy of Engineering Drawing, Structural Steel Details (from City of Norton Shores) - William S. Antisdale Memorial State Reward Bridge, Spanning Mona Lake at Henry Street, Norton Shores, Muskegon County, MI

  7. 11. Detail, southeast corner, showing decorative elements of main structure, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Detail, southeast corner, showing decorative elements of main structure, and window at the second story of the hose tower. - Independent Hose Company No. 3, Nineteenth & Belmont Streets, Bellaire, Belmont County, OH

  8. 109. Detail view of structural frame supporting torch arm; cylindrical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    109. Detail view of structural frame supporting torch arm; cylindrical object in foreground is part of ventilating system. February 1984. - Statue of Liberty, Liberty Island, Manhattan, New York County, NY

  9. 5. Detail of tower bottom step and stairway structure, facing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Detail of tower bottom step and stairway structure, facing southeast - Cold Mountain Fire Lookout Station, Lookout Tower, Krassel District, Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, Dixie, Idaho County, ID

  10. Section A, detail view parking structure, northwest stair tower, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Section A, detail view parking structure, northwest stair tower, showing smoke damage under floors, looking north/northeast. (BH) - World Trade Center Site, Bounded by Vesey, Church, Liberty Streets, & Route 9A, New York County, NY

  11. 39. OUTLET WORKS: CONTROL HOUSE STRUCTURAL DETAILS. Sheet 33, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. OUTLET WORKS: CONTROL HOUSE - STRUCTURAL DETAILS. Sheet 33, August 20, 1938. File no. SA 121/72. - Prado Dam, Outlet Works, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  12. 31. LOWER CHORD / FLOOR STRUCTURE DETAIL OF THROUGH TRUSS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. LOWER CHORD / FLOOR STRUCTURE DETAIL OF THROUGH TRUSS. VIEW TO NORTH. - Abraham Lincoln Memorial Bridge, Spanning Missouri River on Highway 30 between Nebraska & Iowa, Blair, Washington County, NE

  13. 32. LOWER CHORD / FLOOR STRUCTURE DETAIL OF THROUGH TRUSS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. LOWER CHORD / FLOOR STRUCTURE DETAIL OF THROUGH TRUSS. VIEW TO NORTH. - Abraham Lincoln Memorial Bridge, Spanning Missouri River on Highway 30 between Nebraska & Iowa, Blair, Washington County, NE

  14. 12. DETAIL VIEW OF STRUCTURE, FROM BELOW. VIEW OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. DETAIL VIEW OF STRUCTURE, FROM BELOW. VIEW OF THE PARKER-MAYBERRY BRIDGE AND PART OF THE STRUCTURE OF THE COLORADO STREET BRIDGE, SEEN FROM THE ARROYO SECO BELOW THE COLORADO STREET BRIDGE - Colorado Street Bridge, Spanning Arroyo Seco at Colorado Boulevard, Pasadena, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. Hangar no. 2 structural details of west door at SW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Hangar no. 2 structural details of west door at SW corner. Note door tracks in underside of upper door structure. Looking 4 N. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Southern Lighter Than Air Ship Hangar, Near intersection of Windmill Road & Johnson Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  16. Battery Berry Observation Station, detail, frame structure meeting older masonry ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Battery Berry Observation Station, detail, frame structure meeting older masonry building on west side of structure; view east - Fort McKinley, Battery Berry Observation Station, North side of Wood Side Drive approximately 80 feet east of Spring Cove Lane, Great Diamond Island, Portland, Cumberland County, ME

  17. DETAIL VIEW OF THE STRUCTURE OF THE BASE OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF THE STRUCTURE OF THE BASE OF THE TEST STAND AND THE TAIL SECTION OF A REDSTONE (JUPITER) ROCKET. NOTE THE FLAME DEFLECTOR BEHIND THE STRUCTURE IN THE FOREGROUND. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  18. Investigating structural details of lipid-cholesterol-A β interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Durgesh; Anunciado, Divina; Heller, William; O'Neill, Hugh; Urban, Volker; Qian, Shuo

    2015-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia and is predicted to affect 1 in 85 people around the world by 2050. Amyloid beta (A β) -peptide, a peptide composed of 40- 42 amino acids that is the product of cleavage from the amyloid precursor protein (APP), is regarded to play a major role in the development of AD. In addition, accumulating evidence points to a positive association between cholesterol and AD. Here, we present results from our studies about A β-peptide and cholesterol in bilayer by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) using a combination of dimyristoyl, phosphocholine (DMPC) and partially deuterated cholesterol (cholesterol-d7) with and without A β. We compare the results using grazing incidence and transmission SANS on lipid bilayer films and unilamellar vesicles respectively. The structural details on vesicles and bilayers work in conjunction with the circular dichroism on peptide in solution and oriented circular dichroism in bilayer films. The studies confirm a positive association of A β with the membrane layers. The results from different studies will be compared and contrasted in presentation.

  19. Detail Hframe structure about five and onefourth miles southwest of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail H-frame structure about five and one-fourth miles southwest of Morony Dam and Powerhouse showing one modern non-ceramic insulator and two historic porcelain suspension insulators - Morony Hydroelectric Facility, Morony-to-Rainbow 100 kV Transmission Line, West bank of the Missouri River, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  20. Detail of insulator array at first line structure showing historic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of insulator array at first line structure showing historic porcelain suspension insulators in strings of eight, porcelain jumper support insulators in strings of six, arch rings and ball weights - Morony Hydroelectric Facility, Morony-to-Rainbow 100 kV Transmission Line, West bank of the Missouri River, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  1. Section A, detail view at parking structure of heatblistered paint ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Section A, detail view at parking structure of heat-blistered paint on column J3/10. Level B2, looking west/southwest. (BH) - World Trade Center Site, Bounded by Vesey, Church, Liberty Streets, & Route 9A, New York County, NY

  2. Detail of array structural elements through axis of array, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of array structural elements through axis of array, looking north-northeast - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Columbia Falls Radar Site Receive Sector Two Antenna Array, At the end of Shadagee Ridge Road, Columbia Falls, Washington County, ME

  3. Hangar no. 2 interior detail of roof structures and interior ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Hangar no. 2 interior detail of roof structures and interior work spaces. Note concrete piers and cross bracing. Seen at trusses no. 42, 43, & 44. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Southern Lighter Than Air Ship Hangar, Near intersection of Windmill Road & Johnson Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  4. Structure A, architectural sections & details. Drawing no. H2, revised ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Structure A, architectural sections & details. Drawing no. H2, revised as-built dated October 11, 1951. Original drawing by Black & Veatch, consulting engineers, Kansas City, Missouri, prepared for the U.S. Department of the Army, Office of Engineers, Military Construction Division, Washington, D.C. dated October 1. - Travis Air Force Base, Building No. 925, W Street, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  5. 5. Interior Detail of Roof Structure and Trusses Note: Photographs ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Interior Detail of Roof Structure and Trusses Note: Photographs Nos. CA-1543F-6 through CA-1543F-19 are photocopies of construction drawings (various dates). Originals located at Mare Island Naval Shipyard-Staff Civil Engineer's Office. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Chemical Cleaning Facility, North of Fourteenth Street, between California & Railroad Avenue, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  6. 10. Exterior view, showing the structural details and tanks above ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Exterior view, showing the structural details and tanks above at walk-in entry level (bottom) of Test Cell 7, Systems Integration Laboratory Building (T-28), looking west. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Systems Integration Laboratory Building, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  7. 6. Exterior view, showing structural details and instrumentation at the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Exterior view, showing structural details and instrumentation at the walk-in entry level (bottom) of Test Cell 6, Systems Integration Laboratory Building (T-28), looking southwest. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Systems Integration Laboratory Building, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  8. Detail interior view of northeast stay tower at parking structure ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail interior view of northeast stay tower at parking structure in Section A showing graffiti, looking south between levels B3 and B4. Graffiti reads "God bless our local 3 brothers who gave their lives on 9-11-01 and all the rest! Amen" (BH) - World Trade Center Site, Bounded by Vesey, Church, Liberty Streets, & Route 9A, New York County, NY

  9. 31. Detail of Southeast Light lens and roof structure of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. Detail of Southeast Light lens and roof structure of light gallery, 1985. Taken day after Hurricane Gloria, courtesy of Gerald F. Abbott and Block Island Historical Society. - Block Island Southeast Light, Spring Street & Mohegan Trail at Mohegan Bluffs, New Shoreham, Washington County, RI

  10. 26. DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL COLLAPSE OF TOP FLOOR OF MILL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL COLLAPSE OF TOP FLOOR OF MILL, ABOVE ORE BIN, LOOKING WEST FROM TOP OF STAIRWAY IN CA-290-25. THE PIPE AT CENTER WAS USED TO SPREAD CRUSHED ORE COMING FROM THE JAW CRUSHER EVENLY TO ALL AREA OF THE ORE BIN BELOW. - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  11. 25. DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL TIMBERS, ORE BIN, AND STAIRWAY TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL TIMBERS, ORE BIN, AND STAIRWAY TO TOP FLOOR OF MILL, LOOKING SOUTH FROM SECOND FLOOR OF MILL. PORTION OF ORE BIN ON RIGHT, STAIRS ON LEFT. - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  12. 73. DETAIL OF 'A' FRAME STRUCTURE LOOKING NORTH SHOWING PROJECTILE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    73. DETAIL OF 'A' FRAME STRUCTURE LOOKING NORTH SHOWING PROJECTILE CAR, CAMERA TOWER, CANTILEVERED WALKWAYS AND ELECTRICAL GEAR, August 17, 1948. (Original photograph in possession of Dave Willis, San Diego, California.) - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. 16. STRUCTURAL DETAILS: CHANNEL, BIT & CLEAT, ANCHOR BOLTS & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. STRUCTURAL DETAILS: CHANNEL, BIT & CLEAT, ANCHOR BOLTS & PLATES FOR PIERS 4, 5, AND 6, DWG. NO. 97, 1-1/2" = 1', MADE BY A.F., JUNE 13, 1908 - Baltimore Inner Harbor, Pier 5, South of Pratt Street between Market Place & Concord Street, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  14. 10. KIDNER BRIDGE STRUCTURAL STEEL DETAIL SHEET (original plan sheet ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. KIDNER BRIDGE STRUCTURAL STEEL DETAIL SHEET (original plan sheet is in possession of Ball State University, Drawings and Documents Archive, COllege of Architecture and Planing, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana, 47306 - Kidner Bridge, Spanning Mississinewa River at County Road 700 South, Upland, Grant County, IN

  15. 5. STANDPIPE STRUCTURE DETAIL SHOWING CONNECTIONS TO PENSTOCKS, RIVETED SECTIONAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. STANDPIPE STRUCTURE DETAIL SHOWING CONNECTIONS TO PENSTOCKS, RIVETED SECTIONAL CONSTRUCTION OF TWO OF THE THREE ORIGINAL STANDPIPES (PHOTO RIGHT), WELDED SECTIONAL CONSTRUCTION OF FOURTH STANDPIPE, AND MODERN VENTILATION VALVES ON FIFTH PENSTOCK AT PHOTO LEFT CENTER BETWEEN FOURTH STANDPIPE AND ORIGINAL TWO. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Big Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse 3 Penstock Standpipes, Big Creek, Big Creek, Fresno County, CA

  16. Detailed Northern Anatolian Fault Zone crustal structure from receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornwell, D. G.; Kahraman, M.; Thompson, D. A.; Houseman, G. A.; Rost, S.; Turkelli, N.; Teoman, U.; Altuncu Poyraz, S.; Gülen, L.; Utkucu, M.

    2013-12-01

    We present high resolution images derived from receiver functions of the continental crust in Northern Turkey that is dissected by two fault strands of the Northern Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ). The NAFZ is a major continental strike-slip fault system that is comparable in length and slip rate to the San Andreas Fault Zone. Recent large earthquakes occurred towards the western end of the NAFZ in 1999 at Izmit (M7.5) and Düzce (M7.2). As part of the multi-disciplinary Faultlab project, we aim to develop a model of NAFZ crustal structure and locate deformation by constraining variations in seismic properties and anisotropy in the upper and lower crust. The crustal model will be an input to test deformation scenarios in order to match geodetic observations from different phases of the earthquake loading cycle. We calculated receiver functions from teleseismic earthquakes recorded by a rectangular seismometer array spanning the NAFZ with 66 stations at a nominal inter-station spacing of 7 km and 7 additional stations further afield. This Dense Array for North Anatolia (DANA) was deployed from May 2012 until September 2013 and we selected large events (Mw>5.5) from the high quality seismological dataset to analyze further. Receiver functions were calculated for different frequency bands then collected into regional stacks before being inverted for crustal S-wave velocity structure beneath the entire DANA array footprint. In addition, we applied common conversion point (CCP) migration using a regional velocity model to construct a migrated 3D volume of P-to-S converted and multiple energy in order to identify the major crustal features and layer boundaries. We also performed the CCP migration with transverse receiver functions in order to identify regions of anisotropy within the crustal layers. Our preliminary results show a heterogeneous crust above a flat Moho that is typically at a depth of 33 km. We do not observe a prominent step in the Moho beneath the surface

  17. In situ formation of the first proteinogenically functionalized [TeW6O24O2(Glu)]7– structure reveals unprecedented chemical and geometrical features of the Anderson-type cluster† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Full experimental details and additional figures are provided. See DOI: 10.1039/c6cc07004c Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Molitor, Christian; Bijelic, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    The chemistry of polyoxometalates (POMs) in a protein environment is an almost unexplored but highly relevant research field as important biological and pharmacological attributes of certain POMs are based on their interactions with proteins. We report on the A-type Anderson–Evans polyoxotungstate, [TeW6O24]6– (TEW), mediated crystallization of Coreopsis grandiflora aurone synthase (cgAUS1) using ∼0.24 mM protein and 1.0 mM TEW. The 1.78 Å crystal structure reveals the covalent binding of TEW to the protein under the formation of an unprecedented polyoxotungstate cluster, [TeW6O24O2(Glu)]7– (GluTEW). The polyoxotungstate–protein complex exhibits the first covalent bond between a protein and the A-type Anderson–Evans cluster, an archetype where up to now no hybrid structures exist. The polyoxotungstate is modified at two of its six addenda tungsten atoms, which covalently bind to the carboxylic oxygen atoms of glutamic acid (Glu157), leading to W–O distances of ∼2.35 Å. This ligand substitution reaction is accompanied by a reduction of the coordination number of two μ3 polyoxotungstate oxygen atoms. This is so far unique since all known hybridizations of the Anderson–Evans POM with organic units have been obtained via the functionalization of the B-type Anderson–Evans structure through its bridging oxygen atoms. The structure reported here proves the reactivity of this POM archetype's addenda atoms as it has been administered into the protein solution as a pre-assembled cluster. Moreover, the novel cluster [TeW6O24O2(Glu)]7– displays the great versatility of the Anderson–Evans POM class. PMID:27722437

  18. 9. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; CABLE TUNNEL, PLAN, SECTIONS, DETAILS." Specifications ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; CABLE TUNNEL, PLAN, SECTIONS, DETAILS." Specifications No. OC1-55-72-(Rev.); Drawing No. 60-09-12; sheet 43 of 148; file no. AF 1320/94, Rev. A. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A Terminal Room, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  19. 12. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; DEFLECTOR PIT DETAILS, SHEET NO. 1." ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; DEFLECTOR PIT DETAILS, SHEET NO. 1." Specifications No. ENG-04-353-55-72; Drawing No. 60-09-12; sheet 41 of 148; file no. 1320/92, Rev. A. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A Terminal Room, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  20. 9. DETAIL OF DIVERSION STRUCTURE WEST OF DERBY LAKE (SECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. DETAIL OF DIVERSION STRUCTURE WEST OF DERBY LAKE (SECTION 2) SHOWING DIVERSION GATE TO LAKE LADORA. - Highline Canal, Sand Creek Lateral, Beginning at intersection of Peoria Street & Highline Canal in Arapahoe County (City of Aurora), Sand Creek lateral Extends 15 miles Northerly through Araphoe County, City & County of Denver, & Adams County to its end point, approximately 1/4 mile Southest of intersectioin of D Street & Ninth Avenue in Adams County (Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City Vicinity), Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  1. Detail View looking at the protected structure and landing gear ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail View looking at the protected structure and landing gear housing in the void created by the removal of the Forward Reaction Control System Module from the forward section of the Orbiter Discovery. This view was taken from the service platform in the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  2. DETAIL VIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL STRUCTURE, LOOKING NORTHEAST TOWARD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL STRUCTURE, LOOKING NORTHEAST TOWARD THE REAR OF THE STRUCTURE. THE WHEELS AT THE TOP OF THE TRAM BUCKETS RODE OFF THE STATIONARY CABLES ONTO THE TRACK SUPPORTED BY THE "C" IRONS SUSPENDED FROM THE TOP TIMBERS, CLEARLY SEEN AT THE TOP OF THE FRAME. THE ANCHOR POINTS FOR THE TWO STATIONARY CABLES ARE AT BOTTOM CENTER, JUST BELOW THE CABLE WHEEL. THE MAIN CABLE WHEEL IS IN THE DISTANCE AT CENTER LEFT. THE ORE CHUTES COMING FROM THE ORE BIN ARE AT LEFT CENTER EDGE. TRAM BUCKETS WERE CHARGED HERE. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  3. Aircraft wing structural detail design (wing, aileron, flaps, and subsystems)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downs, Robert; Zable, Mike; Hughes, James; Heiser, Terry; Adrian, Kenneth

    1993-01-01

    The goal of this project was to design, in detail, the wing, flaps, and ailerons for a primary flight trainer. Integrated in this design are provisions for the fuel system, the electrical system, and the fuselage/cabin carry-through interface structure. This conceptual design displays the general arrangement of all major components in the wing structure, taking into consideration the requirements set forth by the appropriate sections of Federal Aviation Regulation Part 23 (FAR23) as well as those established in the statement of work.

  4. 115. Stage Level floor structure. Detail of the ends of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    115. Stage Level floor structure. Detail of the ends of three movable stage floor sections. An inclined steel angle track attached to the web of the floor beam allows the sections to roll under the fixed floor. The upper section of the inclined track is hinged so it can be moved upward by a cam mechanism to raise the end of the movable section level with the stage floor. A similar mechanism was used to open and close the floor sections for the star lifts (see sheet 4 of 9, note 6; sheet 8 of 9, details 5, 6A and 6B; sheet 6 of 9, notes 2A, 2B, and 3; and photo IL-1007-120). The pulley, and tongue extending out from the end of the movable section, were used to move the sections back and forth. - Auditorium Building, 430 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  5. DETAIL VIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL STRUCTURE, LOOKING SOUTH TOWARD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL STRUCTURE, LOOKING SOUTH TOWARD THE FRONT OF THE STRUCTURE. THE WHEELS AT THE TOP OF THE TRAM BUCKETS RODE OFF THE STATIONARY CABLES ONTO THE TRACK SUPPORTED BY THE "C" IRONS SUSPENDED FROM THE TOP TIMBERS ON THE LEFT AND RIGHT. THE BUCKET OPENING MECHANISM IS ON THE LEFT, AND PART OF THE CLOSING MECHANISM ON THE RIGHT EDGE OF THE FRAME. THE TWO CABLES AT CENTER ARE THE STATIONARY TRAM CABLES THAT RUN ALONG THE TOP OF THE SUPPORT TOWERS ON WHICH THE WHEELS OF THE TRAM BUCKETS RODE. THEY ARE ANCHORED AT GROUND LEVEL JUST OFF FRAME TO THE LOWER LEFT. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  6. Detailed temporal structure of communication networks in groups of songbirds

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, David

    2016-01-01

    Animals in groups often exchange calls, in patterns whose temporal structure may be influenced by contextual factors such as physical location and the social network structure of the group. We introduce a model-based analysis for temporal patterns of animal call timing, originally developed for networks of firing neurons. This has advantages over cross-correlation analysis in that it can correctly handle common-cause confounds and provides a generative model of call patterns with explicit parameters for the influences between individuals. It also has advantages over standard Markovian analysis in that it incorporates detailed temporal interactions which affect timing as well as sequencing of calls. Further, a fitted model can be used to generate novel synthetic call sequences. We apply the method to calls recorded from groups of domesticated zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) individuals. We find that the communication network in these groups has stable structure that persists from one day to the next, and that ‘kernels’ reflecting the temporal range of influence have a characteristic structure for a calling individual's effect on itself, its partner and on others in the group. We further find characteristic patterns of influences by call type as well as by individual. PMID:27335223

  7. Detailed temporal structure of communication networks in groups of songbirds.

    PubMed

    Stowell, Dan; Gill, Lisa; Clayton, David

    2016-06-01

    Animals in groups often exchange calls, in patterns whose temporal structure may be influenced by contextual factors such as physical location and the social network structure of the group. We introduce a model-based analysis for temporal patterns of animal call timing, originally developed for networks of firing neurons. This has advantages over cross-correlation analysis in that it can correctly handle common-cause confounds and provides a generative model of call patterns with explicit parameters for the influences between individuals. It also has advantages over standard Markovian analysis in that it incorporates detailed temporal interactions which affect timing as well as sequencing of calls. Further, a fitted model can be used to generate novel synthetic call sequences. We apply the method to calls recorded from groups of domesticated zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) individuals. We find that the communication network in these groups has stable structure that persists from one day to the next, and that 'kernels' reflecting the temporal range of influence have a characteristic structure for a calling individual's effect on itself, its partner and on others in the group. We further find characteristic patterns of influences by call type as well as by individual.

  8. Detailed temporal structure of communication networks in groups of songbirds.

    PubMed

    Stowell, Dan; Gill, Lisa; Clayton, David

    2016-06-01

    Animals in groups often exchange calls, in patterns whose temporal structure may be influenced by contextual factors such as physical location and the social network structure of the group. We introduce a model-based analysis for temporal patterns of animal call timing, originally developed for networks of firing neurons. This has advantages over cross-correlation analysis in that it can correctly handle common-cause confounds and provides a generative model of call patterns with explicit parameters for the influences between individuals. It also has advantages over standard Markovian analysis in that it incorporates detailed temporal interactions which affect timing as well as sequencing of calls. Further, a fitted model can be used to generate novel synthetic call sequences. We apply the method to calls recorded from groups of domesticated zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) individuals. We find that the communication network in these groups has stable structure that persists from one day to the next, and that 'kernels' reflecting the temporal range of influence have a characteristic structure for a calling individual's effect on itself, its partner and on others in the group. We further find characteristic patterns of influences by call type as well as by individual. PMID:27335223

  9. Additive Manufacturing of a Microbial Fuel Cell--A detailed study.

    PubMed

    Calignano, Flaviana; Tommasi, Tonia; Manfredi, Diego; Chiolerio, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    In contemporary society we observe an everlasting permeation of electron devices, smartphones, portable computing tools. The tiniest living organisms on Earth could become the key to address this challenge: energy generation by bacterial processes from renewable stocks/waste through devices such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs). However, the application of this solution was limited by a moderately low efficiency. We explored the limits, if any, of additive manufacturing (AM) technology to fabricate a fully AM-based powering device, exploiting low density, open porosities able to host the microbes, systems easy to fuel continuously and to run safely. We obtained an optimal energy recovery close to 3 kWh m(-3) per day that can power sensors and low-power appliances, allowing data processing and transmission from remote/harsh environments.

  10. Additive Manufacturing of a Microbial Fuel Cell—A detailed study

    PubMed Central

    Calignano, Flaviana; Tommasi, Tonia; Manfredi, Diego; Chiolerio, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    In contemporary society we observe an everlasting permeation of electron devices, smartphones, portable computing tools. The tiniest living organisms on Earth could become the key to address this challenge: energy generation by bacterial processes from renewable stocks/waste through devices such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs). However, the application of this solution was limited by a moderately low efficiency. We explored the limits, if any, of additive manufacturing (AM) technology to fabricate a fully AM-based powering device, exploiting low density, open porosities able to host the microbes, systems easy to fuel continuously and to run safely. We obtained an optimal energy recovery close to 3 kWh m−3 per day that can power sensors and low-power appliances, allowing data processing and transmission from remote/harsh environments. PMID:26611142

  11. Additive Manufacturing of a Microbial Fuel Cell—A detailed study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calignano, Flaviana; Tommasi, Tonia; Manfredi, Diego; Chiolerio, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    In contemporary society we observe an everlasting permeation of electron devices, smartphones, portable computing tools. The tiniest living organisms on Earth could become the key to address this challenge: energy generation by bacterial processes from renewable stocks/waste through devices such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs). However, the application of this solution was limited by a moderately low efficiency. We explored the limits, if any, of additive manufacturing (AM) technology to fabricate a fully AM-based powering device, exploiting low density, open porosities able to host the microbes, systems easy to fuel continuously and to run safely. We obtained an optimal energy recovery close to 3 kWh m-3 per day that can power sensors and low-power appliances, allowing data processing and transmission from remote/harsh environments.

  12. Structure Property Studies for Additively Manufactured Parts

    SciTech Connect

    Milenski, Helen M; Schmalzer, Andrew Michael; Kelly, Daniel

    2015-08-17

    Since the invention of modern Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes engineers and designers have worked hard to capitalize on the unique building capabilities that AM allows. By being able to customize the interior fill of parts it is now possible to design components with a controlled density and customized internal structure. The creation of new polymers and polymer composites allow for even greater control over the mechanical properties of AM parts. One of the key reasons to explore AM, is to bring about a new paradigm in part design, where materials can be strategically optimized in a way that conventional subtractive methods cannot achieve. The two processes investigated in my research were the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) process and the Direct Ink Write (DIW) process. The objectives of the research were to determine the impact of in-fill density and morphology on the mechanical properties of FDM parts, and to determine if DIW printed samples could be produced where the filament diameter was varied while the overall density remained constant.

  13. Detailed analysis of the structural consequences of railgun augumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, G.W.; Schuler, K.W.

    1988-06-01

    The advantage of augmenting a plasma railgun is to provide the same driving force on the projectile as in an unaugmented railgun at a lower plasma arc current, thus producing less erosion and barrel damage. However, there are structural consequences to railgun augmentation which must be overcome before the advantages of lower plasma arc currents can be realized. To investigate these consequences, a bolted V-block supporting structure is considered with two cores; unaugmented (a single pair of conducting rails), and augmented (conducting rails augmented by a second tandem set of conductors). For each core, a two-dimensional dynamic finite element structural analysis is performed. The loadings, applied sequentially, consist of the static bolt preload, the plasma pressure behind the projectile, and the magnetic pressure induced by currents flowing in the rails or augmenting conductors. The magnetic pressure induced by currents flowing in the rails or augmenting conductors. A maximum rail current is found for which the unaugmented railgun can be fired without permanent deformation of the gun bore, thus allowing repeated firings. For the augmented railgun, at the same projectile acceleration, large permanent deformations are shown. 7 refs., 41 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Cutinisation of tomato fruit epidermis: Structural and morphological details

    PubMed Central

    Segado, Patricia; Domínguez, Eva; Heredia, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In tomato, the ovary is covered with a thin, electron-dense and uniform cuticle. The first 10 d after anthesis are critical in the cutinisation of the outer epidermal wall. During this period, singular cytoplasmic domains have been identified in the epidermal cells which seem to be involved in lipid biosynthesis. Moreover, the inner side of the procuticle showed a globular structure with vesicle-like particles of different size that seemed to migrate from the cytoplasm to the procuticle. These electron-dense particles are postulated to play an important role in early cutin synthesis. PMID:27031163

  15. Cutinisation of tomato fruit epidermis: Structural and morphological details.

    PubMed

    Segado, Patricia; Domínguez, Eva; Heredia, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    In tomato, the ovary is covered with a thin, electron-dense and uniform cuticle. The first 10 d after anthesis are critical in the cutinisation of the outer epidermal wall. During this period, singular cytoplasmic domains have been identified in the epidermal cells which seem to be involved in lipid biosynthesis. Moreover, the inner side of the procuticle showed a globular structure with vesicle-like particles of different size that seemed to migrate from the cytoplasm to the procuticle. These electron-dense particles are postulated to play an important role in early cutin synthesis.

  16. Content, Structure, and Sequence of the Detailing Discipline at Kendall College of Art and Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulder, Bruce E.

    A study identified the appropriate general content, structure, and sequence for a detailing discipline that promoted student achievement to professional levels. Its focus was the detailing discipline, a sequence of studio courses within the furniture design program at Kendall College of Art and Design, Grand Rapids, Michigan. (Detailing, an…

  17. High-resolution crystal structure reveals molecular details of target recognition by bacitracin

    PubMed Central

    Economou, Nicoleta J.; Cocklin, Simon; Loll, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    Bacitracin is a metalloantibiotic agent that is widely used as a medicine and feed additive. It interferes with bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis by binding undecaprenyl-pyrophosphate, a lipid carrier that serves as a critical intermediate in cell wall production. Despite bacitracin’s broad use, the molecular details of its target recognition have not been elucidated. Here we report a crystal structure for the ternary complex of bacitracin A, zinc, and a geranyl-pyrophosphate ligand at a resolution of 1.1 Å. The antibiotic forms a compact structure that completely envelopes the ligand’s pyrophosphate group, together with flanking zinc and sodium ions. The complex adopts a highly amphipathic conformation that offers clues to antibiotic function in the context of bacterial membranes. Bacitracin’s efficient sequestration of its target represents a previously unseen mode for the recognition of lipid pyrophosphates, and suggests new directions for the design of next-generation antimicrobial agents. PMID:23940351

  18. Detailed analysis of surface asperity deformation mechanism in diffusion bonding of steel hollow structural components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Li, H.; Li, M. Q.

    2016-05-01

    This study focused on the detailed analysis of surface asperity deformation mechanism in similar diffusion bonding as well as on the fabrication of high quality martensitic stainless steel hollow structural components. A special surface with regular patterns was processed to be joined so as to observe the extent of surface asperity deformation under different bonding pressures. Results showed that an undamaged hollow structural component has been obtained with full interfacial contact and the same shear strength to that of base material. Fracture surface characteristic combined with surface roughness profiles distinctly revealed the enhanced surface asperity deformation as the applied pressure increases. The influence of surface asperity deformation mechanism on joint formation was analyzed: (a) surface asperity deformation not only directly expanded the interfacial contact areas, but also released deformation heat and caused defects, indirectly accelerating atomic diffusion, then benefits to void shrinkage; (b) surface asperity deformation readily introduced stored energy difference between two opposite sides of interface grain boundary, resulting in strain induced interface grain boundary migration. In addition, the influence of void on interface grain boundary migration was analyzed in detail.

  19. Creating Imaginative Worlds: Unique Details and Structure in Norma Fox Mazer's Young Adult Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angel, Ann

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how writer Norma Fox Mazer has helped many readers make the leap between reality and imagination simply in the way she handles details in the lives of her characters. Explores the ideas of communicating with detail, experimenting with structure, and playing with time in crucial scenes. (SG)

  20. 36. ARCHITECTURAL AND STRUCTURAL DETAILS OF ELEVATOR HOUSING, NaK HEATER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. ARCHITECTURAL AND STRUCTURAL DETAILS OF ELEVATOR HOUSING, NaK HEATER STACK ROOF FLASHING, HOOD ELEVATION DETAIL. INCLUDES PARTIAL 'BILL OF MATERIAL.' INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0633-00-287-106361. FLUOR NUMBER 5775-CPP-633-A-11. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. 22. U.S. Route 60 grade separation structure. Detail of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. U.S. Route 60 grade separation structure. Detail of the arch stones on the east elevation. View facing north. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  2. 17. DETAIL, ROOF STRUCTURE (4 x 5 NEGATIVE) U.S. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. DETAIL, ROOF STRUCTURE (4 x 5 NEGATIVE) - U.S. General Services Administration, Central Heating Plant, C & D Streets between Twelfth & Thirteenth Streets Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  3. Detail of antenna tower structure, looking northnorthwest OvertheHorizon Backscatter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of antenna tower structure, looking north-northwest - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Tulelake Radar Site Receive Sector Five Antenna Array, Unnamed Road West of Double Head Road, Tulelake, Siskiyou County, CA

  4. View south; interior structural detail at column A13 south bay ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View south; interior structural detail at column A13 south bay - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Foundry-Propeller Shop, North of Porter Avenue, west of Third Street West, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  5. View northeast; interior structural detail Naval Base PhiladelphiaPhiladelphia Naval ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View northeast; interior structural detail - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Foundry-Propeller Shop, North of Porter Avenue, west of Third Street West, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  6. 1. Building #3, original structure and first addition, north side, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Building #3, original structure and first addition, north side, looking south. Photo shows (from left) the original 1911 structure, the 1939 infill addition, and the 1934 structure. - S. W. Shattuck Chemical Company, Incorporated, Building No. 3, 1805 South Bannock Street, Denver, Denver County, CO

  7. Structural and electronic characterisation of π-extended tetrathiafulvalene derivatives as active components in field-effect transistors† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedures, characterization data, XRD single crystal data, computational details and device fabrication. CCDC 1460868 and 1460869. For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c6ce01200k Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Antonio; Oxtoby, Neil; Galindo, Sergi; Pfattner, Raphael; Veciana, Jaume; Bromley, Stefan T.

    2016-01-01

    The electronic and structural properties of two tetrathiafulvalene derivatives bearing aromatic benzene rings are reported. Thin film transistors of these materials show p-type characteristics with comparable mobility values. It is found that the rigidification of the molecule is beneficial for reducing the reorganisation energy but also has an unfavorable impact on the electronic structure dimensionality. PMID:27774040

  8. The detailed crystal and electronic structures of the cotunnite-type ZrO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Duan, Li; Ji, Vincent

    2016-07-01

    The detailed crystal and orbital-decomposed electronic structures of cotunnite-type ZrO2 have been investigated by using the first-principles projector augmented wave (PAW) potential within the generalized gradient approximation as well as taking into account on-site Coulomb repulsive interaction (GGA+U). The optimized structure shows that the OI and OII anions are surrounded by an arbitrary tetrahedron of four Zr cations and an arbitrary pentahedron of five Zr cations, respectively, in turn, the Zr cation is surrounded by an arbitrary tetrakaidecahedron formed by nine oxygen ligands. Although one more Zr cation is coordinated to OII, the larger bond lengths between OII and its adjacent five Zr cations (dOII-Zr) than those between OI and its adjacent four Zr cations (dOI-Zr) makes density of states (DOS) of s and three p (px , py and pz) states of the OII anion driving down in lower energy region and driving up in higher energy region. No crystal-field splitting is observed between three p (px , py and pz) states of anions OI and OII (between three p (px , py and pz) states and five d (dxy , dyz , dxz , dz2 and dx2-y2) states of cation Zr) is resulted from the arrangements of the surrounding cations (anions) do not have any symmetry. The additional covalent character upon Zr-O ionic bonds is attributed to the hybridization of itinerant Zr(5s) and less filled Zr(4d) states to the separated O(2s) and O(2p) states.

  9. 11. 22'X34' original blueprint, VariableAngle Launcher, 'CONTROL STATION STRUCTURAL DETAILS' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. 22'X34' original blueprint, Variable-Angle Launcher, 'CONTROL STATION STRUCTURAL DETAILS' drawn at 1 1/2'=1'-0'. (BUORD Sketch # 208401). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Control Station, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. Detail of insulator array at Hframe structure on RyantoRainbow Line ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of insulator array at H-frame structure on Ryan-to-Rainbow Line 2 about three and one-fourth miles southwest of Ryan Dam. Array has three historic porcelain suspension insulators - Ryan Hydroelectric Facility, Ryan-to-Rainbow 100 kV Transmission Line, West bank of Missouri River, northeast of Great Falls, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  11. Detail of insulator array at Hframe structure on RyantoRainbow Line ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of insulator array at H-frame structure on Ryan-to-Rainbow Line 1 about three miles southwest of Ryan Dam. Array has one historic porcelain suspension insulator and two non-ceramic insulators - Ryan Hydroelectric Facility, Ryan-to-Rainbow 100 kV Transmission Line, West bank of Missouri River, northeast of Great Falls, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  12. Detail of MoronytoRainbow Hframe structure just east of Ryan Dam ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of Morony-to-Rainbow H-frame structure just east of Ryan Dam Road showing three historic porcelain suspension insulators in strings of six. View to east - Morony Hydroelectric Facility, Morony-to-Rainbow 100 kV Transmission Line, West bank of the Missouri River, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  13. Section A, detail view at parking structure of column J4/12 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Section A, detail view at parking structure of column J4/12 at level B2, looking southeast, showing smoke damage at drop panel. (BH) - World Trade Center Site, Bounded by Vesey, Church, Liberty Streets, & Route 9A, New York County, NY

  14. STRUCTURAL DETAILS AND SECTIONS OF MAIN PROCESSING BUILDING (CPP601). INL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STRUCTURAL DETAILS AND SECTIONS OF MAIN PROCESSING BUILDING (CPP-601). INL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0601-00-291-103079. ALTERNATE ID NUMBER 542-11-B-73. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. Hangar no. 2 structural detail. Tool room/GSE between trusses no. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Hangar no. 2 structural detail. Tool room/GSE between trusses no. 38 an no. 39. South side of room seen from window. Note footing for concrete piers and cross bracing. Looking 180 S. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Southern Lighter Than Air Ship Hangar, Near intersection of Windmill Road & Johnson Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  16. Hangar no. 2 structural detail. Tool room/GSE between trusses no. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Hangar no. 2 structural detail. Tool room/GSE between trusses no. 38 an no. 39. North side of room seen from door. Note footing for concrete piers and cross bracing. Looking 2 N. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Southern Lighter Than Air Ship Hangar, Near intersection of Windmill Road & Johnson Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  17. Structure A, reinforcing details. Drawing No. H2302, as built, Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Structure A, reinforcing details. Drawing No. H2-302, as built, Original drawing by Black & Veatch, Consulting Engineers, Kansas City, Missouri, prepared for the U.S. Department of the Army, Office of Engineers, Military Construction Division, Washington, D.C. dated October 1, 1951. - Travis Air Force Base, Building No. 925, W Street, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  18. A&M. TAN607. Storage pool vestibule wall. Sections and structural details. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. TAN-607. Storage pool vestibule wall. Sections and structural details. Ralph M. Parsons 902-3-ANP-607-S137. Date: December 1952. INEEL index code no. 034-0607-62-693-106781 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  19. PLUG STORAGE BUILDING, TRA611. STRUCTURAL DETAILS. FACE PLATE. FOURTEEN OPENINGS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PLUG STORAGE BUILDING, TRA-611. STRUCTURAL DETAILS. FACE PLATE. FOURTEEN OPENINGS LABELED FOR PLUGS FROM SPECIFIC SIZE GROUPS IN THE MTR. BLAW-KNOX 3150-811-2, 1/1951. INL INDEX NO. 531-0611-00-098-100694, REV. 1. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. A&M. Outside turntable, TAN705. Structural plan and details. Ralph M. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. Outside turntable, TAN-705. Structural plan and details. Ralph M. Parsons 902-3-ANP-705-S-149. Date: January 1953. Approved by INEEL index code no. 034-0705-60-693-106793 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. Biobased extreme pressure additives: Structure-property considerations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extreme pressure additives are widely used in lubricant formulations for engine oils, hydraulic fluids, gear oils, metalworking fluids, and many others. Extreme pressure additives contain selected elements such as sulfur, phosphorus, and halogens in their structures. These elements, under extreme tr...

  2. Detailed Seismic Velocity Structure of the Plate Boundary, Cascadia Subduction Zone, from Prestack Waveform Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, W.; Holbrook, W.; Tobin, H. J.; Keranen, K. M.; Everson, E.; Mallick, S.; Padhi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the geologic makeup of the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) has great importance for understanding seismic hazards in the coastal margin of the U.S. Pacific Northwest. The Cascadia margin is a potential earthquake and tsunami threat to the many millions who live in the area, yet details of its structure and mechanics remain poorly understood. In particular, the character of the subduction interface is elusive due to the CSZ's relatively aseismic behavior and low seismic reflectivity, making imaging difficult for passive and active source methods, respectively. In July 2012 seismic data were acquired as a part of the COAST project, spanning the important transition from the Cascadia basin, across the deformation front, and into the accretionary wedge. This modern data, coupled with sophisticated pre-stack full waveform seismic inversion methods, allows us to create highly detailed velocity models. While still computationally expensive, current computing clusters can perform these inversions with enough lateral density to yield highly detailed velocity information in both the vertical and horizontal. Here we present pre-stack full waveform inversions of a seismic line from the center of the COAST survey offshore Washington state as a cross section of the velocity structure of the CSZ. This detailed velocity model is a necessary initial step toward a detailed porosity cross section to be used to determine the role of fluids in the CSZ. Using these new data we investigate the lateral variability in reflectivity of the subducting plate boundary reflection in terms of its seismic velocity.

  3. PROCESS WATER BUILDING, TRA605. BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN AND STRUCTURAL DETAILS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PROCESS WATER BUILDING, TRA-605. BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN AND STRUCTURAL DETAILS. SUMP TANK (DIAMETER 33 FEET; CAPACITY 100,000 GALLONS) LOCATION IN HIGH ROOF SECTION ON WEST SIDE. REPAIR SHOP AND STORAGE AREA IN LOW-ROOF AREA. WALL DETAILS: THICKNESS OF REINFORCED CONCRETE RANGES FROM 1'-6" TO 2' THICK. FOUNDATIONS FOR FIVE CELLS ENCLOSING PUMPS. BLAW-KNOX 3150-805-2, 12/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0605-62-098-100658, REV. 3. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  4. Detailed requirements document for the integrated structural analysis system, phase B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rainey, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The requirements are defined for a software system entitled integrated Structural Analysis System (ISAS) Phase B which is being developed to provide the user with a tool by which a complete and detailed analysis of a complex structural system can be performed. This software system will allow for automated interface with numerous structural analysis batch programs and for user interaction in the creation, selection, and validation of data. This system will include modifications to the 4 functions developed for ISAS, and the development of 25 new functions. The new functions are described.

  5. Detailed imaging of flowing structures at depth using microseismicity: a tool for site investigation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pytharouli, S.; Lunn, R. J.; Shipton, Z. K.

    2011-12-01

    Field evidence shows that faults and fractures can act as focused pathways or barriers for fluid migration. This is an important property for modern engineering problems, e.g., CO2 sequestration, geological radioactive waste disposal, geothermal energy exploitation, land reclamation and remediation. For such applications the detailed characterization of the location, orientation and hydraulic properties of existing fractures is necessary. These investigations are expensive, requiring the hire of expensive equipment (excavator or drill rigs), which incur standing charges when not in use. In addition, they only provide information for discrete sample 'windows'. Non-intrusive methods have the ability to gather information across an entire area. Methods including electrical resistivity/conductivity and ground penetrating radar (GRP), have been used as tools for site investigations. Their imaging ability is often restricted due to unfavourable on-site conditions e.g. GRP is not useful in cases where a layer of clay or reinforced concrete is present. Our research has shown that high quality seismic data can be successfully used in the detailed imaging of sub-surface structures at depth; using induced microseismicity data recorded beneath the Açu reservoir in Brazil we identified orientations and values of average permeability of open shear fractures at depths up to 2.5km. Could microseismicity also provide information on the fracture width in terms of stress drops? First results from numerical simulations showed that higher stress drop values correspond to narrower fractures. These results were consistent with geological field observations. This study highlights the great potential of using microseismicity data as a supplementary tool for site investigation. Individual large-scale shear fractures in large rock volumes cannot currently be identified by any other geophysical dataset. The resolution of the method is restricted by the detection threshold of the local

  6. 12. "OBSERVATION POSTS, STRUCTURAL PLANS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. OC25572; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. "OBSERVATION POSTS, STRUCTURAL PLANS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. OC2-55-72; Drawing No. 60-09-12; sheet 89 of 148; file no. 1321/40, Rev. A. Very faint stamp above note reads: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  7. Structure A, protective alarm installation details. Drawing no. H3709, revised ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Structure A, protective alarm installation details. Drawing no. H3-709, revised as-built dated August 28, 1952. Original drawing by Black & Veatch, consulting engineers, Kansas City, Missouri, prepared for the U.S. Department of the Army, Office of Engineers, Military Construction Division, Washington, D.C. dated October 1, 1951. - Travis Air Force Base, Building No. 925, W Street, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  8. PROCESS WATER BUILDING, TRA605. FIRST FLOOR PLAN WITH STRUCTURAL DETAILS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PROCESS WATER BUILDING, TRA-605. FIRST FLOOR PLAN WITH STRUCTURAL DETAILS. FLOOR SLABS AND HATCHES. SHOWER/LOCKER ROOM. STAIRWAYS. TWENTY-INCH-THICK WALL DIVIDES SUMP AND SEAL TANK CHAMBERS FROM REST OF FLOOR. BLAW-KNOX 3150-805-3, 1/1951. INL INDEX NO. 531-0605-62-098-100659, REV. 1. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  9. A&M. TAN607. Construction detail showing structural steel framework with reinforcing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. TAN-607. Construction detail showing structural steel framework with reinforcing steel in place prior to pouring concrete for biparting doors between hot shop and special equipment service (SES) room. Facing north. Hot shop to left, SES room to right. slot for north half of door shows at upper left of view. Date: May 21, 1954. INEEL negative no. 10548 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  11. NMR crystallography of enzyme active sites: probing chemically detailed, three-dimensional structure in tryptophan synthase.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Leonard J; Dunn, Michael F

    2013-09-17

    NMR crystallography--the synergistic combination of X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and computational chemistry--offers unprecedented insight into three-dimensional, chemically detailed structure. Initially, researchers used NMR crystallography to refine diffraction data from organic and inorganic solids. Now we are applying this technique to explore active sites in biomolecules, where it reveals chemically rich detail concerning the interactions between enzyme site residues and the reacting substrate. Researchers cannot achieve this level of detail from X-ray, NMR,or computational methodologies in isolation. For example, typical X-ray crystal structures (1.5-2.5 Å resolution) of enzyme-bound intermediates identify possible hydrogen-bonding interactions between site residues and substrate but do not directly identify the protonation states. Solid-state NMR can provide chemical shifts for selected atoms of enzyme-substrate complexes, but without a larger structural framework in which to interpret them only empirical correlations with local chemical structure are possible. Ab initio calculations and molecular mechanics can build models for enzymatic processes, but they rely on researcher-specified chemical details. Together, however, X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and computational chemistry can provide consistent and testable models for structure and function of enzyme active sites: X-ray crystallography provides a coarse framework upon which scientists can develop models of the active site using computational chemistry; they can then distinguish these models by comparing calculated NMR chemical shifts with the results of solid-state NMR spectroscopy experiments. Conceptually, each technique is a puzzle piece offering a generous view of the big picture. Only when correctly pieced together, however, can they reveal the big picture at the highest possible resolution. In this Account, we detail our first steps in the development of

  12. Structuring Numbers 1 to 20: Developing Facile Addition and Subtraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellemor-Collins, David; Wright, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The Numeracy Intervention Research Project (NIRP) aims to develop assessment and instructional tools for use with low-attaining 3rd- and 4th-graders. The NIRP approach to instruction in addition and subtraction in the range 1 to 20 is described. The approach is based on a notion of structuring numbers, which draws on the work of Freudenthal and…

  13. Structural details of light activation of the LOV2-based photoswitch PA-Rac1.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Andreas; Barends, Thomas R M; Udvarhelyi, Anikó; Lenherr-Frey, Daniel; Lomb, Lukas; Menzel, Andreas; Schlichting, Ilme

    2015-02-20

    Optical control of cellular processes is an emerging approach for studying biological systems, affording control with high spatial and temporal resolution. Specifically designed artificial photoswitches add an interesting extension to naturally occurring light-regulated functionalities. However, despite a great deal of structural information, the generation of new tools cannot be based fully on rational design yet; in many cases design is limited by our understanding of molecular details of light activation and signal transduction. Our biochemical and biophysical studies on the established optogenetic tool PA-Rac1, the photoactivatable small GTPase Rac1, reveal how unexpected details of the sensor-effector interface, such as metal coordination, significantly affect functionally important structural elements of this photoswitch. Together with solution scattering experiments, our results favor differences in the population of pre-existing conformations as the underlying allosteric activation mechanism of PA-Rac1, rather than the assumed release of the Rac1 domain from the caging photoreceptor domain. These results have implications for the design of new optogenetic tools and highlight the importance of including molecular details of the sensor-effector interface, which is however difficult to assess during the initial design of novel artificial photoswitches.

  14. Seismic retroftting of RC columns with RC jackets and wing walls with different structural details

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shuenn-Yih; Chen, Ting-Wei; Tran, Ngoc-Cuong; Liao, Wen-I.

    2014-06-01

    An original reinforced concrete (RC) column and four strengthened specimens, two with RC jackets and two with wing walls, were tested in this study. The original column specimen was designed to comply with older (pre-1999) design standards so that the usual detailing deficiencies in existing school buildings in Taiwan could be simulated. Two different structural details were chosen to fabricate the full-scale specimens for each retrofitting technique. The study confirmed that either RC jacketing or the installation of wing walls with two different structural details can effectively improve the stiffness and strength of an existing column. RC jacketing shows a better improvement in energy dissipation and ductility when compared to the columns with wing walls installed. This is because the two RC jacketed columns experienced a flexural failure, while a shear failure was found in the two columns with the wing walls installed, and thus led to a drastic decrease of the maximum lateral strengths and ductility. Since many factors may affect the installation of a post-installed anchor, it is better to use standard hooks to replace post-installed anchors in some specific points when using RC jacketing or installing wing walls.

  15. Imaging the internal structure of fluid upflow zones with detailed digital Parasound echosounder surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiess, V.; Zuehlsdorff, L.; von Lom-Keil, H.; Schwenk, T.

    2001-12-01

    Sites of venting fluids both with continuous and episodic supply often reveal complex surface and internal structures, which are difficult to image and cause problems to transfer results from local sampling towards a structural reconstruction and a quantification of (average) flux rates. Detailed acoustic and seismic surveys would be required to retrieve this information, but also an appropriate environment, where fluid migration can be properly imaged from contrasts to unaffected areas. Hemipelagic sediments are most suitable, since typically reflectors are coherent and of low lateral amplitude variation and structures are continuous over distances much longer than the scale of fluid migration features. During RV Meteor Cruise M473 and RV Sonne Cruise SO 149 detailed studies were carried out in the vicinity of potential fluid upflow zones in the Lower Congo Basin at 5oS in 3000 m water depth and at the Northern Cascadia Margin in 1000 m water depth. Unexpected sampling of massive gas hydrates from the sea floor as well as of carbonate concretions, shell fragments and different liveforms indicated active fluid venting in a typically hemipelagic realm. The acoustic signature of such zones includes columnar blanking, pockmark depressions at the sea floor, association with small offset faults (< 1m). A dedicated survey with closely spaced grid lines was carried out with the Parasound sediment echosounder (4 kHz), which data were digitally acquired with the ParaDigMA System for further processing and display, to image the spatial structure of the upflow zones. Due to the high data density amplitudes and other acoustic properties could be investigated in a 3D volume and time slices as well as reflector surfaces were analyzed. Pronounced lateral variations of reflection amplitudes within a complex pattern indicate potential pathways for fluid/gas migration and occurrences of near-surface gas hydrate deposits, which may be used to trace detailed surface evidence from side

  16. Formulation of probabilistic models of protein structure in atomic detail using the reference ratio method.

    PubMed

    Valentin, Jan B; Andreetta, Christian; Boomsma, Wouter; Bottaro, Sandro; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Frellsen, Jes; Mardia, Kanti V; Tian, Pengfei; Hamelryck, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    We propose a method to formulate probabilistic models of protein structure in atomic detail, for a given amino acid sequence, based on Bayesian principles, while retaining a close link to physics. We start from two previously developed probabilistic models of protein structure on a local length scale, which concern the dihedral angles in main chain and side chains, respectively. Conceptually, this constitutes a probabilistic and continuous alternative to the use of discrete fragment and rotamer libraries. The local model is combined with a nonlocal model that involves a small number of energy terms according to a physical force field, and some information on the overall secondary structure content. In this initial study we focus on the formulation of the joint model and the evaluation of the use of an energy vector as a descriptor of a protein's nonlocal structure; hence, we derive the parameters of the nonlocal model from the native structure without loss of generality. The local and nonlocal models are combined using the reference ratio method, which is a well-justified probabilistic construction. For evaluation, we use the resulting joint models to predict the structure of four proteins. The results indicate that the proposed method and the probabilistic models show considerable promise for probabilistic protein structure prediction and related applications.

  17. Development of a new tow-yo instrument to observe detailed river plume structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masunaga, E.; Yamazaki, H.; Nagai, T.

    2012-12-01

    Field observations in coastal and estuary area are important factors in revealing physical and biological structures. However, detailed fine scale structures are difficult to observe in situ due to lack of a suitable instrument. We have developed a new Tow-Yo instrument, Yoing Ocean Data Acquisition Profiler (YODA) to observe the small scale features of coastal waters directly. The high-resolution data obtained from YODA showed fine scale complicated internal wave structures and patchily distribution of phytoplankton along a river plume (Fig.1). We have also developed a scheme to estimate the rate of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation ɛ from dC/dz signals obtained from YODA. We will present various observed fine scale events. Also we present that a critical angle theory for low frequency internal wave is consistent with our observation.; Fig.1 Salinity and fluorescence distribution around the river mouth obtained from YODA.

  18. Detailed design of an SMA-actuated self-locking device for rotary feed structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoyu, Qin; Xiaojun, Yan; Xiaoyong, Zhang; Weibing, Wang; Lianghai, Li

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a detailed design of a locking device which is used to lock the rotary feed structure of a space-borne microwave radiometer during the launching stage. This locking device employs two redundant shape memory alloy (SMA) wires as the actuating elements, uses a self-locking structure to achieve the locking function and a step structure to ensure a safety clearance after release. Based on the design concept, preliminary design of the locking/release unit and the clamp unit are performed. Then, a more accurate simulation of the release process and the cyclic property of the device is carried out by using an improved Brinson’s SMA constitutive model and a heat transfer equation. After the design and simulation, four prototypes are fabricated and their performance tests are carried out to evaluate the self-locking property, lifetime and thermal tolerance.

  19. Comprehension and retention: The effect of concrete details and causal structure in scientific narrative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcken, Wendi M.

    The purpose of this study was to examine two of the salient elements of instructional narratives as a guide to instructional practice. The literature summarized in this report discusses the theoretical basis for narrative impact on comprehension and retention, enumerates and defines possible salient narrative elements from the literature, and examines the instructional impact of two of these elements: concrete details and causal structure. This is intended to help provide guidance to instructional designers and teachers who desire to use narrative in science instruction. Participants included 94 high school physics students. An experimental research design of 2 (Gender) x 2 (Concreteness) x 2 (Causal Structure) x 2 (Comprehension as within-subjects) ANCOVA was used to analyze the effects of the narrative elements. It was found that concrete details improved comprehension and retention but that causal structure had no statistically significant impact on comprehension or retention. There were no significant gender differences in comprehension or retention though there were two- and three-way interactions between the independent variables.

  20. A Detailed Study on the Low-Energy Structures of Charged Colloidal Clusters.

    PubMed

    Cruz, S M A; Marques, J M C

    2016-04-01

    The target of this investigation is the systematic characterization of the low-energy structures of charged colloidal clusters that may be important to understand the self-assembling process of biomolecules. The aggregation of charged colloidal particles is governed by the attractive short-ranged Morse potential and the Yukawa repulsive tail to describe the long-range charge effect. A global optimization strategy, based on our own evolutionary algorithm, was adopted to discover the low-energy structures of colloidal clusters composed of up to 20 particles. A detailed analysis of the low-energy structures involving charged particles shows that the appearance of the Bernal spiral as the most stable motif occurs, first, at N = 6, but it is favored for larger clusters (N ≥ 13); for 6 ≤ N ≤ 12, there is a competition between the spiral (which is favored for higher charges) and more spherical-like structures. Finally, we study binary clusters composed by two sets of differently charged colloidal particles. Although a great diversity of low-energy structures is observed (especially for aggregates with one of the components in excess), the global minimum is disputed by three structural motifs depending on the composition of the cluster and, in some cases, on the range of the Morse potential. PMID:26986933

  1. The design of impact absorbing structures for additive manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan-Craddock, J.; Brackett, D.; Wildman, R.; Hague, R.

    2012-08-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is increasingly becoming a viable manufacturing process due to dramatic advantages that it facilitates in the area of design complexity. This paper investigates the potential of additively manufactured lattice structures for the application of tailored impact absorption specifically for conformal body protection. It explores lattice cell types based on foam microstructures and assesses their suitability for impact absorption. The effect of varying the cell strut edge design is also investigated. The implications of scaling these cells up for AM are discussed as well as the design issues regarding the handling of geometric complexity and the requirement for body conformity. The suitability of AM materials for this application is also discussed.

  2. 113. Stage level floor structure. In addition to the movable ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    113. Stage level floor structure. In addition to the movable sections, there were hinged slots that could be opened in the stage floor (see sheet 4 of 9, note 4; sheet 5 of 9, note 2; and sheet 7 of 9, note 1). A remaining cast iron bracket is visible in the left foreground of the photograph. The actual structure for a hinged section is visible in the background, to the right of center. The hydraulic ram (type D) visible below the floor level is the south ram in the middle row; the view is facing north. - Auditorium Building, 430 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  3. Oxygen additions in serial femtosecond crystallographic protein structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jimin

    2016-10-01

    In principle, serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) could yield data sets that are completely free of the effects caused by slow, radiation-induced chemical reactions, for example, oxygen additions, responsible for radiation damage. However, experimental evidence is presented here that SFX data sets obtained by techniques that expose different parts of the same specimen to single pulses of radiation do not have this property, even if the specimen in question is frozen. The diffraction image of each such crystal obtained with the first pulse of radiation is certain to represent the structure of a protein that has not been modified chemically, but all of the images obtained subsequently from the same crystal will represent structures that have been modified to a lesser or greater extent by oxygen additions because of the rapid diffusion of oxygenic free radicals through the specimen. The higher the level of oxygen additions a crystal suffers during data collection, the poorer the statistical quality of data set obtained from it will, and the higher the free R-factors of the resulting structural model. PMID:27438534

  4. Bioinspired Cellular Structures: Additive Manufacturing and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stampfl, J.; Pettermann, H. E.; Liska, R.

    Biological materials (e.g., wood, trabecular bone, marine skeletons) rely heavily on the use of cellular architecture, which provides several advantages. (1) The resulting structures can bear the variety of "real life" load spectra using a minimum of a given bulk material, featuring engineering lightweight design principles. (2) The inside of the structures is accessible to body fluids which deliver the required nutrients. (3) Furthermore, cellular architectures can grow organically by adding or removing individual struts or by changing the shape of the constituting elements. All these facts make the use of cellular architectures a reasonable choice for nature. Using additive manufacturing technologies (AMT), it is now possible to fabricate such structures for applications in engineering and biomedicine. In this chapter, we present methods that allow the 3D computational analysis of the mechanical properties of cellular structures with open porosity. Various different cellular architectures including disorder are studied. In order to quantify the influence of architecture, the apparent density is always kept constant. Furthermore, it is shown that how new advanced photopolymers can be used to tailor the mechanical and functional properties of the fabricated structures.

  5. Probing the Detailed Seismic Velocity Structure of Subduction Zones Using Advanced Seismic Tomography Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Thurber, C. H.

    2005-12-01

    Subduction zones are one of the most important components of the Earth's plate tectonic system. Knowing the detailed seismic velocity structure within and around subducting slabs is vital to understand the constitution of the slab, the cause of intermediate depth earthquakes inside the slab, the fluid distribution and recycling, and tremor occurrence [Hacker et al., 2001; Obara, 2002].Thanks to the ability of double-difference tomography [Zhang and Thurber, 2003] to resolve the fine-scale structure near the source region and the favorable seismicity distribution inside many subducting slabs, it is now possible to characterize the fine details of the velocity structure and earthquake locations inside the slab, as shown in the study of the Japan subduction zone [Zhang et al., 2004]. We further develop the double-difference tomography method in two aspects: the first improvement is to use an adaptive inversion mesh rather than a regular inversion grid and the second improvement is to determine a reliable Vp/Vs structure using various strategies rather than directly from Vp and Vs [see our abstract ``Strategies to solve for a better Vp/Vs model using P and S arrival time'' at Session T29]. The adaptive mesh seismic tomography method is based on tetrahedral diagrams and can automatically adjust the inversion mesh according to the ray distribution so that the inversion mesh nodes are denser where there are more rays and vice versa [Zhang and Thurber, 2005]. As a result, the number of inversion mesh nodes is greatly reduced compared to a regular inversion grid with comparable spatial resolution, and the tomographic system is more stable and better conditioned. This improvement is quite valuable for characterizing the fine structure of the subduction zone considering the highly uneven distribution of earthquakes within and around the subducting slab. The second improvement, to determine a reliable Vp/Vs model, lies in jointly inverting Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs using P, S, and S

  6. Structure of ternary additive hard-sphere fluid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malijevský, Alexander; Malijevský, Anatol; Yuste, Santos B.; Santos, Andrés; López de Haro, Mariano

    2002-12-01

    Monte Carlo simulations on the structural properties of ternary fluid mixtures of additive hard spheres are reported. The results are compared with those obtained from a recent analytical approximation [S. B. Yuste, A. Santos, and M. López de Haro, J. Chem. Phys. 108, 3683 (1998)] to the radial distribution functions of hard-sphere mixtures and with the results derived from the solution of the Ornstein-Zernike integral equation with both the Martynov-Sarkisov and the Percus-Yevick closures. Very good agreement between the results of the first two approaches and simulation is observed, with a noticeable improvement over the Percus-Yevick predictions especially near contact.

  7. Detailed crustal structure of the North China and its implication for seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wenliang; Wang, Xin; Tian, Tian; Zhang, Jingfa; Wang, Donglei

    2014-02-01

    Since the Mesozoic-Cenozoic era the North China Craton has experienced an important tectonic transition and it has given rise to complicated crustal structure and strong earthquake activity. Based on the large-scale surface gravity data, we studied the detailed crustal structure and seismogenic mechanism of the North China. The results indicate that the North China presents typical characteristics of adjoining depression and uplift, alternating basins and hills, inhomogeneous density and also great differences in crustal structure and Moho topography. The upper and middle crustal structures are dominated by the NNE-striking tectonic units, with many faults cut down to the middle crust. The lower crust is characterized by the folding-structure, with high and low-density placed alternately from west to east, presenting lateral heterogeneous feature. Adjusted by the gravity isostasy, Moho topography of the North China fluctuates greatly. Compared with the North China Basin, crustal thickness in the Western Taihang, northern Yanshan and Luzhong areas are much thicker while those densities are lower than the North China Basin. The dominating tectonic direction of the Moho topography strikes NE to NNE and undulates alternately from west to east. The epicenters are mostly concentrated in the upper and middle crust, especially the transitional areas between the high and low-gravity anomalies. The Tancheng earthquake in 1668, Sanhe earthquake in 1673, Tangshan earthquake in 1976, and all other seismic tectonic zones of the North China are all distributed in area where magma moves strongly beneath the crust, which is considered to be related to the movement of the high density, unstable and heat flows along the deep passage from the uppermost and asthenosphere due to the subduction of the Pacific slab towards the Eurasian plate.

  8. Detailed structural analysis of the rim of a large, complex impact crater: Bosumtwi Crater, Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimold, Wolf U.; Brandt, Dion; Koeberl, Christian

    1998-06-01

    The 1 Ma Bosumtwi Crater in Ghana is an 11-km-diameter, presumably complex, well-preserved impact structure that is associated with the Ivory Coast tektite strewnfield. Detailed structural geologic studies along a complete traverse through the northwestern rim section indicated four zones characterized by distinct deformation styles from just outside of the crater rim to near the crater floor. Zone 1 is dominated by thick deposits of lithic impact breccia, intercalated in places with products of local mass wasting. Zone 2 contains inward-dipping thrust planes, conjugate radial fractures, isoclinal folding, and overturned stratigraphic sequences. Zone 3 represents a megabreccia zone, in which block size decreases upward and outward toward the rim crest. The innermost zone 4 is dominated by intense thrust faulting of multiple orientations, resulting in complex duplex- and lens-shaped bodies. These deformation styles generally correspond to those previously reported from the rims of simple bowl-shaped meteorite-impact craters and appear to be characteristic of impact structures in general.

  9. Additive manufacturing of ceramic structures by laser engineered net shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Fangyong; Wu, Dongjiang; Ma, Guangyi; Zhang, Bi

    2015-11-01

    Ceramic is an important material with outstanding physical properties whereas impurities and porosities generated by traditional manufacturing methods limits its further industrial applications. In order to solve this problem, direct fabrication of Al2O3 ceramic structures is conducted by laser engineered net shaping system and pure ceramic powders. Grain refinement strengthening method by doping ZrO2 and dispersion strengthening method by doping SiC are proposed to suppress cracks in fabricating Al2O3 structure. Phase compositions, microstructures as well as mechanical properties of fabricated specimens are then analyzed. The results show that the proposed two methods are effective in suppressing cracks and structures of single-bead wall, arc and cylinder ring are successfully deposited. Stable phase of α-Al2O3 and t-ZrO2 are obtained in the fabricated specimens. Micro-hardness higher than 1700 HV are also achieved for both Al2O3 and Al2O3/ZrO2, which are resulted from fine directional crystals generated by the melting-solidification process. Results presented indicate that additive manufacturing is a very attractive technique for the production of high-performance ceramic structures in a single step.

  10. Porous electrode apparatus for electrodeposition of detailed metal structures or microelectronic interconnections

    DOEpatents

    Griffiths, Stewart K.; Nilson, Robert H.; Hruby, Jill M.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and procedure for performing microfabrication of detailed metal structures by electroforming metal deposits within small cavities. Two primary areas of application are: the LIGA process which manufactures complex three-dimensional metal parts and the damascene process used for electroplating line and via interconnections of microelectronic devices. A porous electrode held in contact or in close proximity with a plating substrate or mold top to ensure one-dimensional and uniform current flow into all mold cavities is used. Electrolyte is pumped over the exposed surface of the porous electrode to ensure uniform ion concentrations at this external surface. The porous electrode prevents electrolyte circulation within individual mold cavities, avoiding preferential enhancement of ion transport in cavities having favorable geometries. Both current flow and ion transport are one-dimensional and identical in all mold cavities, so all metal deposits grow at the same rate eliminating nonuniformities of the prior art.

  11. Crystal structure of listeriolysin O reveals molecular details of oligomerization and pore formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köster, Stefan; van Pee, Katharina; Hudel, Martina; Leustik, Martin; Rhinow, Daniel; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Chakraborty, Trinad; Yildiz, Özkan

    2014-04-01

    Listeriolysin O (LLO) is an essential virulence factor of Listeria monocytogenes that causes listeriosis. Listeria monocytogenes owes its ability to live within cells to the pH- and temperature-dependent pore-forming activity of LLO, which is unique among cholesterol-dependent cytolysins. LLO enables the bacteria to cross the phagosomal membrane and is also involved in activation of cellular processes, including the modulation of gene expression or intracellular Ca2+ oscillations. Neither the pore-forming mechanism nor the mechanisms triggering the signalling processes in the host cell are known in detail. Here, we report the crystal structure of LLO, in which we identified regions important for oligomerization and pore formation. Mutants were characterized by determining their haemolytic and Ca2+ uptake activity. We analysed the pore formation of LLO and its variants on erythrocyte ghosts by electron microscopy and show that pore formation requires precise interface interactions during toxin oligomerization on the membrane.

  12. Tuning structure and mobility of solvation shells surrounding tracer additives

    SciTech Connect

    Carmer, James; Jain, Avni; Bollinger, Jonathan A.; Truskett, Thomas M.; Swol, Frank van

    2015-03-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations and a stochastic Fokker-Planck equation based approach are used to illuminate how position-dependent solvent mobility near one or more tracer particle(s) is affected when tracer-solvent interactions are rationally modified to affect corresponding solvation structure. For tracers in a dense hard-sphere fluid, we compare two types of tracer-solvent interactions: (1) a hard-sphere-like interaction, and (2) a soft repulsion extending beyond the hard core designed via statistical mechanical theory to enhance tracer mobility at infinite dilution by suppressing coordination-shell structure [Carmer et al., Soft Matter 8, 4083–4089 (2012)]. For the latter case, we show that the mobility of surrounding solvent particles is also increased by addition of the soft repulsive interaction, which helps to rationalize the mechanism underlying the tracer’s enhanced diffusivity. However, if multiple tracer surfaces are in closer proximity (as at higher tracer concentrations), similar interactions that disrupt local solvation structure instead suppress the position-dependent solvent dynamics.

  13. Tuning structure and mobility of solvation shells surrounding tracer additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmer, James; Jain, Avni; Bollinger, Jonathan A.; van Swol, Frank; Truskett, Thomas M.

    2015-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations and a stochastic Fokker-Planck equation based approach are used to illuminate how position-dependent solvent mobility near one or more tracer particle(s) is affected when tracer-solvent interactions are rationally modified to affect corresponding solvation structure. For tracers in a dense hard-sphere fluid, we compare two types of tracer-solvent interactions: (1) a hard-sphere-like interaction, and (2) a soft repulsion extending beyond the hard core designed via statistical mechanical theory to enhance tracer mobility at infinite dilution by suppressing coordination-shell structure [Carmer et al., Soft Matter 8, 4083-4089 (2012)]. For the latter case, we show that the mobility of surrounding solvent particles is also increased by addition of the soft repulsive interaction, which helps to rationalize the mechanism underlying the tracer's enhanced diffusivity. However, if multiple tracer surfaces are in closer proximity (as at higher tracer concentrations), similar interactions that disrupt local solvation structure instead suppress the position-dependent solvent dynamics.

  14. Detailed Study of Emission Structures in the Vicinity of LkHα 198

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevorgyan, M. H.; Movsessian, T. A.; Andreasyan, H. R.; Magakian, T. Yu.

    2016-09-01

    Results from a study of collimated flows near the star LkHα 198 are reported. Observations were made using the VAGR multipupil spectrograph installed on the 2.6-m telescope at the Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory. The morphology and kinematics of emission structures in the vicinity of LkHα 198, including HH 161, were studied and electron density charts obtained. Besides the HH 161 object, our data revealed an arc-shaped emission structure with LkHα 198 at its apex. A shape of this kind is usually a direct indication of the presence of a cavity in a dark cloud blown out by a directed outflow. In addition, a faint "tail" extending in the direction of the central star is observed in HH 161. A comparison of these results with radio frequency observations shows that the probable source of HH 161 is the binary system LkHα 198.

  15. Possibility of supervision over detailed structure of ocean currents by MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklyarov, V. E.

    2008-02-01

    The report focuses on the analysis of the detail structure of ocean currents in areas of dust storms distribution or intensive phytoplankton's development. Dust storms represent the global phenomenon occurring regularly and, thus, atmospheric streams transfer a significant amount of the sand and dust (more than 2000 million tons) from deserts of Gobi, Sahara, Namibia, and Arabian Peninsula etc. The dust from Sahara achieves Caribbean Sea and southeast areas of USA for 5-7 days, and traces of the Asian dust storm, which have crossed Pacific Ocean, were found out in Great Lakes. For the purposes of our research the influence of sand and a dust dropping out from atmosphere on optical properties of the top layer of the ocean is represented especially significant. We shall note, that this question is poorly covered in the scientific literature. On our data, there are only separate certificates that return dispersion in green area of a spectrum for the top layer of the ocean is considerably increased after passage of a dust storm. It occurs due to saturation of the ocean top layer sand particles were sunlight diffusion is good. On the other hand, these particles, being a passive tracer, are easily involved by separate jets of currents in local circulation. These factors create a real basis for space observations on details mesoscale ocean circulation. As a trial experiment, author of the report have leaded the multispectral analysis data from MODIS (satellite AQUA), received on a northwest part Indian Ocean and Gulf of Aden. Results of the analysis confirm the made hypothesis.

  16. Simulating photon scattering effects in structurally detailed ventricular models using a Monte Carlo approach

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Martin J.; Plank, Gernot

    2014-01-01

    Light scattering during optical imaging of electrical activation within the heart is known to significantly distort the optically-recorded action potential (AP) upstroke, as well as affecting the magnitude of the measured response of ventricular tissue to strong electric shocks. Modeling approaches based on the photon diffusion equation have recently been instrumental in quantifying and helping to understand the origin of the resulting distortion. However, they are unable to faithfully represent regions of non-scattering media, such as small cavities within the myocardium which are filled with perfusate during experiments. Stochastic Monte Carlo (MC) approaches allow simulation and tracking of individual photon “packets” as they propagate through tissue with differing scattering properties. Here, we present a novel application of the MC method of photon scattering simulation, applied for the first time to the simulation of cardiac optical mapping signals within unstructured, tetrahedral, finite element computational ventricular models. The method faithfully allows simulation of optical signals over highly-detailed, anatomically-complex MR-based models, including representations of fine-scale anatomy and intramural cavities. We show that optical action potential upstroke is prolonged close to large subepicardial vessels than further away from vessels, at times having a distinct “humped” morphology. Furthermore, we uncover a novel mechanism by which photon scattering effects around vessels cavities interact with “virtual-electrode” regions of strong de-/hyper-polarized tissue surrounding cavities during shocks, significantly reducing the apparent optically-measured epicardial polarization. We therefore demonstrate the importance of this novel optical mapping simulation approach along with highly anatomically-detailed models to fully investigate electrophysiological phenomena driven by fine-scale structural heterogeneity. PMID:25309442

  17. Faxing Structures to the Moon: Freeform Additive Construction System (FACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, A. Scott; Wilcox, Brian; McQuin, Christopher; Townsend, Julie; Rieber, Richard; Barmatz, Martin; Leichty, John

    2013-01-01

    Using the highly articulated All-Terrain Hex-Limbed Extra-Terrestrial Explorer (ATHLETE) robotic mobility system as a precision positioning tool, a variety of print head technologies can be used to 3D print large-scale in-situ structures on planetary surfaces such as the moon or Mars. In effect, in the same way CAD models can be printed in a 3D printer, large-scale structures such as walls, vaults, domes, berms, paving, trench walls, and other insitu derived elements can be FAXed to the planetary surface and built in advance of the arrival of crews, supplementing equipment and materials brought from earth. This paper discusses the ATHLETE system as a mobility / positioning platform, and presents several options for large-scale additive print head technologies, including tunable microwave "sinterator" approaches and in-situ concrete deposition. The paper also discusses potential applications, such as sintered-in-place habitat shells, radiation shielding, road paving, modular bricks, and prefabricated construction components.

  18. Five checkpoints maintaining the fidelity of transcription by RNA polymerases in structural and energetic details.

    PubMed

    Wang, Beibei; Opron, Kristopher; Burton, Zachary F; Cukier, Robert I; Feig, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional fidelity, which prevents the misincorporation of incorrect nucleoside monophosphates in RNA, is essential for life. Results from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of eukaryotic RNA polymerase (RNAP) II and bacterial RNAP with experimental data suggest that fidelity may involve as many as five checkpoints. Using MD simulations, the effects of different active site NTPs in both open and closed trigger loop (TL) structures of RNAPs are compared. Unfavorable initial binding of mismatched substrates in the active site with an open TL is proposed to be the first fidelity checkpoint. The leaving of an incorrect substrate is much easier than a correct one energetically from the umbrella sampling simulations. Then, the closing motion of the TL, required for catalysis, is hindered by the presence of mismatched NTPs. Mismatched NTPs also lead to conformational changes in the active site, which perturb the coordination of magnesium ions and likely affect the ability to proceed with catalysis. This step appears to be the most important checkpoint for deoxy-NTP discrimination. Finally, structural perturbations in the template DNA and the nascent RNA in the presence of mismatches likely hinder nucleotide addition and provide the structural foundation for backtracking followed by removing erroneously incorporated nucleotides during proofreading.

  19. Unveiling the Detailed Density and Velocity Structures of the Protostellar Core B335

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurono, Yasutaka; Saito, Masao; Kamazaki, Takeshi; Morita, Koh-Ichiro; Kawabe, Ryohei

    2013-03-01

    We present an observational study of the protostellar core B335 harboring a low-mass Class 0 source. The observations of the H13CO+(J = 1-0) line emission were carried out using the Nobeyama 45 m telescope and Nobeyama Millimeter Array. Our combined image of the interferometer and single-dish data depicts detailed structures of the dense envelope within the core. We found that the core has a radial density profile of n(r)vpropr -p and a reliable difference in the power-law indices between the outer and inner regions of the core: p ≈ 2 for r >~ 4000 AU and p ≈ 1.5 for r <~ 4000 AU. The dense core shows a slight overall velocity gradient of ~1.0 km s-1 over the scale of 20, 000 AU across the outflow axis. We believe that this velocity gradient represents a solid-body-like rotation of the core. The dense envelope has a quite symmetrical velocity structure with a remarkable line broadening toward the core center, which is especially prominent in the position-velocity diagram across the outflow axis. The model calculations of position-velocity diagrams do a good job of reproducing observational results using the collapse model of an isothermal sphere in which the core has an inner free-fall region and an outer region conserving the conditions at the formation stage of a central stellar object. We derived a central stellar mass of ~0.1 M ⊙, and suggest a small inward velocity, v_{r ≥ r_inf}˜ 0 km s^{-1} in the outer core at >~ 4000 AU. We concluded that our data can be well explained by gravitational collapse with a quasi-static initial condition, such as Shu's model, or by the isothermal collapse of a marginally critical Bonnor-Ebert sphere.

  20. A global/local analysis method for treating details in structural design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aminpour, Mohammad A.; Mccleary, Susan L.; Ransom, Jonathan B.

    1993-01-01

    A method for analyzing global/local behavior of plate and shell structures is described. In this approach, a detailed finite element model of the local region is incorporated within a coarser global finite element model. The local model need not be nodally compatible (i.e., need not have a one-to-one nodal correspondence) with the global model at their common boundary; therefore, the two models may be constructed independently. The nodal incompatibility of the models is accounted for by introducing appropriate constraint conditions into the potential energy in a hybrid variational formulation. The primary advantage of this method is that the need for transition modeling between global and local models is eliminated. Eliminating transition modeling has two benefits. First, modeling efforts are reduced since tedious and complex transitioning need not be performed. Second, errors due to the mesh distortion, often unavoidable in mesh transitioning, are minimized by avoiding distorted elements beyond what is needed to represent the geometry of the component. The method is applied reduced to a plate loaded in tension and transverse bending. The plate has a central hole, and various hole sixes and shapes are studied. The method is also applied to a composite laminated fuselage panel with a crack emanating from a window in the panel. While this method is applied herein to global/local problems, it is also applicable to the coupled analysis of independently modeled components as well as adaptive refinement.

  1. Detailed fault structure of the 2000 Western Tottori, Japan, earthquake sequence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fukuyama, E.; Ellsworth, W.L.; Waldhauser, F.; Kubo, A.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the faulting process of the aftershock region of the 2000 western Tottori earthquake (Mw 6.6) by combining aftershock hypocenters and moment tensor solutions. Aftershock locations were precisely determined by the double difference method using P- and S-phase arrival data of the Japan Meteorological Agency unified catalog. By combining the relocated hypocenters and moment tensor solutions of aftershocks by broadband waveform inversion of FREESIA (F-net), we successfully resolved very detailed fault structures activated by the mainshock. The estimated fault model resolves 15 individual fault segments that are consistent with both aftershock distribution and focal mechanism solutions. Rupture in the mainshock was principally confined to the three fault elements in the southern half of the zone, which is also where the earliest aftershocks concentrate. With time, the northern part of the zone becomes activated, which is also reflected in the postseismic deformation field. From the stress tensor analysis of aftershock focal mechanisms, we found a rather uniform stress field in the aftershock region, although fault strikes were scattered. The maximum stress direction is N107??E, which is consistent with the tectonic stress field in this region. In the northern part of the fault, where no slip occurred during the mainshock but postseismic slip was observed, the maximum stress direction of N130??E was possible as an alternative solution of stress tensor inversion.

  2. Accuracy assessment of modeling architectural structures and details using terrestrial laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedzierski, M.; Walczykowski, P.; Orych, A.; Czarnecka, P.

    2015-08-01

    One of the most important aspects when performing architectural documentation of cultural heritage structures is the accuracy of both the data and the products which are generated from these data: documentation in the form of 3D models or vector drawings. The paper describes an assessment of the accuracy of modelling data acquired using a terrestrial phase scanner in relation to the density of a point cloud representing the surface of different types of construction materials typical for cultural heritage structures. This analysis includes the impact of the scanning geometry: the incidence angle of the laser beam and the scanning distance. For the purposes of this research, a test field consisting of samples of different types of construction materials (brick, wood, plastic, plaster, a ceramic tile, sheet metal) was built. The study involved conducting measurements at different angles and from a range of distances for chosen scanning densities. Data, acquired in the form of point clouds, were then filtered and modelled. An accuracy assessment of the 3D model was conducted by fitting it with the point cloud. The reflection intensity of each type of material was also analyzed, trying to determine which construction materials have the highest reflectance coefficients, and which have the lowest reflection coefficients, and in turn how this variable changes for different scanning parameters. Additionally measurements were taken of a fragment of a building in order to compare the results obtained in laboratory conditions, with those taken in field conditions.

  3. UNVEILING THE DETAILED DENSITY AND VELOCITY STRUCTURES OF THE PROTOSTELLAR CORE B335

    SciTech Connect

    Kurono, Yasutaka; Saito, Masao; Kamazaki, Takeshi; Morita, Koh-Ichiro; Kawabe, Ryohei

    2013-03-10

    We present an observational study of the protostellar core B335 harboring a low-mass Class 0 source. The observations of the H{sup 13}CO{sup +}(J = 1-0) line emission were carried out using the Nobeyama 45 m telescope and Nobeyama Millimeter Array. Our combined image of the interferometer and single-dish data depicts detailed structures of the dense envelope within the core. We found that the core has a radial density profile of n(r){proportional_to}r {sup -p} and a reliable difference in the power-law indices between the outer and inner regions of the core: p Almost-Equal-To 2 for r {approx}> 4000 AU and p Almost-Equal-To 1.5 for r {approx}< 4000 AU. The dense core shows a slight overall velocity gradient of {approx}1.0 km s{sup -1} over the scale of 20, 000 AU across the outflow axis. We believe that this velocity gradient represents a solid-body-like rotation of the core. The dense envelope has a quite symmetrical velocity structure with a remarkable line broadening toward the core center, which is especially prominent in the position-velocity diagram across the outflow axis. The model calculations of position-velocity diagrams do a good job of reproducing observational results using the collapse model of an isothermal sphere in which the core has an inner free-fall region and an outer region conserving the conditions at the formation stage of a central stellar object. We derived a central stellar mass of {approx}0.1 M{sub Sun }, and suggest a small inward velocity, v{sub r{>=}r{sub i{sub n{sub f}}}}{approx}0 km s{sup -1} in the outer core at {approx}> 4000 AU. We concluded that our data can be well explained by gravitational collapse with a quasi-static initial condition, such as Shu's model, or by the isothermal collapse of a marginally critical Bonnor-Ebert sphere.

  4. A detailed study of the structure of the nested planetary nebula, Hb 12, the Matryoshka nebula

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D. M.; López, J. A.; Edwards, M. L.; Winge, C. E-mail: jal@astrosen.unam.mx E-mail: cwinge@gemini.edu

    2014-11-01

    We present near-IR, integral field spectroscopic observations of the planetary nebula (PN) Hb 12 using Near-infrared Integral Field Spectrograph (NIFS) on Gemini-North. Combining NIFS with the adaptive optics system Altair, we provide a detailed study of the core and inner structure of this PN. We focus the analysis in the prominent emission lines [Fe II] (1.6436 μm), He I (2.0585 μm), H{sub 2} (2.1214 μm), and Br{sub γ} (2.16553 μm). We find that the [Fe II] emission traces a tilted system of bipolar lobes, with the northern lobe being redshifted and the southern lobe blueshifted. The [Fe II] emission is very faint at the core and only present close to the systemic velocity. There is no H{sub 2} emission in the core, whereas the core is prominent in the He I and Br{sub γ} recombination lines. The H{sub 2} emission is concentrated in equatorial arcs of emission surrounding the core and expanding at ∼30 km s{sup –1}. These arcs are compared with Hubble Space Telescope images and shown to represent nested loops belonging to the inner sections of a much larger bipolar structure that replicates the inner one. The He I and Br{sub γ} emission from the core clearly show a cylindrical central cavity that seems to represent the inner walls of an equatorial density enhancement or torus. The torus is 0.''2 wide (≡200 AU radius at a distance of 2000 pc) and expanding at ≤30 km s{sup –1}. The eastern wall of the inner torus is consistently more intense than the western wall, which could indicate the presence of an off-center star, such as is observed in the similar hourglass PN, MyCn 18. A bipolar outflow is also detected in Br{sub γ} emerging within 0.''1 from the core at ∼ ± 40 km s{sup –1}.

  5. Structural diversity of halocarbonyl molybdenum and tungsten PNP pincer complexes through ligand modifications† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Complete crystallographic data and technical details in CIF format for 5a, 5b·1.5CH2Cl2, 6a·CDCl3, 7a, 8a and 10. Atomic coordinates for all DFT optimized structures. CCDC 1478552–1478557. For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c6dt02251k Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    de Aguiar, Sara R. M. M.; Stöger, Berthold; Pittenauer, Ernst; Allmaier, Günter; Veiros, Luis F.

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a comparative study of a series of halocarbonyl Mo(ii) and W(ii) complexes of the types [M(PNP)(CO)3X]X and [M(PNP)(CO)2X2] (M = Mo, W; X = I, Br), featuring PNP pincer ligands based on a 2,6-diaminopyridine scaffold. The complexes were prepared and fully characterized. The syntheses of these complexes were accomplished by treatment of [M(PNP)(CO)3] with stoichiometric amounts of I2 and Br2, respectively. The modification of the 2,6-diaminopyridine scaffold by introducing NMe and NPh instead of NH spacers with concomitant modification of the phosphine moieties changed the steric and electronic properties of the PNP ligand significantly. While in the case of NH linkers exclusively cationic seven-coordinate complexes of the type [M(PNP)(CO)3X]+ were obtained with NMe and NPh spacers neutral seven-coordinate complexes of the type [M(PNP)(CO)2X2] were afforded. In the case of the latter, when the reaction is performed in the presence of CO also [M(PNP)(CO)3X]+ complexes are formed which slowly lose CO to give [M(PNP)(CO)2X2]. The halocarbonyl tungsten chemistry parallels that of molybdenum. The only exception is molybdenum in conjunction with the PNPMe-iPr ligand, where the coordinatively unsaturated complex [Mo(PNPMe-iPr)(CO)X2] is formed. DFT mechanistic studies reveal that the seven-coordinate complexes should be the thermodynamic as well as the kinetic products. Since [Mo(PNPMe-iPr)(CO)X2] is the observed product it suggests that the reaction follows an alternative path. Structures of representative complexes were determined by X-ray single crystal analyses. PMID:27513832

  6. Antifreeze (glyco)protein mimetic behavior of poly(vinyl alcohol): detailed structure ice recrystallization inhibition activity study.

    PubMed

    Congdon, Thomas; Notman, Rebecca; Gibson, Matthew I

    2013-05-13

    This manuscript reports a detailed study on the ability of poly(vinyl alcohol) to act as a biomimetic surrogate for antifreeze(glyco)proteins, with a focus on the specific property of ice-recrystallization inhibition (IRI). Despite over 40 years of study, the underlying mechanisms that govern the action of biological antifreezes are still poorly understood, which is in part due to their limited availability and challenging synthesis. Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) has been shown to display remarkable ice recrystallization inhibition activity despite its major structural differences to native antifreeze proteins. Here, controlled radical polymerization is used to synthesize well-defined PVA, which has enabled us to obtain the first quantitative structure-activity relationships, to probe the role of molecular weight and comonomers on IRI activity. Crucially, it was found that IRI activity is "switched on" when the polymer chain length increases from 10 and 20 repeat units. Substitution of the polymer side chains with hydrophilic or hydrophobic units was found to diminish activity. Hydrophobic modifications to the backbone were slightly more tolerated than side chain modifications, which implies an unbroken sequence of hydroxyl units is necessary for activity. These results highlight that, although hydrophobic domains are key components of IRI activity, the random inclusion of addition hydrophobic units does not guarantee an increase in activity and that the actual polymer conformation is important.

  7. A Detailed Derivation of Gaussian Orbital-Based Matrix Elements in Electron Structure Calculations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersson, T.; Hellsing, B.

    2010-01-01

    A detailed derivation of analytic solutions is presented for overlap, kinetic, nuclear attraction and electron repulsion integrals involving Cartesian Gaussian-type orbitals. It is demonstrated how s-type orbitals can be used to evaluate integrals with higher angular momentum via the properties of Hermite polynomials and differentiation with…

  8. Structural changes in gluten protein structure after addition of emulsifier. A Raman spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, Evelina G.; Gómez, Analía V.; Añón, María C.; Puppo, María C.

    2011-06-01

    Food protein product, gluten protein, was chemically modified by varying levels of sodium stearoyl lactylate (SSL); and the extent of modifications (secondary and tertiary structures) of this protein was analyzed by using Raman spectroscopy. Analysis of the Amide I band showed an increase in its intensity mainly after the addition of the 0.25% of SSL to wheat flour to produced modified gluten protein, pointing the formation of a more ordered structure. Side chain vibrations also confirmed the observed changes.

  9. Charles Edward Isaacs (1811-1860): exploring the details of nephron structure and function in the post-Bowman period.

    PubMed

    Fine, Leon G

    2003-01-01

    Charles Edward Isaacs (1811-1860), an anatomist working in New York, undertook a series of studies which attempted to define the microscopic structure of the nephrons in a variety of species. Given that he published his findings 15 years after William Bowman's seminal paper on the subject, he was able to add only a few of the finer details to the picture. He observed the continuity of the epithelium of the glomerular capsule with that of the proximal tubule and he demonstrated that the glomerular tuft is covered by a layer of epithelial cells. In a series of studies on human renal function he erroneously concluded that the glomerulus must have an excretory function in addition to its filtration function and that diuretics act primarily on the glomerlus. The latter conclusion was based upon observations of substances not currently categorized as being diuretic agents. The absence of a major conceptual advance in the writings of Isaacs probably accounts for that fact that his contribution has been largely forgotten.

  10. Teachers' Personal Agency: Making Sense of Slope through Additive Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Janet G.; Gerson, Hope

    2007-01-01

    In the context of a three-year professional development program in mathematics, practicing elementary teachers persistently engaged in collaborative inquiry and reflection to build connected meanings for slope. One teacher invented a compelling representation for slope as a process of repeated addition, using Cuisenaire rods, based on teachers'…

  11. Conductivity and structure of bilinear organic addition compounds

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    The relationship between crystal structures and metallic conductivities of linear organic materials such as tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane is explained in terms of strong lateral elastic interactions between chains. A microdomain model is presented in which at high temperatures there are, in general, two coexisting phases on each stacked molecular chain. The ordering of (in general, four) phases on two interacting chains leads to a variety of phase transitions at low temperatures. By examining temperature-dependent electrical conductivities and magnetic susceptibilities one can establish the character of each such transition. PMID:16592359

  12. Mechanistic Details of Glutathione Biosynthesis Revealed by Crystal Structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Glutamate Cysteine Ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Biterova, Ekaterina I.; Barycki, Joseph J.

    2009-12-01

    Glutathione is a thiol-disulfide exchange peptide critical for buffering oxidative or chemical stress, and an essential cofactor in several biosynthesis and detoxification pathways. The rate-limiting step in its de novo biosynthesis is catalyzed by glutamate cysteine ligase, a broadly expressed enzyme for which limited structural information is available in higher eukaryotic species. Structural data are critical to the understanding of clinical glutathione deficiency, as well as rational design of enzyme modulators that could impact human disease progression. Here, we have determined the structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae glutamate cysteine ligase (ScGCL) in the presence of glutamate and MgCl{sub 2} (2.1 {angstrom}; R = 18.2%, R{sub free} = 21.9%), and in complex with glutamate, MgCl{sub 2}, and ADP (2.7 {angstrom}; R = 19.0%, R{sub free} = 24.2%). Inspection of these structures reveals an unusual binding pocket for the {alpha}-carboxylate of the glutamate substrate and an ATP-independent Mg{sup 2+} coordination site, clarifying the Mg{sup 2+} dependence of the enzymatic reaction. The ScGCL structures were further used to generate a credible homology model of the catalytic subunit of human glutamate cysteine ligase (hGCLC). Examination of the hGCLC model suggests that post-translational modifications of cysteine residues may be involved in the regulation of enzymatic activity, and elucidates the molecular basis of glutathione deficiency associated with patient hGCLC mutations.

  13. Detailed gravity mapping of the Panther Mountain circular structure, Catskill Mountains, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Isachsen, Y.W. ); Revetta, F.A. )

    1993-03-01

    The Panther Mountain circular structure is located in the Catskill Mountains near the eastern edge of the Allegheny Plateau where depth through the sedimentary section to basement is about 3200 m. The structure is distinguished from the rest of the Plateau only by its physiography. It is a circular mountain mass, 10 km in diameter, defined by an anomalous annular drainage pattern formed by Esopus Creek and its tributary Woodland Creek. Because of pervasive fluvial cross bedding in the sedimentary pile, the authors were unable to determine whether the structure is slightly domical, sightly basinal, or unwarped. North-south and east-west gravity profiles were next made and modeled to look for a subsurface explanation for the structure. The only computed profiles that matched the measured values were those for a shallowly-buried meteorite crater with its underlying breccia lens, lying beneath the Panther Mountain. Renewed interest in the structure led them to make 125 new gravity measurements, in a study that is continuing. Gravity values are corrected using the International Gravity Formula of 1967 and densities of 2.67 and 2.50 gms/cm[sup 3]. Terrain corrections were computed using an inner radius of .895 km and an outer radius of 166.70 km. The complete Bouguer gravity anomaly was separated into its regional and residual components to obtain a third order residual gravity map for computer modeling. The residual gravity map confirms the earlier detected gravity low and leaves the buried meteorite crater model as a viable model.

  14. Crump Geyser Exploration and Drilling Project. High Precision Geophysics and Detailed Structural Exploration and Slim Well Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Fairbank, Brian D.; Smith, Nicole

    2015-06-10

    The Crump Geyser Exploration and Drilling Project – High Precision Geophysics and Detailed Structural Exploration and Slim Well Drilling ran from January 29, 2010 to September 30, 2013. During Phase 1 of the project, collection of all geophysical surveys was completed as outlined in the Statement of Project Objectives. In addition, a 5000-foot full sized exploration well was drilled by Ormat, and preexisting drilling data was discovered for multiple temperature gradient wells within the project area. Three dimensional modeling and interpretation of results from the geophysical surveys and drilling data gave confidence to move to the project into Phase 2 drilling. Geological and geophysical survey interpretations combined with existing downhole temperature data provided an ideal target for the first slim-hole drilled as the first task in Phase 2. Slim-hole 35-34 was drilled in September 2011 and tested temperature, lithology, and permeability along the primary range-bounding fault zone near its intersection with buried northwest-trending faults that have been identified using geophysical methods. Following analysis of the results of the first slim-hole 35-34, the second slim hole was not drilled and subsequent project tasks, including flowing differential self-potential (FDSP) surveys that were designed to detail the affect of production and injection on water flow in the shallow aquifer, were not completed. NGP sold the Crump project to Ormat in August 2014, afterwards, there was insufficient time and interest from Ormat available to complete the project objectives. NGP was unable to continue managing the award for a project they did not own due to liability issues and Novation of the award was not a viable option due to federal award timelines. NGP submitted a request to mutually terminate the award on February 18, 2015. The results of all of the technical surveys and drilling are included in this report. Fault interpretations from surface geology, aeromag

  15. Crystal structure of advanced lithium titanate with lithium oxide additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Tsuyoshi; Sasaki, Kazuya; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Hayashi, Kimio; Suzuki, Akihiro; Hashimoto, Takuya; Terai, Takayuki

    2009-04-01

    Li 2TiO 3 is one of the most promising candidates among solid breeder materials proposed for fusion reactors. However, the mass of Li 2TiO 3 was found to decrease with time in the sweep gas mixed with hydrogen. This mass change indicates that the oxygen content of the sample decreased, suggesting the change from Ti 4+ to Ti 3+. In the present paper, the crystal structure and the non-stoichiometry of Li 2TiO 3 added with Li 2O have been extensively investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetry. In the case of the Li 2TiO 3 samples used in the present study, LiO-C 2H 5 or LiO-i-C 3H 7 and Ti(O-i-C 3H 7) 4 were mixed in the proportion corresponding to the molar ratio Li 2O/TiO 2 of either 2.00 or 1.00. In thermogravimetry, the mass of this sample decreased with time due to lithium deficiency, where no presence of oxygen deficiency was indicated.

  16. Detailed analysis of shake structures in the KLL Auger spectrum of H2S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Püttner, R.; Céolin, D.; Guillemin, R.; Kushawaha, R. K.; Marchenko, T.; Journel, L.; Piancastelli, M. N.; Simon, M.

    2016-04-01

    Shake processes of different origin are identified in the KLL Auger spectrum of H2S with unprecedented detail. The KLL Auger spectrum is presented together with the S 1 s-1 photoelectron spectrum including the S 1 s-1V-1n λ and S 1 s-12 p-1n λ shake-up satellites with V-1 and n λ indicating a hole in the valence shell and an unoccupied molecular orbital, respectively. By using different photon energies between 2476 and 4150 eV to record the KLL Auger spectra two different shake-up processes responsible for the satellite lines are identified. The first process is a shake-up during the Auger decay of the S 1 s-1 core hole and can be described by S 1 s-1→2 p-2V-1n λ . The second process is the Auger decay of the shake-up satellite in the ionization process leading to S 1 s-1V-1n λ →2 p-2V-1n λ transitions. By combining the results of photoelectron and Auger spectra the involved V-1n λ levels are assigned.

  17. The effects of design details on cost and weight of fuselage structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, G. D.; Metschan, S. L.; Morris, M. R.; Kassapoglou, C.

    1993-01-01

    Crown panel design studies showing the relationship between panel size, cost, weight, and aircraft configuration are compared to aluminum design configurations. The effects of a stiffened sandwich design concept are also discussed. This paper summarizes the effect of a design cost model in assessing the cost and weight relationships for fuselage crown panel designs. Studies were performed using data from existing aircraft to assess the effects of different design variables on the cost and weight of transport fuselage crown panel design. Results show a strong influence of load levels, panel size, and material choices on the cost and weight of specific designs. A design tool being developed under the NASA ACT program is used in the study to assess these issues. The effects of panel configuration comparing postbuckled and buckle resistant stiffened laminated structure is compared to a stiffened sandwich concept. Results suggest some potential economy with stiffened sandwich designs for compression dominated structure with relatively high load levels.

  18. The structure of apo human glutamate dehydrogenase details subunit communication and allostery.

    PubMed

    Smith, Thomas J; Schmidt, Timothy; Fang, Jie; Wu, Jane; Siuzdak, Gary; Stanley, Charles A

    2002-05-01

    The structure of human glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) has been determined in the absence of active site and regulatory ligands. Compared to the structures of bovine GDH that were complexed with coenzyme and substrate, the NAD binding domain is rotated away from the glutamate-binding domain. The electron density of this domain is more disordered the further it is from the pivot helix. Mass spectrometry results suggest that this is likely due to the apo form being more dynamic than the closed form. The antenna undergoes significant conformational changes as the catalytic cleft opens. The ascending helix in the antenna moves in a clockwise manner and the helix in the descending strand contracts in a manner akin to the relaxation of an extended spring. A number of spontaneous mutations in this antenna region cause the hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia syndrome by decreasing GDH sensitivity to the inhibitor, GTP. Since these residues do not directly contact the bound GTP, the conformational changes in the antenna are apparently crucial to GTP inhibition. In the open conformation, the GTP binding site is distorted such that it can no longer bind GTP. In contrast, ADP binding benefits by the opening of the catalytic cleft since R463 on the pivot helix is pushed into contact distance with the beta-phosphate of ADP. These results support the previous proposal that purines regulate GDH activity by altering the dynamics of the NAD binding domain. Finally, a possible structural mechanism for negative cooperativity is presented.

  19. Detailed Post-Soft Impact Progressive Damage Assessment for Hybrid Structure Jet Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siddens, Aaron; Bayandor, Javid; Celestina, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, certification of engine designs for resistance to bird strike is reliant on physical tests. Predictive modeling of engine structural damage has mostly been limited to evaluation of individual forward section components, such as fan blades within a fixed frame of reference, to direct impact with a bird. Such models must be extended to include interactions among engine components under operating conditions to evaluate the full extent of engine damage. This paper presents the results of a study aim to develop a methodology for evaluating bird strike damage in advanced propulsion systems incorporating hybrid composite/metal structures. The initial degradation and failure of individual fan blades struck by a bird were investigated. Subsequent damage to other fan blades and engine components due to resultant violent fan assembly vibrations and fragmentation was further evaluated. Various modeling parameters for the bird and engine components were investigated to determine guidelines for accurately capturing initial damage and progressive failure of engine components. Then, a novel hybrid structure modeling approach was investigated and incorporated into the crashworthiness methodology. Such a tool is invaluable to the process of design, development, and certification of future advanced propulsion systems.

  20. Detailed structural and biochemical characterization of the nexin-dynein regulatory complex

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Toshiyuki; Yanagisawa, Haruaki; Kikkawa, Masahide

    2015-01-01

    The nexin-dynein regulatory complex (N-DRC) forms a cross-bridge between the outer doublet microtubules of the axoneme and regulates dynein motor activity in cilia/flagella. Although the molecular composition and the three-dimensional structure of N-DRC have been studied using mutant strains lacking N-DRC subunits, more accurate approaches are necessary to characterize the structure and function of N-DRC. In this study, we precisely localized DRC1, DRC2, and DRC4 using cryo–electron tomography and structural labeling. All three N-DRC subunits had elongated conformations and spanned the length of N-DRC. Furthermore, we purified N-DRC and characterized its microtubule-binding properties. Purified N-DRC bound to the microtubule and partially inhibited microtubule sliding driven by the outer dynein arms (ODAs). Of interest, microtubule sliding was observed even in the presence of fourfold molar excess of N-DRC relative to ODA. These results provide insights into the role of N-DRC in generating the beating motions of cilia/flagella. PMID:25411337

  1. Detailed structure and stratigraphy of the eastern Marble Mountain terrane, Klamath Mountains, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.E.; Hacker, B.R. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Amphibolite-grade rocks in the eastern Marble Mountains (MM), N. California, consist of several fault-bounded, SSE-dipping lithotectonic units. Each unit is ca. 2 km thick and is characterized by differences in rock type, metamorphism, and structural style. The lowermost unit composed of well-foliated and lineated epidote amphibolite grading upward into clinopyroxene-bearing amphibolite with a consistent NE-SW lineation. Structurally overlying these rocks are andalusite- and staurolite-bearing, epidote-amphibolite facies rocks (Wright Lake assemblage (WLa)) that have variable foliation and lineation orientations. The WLa consists of meta-supracrustal rocks with well-preserved relict textures, and massive, meta-ultramafic rock. Supracrustal rocks include polymict conglomerate and breccia, fine- to medium-grained clastic rocks, alkalic pillow basalt, chert, and carbonate. Conglomerate clasts include partially recrystallized granitoids and quartzite. Previous studies have interpreted the WLa to represent a fragment of oceanic crust, but coeval coarse-grained sedimentation and alkalic volcanism, small volume of mafic volcanics, conglomerate composition, and lack of oceanic plutonic and hypabyssal rocks suggest deposition in an arc-related rift or transtensional basin. Previous studies have also described the terrane as melange, but recognition of local pseudostratigraphy allows mapping of multiply folded, isoclinal, nappe-like structures. Small-scale nappes are generally 100+ m thick and are imbricated with massive meta-ultramafic rocks along gently to steeply east-dipping shear zones. Shear zones are characterized by metamorphosed ultramafic fault rocks that suggest a range of brittle to ductile behavior. Regionally distributed, Ar/Ar hornblende ages of 149.9[+-]0.4, 150.3[+-]0.6, 152.1[+-]4.7, 152.5[+-]2.5 Ma and Ar/Ar biotite ages of 148.8[+-]2.6 and 149.9[+-]0.4 Ma indicate the MM terrane cooled rapidly through ca. 500--300 C in the Late Jurassic.

  2. A detailed study of nucleon structure function in nuclei in the valence quark region

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, N.

    1994-04-01

    The so called {open_quotes}EMC effect{close_quotes} discovered during the 1980`s, has caused a big controversy in the community of nuclear and high energy physicists; during the last ten years, five experiments have been performed in different laboratories and several hundreds of papers about the possible interpretation of the modification of the nucleon structure function inside nuclei have been published. However, from the experimental point of view, the main goal of four experiments (EMC, BCDMS, NMC, FNAL) has been to emphasize the region of low x{sub b}, where shadowing effects appear. In the region of valence quarks and nuclear effects (x{sub b} > 0.1 - 0.2) the most reliable data presently available are from the SLAC E139 experiment performed in 1983 with only 80 hours of beam time. New precise data in the valence quark region are necessary to measure separate structure functions F{sub 2}(x{sub b}, Q{sup 2}) and R{sup lt}(x{sub b},Q{sup 2}) = {sigma}{sub l}/{sigma}{sub t}, and to investigate the real A-dependence of the ratio between bound and free-nucleon structure functions which is not completely defined by the SLAC data. Moreover, from the nuclear physics point of view, a measurement on some unexplored nuclei, like {sup 3}He and {sup 48}Ca, would be of great interest. The intermediate scaling region (0.1 < x{sub b} < 0.7) would be accessible at CEBAF if the machine energy will reach 6-8 GeV, as suggested by all the tests performed on the RF cavities. This physics program has been already presented in two letter of intents.

  3. [Systematic value of the larval structure and details of postlarval morphogenesis in Bryozoa gymnolaemates].

    PubMed

    d'Hondt, J L

    1977-01-01

    Among the various species of Bryozoa Gymnolaemata, the larvae and their development were studied, comparing the larval structure and the evolution of their cellular categories during the post-larval morphogenesis the existence of nine well-defined larval types could be revealed. Cases of insufficiently described larvae are discussed. The present systematic of Bryozoa Gymnolaemata is compared with the classification of various larval types. For the major part of cases, each systematic family is marked by a precise type of larva; however there are some exceptions, especially in the ordre Ctenostomata. These discordances may suggest some rearrangements of the classification utilized at the present time.

  4. Stochastic Kinetics of Viral Capsid Assembly Based on Detailed Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Hemberg, Martin; Yaliraki, Sophia N.; Barahona, Mauricio

    2006-01-01

    We present a generic computational framework for the simulation of viral capsid assembly which is quantitative and specific. Starting from PDB files containing atomic coordinates, the algorithm builds a coarse-grained description of protein oligomers based on graph rigidity. These reduced protein descriptions are used in an extended Gillespie algorithm to investigate the stochastic kinetics of the assembly process. The association rates are obtained from a diffusive Smoluchowski equation for rapid coagulation, modified to account for water shielding and protein structure. The dissociation rates are derived by interpreting the splitting of oligomers as a process of graph partitioning akin to the escape from a multidimensional well. This modular framework is quantitative yet computationally tractable, with a small number of physically motivated parameters. The methodology is illustrated using two different viruses which are shown to follow quantitatively different assembly pathways. We also show how in this model the quasi-stationary kinetics of assembly can be described as a Markovian cascading process, in which only a few intermediates and a small proportion of pathways are present. The observed pathways and intermediates can be related a posteriori to structural and energetic properties of the capsid oligomers. PMID:16473916

  5. Detailed design of a lattice composite fuselage structure by a mixed optimization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Lohse-Busch, H.; Toropov, V.; Hühne, C.; Armani, U.

    2016-10-01

    In this article, a procedure for designing a lattice fuselage barrel is developed. It comprises three stages: first, topology optimization of an aircraft fuselage barrel is performed with respect to weight and structural performance to obtain the conceptual design. The interpretation of the optimal result is given to demonstrate the development of this new lattice airframe concept for the fuselage barrel. Subsequently, parametric optimization of the lattice aircraft fuselage barrel is carried out using genetic algorithms on metamodels generated with genetic programming from a 101-point optimal Latin hypercube design of experiments. The optimal design is achieved in terms of weight savings subject to stability, global stiffness and strain requirements, and then verified by the fine mesh finite element simulation of the lattice fuselage barrel. Finally, a practical design of the composite skin complying with the aircraft industry lay-up rules is presented. It is concluded that the mixed optimization method, combining topology optimization with the global metamodel-based approach, allows the problem to be solved with sufficient accuracy and provides the designers with a wealth of information on the structural behaviour of the novel anisogrid composite fuselage design.

  6. Hybrid Residual Flexibility/Mass-Additive Method for Structural Dynamic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinker, M. L.

    2003-01-01

    A large fixture was designed and constructed for modal vibration testing of International Space Station elements. This fixed-base test fixture, which weighs thousands of pounds and is anchored to a massive concrete floor, initially utilized spherical bearings and pendulum mechanisms to simulate Shuttle orbiter boundary constraints for launch of the hardware. Many difficulties were encountered during a checkout test of the common module prototype structure, mainly due to undesirable friction and excessive clearances in the test-article-to-fixture interface bearings. Measured mode shapes and frequencies were not representative of orbiter-constrained modes due to the friction and clearance effects in the bearings. As a result, a major redesign effort for the interface mechanisms was undertaken. The total cost of the fixture design, construction and checkout, and redesign was over $2 million. Because of the problems experienced with fixed-base testing, alternative free-suspension methods were studied, including the residual flexibility and mass-additive approaches. Free-suspension structural dynamics test methods utilize soft elastic bungee cords and overhead frame suspension systems that are less complex and much less expensive than fixed-base systems. The cost of free-suspension fixturing is on the order of tens of thousands of dollars as opposed to millions, for large fixed-base fixturing. In addition, free-suspension test configurations are portable, allowing modal tests to be done at sites without modal test facilities. For example, a mass-additive modal test of the ASTRO-1 Shuttle payload was done at the Kennedy Space Center launch site. In this Technical Memorandum, the mass-additive and residual flexibility test methods are described in detail. A discussion of a hybrid approach that combines the best characteristics of each method follows and is the focus of the study.

  7. Preliminary System Development and Detailed Structural Design and Analysis for the CanX-7 Nanosatellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singarayar, Fiona

    Satellites placed in LEO can remain there for an indefinite period of time. To reduce the density of this orbit so as to avoid potential collisions with other satellites, the IADC has published a report that suggests any satellite in LEO should de-orbit within 25 years. CanX-7 is a de-orbiting technology demonstration mission intended to help solve the global space debris problem. The work summarized in this thesis describes the author's contribution to the CanX-7 preliminary system development, as well as to the deployment detection and structural subsystems. Discussed herein are the challenges of carrying forward multiple designs in parallel and the factors and design trades that aid the decision-making process. This thesis not only presents the description of the final design of the nanosatellite, but also the evolution of the spacecraft from when it was initially envisioned in 2010 to its current state at the time of this writing.

  8. Detailed Analysis of the Structural Changes of Bone Matrix During the Demineralization Process Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timchenko, E. V.; Zherdeva, L. A.; Timchenko, P. E.; Volova, L. T.; Ponomareva, U. V.

    The results of experimental research of human cortical bone tissue depending on demineralization time were represented using Raman spectroscopy. Depending on demineralization time the ratio of the mineral (РO43- and CO32-) and organic components (amide I) of bone tissue, as well as changes in the spectral regions responsible for the structural integrity of the collagen fibers in bone tissue (1200-1460 cm-1 and 2880-3000 cm-1) were investigated. The observed changes show a decrease in mineral components: thus, the value of Raman band intensity at 956 and 1069 cm-1 for 5 minutes demineralization is 68.5 and 77.3%, for 20 minutes - 55.1 and 61.1%, for 120 minutes - 32.8 and 37% from Raman intensity values of not demineralized tissue objects respectively.

  9. Toward a detailed understanding of search trajectories in fragment assembly approaches to protein structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Handl, Julia; Lovell, Simon C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Energy functions, fragment libraries, and search methods constitute three key components of fragment‐assembly methods for protein structure prediction, which are all crucial for their ability to generate high‐accuracy predictions. All of these components are tightly coupled; efficient searching becomes more important as the quality of fragment libraries decreases. Given these relationships, there is currently a poor understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the sampling approaches currently used in fragment‐assembly techniques. Here, we determine how the performance of search techniques can be assessed in a meaningful manner, given the above problems. We describe a set of techniques that aim to reduce the impact of the energy function, and assess exploration in view of the search space defined by a given fragment library. We illustrate our approach using Rosetta and EdaFold, and show how certain features of these methods encourage or limit conformational exploration. We demonstrate that individual trajectories of Rosetta are susceptible to local minima in the energy landscape, and that this can be linked to non‐uniform sampling across the protein chain. We show that EdaFold's novel approach can help balance broad exploration with locating good low‐energy conformations. This occurs through two mechanisms which cannot be readily differentiated using standard performance measures: exclusion of false minima, followed by an increasingly focused search in low‐energy regions of conformational space. Measures such as ours can be helpful in characterizing new fragment‐based methods in terms of the quality of conformational exploration realized. Proteins 2016; 84:411–426. © 2016 The Authors Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26799916

  10. Detailed Structural and Mechanical Response of Wet Foam to the Settling Particle.

    PubMed

    Jing, Zefeng; Wang, Shuzhong; Wang, Zhiguo

    2016-03-15

    Liquid foam, as a complex fluid, provides an observable prototype for studying a discrete fluid system. In this work, a numerical study on the settling behavior of a round particle in wet polydisperse foam has been conducted on the bubble scale. The local and nonuniform distribution of bubble pressure, as well as the localized plastic events, is presented. It shows a foam region of higher pressure in front of the settling particle due to the extrusion deformation of the bubbles applied by the particle. Additionally, the forces exerted on the particle by the disordered wet foam are measured during the sedimentation. It exhibits in particular a power-law dependence of the drag force caused by the bubble as a function of the foam quality. Moreover, sedimentation experiments are demonstrated to verify this power-law relation. The evolution of the components of drag force is demonstrated when a plastic event occurs in front of the settling particle. The result shows that both the contributions of the pulling force of foam films and the bubble pressure to the drag force decrease in that case. Likewise, the variation of both these contributions to the drag force is illustrated as well when a bubble in the wake detaches from the particle. These results assist in understanding the mesoscopic response of wet foam to a settling particle.

  11. Detailed Structural and Mechanical Response of Wet Foam to the Settling Particle.

    PubMed

    Jing, Zefeng; Wang, Shuzhong; Wang, Zhiguo

    2016-03-15

    Liquid foam, as a complex fluid, provides an observable prototype for studying a discrete fluid system. In this work, a numerical study on the settling behavior of a round particle in wet polydisperse foam has been conducted on the bubble scale. The local and nonuniform distribution of bubble pressure, as well as the localized plastic events, is presented. It shows a foam region of higher pressure in front of the settling particle due to the extrusion deformation of the bubbles applied by the particle. Additionally, the forces exerted on the particle by the disordered wet foam are measured during the sedimentation. It exhibits in particular a power-law dependence of the drag force caused by the bubble as a function of the foam quality. Moreover, sedimentation experiments are demonstrated to verify this power-law relation. The evolution of the components of drag force is demonstrated when a plastic event occurs in front of the settling particle. The result shows that both the contributions of the pulling force of foam films and the bubble pressure to the drag force decrease in that case. Likewise, the variation of both these contributions to the drag force is illustrated as well when a bubble in the wake detaches from the particle. These results assist in understanding the mesoscopic response of wet foam to a settling particle. PMID:26898137

  12. Solution Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Reveals Structural Details of Lipid Domains in Ternary Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, J.; Kiss, A; Pramudya, Y; Nguyen, L; Hirst, L

    2009-01-01

    The influence of cholesterol on lipid bilayer structure is significant and the effect of cholesterol on lipid sorting and phase separation in lipid-raft-forming model membrane systems has been well investigated by microscopy methods on giant vesicles. An important consideration however is the influence of fluorescence illumination on the phase state of these lipids and this effect must be carefully minimized. In this paper, we show that synchrotron x-ray scattering on solution lipid mixtures is an effective alternative technique for the identification and characterization of the l o (liquid ordered) and l d (liquid disordered) phases. The high intensity of synchrotron x rays allows the observation of up to 5 orders of diffraction from the l o phase, whereas only two are clearly visible when the l d phase alone is present. This data can be collected in approximately 1 min/sample, allowing rapid generation of phase data. In this paper, we measure the lamellar spacing in both the liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases simultaneously, as a function of cholesterol concentration in two different ternary mixtures. We also observe evidence of a third gel-phaselike population at 10-12 mol % cholesterol and determine the thickness of the bilayer for this phase. Importantly we are able to look at phase coexistence in the membrane independent of photoeffects.

  13. Contextual Land Use Classification: how Detailed can the Class Structure Be?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, L.; Rottensteiner, F.; Heipke, C.

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to investigate the maximum level of semantic resolution that can be achieved in an automated land use change detection process based on mono-temporal, multi-spectral, high-resolution aerial image data. For this purpose, we perform a step-wise refinement of the land use classes that follows the hierarchical structure of most object catalogues for land use databases. The investigation is based on our previous work for the simultaneous contextual classification of aerial imagery to determine land cover and land use. Land cover is determined at the level of small image segments. Land use classification is applied to objects from the geospatial database. Experiments are carried out on two test areas with different characteristics and are intended to evaluate the step-wise refinement of the land use classes empirically. The experiments show that a semantic resolution of ten classes still delivers acceptable results, where the accuracy of the results depends on the characteristics of the test areas used. Furthermore, we confirm that the incorporation of contextual knowledge, especially in the form of contextual features, is beneficial for land use classification.

  14. Detailed Structure of the Outer Disk Around HD 169142 with Polarized Light in H-band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momose, Munetake; Morita, Ayaka; Fukagawa, Misato; Muto, Takayuki; Takeuchi, Taku; Hashimoto, Jun; Honda, Mitsuhiko; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Okamoto, Yoshiko K.; Kanagawa, Kazuhiro D.; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Grady, Carol A.; Sitko, Michael L.; Akiyama, Eiji; Currie, Thayne; Follette, Katherine B.; Mayama, Satoshi; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Abe, Lyu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph C.; Egner, Sebastian; Feldt, Markus; McElwain, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Coronagraphic imagery of the circumstellar disk around HD 169142 in H-band polarized intensity (PI) with Subaru/HiCIAO is presented. The emission scattered by dust particles at the disk surface in 0.''2=r=1.''2, or 29=r=174 AU, is successfully detected. The azimuthally-averaged radial profile of the PI shows a double power-law distribution, in which the PIs in r = 29-52 AU and r = 81.2-145 AU respectively show r-3-dependence. These two power-law regions are connected smoothly with a transition zone (TZ), exhibiting an apparent gap in r = 40-70 AU. The PI in the inner power-law region shows a deep minimum whose location seems to coincide with the point source at lambda = 7 mm. This can be regarded as another sign of a protoplanet in TZ. The observed radial profile of the PI is reproduced by a minimally flaring disk with an irregular surface density distribution or with an irregular temperature distribution or with the combination of both. The depletion factor of surface density in the inner power-law region (r <50 AU) is derived to be =0.16 from a simple model calculation. The obtained PI image also shows small scale asymmetries in the outer power-law region. Possible origins for these asymmetries include corrugation of the scattering surface in the outer region, and shadowing effect by a puffed up structure in the inner power-law region.

  15. Energetic and structural details of the trigger-loop closing transition in RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Wang, Beibei; Predeus, Alexander V; Burton, Zachary F; Feig, Michael

    2013-08-01

    An evolutionarily conserved element in RNA polymerase II, the trigger loop (TL), has been suggested to play an important role in the elongation rate, fidelity of selection of the matched nucleoside triphosphate (NTP), catalysis of transcription elongation, and translocation in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. In response to NTP binding, the TL undergoes large conformational changes to switch between distinct open and closed states to tighten the active site and avail catalysis. A computational strategy for characterizing the conformational transition pathway is presented to bridge the open and closed states of the TL. Information from a large number of independent all-atom molecular dynamics trajectories from Hamiltonian replica exchange and targeted molecular dynamics simulations is gathered together to assemble a connectivity map of the conformational transition. The results show that with a cognate NTP, TL closing should be a spontaneous process. One major intermediate state is identified along the conformational transition pathway, and the key structural features are characterized. The complete pathway from the open TL to the closed TL provides a clear picture of the TL closing.

  16. Solution synchrotron x-ray diffraction reveals structural details of lipid domains in ternary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jing; Kiss, Alexander; Pramudya, Yohanes H.; Nguyen, Lam T.; Hirst, Linda S.

    2009-03-01

    The influence of cholesterol on lipid bilayer structure is significant and the effect of cholesterol on lipid sorting and phase separation in lipid-raft-forming model membrane systems has been well investigated by microscopy methods on giant vesicles. An important consideration however is the influence of fluorescence illumination on the phase state of these lipids and this effect must be carefully minimized. In this paper, we show that synchrotron x-ray scattering on solution lipid mixtures is an effective alternative technique for the identification and characterization of the lo (liquid ordered) and ld (liquid disordered) phases. The high intensity of synchrotron x rays allows the observation of up to 5 orders of diffraction from the lo phase, whereas only two are clearly visible when the ld phase alone is present. This data can be collected in ˜1min/sample , allowing rapid generation of phase data. In this paper, we measure the lamellar spacing in both the liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases simultaneously, as a function of cholesterol concentration in two different ternary mixtures. We also observe evidence of a third gel-phaselike population at 10-12mol% cholesterol and determine the thickness of the bilayer for this phase. Importantly we are able to look at phase coexistence in the membrane independent of photoeffects.

  17. Ad-hoc Solutions for Capturing Electronic Structure Details in Classical Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crill, John Wesley

    Traditional empirical potentials used in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations replace an explicit treatment of the electronic structure with an appropriate interatomic potential energy expression. This enables MD simulations to model atomistic processes, such as dislocation dynamics and plastic deformation, which typically require size and time domains exceeding what is currently feasible with computationally-demanding first principles techniques. However, discarding the electronic degrees of freedom prevents MD simulations from properly resolving certain phenomena which are dominated by electronic interactions. One example is thermal transport in metals, which is often underestimated by orders of magnitude in MD simulations. A recently-developed multi-scale simulation approach, allowing ad-hoc feedback from continuum heat flow solutions to thermostat atoms in an MD simulation, is used to model Joule-heating in nano-scale metallic contacts under electromagnetic stress. The simulations are carried out under conditions representative of contact surfaces in Radio Frequency Electromechanical Switches (RF MEMS) and rail/armature components of Electromagnetic Launchers (EMLs) and are used to speculate on the mechanisms for experimentally-observed material transfer. Another phenomenon that is typically neglected in MD simulations is charge transfer between atoms of dissimilar electronegativity. A common approach to incorporating a dynamic treatment of charge in a classical potential simulation is to solve atomic charges using an equalization of electronegativity in the charge equilibration (QEq) method. The current work studies the effectiveness of the QEq to mimic the charge distribution properties of f-center defects in a sodium chloride crystal. The results indicate that the QEq is able to replicate some of the electrostatic energy features of an f-center, which include an extremely localized potential well in the vicinity of the defect.

  18. The detailed flame structure of highly stretched turbulent premixed methane-air flames

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.C.; Peters, N.; Schneemann, G.A.; Wruck, N.; Renz, U.; Mansour, M.S.

    1996-11-01

    The premixed stoichiometric turbulent methane flames are investigated on a piloted Bunsen burner with mean nozzle exit velocities of 65, 50, and 30 m/s. Advanced laser diagnostics of the flow field using two-component and two-point laser Doppler anemometer, as well as of the scalar fields with 2-D Rayleigh thermometry and line Raman/Rayleigh laser-induced predissociation fluorescence techniques, are applied to obtain both the instantaneous and mean flame structure in terms of velocity, temperature, and major species concentrations, as well as turbulent kinetic energy and length scales. The three flames cover the entire range of the distributed-reaction-zones regime from the borderline to the well-stirred reactor regime to the flamelet regime. Measurements were from X/D = 2.5 above the nozzle exit plane to X/D = 12.5 downstream. Thus, a complete database is established for comparison with the numerical predictions. Within the mixing layer between the unburnt gas and the pilot flame, the instantaneous temperatures are much lower than the adiabatic flame temperature due to the short residence time and heat loss to the burner. With increasing residence time the mean flame temperature increases in the axial direction. The radial mixing of the turbulence generated with the shear layers between the nozzle jet stream and surrounding pilot stream is suppressed, such that the turbulence kinetic energy remains nearly constant on the centerline. From the two-dimensional temperature fields instantaneous iso-temperature contours are plotted showing broad regions where burnt and unburnt gas are partially mixed. These regions are interpreted in terms of the quench scale {ell}{sub q} = ({epsilon}{tau}{sub c}{sup 3}){sup 1/2}. The measured values of the flame brush thickness are proportional to the quench scale for the two high-velocity flames, whereas the low-velocity flame exhibits essential flamelet behavior.

  19. High-Resolution AUV Mapping Reveals Structural Details of Submarine Inflated Lava Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paduan, J.; Clague, D. A.; Caress, D. W.; Thomas, H.; Thompson, D.; Conlin, D.

    2009-12-01

    The MBARI mapping AUV D. Allan B. has now been used to map volcanic terrain at mid-ocean ridges, back-arc spreading centers, and seamounts. These include the summit caldera and upper south rift zone at Axial Volcano, the summit of Davidson Seamount, the Endeavour hydrothermal fields, the Northeast Lau Spreading Center and West Mata Volcano, and, most recently, the CoAxial, North Cleft and North Gorda historic eruption sites on the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Ridges. ROV and submersible dives at most of these sites have provided groundtruth for the textures and features revealed in the roughly 1-m resolution maps. A prominent feature in the maps from four of the sites are inflated flows that did not deflate or drain. These resemble subaerial tumuli but differ in being located on level terrain, apparently atop or very near eruptive vents instead of being in the distal portions of flows. The largest inflated flow at Axial Volcano is on the caldera floor. The main part is 500 by 300 m, and up to 30 m high, with a lobe that extends another 750 m in a sinuous path. It and two nearby, medium-sized inflated flows were first described from sidescan imagery and a submersible dive by Appelgate and Embley (Bull. Volcanol., 54, 447-458, 1992). The AUV maps show clearly the smooth, gently domed relief of the large inflated flow and its sinuous shape on the seafloor, the medium-sized nearby inflated flows, and several additional smaller ones. Particularly striking is a network of 4 to 10 m deep cracks along the crest of each inflation. The cracks occur 30 to 50 m from the margins on all sides of the wider parts of the inflated flows, and become medial cracks along the entire length of the narrow parts, which are nearly triangular in cross-section. An inflation pit 35 m in diameter has a depth equal to the surrounding lava fields. ROV Doc Ricketts dove on these flows in August 2009 and photographed the deeply cracked, uplifted, once flat-lying lineated and ropy sheet flows that form

  20. Genomic-scale comparison of sequence- and structure-based methods of function prediction: Does structure provide additional insight?

    PubMed Central

    Fetrow, Jacquelyn S.; Siew, Naomi; Di Gennaro, Jeannine A.; Martinez-Yamout, Maria; Dyson, H. Jane; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    A function annotation method using the sequence-to-structure-to-function paradigm is applied to the identification of all disulfide oxidoreductases in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. The method identifies 27 sequences as potential disulfide oxidoreductases. All previously known thioredoxins, glutaredoxins, and disulfide isomerases are correctly identified. Three of the 27 predictions are probable false-positives. Three novel predictions, which subsequently have been experimentally validated, are presented. Two additional novel predictions suggest a disulfide oxidoreductase regulatory mechanism for two subunits (OST3 and OST6) of the yeast oligosaccharyltransferase complex. Based on homology, this prediction can be extended to a potential tumor suppressor gene, N33, in humans, whose biochemical function was not previously known. Attempts to obtain a folded, active N33 construct to test the prediction were unsuccessful. The results show that structure prediction coupled with biochemically relevant structural motifs is a powerful method for the function annotation of genome sequences and can provide more detailed, robust predictions than function prediction methods that rely on sequence comparison alone. PMID:11316881

  1. Structural and technical details of the Kirkwood-Buff integrals from the optimization of ionic force fields: focus on fluorides.

    PubMed

    Fyta, M

    2012-03-01

    Results on the structural details of Kirkwood-Buff integrals obtained from the optimization of ionic force fields are presented. We have proposed and make use of an optimization scheme for ionic force fields, which is based on the modification of the cation-anion mixing rules, the calculation of the thermodynamics properties of various monovalent salt solutions according to the Kirkwood-Buff theory of solutions and the comparison to relevant experimental findings. Here, we complete and extend our calculations and analysis as we focus on the technical details of this optimization procedure and the case of fluorides, which have been proven difficult to handle. Important insight is given on the dependence of the radial distribution functions, the short-ranged potentials of mean force, and the Kirkwood-Buff integrals of the salt solutions on the different scaling factors in the mixing rules. Specifically, the way the structural details and inherent characteristics of the above properties are affected by the quantitative and qualitative differences in the mixing rules for a variety of common biologically relevant monovalent salts is mainly addressed. We conclude on the efficiency of this scheme, again with a focus on the fluorides. In the end, we provide a variation of the ion-pair mixing rules scaling factors with salt concentration to identify regimes for which different mixing rules prefactors lead to well-optimized force fields. All results are obtained through Molecular Dynamics simulations using previously optimized force fields for the monovalent ions.

  2. Structural and ferromagnetic properties of an orthorhombic phase of MnBi stabilized with Rh additions

    DOE PAGES

    Taufour, Valentin; Thimmaiah, Srinivasa; March, Stephen; Saunders, Scott; Sun, Kewei; Lamichhane, Tej Nath; Kramer, Matthew J.; Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-28

    The article addresses the possibility of alloy elements in MnBi which may modify the thermodynamic stability of the NiAs-type structure without significantly degrading the magnetic properties. The addition of small amounts of Rh and Mn provides an improvement in the thermal stability with some degradation of the magnetic properties. The small amounts of Rh and Mn additions in MnBi stabilize an orthorhombic phase whose structural and magnetic properties are closely related to the ones of the previously reported high-temperature phase of MnBi (HT MnBi). The properties of the HT MnBi, which is stable between 613 and 719 K, have notmore » been studied in detail because of its transformation to the stable low-temperature MnBi (LT MnBi), making measurements near and below its Curie temperature difficult. The Rh-stabilized MnBi with chemical formula Mn1.0625–xRhxBi [x=0.02(1)] adopts a new superstructure of the NiAs/Ni2In structure family. It is ferromagnetic below a Curie temperature of 416 K. The critical exponents of the ferromagnetic transition are not of the mean-field type but are closer to those associated with the Ising model in three dimensions. The magnetic anisotropy is uniaxial; the anisotropy energy is rather large, and it does not increase when raising the temperature, contrary to what happens in LT MnBi. The saturation magnetization is approximately 3μB/f.u. at low temperatures. Thus, while this exact composition may not be application ready, it does show that alloying is a viable route to modifying the stability of this class of rare-earth-free magnet alloys.« less

  3. Structural and ferromagnetic properties of an orthorhombic phase of MnBi stabilized with Rh additions

    SciTech Connect

    Taufour, Valentin; Thimmaiah, Srinivasa; March, Stephen; Saunders, Scott; Sun, Kewei; Lamichhane, Tej Nath; Kramer, Matthew J.; Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-28

    The article addresses the possibility of alloy elements in MnBi which may modify the thermodynamic stability of the NiAs-type structure without significantly degrading the magnetic properties. The addition of small amounts of Rh and Mn provides an improvement in the thermal stability with some degradation of the magnetic properties. The small amounts of Rh and Mn additions in MnBi stabilize an orthorhombic phase whose structural and magnetic properties are closely related to the ones of the previously reported high-temperature phase of MnBi (HT MnBi). The properties of the HT MnBi, which is stable between 613 and 719 K, have not been studied in detail because of its transformation to the stable low-temperature MnBi (LT MnBi), making measurements near and below its Curie temperature difficult. The Rh-stabilized MnBi with chemical formula Mn1.0625–xRhxBi [x=0.02(1)] adopts a new superstructure of the NiAs/Ni2In structure family. It is ferromagnetic below a Curie temperature of 416 K. The critical exponents of the ferromagnetic transition are not of the mean-field type but are closer to those associated with the Ising model in three dimensions. The magnetic anisotropy is uniaxial; the anisotropy energy is rather large, and it does not increase when raising the temperature, contrary to what happens in LT MnBi. The saturation magnetization is approximately 3μB/f.u. at low temperatures. Thus, while this exact composition may not be application ready, it does show that alloying is a viable route to modifying the stability of this class of rare-earth-free magnet alloys.

  4. EM-fold: de novo atomic-detail protein structure determination from medium-resolution density maps.

    PubMed

    Lindert, Steffen; Alexander, Nathan; Wötzel, Nils; Karakaş, Mert; Stewart, Phoebe L; Meiler, Jens

    2012-03-01

    Electron density maps of membrane proteins or large macromolecular complexes are frequently only determined at medium resolution between 4 Å and 10 Å, either by cryo-electron microscopy or X-ray crystallography. In these density maps, the general arrangement of secondary structure elements (SSEs) is revealed, whereas their directionality and connectivity remain elusive. We demonstrate that the topology of proteins with up to 250 amino acids can be determined from such density maps when combined with a computational protein folding protocol. Furthermore, we accurately reconstruct atomic detail in loop regions and amino acid side chains not visible in the experimental data. The EM-Fold algorithm assembles the SSEs de novo before atomic detail is added using Rosetta. In a benchmark of 27 proteins, the protocol consistently and reproducibly achieves models with root mean square deviation values <3 Å.

  5. Additional Constraints on the Shallow Seismic Velocity Structure of the Atlantis Massif Oceanic Core Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henig, A. S.; Blackman, D. K.; Harding, A. J.; Kent, G. M.; Canales, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    We investigate the detailed structure of the uppermost ~km of Atlantis Massif, an oceanic core complex at 30°N on the Mid Atlantic Ridge, using pre-existing multichannel seismic data. The Synthetic On- Bottom Experiment (SOBE) method that we employ downward continues both the shots and receivers to a depth just above the seafloor. This allows us to pick refracted arrivals recorded on the streamer at very-near offset, providing constraints from rays that are received within the 300-2000 m range that was unavailable to earlier studies where standard shot gathers had been analyzed. Thus, we can better model the upper few hundred meters of the section which, in turn, adds confidence for determining the deeper (400-1500 m) structure. New work on a ridge-parallel line has been added to last year's work on a cross-axis line over the Central Dome of the massif. Tomographic results are similar for these crossing lines: a thin (100-150 m) low velocity (< 3 km/s) layer caps the dome; high horizontal gradients (>1.25 s-1) occur in local (1-2 km wide) regions within these 6-8 km long subsections of the MCS lines analyzed to date; and very high vertical velocity gradients, greater than 3.75 s-1, occur within the km just below the exposed detachment in these areas. We obtain general agreement with Canales et al., 2008, results over the Central Dome but our models suggest a finer scale lateral heterogeneity. We have begun analysis of additional and extended MCS lines over the domal core of the massif and our priority for this presentation is to assess the detailed structure of the Southern Ridge. In at least some areas the thin, low velocity layer contrasts sufficiently with underlying material that a clear refracted arrival is visible in supergathers. We will determine whether the low velocity layer persists over the whole dome or if it is restricted to the Central Dome. An important question is whether its thickness on the Southern Ridge, if it exists there, differs from that

  6. Charge distribution as a tool to investigate structural details. III. Extension to description in terms of anion-centred polyhedra.

    PubMed

    Eon, Jean-Guillaume; Nespolo, Massimo

    2015-02-01

    The charge distribution (CHARDI) method is a self-consistent generalization of Pauling's concept of bond strength which does not make use of empirical parameters but exploits the experimental geometry of the coordination polyhedra building a crystal structure. In the two previous articles of this series [Nespolo et al. (1999). Acta Cryst. B55, 902-916; Nespolo et al. (2001). Acta Cryst. B57, 652-664], we have presented the features and advantages of this approach and its extension to distorted and heterovalent polyhedra and to hydrogen bonds. In this third article we generalize CHARDI to structures based on anion-centred polyhedra, which have drawn attention in recent years, and we show that computations based on both descriptions can be useful to obtain a deeper insight into the structural details, in particular for mixed-valence compounds where CHARDI is able to give precise indications on the statistical distribution of atoms with different oxidation number. A graph-theoretical description of the structures rationalizes and gives further support to the conclusions obtained via the CHARDI approach.

  7. Role of hydrogen abstraction acetylene addition mechanisms in the formation of chlorinated naphthalenes. 2. Kinetic modeling and the detailed mechanism of ring closure.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Grant J; Russell, Douglas K

    2014-12-26

    The dominant formation mechanisms of chlorinated phenylacetylenes, naphthalenes, and phenylvinylacetylenes in relatively low pressure and temperature (∼40 Torr and 1000 K) pyrolysis systems are explored. Mechanism elucidation is achieved through a combination of theoretical and experimental techniques, the former employing a novel simplification of kinetic modeling which utilizes rate constants in a probabilistic framework. Contemporary formation schemes of the compounds of interest generally require successive additions of acetylene to phenyl radicals. As such, infrared laser powered homogeneous pyrolyses of dichloro- or trichloroethylene were perturbed with 1,2,4- or 1,2,3-trichlorobenzene. The resulting changes in product identities were compared with the major products expected from conventional pathways, aided by the results of our previous computational work. This analysis suggests that a Bittner-Howard growth mechanism, with a novel amendment to the conventional scheme made just prior to ring closure, describes the major products well. Expected products from a number of other potentially operative channels are shown to be incongruent with experiment, further supporting the role of Bittner-Howard channels as the unique pathway to naphthalene growth. A simple quantitative analysis which performs very well is achieved by considering the reaction scheme as a probability tree, with relative rate constants being cast as branching probabilities. This analysis describes all chlorinated phenylacetylene, naphthalene, and phenylvinylacetylene congeners. The scheme is then tested in a more general system, i.e., not enforcing a hydrogen abstraction/acetylene addition mechanism, by pyrolyzing mixtures of di- and trichloroethylene without the addition of an aromatic precursor. The model indicates that these mechanisms are still likely to be operative.

  8. A novel material detection algorithm based on 2D GMM-based power density function and image detail addition scheme in dual energy X-ray images.

    PubMed

    Pourghassem, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Material detection is a vital need in dual energy X-ray luggage inspection systems at security of airport and strategic places. In this paper, a novel material detection algorithm based on statistical trainable models using 2-Dimensional power density function (PDF) of three material categories in dual energy X-ray images is proposed. In this algorithm, the PDF of each material category as a statistical model is estimated from transmission measurement values of low and high energy X-ray images by Gaussian Mixture Models (GMM). Material label of each pixel of object is determined based on dependency probability of its transmission measurement values in the low and high energy to PDF of three material categories (metallic, organic and mixed materials). The performance of material detection algorithm is improved by a maximum voting scheme in a neighborhood of image as a post-processing stage. Using two background removing and denoising stages, high and low energy X-ray images are enhanced as a pre-processing procedure. For improving the discrimination capability of the proposed material detection algorithm, the details of the low and high energy X-ray images are added to constructed color image which includes three colors (orange, blue and green) for representing the organic, metallic and mixed materials. The proposed algorithm is evaluated on real images that had been captured from a commercial dual energy X-ray luggage inspection system. The obtained results show that the proposed algorithm is effective and operative in detection of the metallic, organic and mixed materials with acceptable accuracy.

  9. Heterologous Stacking of Prion Protein Peptides Reveals Structural Details of Fibrils and Facilitates Complete Inhibition of Fibril GrowthS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Boshuizen, Ronald S.; Schulz, Veronica; Morbin, Michela; Mazzoleni, Giulia; Meloen, Rob H.; Langedijk, Johannes P. M.

    2009-01-01

    Fibrils play an important role in the pathogenesis of amyloidosis; however, the underlying mechanisms of the growth process and the structural details of fibrils are poorly understood. Crucial in the fibril formation of prion proteins is the stacking of PrP monomers. We previously proposed that the structure of the prion protein fibril may be similar as a parallel left-handed β-helix. The β-helix is composed of spiraling rungs of parallel β-strands, and in the PrP model residues 105–143 of each PrP monomer can contribute two β-helical rungs to the growing fibril. Here we report data to support this model. We show that two cyclized human PrP peptides corresponding to residues 105–124 and 125–143, based on two single rungs of the left-handed β-helical core of the human PrPSc fibril, show spontaneous cooperative fibril growth in vitro by heterologous stacking. Because the structural model must have predictive value, peptides were designed based on the structure rules of the left-handed β-helical fold that could stack with prion protein peptides to stimulate or to block fibril growth. The stimulator peptide was designed as an optimal left-handed β-helical fold that can serve as a template for fibril growth initiation. The inhibiting peptide was designed to bind to the exposed rung but frustrate the propagation of the fibril growth. The single inhibitory peptide hardly shows inhibition, but the combination of the inhibitory with the stimulatory peptide showed complete inhibition of the fibril growth of peptide huPrP-(106–126). Moreover, the unique strategy based on stimulatory and inhibitory peptides seems a powerful new approach to study amyloidogenic fibril structures in general and could prove useful for the development of therapeutics. PMID:19304665

  10. Detailed structure of heat island phenomena from moving observations from electric tram-cars in Metropolitan Tokyo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Shuji

    In this study, the detailed horizontal structure, i.e. cliffs and plateaux of the heat island of the Metropolitan Tokyo area is investigated. According to Oke (1977), cliff is steep temperature gradient at the rural/urban boundary and plateau is a steady but weaker horizontal gradient of increasing temperature towards the city center. However, these features are not always evident, e.g. large city like Tokyo. To elucidate such aspects, moving observations of the horizontal distribution of air temperature from electric trains of the transportation network of Metropolitan Tokyo during late evening or early morning were thus conducted. In total, 16 railroad lines were used for the moving observations. The observations were done in two phases for sectional and horizontal distributions. Results show that three cliffs exist in the heat island of Metropolitan Tokyo, although the location of these cliffs should be taken into consideration for urban planning or urban redevelopment.

  11. Understanding the structure of skill through a detailed analysis of Individuals' performance on the Space Fortress game.

    PubMed

    Towne, Tyler J; Boot, Walter R; Ericsson, K Anders

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we describe a novel approach to the study of individual differences in acquired skilled performance in complex laboratory tasks based on an extension of the methodology of the expert-performance approach (Ericsson & Smith, 1991) to shorter periods of training and practice. In contrast to more traditional approaches that study the average performance of groups of participants, we explored detailed behavioral changes for individual participants across their development on the Space Fortress game. We focused on dramatic individual differences in learning and skill acquisition at the individual level by analyzing the archival game data of several interesting players to uncover the specific structure of their acquired skill. Our analysis revealed that even after maximal values for game-generated subscores were reached, the most skilled participant's behaviors such as his flight path, missile firing, and mine handling continued to be refined and improved (Participant 17 from Boot et al., 2010). We contrasted this participant's behavior with the behavior of several other participants and found striking differences in the structure of their performance, which calls into question the appropriateness of averaging their data. For example, some participants engaged in different control strategies such as "world wrapping" or maintaining a finely-tuned circular flight path around the fortress (in contrast to Participant 17's angular flight path). In light of these differences, we raise fundamental questions about how skill acquisition for individual participants should be studied and described. Our data suggest that a detailed analysis of individuals' data is an essential step for generating a general theory of skill acquisition that explains improvement at the group and individual levels. PMID:27214790

  12. Understanding the structure of skill through a detailed analysis of Individuals' performance on the Space Fortress game.

    PubMed

    Towne, Tyler J; Boot, Walter R; Ericsson, K Anders

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we describe a novel approach to the study of individual differences in acquired skilled performance in complex laboratory tasks based on an extension of the methodology of the expert-performance approach (Ericsson & Smith, 1991) to shorter periods of training and practice. In contrast to more traditional approaches that study the average performance of groups of participants, we explored detailed behavioral changes for individual participants across their development on the Space Fortress game. We focused on dramatic individual differences in learning and skill acquisition at the individual level by analyzing the archival game data of several interesting players to uncover the specific structure of their acquired skill. Our analysis revealed that even after maximal values for game-generated subscores were reached, the most skilled participant's behaviors such as his flight path, missile firing, and mine handling continued to be refined and improved (Participant 17 from Boot et al., 2010). We contrasted this participant's behavior with the behavior of several other participants and found striking differences in the structure of their performance, which calls into question the appropriateness of averaging their data. For example, some participants engaged in different control strategies such as "world wrapping" or maintaining a finely-tuned circular flight path around the fortress (in contrast to Participant 17's angular flight path). In light of these differences, we raise fundamental questions about how skill acquisition for individual participants should be studied and described. Our data suggest that a detailed analysis of individuals' data is an essential step for generating a general theory of skill acquisition that explains improvement at the group and individual levels.

  13. Comparison between enhanced MALDI in-source decay by ammonium persulfate and N- or C-terminal derivatization methods for detailed peptide structure determination.

    PubMed

    Horvatić, Anita; Dodig, Ivana; Vuletić, Tomislav; Pavoković, Dubravko; Hameršak, Zdenko; Butorac, Ana; Cindrić, Mario

    2013-04-16

    Amino acid sequencing and more detailed structure elucidation analysis of peptides and small proteins is a very difficult task even if state-of-the-art mass spectrometry (MS) is employed. To make this task easier, chemical derivatization methods of the N terminus with 4-sulfophenyl-isothiocyanate (SPITC) or the C terminus with 2-methoxy-4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazole (Lys-tag) can enhance peptide fragmentation or fragment ionizability, via proton mobility/localization mechanisms making tandem MS (MS(2)) spectra more informative and less demanding for structural interpretation. Observed disadvantages related to both derivatization methods are sample- and time-consuming procedures and the increased number of reaction byproducts. A novel, sulfate radical in-source formation method of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) MS based on chemically enhanced in-source decay (ISD) can be accomplished by simple addition of ammonium persulfate (APS) in the matrix solution. This method enables effective decomposition of peptide ions already in the first stage of MS analysis where a large number of fragment ions are produced. The resultant MALDI-ISD mass spectra (MS after APS → MALDI-ISD MS) are almost equivalent to conventional, collision-induced dissociation (CID) MS(2) spectra. These fragment ions are further subjected to the second stage of the MS, and consequently, MS(3) spectra are produced, which makes the sequence analysis more informative and complete (CID MS(2) is thus equivalent to CID MS(3)). Multiply stage MS after APS addition showed enhanced sensitivity, resolution, and mass accuracy compared to peptide derivatization (SPITC and Lys-tag) or conventional MS and MS(2) analyses and offered more detailed insight into peptide structure.

  14. The Details of Glycolipid Glycan Hydrolysis by the Structural Analysis of a Family 123 Glycoside Hydrolase from Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Noach, Ilit; Pluvinage, Benjamin; Laurie, Cassandra; Abe, Kento T; Alteen, Matthew G; Vocadlo, David J; Boraston, Alisdair B

    2016-08-14

    Clostridium perfringens is an opportunistic pathogen of humans and animals whose genome encodes a wide variety of putative carbohydrate-hydrolyzing enzymes that are increasingly being shown to be directed toward the cleavage of host glycans. Among these putative enzymes is a member of glycoside hydrolase family 123. Here we show that the recombinant enzyme (referred to as CpNga123) encoded by the gene cloned from C. perfringens strain ATCC 13124 (locus tag CPF_1473) is a β-N-acetylgalactosaminidase, similar to NgaP from Paenibacillus sp. TS12. Like NgaP, CpNga123 was able to cleave the terminal β-D-GalNAc-(1→4)-D-Gal and β-D-GalNAc-(1→3)-D-Gal motifs that would be found in glycosphigolipids. The X-ray crystal structure of CpNga123 revealed it to have an N-terminal β-sandwich domain and a (β/α)8-barrel catalytic domain with a C-terminal α-helical elaboration. The structures determined in complex with reaction products provide details of the -1 subsite architecture, catalytic residues, and a structural change in the active site that is likely required to enable hydrolysis of the glycosidic bond by promoting engagement of the substrate by the catalytic residues. The features of the active site support the likelihood of a substrate-assisted catalytic mechanism for this enzyme. The structures of an inactive mutant of CpNga123 in complex with intact GA2 and Gb4 glycosphingolipid motifs reveal insight into aglycon recognition and suggest that the kinked or pleated conformation of GA2 caused by the β-1,4-linkage between N-acetylgalactosamine and galactose, and the accommodation of this conformation by the enzyme active site, may be responsible for greater activity on GA2. PMID:27038508

  15. Three new crystal structures in the Na-Pb system: solving structures without additional experimental input.

    PubMed

    Ward, Logan; Michel, Kyle; Wolverton, Chris

    2015-09-01

    The structures of three Na-Pb compounds, γ, δ and δ', have remained incompletely solved for nearly 60 years. The space group, lattice parameters and positions of the Pb atoms of these three structures have been determined, but the positions of the Na atoms are still unknown. In this work, the First-Principles Assisted Structure Solution (FPASS) method [Meredig & Wolverton (2013). Nat. Mater. 12, 123-127] has been used to complete the description of these three structures using only experimental information available from the literature as input. The paper also discusses the relative advantages of constrained crystal structure prediction tools, like FPASS, in comparison to conventional crystal structure prediction methods in reference to their abilities to complete the solution of other unsolved structures. PMID:26317197

  16. An atomic view of additive mutational effects in a protein structure

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, M.M.; Terwilliger, T.C.

    1996-04-01

    Substitution of a single amino acid in a protein will often lead to substantial changes in properties. If these properties could be altered in a rational way then proteins could be readily generated with functions tailored to specific uses. When amino acid substitutions are made at well-separated locations in a single protein, their effects are generally additive. Additivity of effects of amino acid substitutions is very useful because the properties of proteins with any combination of substitutions can be inferred directly from those of the proteins with single changes. It would therefore be of considerable interest to have a means of knowing whether substitutions at a particular pair of sites in a protein are likely to lead to additive effects. The structural basis for additivity of effects of mutations on protein function was examined by determining crystal structures of single and double mutants in the hydrophobic core of gene V protein. Structural effects of mutations were found to be cumulative when two mutations were made in a single protein. Additivity occurs in this case because the regions structurally affected by mutations at the two sites do not overlap even though the sites are separated by only 9 {angstrom}. Structural distortions induced by mutations in gene V protein decrease rapidly, but not isotropically, with distance from the site of mutation. It is anticipated that cases where structural and functional effects of mutations will be additive could be identified simply by examining whether the regions structurally affected by each component mutation overlap.

  17. A survey of molecular details in the human pineal gland in the light of phylogeny, structure, function and chronobiological diseases.

    PubMed

    Stehle, Jörg H; Saade, Anastasia; Rawashdeh, Oliver; Ackermann, Katrin; Jilg, Antje; Sebestény, Tamás; Maronde, Erik

    2011-08-01

    The human pineal gland is a neuroendocrine transducer that forms an integral part of the brain. Through the nocturnally elevated synthesis and release of the neurohormone melatonin, the pineal gland encodes and disseminates information on circadian time, thus coupling the outside world to the biochemical and physiological internal demands of the body. Approaches to better understand molecular details behind the rhythmic signalling in the human pineal gland are limited but implicitly warranted, as human chronobiological dysfunctions are often associated with alterations in melatonin synthesis. Current knowledge on melatonin synthesis in the human pineal gland is based on minimally invasive analyses, and by the comparison of signalling events between different vertebrate species, with emphasis put on data acquired in sheep and other primates. Together with investigations using autoptic pineal tissue, a remnant silhouette of premortem dynamics within the hormone's biosynthesis pathway can be constructed. The detected biochemical scenario behind the generation of dynamics in melatonin synthesis positions the human pineal gland surprisingly isolated. In this neuroendocrine brain structure, protein-protein interactions and nucleo-cytoplasmic protein shuttling indicate furthermore a novel twist in the molecular dynamics in the cells of this neuroendocrine brain structure. These findings have to be seen in the light that an impaired melatonin synthesis is observed in elderly and/or demented patients, in individuals affected by Alzheimer's disease, Smith-Magenis syndrome, autism spectrum disorder and sleep phase disorders. Already, recent advances in understanding signalling dynamics in the human pineal gland have significantly helped to counteract chronobiological dysfunctions through a proper restoration of the nocturnal melatonin surge.

  18. Attenuation tomography in the western central Andes: A detailed insight into the structure of a magmatic arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberland, Christian; Rietbrock, Andreas

    2001-06-01

    High-quality data from 1498 local earthquakes recorded by the PISCO '94 (Proyecto de Investigatión Sismológica de la Cordillera Occidental, 1994) and ANCORP '96 (Andean Continental Research Project, 1996) temporary seismological networks allowed the detailed determination of the three-dimensional (3-D) attenuation structure (Qp-1) beneath the recent magmatic arc in the western central Andes (20° to 24°S). Assuming a frequency-independent Qp-1 in a frequency band between 1 and 30 Hz, whole path attenuation (t*) was estimated from the amplitude spectra of the P waves using spectral ratios and a spectral inversion technique. The damped least squares inversion (tomography) of the data reveals a complex attenuation structure. Crust and mantle of the forearc and subducting slab are generally characterized by low attenuation (Qp > 1000). Crust and mantle beneath the magmatic arc show elevated attenuation. The strongest anomaly of extremely low Qp is found in the crust between 22° and 23°S beneath the recent volcanic arc (Qp < 100). N-S variations can be observed: The western flank of the crustal attenuation anomaly follows the curved course of the volcanic front. North of 21°S the attenuation is less developed. In the northern part of the study area the low-Qp zone penetrates in the forearc mantle down to the subducting slab. In the south a deeper zone of high attenuation is resolved between 23° and 24°S directly above the subducting slab. Low Qp in the mantle correlates with earthquake clusters. The strong crustal attenuation is confined to the distribution of young ignimbrites and silicic volcanism and is interpreted as a thermally weakened zone with partial melts. The attenuation pattern in the upper mantle might reflect the variable extent of the asthenosphere and maps variations of subduction-related hydration processes in the mantle wedge from slab-derived fluids.

  19. Academic detailing.

    PubMed

    Shankar, P R; Jha, N; Piryani, R M; Bajracharya, O; Shrestha, R; Thapa, H S

    2010-01-01

    There are a number of sources available to prescribers to stay up to date about medicines. Prescribers in rural areas in developing countries however, may not able to access some of them. Interventions to improve prescribing can be educational, managerial, and regulatory or use a mix of strategies. Detailing by the pharmaceutical industry is widespread. Academic detailing (AD) has been classically seen as a form of continuing medical education in which a trained health professional such as a physician or pharmacist visits physicians in their offices to provide evidence-based information. Face-to-face sessions, preferably on an individual basis, clear educational and behavioural objectives, establishing credibility with respect to objectivity, stimulating physician interaction, use of concise graphic educational materials, highlighting key messages, and when possible, providing positive reinforcement of improved practices in follow-up visits can increase success of AD initiatives. AD is common in developed countries and certain examples have been cited in this review. In developing countries the authors have come across reports of AD in Pakistan, Sudan, Argentina and Uruguay, Bihar state in India, Zambia, Cuba, Indonesia and Mexico. AD had a consistent, small but potentially significant impact on prescribing practices. AD has much less resources at its command compared to the efforts by the industry. Steps have to be taken to formally start AD in Nepal and there may be specific hindering factors similar to those in other developing nations. PMID:21209521

  20. LASER BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE: Visualisation of details of a complicated inner structure of model objects by the method of diffusion optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tret'yakov, Evgeniy V.; Shuvalov, Vladimir V.; Shutov, I. V.

    2002-11-01

    An approximate algorithm is tested for solving the problem of diffusion optical tomography in experiments on the visualisation of details of the inner structure of strongly scattering model objects containing scattering and semitransparent inclusions, as well as absorbing inclusions located inside other optical inhomogeneities. The stability of the algorithm to errors is demonstrated, which allows its use for a rapid (2 — 3 min) image reconstruction of the details of objects with a complicated inner structure.

  1. The Use of Additive Manufacturing for Fabrication of Multi-Function Small Satellite Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Horais, Brian J; Love, Lonnie J; Dehoff, Ryan R

    2013-01-01

    The use of small satellites in constellations is limited only by the growing functionality of smallsats themselves. Additive manufacturing provides exciting new design opportunities for development of multifunction CubeSat structures that integrate such functions as propulsion and thermal control into the satellite structures themselves. Manufacturing of these complex multifunction structures is now possible in lightweight, high strength, materials such as titanium by using existing electron beam melting additive manufacturing processes. However, the use of today's additive manufacturing capabilities is often cost-prohibitive for small companies due to the large capital investments required. To alleviate this impediment the U.S. Department of Energy has established a Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) at their Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Tennessee that provides industry access to a broad range of energy-efficient additive manufacturing equipment for collaborative use by both small and large organizations. This paper presents a notional CubeSat multifunction design that integrates the propulsion system into a three-unit (3U) CubeSat structure. The full-scale structure has been designed and fabricated at the ORNL MDF. The use of additive manufacturing for spacecraft fabrication is opening up many new possibilities in design and fabrication capabilities for what had previously been impossible structures to fabricate.

  2. On the structure and dynamics of Ellerman bombs. Detailed study of three events and modelling of Hα

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello González, N.; Danilovic, S.; Kneer, F.

    2013-09-01

    Aims: We study the structure and dynamics of three Ellerman bombs (EBs) observed in an evolving active region. Methods: The active region NOAA 11271 was observed with the Vacuum Tower Telescope at Observatorio del Teide/Tenerife on August 18, 2011. We used the two-dimensional Triple Etalon SOlar Spectrometer (TESOS) to obtain time sequences of the active region and of EBs in Hα at a cadence of 15 s. Simultaneously, we obtained full Stokes profiles with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP II) in the two magnetically sensitive Fe i infrared lines (IR) at 1.56 μ, scanning spatial sections of the area with cadences of 28-46 s. The Hα data were reconstructed with speckle methods to study the evolution of the atmospheric stratification. Two methods were used to extract magnetic field information from the IR Stokes profiles: 1) fitting of the (Q,U,V) profiles by Gaussians; and 2) applying the Milne-Eddington approximation, assuming two separate magnetic structures in the resolution element and fitting by trial and error some profiles from the EB areas. Data from SDO-HMI and -AIA were also used. We performed two-dimensional (2D) non-LTE radiative transfer calculations of Hα in parameterised models of EBs. Results: The three EBs studied in detail occurred in a complex active region near sunspots. They were very bright with a factor of 1.5-2.8 brighter than the nearby area. They lived for 1/2 h and longer. They were related to broadband faculae, but the latter were not the brightest features in the field of view. The EBs occurred in magnetic field configurations with opposite polarity close together. One EB was located at the outskirts of a penumbra of a complex sunspot and showed repeated "flaring" in SDO-AIA data. Another was close to a strong field patch and moved into this during the end of its lifetime. The third EB showed clear changes of field structure during the time it was observed. We obtained from the 2D modelling that heating and increase in Hα opacity

  3. Telomere Capping Proteins are Structurally Related to RPA with an additional Telomere-Specific Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Gelinas, A.; Paschini, M; Reyes, F; Heroux, A; Batey, R; Lundblad, V; Wuttke, D

    2009-01-01

    Telomeres must be capped to preserve chromosomal stability. The conserved Stn1 and Ten1 proteins are required for proper capping of the telomere, although the mechanistic details of how they contribute to telomere maintenance are unclear. Here, we report the crystal structures of the C-terminal domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Stn1 and the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Ten1 proteins. These structures reveal striking similarities to corresponding subunits in the replication protein A complex, further supporting an evolutionary link between telomere maintenance proteins and DNA repair complexes. Our structural and in vivo data of Stn1 identify a new domain that has evolved to support a telomere-specific role in chromosome maintenance. These findings endorse a model of an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of DNA maintenance that has developed as a result of increased chromosomal structural complexity.

  4. Effect of stabilizing additives on the structure and hydration of proteins: a study involving monoclinic lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Saraswathi, N T; Sankaranarayanan, R; Vijayan, M

    2002-07-01

    In pursuance of a long-range programme on the hydration, mobility and action of proteins, the structural basis of the stabilizing effect of sugars and polyols is being investigated. With two crystallographically independent molecules with slightly different packing environments in the crystal, monoclinic lysozyme constitutes an ideal system for exploring the problem. The differences in the structure and hydration of the two molecules provide a framework for examining the changes caused by stabilizing additives. Monoclinic crystals were grown under native conditions and also in the presence of 10% sucrose, 15% trehalose, 10% trehalose, 10% sorbitol and 5% glycerol. The crystal structures were refined at resolutions ranging from 1.8 to 2.1 A. The average B values, and hence the mobility of the structure, are lower in the presence of additives than in the native crystals. However, a comparison of the structures indicates that the effect of the additives on the structure and the hydration shell around the protein molecule is considerably less than that caused by differences in packing. It is also less than that caused by the replacement of NaNO(3) by NaCl as the precipitant in the crystallization experiments. This result is not in conformity with the commonly held belief that additives exert their stabilizing effect through the reorganization of the hydration shell, at least as far as the ordered water molecules are concerned.

  5. Improved structural detail in freeze-fracture replicas: high-angle shadowing of gap junctions cooled below -170 degrees C and protected by liquid nitrogen-cooled shrouds.

    PubMed

    Rash, J E; Yasumura, T

    1992-01-15

    before they were replicated, the E-face pits faithfully maintained the shape that the IMPs had before fracturing. These more detailed images revealed a new structure in the center of each E-face pit: a 2-3 nm "peg" that may represent the frozen aqueous matrix of the connexon ion channel that remained after elastic extraction of the surrounding six connexin molecules. Thus, high-angle shadowing at very low specimen temperature under virtually non-contaminating conditions has revealed a new level of detail for membrane structure in freeze-fracture replicas. PMID:1547359

  6. Terrestrial exposure of oilfield flowline additives diminish soil structural stability and remediative microbial function.

    PubMed

    George, S J; Sherbone, J; Hinz, C; Tibbett, M

    2011-10-01

    Onshore oil production pipelines are major installations in the petroleum industry, stretching many thousands of kilometres worldwide which also contain flowline additives. The current study focuses on the effect of the flowline additives on soil physico-chemical and biological properties and quantified the impact using resilience and resistance indices. Our findings are the first to highlight deleterious effect of flowline additives by altering some fundamental soil properties, including a complete loss of structural integrity of the impacted soil and a reduced capacity to degrade hydrocarbons mainly due to: (i) phosphonate salts (in scale inhibitor) prevented accumulation of scale in pipelines but also disrupted soil physical structure; (ii) glutaraldehyde (in biocides) which repressed microbial activity in the pipeline and reduced hydrocarbon degradation in soil upon environmental exposure; (iii) the combinatory effects of these two chemicals synergistically caused severe soil structural collapse and disruption of microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons.

  7. Herschel far-infrared observations of the Carina Nebula complex. III. Detailed cloud structure and feedback effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roccatagliata, V.; Preibisch, T.; Ratzka, T.; Gaczkowski, B.

    2013-06-01

    Context. The star formation process in large clusters/associations can be strongly influenced by the feedback from high-mass stars. Whether the resulting net effect of the feedback is predominantly negative (cloud dispersal) or positive (triggering of star formation due to cloud compression) is still an open question. Aims: The Carina Nebula complex (CNC) represents one of the most massive star-forming regions in our Galaxy. We use our Herschel far-infrared observations to study the properties of the clouds over the entire area of the CNC (with a diameter of ≈3.2°, which corresponds to ≈125 pc at a distance of 2.3 kpc). The good angular resolution (10''-36'') of the Herschel maps corresponds to physical scales of 0.1-0.4 pc, and allows us to analyze the small-scale (i.e., clump-size) structures of the clouds. Methods: The full extent of the CNC was mapped with PACS and SPIRE in the 70, 160, 250, 350, and 500 μm bands. We determined temperatures and column densities at each point in these maps by modeling the observed far-infrared spectral energy distributions. We also derived a map showing the strength of the UV radiation field. We investigated the relation between the cloud properties and the spatial distribution of the high-mass stars and computed total cloud masses for different density thresholds. Results: Our Herschel maps resolve for the first time the small-scale structure of the dense clouds over the entire spatial extent of the CNC. Several particularly interesting regions, including the prominent pillars south of η Car, are analyzed in detail. We compare the cloud masses derived from the Herschel data with previous mass estimates based on sub-mm and molecular line data. Our maps also reveal a peculiar wave-like pattern in the northern part of the Carina Nebula. Finally, we characterize two prominent cloud complexes at the periphery of our Herschel maps, which are probably molecular clouds in the Galactic background. Conclusions: We find that the

  8. Structural Implications of new Geologic Mapping and a Detailed Gravity Traverse in the Brooks Range Foothills, Chandler Lake Quadrangle, Northern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peapples, P. R.; Saltus, R. W.; Swenson, R.; Brown, P. J.

    2005-12-01

    A fold and thrust belt in northern Alaska occupies the structural transition from the imbricate thrust sheets (or allochthons) of the Brooks Range to the North Slope coastal plain. Understanding this complexly deformed zone is critical to hydrocarbon assessment in the state-owned lands south of Prudhoe Bay. New geologic mapping and geophysical studies are focused on this important region. Detailed (1:63,360 scale) geologic mapping along the drainages of Tiglukpuk Creek and the Siksikpuk River documents exposures of deep structural levels and provides important constraints for a structural model of this region. A south-to-north structural transect encompasses the transition from the highly deformed thrust sheets of the Endicott Mountains Allochthon (EMA) at the mountain front to the inferred triangle zone at the Tuktu Escarpment 45 miles to the north. Mississippian Carbonates to Triassic siliciclastics make up the EMA north of the mountain front where there is an abrupt transition in structural style from north-vergent asymmetric overturned folding to gentle warping above shallowly dipping fault ramps. Tiglukpuk Anticline represents a fenster where the EMA is overlain in thrust contact by a melange of more distal Ipnavik River Allochthon (IRA) rocks. Parallel synclinoria contain the Okpikruak siliciclastics of the IRA assemblage and the Brookian syntectonic siliciclastics of the Fortress Mountain formation, carried atop the EMA thrust sheets during the latest phase of deformation. This complex structural style abruptly ends at the Tuktu Escarpment which likely represents a backthrust/triangle zone that places shallow north dipping coarse clastics of the Nanushuk Formation over the less competent and highly deformed Torok shale. The structural complexity and associated steeply dipping strata in the foothills belt were not well imaged by existing conventional seismic data in this region. To provide additional subsurface control, we collected ground station gravity

  9. Structural evaluation of mixer pump installed in Tank 241-AN-107 for caustic addition project

    SciTech Connect

    Leshikar, G.A.

    1995-06-16

    This report documents the structural analysis and evaluation of a mixer pump and caustic addition system to be used in Tank 107-AN. This pump will be installed in the central pump pit of this double- shell tank for the purpose of bringing the hydroxide ion concentration into compliance with Tank Farm operating specifications.

  10. Investigation of detailed spatial structure of the Moscow urban heat island with application of the newest meteorological observations and regional climate modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varentsov, Mikhail; Pavel, Konstantinov; Timofey, Samsonov

    2016-04-01

    During the last years, the network of metrological observation in Moscow megacity and its neighborhoods, forming the biggest urban agglomeration in Europe, was significantly extended. Several new weather stations and completely new dense network of air-quality monitoring appears during the last decade. In addition, several microwave meteorological profilers MTP 5, which are available to measure temperature at the heights from 0 to 1000 meters with 50-m resolution, were installed in the city and its surrounding. All these measurements allow revealing undiscovered features of Moscow urban climate and urban heat island (UHI). In our research, bases on this data, we covered several topics related to urban climatology: - Investigation of detailed spatial structure of Moscow UHI and its relationships with building features, such as land use and morphology of the street canyons, obtained by GIS-algorithms according (Samsonov et. al, 2015); - Investigation of three-dimensional structure of the UHI, including its vertical extend and influence on the stratification of the atmosphere, and three-dimensional structure of the urban heat island advection and urban heat plumes; - Application of the newest data for validation of the regional climate model COSMO-CLM, coupled with TEB urban scheme (Masson, 2000; Trusilova et. al., 2013), launched for Moscow region with 1-km spatial resolution. References: 1. Masson V. A. Physically-Based Scheme for the Urban Energy Budget in Atmospheric models. Bound. Layer Meteor. 2000. V. 94 (3). P. 357-397. 2. Trusilova K., Früh B., Brienen S., Walter A., Masson V., Pigeon G., Becker P. Implementation of an Urban Parameterization Scheme into the Regional Climate Model COSMO-CLM. J. Appl. Meteor. Climatol. V. 52. P. 2296-2311. 3. Samsonov T.E., Konstantinov P.I., Varentsov M.I. Object-oriented approach to urban canyon analysis and its applications in meteorological modeling. Urban Climate. 2015. Vol. 13. P. 122-139.

  11. Ten-Structure as Strategy of Addition 1-20 by Involving Spatial Structuring Ability for First Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmah, Ummy; Putri, Ratu Ilma Indra; Somakim

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to design learning activities that can support students to develop strategies for the addition of number 1 to 20 in the first grade by involving students' spatial structuring ability. This study was conducted in Indonesia by involving 27 students. In this paper, one of three activities is discussed namely ten-box activity.…

  12. Nearly complete rRNA genes from 371 Animalia: updated structure-based alignment and detailed phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Mallatt, Jon; Craig, Catherine Waggoner; Yoder, Matthew J

    2012-09-01

    This study presents a manually constructed alignment of nearly complete rRNA genes from most animal clades (371 taxa from ~33 of the ~36 metazoan phyla), expanded from the 197 sequences in a previous study. This thorough, taxon-rich alignment, available at http://www.wsu.edu/~jmallatt/research/rRNAalignment.html and in the Dryad Repository (doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.1v62kr3q), is based rigidly on the secondary structure of the SSU and LSU rRNA molecules, and is annotated in detail, including labeling of the erroneous sequences (contaminants). The alignment can be used for future studies of the molecular evolution of rRNA. Here, we use it to explore if the larger number of sequences produces an improved phylogenetic tree of animal relationships. Disappointingly, the resolution did not improve, neither when the standard maximum-likelihood method was used, nor with more sophisticated methods that partitioned the rRNA into paired and unpaired sites (stem, loop, bulge, junction), or accounted for the evolution of the paired sites. For example, no doublet model of paired-site substitutions (16-state, 16A and 16B, 7A-F, or 6A-C models) corrected the placement of any rogue taxa or increased resolution. The following findings are from the simplest, standard, ML analysis. The 371-taxon tree only imperfectly supported the bilaterian clades of Lophotrochozoa and Ecdysozoa, and this problem remained after 17 taxa with unstably positioned sequences were omitted from the analysis. The problem seems to stem from base-compositional heterogeneity across taxa and from an overrepresentation of highly divergent sequences among the newly added taxa (e.g., sequences from Cephalopoda, Rotifera, Acoela, and Myxozoa). The rogue taxa continue to concentrate in two locations in the rRNA tree: near the base of Arthropoda and of Bilateria. The approximately uncertain (AU) test refuted the monophyly of Mollusca and of Chordata, probably due to long-branch attraction of the highly

  13. Characterization of Effect of Support Structures in Laser Additive Manufacturing of Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järvinen, Jukka-Pekka; Matilainen, Ville; Li, Xiaoyun; Piili, Heidi; Salminen, Antti; Mäkelä, Ismo; Nyrhilä, Olli

    Laser additive manufacturing (LAM) of stainless steel is a layer wisetechnology for fabricating 3D parts from metal powder via selectively melting powder with laser beam. Support structures play a significant role in LAM process as they help to remove heat away from the process and on the other hand hold the work piece in its place. A successful design of support structures can help to achievea building process fast and inexpensive with high quality. Aimof this study was to characterize the usability of two types of support structures: web and tube supports. Purpose of this studywas also to analyze how suitable they are in two industrial application cases: case for dental application and case for jewelry application. It was concluded that the removability of web supports was much better than tube supports. It was noticed that support structures are an important part of LAM process and they strongly affect the manufacturability and the end quality of the part.

  14. Analysis of Gravity and Topographic/Bathymetric Data Over the Chicxulub Impact Structure: A Look at Details

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsland, G. L.; Hurtado, M.; Ceron, A.; Pope, K.; Ocampo, A.; Smythe, W.; Bedard, P.

    1996-03-01

    The Chicxulub impact feature, has been characterized as being relatively circular with a diameter of 180 Km, 240 Km, or 300 Km. To arrive at these characterizations the authors have relied for the most part upon gravity data, sparse well control, a few seismic lines and a ring of cenotes (sinkholes). We are better defining the feature by analysis of the details of the gravity and topographic/bathymetric data.

  15. Addition of three-dimensional isoparametric elements to NASA structural analysis program (NASTRAN)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Field, E. I.; Johnson, S. E.

    1973-01-01

    Implementation is made of the three-dimensional family of linear, quadratic and cubic isoparametric solid elements into the NASA Structural Analysis program, NASTRAN. This work included program development, installation, testing, and documentation. The addition of these elements to NASTRAN provides a significant increase in modeling capability particularly for structures requiring specification of temperatures, material properties, displacements, and stresses which vary throughout each individual element. Complete program documentation is presented in the form of new sections and updates for direct insertion to the three NASTRAN manuals. The results of demonstration test problems are summarized. Excellent results are obtained with the isoparametric elements for static, normal mode, and buckling analyses.

  16. Unravelling the impact of hydrocarbon structure on the fumarate addition mechanism--a gas-phase ab initio study.

    PubMed

    Bharadwaj, Vivek S; Vyas, Shubham; Villano, Stephanie M; Maupin, C Mark; Dean, Anthony M

    2015-02-14

    The fumarate addition reaction mechanism is central to the anaerobic biodegradation pathway of various hydrocarbons, both aromatic (e.g., toluene, ethyl benzene) and aliphatic (e.g., n-hexane, dodecane). Succinate synthase enzymes, which belong to the glycyl radical enzyme family, are the main facilitators of these biochemical reactions. The overall catalytic mechanism that converts hydrocarbons to a succinate molecule involves three steps: (1) initial H-abstraction from the hydrocarbon by the radical enzyme, (2) addition of the resulting hydrocarbon radical to fumarate, and (3) hydrogen abstraction by the addition product to regenerate the radical enzyme. Since the biodegradation of hydrocarbon fuels via the fumarate addition mechanism is linked to bio-corrosion, an improved understanding of this reaction is imperative to our efforts of predicting the susceptibility of proposed alternative fuels to biodegradation. An improved understanding of the fuel biodegradation process also has the potential to benefit bioremediation. In this study, we consider model aromatic (toluene) and aliphatic (butane) compounds to evaluate the impact of hydrocarbon structure on the energetics and kinetics of the fumarate addition mechanism by means of high level ab initio gas-phase calculations. We predict that the rate of toluene degradation is ∼100 times faster than butane at 298 K, and that the first abstraction step is kinetically significant for both hydrocarbons, which is consistent with deuterium isotope effect studies on toluene degradation. The detailed computations also show that the predicted stereo-chemical preference of the succinate products for both toluene and butane are due to the differences in the radical addition rate constants for the various isomers. The computational and kinetic modeling work presented here demonstrates the importance of considering pre-reaction and product complexes in order to accurately treat gas phase systems that involve intra and inter

  17. Detailed structure of the H2PO4(-)-guanosine diphosphate intermediate in Ras-GAP decoded from FTIR experiments by biomolecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Xia, Fei; Rudack, Till; Cui, Qiang; Kötting, Carsten; Gerwert, Klaus

    2012-12-12

    Essential biochemical processes such as signal transduction, energy conversion, or substrate conversion depend on transient ligand binding. Thus, identifying the detailed structure and transient positioning of small ligands, and their stabilization by the surrounding protein, is of great importance. In this study, by decoding information from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra with biomolecular simulation methods, we identify the precise position and hydrogen network of a small compound, the guanosine diphosphate (GDP)-H(2)PO(4)(-) intermediate, in the surrounding protein-protein complex of Ras and its GTPase-activating protein, a central molecular switch in cellular signal transduction. We validate the simulated structure by comparing the calculated fingerprint vibrational modes of H(2)PO(4)(-) with those obtained from FTIR experiments. The new structural information, below the resolution of X-ray structural analysis, gives detailed insight into the catalytic mechanism.

  18. Addition of lipid to the photosynthetic membrane: effects on membrane structure and energy transfer

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    We have carried out a series of experiments in which the lipid composition of the photosynthetic membrane has been altered by the addition of lipid from a defined source under experimental conditions. Liposomes prepared by sonication are mixed with purified photosynthetic membranes obtained from spinach chloroplasts and are taken through cycles of freezing and thawing. Several lines of evidence, including gel electrophoresis and freeze-fracture electron microscopy, indicate that an actual addition of lipid has taken place. Structural analysis by freeze-fracture shows that intramembrane particles are widely separated after the addition of large amounts of lipid, with one exception: large hexagonal lattices of particles appear in some regions of the membrane. These lattices are identical in appearance with lattices formed from a single purified component of the membrane known as chlorophyll-protein complex II. The suggestion that the presence of such lattices in lipid-enriched membranes reflects a profound rearrangement of photosynthetic structures has been confirmed by analysis of the fluorescence emission spectra of natural and lipid- enriched membranes. Specifically, lipid addition in each of the cases we have studied results in the apparent detachment of chlorophyll- protein complex II from photosynthetic reaction centers. It is concluded that specific arrangements of components in the photosynthetic membrane, necessary for the normal functioning of the membrane in the light reaction of photosynthesis, can be regulated to a large extent by the lipid content of the membrane. PMID:7298712

  19. Impact ignition of aluminum-teflon based energetic materials impregnated with nano-structured carbon additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappagantula, Keerti; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Hunt, Emily M.

    2012-07-01

    The inclusion of graphene into composite energetic materials to enhance their performance is a new area of interest. Studies have shown that the addition of graphene significantly enhances the thermal transport properties of an energetic composite, but how graphene influences the composite's ignition sensitivity has not been studied. The objective of this study is to examine the influence of carbon additives in composite energetic material composed of aluminum and polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon™) on ignition sensitivity due to low velocity, drop weight impact. Specifically, three forms of carbon additives were investigated and selected based on different physical and structural properties: spherically shaped amorphous nano particles of carbon, cylindrically shaped multi walled carbon nanotubes, and sheet like graphene flakes. Results show an interesting trend: composites consisting of carbon nanotubes are significantly more sensitive to impact ignition and require the lowest ignition energy. In contrast, graphene is least sensitive to ignition exhibiting negligible reduction in ignition energy with low concentrations of graphene additive. While graphene does not significantly sensitize the energetic composite to ignition, graphene does, however, result in greater overall reactivity as observed through images of the reaction. The enhanced thermal transport properties of graphene containing composites may promote greater energy transport once ignited, but those properties do not also increase ignition sensitivity. These results and the understanding of the structural arrangement of particles within a composite as a key parameter affecting impact ignition sensitivity will have an impact on the safe handling and use of composite energetic materials.

  20. Phosphate addition and plant species alters microbial community structure in acidic upland grassland soil.

    PubMed

    Rooney, Deirdre C; Clipson, Nicholas J W

    2009-01-01

    Agricultural improvement (addition of fertilizers, liming) of seminatural acidic grasslands across Ireland and the UK has resulted in significant shifts in floristic composition, soil chemistry, and microbial community structure. Although several factors have been proposed as responsible for driving shifts in microbial communities, the exact causes of such changes are not well defined. Phosphate was added to grassland microcosms to investigate the effect on fungal and bacterial communities. Plant species typical of unimproved grasslands (Agrostis capillaris, Festuca ovina) and agriculturally improved grasslands (Lolium perenne) were grown, and phosphate was added 25 days after seed germination, with harvesting after a further 50 days. Phosphate addition significantly increased root biomass (p < 0.001) and shoot biomass (p < 0.05), soil pH (by 0.1 U), and microbial activity (by 5.33 mg triphenylformazan [TPF] g(-1) soil; p < 0.001). A slight decrease (by 0.257 mg biomass-C g(-1) soil; p < 0.05) in microbial biomass after phosphate addition was found. The presence of plant species significantly decreased soil pH (p < 0.05; by up to 0.2 U) and increased microbial activity (by up to 6.02 mg TPF g(-1) soil) but had no significant effect on microbial biomass. Microbial communities were profiled using automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis. Multidimensional scaling plots and canonical correspondence analysis revealed that phosphate addition and its interactions with upland grassland plant species resulted in considerable changes in the fungal and bacterial communities of upland soil. The fungal community structure was significantly affected by both phosphate (R = 0.948) and plant species (R = 0.857), and the bacterial community structure was also significantly affected by phosphate (R = 0.758) and plant species (R = 0.753). Differences in microbial community structure following P addition were also revealed by similarity percentage analysis. These data suggest

  1. Towards detailed knowledge of atomic nuclei—the past, present and future of nuclear structure investigations at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerl, J.; Gόrska, M.; Wollersheim, H. J.

    2016-10-01

    Selected experimental nuclear structure physics results are presented which have been obtained at GSI since the mid 70ties employing the UNILAC and the SIS/FRS accelerator facility. It is shown how stable heavy-ion beams as well as radioactive isotope beams of this facility together with state-of-the-art instrumentation produced many discoveries and led to a multitude of important results covering many aspects of nuclear structure. Finally, we discuss the future directions of nuclear structure research at GSI with the FAIR/NUSTAR project.

  2. Is the structural diversity of tripeptides sufficient for developing functional food additives with satisfactory multiple bioactivities?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-Hui; Liu, Yong-Le; Ning, Jing-Heng; Yu, Jian; Li, Xiang-Hong; Wang, Fa-Xiang

    2013-05-01

    Multifunctional peptides have attracted increasing attention in the food science community because of their therapeutic potential, low toxicity and rapid intestinal absorption. However, previous study demonstrated that the limited structural variations make it difficult to optimize dipeptide molecules in a good balance between desirable and undesirable properties (F. Tian, P. Zhou, F. Lv, R. Song, Z. Li, J. Pept. Sci. 13 (2007) 549-566). In the present work, we attempt to answer whether the structural diversity is sufficient for a tripeptide to have satisfactory multiple bioactivities. Statistical test, structural examination and energetic analysis confirm that peptides of three amino acids long can bind tightly to human angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and thus exert significant antihypertensive efficacy. Further quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling and prediction of all 8000 possible tripeptides reveal that their ACE-inhibitory potency exhibits a good (positive) relationship to antioxidative activity, but has only a quite modest correlation with bitterness. This means that it is possible to find certain tripeptide entities possessing the optimal combination of strong ACE-inhibitory potency, high antioxidative activity and weak bitter taste, which are the promising candidates for developing multifunctional food additives with satisfactory multiple bioactivities. The marked difference between dipeptide and tripeptide can be attributed to the fact that the structural diversity of peptides increases dramatically with a slight change in sequence length.

  3. Experiments to Populate and Validate a Processing Model for Polyurethane Foam: Additional Data for Structural Foams.

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Rekha R.; Celina, Mathias C.; Giron, Nicholas Henry; Long, Kevin Nicholas; Russick, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    We are developing computational models to help understand manufacturing processes, final properties and aging of structural foam, polyurethane PMDI. Th e resulting model predictions of density and cure gradients from the manufacturing process will be used as input to foam heat transfer and mechanical models. BKC 44306 PMDI-10 and BKC 44307 PMDI-18 are the most prevalent foams used in structural parts. Experiments needed to parameterize models of the reaction kinetics and the equations of motion during the foam blowing stages were described for BKC 44306 PMDI-10 in the first of this report series (Mondy et al. 2014). BKC 44307 PMDI-18 is a new foam that will be used to make relatively dense structural supports via over packing. It uses a different catalyst than those in the BKC 44306 family of foams; hence, we expect that the reaction kineti cs models must be modified. Here we detail the experiments needed to characteriz e the reaction kinetics of BKC 44307 PMDI-18 and suggest parameters for the model based on these experiments. In additi on, the second part of this report describes data taken to provide input to the preliminary nonlinear visco elastic structural response model developed for BKC 44306 PMDI-10 foam. We show that the standard cu re schedule used by KCP does not fully cure the material, and, upon temperature elevation above 150 o C, oxidation or decomposition reactions occur that alter the composition of the foam. These findings suggest that achieving a fully cured foam part with this formulation may be not be possible through therma l curing. As such, visco elastic characterization procedures developed for curing thermosets can provide only approximate material properties, since the state of the material continuously evolves during tests.

  4. A role of BNLT compound addition on structure and properties of PZT ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaita, P.; Watcharapasorn, A.; Jiansirisomboon, S.

    2010-09-01

    In this research, effects of lead-free bismuth sodium lanthanum titanate (BNLT) addition on structure and properties of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics were investigated. PZT ceramics with addition of 0.1-3.0 wt%BNLT were fabricated by a solid-state mixed oxide method and sintering at 1050-1200 °C for 2 h to obtain dense ceramics with at least 96% of theoretical density. X-ray diffraction indicated that complete solid solution occurred for all compositions. Phase identification showed both tetragonal and rhombohedral perovskite structure of PZT with no BNLT phase detected. Scanning electron micrographs of fractured PZT/BNLT ceramics showed equiaxed grain shape with both transgranular and intergranular fracture modes. Addition of BNLT was also found to reduce densification and effectively limited grain growth of PZT ceramic. Optimum Hv and KIC values were found to be 4.85 GPa and 1.56 MPa.m 1/2 for PZT/0.5 wt%BNLT sample. Among PZT/BNLT samples, room temperature dielectric constant seemed to be improved with increasing BNLT content. The maximum piezoelectric coefficient values were observed in pure PZT ceramic and were slightly decreased in BNLT-added samples. Small reduction of remanent polarization and coercive field in hysteresis loops was observed in BNLT-added samples, indicating a slightly suppressed ferroelectric interaction in this material system.

  5. An identification method for enclosed voids restriction in manufacturability design for additive manufacturing structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shutian; Li, Quhao; Chen, Wenjiong; Tong, Liyong; Cheng, Gengdong

    2015-06-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) technologies, such as selective laser sintering (SLS) and fused deposition modeling (FDM), have become the powerful tools for direct manufacturing of complex parts. This breakthrough in manufacturing technology makes the fabrication of new geometrical features and multiple materials possible. Past researches on designs and design methods often focused on how to obtain desired functional performance of the structures or parts, specific manufacturing capabilities as well as manufacturing constraints of AM were neglected. However, the inherent constraints in AM processes should be taken into account in design process. In this paper, the enclosed voids, one type of manufacturing constraints of AM, are investigated. In mathematics, enclosed voids restriction expressed as the solid structure is simplyconnected. We propose an equivalent description of simply-connected constraint for avoiding enclosed voids in structures, named as virtual temperature method (VTM). In this method, suppose that the voids in structure are filled with a virtual heating material with high heat conductivity and solid areas are filled with another virtual material with low heat conductivity. Once the enclosed voids exist in structure, the maximum temperature value of structure will be very high. Based upon this method, the simplyconnected constraint is equivalent to maximum temperature constraint. And this method can be easily used to formulate the simply-connected constraint in topology optimization. The effectiveness of this description method is illustrated by several examples. Based upon topology optimization, an example of 3D cantilever beam is used to illustrate the trade-off between manufacturability and functionality. Moreover, the three optimized structures are fabricated by FDM technology to indicate further the necessity of considering the simply-connected constraint in design phase for AM.

  6. Interactive effects between N addition and disturbance on boreal forest ecosystem structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordin, Annika; Strengbom, Joachim; From, Fredrik

    2014-05-01

    In management of boreal forests, nitrogen (N) enrichment from atmospheric deposition or from forest fertilization can appear in combination with land-use related disturbances, i.e. tree harvesting by clear-felling. Long-term interactive effects between N enrichment and disturbance on boreal forest ecosystem structure and function are, however, poorly known. We investigated effects of N enrichment by forest fertilization done > 25 years ago on forest understory species composition in old-growth (undisturbed) forests, and in forests clear-felled 10 years ago (disturbed). In clear-felled forests we also investigated effects of the previous N addition on growth of tree saplings. The results show that the N enrichment effect on the understory species composition was strongly dependent on the disturbance caused by clear-felling. In undisturbed forests, there were small or no effects on understory species composition from N addition. In contrast, effects were large in forests first exposed to N addition and subsequently disturbed by clear-felling. Effects of N addition differed among functional groups of plants. Abundance of graminoids increased (+232%) and abundance of dwarf shrubs decreased (-44%) following disturbance in N fertilized forests. For vascular plants, the two perturbations had contrasting effects on α-(within forests) and β-diversity (among forests): in disturbed forests, N addition reduced, or had no effect on α-diversity, while β-diversity increased. For bryophytes, negative effects of disturbance on α-diversity were smaller in N fertilized forests than in forests not fertilized, while neither N addition nor disturbance had any effects on β-diversity. Moreover, sapling growth in forests clear-felled 10 years ago was significantly higher in previously N fertilized forests than in forests not fertilized. Our study show that effects of N addition on plant communities may appear small, short-lived, or even absent until exposed to a disturbance. This

  7. Effect of boron addition on the structure and magnetic properties of CoPt nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Khemjeen, Yutthaya; Pinitsoontorn, Supree Chompoosor, Apiwat

    2015-05-07

    The effect of B addition on CoPt nanoparticles was investigated. The CoPt-B nanoparticles were synthesized by means of the polyol process. Transmission electron microscopy has shown that the as-synthesized particles have a spherical morphology with average size about 2–3 nm. The X-ray absorption spectroscopy and the X-ray diffraction technique showed the effect of B concentration on phase transformation. The addition of B at up to 60% promoted the formation of the L1{sub 0} phase when the nanoparticles were subjected to annealing at 600 °C. If the B content is higher than 60%, the phase transition is suppressed. The evidence of B addition on the structure of CoPt nanoparticles was further supported by the magnetic measurements. The results show that the coercivity of the annealed CoPt-B nanoparticles was enhanced by the B additions from 20% to 60%, with the maximum coercivity of 12 000 Oe for the CoPt-40%B sample.

  8. Response of bacterial community structure and function to experimental rainwater additions in a coastal eutrophic embayment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teira, Eva; Hernando-Morales, Víctor; Martínez-García, Sandra; Figueiras, Francisco G.; Arbones, Belén; Álvarez-Salgado, Xosé Antón

    2013-03-01

    Although recognized as a potentially important source of both inorganic and organic nutrients, the impact of rainwater on microbial populations from marine planktonic systems has been poorly assessed. The effect of rainwater additions on bacterioplankton metabolism and community composition was evaluated in microcosm experiments enclosing natural marine plankton populations from the Ría de Vigo (NW Spain). The experiments were conducted during three different seasons (spring, autumn and winter) using rainwater collected at three different locations: marine, urban and rural sites. Bacterial abundance and production significantly increased up to 1.3 and 1.8-fold, respectively, after urban rainwater additions in spring, when ambient nutrient concentration was very low. Overall, the increments in bacterial production were higher than those in bacterial respiration, which implies that a higher proportion of carbon consumed by bacteria would be available to higher trophic levels. The response of the different bacterial groups to distinct rainwater types differed between seasons. The most responsive bacterial groups were Betaproteobacteria which significantly increased their abundance after urban (in spring and winter) and marine (in spring) rainwater additions, and Bacteroidetes which positively responded to all rainwater treatments in spring and to urban rainwater in autumn. Gammaproteobacteria and Roseobacter responded only to urban (in spring) and marine (in winter) rainwater treatment, respectively. The responses to rainwater additions were moderate and transient, and the resulting bacterial community structure was not importantly altered.

  9. EBSD analysis of magnesium addition on inclusion formation in SS400 structural steel

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Sin-Jie; Su, Yen-Hao Frank; Lu, Muh-Jung; Kuo, Jui-Chao

    2013-08-15

    In this study, the effect of magnesium addition on the inclusion formation in SS400 steel was investigated. The experimental specimens with and without Mg addition treatment were compared. The microstructure was observed using optical microscopy after etching with 3% nital. The morphology and chemical composition of the inclusions were analyzed via scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry. The lattice structure and orientation of the inclusions were identified by electron backscattering diffraction. The average size of inclusions in SS400 was between 0.67 and 0.75 μm, and between 0.65 and 0.68 μm in SS400 + Mg. The 2 ppm Mg addition resulted in the oxide formation change from Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to MgO·Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and in the inclusion formation change from Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–MnS to MgO·Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–MnS. Moreover, a simple-phase MnS with an average grain size of 1 μm to 2 μm was observed in rod-like, globular, and polyhedron forms. - Highlights: • The effect of magnesium addition was investigated for SS400 steel. • 2 ppm Mg addition changes the inclusion formation from Al2O3-MnS to MgO·Al2O3-MnS. • MnS observed in inclusions exhibits rod-like, globular, and polyhedron forms.

  10. A detailed examination of the growth of CdSe thin films through structural and optical characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Yükselici, M.H.; Aşıkoğlu Bozkurt, A.; Ömür, B. Can

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: ► Urbach tail width decreases by about 200 meV with the film thickness. ► A coefficient of strain of around 3 × 10{sup −3} along [0 0 2] axis was predicted. ► Compressive strain gives rise to about 11 meV red shift in the band gap energy. ► A relative shift of about 2 cm{sup −1} of LO{sub 1} phonon mode in Raman spectra was observed between different thickness films. - Abstract: Different thickness CdSe thin films were grown on glass substrates by physical vapor deposition and characterized by optical and structural investigations. Urbach energy related to the width of the optical absorption tail decreases from 430 meV for a film thickness of 50 nm to 200 meV for 450 nm. The film thickness dependent grain sizes were estimated by using effective mass model under quantum size effect from the shift of around 500 meV in the asymptotic absorption edge. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern is consistent with CdSe hexagonal crystal structure which indicates crystal growth mode along c axis. XRD peaks broaden and shift depending on film thicknesses which are presumably due to strain and size effect. We observe both blue and red shift depending on thickness in Longitudinal Optical phonon frequency in Raman spectra with respect to that of the source CdSe powder which could also be due to strain on thin films and/or finite crystallite size. In this work we combine the results of optical absorption, Raman and XRD spectroscopies to study the evolution of grain size, strain and structural disorder depending on film thickness.

  11. Micro- and nano-structural details of a spider's filter for substrate vibrations: relevance for low-frequency signal transmission.

    PubMed

    Erko, Maxim; Younes-Metzler, Osnat; Rack, Alexander; Zaslansky, Paul; Young, Seth L; Milliron, Garrett; Chyasnavichyus, Marius; Barth, Friedrich G; Fratzl, Peter; Tsukruk, Vladimir; Zlotnikov, Igor; Politi, Yael

    2015-03-01

    The metatarsal lyriform organ of the Central American wandering spider Cupiennius salei is its most sensitive vibration detector. It is able to sense a wide range of vibration stimuli over four orders of magnitude in frequency between at least as low as 0.1 Hz and several kilohertz. Transmission of the vibrations to the slit organ is controlled by a cuticular pad in front of it. While the mechanism of high-frequency stimulus transfer (above ca 40 Hz) is well understood and related to the viscoelastic properties of the pad's epicuticle, it is not yet clear how low-frequency stimuli (less than 40 Hz) are transmitted. Here, we study how the pad material affects the pad's mechanical properties and thus its role in the transfer of the stimulus, using a variety of experimental techniques, such as X-ray micro-computed tomography for three-dimensional imaging, X-ray scattering for structural analysis, and atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy for surface imaging. The mechanical properties were investigated using scanning acoustic microscopy and nanoindentation. We show that large tarsal deflections cause large deformation in the distal highly hydrated part of the pad. Beyond this region, a sclerotized region serves as a supporting frame which resists the deformation and is displaced to push against the slits, with displacement values considerably scaled down to only a few micrometres. Unravelling the structural arrangement in such specialized structures may provide conceptual ideas for the design of new materials capable of controlling a technical sensor's specificity and selectivity, which is so typical of biological sensors.

  12. Micro- and nano-structural details of a spider's filter for substrate vibrations: relevance for low-frequency signal transmission

    PubMed Central

    Erko, Maxim; Younes-Metzler, Osnat; Rack, Alexander; Zaslansky, Paul; Young, Seth L.; Milliron, Garrett; Chyasnavichyus, Marius; Barth, Friedrich G.; Fratzl, Peter; Tsukruk, Vladimir; Zlotnikov, Igor; Politi, Yael

    2015-01-01

    The metatarsal lyriform organ of the Central American wandering spider Cupiennius salei is its most sensitive vibration detector. It is able to sense a wide range of vibration stimuli over four orders of magnitude in frequency between at least as low as 0.1 Hz and several kilohertz. Transmission of the vibrations to the slit organ is controlled by a cuticular pad in front of it. While the mechanism of high-frequency stimulus transfer (above ca 40 Hz) is well understood and related to the viscoelastic properties of the pad's epicuticle, it is not yet clear how low-frequency stimuli (less than 40 Hz) are transmitted. Here, we study how the pad material affects the pad's mechanical properties and thus its role in the transfer of the stimulus, using a variety of experimental techniques, such as X-ray micro-computed tomography for three-dimensional imaging, X-ray scattering for structural analysis, and atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy for surface imaging. The mechanical properties were investigated using scanning acoustic microscopy and nanoindentation. We show that large tarsal deflections cause large deformation in the distal highly hydrated part of the pad. Beyond this region, a sclerotized region serves as a supporting frame which resists the deformation and is displaced to push against the slits, with displacement values considerably scaled down to only a few micrometres. Unravelling the structural arrangement in such specialized structures may provide conceptual ideas for the design of new materials capable of controlling a technical sensor's specificity and selectivity, which is so typical of biological sensors. PMID:25631567

  13. Investigation of an investment casting method combined with additive manufacturing methods for manufacturing lattice structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodira, Ganapathy D.

    Cellular metals exhibit combinations of mechanical, thermal and acoustic properties that provide opportunities for various implementations and applications; light weight aerospace and automobile structures, impact and noise absorption, heat dissipation, and heat exchange. Engineered cell topologies enable one to control mechanical, thermal, and acoustic properties of the gross cell structures. A possible way to manufacture complex 3D metallic cellular solids for mass production with a relatively low cost, the investment casting (IC) method may be used by combining the rapid prototyping (RP) of wax or injection molding. In spite of its potential to produce mass products of various 3D cellular metals, the method is known to have significant casting porosity as a consequence of the complex cellular topology which makes continuous fluid's access to the solidification interface difficult. The effects of temperature on the viscosity of the fluids were studied. A comparative cost analysis between AM-IC and additive manufacturing methods is carried out. In order to manufacture 3D cellular metals with various topologies for multi-functional applications, the casting porosity should be resolved. In this study, the relations between casting porosity and processing conditions of molten metals while interconnecting with complex cellular geometries are investigated. Temperature and pressure conditions on the rapid prototyping -- investment casting (RP-IC) method are reported, thermal stresses induced are also studied. The manufactured samples are compared with those made by additive manufacturing methods.

  14. Reversible intermolecular E-H oxidative addition to a geometrically deformed and structurally dynamic phosphorous triamide.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; McCarthy, Sean M; Lai, Ting Yi; Yennawar, Hemant P; Radosevich, Alexander T

    2014-12-17

    The synthesis and reactivity of geometrically constrained tricoordinate phosphorus (σ(3)-P) compounds supported by tridentate triamide chelates (N[o-NR-C6H4]2(3-); R = Me or (i)Pr) are reported. Studies indicate that 2 (P{N[o-NMe-C6H4]2}) adopts a Cs-symmetric structure in the solid state. Variable-temperature NMR studies demonstrate a low-energy inversion at phosphorus in solution (ΔG(‡)(exptl)(298) = 10.7(5) kcal/mol), for which DFT calculations implicate an edge-inversion mechanism via a metastable C2-symmetric intermediate. In terms of reactivity, compound 2 exhibits poor nucleophilicity, but undergoes oxidative addition at ambient temperature of diverse O-H- and N-H-containing compounds (including alcohols, phenols, carboxylic acids, amines, and anilines). The resulting pentacoordinate adducts 2·[H][OR] and 2·[H][NHR] are characterized by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography, and their structures (which span the pseudorotation coordinate between trigonal bipyramidal and square planar) are evaluated in terms of negative hyperconjugation. At elevated temperatures, the oxidative addition is shown to be reversible for volatile alcohols and amines.

  15. Structural Details of Ufd1 Binding to p97 and Their Functional Implications in ER-Associated Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Le, Oanh Thi Tu; Lee, Sang Yoon; Yang, Jin Kuk

    2016-01-01

    The hexameric ATPase p97 has been implicated in diverse cellular processes through interactions with many different adaptor proteins at its N-terminal domain. Among these, the Ufd1-Npl4 heterodimer is a major adaptor, and the p97-Ufd1-Npl4 complex plays an essential role in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD), acting as a segregase that translocates the ubiquitinated client protein from the ER membrane into the cytosol for proteasomal degradation. We determined the crystal structure of the complex of the N-terminal domain of p97 and the SHP box of Ufd1 at a resolution of 1.55 Å. The 11-residue-long SHP box of Ufd1 binds at the far-most side of the Nc lobe of the p97 N domain primarily through hydrophobic interactions, such that F225, F228, N233 and L235 of the SHP box contact hydrophobic residues on the surface of the p97 Nc lobe. Mutating these key interface residues abolished the interactions in two different binding experiments, isothermal titration calorimetry and co-immunoprecipitation. Furthermore, cycloheximide chase assays showed that these same mutations caused accumulation of tyrosinase-C89R, a well-known ERAD substrate, thus implying decreased rate of protein degradation due to their defects in ERAD function. Together, these results provide structural and biochemical insights into the interaction between p97 N domain and Ufd1 SHP box. PMID:27684549

  16. Soil microbial community structure and nitrogen cycling responses to agroecosystem management and carbon substrate addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthrong, S. T.; Buckley, D. H.; Drinkwater, L. E.

    2011-12-01

    Fertilizer application in conventional agriculture leads to N saturation and decoupled soil C and N cycling, whereas organic practices, e.g. complex rotations and legume incorporation, often results in increased SOM and tightly coupled cycles of C and N. These legacy effects of management on soils likely affect microbial community composition and microbial process rates. This project tested if agricultural management practices led to distinct microbial communities and if those communities differed in ability to utilize labile plant carbon substrates and to produce more plant available N. We addressed several specific questions in this project. 1) Do organic and conventional management legacies on similar soils produce distinct soil bacterial and fungal community structures and abundances? 2) How do these microbial community structures change in response to carbon substrate addition? 3) How do the responses of the microbial communities influence N cycling? To address these questions we conducted a laboratory incubation of organically and conventionally managed soils. We added C-13 labelled glucose either in one large dose or several smaller pulses. We extracted genomic DNA from soils before and after incubation for TRFLP community fingerprinting. We measured C in soil pools and respiration and N in soil extracts and leachates. Management led to different compositions of bacteria and fungi driven by distinct components in organic soils. Biomass did not differ across treatments indicating that differences in cycling were due to composition rather than abundance. C substrate addition led to convergence in bacterial communities; however management still strongly influenced the difference in communities. Fungal communities were very distinct between managements and plots with substrate addition not altering this pattern. Organic soils respired 3 times more of the glucose in the first week than conventional soils (1.1% vs 0.4%). Organic soils produced twice as much

  17. Global Bifurcation Structure and Variability of Pacemaker Rhythm in a Detailed Model of Cardiac Sinoatrial Node Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhenxing; Doi, Shinji

    As a cardiac pacemaker, sinoatrial node spontaneously generates periodic electrical signals (action potentials) in its cells. The action potential generation is deeply related to various ion channels in cell membranes, and the abnormalities of ion channels cause sinus arrhythmia. We use the Zhang model of sinoatrial node cells to investigate the relation between pacemaker rhythm (frequency of action potential generation) and ion channels. The Zhang model is described by the Hodgkin-Huxley-type nonlinear ordinary differential equations, and its parameter values vary between periphery and center cells of sinoatrial node. We analyze the bifurcation structure of the Zhang model, and investigate the variability of pacemaker rhythm and its sensitivity on ion channel conductance changes for both periphery and center cells. Moreover, these results are compared with the previous results of another sinoatrial node cell model: Yanagihara-Noma-Irisawa model.

  18. Biomechanical investigation into the structural design of porous additive manufactured cages using numerical and experimental approaches.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pei-I; Hsu, Ching-Chi; Chen, San-Yuan; Wu, Tsung-Han; Huang, Chih-Chieh

    2016-09-01

    Traditional solid cages have been widely used in posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) surgery. However, solid cages significantly affect the loading mechanism of the human spine due to their extremely high structural stiffness. Previous studies proposed and investigated porous additive manufactured (AM) cages; however, their biomechanical performances were analyzed using oversimplified bone-implant numerical models. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the outer shape and inner porous structure of the AM cages. The outer shape of the AM cages was discovered using a simulation-based genetic algorithm; their inner porous structure was subsequently analyzed parametrically using T10-S1 multilevel spine models. Finally, six types of the AM cages, which were manufactured using selective laser melting, were tested to validate the numerical outcomes. The subsidence resistance of the optimum design was superior to the conventional cage designs. A porous AM cage with a pillar diameter of 0.4mm, a pillar angle of 40°, and a porosity of between 69% and 80% revealed better biomechanical performances. Both the numerical and experimental outcomes can help surgeons to understand the biomechanics of PLIF surgery combined with the use of AM cages. PMID:27392226

  19. Combined analysis of passive and active seismic measurements using additional geologic data for the determination of shallow subsurface structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horstmann, Tobias; Brüstle, Andrea; Spies, Thomas; Schlittenhardt, Jörg; Schmidt, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    A detailed knowledge of subsurface structure is essential for geotechnical projects and local seismic hazard analyses. Passive seismic methods like microtremor measurements are widely used in geotechnical practice, but limitations and developments are still in focus of scientific discussion. The presentation outlines microtremor measurements in the context of microzonation in the scale of districts or small communities. H/V measurements are used to identify zones with similar underground properties. Subsequently a shear wave velocity (Vs) depth profile for each zone is determined by array measurements at selected sites. To reduce possible uncertainties in dispersion curve analyses of passive array measurements and ambiguities within the inversion process, we conducted an additional active seismic experiment and included available geological information. The presented work is realized in the framework of the research project MAGS2 ("Microseismic Activity of Geothermal Systems") and deals with the determination of seismic hazard analysis at sites near deep geothermal power plants in Germany. The measurements were conducted in the Upper Rhine Graben (URG) and the Bavarian molasses, where geothermal power plants are in operation. The results of the H/V- and array-measurements in the region of Landau (URG) are presented and compared to known geological-tectonic structures. The H/V measurements show several zones with similar H/V-curves which indicate homogenous underground properties. Additionally to the passive seismic measurements an active refraction experiment was performed and evaluated using the MASW method („Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves") to strengthen the determination of shear-wave-velocity depth profile. The dispersion curves for Rayleigh-waves of the active experiment support the Rayleigh-dispersion curves from passive measurements and therefore provide a valuable supplement. Furthermore, the Rayleigh-wave ellipticity was calculated to reduce

  20. Detailed crustal structure in the area of the southern Apennines-Calabrian Arc border from local earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totaro, C.; Koulakov, I.; Orecchio, B.; Presti, D.

    2014-12-01

    We present a new seismic velocity model for the southern Apennines-Calabrian Arc border region with the aim to better define the crustal structures at the northern edge of the Ionian subduction zone. This sector also includes the Pollino Mts. area, where a seismic sequence of thousands of small to moderate earthquakes has been recorded between spring 2010 and 2013. In this sector a seismic gap was previously hypothesized by paleoseismological evidences associated with the lack of major earthquakes in historical catalogs. To perform the tomographic inversion we selected ca. 3600 earthquakes that have occurred in the last thirty years and recorded by permanent and temporary networks managed by INGV and Calabria University. Using for the first time the Local Tomography Software for passive tomography inversion (LOTOS hereinafter) to crustal analysis in southern Italy, we have computed the distribution of Vp, Vs, and the Vp/Vs ratio. The obtained velocity model, jointly evaluated with results of synthetic modeling, as well as with the hypocenter distribution and geological information, gives us new constraints on the geodynamical and structural knowledge of the study area. The comparison between the shallow tomography sections and surface geology shows good correlation between velocity patterns and the main geological features of the study area. In the upper crust a low-velocity anomaly of P- and S-waves is detectable beneath the Pollino Mts. area and seems to separate the Calabrian and southern Apennines domains, characterized by higher velocities. The distributions of high Vp/Vs ratio, representing strongly fractured rocks with likely high fluid content, clearly correlate with areas of significant seismicity. In the lower crust we detect a clear transition from high to low seismic velocities in correspondence with the Tyrrhenian coast of the study area, which may represent the transition from the thinner Tyrrhenian crust to the thicker one beneath Calabria. In this

  1. Detailed mtDNA genotypes permit a reassessment of the settlement and population structure of the Andaman Islands.

    PubMed

    Barik, S S; Sahani, R; Prasad, B V R; Endicott, P; Metspalu, M; Sarkar, B N; Bhattacharya, S; Annapoorna, P C H; Sreenath, J; Sun, D; Sanchez, J J; Ho, S Y W; Chandrasekar, A; Rao, V R

    2008-05-01

    The population genetics of the Indian subcontinent is central to understanding early human prehistory due to its strategic location on the proposed corridor of human movement from Africa to Australia during the late Pleistocene. Previous genetic research using mtDNA has emphasized the relative isolation of the late Pleistocene colonizers, and the physically isolated Andaman Island populations of Island South-East Asia remain the source of claims supporting an early split between the populations that formed the patchy settlement pattern along the coast of the Indian Ocean. Using whole-genome sequencing, combined with multiplexed SNP typing, this study investigates the deep structure of mtDNA haplogroups M31 and M32 in India and the Andaman Islands. The identification of a so far unnoticed rare polymorphism shared between these two lineages suggests that they are actually sister groups within a single haplogroup, M31'32. The enhanced resolution of M31 allows for the inference of a more recent colonization of the Andaman Islands than previously suggested, but cannot reject the very early peopling scenario. We further demonstrate a widespread overlap of mtDNA and cultural markers between the two major language groups of the Andaman archipelago. Given the "completeness" of the genealogy based on whole genome sequences, and the multiple scenarios for the peopling of the Andaman Islands sustained by this inferred genealogy, our study hints that further mtDNA based phylogeographic studies are unlikely to unequivocally support any one of these possibilities.

  2. Conserved motifs reveal details of ancestry and structure in the small TIM chaperones of the mitochondrial intermembrane space.

    PubMed

    Gentle, Ian E; Perry, Andrew J; Alcock, Felicity H; Likić, Vladimir A; Dolezal, Pavel; Ng, Ee Ting; Purcell, Anthony W; McConnville, Malcolm; Naderer, Thomas; Chanez, Anne-Laure; Charrière, Fabien; Aschinger, Caroline; Schneider, André; Tokatlidis, Kostas; Lithgow, Trevor

    2007-05-01

    The mitochondrial inner and outer membranes are composed of a variety of integral membrane proteins, assembled into the membranes posttranslationally. The small translocase of the inner mitochondrial membranes (TIMs) are a group of approximately 10 kDa proteins that function as chaperones to ferry the imported proteins across the mitochondrial intermembrane space to the outer and inner membranes. In yeast, there are 5 small TIM proteins: Tim8, Tim9, Tim10, Tim12, and Tim13, with equivalent proteins reported in humans. Using hidden Markov models, we find that many eukaryotes have proteins equivalent to the Tim8 and Tim13 and the Tim9 and Tim10 subunits. Some eukaryotes provide "snapshots" of evolution, with a single protein showing the features of both Tim8 and Tim13, suggesting that a single progenitor gene has given rise to each of the small TIMs through duplication and modification. We show that no "Tim12" family of proteins exist, but rather that variant forms of the cognate small TIMs have been recently duplicated and modified to provide new functions: the yeast Tim12 is a modified form of Tim10, whereas in humans and some protists variant forms of Tim9, Tim8, and Tim13 are found instead. Sequence motif analysis reveals acidic residues conserved in the Tim10 substrate-binding tentacles, whereas more hydrophobic residues are found in the equivalent substrate-binding region of Tim13. The substrate-binding region of Tim10 and Tim13 represent structurally independent domains: when the acidic domain from Tim10 is attached to Tim13, the Tim8-Tim13(10) complex becomes essential and the Tim9-Tim10 complex becomes dispensable. The conserved features in the Tim10 and Tim13 subunits provide distinct binding surfaces to accommodate the broad range of substrate proteins delivered to the mitochondrial inner and outer membranes.

  3. Crowdsourcing detailed flood data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walliman, Nicholas; Ogden, Ray; Amouzad*, Shahrzhad

    2015-04-01

    Over the last decade the average annual loss across the European Union due to flooding has been 4.5bn Euros, but increasingly intense rainfall, as well as population growth, urbanisation and the rising costs of asset replacements, may see this rise to 23bn Euros a year by 2050. Equally disturbing are the profound social costs to individuals, families and communities which in addition to loss of lives include: loss of livelihoods, decreased purchasing and production power, relocation and migration, adverse psychosocial effects, and hindrance of economic growth and development. Flood prediction, management and defence strategies rely on the availability of accurate information and flood modelling. Whilst automated data gathering (by measurement and satellite) of the extent of flooding is already advanced it is least reliable in urban and physically complex geographies where often the need for precise estimation is most acute. Crowdsourced data of actual flood events is a potentially critical component of this allowing improved accuracy in situations and identifying the effects of local landscape and topography where the height of a simple kerb, or discontinuity in a boundary wall can have profound importance. Mobile 'App' based data acquisition using crowdsourcing in critical areas can combine camera records with GPS positional data and time, as well as descriptive data relating to the event. This will automatically produce a dataset, managed in ArcView GIS, with the potential for follow up calls to get more information through structured scripts for each strand. Through this local residents can provide highly detailed information that can be reflected in sophisticated flood protection models and be core to framing urban resilience strategies and optimising the effectiveness of investment. This paper will describe this pioneering approach that will develop flood event data in support of systems that will advance existing approaches such as developed in the in the UK

  4. Properties of Inconel 625 Mesh Structures Grown by Electron Beam Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    List III, Frederick Alyious; Dehoff, Ryan R; Lowe, Larry E; Sames, William J

    2014-01-01

    Relationships between electron beam parameters (beam current, beam speed, and beam focus) and physical properties (mass, diameter, elastic modulus, and yield strength) have been investigated for Inconel 625 mesh cubes fabricated using an additive manufacturing technology based on electron beam melting. The elastic modulus and yield strength of the mesh cubes have been systematically varied by approximately a factor of ten by changing the electron beam parameters. Simple models have been used to understand better these relationships. Structural anisotropies of the mesh associated with the layered build architecture have been observed and may contribute, along with microstructural anisotropies, to the anisotropic mechanical properties of the mesh. Knowledge of this kind is likely applicable to other metal and alloy systems and is essential to rapidly realize the full potential of this burgeoning technology.

  5. Application and testing of additive manufacturing for mirrors and precision structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Michael; Acreman, Martyn; Vettese, Tom; Myatt, Ray; Thompson, Mike

    2015-09-01

    Additive Manufacturing (aka AM, and 3-D printing) is widely touted in the media as the foundation for the next industrial revolution. Beneath the hype, AM does indeed offer profound advantages in lead-time, dramatically reduced consumption of expensive raw materials, while enabling new and innovative design forms that cannot be produced by other means. General Dynamics and their industry partners have begun to embrace this technology for mirrors and precision structures used in the aerospace, defense, and precision optical instrumentation industries. Aggressively lightweighted, open and closed back test mirror designs, 75-150 mm in size, were first produced by AM from several different materials. Subsequent optical finishing and test experiments have exceeded expectations for density, surface finish, dimensional stability and isotropy of thermal expansion on the optical scale of measurement. Materials currently under examination include aluminum, titanium, beryllium, aluminum beryllium, Inconel 625, stainless steel/bronze, and PEKK polymer.

  6. Structural and biocompatibility properties of dextran from Weissella cibaria JAG8 as food additive.

    PubMed

    Tingirikari, Jagan Mohan Rao; Kothari, Damini; Shukla, Rishikesh; Goyal, Arun

    2014-09-01

    Dextran produced from Weissella cibaria JAG8 was purified and characterized. The molecular mass of dextran as determined by the gel filtration and copper bicinchoninate method was approximately, 800 kDa. Monosaccharide analysis revealed that the polysaccharide comprised only glucose units. Dynamic light scattering study confirmed the mono-disperse nature of dextran with hydrodynamic radius of 900 nm. Surface morphology study of dextran by scanning electron microscopy showed the porous web like structure. Cytotoxicity studies on human cervical cancer (HeLa) cell line showed non-toxic and biocompatible nature of dextran. The relative browning for dextran from W. cibaria JAG8 was similar to commercial prebiotic Nutraflora P-95 and 3-fold lower than Raftilose P-95. Synthesis of dextran by dextransucrase treated, sucrose-supplemented skimmed milk revealed the promising potential of dextran as a food additive.

  7. Structure-property relationships in ABA copolymer gels with A homopolymer additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, Michelle; Rottsolk, Rebecca; Page, Kirt; Shull, Kenneth

    2009-03-01

    ABA acrylic triblock copolymers with poly(methyl methacrylate) endblocks and poly(butyl acrylate) midblocks transition from free flowing liquids to elastic solids with decreasing temperature in alcohol solvents. Homopolymer PMMA chains can be solubilized in the micelle cores if they are shorter than the endblocks. Indentation and compression tests were used to determine gel's modulus and large strain behavior. Gels with volume fractions of PMMA less than ˜0.2 are highly elastic and have moduli dictated by stretching of bridging midblocks. At higher PMMA contents, gels exhibit greater permanent deformation and moduli over an order of magnitude larger than would be expected from rubber elasticity alone. Small angle X-ray and neutron scattering and mean field simulations were used to correlate changes in gel structure and micelle morphology with the addition of homopolymer.

  8. Tailoring of Boehmite-Derived Aluminosilicate Aerogel Structure and Properties: Influence of Ti Addition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.; Guo, Haiquan; Sheets, Erik J.; Miller, Derek R.; Newlin, Katy N.

    2010-01-01

    Aluminosilicate aerogels offer potential for extremely low thermal conductivities at temperatures greater than 900 C, beyond where silica aerogels reach their upper temperature limits. Aerogels have been synthesized at various Al:Si ratios, including mullite compositions, using Boehmite (AlOOH) as the Al source, and tetraethoxy orthosilicate as the Si precursor. The Boehmite-derived aerogels are found to form by a self-assembly process of AlOOH crystallites, with Si-O groups on the surface of an alumina skeleton. Morphology, surface area and pore size varies with the crystallite size of the starting Boehmite powder, as well as with synthesis parameters. Ternary systems, including Al-Si-Ti aerogels incorporating a soluble Ti precursor, are possible with careful control of pH. The addition of Ti influences sol viscosity, gelation time pore structure and pore size distribution, as well as phase formation on heat treatment.

  9. Detailed quantification of delta subsidence, compaction and interaction with man-made structures: the case of the NCA airport, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalié, O.; Sladen, A.; Kelner, M.

    2015-09-01

    River deltas are dynamic coastal systems and their evolutions are closely monitored as it often concentrates vital natural resources for the surrounding areas. Many deltas worldwide experience subsidence due to geological processes (sediment loading and compaction) or human activities (groundwater or hydrocarbon extraction, land reclamation). This causes shoreline erosion or wetland loss which represent serious issues for the population. In this study we investigate the dynamic of the Var delta (France) where reclaimed lands over sea have been built to host the Nice côte d'Azur airport (NCA). Actually, the stability of this infrastructure is a permanent concern since, in 1979, a newly built extension of the runway platform collapsed in the sea, causing important damages. The project of land extension stopped, but the present airport platform is still located on reclaimed land. Factors that can trigger such catastrophic landslide are thought to be linked to the delta activity and the artificial airport platform load. We used, therefore, Envisat InSAR data to measure accurately the ground deformation of the area that includes the Var delta and NCA airport. Combining data from ascending and descending orbits, we estimated the east-west and vertical components of the deformation and obtained very accurate displacement rate (with a 1σ error of 0.25 mm yr-1). We found that nearly all the deformation is vertical and impacts the whole Var delta. The Var valley subsides at a very low rate (0.5-1 mm yr-1) but downstream the subsidence rate increases and a clear jump is observed at the transition with the reclaimed lands (1-2 mm yr-1). On average, the reclaimed lands subside at 3 mm yr-1. Since the subsidence rate increases in correlation with the sediment thickness, we interpret it as the compaction of the delta quaternary sedimentary wedge. In addition, three areas subside faster (between 5 and 10 mm yr-1), with one calling for more attention as it is the largest and

  10. Detailed quantification of delta subsidence, compaction and interaction with man-made structures: the case of the NCA airport, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalié, O.; Sladen, A.; Kelner, M.

    2015-06-01

    River deltas are dynamic costal systems and their evolutions are closely monitored as it often concentrates vital natural resources for the surrounding areas. Many deltas, worldwide, experience subsidence due to geological processes (sediment loading and compaction) or human activities (groundwater or hydrocarbon extraction, land reclamation). This causes shoreline erosion or wetland loss which represent serious issues for the population. In this study, we investigate the dynamic of the Var delta (France) where reclaimed lands over sea have been built to host the Nice côte d'Azur airport (NCA). Actually, the stability of this infrastructure is a permanent concern since, in 1979, a newly built extension of the runway platform collapsed in the sea, causing important damages. The project of land extension stopped, but the present airport platform is still located on reclaimed land. Factors that can trigger such catastrophic landslide are thought to be linked to the delta activity and the artificial airport platform load. We used, therefore, Envisat InSAR data to measure accurately the ground deformation of the area that includes the Var delta and NCA airport. Combining data from ascending and descending orbits, we estimated the east-west and vertical components of the deformation and obtained very accurate displacement rate (with a 1σ error of 0.25 mm yr-1). We found that nearly all the deformation is vertical and impacts the whole Var delta. The Var valley subsides at a very low rate (0.5-1 mm yr-1) but downstream the subsidence rate increases and a clear jump is observed at the transition with the reclaimed lands (1-2 mm yr-1). On average, the reclaimed lands subside at 3 mm yr-1. Since the subsidence rate increases in correlation with the sediment thickness, we interpret it as the compaction of the delta quaternary sedimentary wedge. In addition, three areas subsides faster (between 5 and 10 mm yr-1), with one calling for more attention as it is the largest and

  11. Detailed simulation of the role of functionalized polymer chains on the structural, dynamic and mechanical properties of polymer nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Shen, Jianxiang; Gao, Yangyang; Zhou, Huanhuan; Wu, Youping; Zhang, Liqun

    2014-11-28

    To systematically study the effect of functionalized chain groups on polymer nanocomposites, we perform our simulation work in the following two ways. In the case of dilute loading of nanoparticles (NPs) with different geometries (spherical, sheet-like, rod-like NPs), we adopt coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation to study the structural, dynamic and mechanical properties of polymer nanocomposites influenced by the terminal groups of linear polymer chains. We observe that the terminal groups have more probability to be adsorbed onto the surface of NPs with decreasing temperature, chain molecular weight and increasing chain stiffness. For all NPs with different geometries, more terminal groups segregate into the surface of NPs with increase in the interaction energy εf-n between the terminal groups and the NPs. We also notice that the attractive interaction between the terminal groups and the sheet-like NPs induces the appearance of a gradient of translational dynamics of polymer chains, and the relaxation at the chain length scale is evidently different for various adsorbed layers, whereas the segmental relaxation only becomes slightly slower nearby the sheet-like NPs. For both pure and filled systems with spherical NPs, it is found that the stress-strain curves and bond orientations are significantly enhanced with increase in the interaction strength between the terminal groups as well as terminal groups and NPs. In the case of concentrated loading of NPs, we construct the atomistic models of C60, CNT and graphene to accurately account for the "many body effect." We explore the influence of the functionalization position along the chain backbone on the dispersion kinetics, realizing that the end-functionalization is more effective. The end-groups effect on the chain configuration, chain packing and graphene equilibrium dispersibility is examined. The translational and rotational (segmental and terminal relaxation) dynamics influenced by the interactions

  12. Raman spectroscopic evaluation of meat batter structural changes induced by thermal treatment and salt addition.

    PubMed

    Herrero, A M; Carmona, P; López-López, I; Jiménez-Colmenero, F

    2008-08-27

    Raman spectroscopy, texture, proximate composition, and water binding analysis were carried out to evaluate the effect of thermal treatment and/or salt addition to meat batter. For this purpose, different meat batters were elaborated: control meat batter (no salt) and meat batters with low (1.0%) and high (2.5%) NaCl content with and without thermal treatment (70 degrees C/30 min). Increase (P < 0.05) in penetration force and hardness upon heating was observed. Results also showed hardness increasing (P < 0.05) as a function of salt addition in heated meat batter. Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in alpha-helix content accompanied by an increase (P < 0.05) in beta-sheets resulting from heating. Significant (P < 0.05) correlations were found between these secondary structural changes in meat proteins and water binding and textural properties of meat batter. In this way, a significant correlation was found between beta-sheets, salt content, hardness, and chewiness in heated samples.

  13. Essential Structural Requirements and Additive Effects for Flavonoids to Scavenge Methylglyoxal.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xi; Chen, Huadong; Zhu, Yingdong; Sedighi, Rashin; Ho, Chi-Tang; Sang, Shengmin

    2014-04-01

    Reactive dicarbonyl species, such as methylglyoxal (MGO), are considered as the major precursors of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which are believed to be one of the physiological causes of diabetes and its complications. Scavenging of reactive dicarbonyl species using naturally occurring flavonoids has been proposed as an effective way to prevent diabetic complications. To elucidate the structural requirements of flavonoids in scavenging MGO, seven flavonoids (quercetin, luteolin, epicatechin, genistein, daidzein, apigenin, and phloretin) and five sub-components of the flavonoids (gallic acid, phloroglucinol, pyrogallol, pyrocatechol, and resorcinol) were examined in this study. Our results showed the following: (1) 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene (pyrogallol) has higher MGO scavenging activity than 1,3,5-trihydroxybenzene and 1,2- and 1,3-dihydroxybenzene, and substitution at position 5 of pyrogallol diminished the scavenging activity, indicating that position 5 is the active site of pyrogallol; (2) the A ring is the active site of flavonoids in contributing the MGO-trapping efficacy, and the hydroxyl group at C-5 on the A ring enhances the trapping efficacy; (3) the double bond between C-2 and C-3 on the C ring could facilitate the trapping efficacy; and (4) the number of hydroxyl groups on the B ring does not significantly influence the trapping efficacy. In addition, we found there is an additive effect in MGO trapping by two common flavonoids, quercetin and phloretin, indicating that flavonoid-enriched foods and beverages hold great promise to prevent the development of diabetic complications.

  14. Children's Understanding of the Additive Composition of Number and of the Decimal Structure: What Is the Relationship?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs, Georgina; Squire, Sarah; Bryant, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Nunes and Bryant (Children doing mathematics, Blackwell, Oxford, 1996) proposed that an understanding of the additive composition of number could be a precursor to an understanding of the decimal structure. If this is so, children should achieve an understanding of additive composition before they can handle the decimal structure. The aim of our…

  15. effect of hydrogen addition and burner diameter on the stability and structure of lean, premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Kelsey Leigh

    Low swirl burners (LSBs) have gained popularity in heating and gas power generation industries, in part due to their proven capacity for reducing the production of NOx, which in addition to reacting to form smog and acid rain, plays a central role in the formation of the tropospheric ozone layer. With lean operating conditions, LSBs are susceptible to combustion instability, which can result in flame extinction or equipment failure. Extensive work has been performed to understand the nature of LSB combustion, but scaling trends between laboratory- and industrial-sized burners have not been established. Using hydrogen addition as the primary method of flame stabilization, the current work presents results for a 2.54 cm LSB to investigate potential effects of burner outlet diameter on the nature of flame stability, with focus on flashback and lean blowout conditions. In the lean regime, the onset of instability and flame extinction have been shown to occur at similar equivalence ratios for both the 2.54 cm and a 3.81 cm LSB and depend on the resolution of equivalence ratios incremented. Investigations into flame structures are also performed. Discussion begins with a derivation for properties in a multicomponent gas mixture used to determine the Reynolds number (Re) to develop a condition for turbulent intensity similarity in differently-sized LSBs. Based on this requirement, operating conditions are chosen such that the global Reynolds number for the 2.54 cm LSB is within 2% of the Re for the 3.81 cm burner. With similarity obtained, flame structure investigations focus on flame front curvature and flame surface density (FSD). As flame structure results of the current 2.54 cm LSB work are compared to results for the 3.81 cm LSB, no apparent relationship is shown to exist between burner diameter and the distribution of flame surface density. However, burner diameter is shown to have a definite effect on the flame front curvature. In corresponding flow conditions, a

  16. Changes in bacterial diversity and community structure following pesticides addition to soil estimated by cultivation technique.

    PubMed

    Cycoń, Mariusz; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2009-07-01

    An experiment was conducted under laboratory conditions to investigate the effect of increasing concentrations of fenitrothion (2, 10 and 200 mg a.i./kg soil), diuron (1.5, 7.5 and 150 mg a.i./kg soil) and thiram (3.5, 17.5 and 350 mg a.i./kg soil) on soil respiration, bacterial counts and changes in culturable fraction of soil bacteria. To ascertain these changes, the community structure, bacterial biodiversity and process of colony formation, based on the r/K strategy concept, EP- and CD-indices and the FOR model, respectively, were determined. The results showed that the measured parameters were generally unaffected by the lowest dosages of pesticides, corresponding to the recommended field rates. The highest dosages of fenitrothion and thiram suppressed the peak SIR by 15-70% and 20-80%, respectively, while diuron increased respiration rate by 17-25% during the 28-day experiment. Also, the total numbers of bacteria increased in pesticide-treated soils. However, the reverse effect on day 1 and, in addition, in case of the highest dosages of insecticide on days 14 and 28, was observed. Analysis of the community structure revealed that in all soil treatments bacterial communities were generally dominated by K-strategists. Moreover, differences in the distribution of individual bacteria classes and the gradual domination of bacteria populations belonging to r-strategists during the experiment, as compared to control, was observed. However, on day 1, at the highest pesticide dosages, fast growing bacteria constituted only 1-10% of the total colonies number during 48 h of plate incubation, whereas in remaining samples they reached from 20 to 40% of total cfu. This effect, in case of fenitrothion, lasted till the end of the experiment. At the highest dosages of fenitrothion, diuron and at all dosages of thiram the decrease of biodiversity, as indicated by EP- and CD-indices on day 1, was found. At the next sampling time, no significant retarding or stimulating effect

  17. Critical review of the safety assessment of nano-structured silica additives in food.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Hans Christian; Suter, Mark; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2016-01-01

    The development of nano-materials is viewed as one of the most important technological advances of the 21st century and new applications of nano-sized particles in the production, processing, packaging or storage of food are expected to emerge soon. This trend of growing commercialization of engineered nano-particles as part of modern diet will substantially increase oral exposure. Contrary to the proven benefits of nano-materials, however, possible adverse health effects have generally received less attention. This problem is very well illustrated by nano-structured synthetic amorphous silica (SAS), which is a common food additive since several decades although the relevant risk assessment has never been satisfactorily completed. A no observed adverse effect level of 2500 mg SAS particles/kg body weight per day was derived from the only available long-term administration study in rodents. However, extrapolation to a safe daily intake for humans is problematic due to limitations of this chronic animal study and knowledge gaps as to possible local intestinal effects of SAS particles, primarily on the gut-associated lymphoid system. This uncertainty is aggravated by digestion experiments indicating that dietary SAS particles preserve their nano-sized structure when reaching the intestinal lumen. An important aspect is whether food-borne particles like SAS alter the function of dendritic cells that, embedded in the intestinal mucosa, act as first-line sentinels of foreign materials. We conclude that nano-particles do not represent a completely new threat and that most potential risks can be assessed following procedures established for conventional chemical hazards. However, specific properties of food-borne nano-particles should be further examined and, for that purpose, in vitro tests with decision-making cells of the immune system are needed to complement existing in vivo studies. PMID:27287345

  18. Critical review of the safety assessment of nano-structured silica additives in food.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Hans Christian; Suter, Mark; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2016-06-10

    The development of nano-materials is viewed as one of the most important technological advances of the 21st century and new applications of nano-sized particles in the production, processing, packaging or storage of food are expected to emerge soon. This trend of growing commercialization of engineered nano-particles as part of modern diet will substantially increase oral exposure. Contrary to the proven benefits of nano-materials, however, possible adverse health effects have generally received less attention. This problem is very well illustrated by nano-structured synthetic amorphous silica (SAS), which is a common food additive since several decades although the relevant risk assessment has never been satisfactorily completed. A no observed adverse effect level of 2500 mg SAS particles/kg body weight per day was derived from the only available long-term administration study in rodents. However, extrapolation to a safe daily intake for humans is problematic due to limitations of this chronic animal study and knowledge gaps as to possible local intestinal effects of SAS particles, primarily on the gut-associated lymphoid system. This uncertainty is aggravated by digestion experiments indicating that dietary SAS particles preserve their nano-sized structure when reaching the intestinal lumen. An important aspect is whether food-borne particles like SAS alter the function of dendritic cells that, embedded in the intestinal mucosa, act as first-line sentinels of foreign materials. We conclude that nano-particles do not represent a completely new threat and that most potential risks can be assessed following procedures established for conventional chemical hazards. However, specific properties of food-borne nano-particles should be further examined and, for that purpose, in vitro tests with decision-making cells of the immune system are needed to complement existing in vivo studies.

  19. Combinatorial reshaping of a lipase structure for thermostability: additive role of surface stabilizing single point mutations.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Singh, Ranvir; Kaur, Jagdeep

    2014-05-16

    Thermostable lipases are of high priority for industrial applications. In the present study, targeted improvement of the thermostability of a lipase from metagenomic origin was examined by using a combinatorial protein engineering approach exploring additive effects of single amino acid substitutions. A variant (LipR5) was generated after combination of two thermostabilizing mutations (R214C & N355K). Thermostability of the variant enzyme was analyzed by half-life measurement and circular dichroism (CD). To assess whether catalytic properties were affected by mutation, the optimal reaction conditions were determined. The protein LipR5, displayed optimum activity at 50°C and pH 8.0. It showed two fold enhancement in thermostability (at 60°C) as compared to LipR3 (R214C) and nearly 168 fold enhancement as compared to parent enzyme (LipR1). Circular dichroism and fluorescence study suggest that the protein structure had become more rigid and stable to denaturation. Study of 3D model suggested that Lys355 was involved in formation of a Hydrogen bond with OE1 of Glu284. Lys355 was also making salt bridge with OE2 of Glu284. PMID:24751523

  20. Influencing the structure of block copolymer micelles with small molecule additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Megan; Singh, Avantika; Cooksey, Tyler; Kidd, Bryce; Piemonte, Rachele; Wang, Shu; Mai Le, Kim; Madsen, Louis

    Amphiphilic block copolymer micelles in water are under broad exploration for drug delivery applications due to their high loading capacity and targeted drug delivery. We aim to understand the kinetic and thermodynamic processes that underlie the self-assembly of diblock copolymer micelle systems. The present work focuses on diblock copolymers containing poly(ethylene oxide) (a hydrophilic polymer) and polycaprolactone (a hydrophobic polymer), which spontaneously self-assemble into spherical micelles in water. Addition of a common good solvent (a co-solvent) for both of the constituting blocks, such as tetrahydrofuran (THF), reduces the interfacial tension at the core-corona interface. We are currently investigating the effect of this phenomenon on the micelle structural properties, using small-angle scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance. We have characterized the hydrodynamic radius, core radius, corona thickness, aggregation number, degree of swelling of the micelle core with the co-solvent, and unimer (free chain) concentration, as a function of the co-solvent concentration. Fundamental knowledge from these studies will inform design of drug delivery systems by allowing us to tailor micelle properties for optimal cargo loading.

  1. Phase Structure and Site Preference Behavior of Ternary Alloying Additions to PdTi and PtTi Shape-Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Mosca, Hugo O.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2006-01-01

    The phasc structure and concentration dependence of the lattice parameter and energy of formation of ternary Pd-'I-X and Pt-Ti-X alloys for a large number of ternary alloying additions X (X = Na, Mg, Al, Si, Sc. V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Ag, Cd, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir) are investigated with an atomistic modeling approach. In addition, a detailed description of the site preference behavior of such additions showing that the elements can be grouped according to their absolute preference for a specific site, regardless of concentration, or preference for available sites in the deficient sublattice is provided.

  2. Crystal structures of flax rust avirulence proteins AvrL567-A and -D reveal details of the structural basis for flax disease resistance specificity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-I A; Guncar, Gregor; Forwood, Jade K; Teh, Trazel; Catanzariti, Ann-Maree; Lawrence, Gregory J; Loughlin, Fionna E; Mackay, Joel P; Schirra, Horst Joachim; Anderson, Peter A; Ellis, Jeffrey G; Dodds, Peter N; Kobe, Bostjan

    2007-09-01

    The gene-for-gene mechanism of plant disease resistance involves direct or indirect recognition of pathogen avirulence (Avr) proteins by plant resistance (R) proteins. Flax rust (Melampsora lini) AvrL567 avirulence proteins and the corresponding flax (Linum usitatissimum) L5, L6, and L7 resistance proteins interact directly. We determined the three-dimensional structures of two members of the AvrL567 family, AvrL567-A and AvrL567-D, at 1.4- and 2.3-A resolution, respectively. The structures of both proteins are very similar and reveal a beta-sandwich fold with no close known structural homologs. The polymorphic residues in the AvrL567 family map to the surface of the protein, and polymorphisms in residues associated with recognition differences for the R proteins lead to significant changes in surface chemical properties. Analysis of single amino acid substitutions in AvrL567 proteins confirm the role of individual residues in conferring differences in recognition and suggest that the specificity results from the cumulative effects of multiple amino acid contacts. The structures also provide insights into possible pathogen-associated functions of AvrL567 proteins, with nucleic acid binding activity demonstrated in vitro. Our studies provide some of the first structural information on avirulence proteins that bind directly to the corresponding resistance proteins, allowing an examination of the molecular basis of the interaction with the resistance proteins as a step toward designing new resistance specificities.

  3. 13. DETAIL VIEW OF BRIDGE, LOOKING SOUTH FROM ROADWAY. DETAIL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. DETAIL VIEW OF BRIDGE, LOOKING SOUTH FROM ROADWAY. DETAIL VIEW OF THE PIERS AND LIGHTING FIXTURES ON THE COLORADO STREET BRIDGE. THIS VIEW SHOWS A PORTION OF THE BRIDGE ALONG THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE ROADWAY. EACH FIXTURE ALSO ORIGINALLY HAD FOUR ADDITIONAL GLOBES, WHICH EXTENDED FROM THE COLUMN BELOW THE MAIN GLOBE. THE 'REFUGE' SEATING AREAS ARE ORIGINAL, WHILE THE RAILING IS A LATER ADDITION. - Colorado Street Bridge, Spanning Arroyo Seco at Colorado Boulevard, Pasadena, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. Details of meiosis

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 18, discusses the details of meiosis, beginning with the structure and number of chiasmata, i.e., the cytological term for two homologous chromosomes forming a bivalent which begin to repel each other until they are held together only at the point of crossing-over. The synaptonemal complex which consists of two lateral elements which contain protein and RNA is also discussed. The chapter concludes with a description of meiosis in polyploids, human meiosis, and the behavior of X and Y chromosomes. 28 refs., 8 figs.

  5. A Pilot Study to Examine the Effect of Additional Structured Outdoor Playtime on Preschoolers' Physical Activity Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alhassan, Sofiya; Nwaokelemeh, Ogechi; Lyden, Kate; Goldsby, TaShauna; Mendoza, Albert

    2013-01-01

    The impact of additional structured outdoor playtime on preschoolers'; physical activity (PA) level is unclear. The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the effects of increasing structured outdoor playtime on preschoolers'; PA levels. Eight full-day classrooms (n = 134 children) from two preschool programmes were randomised into a treatment…

  6. Structural Studies of Medicago truncatula Histidinol Phosphate Phosphatase from Inositol Monophosphatase Superfamily Reveal Details of Penultimate Step of Histidine Biosynthesis in Plants.

    PubMed

    Ruszkowski, Milosz; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2016-05-01

    The penultimate enzyme in the histidine biosynthetic pathway catalyzes dephosphorylation of l-histidinol 1-phosphate (HOLP) into l-histidinol. The recently discovered in Arabidopsis thaliana plant-type histidinol phosphate phosphatase (HPP) shares no homology with the two other HPP superfamilies known previously in prokaryotes and resembles myo-inositol monophosphatases (IMPases). In this work, identification of an HPP enzyme from a model legume, Medicago truncatula (MtHPP) was based on the highest sequence identity to A. thaliana enzyme. Biochemical assays confirmed that MtHPP was able to cleave inorganic phosphate from HOLP but not from d-myo-inositol-1-phosphate, the main substrate of IMPases. Dimers of MtHPP, determined by size exclusion chromatography, in the presence of CO2 or formaldehyde form mutual, methylene-bridged cross-links between Lys(158) and Cys(245) residues. Four high resolution crystal structures, namely complexes with HOLP (substrate), l-histidinol (product), and PO4 (3-) (by-product) as well as the structure showing the cross-linking between two MtHPP molecules, provide detailed structural information on the enzyme. Based on the crystal structures, the enzymatic reaction mechanism of IMPases is accustomed to fit the data for MtHPP. The enzymatic reaction, which requires Mg(2+) cations, is catalyzed mainly by amino acid residues from the N-terminal domain. The C-terminal domain, sharing little identity with IMPases, is responsible for the substrate specificity (i.e. allows the enzyme to distinguish between HOLP and d-myo-inositol-1-phosphate). Structural features, mainly the presence of a conserved Asp(246), allow MtHPP to bind HOLP specifically. PMID:26994138

  7. Detailed Debunking of Denial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enting, I. G.; Abraham, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    The disinformation campaign against climate science has been compared to a guerilla war whose tactics undermine the traditional checks and balances of science. One comprehensive approach has to been produce archives of generic responses such as the websites of RealClimate and SkepticalScience. We review our experiences with an alternative approach of detailed responses to a small number of high profile cases. Our particular examples were Professor Ian Plimer and Christopher Monckton, the Third Viscount Monckton of Brenchley, each of whom has been taken seriously by political leaders in our respective countries. We relate our experiences to comparable examples such as John Mashey's analysis of the Wegman report and the formal complaints about Lomborg's "Skeptical Environmentalist" and Durkin's "Great Global Warming Swindle". Our two approaches used contrasting approaches: an on-line video of a lecture vs an evolving compendium of misrepresentations. Additionally our approaches differed in the emphasis. The analysis of Monckton concentrated on the misrepresentation of the science, while the analysis of Plimer concentrated on departures from accepted scientific practice: fabrication of data, misrepresentation of cited sources and unattributed use of the work of others. Benefits of an evolving compendium were the ability to incorporate contributions from members of the public who had identified additional errors and the scope for addressing new aspects as they came to public attention. `Detailed debunking' gives non-specialists a reference point for distinguishing non-science when engaging in public debate.

  8. Details of the structure determination of the sulfated steroids PSDS and PADS: new components of the sea lamprey (petromyzon marinus) migratory pheromone.

    PubMed

    Hoye, Thomas R; Dvornikovs, Vadims; Fine, Jared M; Anderson, Kari R; Jeffrey, Christopher S; Muddiman, David C; Shao, Feng; Sorensen, Peter W; Wang, Jizhou

    2007-09-28

    The discovery of two new components of the migratory pheromone used by sea lamprey to guide adults to spawning grounds was recently reported. These hold promise for use in a pheromone-based control program for this species, an invasive pest in the Great Lakes. Details of the structure determination of these steroidal bis-sulfates [petromyzosterol disulfate (PSDS, 2) and petromyzonamine disulfate (PADS, 3)] are described here. Pattern matching of 1H NMR data was particularly valuable. This involved comparison of spectra of the natural samples of 2 and 3 with those of appropriate steroidal analogues [e.g., petromyzonol sulfate (PS, 1, a previously known sea lamprey bile acid derivative that is a third component of the migratory pheromone), cholesterol sulfate (6), and squalamine (8)] and model compounds containing the unprecedented aminolactam substructure present in 3. The logic underlying the iterative analyses used is presented.

  9. Details of the structure determination of the sulfated steroids PSDS and PADS: new components of the sea lamprey (petromyzon marinus) migratory pheromone.

    PubMed

    Hoye, Thomas R; Dvornikovs, Vadims; Fine, Jared M; Anderson, Kari R; Jeffrey, Christopher S; Muddiman, David C; Shao, Feng; Sorensen, Peter W; Wang, Jizhou

    2007-09-28

    The discovery of two new components of the migratory pheromone used by sea lamprey to guide adults to spawning grounds was recently reported. These hold promise for use in a pheromone-based control program for this species, an invasive pest in the Great Lakes. Details of the structure determination of these steroidal bis-sulfates [petromyzosterol disulfate (PSDS, 2) and petromyzonamine disulfate (PADS, 3)] are described here. Pattern matching of 1H NMR data was particularly valuable. This involved comparison of spectra of the natural samples of 2 and 3 with those of appropriate steroidal analogues [e.g., petromyzonol sulfate (PS, 1, a previously known sea lamprey bile acid derivative that is a third component of the migratory pheromone), cholesterol sulfate (6), and squalamine (8)] and model compounds containing the unprecedented aminolactam substructure present in 3. The logic underlying the iterative analyses used is presented. PMID:17718505

  10. Impact of zeolite-based nanomodified additive on the structure and strength of the cement stone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, A. D.; Filippova, K. E.

    2015-01-01

    Portland cement is the main binder in the building materials industry; its properties strongly influence properties of mortars and concretes. Some regions experience difficulties with delivery and storage of Portland cement, raising the need to develop an effective additive from the available raw materials. Such materials for the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) are zeolite-containing rocks. Studies have shown that introducing of dibutylphthalate to the composition of modified additive during mechanochemical activation leads to achievement of up to 11% of total amount particles with the size of 3-30 nm. After introducing 0.5% of the obtained additives, the compressive strength of cement-sand slurry samples increases up to 28%. Positive effect of additives introduction is also observed at high flow rate of water (W / C = 0.7). Gaining strength reaches 23%, allowing the efficient use of additive for movable mixtures with enhanced strength properties. In general, the proposed supplement allows reducing the water flow in the solution without decreasing its mobility, and increasing strength properties, which makes it possible to obtain a whole class of solutions of modified cement binder. The market value of the developed additives is 18 rubles per 1 kg, making sound competition in the market of modifying additives.

  11. The electronic structure and second-order nonlinear optical properties of donor-acceptor acetylenes - A detailed investigation of structure-property relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiegman, A. E.; Graham, Eva; Khundkar, Lutfur R.; Perry, Joseph W.; Cheng, L.-T.; Perry, Kelly J.

    1991-01-01

    A series of donor-acceptor acetylene compounds was synthesized in which systematic changes in both the conjugation length and the donor-acceptor strength were made. The effect of these structural changes on the spectroscopic and electronic properties of the molecules and, ultimately, on the measured second-order molecular hyperpolarizabilities (beta) was investigated. It was found that increases in the donor-acceptor strength resulted in increases in the magnitude of beta. For this class of molecules, the increase is dominated by the energy of the intramolecular charge-transfer transition, while factors such as the ground to excited-state dipole moment change and the transition-moment integral are much less important. Increasing the conjugation length from one to two acetylene linkers did not result in an increase in the value of beta; however, beta increased sharply in going from two acetylenes to three. This increase is attributed to the superposition of several nearly isoenergetic excited states.

  12. Detailed structure of the Philippine Sea plate subducting along the Nankai Trough, western Japan, inferred from high-frequency seismic wave analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furumura, T.; Padhy, S.; Maeda, T.

    2012-12-01

    A detailed structure of the subducting Philippine Sea plate (PHP) along the Nankai trough in western Japan was studied by analyzing waveforms recorded at dense Hi-net stations in Japan. It is well recognized that the waveforms from intraplate earthquakes dominate in high-frequency (f >1 Hz) signals due to the waveguide effect of the subducting slab (Furumura and Kennett, 2005; 2008). This results in distorted pattern of intensity and peak ground acceleration (PGA) above the hypocenter with a substantial elongation of isoseismic contours correlated with the configuration of the isodepth contours of the subducting PHP beneath western Japan. A detailed analysis of the dense Hi-net waveform data from the intermediate-depth PHP event shows that the high-frequency S-wave signals suddenly disappear as the waves propagate the zone away from the Kii Channel to the boundary of Hyogo and Okayama prefectures and large S-to-P conversion occurs before the arrival of S-wave. Such anomalies do not occur for shallow and deep earthquakes occurring outside the PHP. These observations support the recent debate on the complexities of the configuration of the PHP subducting beneath western Japan such as that shown by Shiomi et al. (2008) based on receiver function images and the PHP-split model beneath the Kii channel shown by Ide et al.(2010) based on the analysis of comprehensive geophysical data. In order to explain the observations associated with sudden lateral change in the PHP structure, we conducted finite difference method (FDM) simulations of seismic wave propagation taking the detailed PHP model into account. It is confirmed that high-frequency guided wave energy decouple from waveguide where the shape of the PHP is suddenly deformed, which results in dramatic attenuation of high-frequency signals associating with large S-to-P conversions developed at sharp plate boundary. The present results also support the recently proposed complicated PHP-split model, however, further

  13. Effects of meat addition on pasta structure, nutrition and in vitro digestibility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Hamid, Nazimah; Kantono, Kevin; Pereira, Loveena; Farouk, Mustafa M; Knowles, Scott O

    2016-12-15

    In our study, semolina flour was substituted with beef emulsion (EM) at three different levels of 15, 30 and 45% (w/w) to develop a pasta with enhanced nutritional profile. The protein, fat, and water content significantly increased with addition of meat. The addition of meat enhanced the pasta gluten network. The redness and yellowness of cooked pasta increased with meat addition. Tensile strength increased from 0.018N/mm(2) in the control sample to 0.046N/mm(2) in 45% beef emulsion (45EM) sample. All meat-containing samples had significantly higher elasticity than control (0.039N/mm(2)). GI significantly decreased and IVPD value increased in 45EM sample. Five essential amino acids (leucine, lysine, methionine, threonine, tryptophan) in pasta digesta increased significantly with increasing meat addition.

  14. Effects of meat addition on pasta structure, nutrition and in vitro digestibility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Hamid, Nazimah; Kantono, Kevin; Pereira, Loveena; Farouk, Mustafa M; Knowles, Scott O

    2016-12-15

    In our study, semolina flour was substituted with beef emulsion (EM) at three different levels of 15, 30 and 45% (w/w) to develop a pasta with enhanced nutritional profile. The protein, fat, and water content significantly increased with addition of meat. The addition of meat enhanced the pasta gluten network. The redness and yellowness of cooked pasta increased with meat addition. Tensile strength increased from 0.018N/mm(2) in the control sample to 0.046N/mm(2) in 45% beef emulsion (45EM) sample. All meat-containing samples had significantly higher elasticity than control (0.039N/mm(2)). GI significantly decreased and IVPD value increased in 45EM sample. Five essential amino acids (leucine, lysine, methionine, threonine, tryptophan) in pasta digesta increased significantly with increasing meat addition. PMID:27451161

  15. Effect of additives on the structure, nanomorphology and efficiency of PCPDTBT: PC71BM solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, Shogo; Palanisamy, Kumar; Kannappan, Santhakumar; Ochiai, Shizuyasu

    2012-08-01

    We investigated the effect of additives on the morphology of a poly[2,6-(4,4-bis-(2-ethylhexyl)-4H-cyclopenta[2,1-b;3,4-b']dithiophene)-alt-4,7-(2,1,3-benzothiadiazole)] (PCPDTBT):(6,6)-phenyl C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) blended onto a surface of poly (3, 4-ethylendioxythiophene): poly(styrensulfonate)(PEDOT:PSS) to form photoactive films. Films of PCPDTBT: PC71-BM bulk heterojunctions were prepared by spin-coating from a solution in chlorobenzene (CB) and were processed with and without the addition of 2%, 4%, and 6 vol% 1-chloro naphthalene (CN) or 1, 8-octanedithiol (ODT) as additives. For all samples, the PCPDTBT:PC71BM molar ratio was 1:2 (wt%), and the additives in 1 ml were prepared with a concentration of 30 mg of PCPDTBT:PC71BM. Optical absorption spectroscopy measurements of the films indicated shifts in the absorption peaks in the range from 500-800 nm which was attributed to PCPDTBT. XRay diffraction (XRD) was used to investigate the nature of the molecular stacking in the polymer thin films. Topographic images which were obtained by using an atomic force microscope, of the PCPDTBT:PC71BM layers with 2 vol% ODT additive, were found to have the highest surface roughness. The best performing device shows a power conversion efficiency of 2.15% for a 2-vol% ODT additive.

  16. Priming word order by thematic roles: no evidence for an additional involvement of phrase structure.

    PubMed

    Pappert, Sandra; Pechmann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Three experiments are reported that studied the priming of word order in German. Experiment 1 demonstrated priming of the order of case-marked verb arguments. However, order of noun phrases and order of thematic roles were confounded. In Experiment 2, we therefore aimed at disentangling the impact of these two possible factors. By using primes that differed from targets in phrase structure but were parallel with regard to the order of thematic roles, we nevertheless found priming demonstrating the critical impact of thematic roles. Experiment 3 replicated the priming effects from Experiments 1 and 2 within participants and revealed no evidence for a modulation of priming by phrase structure. Consequently, our findings suggest that word order priming crucially depends on the structural outline of thematic roles rather than on the linearization of phrases.

  17. Studies on the Food Additive Propyl Gallate: Synthesis, Structural Characterization, and Evaluation of the Antioxidant Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrido, Jorge; Garrido, E. Manuela; Borges, Fernanda

    2012-01-01

    Antioxidants are additives largely used in industry for delaying, retarding, or preventing the development of oxidative deterioration. Propyl gallate (E310) is a phenolic antioxidant extensively used in the food, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries. A series of lab experiments have been developed to teach students about the importance and…

  18. Influence of Additive and Multiplicative Structure and Direction of Comparison on the Reversal Error

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    González-Calero, José Antonio; Arnau, David; Laserna-Belenguer, Belén

    2015-01-01

    An empirical study has been carried out to evaluate the potential of word order matching and static comparison as explanatory models of reversal error. Data was collected from 214 undergraduate students who translated a set of additive and multiplicative comparisons expressed in Spanish into algebraic language. In these multiplicative comparisons…

  19. Structural Controls of the MacFarlane Geothermal System, Humboldt County, Nevada: New Insights Based on Detailed Geologic Mapping, Shallow Temperature Surveys, and Magnetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraushaar, Sabina M.

    Detailed geologic mapping, structural analysis, magnetic and two-meter temperature data, integrated with previous datasets, constrain the structural controls of the MacFarlane geothermal system. MacFarlane hot springs and the travertine fissure ridges lie within a relay ramp. The relay ramp is formed between two overlapping, north-northeast-striking, west-dipping Holocene normal faults exposed in Lake Lahontan sediments. Other mapped faults near the hot spring include a north-striking, west-dipping Tertiary fault east of MacFarlane hot springs. The highest temperature gradient is found at the projected intersection between the Tertiary and north-northeast-striking Quaternary fault, ˜2.5 km northeast of the hot spring (Sibbett et al., 1982; Swanberg and Bowers, 1982). Our new data suggest other controls involving the relay ramp geometry of the Holocene faults. The anomalous orientation of the travertine fissure ridge motivated this study of the structural controls of the geothermal system. MacFarlane hot spring is located on the eastern margin of the Black Rock Desert, ˜85 km west of Winnemucca, in Humboldt County, Nevada. The active hot spring emerges from the west end of an east-trending travertine fissure ridge, which is ˜180 m long. The travertine fissure ridge is up to ˜2 m tall and ˜5 m wide, and has a central fissure along its long axis. The orientation of the travertine fissure ridge indicates local north-south extension, which is inconsistent with the regional west-northwest extension of the northwestern Basin and Range province. The anomalous travertine orientation is due to fractures that occurred during formation of a relay ramp between two overlapping fault segments.

  20. Human Naa50 Protein Displays Broad Substrate Specificity for Amino-terminal Acetylation: DETAILED STRUCTURAL AND BIOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS USING TETRAPEPTIDE LIBRARY.

    PubMed

    Reddi, Ravikumar; Saddanapu, Venkateshwarlu; Chinthapalli, Dinesh Kumar; Sankoju, Priyanka; Sripadi, Prabhakar; Addlagatta, Anthony

    2016-09-23

    Amino-terminal acetylation is a critical co-translational modification of the newly synthesized proteins in a eukaryotic cell carried out by six amino-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs). All NATs contain at least one catalytic subunit, and some contain one or two additional auxiliary subunits. For example, NatE is a complex of Naa10, Naa50, and Naa15 (auxiliary). In the present study, the crystal structure of human Naa50 suggested the presence of CoA and acetylated tetrapeptide (AcMMXX) that have co-purified with the protein. Biochemical and thermal stability studies on the tetrapeptide library with variations in the first and second positions confirm our results from the crystal structure that a peptide with Met-Met in the first two positions is the best substrate for this enzyme. In addition, Naa50 acetylated all MXAA peptides except for MPAA. Transcriptome analysis of 10 genes that make up six NATs in humans from eight different cell lines suggests that components of NatE are transcribed in all cell lines, whereas others are variable. Because Naa10 is reported to acetylate all amino termini that are devoid of methionine and Naa50 acetylates all other peptides that are followed by methionine, we believe that NatE complex can be a major contributor for amino-terminal acetylation at the ribosome exit tunnel.

  1. Human Naa50 Protein Displays Broad Substrate Specificity for Amino-terminal Acetylation: DETAILED STRUCTURAL AND BIOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS USING TETRAPEPTIDE LIBRARY.

    PubMed

    Reddi, Ravikumar; Saddanapu, Venkateshwarlu; Chinthapalli, Dinesh Kumar; Sankoju, Priyanka; Sripadi, Prabhakar; Addlagatta, Anthony

    2016-09-23

    Amino-terminal acetylation is a critical co-translational modification of the newly synthesized proteins in a eukaryotic cell carried out by six amino-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs). All NATs contain at least one catalytic subunit, and some contain one or two additional auxiliary subunits. For example, NatE is a complex of Naa10, Naa50, and Naa15 (auxiliary). In the present study, the crystal structure of human Naa50 suggested the presence of CoA and acetylated tetrapeptide (AcMMXX) that have co-purified with the protein. Biochemical and thermal stability studies on the tetrapeptide library with variations in the first and second positions confirm our results from the crystal structure that a peptide with Met-Met in the first two positions is the best substrate for this enzyme. In addition, Naa50 acetylated all MXAA peptides except for MPAA. Transcriptome analysis of 10 genes that make up six NATs in humans from eight different cell lines suggests that components of NatE are transcribed in all cell lines, whereas others are variable. Because Naa10 is reported to acetylate all amino termini that are devoid of methionine and Naa50 acetylates all other peptides that are followed by methionine, we believe that NatE complex can be a major contributor for amino-terminal acetylation at the ribosome exit tunnel. PMID:27484799

  2. Effect of biodiesel addition on microbial community structure in a simulated fuel storage system.

    PubMed

    Restrepo-Flórez, Juan-Manuel; Bassi, Amarjeet; Rehmann, Lars; Thompson, Michael R

    2013-11-01

    Understanding changes in microbial structure due to biodiesel storage is important both for protecting integrity of storage systems and fuel quality management. In this work a simulated storage system was used to study the effect of biodiesel (0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%) on a microbial population, which was followed by community level physiological profiling (CLPP), 16s rDNA analysis and plating in selective media. Results proved that structure and functionality were affected by biodiesel. CLPP showed at least three populations: one corresponding to diesel, one to biodiesel and one to blends of diesel and biodiesel. Analysis of 16s rDNA revealed that microbial composition was different for populations growing in diesel and biodiesel. Genera identified are known for degradation of hydrocarbons and emulsifier production. Maximum growth was obtained in biodiesel; however, microbial counts in standard media were lower for this samples. Acidification of culture media was observed at high biodiesel concentration.

  3. Structure alterations in Al-Y-based metallic glasses with La and Ni addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X. M.; Wang, X. D.; Yu, Q.; Cao, Q. P.; Zhang, D. X.; Zhang, J.; Hu, T. D.; Lai, L. H.; Xie, H. L.; Xiao, T. Q.; Jiang, J. Z.

    2016-03-01

    The atomic structures of Al89Y11, Al90Y6.5La3.5, and Al82.8Y6.07Ni8La3.13 metallic glasses have been studied by using high energy X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption fine structure combined with the ab initio molecular dynamics and reverse Monte Carlo simulations. It is demonstrated that the partial replacement of Y atoms by La has limited improvement of the glass forming ability (GFA), although La atoms reduce the ordering around Y atoms and also the fractions of icosahedron-like polyhedra centered by Al atoms. In contrast, Ni atoms can significantly improve the GFA, which are inclined to locate in the shell of polyhedra centered by Al, Y, and La atoms, mainly forming Ni-centered icosahedron-like polyhedra to enhance the spatial connectivity between clusters and suppress the crystallization.

  4. Structure-property effects of tantalum additions to nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckel, R. W.; Pletka, B. J.; Koss, D. A.; Jackson, M. R.

    1982-01-01

    The characterization of the effect of Ta on the structure of Ni base superalloys, the determination of the effects of Ta (structure) variations on the mechanical, thermal, and oxidation behavior, and the identification of alloying elements which have potential as substitutes for Ta are investigated. Mar M247 type alloys are emphasized; nominal and analyzed compositions of ten alloys under study are given. X-ray and composition analysis are being used to determine the partitioning of alloying elements between gamma, gamma primes, and MC (cubic) as a function of Ta content. The diffusional interactions of the Mar M247-type alloys with as cast beta + gamma alloys are studied to determine the effects of Ta on alloy/coating degradation.

  5. [Error structure and additivity of individual tree biomass model for four natural conifer species in Northeast China].

    PubMed

    Dogn, Li-hu; Li, Feng-ri; Song, Yu-wen

    2015-03-01

    Based on the biomass data of 276 sampling trees of Pinus koraiensis, Abies nephrolepis, Picea koraiensis and Larix gmelinii, the mono-element and dual-element additive system of biomass equations for the four conifer species was developed. The model error structure (additive vs. multiplicative) of the allometric equation was evaluated using the likelihood analysis, while nonlinear seemly unrelated regression was used to estimate the parameters in the additive system of biomass equations. The results indicated that the assumption of multiplicative error structure was strongly supported for the biomass equations of total and tree components for the four conifer species. Thus, the additive system of log-transformed biomass equations was developed. The adjusted coefficient of determination (Ra 2) of the additive system of biomass equations for the four conifer species was 0.85-0.99, the mean relative error was between -7.7% and 5.5%, and the mean absolute relative error was less than 30.5%. Adding total tree height in the additive systems of biomass equations could significantly improve model fitting performance and predicting precision, and the biomass equations of total, aboveground and stem were better than biomass equations of root, branch, foliage and crown. The precision of each biomass equation in the additive system varied from 77.0% to 99.7% with a mean value of 92.3% that would be suitable for predicting the biomass of the four natural conifer species.

  6. [Effects of nitrogen and water addition on soil bacterial diversity and community structure in temperate grasslands in northern China].

    PubMed

    Yang, Shan; Li, Xiao-bing; Wang, Ru-zhen; Cai, Jiang-ping; Xu, Zhu-wen; Zhang, Yu-ge; Li, Hui; Jiang, Yong

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we measured the responses of soil bacterial diversity and community structure to nitrogen (N) and water addition in the typical temperate grassland in northern China. Results showed that N addition significantly reduced microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN) under regular precipitation treatment. Similar declined trends of MBC and MBN caused by N addition were also found under increased precipitation condition. Nevertheless, water addition alleviated the inhibition by N addition. N addition exerted no significant effects. on bacterial α-diversity indices, including richness, Shannon diversity and evenness index under regular precipitation condition. Precipitation increment tended to increase bacterial α-diversity, and the diversity indices of each N gradient under regular precipitation were much lower than that of the corresponding N addition rate under increased precipitation. Correlation analysis showed that soil moisture, nitrate (NO3(-)-N) and ammonium (NH4+-N) were significantly negatively correlated with bacterial evenness index, and MBC and MBN had a significant positive correlation with bacterial richness and evenness. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) ordination illustrated that the bacterial communities were significantly separated by N addition rates, under both water ambient and water addition treatments. Redundancy analysis (RDA) revealed that soil MBC, MBN, pH and NH4+-N were the key environmental factors for shaping bacterial communities.

  7. Detailed magnetic and structural analysis mapping a robust magnetic C4 dome in Sr1 -xNaxFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddei, K. M.; Allred, J. M.; Bugaris, D. E.; Lapidus, S.; Krogstad, M. J.; Stadel, R.; Claus, H.; Chung, D. Y.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Rosenkranz, S.; Osborn, R.; Chmaissem, O.

    2016-04-01

    The recently discovered C4 tetragonal magnetic phase in hole-doped members of the iron-based superconductors provides insights into the origin of unconventional superconductivity. Previously observed in Ba1-xNaxFe2As2 (with A = K, Na), the C4 magnetic phase exists within the well-studied C2 spin-density-wave dome, arising just before the complete suppression of antiferromagnetic order but after the onset of superconductivity. Here, we present detailed x-ray and neutron diffraction studies of Sr1-xNaxFe2As2 (0.10 ≤x ≤0.60 ) to determine their structural evolution and the extent of the C4 phase. Spanning Δ x ˜0.14 in composition, the C4 phase is found to extend over a larger range of compositions, and to exhibit a significantly higher transition temperature, Tr˜65 K, than in either of the other systems in which it has been observed. The onset of this phase is seen near a composition (x ˜0.30 ) where the bonding angles of the Fe2As2 layers approach the perfect 109 .46∘ tetrahedral angle. We discuss the possible role of this return to a higher symmetry environment for the magnetic iron site in triggering the magnetic reorientation and the coupled reentrance to the tetragonal structure. Finally, we present a phase diagram, complete with the C4 phase, and use its observation in a third hole-doped 122 system to suggest the universality of this phase.

  8. Structural details of HIV-1 recognition by the broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody 2F5: epitope conformation, antigen-recognition loop mobility, and anion-binding site.

    PubMed

    Julien, Jean-Philippe; Bryson, Steve; Nieva, Jose L; Pai, Emil F

    2008-12-12

    2F5 is a monoclonal antibody with potent and broadly neutralizing activity against HIV-1. It targets the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the gp41 subunit of the envelope glycoprotein and interferes with the process of fusion between viral and host cell membranes. This study presents eight 2F5 F(ab)' crystal structures in complex with various gp41 peptide epitopes. These structures reveal several key features of this antibody-antigen interaction. (1) Whenever free of contacts caused by crystal artifacts, the extended complementarity-determining region H3 loop is mobile; this is true for ligand-free and epitope-bound forms. (2) The interaction between the antibody and the gp41 ELDKWA epitope core is absolutely critical, and there are also close and specific contacts with residues located N-terminal to the epitope core. (3) Residues located at the C-terminus of the gp41 ELDKWA core do not interact as tightly with the antibody. However, in the presence of a larger peptide containing the gp41 fusion peptide segment, these residues adopt a conformation consistent with the start of an alpha-helix. (4) At high sulfate concentrations, the electron density maps of 2F5 F(ab)'-peptide complexes contain a peak that may mark a binding site for phosphate groups of negatively charged lipid headgroups. The refined atomic-level details of 2F5 paratope-epitope interactions revealed here should contribute to a better understanding of the mechanism of 2F5-based virus neutralization, in general, and prove important for the design of potential vaccine candidates intended to elicit 2F5-like antibody production.

  9. A detailed staging scheme for late larval development in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus focused on readily-visible juvenile structures within the rudiment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, has long been the focus of developmental and ecological studies, and its recently-sequenced genome has spawned a diversity of functional genomics approaches. S. purpuratus has an indirect developmental mode with a pluteus larva that transforms after 1–3 months in the plankton into a juvenile urchin. Compared to insects and frogs, mechanisms underlying the correspondingly dramatic metamorphosis in sea urchins remain poorly understood. In order to take advantage of modern techniques to further our understanding of juvenile morphogenesis, organ formation, metamorphosis and the evolution of the pentameral sea urchin body plan, it is critical to assess developmental progression and rate during the late larval phase. This requires a staging scheme that describes developmental landmarks that can quickly and consistently be used to identify the stage of individual living larvae, and can be tracked during the final two weeks of larval development, as the juvenile is forming. Results Notable structures that are easily observable in developing urchin larvae are the developing spines, test and tube feet within the juvenile rudiment that constitute much of the oral portion of the adult body plan. Here we present a detailed staging scheme of rudiment development in the purple urchin using soft structures of the rudiment and the primordia of these juvenile skeletal elements. We provide evidence that this scheme is robust and applicable across a range of temperature and feeding regimes. Conclusions Our proposed staging scheme provides both a useful method to study late larval development in the purple urchin, and a framework for developing similar staging schemes across echinoderms. Such efforts will have a high impact on evolutionary developmental studies and larval ecology, and facilitate research on this important deuterostome group. PMID:24886415

  10. Detailed low-energy electron diffraction analysis of the (4×4) surface structure of C60 on Cu(111): Seven-atom-vacancy reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Geng; Shi, Xing-Qiang; Zhang, R. Q.; Pai, Woei Wu; Jeng, H. T.; Van Hove, M. A.

    2012-08-01

    A detailed and exhaustive structural analysis by low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) is reported for the C60-induced reconstruction of Cu(111), in the system Cu(111) + (4 × 4)-C60. A wide LEED energy range allows enhanced sensitivity to the crucial C60-metal interface that is buried below the 7-Å-thick molecular layer. The analysis clearly favors a seven-Cu-atom vacancy model (with Pendry R-factor Rp = 0.376) over a one-Cu-atom vacancy model (Rp = 0.608) and over nonreconstructed models (Rp = 0.671 for atop site and Rp = 0.536 for hcp site). The seven-Cu-atom vacancy forms a (4 × 4) lattice of bowl-like holes. In each hole, a C60 molecule can nestle by forming strong bonds (shorter than 2.30 Å) between 15 C atoms of the molecule and 12 Cu atoms of the outermost and second Cu layers.

  11. Effect of reduction of strategic Columbium addition in 718 Alloy on the structure and properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegler, K. R.; Wallace, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    A series of alloys was developed having a base composition similar to Inconel 718, with reduced Cb levels of 3.00 and 1.10 wt% Cb. Substitutions of 3.0% W, 3.0W + 0.9V or Mo increased from 3.0% to 5.8% were made for the Cb in these alloys. Two additional alloys, one containing 3.49% Cb and 1.10% Ti and another containing 3.89% Cb and 1.29% Ti were also studied. Tensile properties at rooom and elevated temperatures, stress-rupture tests, and an analysis of extracted phases were carried out for each of the alloys. Additions of solid solution elements to a reduced Cb alloy had no significant effect on the properties of the alloys under either process condition. The solution and age alloys with substitutions of 1.27% i at 3.89% Cb had tensile properties similar top hose of the original alloy and stress-rupture properties superior to the original alloy. The improved stress-rupture properties were the result of significant precipitation of Ni3Ti-gamma prime in the alloy, which is more stable than gamma' at the elevated temperatures. At lower temperatures, the new alloy benefits from gamma' strengthening. With more precise control and proper processing, the reduced Cb direct-age alloy could substitute for Alloy 718 in high strength applications.

  12. Modifying structure-sensitive reactions by addition of Zn to Pd

    SciTech Connect

    Childers, David J.; Schweitzer, Neil M.; Kamali Shahari, Seyed Mehdi; Rioux, Robert M.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Meyer, Randall J.

    2014-10-01

    Silica-supported Pd and PdZn nanoparticles of a similar size were evaluated for neopentane hydrogenolysis/isomerization and propane hydrogenolysis/dehydrogenation. Monometallic Pd showed high neopentane hydrogenolysis selectivity. Addition of small amounts of Zn to Pd lead Pd–Zn scatters in the EXAFS spectrum and an increase in the linear bonded CO by IR. In addition, the neopentane turnover rate decreased by nearly 10 times with little change in the selectivity. Increasing amounts of Zn lead to greater Pd–Zn interactions, higher linear-to-bridging CO ratios by IR and complete loss of neopentane conversion. Pd NPs also had high selectivity for propane hydrogenolysis and thus were poorly selective for propylene. The PdZn bimetallic catalysts, however, were able to preferentially catalyze dehydrogenation, were not active for propane hydrogenolysis, and thus were highly selective for propylene formation. The decrease in hydrogenolysis selectivity was attributed to the isolation of active Pd atoms by inactive metallic Zn,demonstrating that hydrogenolysis requires a particular reactive ensemble whereas propane dehydrogenation does not.

  13. Influence of additives on the structure of surfactant-free microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Marcus, J; Touraud, D; Prévost, S; Diat, O; Zemb, T; Kunz, W

    2015-12-28

    We study the addition of electrolytes to surfactant-free microemulsions in the domain where polydisperse pre-Ouzo aggregates are present. As in previous studies, the microemulsion is the ternary system water/ethanol/1-octanol, where ethanol acts as co-solvent. Addition of electrolytes modifies the static X-ray and neutron scattering, and dynamic light scattering patterns, as well as the position of the miscibility gap, where spontaneous emulsification occurs upon dilution with water. All observations can be rationalized considering that electrolytes are either "salting out" the ethanol, which is the main component of the interface stabilizing the aggregates, or producing charge separation via the antagonistic ion effect discovered by Onuki et al. Amphiphilic electrolytes, such as sodium dodecylsulfate or sodium dietheylhexylphosphate, induce a gradual transition towards monodisperse ionic micelles with their characteristic broad scattering "peak". In these micelles the ethanol plays then the role of a cosurfactant. Dynamic light scattering can only be understood by combination of fluctuations of aggregate concentration due to the vicinity of a critical point and in-out fluctuations of ethanol. PMID:26593697

  14. Characterization of embedded fiber optic strain sensors into metallic structures via ultrasonic additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schomer, John J.; Hehr, Adam J.; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2016-04-01

    Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors measure deviation in a reflected wavelength of light to detect in-situ strain. These sensors are immune to electromagnetic interference, and the inclusion of multiple FBGs on the same fiber allows for a seamlessly integrated sensing network. FBGs are attractive for embedded sensing in aerospace applications due to their small noninvasive size and prospect of constant, real-time nondestructive evaluation. In this study, FBG sensors are embedded in aluminum 6061 via ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM), a rapid prototyping process that uses high power ultrasonic vibrations to weld similar and dissimilar metal foils together. UAM was chosen due to the desire to embed FBG sensors at low temperatures, a requirement that excludes other additive processes such as selective laser sintering or fusion deposition modeling. In this paper, the embedded FBGs are characterized in terms of birefringence losses, post embedding strain shifts, consolidation quality, and strain sensing performance. Sensors embedded into an ASTM test piece are compared against an exterior surface mounted foil strain gage at both room and elevated temperatures using cyclic tensile tests.

  15. Modeling the Structure of Complex Aluminosilicate Glasses: The Effect of Zinc Addition.

    PubMed

    Bernasconi, Andrea; Dapiaggi, Monica; Pavese, Alessandro; Agostini, Giovanni; Bernasconi, Maurizio; Bowron, Daniel T

    2016-03-10

    An empirical potential structure refinement of neutron and X-ray diffraction data combined with extended absorption fine structure evidence has been applied to the investigation of two distinct sets of complex aluminosilicate glasses containing different quantities of zinc. Data come from (i) neutron and X-ray total scattering experiments, which have been performed at the ISIS neutron spallation source (SANDALS beamline) and at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ID11 beamline), and (ii) EXAFS experiments which have been performed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BM23 beamline). By careful examination of the modeled ensemble of atoms, a wide range of structural information has been extracted: coordination numbers, bond distances, cluster sizes, type of oxygen sharing, and the preference of large cations to adopt a charge-compensating role. The first series of glasses, which is characterized by a fixed network modifier element content (i.e., Na), shows how the introduction of Zn at the expense of Si and Al network forming elements does not significantly alter the polymerization degree, as a result of its dominant 4-fold coordination. In the case of the second series, which is characterized by fixed network forming element content (i.e., Si and Al), it is shown how the replacement of a network modifier element (i.e., Ca) with the introduction of Zn does not change the propensity of Zn to be mainly 4-fold coordinated by promoting the network. Where appropriate the experimental results have been compared with classical theoretical approaches such as stoichiometric models based on Zachariasen's rules and computational routines. PMID:26848740

  16. The Purification of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast ClpP complex: additional subunits and structural features

    PubMed Central

    Derrien, Benoît; Majeran, Wojciech; Effantin, Grégory; Ebenezer, Joseph; Friso, Giulia; van Wijk, Klaas J.; Steven, Alasdair C.; Maurizi, Michael R.; Vallon, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    The ClpP peptidase is a major constituent of the proteolytic machinery of bacteria and organelles. The chloroplast ClpP complex is unusual, in that it associates a large number of subunits, one of which (ClpP1) is encoded in the chloroplast, the others in the nucleus. The complexity of these large hetero-oligomeric complexes has been a major difficulty in their overproduction and biochemical characterization. In this paper, we describe the purification of native chloroplast ClpP complex from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, using a strain that carries the Strep-tag II at the C-terminus of the ClpP1 subunit. Similar to land plants, the algal complex comprises active and inactive subunits (3 ClpP and 5 ClpR, respectively). Evidence is presented that a sub-complex can be produced by dissociation, comprising ClpP1 and ClpR1, 2, 3 and 4, similar to the ClpR-ring described in land plants. Our Chlamydomonas ClpP preparation also contains two ClpT subunits, ClpT3 and ClpT4, which like the land plant ClpT1 and ClpT2 show 2 Clp-N domains. ClpTs are believed to function in substrate binding and/or assembly of the two heptameric rings. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that ClpT subunits have appeared independently in Chlorophycean algae, in land plants and in dispersed cyanobacterial genomes. Negative staining electron microscopy shows that the Chlamydomonas complex retains the barrel-like shape of homo-oligomeric ClpPs, with 4 additional peripheral masses that we speculate represent either the additional IS1 domain of ClpP1 (a feature unique to algae) or ClpTs or extensions of ClpR subunits PMID:22772861

  17. The purification of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast ClpP complex: additional subunits and structural features.

    PubMed

    Derrien, Benoît; Majeran, Wojciech; Effantin, Grégory; Ebenezer, Joseph; Friso, Giulia; van Wijk, Klaas J; Steven, Alasdair C; Maurizi, Michael R; Vallon, Olivier

    2012-09-01

    The ClpP peptidase is a major constituent of the proteolytic machinery of bacteria and organelles. The chloroplast ClpP complex is unusual, in that it associates a large number of subunits, one of which (ClpP1) is encoded in the chloroplast, the others in the nucleus. The complexity of these large hetero-oligomeric complexes has been a major difficulty in their overproduction and biochemical characterization. In this paper, we describe the purification of native chloroplast ClpP complex from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, using a strain that carries the Strep-tag II at the C-terminus of the ClpP1 subunit. Similar to land plants, the algal complex comprises active and inactive subunits (3 ClpP and 5 ClpR, respectively). Evidence is presented that a sub-complex can be produced by dissociation, comprising ClpP1 and ClpR1, 2, 3 and 4, similar to the ClpR-ring described in land plants. Our Chlamydomonas ClpP preparation also contains two ClpT subunits, ClpT3 and ClpT4, which like the land plant ClpT1 and ClpT2 show 2 Clp-N domains. ClpTs are believed to function in substrate binding and/or assembly of the two heptameric rings. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that ClpT subunits have appeared independently in Chlorophycean algae, in land plants and in dispersed cyanobacterial genomes. Negative staining electron microscopy shows that the Chlamydomonas complex retains the barrel-like shape of homo-oligomeric ClpPs, with 4 additional peripheral masses that we speculate represent either the additional IS1 domain of ClpP1 (a feature unique to algae) or ClpTs or extensions of ClpR subunits.

  18. Geological Features and Crustal Structure of the Cretaceous Middle Benue Trough, Nigeria: Insights from Detailed Analysis and Modelling of Magnetic and Gravity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anudu, G. K.; Stephenson, R.; Macdonald, D.

    2015-12-01

    The middle Benue Trough is the middle (central) segment of the Nigerian Benue Trough, an intra-continental rift that developed during the second phase of rifting of the Gondwana supercontinent that resulted in the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Guinea and separation of South America from Africa in the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous. Airborne magnetic and terrestrial gravity data from the area have been analysed and modelled in detail. Results obtained using a variety of edge enhancement (derivative) methods applied to high-resolution, airborne magnetic data reveal widespread magmatic intrusions (mainly volcanic/sub-volcanic rocks, with an areal extent greater than 12000 km2) and numerous geological structures. Rose (azimuth frequency) plots show that the geological structural trends are predominantly NE - SW, NW - SE and ESE - WNW with minor ENE -WSW/N - S trends and thus suggest that the area has undergone several phases of tectonic deformation at different geological times. Integrated two-dimensional (2-D) gravity and magnetic modelling along five profiles constrained by 2-D magnetic depth-to-source estimates and available seismological velocity models indicates the presence of a number of distinct crustal bodies and thin crust. Moho depth varies from ca. 21 - 29 km, while the crustal thickness ranges between ca. 19 and 29 km. Shallower Moho and thinner crust are observed along the trough axis. Results from the study also reveal that the amount of crustal thinning and crustal stretching factor (β) across the area varies from 3.3 - 14.5 km and 1.11 - 1.78, respectively. Broad positive to near positive Bouguer gravity anomalies in the region of the trough axis are due to the combined effects of dense (intermediate to basic) magmatic intrusions (both intra-sedimentary and intra-basement/crustal ones), shallow basement horsts (basement uplift zones) and thin crust replaced by dense abnormal upper mantle bodies. Reactivated intra-basement structures

  19. Seismic Simulations of the August 24, 2014 South Napa and Nearby Earthquakes to Investigate the Effects of Rupture Details and Three-Dimensional Structure on Ground Motions and Static Displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, A. J.; Dreger, D. S.; Pitarka, A.; Petersson, A.; Johanson, I. A.

    2014-12-01

    We performed three-dimensional (3D) anelastic finite difference simulations to investigate the effects of rupture details and sub-surface structure (including surface topography) on motions for the August 24, 2014 South Napa M6.0 earthquake, its aftershocks and nearby earthquakes. We compared observed seismic ground motions and static displacements (from GPS and InSAR) with motions computed with 3D simulations. Calculations were performed with the SW4 finite difference code, which computes the transient motions and permanent displacements including the effects of 3D structure based on the USGS San Francisco Bay Area 3D model (version USGSBayAreaVM-08.3.0.etree) and surface topography. We investigated the response using both an average plane-layered (one-dimensional, 1D) and the USGS 3D structure. We computed motions for available models of the mainshock rupture (including the model reported by Dreger, 2014 from broadband seismic waveforms). To unravel the effects of earthquake rupture and propagation through complex 3D structure, we modeled both the M6 mainshock and smaller (M3-4) nearby events, which can be represented as simple point moment tensor sources. The computed ground motions were compared to observations. For the seismic ground motions, the simulated motions with the 3D model (up to 1 Hz) produce remarkably better fits to the data than the average 1D model, suggesting there are significant path effects due to sedimentary basins and other sub-surface features. Aftershocks are well modeled for most paths, including paths crossing sedimentary basin structures in the Napa Valley and San Pablo Bay, indicating that the USGS 3D model can reasonably predict complex path effects. The M6.0 South Napa mainshock ruptured toward the north and resulted in complex high-frequency response in the backward directivity direction to the south, which we have not yet been able to reproduce with simulations and may require addition of finer details in the rupture model

  20. Development of Additive Construction Technologies for Application to Development of Lunar/Martian Surface Structures Using In-Situ Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werkheiser, Niki J.; Fiske, Michael R.; Edmunson, Jennifer E.; Khoshnevis, Berokh

    2015-01-01

    For long-duration missions on other planetary bodies, the use of in situ materials will become increasingly critical. As human presence on these bodies expands, so must the breadth of the structures required to accommodate them including habitats, laboratories, berms, radiation shielding for natural radiation and surface reactors, garages, solar storm shelters, greenhouses, etc. Planetary surface structure manufacturing and assembly technologies that incorporate in situ resources provide options for autonomous, affordable, pre-positioned environments with radiation shielding features and protection from micrometeorites, exhaust plume debris, and other hazards. The ability to use in-situ materials to construct these structures will provide a benefit in the reduction of up-mass that would otherwise make long-term Moon or Mars structures cost prohibitive. The ability to fabricate structures in situ brings with it the ability to repair these structures, which allows for the self-sufficiency and sustainability necessary for long-duration habitation. Previously, under the auspices of the MSFC In-Situ Fabrication and Repair (ISFR) project and more recently, under the jointly-managed MSFC/KSC Additive Construction with Mobile Emplacement (ACME) project, the MSFC Surface Structures Group has been developing materials and construction technologies to support future planetary habitats with in-situ resources. One such additive construction technology is known as Contour Crafting. This paper presents the results to date of these efforts, including development of novel nozzle concepts for advanced layer deposition using this process. Conceived initially for rapid development of cementitious structures on Earth, it also lends itself exceptionally well to the automated fabrication of planetary surface structures using minimally processed regolith as aggregate, and binders developed from in situ materials as well. This process has been used successfully in the fabrication of

  1. Additive gene-environment effects on hippocampal structure in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Rabl, Ulrich; Meyer, Bernhard M; Diers, Kersten; Bartova, Lucie; Berger, Andreas; Mandorfer, Dominik; Popovic, Ana; Scharinger, Christian; Huemer, Julia; Kalcher, Klaudius; Pail, Gerald; Haslacher, Helmuth; Perkmann, Thomas; Windischberger, Christian; Brocke, Burkhard; Sitte, Harald H; Pollak, Daniela D; Dreher, Jean-Claude; Kasper, Siegfried; Praschak-Rieder, Nicole; Moser, Ewald; Esterbauer, Harald; Pezawas, Lukas

    2014-07-23

    Hippocampal volume loss has been related to chronic stress as well as genetic factors. Although genetic and environmental variables affecting hippocampal volume have extensively been studied and related to mental illness, limited evidence is available with respect to G × E interactions on hippocampal volume. The present MRI study investigated interaction effects on hippocampal volume between three well-studied functional genetic variants (COMT Val158Met, BDNF Val66Met, 5-HTTLPR) associated with hippocampal volume and a measure of environmental adversity (life events questionnaire) in a large sample of healthy humans (n = 153). All three variants showed significant interactions with environmental adversity with respect to hippocampal volume. Observed effects were additive by nature and driven by both recent as well as early life events. A consecutive analysis of hippocampal subfields revealed a spatially distinct profile for each genetic variant suggesting a specific role of 5-HTTLPR for the subiculum, BDNF Val66Met for CA4/dentate gyrus, and COMT Val158Met for CA2/3 volume changes. The present study underscores the importance of G × E interactions as determinants of hippocampal volume, which is crucial for the neurobiological understanding of stress-related conditions, such as mood disorders or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PMID:25057194

  2. Additive Gene–Environment Effects on Hippocampal Structure in Healthy Humans

    PubMed Central

    Rabl, Ulrich; Meyer, Bernhard M.; Diers, Kersten; Bartova, Lucie; Berger, Andreas; Mandorfer, Dominik; Popovic, Ana; Scharinger, Christian; Huemer, Julia; Kalcher, Klaudius; Pail, Gerald; Haslacher, Helmuth; Perkmann, Thomas; Windischberger, Christian; Brocke, Burkhard; Sitte, Harald H.; Pollak, Daniela D.; Dreher, Jean-Claude; Kasper, Siegfried; Praschak-Rieder, Nicole; Moser, Ewald; Esterbauer, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal volume loss has been related to chronic stress as well as genetic factors. Although genetic and environmental variables affecting hippocampal volume have extensively been studied and related to mental illness, limited evidence is available with respect to G × E interactions on hippocampal volume. The present MRI study investigated interaction effects on hippocampal volume between three well-studied functional genetic variants (COMT Val158Met, BDNF Val66Met, 5-HTTLPR) associated with hippocampal volume and a measure of environmental adversity (life events questionnaire) in a large sample of healthy humans (n = 153). All three variants showed significant interactions with environmental adversity with respect to hippocampal volume. Observed effects were additive by nature and driven by both recent as well as early life events. A consecutive analysis of hippocampal subfields revealed a spatially distinct profile for each genetic variant suggesting a specific role of 5-HTTLPR for the subiculum, BDNF Val66Met for CA4/dentate gyrus, and COMT Val158Met for CA2/3 volume changes. The present study underscores the importance of G × E interactions as determinants of hippocampal volume, which is crucial for the neurobiological understanding of stress-related conditions, such as mood disorders or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PMID:25057194

  3. Additive gene-environment effects on hippocampal structure in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Rabl, Ulrich; Meyer, Bernhard M; Diers, Kersten; Bartova, Lucie; Berger, Andreas; Mandorfer, Dominik; Popovic, Ana; Scharinger, Christian; Huemer, Julia; Kalcher, Klaudius; Pail, Gerald; Haslacher, Helmuth; Perkmann, Thomas; Windischberger, Christian; Brocke, Burkhard; Sitte, Harald H; Pollak, Daniela D; Dreher, Jean-Claude; Kasper, Siegfried; Praschak-Rieder, Nicole; Moser, Ewald; Esterbauer, Harald; Pezawas, Lukas

    2014-07-23

    Hippocampal volume loss has been related to chronic stress as well as genetic factors. Although genetic and environmental variables affecting hippocampal volume have extensively been studied and related to mental illness, limited evidence is available with respect to G × E interactions on hippocampal volume. The present MRI study investigated interaction effects on hippocampal volume between three well-studied functional genetic variants (COMT Val158Met, BDNF Val66Met, 5-HTTLPR) associated with hippocampal volume and a measure of environmental adversity (life events questionnaire) in a large sample of healthy humans (n = 153). All three variants showed significant interactions with environmental adversity with respect to hippocampal volume. Observed effects were additive by nature and driven by both recent as well as early life events. A consecutive analysis of hippocampal subfields revealed a spatially distinct profile for each genetic variant suggesting a specific role of 5-HTTLPR for the subiculum, BDNF Val66Met for CA4/dentate gyrus, and COMT Val158Met for CA2/3 volume changes. The present study underscores the importance of G × E interactions as determinants of hippocampal volume, which is crucial for the neurobiological understanding of stress-related conditions, such as mood disorders or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

  4. A study of alternative metal particle structures and mixtures for dental amalgams based on mercury additions.

    PubMed

    Marquez, J A; Murr, L E; Agüero, V

    2000-08-01

    The perception that mercury in dental amalgam is toxic to the human organism has prompted worldwide efforts by the scientific community to develop alternative amalgam-like materials that utilize little or no mercury. In this investigation, an attempt is made to develop a new dental alloy system by adding liquid mercury to silver-coated Ag4Sn intermetallic particles in lesser amounts than are used in conventional amalgam alloys. An effort to precipitate the important eta-prime (Cu6Sn5) phase was made by adding pure Cu and Sn powders to the alloy formulation during trituration. Tytin a popular Ag-Sn-Cu single-composition, spray-atomized conventional dental alloy was used as the control to obtain baseline data for comparisons of microstructures and mechanical properties. Amalgamation of the coated particles with mercury, with or without the addition of Cu and Sn powders, mostly produced specimens with chemically non-coherent microstructures that were relatively weak in compression. These results were due, in part, to mercury's inability to chemically wet the Ag-coated particles and Cu and Sn powders because of naturally occurring surface oxide films. The strongest specimens tested had silver dendritic coatings, resulting in compression strength values up to 40% of the control's. Their higher strength is attributed to mechanical interlocking at the particle/matrix interfaces.

  5. Effect of Eu ion incorporation on the emission behavior of Y2O3 nanophosphors: A detailed study of structural and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Y.; Pal, Mou; Herrera, M.; Mathew, X.

    2016-10-01

    In order to investigate the effect of doping concentration on the luminescence behavior of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) europium (Eu) doped nanoparticles were prepared by co-precipitation method. Incorporation of Eu ion in Y2O3 matrix is clearly reflected in structural and optical properties of the doped Y2O3 phosphor. Cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy proves the presence of strong Eu3+ emissions along with the presence of an additional weak band corresponding to electronic transitions 4f65d1 (7FJ) - 4f7 (8S7/2) of the Eu2+. The presence of Eu3+ and Eu2+ ions in Y2O3 nanoparticles have been additionally confirmed by XPS analysis. Luminescence band corresponding to Eu3+ ions appears in both CL and photoluminescence (PL) spectra, covering the orange-red emissions from 580 to 710 nm. Vibrational properties analyzed through Raman spectroscopy have revealed the evolution of different peaks associated with Eu emission in the doped Y2O3 nanocrystals.

  6. LASER Additive Manufacturing of Titanium-Tantalum Alloy Structured Interfaces for Modular Orthopedic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuerst, Jacob; Medlin, Dana; Carter, Michael; Sears, James; Vander Voort, George

    2015-04-01

    Tantalum is recognized to have better biocompatibility and osseointegrative properties than other more commonly used orthopedic grade alloys. There are several novel methods that tantalum or tantalum-titanium could be used to augment orthopedic implants. A tantalum or tantalum-titanium alloy at the bone/implant or modular component interfaces would substantially increase the longevity and performance of modular devices. Bonding a functional tantalum coating to a titanium orthopedic device is inherently difficult because of the small difference between the melting temperature of tantalum, 3017°C, and the boiling point of titanium, 3287°C. LASER powder deposition (LPD) is a fusion operation using an Nd:YAG to melt a small volume of substrate into which metal powder is sprayed achieving high temperature with a high solidification rate. LPD of Ti-Ta onto a Ti-6Al-4V substrate produced both a solid surface and structured coating with a pore size in the optimal 350-500 μm range.

  7. Numerical simulation of the fatigue behavior of additive manufactured titanium porous lattice structures.

    PubMed

    Zargarian, A; Esfahanian, M; Kadkhodapour, J; Ziaei-Rad, S

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the effects of cell geometry and relative density on the high-cycle fatigue behavior of Titanium scaffolds produced by selective laser melting and electron beam melting techniques were numerically investigated by finite element analysis. The regular titanium lattice samples with three different unit cell geometries, namely, diamond, rhombic dodecahedron and truncated cuboctahedron, and the relative density range of 0.1-0.3 were analyzed under uniaxial cyclic compressive loading. A failure event based algorithm was employed to simulate fatigue failure in the cellular material. Stress-life approach was used to model fatigue failure of both bulk (struts) and cellular material. The predicted fatigue life and the damage pattern of all three structures were found to be in good agreement with the experimental fatigue investigations published in the literature. The results also showed that the relationship between fatigue strength and cycles to failure obeyed the power law. The coefficient of power function was shown to depend on relative density, geometry and fatigue properties of the bulk material while the exponent was only dependent on the fatigue behavior of the bulk material. The results also indicated the failure surface at an angle of 45° to the loading direction. PMID:26706539

  8. ProFold: Protein Fold Classification with Additional Structural Features and a Novel Ensemble Classifier

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Protein fold classification plays an important role in both protein functional analysis and drug design. The number of proteins in PDB is very large, but only a very small part is categorized and stored in the SCOPe database. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an efficient method for protein fold classification. In recent years, a variety of classification methods have been used in many protein fold classification studies. In this study, we propose a novel classification method called proFold. We import protein tertiary structure in the period of feature extraction and employ a novel ensemble strategy in the period of classifier training. Compared with existing similar ensemble classifiers using the same widely used dataset (DD-dataset), proFold achieves 76.2% overall accuracy. Another two commonly used datasets, EDD-dataset and TG-dataset, are also tested, of which the accuracies are 93.2% and 94.3%, higher than the existing methods. ProFold is available to the public as a web-server.

  9. Numerical simulation of the fatigue behavior of additive manufactured titanium porous lattice structures.

    PubMed

    Zargarian, A; Esfahanian, M; Kadkhodapour, J; Ziaei-Rad, S

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the effects of cell geometry and relative density on the high-cycle fatigue behavior of Titanium scaffolds produced by selective laser melting and electron beam melting techniques were numerically investigated by finite element analysis. The regular titanium lattice samples with three different unit cell geometries, namely, diamond, rhombic dodecahedron and truncated cuboctahedron, and the relative density range of 0.1-0.3 were analyzed under uniaxial cyclic compressive loading. A failure event based algorithm was employed to simulate fatigue failure in the cellular material. Stress-life approach was used to model fatigue failure of both bulk (struts) and cellular material. The predicted fatigue life and the damage pattern of all three structures were found to be in good agreement with the experimental fatigue investigations published in the literature. The results also showed that the relationship between fatigue strength and cycles to failure obeyed the power law. The coefficient of power function was shown to depend on relative density, geometry and fatigue properties of the bulk material while the exponent was only dependent on the fatigue behavior of the bulk material. The results also indicated the failure surface at an angle of 45° to the loading direction.

  10. ProFold: Protein Fold Classification with Additional Structural Features and a Novel Ensemble Classifier

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Protein fold classification plays an important role in both protein functional analysis and drug design. The number of proteins in PDB is very large, but only a very small part is categorized and stored in the SCOPe database. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an efficient method for protein fold classification. In recent years, a variety of classification methods have been used in many protein fold classification studies. In this study, we propose a novel classification method called proFold. We import protein tertiary structure in the period of feature extraction and employ a novel ensemble strategy in the period of classifier training. Compared with existing similar ensemble classifiers using the same widely used dataset (DD-dataset), proFold achieves 76.2% overall accuracy. Another two commonly used datasets, EDD-dataset and TG-dataset, are also tested, of which the accuracies are 93.2% and 94.3%, higher than the existing methods. ProFold is available to the public as a web-server. PMID:27660761

  11. Exploring details about structure requirements based on novel CGRP receptor antagonists urethanamide, aspartate, succinate and pyridine derivatives by in silico methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; He, Haoran; Wang, Jinghui; Han, Chunxiao; Feng, Jiaqi; Zhang, Shuwei; Yang, Ling

    2014-09-01

    The migraine never fails to afflict individuals in the world that knows no lack of such cases. CGRP (calcitonin gene-related peptide) is found closely related to migraine and olcegepant (BIBN4096) is effective in alleviating the pain. In our work, the combination of ligand- and receptor-based three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) studies along with molecular docking was applied to provide us insights about how urethanamide, pyridine and aspartate and succinate derivatives (novel CGRP receptor antagonists) play a part in inhibiting the activity of CGRP receptor. The optimal CoMSIA model shows the Q2 of 0.505, R2ncv of 0.992 and its accurate predictive ability was confirmed by checking out an independent test set which gave R2pred value of 0.885. Besides, the 3D contour maps help us identify how different groups affect the antagonist activity while connecting to some key positions. In addition, the docking analysis shows the binding site emerging as the distorted “V” shape and including two binding pockets: one of them is hydrophobic, fixing the structural part 3 of compound 80, the other anchors the part 1 of compound 80. The docking analysis also shows the interaction mechanism between compound 80 and CGRP receptor, similar to the interaction between olcegepant and CGRP receptor. The findings derived from this work reveal the mechanism of related antagonists and facilitate the future rational design of novel antagonists with higher potency.

  12. Feasibility Study on 3-D Printing of Metallic Structural Materials with Robotized Laser-Based Metal Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yaoyu; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2016-07-01

    Metallic structural materials continue to open new avenues in achieving exotic mechanical properties that are naturally unavailable. They hold great potential in developing novel products in diverse industries such as the automotive, aerospace, biomedical, oil and gas, and defense. Currently, the use of metallic structural materials in industry is still limited because of difficulties in their manufacturing. This article studied the feasibility of printing metallic structural materials with robotized laser-based metal additive manufacturing (RLMAM). In this study, two metallic structural materials characterized by an enlarged positive Poisson's ratio and a negative Poisson's ratio were designed and simulated, respectively. An RLMAM system developed at the Research Center for Advanced Manufacturing of Southern Methodist University was used to print them. The results of the tensile tests indicated that the printed samples successfully achieved the corresponding mechanical properties.

  13. Aperture Synthesis C18O J = 1-0 Observations of L1551 IRS 5: Detailed Structure of the Infalling Envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momose, Munetake; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Kawabe, Ryohei; Nakano, Takenori; Hayashi, Masahiko

    1998-09-01

    We report aperture synthesis C18O J = 1-0 observations of L1551 IRS 5 with a spatial resolution of 2.8" × 2.5" using the Nobeyama Millimeter Array. We have detected an emission component centrally condensed around IRS 5, as well as a diffuse component extending in the north-south direction from the centrally condensed component. The centrally condensed component, 2380 × 1050 AU in size, is elongated in the direction perpendicular to the outflow axis, indicating the existence of a flattened circumstellar envelope around L1551 IRS 5. The mass of the centrally condensed component is estimated to be 0.062 M⊙. The position-velocity (P-V) diagrams reveal that the velocity field in the centrally condensed component is composed of infall and slight rotation. The infall velocity in the outer part is equal to the free-fall velocity around a central mass of ~0.1 M⊙, e.g., 0.5 km s-1 at r = 700 AU, whereas the rotation velocity, 0.24 km s-1 at the same radius, gets prominent at inner radii with a radial dependence of r-1. We make up P-V diagrams for the model envelopes with vertical structure, in which the matter falls under the gravity and eventually settles down in Keplerian rotation inside the centrifugal radius, and compare them with the observed P-V diagrams of the centrally condensed component. The main characteristics of the observed P-V diagrams are reproduced by either (1) an envelope with a moderately flattened density distribution, or (2) a spherical envelope with a bipolar cavity whose half-opening angle is about 50°. Detailed comparison of the observed and model P-V diagrams suggests that the C18O J = 1-0 emission from the outer part of the centrally condensed component is well reproduced with the models with the central mass ~0.15 M⊙ and the mass infall rate ~6 × 10-6 M⊙ yr-1. However, the higher velocity features of the emission near the star cannot be reproduced unless the central mass is taken to be ~0.5 M⊙. These facts suggest either that the

  14. A Detailed 3D Seismic Velocity Structure of the Subducting Pacific Slab Beneath Hokkaido, Tohoku and Kanto, Japan, by Double-Difference Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Y.; Nakajima, J.; Kita, S.; Okada, T.; Matsuzawa, T.; Hasegawa, A.

    2007-12-01

    Three-dimensional heterogeneous structure beneath northeastern (NE) Japan has been investigated by previous studies and an inclined seismic low-velocity zone is imaged in the mantle wedge sub-parallel to the down-dip direction of the subducting slab (Zhao et al., 1992, Nakajima et al., 2001). However, the heterogeneous structure within the slab has not been well studied even though it is very important to understand the whole process of water transportation from the slab to the surface. Here we show a detailed 3D seismic velocity structure within the subducted Pacific slab around Japan and propose a water-transportation path from the slab to the mantle wedge. In this study, we estimated 3D velocity structure within the Pacific slab by the double-difference tomography (Zhang and Thurber, 2003). We divided the study area, from Hokkaido to Kanto, into 6 areas due to the limitation of memory and computation time. In each area, arrival-time data of 7,500-17,000 events recorded at 70-170 stations were used in the analysis. The total number of absolute travel-time data was about 140,000-312,000 for P wave and 123,000-268,000 for S wave, and differential data were about 736,000-1,920,000 for P wave and 644,000-1,488,000 for S wave. Horizontal and vertical grid separations are 10-25 km and 6.5 km, respectively. RMS residuals of travel times for P wave decreased from 0.23s to 0.09s and for S wave from 0.35s to 0.13s. The obtained results are as follows: (1) a remarkable low-Vs zone exists in the uppermost part of the subducting slab, (2) it extends down to a depth of about 80 km, (3) the termination of this low-Vs zone almost corresponds to the "seismic belt" recently detected in the upper plane of the double seismic zone (Kita et al.,2006; Hasegawa et al., 2007), (4) at depths deeper than 80 km, a low-Vs and high-Vp/Vs zone is apparently distributed in the mantle wedge, immediately above the slab crust. We consider that these features reflect water-transportation processes

  15. Routing Corners of Building Structures - by the Method of Vector Addition - Measured with RTN GNSS Surveying Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzyżek, Robert

    2015-12-01

    The paper deals with the problem of surveying buildings in the RTN GNSS mode using modernized indirect methods of measurement. As a result of the classical realtime measurements using indirect methods (intersection of straight lines or a point on a straight line), we obtain a building structure (a building) which is largely deformed. This distortion is due to the inconsistency of the actual dimensions of the building (tie distances) relative to the obtained measurement results. In order to eliminate these discrepancies, and thus to ensure full consistency of the building geometric structure, an innovative solution was applied - the method of vector addition - to modify the linear values (tie distances) of the external face of the building walls. A separate research problem tackled in the article, although not yet fully solved, is the issue of coordinates of corners of a building obtained after the application of the method of vector addition.

  16. Effect of Nano-Particle Addition on Grain Structure Evolution of Friction Stir-Processed Al 6061 During Postweld Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Junfeng; Lee, Bing Yang; Du, Zhenglin; Bi, Guijun; Tan, Ming Jen; Wei, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The fabrication of nano-composites is challenging because uniform dispersion of nano-sized reinforcements in metallic substrate is difficult to achieve using powder metallurgy or liquid processing methods. In the present study, Al-based nano-composites reinforced with Al2O3 particles have been successfully fabricated using friction stir processing. The effects of nano-Al2O3 particle addition on grain structure evolution of friction stir-processed Al matrix during post-weld annealing were investigated. It was revealed that the pinning effect of Al2O3 particles retarded grain growth and completely prevented abnormal grain growth during postweld annealing at 470°C. However, abnormal grain growth can still occur when the composite material was annealed at 530°C. The mechanism involved in the grain structure evolution and the effect of nano-sized particle addition on the mechanical properties were discussed therein.

  17. Effect of Nano-Particle Addition on Grain Structure Evolution of Friction Stir-Processed Al 6061 During Postweld Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Junfeng; Lee, Bing Yang; Du, Zhenglin; Bi, Guijun; Tan, Ming Jen; Wei, Jun

    2016-06-01

    The fabrication of nano-composites is challenging because uniform dispersion of nano-sized reinforcements in metallic substrate is difficult to achieve using powder metallurgy or liquid processing methods. In the present study, Al-based nano-composites reinforced with Al2O3 particles have been successfully fabricated using friction stir processing. The effects of nano-Al2O3 particle addition on grain structure evolution of friction stir-processed Al matrix during post-weld annealing were investigated. It was revealed that the pinning effect of Al2O3 particles retarded grain growth and completely prevented abnormal grain growth during postweld annealing at 470°C. However, abnormal grain growth can still occur when the composite material was annealed at 530°C. The mechanism involved in the grain structure evolution and the effect of nano-sized particle addition on the mechanical properties were discussed therein.

  18. Supramolecular polymerisation in water; elucidating the role of hydrophobic and hydrogen-bond interactions† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, characterization by IR and UV spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering, video files of optical microscopy imaging. See DOI: 10.1039/c5sm02843d Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Leenders, Christianus M. A.; Baker, Matthew B.; Pijpers, Imke A. B.; Lafleur, René P. M.; Albertazzi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the self-assembly of small molecules in water is crucial for the development of responsive, biocompatible soft materials. Here, a family of benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide (BTA) derivatives that comprise a BTA moiety connected to an amphiphilic chain is synthesised with the aim to elucidate the role of hydrophobic and hydrogen-bonding interactions in the self-assembly of these BTAs. The amphiphilic chain consists of an alkyl chain with a length of 10, 11, or 12 methylene units, connected to a tetraethylene glycol (at the periphery). The results show that an undecyl spacer is the minimum length required for these BTAs to self-assemble into supramolecular polymers. Interestingly, exchange studies reveal only minor differences in exchange rates between BTAs containing undecyl or dodecyl spacers. Additionally, IR spectroscopy provides the first experimental evidence that hydrogen-bonding is operative and contributes to the stabilisation of the supramolecular polymers in water. PMID:26892482

  19. The fine structure of colleterial glands in two cockroaches and three termites, including a detailed study of Cryptocercus punctulatus (Blattaria, Cryptocercidae) and Mastotermes darwiniensis (Isoptera, Mastotermitidae).

    PubMed

    Courrent, Annie; Quennedey, André; Nalepa, Christine A; Robert, Alain; Lenz, Michael; Bordereau, Christian

    2008-01-01

    The colleterial glands of insects are organs associated with the female genital apparatus. In cockroaches, these glands produce secretions that cover two parallel rows of eggs during oviposition, and in oviparous species, these secretions become the tanned, sculpted, rigid outer casing of the ootheca. The goal of this study was to compare the gross anatomy of the colleterial glands and the ultrastructure of their component tubules in the phylogenetically significant genera Cryptocercus (Blattaria) and Mastotermes (Isoptera). Recent studies indicate that cockroaches in the genus Cryptocercus are the sister group of termites, and Mastotermes is the only termite known to produce a cockroach-like ootheca. One additional oviparous cockroach, Therea, and two additional termites, Zootermopsis and Pseudacanthotermes, were also examined. As in other cockroaches, the colleterial glands of Cryptocercus and Therea are asymmetrical, with a well developed bipartite left gland and a smaller right gland. In the termites Mastotermes, Zootermopsis, and Pseudacanthotermes, the colleterial glands are composed of a well-developed, paired, anterior gland and a small posterior gland; histological staining and cytological evidence suggest that these are homologues of the left and the right colleterial glands of cockroaches, respectively. At the ultrastructural level, colleterial gland tubules are made of cells belonging to a modified class 1 type cell in the cockroaches, in Mastotermes, and in Zootermopsis; the latter lays its eggs singly, without a surrounding ootheca-like structure. In the advanced termite Pseudacanthotermes, the tubules are made of secretory units belonging to the class 3 cell type. This study demonstrates that the cytological characteristics of colleterial glands in basal termites are similar to those of cockroaches, whether the termite secretes an oothecal casing that covers two parallel rows of eggs, as in Mastotermes, or lays its eggs singly, as in Zootermopsis

  20. Insights into the Electronic Structure of Ozone and Sulfur Dioxide from Generalized Valence Bond Theory: Addition of Hydrogen Atoms.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Beth A; Takeshita, Tyler Y; Dunning, Thom H

    2016-05-01

    Ozone (O3) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) are valence isoelectronic species, yet their properties and reactivities differ dramatically. In particular, O3 is highly reactive, whereas SO2 is chemically relatively stable. In this paper, we investigate serial addition of hydrogen atoms to both the terminal atoms of O3 and SO2 and to the central atom of these species. It is well-known that the terminal atoms of O3 are much more amenable to bond formation than those of SO2. We show that the differences in the electronic structure of the π systems in the parent triatomic species account for the differences in the addition of hydrogen atoms to the terminal atoms of O3 and SO2. Further, we find that the π system in SO2, which is a recoupled pair bond dyad, facilitates the addition of hydrogen atoms to the sulfur atom, resulting in stable HSO2 and H2SO2 species.

  1. NMR and X-ray analysis of structural additivity in metal binding site-swapped hybrids of rubredoxin

    PubMed Central

    LeMaster, David M; Anderson, Janet S; Wang, Limin; Guo, Yi; Li, Hongmin; Hernández, Griselda

    2007-01-01

    Background Chimeric hybrids derived from the rubredoxins of Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf) and Clostridium pasteurianum (Cp) provide a robust system for the characterization of protein conformational stability and dynamics in a differential mode. Interchange of the seven nonconserved residues of the metal binding site between the Pf and Cp rubredoxins yields a complementary pair of hybrids, for which the sum of the thermodynamic stabilities is equal to the sum for the parental proteins. Furthermore, the increase in amide hydrogen exchange rates for the hyperthermophile-derived metal binding site hybrid is faithfully mirrored by a corresponding decrease for the complementary hybrid that is derived from the less thermostable rubredoxin, indicating a degree of additivity in the conformational fluctuations that underlie these exchange reactions. Results Initial NMR studies indicated that the structures of the two complementary hybrids closely resemble "cut-and-paste" models derived from the parental Pf and Cp rubredoxins. This protein system offers a robust opportunity to characterize differences in solution structure, permitting the quantitative NMR chemical shift and NOE peak intensity data to be analyzed without recourse to the conventional conversion of experimental NOE peak intensities into distance restraints. The intensities for 1573 of the 1652 well-resolved NOE crosspeaks from the hybrid rubredoxins were statistically indistinguishable from the intensities of the corresponding parental crosspeaks, to within the baseplane noise level of these high sensitivity data sets. The differences in intensity for the remaining 79 NOE crosspeaks were directly ascribable to localized dynamical processes. Subsequent X-ray analysis of the metal binding site-swapped hybrids, to resolution limits of 0.79 Å and 1.04 Å, demonstrated that the backbone and sidechain heavy atoms in the NMR-derived structures lie within the range of structural variability exhibited among the individual

  2. Porous calcium polyphosphate bone substitutes: additive manufacturing versus conventional gravity sinter processing-effect on structure and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Hu, Youxin; Shanjani, Yaser; Toyserkani, Ehsan; Grynpas, Marc; Wang, Rizhi; Pilliar, Robert

    2014-02-01

    Porous calcium polyphosphate (CPP) structures proposed as bone-substitute implants and made by sintering CPP powders to form bending test samples of approximately 35 vol % porosity were machined from preformed blocks made either by additive manufacturing (AM) or conventional gravity sintering (CS) methods and the structure and mechanical characteristics of samples so made were compared. AM-made samples displayed higher bending strengths (≈1.2-1.4 times greater than CS-made samples), whereas elastic constant (i.e., effective elastic modulus of the porous structures) that is determined by material elastic modulus and structural geometry of the samples was ≈1.9-2.3 times greater for AM-made samples. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that samples made by either method displayed the same crystal structure forming β-CPP after sinter annealing. The material elastic modulus, E, determined using nanoindentation tests also showed the same value for both sample types (i.e., E ≈ 64 GPa). Examination of the porous structures indicated that significantly larger sinter necks resulted in the AM-made samples which presumably resulted in the higher mechanical properties. The development of mechanical properties was attributed to the different sinter anneal procedures required to make 35 vol % porous samples by the two methods. A primary objective of the present study, in addition to reporting on bending strength and sample stiffness (elastic constant) characteristics, was to determine why the two processes resulted in the observed mechanical property differences for samples of equivalent volume percentage of porosity. An understanding of the fundamental reason(s) for the observed effect is considered important for developing improved processes for preparation of porous CPP implants as bone substitutes for use in high load-bearing skeletal sites.

  3. The refined 1.9-A X-ray crystal structure of D-Phe-Pro-Arg chloromethylketone-inhibited human alpha-thrombin: structure analysis, overall structure, electrostatic properties, detailed active-site geometry, and structure-function relationships.

    PubMed Central

    Bode, W.; Turk, D.; Karshikov, A.

    1992-01-01

    Thrombin is a multifunctional serine proteinase that plays a key role in coagulation while exhibiting several other key cellular bioregulatory functions. The X-ray crystal structure of human alpha-thrombin was determined in its complex with the specific thrombin inhibitor D-Phe-Pro-Arg chloromethylketone (PPACK) using Patterson search methods and a search model derived from trypsinlike proteinases of known spatial structure (Bode, W., Mayr, I., Baumann, U., Huber, R., Stone, S.R., & Hofsteenge, J., 1989, EMBO J. 8, 3467-3475). The crystallographic refinement of the PPACK-thrombin model has now been completed at an R value of 0.156 (8 to 1.92 A); in particular, the amino- and the carboxy-termini of the thrombin A-chain are now defined and all side-chain atoms localized; only proline 37 was found to be in a cis-peptidyl conformation. The thrombin B-chain exhibits the characteristic polypeptide fold of trypsinlike serine proteinases; 195 residues occupy topologically equivalent positions with residues in bovine trypsin and 190 with those in bovine chymotrypsin with a root-mean-square (r.m.s.) deviation of 0.8 A for their alpha-carbon atoms. Most of the inserted residues constitute novel surface loops. A chymotrypsinogen numbering is suggested for thrombin based on the topological equivalences. The thrombin A-chain is arranged in a boomeranglike shape against the B-chain globule opposite to the active site; it resembles somewhat the propeptide of chymotrypsin(ogen) and is similarly not involved in substrate and inhibitor binding. Thrombin possesses an exceptionally large proportion of charged residues. The negatively and positively charged residues are not distributed uniformly over the whole molecule, but are clustered to form a sandwichlike electrostatic potential; in particular, two extended patches of mainly positively charged residues occur close to the carboxy-terminal B-chain helix (forming the presumed heparin-binding site) and on the surface of loop segment 70

  4. Self-assembly, hydration, and structures in N-decanoyl-N-methylglucamide aqueous solutions: effect of salt addition and temperature.

    PubMed

    Molina-Bolívar, J A; Hierrezuelo, J M; Carnero Ruiz, C

    2007-09-15

    The influence of NaCl addition and temperature on the self-assembly, hydration, and structures of N-decanoyl-N-methylglucamide (MEGA-10) in dilute solution has been investigated by using several experimental techniques, including tensiometry, steady-state fluorescence, density, viscosity, and static and dynamic light scattering. Tensiometry and fluorescence probe studies, by using pyrene as a probe, were used to obtain the critical micelle concentration (cmc) upon the electrolyte addition. The mean micellar aggregation numbers (N(agg)) as a function of the salt addition were obtained by both static light scattering and static quenching methods. The N(agg) values estimated by both methods were found to be in good agreement. It was found that the increase in the micelle size, produced by the addition of NaCl, is due to the increase in the aggregation number and in the amount of water non-specifically associated to the micelle. On the other hand, we have observed that the aggregation number remains invariant in the temperature range studied, whereas the hydrodynamic radius slightly decreases. The effect of electrolyte addition and temperature on the properties of MEGA-10 micelles is much less pronounced than those observed in the traditionally used POE-based surfactants.

  5. Changes in the structure and function of microbial communities in drinking water treatment bioreactors upon addition of phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Upadhyaya, Giridhar; Yuen, Wangki; Brown, Jess; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2010-11-01

    Phosphorus was added as a nutrient to bench-scale and pilot-scale biologically active carbon (BAC) reactors operated for perchlorate and nitrate removal from contaminated groundwater. The two bioreactors responded similarly to phosphorus addition in terms of microbial community function (i.e., reactor performance), while drastically different responses in microbial community structure were detected. Improvement in reactor performance with respect to perchlorate and nitrate removal started within a few days after phosphorus addition for both reactors. Microbial community structures were evaluated using molecular techniques targeting 16S rRNA genes. Clone library results showed that the relative abundance of perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB) Dechloromonas and Azospira in the bench-scale reactor increased from 15.2% and 0.6% to 54.2% and 11.7% after phosphorus addition, respectively. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) experiments revealed that these increases started within a few days after phosphorus addition. In contrast, after phosphorus addition, the relative abundance of Dechloromonas in the pilot-scale reactor decreased from 7.1 to 0.6%, while Zoogloea increased from 17.9 to 52.0%. The results of this study demonstrated that similar operating conditions for bench-scale and pilot-scale reactors resulted in similar contaminant removal performances, despite dramatically different responses from microbial communities. These findings suggest that it is important to evaluate the microbial community compositions inside bioreactors used for drinking water treatment, as they determine the microbial composition in the effluent and impact downstream treatment requirements for drinking water production. This information could be particularly relevant to drinking water safety, if pathogens or disinfectant-resistant bacteria are detected in the bioreactors.

  6. Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing-End Detail - Cumberland Covered Bridge, Spanning Mississinewa River, Matthews, Grant County, IN

  7. Aerosol based direct-write micro-additive fabrication method for sub-mm 3D metal-dielectric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Taibur; Renaud, Luke; Heo, Deuk; Renn, Michael; Panat, Rahul

    2015-10-01

    The fabrication of 3D metal-dielectric structures at sub-mm length scale is highly important in order to realize low-loss passives and GHz wavelength antennas with applications in wearable and Internet-of-Things (IoT) devices. The inherent 2D nature of lithographic processes severely limits the available manufacturing routes to fabricate 3D structures. Further, the lithographic processes are subtractive and require the use of environmentally harmful chemicals. In this letter, we demonstrate an additive manufacturing method to fabricate 3D metal-dielectric structures at sub-mm length scale. A UV curable dielectric is dispensed from an Aerosol Jet system at 10-100 µm length scale and instantaneously cured to build complex 3D shapes at a length scale  <1 mm. A metal nanoparticle ink is then dispensed over the 3D dielectric using a combination of jetting action and tilted dispense head, also using the Aerosol Jet technique and at a length scale 10-100 µm, followed by the nanoparticle sintering. Simulation studies are carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of using such structures as mm-wave antennas. The manufacturing method described in this letter opens up the possibility of fabricating an entirely new class of custom-shaped 3D structures at a sub-mm length scale with potential applications in 3D antennas and passives.

  8. Atomistic Simulations and Experimental Analysis of the Effect of Ti Additions on the Structure of NiAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Noebe, Ronald D.; Ferrante, John; Garg, Anita; Amador, Carlos

    1997-01-01

    The Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) semiempirical method for alloy energetics is applied to the study of ternary additions to NiAl alloys. A detailed description of the method and its application to alloy design is given. Two different approaches are used in the analysis of the effect of Ti additions to NiAl. First, a thorough analytical study is performed, where the energy of formation, lattice parameter and bulk modulus are calculated for hundreds of possible atomic distributions of Ni, Al and Ti. Substitutional site preference schemes and formation of precipitates are thus predicted and analyzed. The second approach used consists of the determination of temperature effects on the final results, as obtained by performing a number of large scale numerical simulations using the Monte Carlo - Metropolis procedure and BFS for the calculation of the energy at every step in the simulation. The results indicate a sharp preference of Ti for Al sites in Ni-rich NiAl alloys and the formation of ternary Heusler precipitates beyond the predicted solubility limit of 5 at. % Ti. Experimental analysis of three NiAl+Ti alloys confirms the theoretical predictions.

  9. A Raman Spectroscopic Study of the Structural Modifications Associated with the Addition of Calcium Oxide and Boron Oxide to Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, Jeff; Tangstad, Merete; Tranell, Gabriella

    2015-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy as an instrumental technique for the determination of silicate structure is widely accepted. This method was utilized for analysis of structural modifications associated with the addition of network modifying species. Silicate melts are described by the extent of oxygen bridging. Therefore, understanding the effect different oxides have on modifying the silicate structure will provide valuable information regarding the removal of boron from silicon in slag refining processes. Samples in the range CaO/SiO2 = 0.56 to 1.2 were evaluated with and without varying concentrations of B2O3. As expected, increasing the CaO content resulted in an increase in the Q 0 and Q 1 species and a decrease in the Q 3 species indicating a depolymerization of the silicate network. The addition of B2O3 to the 36 wt pct CaO-64 wt pct SiO2 system resulted in a decrease in ring-typed structures associated with the vibrational mode near 600 cm-1, an increase in the Q 3 species and a decrease in the Q 2 species. Adding B2O3 to the 54.5 wt pct CaO-45.5 wt pct SiO2 system resulted in decrease in the Q 0 and Q 2 species and an increase in the Q 3 species. Thus, both systems indicate the introduction of B2O3 to the more polymerized structural units in the silicate network. The increase in the peak near 630 cm-1 signifies some formation of ring-type metaborate groups or ring-type danburite groups. A correlation between the experimentally determined Q n distribution and optical basicity is proposed. Viscosity and optical basicity are correlated for the CaO-SiO2 system as well as viscosity and.

  10. A Raman Spectroscopic Study of the Structural Modifications Associated with the Addition of Calcium Oxide and Boron Oxide to Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, Jeff; Tangstad, Merete; Tranell, Gabriella

    2014-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy as an instrumental technique for the determination of silicate structure is widely accepted. This method was utilized for analysis of structural modifications associated with the addition of network modifying species. Silicate melts are described by the extent of oxygen bridging. Therefore, understanding the effect different oxides have on modifying the silicate structure will provide valuable information regarding the removal of boron from silicon in slag refining processes. Samples in the range CaO/SiO2 = 0.56 to 1.2 were evaluated with and without varying concentrations of B2O3. As expected, increasing the CaO content resulted in an increase in the Q 0 and Q 1 species and a decrease in the Q 3 species indicating a depolymerization of the silicate network. The addition of B2O3 to the 36 wt pct CaO-64 wt pct SiO2 system resulted in a decrease in ring-typed structures associated with the vibrational mode near 600 cm-1, an increase in the Q 3 species and a decrease in the Q 2 species. Adding B2O3 to the 54.5 wt pct CaO-45.5 wt pct SiO2 system resulted in decrease in the Q 0 and Q 2 species and an increase in the Q 3 species. Thus, both systems indicate the introduction of B2O3 to the more polymerized structural units in the silicate network. The increase in the peak near 630 cm-1 signifies some formation of ring-type metaborate groups or ring-type danburite groups. A correlation between the experimentally determined Q n distribution and optical basicity is proposed. Viscosity and optical basicity are correlated for the CaO-SiO2 system as well as viscosity and Q_{{exp}}^n.

  11. Structural basis for the requirement of additional factors for MLL1 SET domain activity and recognition of epigenetic marks.

    PubMed

    Southall, Stacey M; Wong, Poon-Sheng; Odho, Zain; Roe, S Mark; Wilson, Jon R

    2009-01-30

    The mixed-lineage leukemia protein MLL1 is a transcriptional regulator with an essential role in early development and hematopoiesis. The biological function of MLL1 is mediated by the histone H3K4 methyltransferase activity of the carboxyl-terminal SET domain. We have determined the crystal structure of the MLL1 SET domain in complex with cofactor product AdoHcy and a histone H3 peptide. This structure indicates that, in order to form a well-ordered active site, a highly variable but essential component of the SET domain must be repositioned. To test this idea, we compared the effect of the addition of MLL complex members on methyltransferase activity and show that both RbBP5 and Ash2L but not Wdr5 stimulate activity. Additionally, we have determined the effect of posttranslational modifications on histone H3 residues downstream and upstream from the target lysine and provide a structural explanation for why H3T3 phosphorylation and H3K9 acetylation regulate activity. PMID:19187761

  12. NOSS Altimeter Detailed Algorithm specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, D. W.; Mcmillan, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    The details of the algorithms and data sets required for satellite radar altimeter data processing are documented in a form suitable for (1) development of the benchmark software and (2) coding the operational software. The algorithms reported in detail are those established for altimeter processing. The algorithms which required some additional development before documenting for production were only scoped. The algorithms are divided into two levels of processing. The first level converts the data to engineering units and applies corrections for instrument variations. The second level provides geophysical measurements derived from altimeter parameters for oceanographic users.

  13. Influence of the NaCl/LiF additives on structure, phasetransitions and dielectric properties of BSPT ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubko, N. V.; Kaleva, G. M.; Mosunov, A. V.; Politova, E. D.; Segalla, A. H.

    2016-04-01

    Influence of the NaCl/LiF additives (with ratio 60:40) on structure parameters, phase transitions and dielectric properties of solid solutions close to the Morphotropic Phase Boundary in the system (1-x)BiScO3 - xPbTiO3 (x=0.635, 0.645) has been studied. Using as initial the BSPT powders prepared from nitrate solutions, dense single phase ceramic samples doped by 5, 10 and 15 w. % of NaCl/LiF have been prepared at 1313 - 1323 K (2 h). Shift of the BSPT compositions phase content from initial mixtures of Rhombohedral and Tetragonal phases to the region of Tetragonal phase was stimulated by addition of the NaCl/LiF additives. This effect is accompanied by decrease of the unit sell volume, increase in the c/a ratio and increase in the Curie temperature value from 668 to 730 K for x=0.635 and from 672 to 724 K for x=0.645 in compositions doped by 10 w. % of the NaCl/LiF additive.

  14. A study of internal structure in components made by additive manufacturing process using 3 D X-ray tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Raguvarun, K. Balasubramaniam, Krishnan Rajagopal, Prabhu; Palanisamy, Suresh; Nagarajah, Romesh; Kapoor, Ajay; Hoye, Nicholas; Curiri, Dominic

    2015-03-31

    Additive manufacturing methods are gaining increasing popularity for rapidly and efficiently manufacturing parts and components in the industrial context, as well as for domestic applications. However, except when used for prototyping or rapid visualization of components, industries are concerned with the load carrying capacity and strength achievable by additive manufactured parts. In this paper, the wire-arc additive manufacturing (AM) process based on gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) has been examined for the internal structure and constitution of components generated by the process. High-resolution 3D X-ray tomography is used to gain cut-views through wedge-shaped parts created using this GTAW additive manufacturing process with titanium alloy materials. In this work, two different control conditions for the GTAW process are considered. The studies reveal clusters of porosities, located in periodic spatial intervals along the sample cross-section. Such internal defects can have a detrimental effect on the strength of the resulting AM components, as shown in destructive testing studies. Closer examination of this phenomenon shows that defect clusters are preferentially located at GTAW traversal path intervals. These results highlight the strong need for enhanced control of process parameters in ensuring components with minimal defects and higher strength.

  15. The shallow structure of the 2009 Mw 6.1 L'Aquila earthquake fault-system (Italy): new insights from integrated high-resolution refraction tomography and detailed geologic mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villani, Fabio; Improta, Luigi; Pucci, Stefano; Civico, Riccardo; Pantosti, Daniela

    2015-04-01

    The 6 April 2009 Mw 6.1 L'Aquila earthquake (central Italy) was caused by the Paganica Fault, which belongs to a ~20 km long network of normal faults (Paganica-San Demetrio Fault System, PSDFS). The hangingwall of the PSDFS hosts a wide Quaternary continental basin (Middle Aterno valley) with complex geometry, structural setting and sedimentary evolution. Before the 2009 earthquake, the shallow crustal structure in the epicentral area was poorly known. Here, we report results of a 2-D high-resolution seismic investigation carried out in 2010 in the NE portion of the basin, across the Paganica Fault, in a challenging urban environment. The survey consisted of 5 dense wide-aperture seismic profiles that run NE-SW for a total length of 8 km. Around 80,000 hand-picked first-arrival traveltimes were input to a non-linear multi-scale tomographic inversion. The merged profiles allow depicting a reliable cross-section of the Middle Aterno basin down to ~300 m depth. In addition, we show for the first time P-wave velocity images across the causative fault of the 6 April 2009 earthquake. Interpretation of the Vp tomograms is constrained by a few drillings and by results of a detailed geologic survey. We interpret low-Vp regions (1500-2000 m/s) as lacustrine sediments and higher Vp bodies (Vp up to 3000 m/s) as coarse fluvial and alluvial fan deposits sited above a Meso-Cenozoic carbonate substratum (Vp >3500-4000 m/s) that shows a very irregular morphology. The improved knowledge of the Middle Aterno valley geological setting together with new tomographic Vp images yield new insights on the buried structure and long-term evolution of two small basins (Bazzano and Paganica basins) crossed by the seismic lines. In particular, the Paganica basin developed since Early-Middle Pleistocene due to the Paganica SW-dipping master fault and its splays. Seismic imaging revealed that the basin infill consists almost exclusively of coarse alluvial fan deposits. We were able to detect 2

  16. Detailed Geological Modelling in Urban Areas focused on Structures relevant to the Near Surface Groundwater Flow in the context of Climatic Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, T.; Pallesen, T. M.; Jensen, N. P.; Mielby, S.; Sandersen, P.; Kristensen, M.

    2015-12-01

    This case demonstrates a practical example from the city of Odense (DK) where new geological modeling techniques has been developed and used in the software GeoScene3D, to create a detailed voxel model of the anthropogenic layer. The voxel model has been combined with a regional hydrostratigraphic layer model. The case is part of a pilot project partly financed by VTU (Foundation for Development of Technology in the Danish Water Sector) and involves many different datatypes such as borehole information, geophysical data, human related elements (landfill, pipelines, basements, roadbeds etc). In the last few years, there has been increased focus on detailed geological modeling in urban areas. The models serve as important input to hydrological models. This focus is partly due to climate changes as high intensity rainfalls are seen more often than in the past, and water recharge is a topic too. In urban areas, this arises new challenges. There is a need of a high level of detailed geological knowledge for the uppermost zone of the soil, which typically are problematic due to practically limitations, especially when using geological layer models. Furthermore, to accommodate the need of a high detail, all relevant available data has to be used in the modeling process. Human activity has deeply changed the soil layers, e.g. by constructions as roadbeds, buildings with basements, pipelines, landfill etc. These elements can act as barriers or pathways regarding surface near groundwater flow and can attribute to local flooding or mobilization and transport of contaminants etc. A geological voxel model is built by small boxes (a voxel). Each box can contain several parameters, ex. lithology, transmissivity or contaminant concentration. Human related elements can be implemented using tools, which gives the modeler advanced options for making detailed small-scale models. This case demonstrates the workflow and the resulting geological model for the pilot area.

  17. Structural consequences of two methyl additions in the E. coli trp repressor L-tryptophan binding pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, C.L.

    1995-12-01

    The flexibility and specificity of the L-tryptophan corepressor binding pocket of E coli trp repressor are being investigated by high-resolution crystallographic examination of aporepressor/corepressor analog complexes. While addition of a methyl group on the corepressor indole (5-methyl-tryptophan) results in a small but measurable shift in the position of that functional group introduction of a methyl group on a nearby residue in the binding pocket (Val 58 {yields} Ile) leaves the indole position of L-tryptophan essentially unchanged. Careful alignment of these structures with aporepressor/L-tryptophan/operator-DNA complexes reveal why 5-methyltryptophan is a better corepressor than L-tryptophan.

  18. Nitrogen addition and harvest frequency rather than initial plant species composition determine vertical structure and light interception in grasslands.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Ute; Isselstein, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    In biodiversity experiments based on seeded experimental communities, species richness and species composition exert a strong influence on canopy structure and can lead to an improved use of aboveground resources. In this study, we want to explore whether these findings are applicable to agriculturally managed permanent grassland. Vertical layered profiles of biomass, leaf area (LA) and light intensity were measured in a removal-type biodiversity experiment (GrassMan) to compare the canopy structure in grassland vegetation of different plant species composition (called sward types). Additionally, the altered sward types were subjected to four different management regimes by a combination of the factors fertilization (unfertilized, NPK fertilized) and cutting frequency (one late cut or three cuts). In spite of large compositional differences (ratio grasses : non-leguminous forbs : leguminous forbs ranging from 93 : 7 : 0 to 39 : 52 : 9), the vegetation of the same management regime hardly differed in its canopy structure, whereas the different management regimes led to distinct vertical profiles in the vegetation. However, the allocation of biomass in response to cutting and fertilization differed among the sward types. Vegetation dominated by grasses was denser and had more LA when fertilized compared with vegetation rich in dicots which merely grew taller. In functionally more diverse vegetation, light interception was not increased compared with vegetation consisting of more than 90 % of grasses in terms of biomass. Management had a much stronger influence on structure and light interception than plant species composition in this grassland experiment. PMID:26199402

  19. Imaging Magma Under St. Helens (iMUSH): Details of passive-source seismic deployment and preliminary 3-D velocity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulberg, C. W.; Creager, K. C.; Moran, S. C.; Abers, G. A.; Denlinger, R. P.; Hotovec-Ellis, A. J.; Vidale, J. E.; Kiser, E.; Levander, A.; Schultz, A.

    2014-12-01

    The imaging Magma Under St. Helens (iMUSH) experiment aims to delineate the extent of the magmatic system beneath Mount St. Helens (MSH) in Washington State. The experiment involves active- and passive-source seismology, magnetotellurics, and geochemistry/petrology. Seventy passive-source broadband seismometers were deployed in a 100-km-diameter array centered on MSH, with an average spacing of 10 km, and a planned duration of two years. The deployment over two weeks in June 2014 involved a group of 18 people split into 6 teams. Approximately half of the seismic stations have aircell batteries and/or pole-mounted solar panels in order to maintain power through deep snow at higher elevations during the winter months. Data will be retrieved 2-4 times a year throughout the duration of the experiment. The first service run performed in mid-July 2014 had a 98.4% data recovery. This is one of the largest wide-aperture two-dimensional arrays covering a volcano anywhere. The active-source portion of the experiment successfully set off 23 shots in late-July 2014. These were recorded clearly at permanent stations run by the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network up to 200 km away, and are expected to be well-recorded on many of the 70 broadband seismometers in addition to the 2500 Reftek "Texans" deployed temporarily for this purpose. For the 2-4 weeks of broadband data collected in July, local earthquakes down to magnitude 0 are recorded across the array, with clear P- and S- arrivals. Earthquakes of this size occur daily within 50 km of MSH. We are keeping a careful catalog of all activity in the region for the duration of the iMUSH experiment. We will pick P- and S-wave travel times at the 70 broadband stations from local earthquakes and active shots, for available data from between June and October 2014. We will also use a tomographic code (Preston et al, 2003, Science) to invert the travel times to obtain preliminary earthquake location and 3-D velocity structure.

  20. Control of ordering and structure in soft templated mesoporous carbon films by use of selective solvent additives.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Zhe; Xue, Jiachen; Stein, Gila E; Cavicchi, Kevin A; Vogt, Bryan D

    2013-07-01

    The structure of ordered mesoporous carbons fabricated using poly(styrene-block-N,N,-dimethyl-n-octadecylamine p-styrenesulfonate) (PS-b-PSS-DMODA) as the template and phenolic resin (resol) as the carbon source can be easily manipulated by inclusion of low concentrations of low volatility selective solvents in the casting solution. Casting from neat methyl ethyl ketone yields a disordered structure even upon thermal annealing. However, addition of both dioctyl phthalate (DOP, PS selective) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO, resol and PSS-DMODA selective) at modest concentrations to this casting solution provides sufficient mobility to produce highly ordered films with cylindrical mesopores. The DOP acts to swell the hydrophobic domain and can more than double the mesopore size, while the DMSO acts to swell the resol phase. Moreover, the surface area of the mesoporous carbons increases significantly as the meosopore size increases. This is a result of the decrease in wall thickness, which can be ascertained by the constant d-spacing of the mesostructure as the pore size increases. This behavior is counter to the typical effect of pore swelling agents that increase the pore size and decrease the surface area. Moreover, with only 4 wt % DOP/DMSO in the solution (20 wt % relative to solids), the scattering profiles exhibit many orders of diffraction, even upon carbonization, which is not typically observed for soft templated films. Variation in the concentration of DOP and DMSO during casting enables facile tuning of the structure of mesoporous carbon films. PMID:23738851

  1. Effect of an iodine-containing additive on the composition, structure, and morphology of chemically deposited lead selenide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, Z. I.; Bakanov, V. M.; Maskaeva, L. N.; Markov, V. F.; Voronin, V. I.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of an ammonium iodide additive on the elemental and phase compositions, structural parameters, and surface morphology of lead selenide films synthesized by chemical deposition from aqueous solutions has been studied using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. It has been established that the obtained PbSe films have a multiphase structure. The iodine content of the films is directly proportional to the NH4I concentration in the reaction mixture and increases linearly with an increase in this concentration to 0.25 mol/L. No individual iodine-containing phases have been detected in the film structure. However, the introduction of iodine leads to an increase in the PbSe phase lattice parameter from ˜6.11 to ˜6.16 Å and to a decrease in the crystal grain size to ˜ 20 nm. It has been found that there is a correlation between the grain size, lattice parameter, and ammonium iodide concentration in the reaction mixture, which can be explained by changes in the film growth mechanism at the initial growth steps.

  2. Response of Mg Addition on the Dendritic Structures and Mechanical Properties of Hypoeutectic Al-10Si (Wt Pct) Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaköse, Ercan; Yildiz, Mehmet; Keskin, Mustafa

    2016-08-01

    Rapidly solidified hypoeutectic Al-10Si- xMg ( x = 0, 5, 10 wt pct) alloys were produced by the melt-spinning method. The phase composition was identified by X-ray diffractometry, and the microstructures of the alloys were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The melting characteristics were studied by differential scanning calorimetry and differential thermal analysis under an Ar atmosphere. The mechanical properties of the melt-spun and conventionally solidified alloys were tested by tensile-strength and Vickers microhardness tests. The results illustrate that the cooling rate and solidification time of 89 μm thick melt-spun ribbon were estimated to be 2.97 × 107 K s-1 and 9.31 × 10-6 s, respectively. Nanoscale Si spot particles were observed growing on the surface of the dendritic α-Al matrix and the average sizes of these spots ranged from 10 to 50 nm. The improvement in the tensile properties and microhardness was related to structural refinement and the supersaturated α-Al solid solution; the nanoscale-dispersed Si spot particles made a significant improvement to the mechanical properties of the melt-spun ribbon. Detailed electrical resistivity tests of the ribbons were carried out at temperatures of 300 K to 800 K (27 °C to 527 °C).

  3. Characterization of the structural details of residual austenite in the weld metal of a 9Cr1MoNbV welded rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xia; Ji, Hui-jun; Liu, Peng; Wang, Peng; Lu, Feng-gui; Gao, Yu-lai

    2014-06-01

    The existence of residual austenite in weld metal plays an important role in determining the properties and dimensional accuracy of welded rotors. An effective corrosive agent and the metallographic etching process were developed to clearly reveal the characteristics of residual austenite in the weld metal of a 9Cr1MoNbV welded rotor. Moreover, the details of the distribution, shape, length, length-to-width ratio, and the content of residual austenite were systematically characterized using the Image-Pro Plus image analysis software. The results revealed that the area fraction of residual austenite was approximately 6.3% in the observed weld seam; the average area, length, and length-to-width ratio of dispersed residual austenite were quantitatively evaluated to be (5.5 ± 0.1) μm2, (5.0 ± 0.1) μm, and (2.2 ± 0.1), respectively. The newly developed corrosive agent and etching method offer an appropriate approach to characterize residual austenite in the weld metal of welded rotors in detail.

  4. Crystal Structures of GII.10 and GII.12 Norovirus Protruding Domains in Complex with Histo-Blood Group Antigens Reveal Details for a Potential Site of Vulnerability

    SciTech Connect

    Hansman, Grant S.; Biertümpfel, Christian; Georgiev, Ivelin; McLellan, Jason S.; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Tongqing; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Kwong, Peter D.

    2011-10-10

    Noroviruses are the dominant cause of outbreaks of gastroenteritis worldwide, and interactions with human histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) are thought to play a critical role in their entry mechanism. Structures of noroviruses from genogroups GI and GII in complex with HBGAs, however, reveal different modes of interaction. To gain insight into norovirus recognition of HBGAs, we determined crystal structures of norovirus protruding domains from two rarely detected GII genotypes, GII.10 and GII.12, alone and in complex with a panel of HBGAs, and analyzed structure-function implications related to conservation of the HBGA binding pocket. The GII.10- and GII.12-apo structures as well as the previously solved GII.4-apo structure resembled each other more closely than the GI.1-derived structure, and all three GII structures showed similar modes of HBGA recognition. The primary GII norovirus-HBGA interaction involved six hydrogen bonds between a terminal {alpha}fucose1-2 of the HBGAs and a dimeric capsid interface, which was composed of elements from two protruding subdomains. Norovirus interactions with other saccharide units of the HBGAs were variable and involved fewer hydrogen bonds. Sequence analysis revealed a site of GII norovirus sequence conservation to reside under the critical {alpha}fucose1-2 and to be one of the few patches of conserved residues on the outer virion-capsid surface. The site was smaller than that involved in full HBGA recognition, a consequence of variable recognition of peripheral saccharides. Despite this evasion tactic, the HBGA site of viral vulnerability may provide a viable target for small molecule- and antibody-mediated neutralization of GII norovirus.

  5. Additive technology of soluble mold tooling for embedded devices in composite structures: A study on manufactured tolerances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Madhuparna

    Composite textiles have found widespread use and advantages in various industries and applications. The constant demand for high quality products and services requires companies to minimize their manufacturing costs, and delivery time in order to compete in general and niche marketplaces. Advanced manufacturing methods aim to provide economical methods of mold production. Creation of molding and tooling options for advanced composites encompasses a large portion of the fabrication time, making it a costly process and restraining factor. This research discusses a preliminary investigation into the use of soluble polymer compounds and additive manufacturing to fabricate soluble molds. These molds suffer from dimensional errors due to several factors, which have also been characterized. The basic soluble mold of a composite is 3D printed to meet the desired dimensions and geometry of holistic structures or spliced components. The time taken to dissolve the mold depends on the rate of agitation of the solvent. This process is steered towards enabling the implantation of optoelectronic devices within the composite to provide sensing capability for structural health monitoring. The shape deviation of the 3D printed mold is also studied and compared to its original dimensions to optimize the dimensional quality to produce dimensionally accurate parts. Mechanical tests were performed on compact tension (CT) resin samples prepared from these 3D printed molds and revealed crack propagation towards an embedded intact optical fiber.

  6. Structure and properties of PVDF membrane with PES-C addition via thermally induced phase separation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lishun; Sun, Junfen

    2014-12-01

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane and PVDF membrane with phenolphthalein polyethersulfone (PES-C) addition were prepared via thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) method by using diphenyl carbonate (DPC) and dimethyl acetamide (DMAc) as mixed diluents. The effects of coagulation temperature and pre-evaporation time on structure and properties of membranes were studied. The changes of sewage flux in MBR and the attenuation coefficient of sewage flux were investigated. The resistance distributions of PVDF and PVDF/PES-C membranes were compared by resistance analysis. Membrane composition and structure were characterized by ATR-FTIR, TGA, SEM and AFM. The foulant on membranes was analyzed by FTIR. The contact angle of PVDF/PES-C membrane was lower than that of PVDF membrane. A thinner skin layer and a porous cellular support layer formed in PVDF/PES-C membrane and resulted in a higher porosity and pure water flux. The pure water flux and porosity of PVDF/PES-C membrane increased with rising coagulation temperature and decreased with extending pre-evaporation time. The flux attenuation coefficient, the cake layer resistance and internal fouling resistance of PVDF/PES-C membrane in MBR were smaller than those of PVDF membrane in MBR. The FTIR spectrum of foulant on membrane indicated that the foulant on PVDF/PES-C membrane was mostly composed of protein and polysaccharide, while the foulant on pure PVDF membrane included biopolymer clusters besides protein and polysaccharide.

  7. Structural-phase composition, structure of the surface, magnetostatic and microwave properties of powders produced by milling of Fe in polystyrene with additions of surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomaeva, S. F.; Maratkanova, A. N.; Syugaev, A. V.; Rozanov, K. N.; Petrov, D. A.

    2015-08-01

    The effect of additions of surfactants (stearic and perfluorononanoic acids, stearylamine, and of their mixtures) on the morphology, structural-phase composition, structure of the surface, and magnetostatic and microwave properties of ferromagnetic powders obtained by the joint high-energy milling of Fe and polystyrene has been investigated. It has been shown that the use of a mixture of stearic and perfluorononanoic acids during milling made it possible to obtain particles of plate-like shape with minimum changes in the phase composition and to produce shells on their surface that consist of the surfactant molecules. All of these factors have positively affected the microwave properties of the composites prepared from thus obtained powders.

  8. The Effect of Emphasizing Mathematical Structure in the Acquisition of Whole Number Computation Skills (Addition and Subtraction) By Seven- and Eight-Year Olds: A Clinical Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uprichard, A. Edward; Collura, Carolyn

    This investigation sought to determine the effect of emphasizing mathematical structure in the acquisition of computational skills by seven- and eight-year-olds. The meaningful development-of-structure approach emphasized closure, commutativity, associativity, and the identity element of addition; the inverse relationship between addition and…

  9. Program for establishing long time flight service performance of composite materials in the central wing structure of C-130 aircraft. Phase 2: Detailed design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvill, W. E.; Duhig, J. J.; Spencer, B. R.

    1973-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and evaluation of boron-epoxy reinforced C-130 center wing boxes are discussed. Design drawings, static strength, fatigue endurance, flutter, and weight analyses required for the wing box fabrication are presented. Additional component testing to verify the design for panel buckling and to evaluate specific local design areas are reported.

  10. Chord Splicing & Joining Detail; Chord & CrossBracing Joint Details; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Chord Splicing & Joining Detail; Chord & Cross-Bracing Joint Details; Cross Bracing Center Joint Detail; Chord & Diagonal Joint Detail - Vermont Covered Bridge, Highland Park, spanning Kokomo Creek at West end of Deffenbaugh Street (moved to), Kokomo, Howard County, IN

  11. Arch & Chord Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Arch & Chord Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie & Crossbracing Joint Detail - Dunlapsville Covered Bridge, Spanning East Fork Whitewater River, Dunlapsville, Union County, IN

  12. Crystal structure of the HIV-1 integrase core domain in complex with sucrose reveals details of an allosteric inhibitory binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Wielens, Jerome; Headey, Stephen J.; Jeevarajah, Dharshini; Rhodes, David I.; Deadman, John; Chalmers, David K.; Scanlon, Martin J.; Parker, Michael W.

    2010-04-19

    HIV integrase (IN) is an essential enzyme in HIV replication and an important target for drug design. IN has been shown to interact with a number of cellular and viral proteins during the integration process. Disruption of these important interactions could provide a mechanism for allosteric inhibition of IN. We present the highest resolution crystal structure of the IN core domain to date. We also present a crystal structure of the IN core domain in complex with sucrose which is bound at the dimer interface in a region that has previously been reported to bind integrase inhibitors.

  13. Response of Functional Structure of Soil Microbial Community to Multi-level Nitrogen Additions on the Central Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Yuan, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The use of fossil fuels and fertilizers has increased the amount of biologically reactive nitrogen in the atmosphere over the past century. Tibet is the one of the most threatened regions by nitrogen deposition, thus understanding how its microbial communities function maybe of high importance to predicting microbial responses to nitrogen deposition. Here we describe a short-time nitrogen addition conducted in an alpine steppe ecosystem to investigate the response of functional structure of soil microbial community to multi-level nitrogen addition. Using a GeoChip 4.0, we showed that functional diversities and richness of functional genes were unchanged at low level of nitrogen fertilizer inputs (<20 kg N ha-1 yr-1), but significantly decreased at higher nitrogen fertilizer inputs (>=40 kg N ha-1 yr-1). Detrended correspondence analysis indicated that the functional structure of microbial communities was markedly different across the nitrogen gradients. Most C degradation genes whose abundances significantly increased under elevated N fertilizer were those involved in the degradation of relatively labile C (starch, hemicellulose, cellulose), whereas the abundance of certain genes involved in the degradation of recalcitrant C (i.e. lignin) was largely decreased (such as manganese peroxidase, mnp). The results suggest that the elevated N fertilization rates might significantly accelerate the labile C degradation, but might not spur recalcitrant C degradation. The combined effect of gdh and ureC genes involved in N cycling appeared to shift the balance between ammonia and organic N toward organic N ammonification and hence increased the N mineralization potential. Moreover, Urease directly involved in urea mineralization significantly increased. Lastly, Canonical correspondence analysis showed that soil (TOC+NH4++NO3-+NO2-+pH) and plant (Aboveground plant productivity + Shannon Diversity) variables could explain 38.9% of the variation of soil microbial community

  14. Structure and high-temperature properties of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} with interstitial additions

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Jason

    1999-12-01

    This study was motivated by the fact that previous research on the structure and properties of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} showed unacceptably inconsistent results. The primary reason for these inconsistencies was interstitial contamination of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} by carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. Thus, this study measured the effects that these interstitial atoms have on some of the previously reported properties. These properties include crystalline structure, thermal expansion anisotropy, electronic structure and bonding, and high temperature oxidation resistance. In Chapter 2 of this study, the lattice parameters and atomic positions of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} as a function of carbon, nitrogen or oxygen content were measured via x-ray and neutron diffraction. Comparing these lattice parameters to those reported in other studies on supposedly pure Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} confirmed that the majority of the previous studies had samples with a considerable amount of interstitial impurities. In fact, the lattice parameter trends given in Chapter 2 can be used to estimate the types and level of impurities in these studies. Furthermore, Chapter 2 discusses how atomic positions change as interstitial atoms are incorporated into the lattice. These changes in atomic separations suggest that strong bonds form between the interstitial atoms and the surrounding titanium atoms. This is in full agreement with the electronic structure calculations given in Chapter 4. These calculations show that bonding does occur between titanium d-states and interstitial atom p-states at the expense of bonding between some of the titanium and silicon atoms. In addition, carbon seems to be the most strongly bonded interstitial atom. Knowledge of the exact interstitial content and its effect on bonding is important because Chapters 3 and 5 have shown that interstitial atoms have a marked effect on the thermal expansion and oxidation resistance. As discussed in Chapter 3, all interstitial atoms lower the thermal

  15. Details of regional particle deposition and airflow structures in a realistic model of human tracheobronchial airways: two-phase flow simulation.

    PubMed

    Rahimi-Gorji, Mohammad; Gorji, Tahereh B; Gorji-Bandpy, Mofid

    2016-07-01

    In the present investigation, detailed two-phase flow modeling of airflow, transport and deposition of micro-particles (1-10µm) in a realistic tracheobronchial airway geometry based on CT scan images under various breathing conditions (i.e. 10-60l/min) was considered. Lagrangian particle tracking has been used to investigate the particle deposition patterns in a model comprising mouth up to generation G6 of tracheobronchial airways. The results demonstrated that during all breathing patterns, the maximum velocity change occurred in the narrow throat region (Larynx). Due to implementing a realistic geometry for simulations, many irregularities and bending deflections exist in the airways model. Thereby, at higher inhalation rates, these areas are prone to vortical effects which tend to entrap the inhaled particles. According to the results, deposition fraction has a direct relationship with particle aerodynamic diameter (for dp=1-10µm). Enhancing inhalation flow rate and particle size will largely increase the inertial force and consequently, more particle deposition is evident suggesting that inertial impaction is the dominant deposition mechanism in tracheobronchial airways. PMID:27160637

  16. Detailed Study of the Influence of InGaAs Matrix on the Strain Reduction in the InAs Dot-In-Well Structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Chen, Qimiao; Wu, Xiaoyan; Cao, Chunfang; Wang, Shumin; Gong, Qian

    2016-12-01

    InAs/InGaAs dot-in-well (DWELL) structures have been investigated with the systematically varied InGaAs thickness. Both the strained buffer layer (SBL) below the dot layer and the strain-reducing layer (SRL) above the dot layer were found to be responsible for the redshift in photoluminescence (PL) emission of the InAs/InGaAs DWELL structure. A linear followed by a saturation behavior of the emission redshift was observed as a function of the SBL and SRL thickness, respectively. The PL intensity is greatly enhanced by applying both of the SRL and SBL. Finite element analysis simulation and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurement were carried out to analyze the strain distribution in the InAs QD and the InGaAs SBL. The results clearly indicate the strain reduction in the QD induced by the SBL, which are likely the main cause for the emission redshift. PMID:26932758

  17. Detailed Study of the Influence of InGaAs Matrix on the Strain Reduction in the InAs Dot-In-Well Structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Chen, Qimiao; Wu, Xiaoyan; Cao, Chunfang; Wang, Shumin; Gong, Qian

    2016-12-01

    InAs/InGaAs dot-in-well (DWELL) structures have been investigated with the systematically varied InGaAs thickness. Both the strained buffer layer (SBL) below the dot layer and the strain-reducing layer (SRL) above the dot layer were found to be responsible for the redshift in photoluminescence (PL) emission of the InAs/InGaAs DWELL structure. A linear followed by a saturation behavior of the emission redshift was observed as a function of the SBL and SRL thickness, respectively. The PL intensity is greatly enhanced by applying both of the SRL and SBL. Finite element analysis simulation and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurement were carried out to analyze the strain distribution in the InAs QD and the InGaAs SBL. The results clearly indicate the strain reduction in the QD induced by the SBL, which are likely the main cause for the emission redshift.

  18. The Structure of Plant Cell Walls: I. The Macromolecular Components of the Walls of Suspension-cultured Sycamore Cells with a Detailed Analysis of the Pectic Polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Talmadge, K W; Keegstra, K; Bauer, W D; Albersheim, P

    1973-01-01

    This is the first in a series of papers dealing with the structure of cell walls isolated from suspension-cultured sycamore cells (Acer pseudoplatanus). These studies have been made possible by the availability of purified hydrolytic enzymes and by recent improvements in the techniques of methylation analysis. These techniques have permitted us to identify and quantitate the macromolecular components of sycamore cell walls. These walls are composed of 10% arabinan, 2% 3,6-linked arabinogalactan, 23% cellulose, 9% oligo-arabinosides (attached to hydroxyproline), 8% 4-linked galactan, 10% hydroxyproline-rich protein, 16% rhamnogalacturonan, and 21% xyloglucan.The structures of the pectic polymers (the neutral arabinan, the neutral galactan, and the acidic rhamnogalacturonan) were obtained, in part, by methylation analysis of fragments of these polymers which were released from the sycamore walls by the action of a highly purified endopolygalacturonase. The data suggest a branched arabinan and a linear 4-linked galactan occurring as side chains on the rhamnogalacturonan. Small amounts or pieces of a xyloglucan, the wall hemicellulose, appear to be covalently linked to some of the galactan chains. Thus, the galactan appears to serve as a bridge between the xyloglucan and rhamnogalacturonan components of the wall.The rhamnogalacturonan consists of an alpha-(1 --> 4)-linked galacturonan chain which is interspersed with 2-linked rhamnosyl residues. The rhamnosyl residues are not randomly distributed in the chain but probably occur in units of rhamnosyl- (1 --> 4)-galacturonosyl- (1 --> 2)-rhamnosyl. This sequence appears to alternate with a homogalacturonan sequence containing approximately 8 residues of 4-linked galacturonic acid. About half of the rhamnosyl residues are branched, having a substituent attached to carbon 4. This is likely to be the site of attachment of the 4-linked galactan.The hydroxyprolyl oligo-arabinosides of the hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein

  19. Crystal structures of two bacterial HECT-like E3 ligases in complex with a human E2 reveal atomic details of pathogen-host interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, David Yin-wei; Diao, Jianbo; Chen, Jue

    2012-12-10

    In eukaryotes, ubiquitination is an important posttranslational process achieved through a cascade of ubiquitin-activating (E1), conjugating (E2), and ligase (E3) enzymes. Many pathogenic bacteria deliver virulence factors into the host cell that function as E3 ligases. How these bacterial 'Trojan horses' integrate into the eukaryotic ubiquitin system has remained a mystery. Here we report crystal structures of two bacterial E3s, Salmonella SopA and Escherichia coli NleL, both in complex with human E2 UbcH7. These structures represent two distinct conformational states of the bacterial E3s, supporting the necessary structural rearrangements associated with ubiquitin transfer. The E2-interacting surface of SopA and NleL has little similarity to those of eukaryotic E3s. However, both bacterial E3s bind to the canonical surface of E2 that normally interacts with eukaryotic E3s. Furthermore, we show that a glutamate residue on E3 is involved in catalyzing ubiquitin transfer from E3 to the substrate, but not from E2 to E3. Together, these results provide mechanistic insights into the ubiquitin pathway and a framework for understanding molecular mimicry in bacterial pathogenesis.

  20. Detailed Shallow Structure and Seismic Catalog Based on Data of a Spatially-Dense Array on the San Jacinto Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zion, Y.

    2015-12-01

    I review results on imaging the shallow structure of San Jacinto fault zone and detection/location of seismic energy sources using data of a spatially-dense Nodal array centered on the Clark branch of the fault. The array operated at the Sage Brush site south of Anza for about 4 weeks in 2014 with 1108 vertical (10 Hz) geophones in about 650 m x 700 m box configuration. Continuous waveforms with signals generated by the ambient seismic noise, earthquakes, and Betsy gunshots were recorded with useable frequencies up to 200 Hz. Imaging the shallow structure is done with surface and body waves extracted from the ambient noise, arrivals from local and teleseismic earthquakes, and waves generated by the gunshots. The results reveal shallow material with very low seismic velocities and attenuation coefficients, strong lateral and vertical variations, seismic trapping structure, local sedimentary basin, and overall lithology contrast across the fault. The detection/location techniques include stacking, beamforming, matched field processing, and templates generated by these methods. The analysis uncovers many hundred of daily earthquakes not detected by the regional networks and several different types of surface noise sources.

  1. LF460 detail design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    This is the final technical report documenting the detail design of the LF460, and advanced turbotip lift fan intended for application with the YJ97-GE-100 turbojet jet generator to a V/STOL transport research aircraft. Primary objective of the design was to achieve a low noise level while maintaining the high thrust/weight ratio capability of a high pressure ratio lift fan. Report covers design requirements and summarizes activities and final results in the areas of aerodynamic and mechanical design, component and system performance, acoustic features and final noise predictions.

  2. Assessment of the micro-structure and depletion potentials in two-dimensional binary mixtures of additive hard-disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera-Burgos, Jorge Adrián; Méndez-Alcaraz, José Miguel; Pérez-Ángel, Gabriel; Castañeda-Priego, Ramón

    2016-09-01

    Depletion forces are a particular class of effective interactions that have been mainly investigated in binary mixtures of hard-spheres in bulk. Although there are a few contributions that point toward the effects of confinement on the depletion potential, little is known about such entropic potentials in two-dimensional colloidal systems. From theoretical point of view, the problem resides in the fact that there is no general formulation of depletion forces in arbitrary dimensions and, typically, any approach that works well in three dimensions has to be reformulated for lower dimensionality. However, we have proposed a theoretical framework, based on the formalism of contraction of the description within the integral equations theory of simple liquids, to account for effective interactions in colloidal liquids, whose main feature is that it does not need to be readapted to the problem under consideration. We have also shown that such an approach allows one to determine the depletion pair potential in three-dimensional colloidal mixtures even near to the demixing transition, provided the bridge functions are sufficiently accurate to correctly describe the spatial correlation between colloids [E. López-Sánchez et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 104908 (2013)]. We here report an extensive analysis of the structure and the entropic potentials in binary mixtures of additive hard-disks. In particular, we show that the same functional form of the modified-Verlet closure relation used in three dimensions can be straightforwardly employed to obtain an accurate solution for two-dimensional colloidal mixtures in a wide range of packing fractions, molar fractions, and size asymmetries. Our theoretical results are explicitly compared with the ones obtained by means of event-driven molecular dynamics simulations and recent experimental results. Furthermore, to assess the accuracy of our predictions, the depletion potentials are used in an effective one-component model to reproduce

  3. Assessment of the micro-structure and depletion potentials in two-dimensional binary mixtures of additive hard-disks.

    PubMed

    Perera-Burgos, Jorge Adrián; Méndez-Alcaraz, José Miguel; Pérez-Ángel, Gabriel; Castañeda-Priego, Ramón

    2016-09-14

    Depletion forces are a particular class of effective interactions that have been mainly investigated in binary mixtures of hard-spheres in bulk. Although there are a few contributions that point toward the effects of confinement on the depletion potential, little is known about such entropic potentials in two-dimensional colloidal systems. From theoretical point of view, the problem resides in the fact that there is no general formulation of depletion forces in arbitrary dimensions and, typically, any approach that works well in three dimensions has to be reformulated for lower dimensionality. However, we have proposed a theoretical framework, based on the formalism of contraction of the description within the integral equations theory of simple liquids, to account for effective interactions in colloidal liquids, whose main feature is that it does not need to be readapted to the problem under consideration. We have also shown that such an approach allows one to determine the depletion pair potential in three-dimensional colloidal mixtures even near to the demixing transition, provided the bridge functions are sufficiently accurate to correctly describe the spatial correlation between colloids [E. López-Sánchez et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 104908 (2013)]. We here report an extensive analysis of the structure and the entropic potentials in binary mixtures of additive hard-disks. In particular, we show that the same functional form of the modified-Verlet closure relation used in three dimensions can be straightforwardly employed to obtain an accurate solution for two-dimensional colloidal mixtures in a wide range of packing fractions, molar fractions, and size asymmetries. Our theoretical results are explicitly compared with the ones obtained by means of event-driven molecular dynamics simulations and recent experimental results. Furthermore, to assess the accuracy of our predictions, the depletion potentials are used in an effective one-component model to reproduce

  4. Detailed structural analysis of glycosidase/inhibitor interactions: complexes of Cex from Cellulomonas fimi with xylobiose-derived aza-sugars.

    PubMed

    Notenboom, V; Williams, S J; Hoos, R; Withers, S G; Rose, D R

    2000-09-26

    Detailed insights into the mode of binding of a series of tight-binding aza-sugar glycosidase inhibitors of two fundamentally different classes are described through X-ray crystallographic studies of complexes with the retaining family 10 xylanase Cex from Cellulomonas fimi. Complexes with xylobiose-derived aza-sugar inhibitors of the substituted "amidine" class (xylobio-imidazole, K(i) = 150 nM; xylobio-lactam oxime, K(i) = 370 nM) reveal lateral interaction of the "glycosidic" nitrogen with the acid/base catalyst (Glu127) and hydrogen bonding of the sugar 2-hydroxyl with the catalytic nucleophile (Glu233), as expected. Tight binding of xylobio-isofagomine (K(i) = 130 nM) appears to be a consequence of strong interactions of the ring nitrogen with the catalytic nucleophile while, surprisingly, no direct protein contacts are made with the ring nitrogen of the xylobio-deoxynojirimycin analogue (K(i) = 5800 nM). Instead the nitrogen interacts with two ordered water molecules, thereby accounting for its relatively weaker binding, though it still binds some 1200-fold more tightly than does xylobiose, presumably as a consequence of electrostatic interactions at the active site. Dramatically weaker binding of these same inhibitors to the family 11 xylanase Bcx from Bacillus circulans (K(i) from 0.5 to 1.5 mM) is rationalized for the substituted amidines on the basis that this enzyme utilizes a syn protonation trajectory and likely hydrolyzes via a (2,5)B boat transition state. Weaker binding of the deoxynojirimycin and isofagomine analogues likely reflects the energetic penalty for distortion of these analogues to a (2,5)B conformation, possibly coupled with destabilizing interactions with Tyr69, a conserved, catalytically essential active site residue.

  5. High resolution clear native electrophoresis (hrCNE) allows a detailed analysis of the heterotrimeric structure of recombinant Neisseria meningitidis porins inserted into liposomes.

    PubMed

    Freixeiro, Paula; Diéguez-Casal, Ernesto; Costoya, Liliana; Marzoa, Juan; Ferreirós, Carlos M; Criado, María Teresa; Sánchez, Sandra

    2013-02-01

    Three recombinant proteins of Neisseria meningitidis, rPorB, rPorA, and rRmpM, were purified and incorporated into liposomes prepared by dialysis-extrusion. The protein complexes formed using different combinations of recombinant proteins were studied by high resolution clear native electrophoresis (hrCNE) and 2-D hrCNE/SDS-PAGE, analyzing the influence of the stoichiometry of the two porins in the formation of complexes and comparing them with native porin complexes present in OMVs from five different N. meningitidis strains. Insertion of the recombinant proteins into liposomes allowed a complete refolding of porin complexes, and the electrophoretic analyses showed that, when the three recombinant proteins are present, the pattern of porin complexes obtained is similar to that observed in native OMVs. We could show homocomplexes of each individual porin and PorA/PorB, RmpM/PorB, and PorA/PorB/RmpM heterocomplexes. Our results suggest that RmpM binds only to PorB, confirm the trimeric structure of N. meningitidis pores, and demonstrate that insertion into liposomes restores the native structure of porin complexes.

  6. Additive Manufacturing of a Photo-Cross-Linkable Polymer via Direct Melt Electrospinning Writing for Producing High Strength Structures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Hochleitner, Gernot; Woodfield, Tim; Groll, Juergen; Dalton, Paul D; Amsden, Brian G

    2016-01-11

    Melt electrospinning writing (MEW) is an emerging additive manufacturing technique that enables the design and fabrication of micrometer-thin fibrous scaffolds made of biocompatible and biodegradable polymers. By using a computer-aided deposition process, a unique control over pore size and interconnectivity of the resulting scaffolds is achieved, features highly interesting for tissue engineering applications. However, MEW has been mainly used to process low melting point thermoplastics such as poly(ε-caprolactone). Since this polymer exhibits creep and a reduction in modulus upon hydration, we manufactured scaffolds of poly(L-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone-co-acryloyl carbonate) (poly(LLA-ε-CL-AC)), a photo-cross-linkable and biodegradable polymer, for the first time. We show that the stiffness of the scaffolds increases significantly (up to ∼10-fold) after cross-linking by UV irradiation at room temperature, compared with un-cross-linked microfiber scaffolds. The preservation of stiffness and high average fiber modulus (370 ± 166 MPa) within the cross-linked hydrated scaffolds upon repetitive loading (10% strain at 1 Hz up to 200,000 cycles) suggests that the prepared scaffolds may be of potential interest for soft connective tissue engineering applications. Moreover, the approach can be readily adapted through manipulation of polymer properties and scaffold geometry to prepare structures with mechanical properties suitable for other tissue engineering applications.

  7. Additive Manufacturing of a Photo-Cross-Linkable Polymer via Direct Melt Electrospinning Writing for Producing High Strength Structures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Hochleitner, Gernot; Woodfield, Tim; Groll, Juergen; Dalton, Paul D; Amsden, Brian G

    2016-01-11

    Melt electrospinning writing (MEW) is an emerging additive manufacturing technique that enables the design and fabrication of micrometer-thin fibrous scaffolds made of biocompatible and biodegradable polymers. By using a computer-aided deposition process, a unique control over pore size and interconnectivity of the resulting scaffolds is achieved, features highly interesting for tissue engineering applications. However, MEW has been mainly used to process low melting point thermoplastics such as poly(ε-caprolactone). Since this polymer exhibits creep and a reduction in modulus upon hydration, we manufactured scaffolds of poly(L-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone-co-acryloyl carbonate) (poly(LLA-ε-CL-AC)), a photo-cross-linkable and biodegradable polymer, for the first time. We show that the stiffness of the scaffolds increases significantly (up to ∼10-fold) after cross-linking by UV irradiation at room temperature, compared with un-cross-linked microfiber scaffolds. The preservation of stiffness and high average fiber modulus (370 ± 166 MPa) within the cross-linked hydrated scaffolds upon repetitive loading (10% strain at 1 Hz up to 200,000 cycles) suggests that the prepared scaffolds may be of potential interest for soft connective tissue engineering applications. Moreover, the approach can be readily adapted through manipulation of polymer properties and scaffold geometry to prepare structures with mechanical properties suitable for other tissue engineering applications. PMID:26620885

  8. Effects of plasmochemical treatments and cerium additions on the structural characteristics and activity of copper catalyst particles in isopropanol dehydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platonov, E. A.; Lobanov, N. N.; Galimova, N. A.; Protasova, I. A.; Yagodovskii, V. D.

    2012-08-01

    The effect of the treatment of the 5 wt % Cu/SiO2 (I) and (5 wt % Cu + 0.5 wt % Ce)/SiO2 (II) catalysts with glow discharge plasma in O2, H2, and Ar on their structural characteristics was studied by X-ray phase analysis; the influence of cerium additions and plasmochemical treatments on the catalyst activity in isopropanol dehydrogenation was also investigated. Under the plasmochemical treatment, the diameters of Cu particles in catalyst I nearly doubled and microstresses in the metal particles also changed. Catalyst II was X-ray amorphous both before and after plasmochemical treatments. The activity of I after plasmochemical treatment increased because of the increase in the number of centers and changes in their composition. Growth of the activity of I compared with the activity of II was explained by the formation of new catalytic centers due to positive charging of the Ce+α adatom on the surface of the copper particle.

  9. We Built This House; It's Time to Move in: Leveraging Existing DICOM Structure to More Completely Utilize Readily Available Detailed Contrast Administration Information.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Jeffrey D; Siegel, Eliot L; Balasubramanian, Sridhar; Wang, Kenneth C

    2015-08-01

    The Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standard is the universal format for interoperability in medical imaging. In addition to imaging data, DICOM has evolved to support a wide range of imaging metadata including contrast administration data that is readily available from many modern contrast injectors. Contrast agent, route of administration, start and stop time, volume, flow rate, and duration can be recorded using DICOM attributes [1]. While this information is sparsely and inconsistently recorded in routine clinical practice, it could potentially be of significant diagnostic value. This work will describe parameters recorded by automatic contrast injectors, summarize the DICOM mechanisms available for tracking contrast injection data, and discuss the role of such data in clinical radiology. PMID:25700615

  10. Detail of Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This color photo of Neptune's large satellite Triton was obtained on Aug. 24 1989 at a range of 530,000 kilometers (330,000 miles). The resolution is about 10 kilometers (6.2 miles), sufficient to begin to show topographic detail. The image was made from pictures taken through the green, violet and ultraviolet filters. In this technique, regions that are highly reflective in the ultraviolet appear blue in color. In reality, there is no part of Triton that would appear blue to the eye. The bright southern hemisphere of Triton, which fills most of this frame, is generally pink in tone as is the even brighter equatorial band. The darker regions north of the equator also tend to be pink or reddish in color. JPL manages the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

  11. Detailed structure and geological background of Foldback Reflectors near Methane-hydrate BSRs inferred from 3D seismic in the eastern Nankai Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, H.; Morita, S.; Kioka, A.; Ashi, J.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding subsurface gas/fluid behavior is significant for revealing hydrocarbon pathways or for discussions on global carbon cycle. Conventional hydrocarbon indicators in seismic profiles are in practice useful for detection of gas hydrates or gas in shallow sedimentary sequences. We herein study uniquely distinct seismic reflectors imaged in 3D seismic data acquired in the eastern Nankai Trough. The reflectors termed here as Foldback reflectors (FBRs), which occur along the edge of BSR and have accordion shaped characteristics. The FBRs resemble but differ from vertically stacked stratigraphic traps, in terms of that all the reflectors cut the formational sequences. FBRs are distributed in thick, well-stratified and less deformed sediments of the north-western slope of the uplifted outer ridge. Two-dimensional thermal structure taking into account topographic effects on the seafloor in our model undoubtedly shows that FBRs are developed well below depths of the base of gas hydrate stability (BGHS), even with changing hydrocarbon proportion including methane and ethane. P-wave velocity strongly suggests that the FBRs serve as a boundary of gas distribution below the BGHS. The polarity reversed at the edge of each FBR is consistent with a velocity model. Relatively fast regional uplift possibly produces the trapped free gas in pore spaces that is related to dissociation of gas hydrates. Morphology of FBRs is controlled by lithology and structure of their surrounding formation. The edge of FBRs might be corresponded to the boundary of the sandy/muddy seismic unit that is inferred from an instantaneous amplitude attribute analysis. Previously reported distribution of gas hydrates in this region can be well-constrained by lithology which is consistent with the seismic unit defined in this study. FBRs strike almost in the same direction with hosting formation, and they are always developed in downdip of the formation below BSRs. It is thus inferred that the

  12. The Devil is in the Details: Using X-Ray Computed Tomography to Develop Accurate 3D Grain Characteristics and Bed Structure Metrics for Gravel Bed Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voepel, H.; Hodge, R. A.; Leyland, J.; Sear, D. A.; Ahmed, S. I.

    2014-12-01

    Uncertainty for bedload estimates in gravel bed rivers is largely driven by our inability to characterize the arrangement and orientation of the sediment grains within the bed. The characteristics of the surface structure are produced by the water working of grains, which leads to structural differences in bedforms through differential patterns of grain sorting, packing, imbrication, mortaring and degree of bed armoring. Until recently the technical and logistical difficulties of characterizing the arrangement of sediment in 3D have prohibited a full understanding of how grains interact with stream flow and the feedback mechanisms that exist. Micro-focus X-ray CT has been used for non-destructive 3D imaging of grains within a series of intact sections of river bed taken from key morphological units (see Figure 1). Volume, center of mass, points of contact, protrusion and spatial orientation of individual surface grains are derived from these 3D images, which in turn, facilitates estimates of 3D static force properties at the grain-scale such as pivoting angles, buoyancy and gravity forces, and grain exposure. By aggregating representative samples of grain-scale properties of localized interacting sediment into overall metrics, we can compare and contrast bed stability at a macro-scale with respect to stream bed morphology. Understanding differences in bed stability through representative metrics derived at the grain-scale will ultimately lead to improved bedload estimates with reduced uncertainty and increased understanding of interactions between grain-scale properties on channel morphology. Figure 1. CT-Scans of a water worked gravel-filled pot. a. 3D rendered scan showing the outer mesh, and b. the same pot with the mesh removed. c. vertical change in porosity of the gravels sampled in 5mm volumes. Values are typical of those measured in the field and lab. d. 2-D slices through the gravels at 20% depth from surface (porosity = 0.35), and e. 75% depth from

  13. Polarimetric imaging of the Galactic center at 12.4 microns - The detailed magnetic field structure in the northern arm and the east-west bar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aitken, David K.; Smith, Craig H.; Gezari, Daniel; Mccaughrean, Mark; Roche, Patrick F.

    1991-01-01

    Recent closely sampled imaging polarimetry of the central 0.5 pc of the Galaxy at 12.4 microns with a 58 x 62 array camera system is presented. The results clearly show that the magnetic field is a property of the diffuse material of the large-scale structures in Sgr A (the northern arm and east-west bar) rather than the embedded sources. The magnetic field is independent of the changes of density and temperature in the compact source environments. The magnetic field direction in much of the east-west bar is complex, and its polarization is probably the result of the superposition of differently oriented filaments. The abrupt decrease of polarization southwest of IRS 1 observed previously is confirmed and shown to reverse sign. This is due either to a rapid change of magnetic field direction close to the dynamical center, or to the superposition of nearly orthogonal fields. The field direction changes smoothly across IRS 1, and no discontinuity of motion here is found.

  14. Assessment of the micro-structure and depletion potentials in two-dimensional binary mixtures of additive hard-disks.

    PubMed

    Perera-Burgos, Jorge Adrián; Méndez-Alcaraz, José Miguel; Pérez-Ángel, Gabriel; Castañeda-Priego, Ramón

    2016-09-14

    Depletion forces are a particular class of effective interactions that have been mainly investigated in binary mixtures of hard-spheres in bulk. Although there are a few contributions that point toward the effects of confinement on the depletion potential, little is known about such entropic potentials in two-dimensional colloidal systems. From theoretical point of view, the problem resides in the fact that there is no general formulation of depletion forces in arbitrary dimensions and, typically, any approach that works well in three dimensions has to be reformulated for lower dimensionality. However, we have proposed a theoretical framework, based on the formalism of contraction of the description within the integral equations theory of simple liquids, to account for effective interactions in colloidal liquids, whose main feature is that it does not need to be readapted to the problem under consideration. We have also shown that such an approach allows one to determine the depletion pair potential in three-dimensional colloidal mixtures even near to the demixing transition, provided the bridge functions are sufficiently accurate to correctly describe the spatial correlation between colloids [E. López-Sánchez et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 104908 (2013)]. We here report an extensive analysis of the structure and the entropic potentials in binary mixtures of additive hard-disks. In particular, we show that the same functional form of the modified-Verlet closure relation used in three dimensions can be straightforwardly employed to obtain an accurate solution for two-dimensional colloidal mixtures in a wide range of packing fractions, molar fractions, and size asymmetries. Our theoretical results are explicitly compared with the ones obtained by means of event-driven molecular dynamics simulations and recent experimental results. Furthermore, to assess the accuracy of our predictions, the depletion potentials are used in an effective one-component model to reproduce

  15. Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross Bracing Joint, Vertical Cross Bracing End Detail - Ceylon Covered Bridge, Limberlost Park, spanning Wabash River at County Road 900 South, Geneva, Adams County, IN

  16. roof truss detail, historic strap hinge detail Chopawamsic Recreational ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    roof truss detail, historic strap hinge detail - Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area - Cabin Camp 1, Main Arts and Crafts Lodge, Prince William Forest Park, Triangle, Prince William County, VA

  17. Detailed Clinical Models: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Goossen-Baremans, Anneke; van der Zel, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Due to the increasing use of electronic patient records and other health care information technology, we see an increase in requests to utilize these data. A highly level of standardization is required during the gathering of these data in the clinical context in order to use it for analyses. Detailed Clinical Models (DCM) have been created toward this purpose and several initiatives have been implemented in various parts of the world to create standardized models. This paper presents a review of DCM. Methods Two types of analyses are presented; one comparing DCM against health care information architectures and a second bottom up approach from concept analysis to representation. In addition core parts of the draft ISO standard 13972 on DCM are used such as clinician involvement, data element specification, modeling, meta information, and repository and governance. Results Six initiatives were selected: Intermountain Healthcare, 13606/OpenEHR Archetypes, Clinical Templates, Clinical Contents Models, Health Level 7 templates, and Dutch Detailed Clinical Models. Each model selected was reviewed for their overall development, involvement of clinicians, use of data types, code bindings, expressing semantics, modeling, meta information, use of repository and governance. Conclusions Using both a top down and bottom up approach to comparison reveals many commonalties and differences between initiatives. Important differences include the use of or lack of a reference model and expressiveness of models. Applying clinical data element standards facilitates the use of conceptual DCM models in different technical representations. PMID:21818440

  18. Effects of nitrogen and phosphorus additions on soil microbial biomass and community structure in two reforested tropical forests.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Gundersen, Per; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Hao; Mo, Jiangming

    2015-01-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition may aggravate phosphorus (P) deficiency in forests in the warm humid regions of China. To our knowledge, the interactive effects of long-term N deposition and P availability on soil microorganisms in tropical replanted forests remain unclear. We conducted an N and P manipulation experiment with four treatments: control, N addition (15 g N m(-2)·yr(-1)), P addition (15 g P m(-2)·yr(-1)), and N and P addition (15 + 15 g N and P m(-2)·yr(-1), respectively) in disturbed (planted pine forest with recent harvests of understory vegetation and litter) and rehabilitated (planted with pine, but mixed with broadleaf returning by natural succession) forests in southern China. Nitrogen addition did not significantly affect soil microbial biomass, but significantly decreased the abundance of gram-negative bacteria PLFAs in both forest types. Microbial biomass increased significantly after P addition in the disturbed forest but not in the rehabilitated forest. No interactions between N and P additions on soil microorganisms were observed in either forest type. Our results suggest that microbial growth in replanted forests of southern China may be limited by P rather than by N, and this P limitation may be greater in disturbed forests. PMID:26395406

  19. Effects of nitrogen and phosphorus additions on soil microbial biomass and community structure in two reforested tropical forests.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Gundersen, Per; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Hao; Mo, Jiangming

    2015-09-23

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition may aggravate phosphorus (P) deficiency in forests in the warm humid regions of China. To our knowledge, the interactive effects of long-term N deposition and P availability on soil microorganisms in tropical replanted forests remain unclear. We conducted an N and P manipulation experiment with four treatments: control, N addition (15 g N m(-2)·yr(-1)), P addition (15 g P m(-2)·yr(-1)), and N and P addition (15 + 15 g N and P m(-2)·yr(-1), respectively) in disturbed (planted pine forest with recent harvests of understory vegetation and litter) and rehabilitated (planted with pine, but mixed with broadleaf returning by natural succession) forests in southern China. Nitrogen addition did not significantly affect soil microbial biomass, but significantly decreased the abundance of gram-negative bacteria PLFAs in both forest types. Microbial biomass increased significantly after P addition in the disturbed forest but not in the rehabilitated forest. No interactions between N and P additions on soil microorganisms were observed in either forest type. Our results suggest that microbial growth in replanted forests of southern China may be limited by P rather than by N, and this P limitation may be greater in disturbed forests.

  20. Effects of nitrogen and phosphorus additions on soil microbial biomass and community structure in two reforested tropical forests

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Gundersen, Per; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Hao; Mo, Jiangming

    2015-01-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition may aggravate phosphorus (P) deficiency in forests in the warm humid regions of China. To our knowledge, the interactive effects of long-term N deposition and P availability on soil microorganisms in tropical replanted forests remain unclear. We conducted an N and P manipulation experiment with four treatments: control, N addition (15 g N m−2·yr−1), P addition (15 g P m−2·yr−1), and N and P addition (15 + 15 g N and P m−2·yr−1, respectively) in disturbed (planted pine forest with recent harvests of understory vegetation and litter) and rehabilitated (planted with pine, but mixed with broadleaf returning by natural succession) forests in southern China. Nitrogen addition did not significantly affect soil microbial biomass, but significantly decreased the abundance of gram-negative bacteria PLFAs in both forest types. Microbial biomass increased significantly after P addition in the disturbed forest but not in the rehabilitated forest. No interactions between N and P additions on soil microorganisms were observed in either forest type. Our results suggest that microbial growth in replanted forests of southern China may be limited by P rather than by N, and this P limitation may be greater in disturbed forests. PMID:26395406

  1. 11. Detail of the interior, looking through an interior doorway ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Detail of the interior, looking through an interior doorway toward the front and east window. Note: This photograph shows that the building had been converted to a residence following its use as a school. In addition, the hazardous condition of the structure's interior is evident. Two ceilings which are visible in the photograph, (the upper, probably original plastered ceiling, and a secondary, adapted ceiling) as well as ceiling joists in the southernmost rooms have collapsed. Because of the dangerous condition of the interior of the building, additional interior photography was not attempted at this time. - Perry Township School No. 3, Middle Mount Vernon & Eickhoff Roads, Evansville, Vanderburgh County, IN

  2. Core-structure-inspired asymmetric addition reactions: enantioselective synthesis of dihydrobenzoxazinone- and dihydroquinazolinone-based anti-HIV agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Shen; Ma, Jun-An

    2015-11-01

    Dihydrobenzoxazinones and dihydroquinazolinones are the core units present in many anti-HIV agents, such as Efavirenz, DPC 961, DPC 963, and DPC 083. All these molecules contain a trifluoromethyl moiety at the quaternary stereogenic carbon center with S configuration. The enantioselective addition of carbon nucleophiles to ketones or cyclic ketimines could serve as a key step to access these molecules. This tutorial review provides an overview of significant advances in the synthesis of dihydrobenzoxazinone- and dihydroquinazolinone-based anti-HIV agents and relative analogues, with an emphasis on asymmetric addition reactions for the establishment of the CF3-containing quaternary carbon centers.

  3. Detail, Scandia Hotel, view to southwest showing details of balloon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, Scandia Hotel, view to southwest showing details of balloon framing, including full two-story studs notched to carry girts supporting second story floor joists (210mm lens) - Scandia Hotel, 225 First Street, Eureka, Humboldt County, CA

  4. Detail East Pier Elevation, Transverse Section, Detail Roof Plan As ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail East Pier Elevation, Transverse Section, Detail Roof Plan As Found - Sulphite Railroad Bridge, Former Boston & Maine Railroad (originally Tilton & Franklin Railroad) spanning Winnipesautee River, Franklin, Merrimack County, NH

  5. Detail view of ornamental lighting detail of southwest corner of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of ornamental lighting detail of southwest corner of Sixth Street Bridge. Looking northeast - Sixth Street Bridge, Spanning 101 Freeway at Sixth Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. 58. DETAIL OF PINION AND BULL GEARS: Detail view towards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    58. DETAIL OF PINION AND BULL GEARS: Detail view towards northeast of the pinion and bull gears of the winding machinery. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  7. 6. Detail of front entry on E elevation. Detail of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Detail of front entry on E elevation. Detail of round, terra cotta medallions on E elevation indicating date of building. - Central of Georgia Railway, Red (Administration) Building, 233 West Broad Street, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  8. Detail of pumps in troughs, detail of truss attachment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of pumps in troughs, detail of truss - attachment to the wall - as well as the troughs themselves. Interior of the main hatchery building, view to the east. - Prairie Creek Fish Hatchery, Hwy. 101, Orick, Humboldt County, CA

  9. Effect of Graphite Addition on Structure and Properties of Ti(CN) Coatings Deposited by Reactive Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Pengbo; He, Jining; Zhao, Hongjian; Ni, Zenglei; Ye, Fuxing

    2016-10-01

    Ti(CN) coatings with graphite addition ranging from 0 to 50 wt.% were prepared using reactive plasma spraying technology and their microstructure, mechanical, and tribological properties were investigated using scanning and transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Vickers microhardness testing, and block-on-ring wear testing. The results showed that graphite addition resulted in crystallite size refinement and an increase in the amount of amorphous phase. The Ti(CN) coatings consisted of a mixture of Ti(CN), graphite, CN x , and amorphous phases. The hardness first increased then decreased as the graphite content was increased, with a maximum of 1450 HV0.2 for 30 wt.% graphite addition. The fracture toughness decreased from 4.38 MPa m1/2 to 2.76 MPa m1/2 with increasing graphite content. The friction coefficient decreased due to unreacted graphite embedded in the matrix. Also, the wear rate first decreased then increased, with a minimum value of 2.65 × 10-6 mm3 N-1 m-1 for 30 wt.% graphite addition. The wear mechanisms of the Ti(CN) coatings included abrasive, adhesive, and oxidation wear.

  10. Clinical professional governance for detailed clinical models.

    PubMed

    Goossen, William; Goossen-Baremans, Anneke

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes the need for Detailed Clinical Models for contemporary Electronic Health Systems, data exchange and data reuse. It starts with an explanation of the components related to Detailed Clinical Models with a brief summary of knowledge representation, including terminologies representing clinic relevant "things" in the real world, and information models that abstract these in order to let computers process data about these things. Next, Detailed Clinical Models are defined and their purpose is described. It builds on existing developments around the world and accumulates in current work to create a technical specification at the level of the International Standards Organization. The core components of properly expressed Detailed Clinical Models are illustrated, including clinical knowledge and context, data element specification, code bindings to terminologies and meta-information about authors, versioning among others. Detailed Clinical Models to date are heavily based on user requirements and specify the conceptual and logical levels of modelling. It is not precise enough for specific implementations, which requires an additional step. However, this allows Detailed Clinical Models to serve as specifications for many different kinds of implementations. Examples of Detailed Clinical Models are presented both in text and in Unified Modelling Language. Detailed Clinical Models can be positioned in health information architectures, where they serve at the most detailed granular level. The chapter ends with examples of projects that create and deploy Detailed Clinical Models. All have in common that they can often reuse materials from earlier projects, and that strict governance of these models is essential to use them safely in health care information and communication technology. Clinical validation is one point of such governance, and model testing another. The Plan Do Check Act cycle can be applied for governance of Detailed Clinical Models

  11. Classification of additives for organic photovoltaic devices.

    PubMed

    Machui, Florian; Maisch, Philipp; Burgués-Ceballos, Ignasi; Langner, Stefan; Krantz, Johannes; Ameri, Tayebeh; Brabec, Christoph J

    2015-04-27

    The use of additives to improve the performance of organic photovoltaic cells has been intensely researched in recent years. However, so far, no system has been reported for the classification of additives and their functions. In this report, a system for classifying additives according to the fundamental mechanism by which they influence microstructure formation for P3HT:PCBM is suggested. The major parameters used for their classification are solubility and drying kinetics. Both are discussed in detail and their consequences on processing are analyzed. Furthermore, a general mechanism to classify the impact of additives on structure formation is suggested and discussed for different materials relevant to organic photovoltaic devices.

  12. The fine details of evolution.

    PubMed

    Laskowski, Roman A; Thornton, Janet M; Sternberg, Michael J E

    2009-08-01

    Charles Darwin's theory of evolution was based on studies of biology at the species level. In the time since his death, studies at the molecular level have confirmed his ideas about the kinship of all life on Earth and have provided a wealth of detail about the evolutionary relationships between different species and a deeper understanding of the finer workings of natural selection. We now have a wealth of data, including the genome sequences of a wide range of organisms, an even larger number of protein sequences, a significant knowledge of the three-dimensional structures of proteins, DNA and other biological molecules, and a huge body of information about the operation of these molecules as systems in the molecular machinery of all living things. This issue of Biochemical Society Transactions contains papers from oral presentations given at a Biochemical Society Focused Meeting to commemorate the 200th Anniversary of Charles Darwin's birth, held on 26-27 January 2009 at the Wellcome Trust Conference Centre, Cambridge. The talks reported on some of the insights into evolution which have been obtained from the study of protein sequences, structures and systems. PMID:19614583

  13. Influences on physicians' adoption of electronic detailing (e-detailing).

    PubMed

    Alkhateeb, Fadi M; Doucette, William R

    2009-01-01

    E-detailing means using digital technology: internet, video conferencing and interactive voice response. There are two types of e-detailing: interactive (virtual) and video. Currently, little is known about what factors influence physicians' adoption of e-detailing. The objectives of this study were to test a model of physicians' adoption of e-detailing and to describe physicians using e-detailing. A mail survey was sent to a random sample of 2000 physicians practicing in Iowa. Binomial logistic regression was used to test the model of influences on physician adoption of e-detailing. On the basis of Rogers' model of adoption, the independent variables included relative advantage, compatibility, complexity, peer influence, attitudes, years in practice, presence of restrictive access to traditional detailing, type of specialty, academic affiliation, type of practice setting and control variables. A total of 671 responses were received giving a response rate of 34.7%. A total of 141 physicians (21.0%) reported using of e-detailing. The overall adoption model for using either type of e-detailing was found to be significant. Relative advantage, peer influence, attitudes, type of specialty, presence of restrictive access and years of practice had significant influences on physician adoption of e-detailing. The model of adoption of innovation is useful to explain physicians' adoption of e-detailing. PMID:19306198

  14. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  15. BFS Simulation and Experimental Analysis of the Effect of Ti Additions on the Structure of NiAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Noebe, Ronald D.; Ferrante,John; Garg, Anita; Honecy, Frank S.; Amador, Carlos

    1999-01-01

    The Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) method for alloy energetics is applied to the study of ternary additions to NiAl. A description of the method and its application to alloy design is given. Two different approaches are used in the analysis of the effect of Ti additions to NiAl. First, a thorough analytical study is performed, where the energy of formation, lattice parameter and bulk modulus are calculated for a large number of possible atomic distributions of Ni, Al and Ti. Substitutional site preference schemes and formation of precipitates are thus predicted and analyzed. The second approach used consists of the determination of temperature effects on the final results, as obtained by performing a number of large scale numerical simulations using the Monte Carlo-Metropolis procedure and BFS for the calculation of the energy at every step in the simulation. The results indicate a sharp preference of Ti for Al sites in Ni-rich NiAl alloys and the formation of ternary Heusler precipitates beyond the predicted solubility limit of 5 at. % Ti. Experimental analysis of three Ni-Al-Ti alloys confirms the theoretical predictions.

  16. Phosphonium-Organophosphate Ionic Liquids as Lubricant Additives: Effects of Cation Structure on Physicochemical and Tribological Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhill, William C.; Qu, Jun; Luo, Huimin; Meyer III, Harry M.; Ma, Cheng; Chi, Miaofang; Papke, Brian L.

    2014-11-17

    In our previous work we suggest great potential for a phosphonium-organophosphate ionic liquid (IL) as an antiwear lubricant additive. In this study, a set of five ILs were carefully designed and synthesized, with identical organophosphate anions but dissimilar phosphonium cations, to allow systematic investigation of the effects of cation alkyl chain length and symmetry on physicochemical and tribological properties. Symmetric cations with shorter alkyl chains seem to increase the density and thermal stability due to closer packing. On the other hand, either higher cation symmetry or longer alkyl moieties induce a higher viscosity, though the viscosity index is dependent more on molecular mass than on symmetry. While a larger cation size generally increases an IL’s solubility in nonpolar hydrocarbon oils, six-carbon seems to be the critical minimum alkyl chain length for high oil miscibility. Both the two ILs, that are mutually oil miscible, have demonstrated promising lubricating performance at 1.04% treat rate, though the symmetric-cation IL moderately outperformed the asymmetric-cation IL. Moreover, characterizations on the tribofilm formed by the best-performing symmetric-cation IL revealed the film thickness, nanostructure, and chemical composition. Our results provide fundamental insights for future molecular design in developing oil-soluble ILs as lubricant additives.

  17. Phosphonium-Organophosphate Ionic Liquids as Lubricant Additives: Effects of Cation Structure on Physicochemical and Tribological Characteristics

    DOE PAGES

    Barnhill, William C.; Qu, Jun; Luo, Huimin; Meyer III, Harry M.; Ma, Cheng; Chi, Miaofang; Papke, Brian L.

    2014-11-17

    In our previous work we suggest great potential for a phosphonium-organophosphate ionic liquid (IL) as an antiwear lubricant additive. In this study, a set of five ILs were carefully designed and synthesized, with identical organophosphate anions but dissimilar phosphonium cations, to allow systematic investigation of the effects of cation alkyl chain length and symmetry on physicochemical and tribological properties. Symmetric cations with shorter alkyl chains seem to increase the density and thermal stability due to closer packing. On the other hand, either higher cation symmetry or longer alkyl moieties induce a higher viscosity, though the viscosity index is dependent moremore » on molecular mass than on symmetry. While a larger cation size generally increases an IL’s solubility in nonpolar hydrocarbon oils, six-carbon seems to be the critical minimum alkyl chain length for high oil miscibility. Both the two ILs, that are mutually oil miscible, have demonstrated promising lubricating performance at 1.04% treat rate, though the symmetric-cation IL moderately outperformed the asymmetric-cation IL. Moreover, characterizations on the tribofilm formed by the best-performing symmetric-cation IL revealed the film thickness, nanostructure, and chemical composition. Our results provide fundamental insights for future molecular design in developing oil-soluble ILs as lubricant additives.« less

  18. Linking process, structure, property, and performance for metal-based additive manufacturing: computational approaches with experimental support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jacob; Xiong, Wei; Yan, Wentao; Lin, Stephen; Cheng, Puikei; Kafka, Orion L.; Wagner, Gregory J.; Cao, Jian; Liu, Wing Kam

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) methods for rapid prototyping of 3D materials (3D printing) have become increasingly popular with a particular recent emphasis on those methods used for metallic materials. These processes typically involve an accumulation of cyclic phase changes. The widespread interest in these methods is largely stimulated by their unique ability to create components of considerable complexity. However, modeling such processes is exceedingly difficult due to the highly localized and drastic material evolution that often occurs over the course of the manufacture time of each component. Final product characterization and validation are currently driven primarily by experimental means as a result of the lack of robust modeling procedures. In the present work, the authors discuss primary detrimental hurdles that have plagued effective modeling of AM methods for metallic materials while also providing logical speculation into preferable research directions for overcoming these hurdles. The primary focus of this work encompasses the specific areas of high-performance computing, multiscale modeling, materials characterization, process modeling, experimentation, and validation for final product performance of additively manufactured metallic components.

  19. Shifts in the phylogenetic structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in response to experimental nitrogen and carbon dioxide additions.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Rebecca C; Bohannan, Brendan J M

    2015-09-01

    Global N inputs and atmospheric CO2 concentrations have increased as a result of human activities, and are predicted to increase along with population growth, with potentially negative effects on biodiversity. Using taxonomic and phylogenetic measures, we examined the response of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) to experimental manipulations of N and CO2 at the Jasper Ridge Global Change Experiment. No significant interactions between N and CO2 were observed, but individual effects of N and CO2 were found. Elevated CO2 resulted in changes in phylogenetic similarity, and a shift to phylogenetic clustering of AMF communities. N addition resulted in higher phylogenetic diversity and evenness, with no shifts in community composition and no significant signal for phylogenetic clustering. N addition resulted in an increase in both available N and the N:P ratio in N-amended plots, which suggests that changing patterns of nutrient limitation could have lead to altered species interactions. These findings suggest that elevated levels of N and CO2 altered patterns of AMF community assembly, with potential effects on ecosystem function. PMID:25990297

  20. 'The effect of inulin addition on structural and textural properties of extruded products under several extrusion conditions': The effect of inulin addition on structural and textural properties of rice flour extrudates.

    PubMed

    Tsokolar-Tsikopoulos, Konstantinos C; Katsavou, Ioanna D; Krokida, Magdalini K

    2015-10-01

    The growing consumer demand for healthy snacks has turned the interest of industry and research in the development of new ready-to-eat products, enriched with dietary fibers. Inulin is a soluble fiber with a neutral taste that promotes the good function of the intestine. Rice flour extrudates were produced under various extrusion temperatures, screw speeds, feed moisture concentrations and inulin replacement levels. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the material characteristics and the extrusion conditions on the structural and textural properties of the extrudates. Simple mathematical models were used for properties correlation with process conditions and through regression analysis it was revealed that there is a significant effect of extrusion temperature, screw speed, feed moisture content and inulin concentration on the final properties. Both density and maximum stress increased when moisture content and inulin concentration increased, while they decreased when extrusion temperature and screw speed increased. These results were also strengthened by scanning electron microscopy. The highest expansion ratio was presented when decreasing all process conditions apart from screw speed. PMID:26396364

  1. Modification of the Structure of Ti-Bearing Mold Flux by the Simultaneous Addition of B2O3 and Na2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhongmin; Sun, Yongqi; Liu, Lili; Zhang, Zuotai

    2016-03-01

    The present paper mainly focused on how B2O3 and Na2O additions influenced the structure of the Ti-bearing fluoride-free mold flux and investigated how the boron-related units were affected by Na2O. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, 11B magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were utilized to identify different structural units and to analyze the overall modification of the network by additives. It was found that BO3 was more abundant than BO4 in the flux. In addition, the addition of B2O3 and Na2O was proved to promote conversion from non-ring BO3 to tetrahedral BO4, and this was confirmed by FTIR and 11B MAS NMR analysis. BO3 was a two-dimensional structure unit and contributed to construct a less stable network. With increasing B2O3 content, degree of polymerization of the flux was increased as confirmed by increased fraction of Q 3 in Raman spectra and non-bridging oxygen in XPS. By contrast, the addition of Na2O, which is a strong network breaker, brought about more non-bridging oxygen by breaking the Si-O-Si linkage which was verified by XPS results. Consequently, a less polymerized network was observed by decreasing content of Q 3 from Raman spectra.

  2. From the Arctic to fetal life: physiological importance and structural basis of an 'additional' chloride-binding site in haemoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    De Rosa, M Cristina; Castagnola, Massimo; Bertonati, Claudia; Galtieri, Antonio; Giardina, Bruno

    2004-01-01

    Haemoglobins from mammals of sub-Arctic and Arctic species, as well as fetal human Hb, are all characterized by a significantly lower Delta H of oxygenation compared with the majority of mammalian haemoglobins from temperate species (exceptions are represented by some cold-resistant species, such as cow, horse and pig). This has been interpreted as an adaptive mechanism of great importance from a physiological point of view. To date, the molecular basis of this thermodynamic characteristic is still not known. In the present study, we show that binding of extra chloride (with respect to adult human Hb) ions to Hb would significantly contribute to lowering the overall heat of oxygenation, thus providing a molecular basis for the low effect of temperature on the oxygenation-deoxygenation cycle. To this aim, the oxygen binding properties of bovine Hb, bear (Ursus arctos) Hb and horse Hb, which are representative of this series of haemoglobins, have been studied with special regard to the effect of heterotropic ligands, such as organic phosphates (namely 2,3-diphosphoglycerate) and chloride. Functional results are consistent with a mechanism for ligand binding that involves an additional binding site for chloride ion. Analysis of computational chemistry results, obtained by the GRID program, further confirm the hypothesis that the reason for the lower Delta H of oxygenation is mainly due to an increase in the number of the oxygen-linked chloride-binding sites. PMID:14979874

  3. Optimal welding parameters for very high power ultrasonic additive manufacturing of smart structures with aluminum 6061 matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolcott, Paul J.; Hehr, Adam; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) is a recent solid state manufacturing process that combines ad- ditive joining of thin metal tapes with subtractive milling operations to generate near net shape metallic parts. Due to the minimal heating during the process, UAM is a proven method of embedding Ni-Ti, Fe-Ga, and PVDF to create active metal matrix composites. Recently, advances in the UAM process utilizing 9 kW very high power (VHP) welding has improved bonding properties, enabling joining of high strength materials previously unweldable with 1 kW low power UAM. Consequently, a design of experiments study was conducted to optimize welding conditions for aluminum 6061 components. This understanding is critical in the design of UAM parts containing smart materials. Build parameters, including weld force, weld speed, amplitude, and temperature were varied based on a Taguchi experimental design matrix and tested for me- chanical strength. Optimal weld parameters were identi ed with statistical methods including a generalized linear model for analysis of variance (ANOVA), mean e ects plots, and interaction e ects plots.

  4. Revealing the Effect of Additives with Different Solubility on the Morphology and the Donor Crystalline Structures of Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiao; Zhao, Suling; Xu, Zheng; Qiao, Bo; Huang, Di; Zhao, Ling; Li, Yang; Zhu, Youqin; Wang, Peng

    2016-07-20

    The impact of two kinds of additives, such as 1,8-octanedithiol (ODT), 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO), diphenylether (DPE), and 1-chloronaphthalene (CN), on the performance of poly[(5,6-difluoro-2,1,3-benzothiadiazol-4,7-diyl)-alt-(3,3‴-di(2-octyldodecyl)2,2';5',2″;5″,2‴-quaterthiophen-5,5‴-diyl)] (PffBT4T-2OD):[6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) based polymer solar cell are investigated. The polymer solar cells (PSCs) of PffBT4T-2OD:PC71BM by using CN show a more improved PCE of 10.23%. The solubility difference of PffBT4T-2OD in DIO and CN creates the fine transformation in phase separation and favorable nanoscale morphology. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) data clearly shows molecular stacking and orientation of the active layer. Interestingly, DIO and CN have different functions on the effect of the molecular orientation. These interesting studies provide important guidance to optimize and control complicated molecular orientations and nanoscale morphology of PffBT4T-2OD based thick films for the application in PSCs. PMID:27328855

  5. 15. CYLINDER DETAILS; DETAILS OF STEEL FOR CYLINDERS NO. 50 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. CYLINDER DETAILS; DETAILS OF STEEL FOR CYLINDERS NO. 50 (PIER 5) AND NO. 66 (PIER 6), DWG. 83, CH BY AF, ECL, APPROVED BY O.F. LACKEY, MAY 18, 1908 - Baltimore Inner Harbor, Pier 5, South of Pratt Street between Market Place & Concord Street, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  6. 10. CYLINDER DETAILS: DETAIL OF STEEL FOR CYLINDER NO. 59, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. CYLINDER DETAILS: DETAIL OF STEEL FOR CYLINDER NO. 59, PIER NO. 6, DWG. 86, 3/4" = 1', MADE BY A.F., CHECKED BY E.C.L., APPROVED BY O.F. LACKEY, JUNE 2, 1908 - Baltimore Inner Harbor, Pier 6, South of Pratt Street between Concord Street & Jones Falls outlet, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  7. An Empirically Derived Approach to the Latent Structure of the Adult Attachment Interview: Additional Convergent and Discriminant Validity Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Haydon, Katherine C.; Roisman, Glenn I.; Marks, Michael J.; Fraley, R. Chris

    2011-01-01

    Building on studies examining the latent structure of attachment-related individual differences as assessed by the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) via Principal Components Analysis, the current report further explores the validity of four AAI dimensions reported by Haydon, Roisman, and Burt (in press): dismissing states of mind, preoccupied states of mind, and inferred negative experience with maternal and paternal caregivers. Study 1 reports evidence of distinctive cognitive correlates of dismissing v. preoccupied states of mind with reaction time in an attachment Stroop task and the valence of endorsed self-descriptors, respectively. Study 2 replicates prior meta-analytic findings of generally trivial convergence between state of mind dimensions and self-reported avoidance and anxiety (i.e., Roisman, Holland, et al., 2007). Study 3 contrastively demonstrates moderate empirical overlap between inferred experience—but not state of mind—AAI scales and self-reported avoidance and anxiety when the latter were assessed at the level of specific caregivers. Taken together, these findings add to accumulating evidence that an empirically-driven approach to scaling adults on AAI dimensions (Haydon et al., in press; Roisman et al., 2007) aids in identifying theoretically anticipated and distinctive affective, behavioral, and cognitive correlates of dismissing versus preoccupied states of mind. PMID:21838649

  8. Addition of MgO Nanoparticles to Carbon Structural Steel and the Effect on Inclusion Characteristics and Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiangzhou; Yang, Shufeng; Li, Jingshe; Liao, Hang; Gao, Wei; Wu, Tuo

    2016-04-01

    An innovative approach for pre-dispersing MgO nanoparticles with AlSi alloy nanoparticles was established, and the nanoparticles were dispersed well in carbon structural steel. After adding different mass fractions of MgO nanoparticles in steel, the majority of inclusions contained MgO·Al2O3 spinel and MgO-Al2O3-bearing hybrid inclusion, and these inclusions promoted acicular ferrite (AF) formation. With increasing amount of added nanoparticles, the average inclusion size increased from 0.90 to 1.50 μm and the inclusion size was considerably refined, but the ability of inclusions to induce AF was greatly declined. It was revealed that the inclusion size was the decisive factor influencing the inducing ability of inclusions for AF, which also got a solid support from the nucleation thermomechanical and dynamic analyses. When the mass fraction of MgO nanoparticles reached 0.05 pct, the proportion of AF in microstructure is relatively larger and the degree of interlocking of the AF within the microstructure was optimized. The ferrite grains also got refined and the average grain size decreased by more than 94 pct compared with that of the original steel.

  9. Microstructures and Electrochemical Properties of Nano-Structured Mg2Ni-BASED Compound Containing Nb Additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohri, Maryam; Kashani-Bozorg, S. F.

    In the present work, high energy ball milling of binary (Mg2Ni) and ternary powder mixtures (Mg1.75Nb0.25Ni and Mg2Ni0.75Nb0.25, i.e., substitution of Nb for Mg and Ni, respectively) was carried out. The effects of milling process parameters on the microstructure of binary and ternary milled products were studied. Also, electrochemical properties of the nano-structured electrodes made from the milled products were measured. It was found that Nb substitution for Mg (Mg1.75Nb0.25Ni) has beneficial effect on the formation kinetic of Mg2Ni-based nano-crystallites. Electrode made from the 20h milled product using initial composition of Mg1.75Nb0.25Ni exhibited a high discharge capacity of 600mAhg-1 and relatively longer discharge life. Such electrode showed a microstructure consisting of an amorphous core surrounded by nano-crystallites.

  10. Identification and structural characterization of the synthetic cannabinoid 3-(1-adamantoyl)-1-pentylindole as an additive in 'herbal incense'.

    PubMed

    Kneisel, Stefan; Westphal, Folker; Bisel, Philippe; Brecht, Volker; Broecker, Sebastian; Auwärter, Volker

    2012-02-01

    Since the end of 2010, more than 20 synthetic cannabimimetics have been identified in 'Spice' products, demonstrating the enormous dynamic in this field. In an effort to cope with the problem, many countries have already undertaken legal measures by putting some of these compounds under control. Nevertheless, once a number of compounds were scheduled, they were soon replaced by other synthetic cannabinoids. In this article, we report the identification of a new--and due to its substitution pattern rather uncommon--cannabimimetic found in several 'herbal incense' products. The GC-EI mass spectrum first led to misidentification as the alpha-methyl-derivative of JWH-250. However, since both substances show different retention indices, thin-layer chromatography was used to isolate the unknown compound. After application of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, high-resolution MS and GC-MS/MS techniques, the compound was identified as 3-(1-adamantoyl)-1-pentylindole, a derivative of JWH-018 carrying an adamantoyl moiety instead of a naphthoyl group. This finding supports that the listing of synthetic cannabinoids as prohibited substances triggers the appearance of compounds with uncommon substituents. Moreover, it emphasizes the necessity of being aware of the risk of misidentification when using techniques sometimes providing only limited structural information like GC-MS.

  11. Efficient eco-friendly inverted quantum dot sensitized solar cells† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: TEM images of QDs, XPS spectra, UV-vis and PL spectra of the sensitized electrodes, details about photophysical characterization and IPCE spectra interpretation. See DOI: 10.1039/c5ta06769c Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jinhyung; Sajjad, Muhammad T.; Jouneau, Pierre-Henri; Ruseckas, Arvydas; Faure-Vincent, Jérôme; Reiss, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in quantum dot (QD) sensitized solar cells has demonstrated the possibility of low-cost and efficient photovoltaics. However, the standard device structure based on n-type materials often suffers from slow hole injection rate, which may lead to unbalanced charge transport. We have fabricated efficient p-type (inverted) QD sensitized cells, which combine the advantages of conventional QD cells with p-type dye sensitized configurations. Moreover, p-type QD sensitized cells can be used in highly promising tandem configurations with n-type ones. QDs without toxic Cd and Pb elements and with improved absorption and stability were successfully deposited onto mesoporous NiO electrode showing good coverage and penetration according to morphological analysis. Detailed photophysical charge transfer studies showed that high hole injection rates (108 s–1) observed in such systems are comparable with electron injection in conventional n-type QD assemblies. Inverted solar cells fabricated with various QDs demonstrate excellent power conversion efficiencies of up to 1.25%, which is 4 times higher than the best values for previous inverted QD sensitized cells. Attempts to passivate the surface of the QDs show that traditional methods of reduction of recombination in the QD sensitized cells are not applicable to the inverted architectures. PMID:27478616

  12. Structure of a microbial community in soil after prolonged addition of low levels of simulated acid rain

    PubMed

    Pennanen; Fritze; Vanhala; Kiikkila; Neuvonen; Baath

    1998-06-01

    Humus samples were collected 12 growing seasons after the start of a simulated acid rain experiment situated in the subarctic environment. The acid rain was simulated with H2SO4, a combination of H2SO4 and HNO3, and HNO3 at two levels of moderate acidic loads close to the natural anthropogenic pollution levels of southern Scandinavia. The higher levels of acid applications resulted in acidification, as defined by humus chemistry. The concentrations of base cations decreased, while the concentrations of exchangeable H+, Al, and Fe increased. Humus pH decreased from 3.83 to 3.65. Basal respiration decreased with decreasing humus pH, and total microbial biomass, measured by substrate-induced respiration and total amount of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA), decreased slightly. An altered PLFA pattern indicated a change in the microbial community structure at the higher levels of acid applications. In general, branched fatty acids, typical of gram-positive bacteria, increased in the acid plots. PLFA analysis performed on the bacterial community growing on agar plates also showed that the relative amount of PLFA specific for gram-positive bacteria increased due to the acidification. The changed bacterial community was adapted to the more acidic environment in the acid-treated plots, even though bacterial growth rates, estimated by thymidine and leucine incorporation, decreased with pH. Fungal activity (measured as acetate incorporation into ergosterol) was not affected. This result indicates that bacteria were more affected than fungi by the acidification. The capacity of the bacterial community to utilize 95 different carbon sources was variable and only showed weak correlations to pH. Differences in the toxicities of H2SO4 and HNO3 for the microbial community were not found.

  13. Computed tomography:the details.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-07-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is a well established technique, particularly in medical imaging, but also applied in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging. Basic CT imaging via back-projection is treated in many texts, but often with insufficient detail to appreciate subtleties such as the role of non-uniform sampling densities. Herein are given some details often neglected in many texts.

  14. 9. Detail view of columns on first floor. This row ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Detail view of columns on first floor. This row of columns indicates the former location of the exterior mill wall before World War II era expansion. The unusual column and beam connection was a key part of the mill structural system patented by Providence, Rhode Island engineers Charles Praray and Charles Makepeace in 1894. Each column was originally located in the apex of triangular window bay, but not connected to the exterior wall. Modifications on the right side of each column support the beams of the addition. - Dixie Cotton Mill, 710 Greenville Street, La Grange, Troup County, GA

  15. The Finer Details: Climate Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    If you want to know whether you will need sunscreen or an umbrella for tomorrow's picnic, you can simply read the local weather report. However, if you are calculating the impact of gas combustion on global temperatures, or anticipating next year's rainfall levels to set water conservation policy, you must conduct a more comprehensive investigation. Such complex matters require long-range modeling techniques that predict broad trends in climate development rather than day-to-day details. Climate models are built from equations that calculate the progression of weather-related conditions over time. Based on the laws of physics, climate model equations have been developed to predict a number of environmental factors, for example: 1. Amount of solar radiation that hits the Earth. 2. Varying proportions of gases that make up the air. 3. Temperature at the Earth's surface. 4. Circulation of ocean and wind currents. 5. Development of cloud cover. Numerical modeling of the climate can improve our understanding of both the past and, the future. A model can confirm the accuracy of environmental measurements taken. in, the past and can even fill in gaps in those records. In addition, by quantifying the relationship between different aspects of climate, scientists can estimate how a future change in one aspect may alter the rest of the world. For example, could an increase in the temperature of the Pacific Ocean somehow set off a drought on the other side of the world? A computer simulation could lead to an answer for this and other questions. Quantifying the chaotic, nonlinear activities that shape our climate is no easy matter. You cannot run these simulations on your desktop computer and expect results by the time you have finished checking your morning e-mail. Efficient and accurate climate modeling requires powerful computers that can process billions of mathematical calculations in a single second. The NCCS exists to provide this degree of vast computing capability.

  16. Effect of the addition order and amylose content on mechanical, barrier and structural properties of films made with starch and montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Romero-Bastida, C A; Bello-Pérez, L A; Velazquez, G; Alvarez-Ramirez, J

    2015-01-01

    This study considered the effect of amylose content (30% and 70%), montmorillonite (MMT) fraction (5 and 15%) and preparation method on mechanical and barrier properties of starch/clay nanocomposites prepared by casting. In Method 1, (30% w/w) glycerol was incorporated before starch gelatinization and MMT addition, while in Method 2 after gelatinization and MMT addition. Nanocomposites with higher amount of MMT showed the highest tensile strength and Young's modulus for both preparation methods. Method 1 favored nanocomposite properties of films with less amylose content, meanwhile Method 2 favored nanocomposites properties with higher amylose content. Water vapor permeability did not decrease significantly in starch films with different amylose content with the two different preparation methods. X-ray diffraction of the starch films indicated intercalated structures. Higher melting temperature (Tm) was found for nanocomposites with Method 2, indicating more ordered structures. Films with 70% amylose content have higher Tm than films with 30% amylose.

  17. Membrane-Docking Loops of the cPLA2 C2 Domain: Detailed Structural Analysis of the Protein-Membrane Interface via Site-Directed Spin-Labeling†

    PubMed Central

    Malmberg, Nathan J.; Van Buskirk, David R.; Falke, Joseph J.

    2013-01-01

    C2 domains are protein modules found in numerous eukaryotic signaling proteins, where their function is to target the protein to cell membranes in response to a Ca2+ signal. Currently, the structure of the interface formed between the protein and the phospholipid bilayer is inaccessible to high-resolution structure determination, but EPR site-directed spin-labeling can provide a detailed medium-resolution view of this interface. To apply this approach to the C2 domain of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), single cysteines were introduced at all 27 positions in the three Ca2+-binding loops and labeled with a methanethiosulfonate spin-label. Altogether, 24 of the 27 spin-labeled domains retained Ca2+-activated phospholipid binding. EPR spectra of these 24 labeled domains obtained in the presence and absence of Ca2+ indicate that Ca2+ binding triggers subtle changes in the dynamics of two localized regions within the Ca2+-binding loops: one face of the loop 1 helix and the junction between loops 1 and 2. However, no significant changes in loop structure were detected upon Ca2+ binding, nor upon Ca2+-triggered docking to membranes. EPR depth parameters measured in the membrane-docked state allow determination of the penetration depth of each residue with respect to the membrane surface. Analysis of these depth parameters, using an improved, generalizable geometric approach, provides the most accurate picture of penetration depth and angular orientation currently available for a membrane-docked peripheral protein. Finally, the observation that Ca2+ binding does not trigger large rearrangements of the membrane-docking loops favors the electrostatic switch model for Ca2+ activation and disfavors, or places strong constraints on, the conformational switch model. PMID:14609334

  18. Occupation Competency Profile: Steel Detailer Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Learning, Edmonton. Apprenticeship and Industry Training.

    This document presents information about the apprenticeship training program of Alberta, Canada, in general and the steel detailer program in particular. The first part of the document discusses the following items: Alberta's apprenticeship and industry training system; the apprenticeship and industry training committee structure; local…

  19. Synthesis and characterization of high-surface-area millimeter-sized silica beads with hierarchical multi-modal pore structure by the addition of agar

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yosep; Choi, Junhyun; Tong, Meiping; Kim, Hyunjung

    2014-04-01

    Millimeter-sized spherical silica foams (SSFs) with hierarchical multi-modal pore structure featuring high specific surface area and ordered mesoporous frameworks were successfully prepared using aqueous agar addition, foaming and drop-in-oil processes. The pore-related properties of the prepared spherical silica (SSs) and SSFs were systematically characterized by field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small-angle X-ray diffraction (SAXRD), Hg intrusion porosimetry, and N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption isotherm measurements. Improvements in the BET surface area and total pore volume were observed at 504 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} and 5.45 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1}, respectively, after an agar addition and foaming process. Despite the increase in the BET surface area, the mesopore wall thickness and the pore size of the mesopores generated from the block copolymer with agar addition were unchanged based on the SAXRD, TEM, and BJH methods. The SSFs prepared in the present study were confirmed to have improved BET surface area and micropore volume through the agar loading, and to exhibit interconnected 3-dimensional network macropore structure leading to the enhancement of total porosity and BET surface area via the foaming process. - Highlights: • Millimeter-sized spherical silica foams (SSFs) are successfully prepared. • SSFs exhibit high BET surface area and ordered hierarchical pore structure. • Agar addition improves BET surface area and micropore volume of SSFs. • Foaming process generates interconnected 3-D network macropore structure of SSFs.

  20. A Honeycomb-Structured Ti-6Al-4V Oil-Gas Separation Rotor Additively Manufactured by Selective Electron Beam Melting for Aero-engine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, H. P.; Wang, Q. B.; Yang, G. Y.; Gu, J.; Liu, N.; Jia, L.; Qian, M.

    2016-03-01

    Oil -gas separation is a key process in an aero-engine lubrication system. This study reports an innovative development in oil -gas separation. A honeycomb-structured rotor with hexagonal cone-shaped pore channels has been designed, additively manufactured from Ti-6Al-4V using selective electron beam melting (SEBM) and assessed for oil -gas separation for aero-engine application. The Ti-6Al-4V honeycomb structure showed a high compressive strength of 110 MPa compared to less than 20 MPa for metal foam structures. The oil -gas separation efficiency of the honeycomb-structured separation rotor achieved 99.8% at the rotation speed of 6000 rpm with much lower ventilation resistance (17.3 kPa) than that of the separator rotor constructed using a Ni-Cr alloy foam structure (23.5 kPa). The honeycomb-structured Ti-6Al-4V separator rotor produced by SEBM provides a promising solution to more efficient oil -gas separation in the aero-engine lubrication system.

  1. Loss of superconductivity with the addition of Al to MgB2 and a structural transition in Mg1-x AlxB2.

    PubMed

    Slusky, J S; Rogado, N; Regan, K A; Hayward, M A; Khalifah, P; He, T; Inumaru, K; Loureiro, S M; Haas, M K; Zandbergen, H W; Cava, R J

    2001-03-15

    The basic magnetic and electronic properties of most binary compounds have been well known for decades. The recent discovery of superconductivity at 39 K in the simple binary ceramic compound magnesium diboride, MgB2, was therefore surprising. Indeed, this material has been known and structurally characterized since the mid 1950s (ref. 2), and is readily available from chemical suppliers (it is commonly used as a starting material for chemical metathesis reactions). Here we show that the addition of electrons to MgB2, through partial substitution of Al for Mg, results in the loss of superconductivity. Associated with the Al substitution is a subtle but distinct structural transition, reflected in the partial collapse of the spacing between boron layers near an Al content of 10 per cent. This indicates that superconducting MgB2 is poised very near a structural instability at slightly higher electron concentrations.

  2. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  3. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  4. Effect of non-solvent additives on the morphology, pore structure, and direct contact membrane distillation performance of PVDF-CTFE hydrophobic membranes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Libing; Wu, Zhenjun; Zhang, Yong; Wei, Yuansong; Wang, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Four common types of additives for polymer membrane preparation including organic macromolecule and micromolecule additives, inorganic salts and acids, and the strong non-solvent H2O were used to prepare poly (vinylidene fluoride-co-chlorotrifluoroethylene) (PVDF-CTFE) hydrophobic flat-sheet membranes. Membrane properties including morphology, porosity, hydrophobicity, pore size and pore distribution were investigated, and the permeability was evaluated via direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) of 3.5g/L NaCl solution in a DCMD configuration. Both inorganic and organic micromolecule additives were found to slightly influence membrane hydrophobicity. Polyethylene glycol (PEG), organic acids, LiCl, MgCl2, and LiCl/H2O mixtures were proved to be effective additives to PVDF-CTFE membranes due to their pore-controlling effects and the capacity to improve the properties and performance of the resultant membranes. The occurrence of a pre-gelation process showed that when organic and inorganic micromolecules were added to PVDF-CTFE solution, the resultant membranes presented a high interconnectivity structure. The membrane prepared with dibutyl phthalate (DBP) showed a nonporous surface and symmetrical cross-section. When H2O and LiCl/H2O mixtures were also used as additives, they were beneficial for solid-liquid demixing, especially when LiCl/H2O mixed additives were used. The membrane prepared with 5% LiCl+2% H2O achieved a flux of 24.53kg/(m(2)·hr) with 99.98% salt rejection. This study is expected to offer a reference not only for PVDF-CTFE membrane preparation but also for other polymer membranes. PMID:27372116

  5. Effect of non-solvent additives on the morphology, pore structure, and direct contact membrane distillation performance of PVDF-CTFE hydrophobic membranes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Libing; Wu, Zhenjun; Zhang, Yong; Wei, Yuansong; Wang, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Four common types of additives for polymer membrane preparation including organic macromolecule and micromolecule additives, inorganic salts and acids, and the strong non-solvent H2O were used to prepare poly (vinylidene fluoride-co-chlorotrifluoroethylene) (PVDF-CTFE) hydrophobic flat-sheet membranes. Membrane properties including morphology, porosity, hydrophobicity, pore size and pore distribution were investigated, and the permeability was evaluated via direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) of 3.5g/L NaCl solution in a DCMD configuration. Both inorganic and organic micromolecule additives were found to slightly influence membrane hydrophobicity. Polyethylene glycol (PEG), organic acids, LiCl, MgCl2, and LiCl/H2O mixtures were proved to be effective additives to PVDF-CTFE membranes due to their pore-controlling effects and the capacity to improve the properties and performance of the resultant membranes. The occurrence of a pre-gelation process showed that when organic and inorganic micromolecules were added to PVDF-CTFE solution, the resultant membranes presented a high interconnectivity structure. The membrane prepared with dibutyl phthalate (DBP) showed a nonporous surface and symmetrical cross-section. When H2O and LiCl/H2O mixtures were also used as additives, they were beneficial for solid-liquid demixing, especially when LiCl/H2O mixed additives were used. The membrane prepared with 5% LiCl+2% H2O achieved a flux of 24.53kg/(m(2)·hr) with 99.98% salt rejection. This study is expected to offer a reference not only for PVDF-CTFE membrane preparation but also for other polymer membranes.

  6. Effect of glycine addition on the structural, thermal, optical, mechanical and electrical properties of Sr (HCOO)2·2H2O crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthupoongodi, S.; Theodore David Manickam, S.; Mahadevan, C. K.; Angel Mary Greena, J.; Balakumar, S.; Sahaya Shajan, X.

    2015-10-01

    Pure and glycine doped strontium formate dihydrate (SFD) single crystals were grown by the free evaporation method to understand the effect of glycine addition on the structural, thermal, optical, mechanical and electrical properties of SFD crystal. The grown crystals were characterized by carrying out powder X-ray diffraction, high resolution X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectral, Raman spectral, UV-vis-NIR spectral, thermogravimetric (TG/DTA), second harmonic generation (SHG), microhardness and DC electrical conductivity measurements. Results obtained in the present study indicate improvement in crystalline perfection, optical transmittance, and SHG efficiency, and change in microhardness, and DC electrical conductivity on doping SFD with glycine. In addition, a large size (~1.9 cm length, ~1.2 cm breath and ~0.6 cm height) SFD crystal with good optical quality could be grown successfully by the seeded free evaporation method.

  7. On The Development of Additive Construction Technologies for Application to Development of Lunar/Martian Surface Structures Using In-Situ Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werkheiser, Niki; Fiske, Michael; Edmunson, Jennifer; Khoshnevis, Behrokh

    2015-01-01

    For long-duration missions on other planetary bodies, the use of in-situ materials will become increasingly critical. As man's presence on these bodies expands, so must the breadth of the structures required to accommodate them including habitats, laboratories, berms, radiation shielding for natural radiation and surface reactors, garages, solar storm shelters, greenhouses, etc. Planetary surface structure manufacturing and assembly technologies that incorporate in-situ resources provide options for autonomous, affordable, pre-positioned environments with radiation shielding features and protection from micrometeorites, exhaust plume debris, and other hazards. This is important because gamma and particle radiation constitute a serious but reducible threat to long-term survival of human beings, electronics, and other materials in space environments. Also, it is anticipated that surface structures will constitute the primary mass element of lunar or Martian launch requirements. The ability to use in-situ materials to construct these structures will provide a benefit in the reduction of up-mass that would otherwise make long-term Moon or Mars structures cost prohibitive. The ability to fabricate structures in situ brings with it the ability to repair these structures, which allows for self-sufficiency necessary for long-duration habitation. Previously, under the auspices of the MSFC In Situ Fabrication and Repair (ISFR) project and more recently, under the joint MSFC/KSC Additive Construction with Mobile Emplacement (ACME) project, the MSFC Surface Structures Group has been developing materials and construction technologies to support future planetary habitats with in situ resources. One such technology, known as Contour Crafting (additive construction), is shown in Figure 1, along with a typical structure fabricated using this technology. This paper will present the results to date of these efforts, including development of novel nozzle concepts for advanced layer

  8. Preservation potential of subtle glacial landforms based on detailed mapping of recently exposed proglacial areas: application of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and structure-from-motion (SfM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewertowski, Marek; Evans, David; Roberts, David; Tomczyk, Aleksandra; Ewertowski, Wojciech

    2016-04-01

    Ongoing glacier retreat results in the continuous exposure of proglacial areas. Such areas contain invaluable information about glacial process-form relationships manifest in specific landform assemblages. However, preservation potential of freshly exposed glacial landforms is very low, as proglacial terrains are one of the most dynamic parts of the landscape. Therefore, rapid mapping and geomorphological characterisation of such areas is important from a glaciological and geomorphological point of view for proper understanding and reconstruction of glacier-landform dynamics and chronology of glacial events. Annual patterns of recession and relatively small areas exposed every year, mean that the performing of regular aerial or satellite survey is expensive and therefore impractical. Recent advances in technology enables the development of low-cost alternatives for traditional aerial surveys. Small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) can be used to acquire high-resolution (several cm) low-altitude photographs. The UAV-based photographs can be subsequently processed through the structure-from-motion process to generate detailed orthophotomaps and digital elevation models. In this study we present case studies from the forelands of various glaciers on Iceland and Svalbard representing different types of proglacial landscapes: Fláajökull (annual push moraines); Hofellsjökul (bedrock bedforms and push moraines); Fjallsjökull (marginal drainage network); Rieperbreen (crevasse squeeze ridges and longitudinal debris stripes); Ayerbreen (transverse debris ridges); Foxfonna (longitudinal debris stripes);Hørbyebreen (geometric ridge network); Nordenskiöldbreen (fluted till surface); Ebbabreen (controlled moraine complex). UAV campaigns were conducted using a low-cost quadcopter platform. Resultant orthophotos and DEMs enabled mapping and assessment of recent glacial landscape development in different types of glacial landsystems. Results of our study indicate that

  9. 64. DETAIL OF CONNECTIONS FOR SIXTEEN CABLES AT THE CARRIAGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    64. DETAIL OF CONNECTIONS FOR SIXTEEN CABLES AT THE CARRIAGE SUPPORT STRUCTURE, STRUCTURE. April 20, 1948. 1048. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects.

  11. Seductive Details in Multimedia Messages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rey, Gunter Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The seductive detail principle asserts that people learn more deeply from a multimedia presentation when interesting but irrelevant adjuncts are excluded rather than included. However, critics could argue that studies about this principle contain methodological problems. The recent experiment attempts to overcome these problems. Students (N = 108)…

  12. Structural Evolution of Electrochemically Lithiated MoS2 Nanosheets and the Role of Carbon Additive in Li-Ion Batteries

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the structure and phase changes associated with conversion-type materials is key to optimizing their electrochemical performance in Li-ion batteries. For example, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) offers a capacity up to 3-fold higher (∼1 Ah/g) than the currently used graphite anodes, but they suffer from limited Coulombic efficiency and capacity fading. The lack of insights into the structural dynamics induced by electrochemical conversion of MoS2 still hampers its implementation in high energy-density batteries. Here, by combining ab initio density-functional theory (DFT) simulation with electrochemical analysis, we found new sulfur-enriched intermediates that progressively insulate MoS2 electrodes and cause instability from the first discharge cycle. Because of this, the choice of conductive additives is critical for the battery performance. We investigate the mechanistic role of carbon additive by comparing equal loading of standard Super P carbon powder and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The latter offer a nearly 2-fold increase in capacity and a 45% reduction in resistance along with Coulombic efficiency of over 90%. These insights into the phase changes during MoS2 conversion reactions and stabilization methods provide new solutions for implementing cost-effective metal sulfide electrodes, including Li–S systems in high energy-density batteries.

  13. Does an additional structured information program during the intensive care unit stay reduce anxiety in ICU patients?: a multicenter randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Communication and information in order to reduce anxiety in the intensive care unit (ICU) has been described as area needing improvement. Therefore, the aim of this trial was to evaluate whether a structured information program that intensifies information given in standard care process reduces anxiety in ICU patients. Methods Multicenter, two-armed, non-blinded, parallel-group randomized controlled trial in hospitals in the cities of Marburg, Halle, and Stuttgart (Germany). The trial was performed in cardiac surgery, general surgery, and internal medicine ICUs. Two-hundred and eleven elective and non-elective ICU patients were enrolled in the study (intervention group, n = 104; control group, n = 107). The experimental intervention comprised a single episode of structured oral information that was given in addition to standard care and covered two main parts: (1) A more standardized part about predefined ICU specific aspects – mainly procedural, sensory and coping information, and (2) an individualized part about fears and questions of the patient. The control group received a non-specific episodic conversation of similar length additional to standard care. Both conversations took place at the beginning of the ICU stay and lasted 10–15 minutes. Study nurses administered both interventions. The primary outcome ICU-related anxiety (CINT-Score, 0–100 pts., higher scores indicate higher anxiety) was assessed after admission to a regular ward. Results The primary outcome could be measured in 82 intervention group participants and 90 control group participants resulting in mean values of 20.4 (SD 14.4) compared to 20.8 (SD 14.7) and a mean difference of −0.2 (CI 95% -4.5 to 4.1). Conclusions A structured information intervention additional to standard care during ICU stay had no demonstrated additional benefit compared to an unspecific communication of similar duration. Reduction of anxiety in ICU patients will probably require more continuous

  14. Oxidative addition of allylic halides to ruthenium(II) compounds. Preparation, reactions, and X-ray crystallographic structure of ruthenium(IV)-allyl complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Nagashima, Hideo; Mukai, Katsunori; Shiota, Yusuke; Yamaguchi, Keitaro; Ara, Kenichi; Fukahori, Takahiko; Itoh, Kenji ); Suzuki, Hiroharu; Akita, Munetaka; Moro-oka, Yoshihiko )

    1990-03-01

    The oxidative addition of allylic halides to (C{sub 5}R{sub 5})RuL{sub 2}X (R = H, Me; L = CO, PPh{sub 3}) gave new Ru(IV)-{eta}{sup 3}-allyl complexes, (C{sub 5}R{sub 5})RuX{sub 2}({eta}{sup 3}-allyl). An X-ray structure determination was carried out on (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5})RuBr{sub 2}({eta}{sup 3}-C{sub 3}H{sub 5}), indicating a pseudo-piano-stool structure having two Br atoms and two terminal carbons of the endo-{eta}{sup 3}-allyl ligand located at the basal positions. There is a crystal mirror plane bisecting the pentamethylcyclopentadienyl and the {pi}-allyl ligands. Crystal data: orthorhombic, space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, a = 22.738 (1) {angstrom}, b = 13.367 (7) {angstrom}, c = 9.383 (1) {angstrom}, Z = 4., data refined to R = 0.0695. Its {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectra showed symmetric allyl signals, supporting that the above-described piano-stool structure is maintained even in solution.

  15. Effect of build geometry on the β-grain structure and texture in additive manufacture of Ti-6Al-4V by selective electron beam melting

    SciTech Connect

    Antonysamy, A.A.; Meyer, J.; Prangnell, P.B.

    2013-10-15

    With titanium alloys, the solidification conditions in Additive Manufacturing (AM) frequently lead to coarse columnar β-grain structures. The effect of geometry on the variability in the grain structure and texture, seen in Ti-6Al-4V alloy components produced by Selective Electron Beam Melting (SEBM), has been investigated. Reconstruction of the primary β-phase, from α-phase EBSD data, has confirmed that in bulk sections where in-fill “hatching” is employed growth selection favours columnar grains aligned with an <001> {sub β} direction normal to the deposited powder layers; this results in a coarse β-grain structure with a strong < 001 > {sub β} fibre texture (up 8 x random) that can oscillate between a near random distribution around the fibre axis and cube reinforcement with build height. It is proposed that this behaviour is related to the highly elongated melt pool and the raster directions alternating between two orthogonal directions every layer, which on average favours grains with cube alignment. In contrast, the outline, or “contour”, pass produces a distinctly different grain structure and texture resulting in a skin layer on wall surfaces, where nucleation occurs off the surrounding powder and growth follows the curved surface of the melt pool. This structure becomes increasingly important in thin sections. Local heterogeneities have also been found within different section transitions, resulting from the growth of skin grain structures into thicker sections. Texture simulations have shown that the far weaker α-texture (∼ 3 x random), seen in the final product, arises from transformation on cooling occurring with a near random distribution of α-plates across the 12 variants possible from the Burgers relationship. - Highlights: • Distinctly different skin and bulk structures are produced by the contour and hatching passes. • Bulk sections contain coarse β-grains with a < 001 > fibre texture in the build direction. • This

  16. Ligand binding studies, preliminary structure-activity relationship and detailed mechanistic characterization of 1-phenyl-6,6-dimethyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine derivatives as inhibitors of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Bharath; Tonddast-Navaei, Sam; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2015-10-20

    Gram-negative bacteria are implicated in the causation of life-threatening hospital-acquired infections. They acquire rapid resistance to multiple drugs and available antibiotics. Hence, there is the need to discover new antibacterial agents with novel scaffolds. For the first time, this study explores the 1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine and 1,2,4-triazine-2,4-diamine group of compounds as potential inhibitors of Escherichia coli DHFR, a pivotal enzyme in the thymidine and purine synthesis pathway. Using differential scanning fluorimetry, DSF, fifteen compounds with various substitutions on either the 3rd or 4th positions on the benzene group of 6,6-dimethyl-1-(benzene)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine were shown to bind to the enzyme with varying affinities. Then, the dose dependence of inhibition by these compounds was determined. Preliminary quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis and docking studies implicate the alkyl linker group and the sulfonyl fluoride group in increasing the potency of inhibition. 4-[4-[3-(4,6-diamino-2,2-dimethyl-1,3,5-triazin-1-yl)phenyl]butyl]benzenesulfonyl fluoride (NSC120927), the best hit from the study and a molecule with no reported inhibition of E. coli DHFR, potently inhibits the enzyme with a Ki value of 42.50 ± 5.34 nM, followed by 4-[6-[4-(4,6-diamino-2,2-dimethyl-1,3,5-triazin-1-yl)phenyl]hexyl]benzenesulfonyl fluoride (NSC132279), with a Ki value of 100.9 ± 12.7 nM. Detailed kinetic characterization of the inhibition brought about by five small-molecule hits shows that these inhibitors bind to the dihydrofolate binding site with preferential binding to the NADPH-bound binary form of the enzyme. Furthermore, in search of novel diaminotriazine scaffolds, it is shown that lamotrigine, a 1,2,4-triazine-3,5-diamine and a sodium-ion channel blocker class of antiepileptic drug, also inhibits E. coli DHFR. This is the first comprehensive study on the binding and inhibition brought about by diaminotriazines of a gram

  17. Influence of a liquid-crystal additive on the structural characteristics of the orientationally ordered near-surface layers of a petroleum oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiriyan, S. V.; Altoiz, B. A.; Shatagina, E. A.

    2013-03-01

    It has been established that a shear flow of a micron interlayer of a petrolatum oil doped with a nematic liquid crystal or a surface-active substance (oleic acid) is non-Newtonian in character. This was explained by the existence of orientationally ordered near-wall layers on the substrate confining the indicated interlayer. The parameters of the structure of such a near-wall layer were estimated within the framework of the rheological model of a heterophase stratified interlayer. It is shown that the thickness and molecular ordering of an interlayer of a petrolatum oil with a liquid-crystal additive are larger than those of an interlayer of this oil doped with a surface-active substance.

  18. Detailed mechanism of benzene oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, David A.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed quantitative mechanism for the oxidation of benzene in both argon and nitrogen diluted systems is presented. Computed ignition delay time for argon diluted mixtures are in satisfactory agreement with experimental results for a wide range of initial conditions. An experimental temperature versus time profile for a nitrogen diluted oxidation was accurately matched and several concentration profiles were matched qualitatively. Application of sensitivity analysis has given approximate rate constant expressions for the two dominant heat release reactions, the oxidation of C6H5 and C5H5 radicals by molecular oxygen.

  19. The construction of graph models for calculations of the properties of substitution isomers of basis structures on the basis of additivity of energy contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilov, D. Yu.; Smolyakov, V. M.

    2012-05-01

    A method for the construction of additive models for calculations of the properties of substitution isomers of basis structures is described for the example of a series of X-substituted methylsilanes CH3 - k X k -SiH3 - l X l (where X = CH3, F, Cl, …, k, l = 0, 1, 2, 3). The method is based on similarity of subgraphs in graphs of several molecules and the arrangement of polygonal numbers (triangular, tetrahedral) of the Pascal triangle. Parameters taking into account multiple nonvalence interactions (-C-Si<, >C-Si<, …) through two atoms along the molecular chain of an X-substituted methylsilane (X = CH3) were for the first time explicitly included in the calculation scheme. Taking these interactions into account allows us to completely differentiate all the structural isomers of certain molecules and obtain numerical parameter values for predicting properties P under consideration in various approximations. Numerical calculations of Δf H {g,298/K o} were performed for 16 alkylsilanes (as X-substituted methylsilanes), including 7 compounds not studied experimentally.

  20. Addition of microbially-treated sugar beet residue and a native bacterium increases structural stability in heavy metal-contaminated Mediterranean soils.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, L; Caravaca, F; Azcón, R; Kohler, J; Roldán, A

    2009-10-15

    A mesocosm experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of the addition of Aspergillus niger-treated sugar beet waste, in the presence of rock phosphate, and inoculation with a native, metal-tolerant bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis, on the stabilisation of soil aggregates of two mine tailings, with differing pH values, from a semiarid Mediterranean area and on the stimulation of growth of Piptatherum miliaceum. Bacterium combined with organic amendment enhanced structural stability (38% in acidic soil and 106% in neutral soil compared with their corresponding controls). Only the organic amendment increased pH, electrical conductivity, water-soluble C, water-soluble carbohydrates and plant growth, in both soils. While in neutral soil both organic amendment and bacterium increased dehydrogenase activity, only organic amendment had a significant effect in acidic soil. This study demonstrates that the use of P. miliaceum in combination with organic amendment and bacterium is a suitable tool for the stabilisation of the soil structure of degraded mine tailings, although its effectiveness is dependent on soil pH. PMID:19660785

  1. Soil microbial biomass and community structure affected by repeated additions of sewage sludge in four Swedish long-term field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börjesson, G.; Kätterer, T.; Kirchmann, H.

    2012-04-01

    Soil organic matter is a key attribute of soil fertility. The pool of soil organic C can be increased, either by mineral fertilisers or by adding organic amendments such as sewage sludge. Sewage sludge has positive effects on agricultural soils through the supply of organic matter and essential plant nutrients, but sludge may also contain unwanted heavy metals, xenobiotic substances and pathogens. One obvious effect of long-term sewage sludge addition is a decrease in soil pH, caused by N mineralisation followed by nitrification, sulphate formation and presence of organic acids with the organic matter added. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of sewage sludge on the microbial biomass and community structure. Materials and methods We analysed soil samples from four sites where sewage sludge has been repeatedly applied in long-term field experiments situated in different parts of Sweden; Ultuna (59°49'N, 17°39'E, started 1956), Lanna (58°21'N, 13°06'E, started 1997-98), Petersborg (55°32'N, 13°00'E, started 1981) and Igelösa (55°45'N, 13°18'E, started 1981). In these four experiments, at least one sewage sludge treatment is included in the experimental design. In the Ultuna experiment, all organic fertilisers, including sewage sludge, are applied every second year, corresponding to 4 ton C ha-1. The Lanna experiment has a similar design, with 8 ton dry matter ha-1 applied every second year. Lanna also has an additional treatment in which metal salts (Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn) are added together with sewage sludge. At Petersborg and Igelösa, two levels of sewage sludge (4 or 12 ton dry matter ha-1 every 4th year) are compared with three levels of NPK fertiliser (0 N, ½ normal N and normal N). Topsoil samples (0-20 cm depth) from the four sites were analysed for total C, total N, pH and PLFAs (phospholipid fatty acids). In addition, crop yields were recorded. Results At all four sites, sewage sludge has had a positive effect on crop yields

  2. Towards a detailed soot model for internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Mosbach, Sebastian; Celnik, Matthew S.; Raj, Abhijeet; Kraft, Markus; Zhang, Hongzhi R.; Kubo, Shuichi; Kim, Kyoung-Oh

    2009-06-15

    In this work, we present a detailed model for the formation of soot in internal combustion engines describing not only bulk quantities such as soot mass, number density, volume fraction, and surface area but also the morphology and chemical composition of soot aggregates. The new model is based on the Stochastic Reactor Model (SRM) engine code, which uses detailed chemistry and takes into account convective heat transfer and turbulent mixing, and the soot formation is accounted for by SWEEP, a population balance solver based on a Monte Carlo method. In order to couple the gas-phase to the particulate phase, a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism describing the combustion of Primary Reference Fuels (PRFs) is extended to include small Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) such as pyrene, which function as soot precursor species for particle inception in the soot model. Apart from providing averaged quantities as functions of crank angle like soot mass, volume fraction, aggregate diameter, and the number of primary particles per aggregate for example, the integrated model also gives detailed information such as aggregate and primary particle size distribution functions. In addition, specifics about aggregate structure and composition, including C/H ratio and PAH ring count distributions, and images similar to those produced with Transmission Electron Microscopes (TEMs), can be obtained. The new model is applied to simulate an n-heptane fuelled Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine which is operated at an equivalence ratio of 1.93. In-cylinder pressure and heat release predictions show satisfactory agreement with measurements. Furthermore, simulated aggregate size distributions as well as their time evolution are found to qualitatively agree with those obtained experimentally through snatch sampling. It is also observed both in the experiment as well as in the simulation that aggregates in the trapped residual gases play a vital role in the soot

  3. Triosmium clusters formed by oxidative addition and decarbonylation of 2-formylpyrrole: Crystal structures of three triosmium clusters containing aromatic or nonaromatic heterocyclic ligands derived from pyrrole

    SciTech Connect

    Day, M.W.; Hardcastle, K.I. ); Deeming, A.J. ); Arce, A.J.; De Sanctis, Y. )

    1990-01-01

    The {mu}-acyl cluster (Os{sub 3}H({mu}{sub 2}-NHCH=CHCH=CCO)(CO){sub 10}) (1) is formed by oxidative addition of 2-formylpyrrole to (Os{sub 3}(CO){sub 10}(MeCN){sub 2}) in refluxing cyclohexane in the same manner as with other aldehydes. The crystals of 1 are triclinic, space group P{bar 1}, with cell dimensions a = 14.882 (2) {angstrom}, b = 15.626 (4) {angstrom}, c = 9.447 (3) {angstrom}, {alpha} = 107.39 (2){degree}, {beta} = 97.29 (2){degree}, {gamma} = 97.84 (2){degree}, and Z = 4. The structure was refined to R{sub w} = 0.034. The pyrrolylacyl ligand bridges two osmium atoms through the C and O atoms of the original formyl group. Thermal loss of two COs from 1 gives two isomers of the cluster (Os{sub 3}H{sub 2}({mu}{sub 3}-C{sub 4}H{sub 3}N)(CO){sub 9}) (2 and 3), isomer 2 converting to 3 thermally. Isomer 2, (Os{sub 3}H{sub 2}({mu}{sub 3}-NHCH=CHC=C)(CO){sub 9}), retains the NH bond and is directly related to the N-methyl analogue of 2, (Os{sub 3}H{sub 2}({mu}{sub 3}-MeNCH=CHC=C)(CO){sub 9}) (5), and closely related to the benzyne cluster (Os{sub 3}H{sub 2}(C{sub 6}H{sub 4})(CO){sub 9}), both of known X-ray structure. Cluster 2 converts to 3 by cleavage of N-H and Os-C bonds and with formation of C-H and Os-N bonds. Crystals of 3 are monoclinic, space group P2{sub 1}/c, with cell dimensions a = 11.308 (2) {angstrom}, b = 12.457 (2) {angstrom}, c = 15.384 (3) {angstrom}, {beta} = 123.59 (2){degree}, and Z = 8. The structure was refined to R{sub w} = 0.052. The structure is best defined by a model in which the {mu}{sub 3}-N=CHCH=CHC ligand is coordinated to one Os atom through a N atom and to the other two through a single C atom forming a {mu}{sub 2}-alkylidene bridge. The C{sub 4}N ring is formally nonaromatic and is oriented vertically to the metal plane.

  4. Morphological details in bloodstain particles.

    PubMed

    De Wael, K; Lepot, L

    2015-01-01

    During the commission of crimes blood can be transferred to the clothing of the offender or on other crime related objects. Bloodstain particles are sub-millimetre sized flakes that are lost from dried bloodstains. The nature of these red particles is easily confirmed using spectroscopic methods. In casework, bloodstain particles showing highly detailed morphological features were observed. These provided a rationale for a series of experiments described in this work. It was found that the "largest" particles are shed from blood deposited on polyester and polyamide woven fabrics. No particles are lost from the stains made on absorbent fabrics and from those made on knitted fabrics. The morphological features observed in bloodstain particles can provide important information on the substrates from which they were lost. PMID:25437904

  5. A Generalized Detailed Balance Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruelle, David

    2016-08-01

    Given a system M in a thermal bath we obtain a generalized detailed balance relation for the ratio r=π _τ (K→ J)/π _τ (J→ K) of the transition probabilities M:J→ K and M:K→ J in time τ . We assume an active bath, containing solute molecules in metastable states. These molecules may react with M and the transition J→ K occurs through different channels α involving different reactions with the bath. We find that r=sum p^α r^α , where p^α is the probability that channel α occurs, and r^α depends on the amount of heat (more precisely enthalpy) released to the bath in channel α.

  6. Effect of hydrogel particle additives on water-accessible pore structure of sandy soils: a custom pressure plate apparatus and capillary bundle model.

    PubMed

    Wei, Y; Durian, D J

    2013-05-01

    To probe the effects of hydrogel particle additives on the water-accessible pore structure of sandy soils, we introduce a custom pressure plate method in which the volume of water expelled from a wet granular packing is measured as a function of applied pressure. Using a capillary bundle model, we show that the differential change in retained water per pressure increment is directly related to the cumulative cross-sectional area distribution f(r) of the water-accessible pores with radii less than r. This is validated by measurements of water expelled from a model sandy soil composed of 2-mm-diameter glass beads. In particular, it is found that the expelled water is dramatically dependent on sample height and that analysis using the capillary bundle model gives the same pore size distribution for all samples. The distribution is found to be approximately log normal, and the total cross-sectional area fraction of the accessible pore space is found to be f(0)=0.34. We then report on how the pore distribution and total water-accessible area fraction are affected by superabsorbent hydrogel particle additives, uniformly mixed into a fixed-height sample at varying concentrations. Under both fixed volume and free swelling conditions, the total area fraction of water-accessible pore space in a packing decreases exponentially as the gel concentration increases. The size distribution of the pores is significantly modified by the swollen hydrogel particles, such that large pores are clogged while small pores are formed.

  7. 7. DETAIL INTERIOR VIEW TO SOUTHWEST OF REAR ORIGINAL SECOND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL INTERIOR VIEW TO SOUTHWEST OF REAR ORIGINAL SECOND FLOOR, WITH PASSAGEWAY LEADING TO c1944-1950 POST-U.S. RADIUM ADDITION - United States Radium Corporation, Paint Application Building, 422 Alden Street, Orange, Essex County, NJ

  8. 3. Exterior, detail view of north elevation, from northeast, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Exterior, detail view of north elevation, from northeast, showing joint of addition. Sept. 12, 1940. Mixon. - Upper Swedish Log Cabin, Darby Creek vicinity, Clifton Heights (Upper Darby Township), Darby, Delaware County, PA

  9. 11. SOUTH AND EAST SIDE, THREEQUARTER VIEW, DETAIL SHOWING SIXTHFLOOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. SOUTH AND EAST SIDE, THREE-QUARTER VIEW, DETAIL SHOWING SIXTH-FLOOR BRICK ADDITION AND ORIGINAL BRICK PILASTERS; LOOKING NORTHWEST - Crown Roller Mill, 105 Fifth Avenue, South, West Side Milling District, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  10. 11. Detail of horse lamp fixture in original Clubhouse bar. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Detail of horse lamp fixture in original Clubhouse bar. Fixture is at north end of bar. Camera pointed up and NW. (July 1993) - Longacres, Clubhouse & Additions, 1621 Southwest Sixteenth Street, Renton, King County, WA

  11. 7. Detail of the Grant Locomotive Works Erecting Shop looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Detail of the Grant Locomotive Works Erecting Shop looking southwest showing ruined wall and entrance of a single story addition. - Grant Locomotive Works, Market & Spruce Streets, Paterson, Passaic County, NJ

  12. PAINT SHOP, DETAIL OF FABRICATED COLUMN AT JUNCTION OF WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PAINT SHOP, DETAIL OF FABRICATED COLUMN AT JUNCTION OF WEST BAY (ORIGINAL) AND CENTER BAYS (SECOND ADDITION), LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Southern Pacific, Sacramento Shops, Paint Shop, 111 I Street, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  13. 5. INTERIOR DETAIL OF 'BATTLESHIP DECK' WALL PARTITION AND CEILING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. INTERIOR DETAIL OF 'BATTLESHIP DECK' WALL PARTITION AND CEILING OF FIRST FLOOR OF 1930 ADDITION TO OFFICE BUILDING - Midwest Steel & Iron Works Company, 25 Larimer Street, Denver, Denver County, CO

  14. Detailed structural characterization of the grafting of [Ta(=CHtBu)(CH2tBu)3] and [Cp*TaMe4] on silica partially dehydroxylated at 700 C and the activity of the grafted complexes toward alkane metathesis

    SciTech Connect

    Le Roux, Erwan; Chabanas, Mathieu; Baudouin, Anne; de Mallmann, Aimery; Coperet, Christophe; Quadrelli, E. Allesandra; Thivolle-Cazat, Jean; Basset, Jean-Marie; Lukens, Wayne; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Sunley, Glenn J.

    2004-08-30

    The reaction of [Ta({double_bond}CHtBu)(CH{sub 2}tBu){sub 3}] or [Cp*Ta(CH{sub 3}){sub 4}] with a silica partially dehydroxylated at 700 C gives the corresponding monosiloxy surface complexes [({triple_bond}SiO)Ta({double_bond}CHtBu)(CH{sub 2}tBu){sub 2}] and [({triple_bond}SiO)Ta(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}Cp*] by eliminating a {sigma}-bonded ligand as the corresponding alkane (H-CH{sub 2}tBu or H-CH{sub 3}). EXAFS data show that an adjacent siloxane bridge of the surface plays the role of an extra surface ligand, which most likely stabilizes these complexes as in [({triple_bond}SiO)Ta({double_bond}CHtBu)(CH{sub 2}tBu){sub 2}({triple_bond}SiOSi{triple_bond})] (1a') and [({triple_bond}SiO)Ta(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}Cp*({triple_bond}SiOSi{triple_bond})] (2a'). In the case of [({triple_bond}SiO)Ta({double_bond}CHtBu)(CH{sub 2}tBu){sub 2}({triple_bond}SiOSi{triple_bond})], the structure is further stabilized by an additional interaction: a C-H agostic bond as evidenced by the small J coupling constant for the carbenic C-H (H{sub C-H} = 80 Hz), which was measured by J-resolved 2D solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The product selectivity in propane metathesis in the presence of [({triple_bond}SiO)Ta({double_bond}CHtBu)-(CH{sub 2}tBu){sub 2}({triple_bond}SiOSi{triple_bond})] (1a') as a catalyst precursor and the inactivity of the surface complex [({triple_bond}SiO)Ta-(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}Cp*({triple_bond}SiOSi{triple_bond})] (2a') show that the active site is required to be highly electrophilic and probably involves a metallacyclobutane intermediate.

  15. Shedding new light on ZnCl2-mediated addition reactions of Grignard reagents to ketones: structural authentication of key intermediates and diffusion-ordered NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, David R; Clegg, William; García-Alvarez, Pablo; McCall, Matthew D; Nuttall, Lorraine; Kennedy, Alan R; Russo, Luca; Hevia, Eva

    2011-04-11

    Building on recent advances in synthesis showing that the addition of inorganic salts to Grignard reagents can greatly enhance their performance in alkylation reactions to ketones, this study explores the reactions of EtMgCl with benzophenone in the presence of stoichiometric or catalytic amounts of ZnCl(2) with the aim of furthering the understanding of the role and constitution of the organometallic species involved in these transformations. Investigations into the metathesis reactions of three molar equivalents of EtMgCl with ZnCl(2) led to the isolation and characterisation (X-ray crystallography and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy) of novel magnesium "zinc-rich" zincate [{(THF)(6)Mg(2)Cl(3)}(+){Zn(2)Et(5)}(-)] (1), whose complicated constitution in THF solutions was assessed by variable-temperature (1)H DOSY NMR studies. Compound 1 reacted with one equivalent of benzophenone to yield magnesium magnesiate [{(THF)(6)Mg(2)Cl(3)}(+){Mg(2)(OC(Et)Ph(2))(2)Cl(3)(THF)}(-)] (3), whose structure was determined by X-ray crystallography. (1)H NMR monitoring of this reaction showed two equivalents of ZnEt(2) formed as a co-product, which together with the "magnesium only constitution" of 3 provides experimental insights into how zinc can be efficiently recycled in these reactions, and therefore used catalytically. The chemoselectivity of this reaction can be rationalised in terms of the synergic effect of magnesium and zinc and contrasts with the results obtained when benzophenone was allowed to react with EtMgCl in the absence of ZnCl(2), where the reduction of the ketone takes place preferentially. The reduction product [{(THF)(5)Mg(3)Cl(4){OC(H)Ph(CF(3))}(2)] (4) obtained from the reaction of EtMgCl with 2,2,2-trifluoroacetophenone was established by X-ray crystallography and multinuclear ((1)H, (13)C and (19)F) NMR spectroscopy. Compounds 3 and 4 exhibit new structural motifs in magnesium chemistry having MgCl(2) integrated within their constitution, which highlights

  16. Picornavirus uncoating intermediate captured in atomic detail

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jingshan; Wang, Xiangxi; Hu, Zhongyu; Gao, Qiang; Sun, Yao; Li, Xuemei; Porta, Claudine; Walter, Thomas S.; Gilbert, Robert J.; Zhao, Yuguang; Axford, Danny; Williams, Mark; McAuley, Katherine; Rowlands, David J.; Yin, Weidong; Wang, Junzhi; Stuart, David I.; Rao, Zihe; Fry, Elizabeth E.

    2013-01-01

    It remains largely mysterious how the genomes of non-enveloped eukaryotic viruses are transferred across a membrane into the host cell. Picornaviruses are simple models for such viruses, and initiate this uncoating process through particle expansion, which reveals channels through which internal capsid proteins and the viral genome presumably exit the particle, although this has not been clearly seen until now. Here we present the atomic structure of an uncoating intermediate for the major human picornavirus pathogen CAV16, which reveals VP1 partly extruded from the capsid, poised to embed in the host membrane. Together with previous low-resolution results, we are able to propose a detailed hypothesis for the ordered egress of the internal proteins, using two distinct sets of channels through the capsid, and suggest a structural link to the condensed RNA within the particle, which may be involved in triggering RNA release. PMID:23728514

  17. Data indicating temperature response of Ti-6Al-4V thin-walled structure during its additive manufacture via Laser Engineered Net Shaping.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Garrett J; Thompson, Scott M; Shamsaei, Nima

    2016-06-01

    An OPTOMEC Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS(™)) 750 system was retrofitted with a melt pool pyrometer and in-chamber infrared (IR) camera for nondestructive thermal inspection of the blown-powder, direct laser deposition (DLD) process. Data indicative of temperature and heat transfer within the melt pool and heat affected zone atop a thin-walled structure of Ti-6Al-4V during its additive manufacture are provided. Melt pool temperature data were collected via the dual-wavelength pyrometer while the dynamic, bulk part temperature distribution was collected using the IR camera. Such data are provided in Comma Separated Values (CSV) file format, containing a 752×480 matrix and a 320×240 matrix of temperatures corresponding to individual pixels of the pyrometer and IR camera, respectively. The IR camera and pyrometer temperature data are provided in blackbody-calibrated, raw forms. Provided thermal data can aid in generating and refining process-property-performance relationships between laser manufacturing and its fabricated materials.

  18. Data indicating temperature response of Ti–6Al–4V thin-walled structure during its additive manufacture via Laser Engineered Net Shaping

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Garrett J.; Thompson, Scott M.; Shamsaei, Nima

    2016-01-01

    An OPTOMEC Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™) 750 system was retrofitted with a melt pool pyrometer and in-chamber infrared (IR) camera for nondestructive thermal inspection of the blown-powder, direct laser deposition (DLD) process. Data indicative of temperature and heat transfer within the melt pool and heat affected zone atop a thin-walled structure of Ti–6Al–4V during its additive manufacture are provided. Melt pool temperature data were collected via the dual-wavelength pyrometer while the dynamic, bulk part temperature distribution was collected using the IR camera. Such data are provided in Comma Separated Values (CSV) file format, containing a 752×480 matrix and a 320×240 matrix of temperatures corresponding to individual pixels of the pyrometer and IR camera, respectively. The IR camera and pyrometer temperature data are provided in blackbody-calibrated, raw forms. Provided thermal data can aid in generating and refining process-property-performance relationships between laser manufacturing and its fabricated materials. PMID:27054180

  19. Influence of Ni nanoparticle addition and spark plasma sintering on the TiNiSn–Ni system: Structure, microstructure, and thermoelectric properties

    SciTech Connect

    Birkel, Christina S.; Douglas, Jason E.; Lettiere, Bethany R.; Seward, Gareth; Zhang, Yichi; Pollock, Tresa M.; Seshadri, Ram; Stucky, Galen D.

    2013-12-01

    The electronic and thermal properties of thermoelectric materials are highly dependent on their microstructure and therefore on the preparation conditions, including the initial synthesis and, if applicable, densification of the obtained powders. Introduction of secondary phases on the nano- and/or microscale is widely used to improve the thermoelectric figure of merit by reduction of the thermal conductivity. In order to understand the effect of the preparation technique on structure and properties, we have studied the thermoelectric properties of the well-known half-Heusler TiNiSn with addition of a small amount of nickel nanoparticles. The different parameters are the initial synthesis (levitation melting and microwave heating), the amount of nickel nanoparticles added and the exact pressing profile using spark plasma sintering. The resulting materials have been characterized by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and microprobe measurements and their thermoelectric properties are investigated. We found the lowest (lattice) thermal conductivity in samples with full-Heusler TiNi2Sn and Ni3Sn4 as secondary phases.

  20. Characteristics and fate of the spermatozoa of Inachus phalangium (Decapoda, Majidae): description of novel sperm structures and evidence for an additional mechanism of sperm competition in Brachyura.

    PubMed

    Rorandelli, Rocco; Paoli, Francesco; Cannicci, Stefano; Mercati, David; Giusti, Fabiola

    2008-03-01

    Various aspects of the reproductive anatomy of the spider crab Inachus phalangium are investigated utilizing light and electron microscopy. Spermatozoal ultrastructure reveals the presence of a glycocalyx in the peripheral region of the periopercular rim, never recorded before in crustacean sperm cells. Sperm cell morphological traits such as semi-lunar acrosome shape, centrally perforate and flat operculum, and absence of a thickened ring, are shared only with Macropodia longirostris, confirming a close phylogenetic relationship of these species and their separation from the other members of the family Majidae. Spermatozoa are transferred to females inside spermatophores of different sizes, but during ejaculate transfer, larger spermatophores might be ruptured by tooth-like structures present on the ejaculatory canal of the male first gonopod, releasing free sperm cells. Such a mechanism could represent the first evidence of a second form of sperm competition in conflict with sperm displacement, the only mechanism of sperm competition known among Brachyura, enabling paternity for both dominant and smaller, non-dominant, males. In addition, we propose several hypotheses concerning the remote and proximal causes of the existence of large seminal receptacles in females of I. phalangium. Among these, genetically diverse progeny, reduction of sexual harassment and phylogenetic retention seem the most plausible, while acquisition of nutrients from seminal fluids, demonstrated in other arthropods, and suggested by previous studies, could be discarded on the basis of the presented data.

  1. Data indicating temperature response of Ti-6Al-4V thin-walled structure during its additive manufacture via Laser Engineered Net Shaping.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Garrett J; Thompson, Scott M; Shamsaei, Nima

    2016-06-01

    An OPTOMEC Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS(™)) 750 system was retrofitted with a melt pool pyrometer and in-chamber infrared (IR) camera for nondestructive thermal inspection of the blown-powder, direct laser deposition (DLD) process. Data indicative of temperature and heat transfer within the melt pool and heat affected zone atop a thin-walled structure of Ti-6Al-4V during its additive manufacture are provided. Melt pool temperature data were collected via the dual-wavelength pyrometer while the dynamic, bulk part temperature distribution was collected using the IR camera. Such data are provided in Comma Separated Values (CSV) file format, containing a 752×480 matrix and a 320×240 matrix of temperatures corresponding to individual pixels of the pyrometer and IR camera, respectively. The IR camera and pyrometer temperature data are provided in blackbody-calibrated, raw forms. Provided thermal data can aid in generating and refining process-property-performance relationships between laser manufacturing and its fabricated materials. PMID:27054180

  2. HUBBLE CAPTURES DETAILED IMAGE OF URANUS' ATMOSPHERE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope has peered deep into Uranus' atmosphere to see clear and hazy layers created by a mixture of gases. Using infrared filters, Hubble captured detailed features of three layers of Uranus' atmosphere. Hubble's images are different from the ones taken by the Voyager 2 spacecraft, which flew by Uranus 10 years ago. Those images - not taken in infrared light - showed a greenish-blue disk with very little detail. The infrared image allows astronomers to probe the structure of Uranus' atmosphere, which consists of mostly hydrogen with traces of methane. The red around the planet's edge represents a very thin haze at a high altitude. The haze is so thin that it can only be seen by looking at the edges of the disk, and is similar to looking at the edge of a soap bubble. The yellow near the bottom of Uranus is another hazy layer. The deepest layer, the blue near the top of Uranus, shows a clearer atmosphere. Image processing has been used to brighten the rings around Uranus so that astronomers can study their structure. In reality, the rings are as dark as black lava or charcoal. This false color picture was assembled from several exposures taken July 3, 1995 by the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2. CREDIT: Erich Karkoschka (University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Lab) and NASA

  3. 12. Detail, typical window with fireproof shutters open, northeast rear, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Detail, typical window with fireproof shutters open, northeast rear, view to southwest, 135mm lens. Note cracks evidencing structural failure. - Benicia Arsenal, Powder Magazine No. 5, Junction of Interstate Highways 680 & 780, Benicia, Solano County, CA

  4. 13. Detail, typical window with fireproof shutters closed, northeast rear, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Detail, typical window with fireproof shutters closed, northeast rear, view to southwest, 135mm lens. Note cracks evidencing structural failure. - Benicia Arsenal, Powder Magazine No. 5, Junction of Interstate Highways 680 & 780, Benicia, Solano County, CA

  5. Detail of sheet steel bulkhead, wharf A, looking northwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of sheet steel bulkhead, wharf A, looking northwest - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  6. Interior detail of south wall with shed roofs showing steel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior detail of south wall with shed roofs showing steel structure, paint room on lower right, view facing west-southwest - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Boat Shop, Seventh Street near Avenue E, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. 4. DETAIL OF CAST AND WROUGHT IRON RAILING WITH SUPPORTING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL OF CAST AND WROUGHT IRON RAILING WITH SUPPORTING STRUCTURES AND STEEL BEAM, FROM THE NORTH BANK LOOKING SOUTHEAST AT THE WEST (UPSTREAM) SIDE - Railroad Avenue Bridge, Spanning Mispillion River on Church Street, Milford, Sussex County, DE

  8. 5. DETAIL OF MUD INFILL (MIXED WITH STRAW), LATHS AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL OF MUD INFILL (MIXED WITH STRAW), LATHS AND STRUCTURAL COMPONENTS (CORNER POST, SILL AND STUD), SOUTHEAST CORNER OF EAST SIDE OF ORIGINAL SECTION. - Thomas Threlkeld House, Benson Pike, Shelbyville, Shelby County, KY

  9. 43. DETAIL VIEW OF THE STAMP BATTERIES SHOWING THE SUPPORT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. DETAIL VIEW OF THE STAMP BATTERIES SHOWING THE SUPPORT STRUCTURE, CAMS, TAPPETS ON THE STAMP SHAFTS AND ONE OF THE TWO DRIVE WHEELS. - Standard Gold Mill, East of Bodie Creek, Northeast of Bodie, Bodie, Mono County, CA

  10. 9. DETAIL OF UMBILICAL MAST BASE WITH STEEL STOPS AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. DETAIL OF UMBILICAL MAST BASE WITH STEEL STOPS AT EAST END OF MOBILE SERVICE STRUCTURE RAIL; VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Cape Canaveral Air Station, Launch Complex 17, Facility 28501, East end of Lighthouse Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  11. INTERIOR; DETAIL OF ANTENNA TRUNK OPENING, LOOKING EAST. Naval ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR; DETAIL OF ANTENNA TRUNK OPENING, LOOKING EAST. - Naval Computer & Telecommunications Area Master Station, Eastern Pacific, Radio Transmitter Facility Lualualei, Helix House No. 2, Base of Radio Antenna Structure No. 427, Makaha, Honolulu County, HI

  12. 3. DETAIL OF ART DECO STAR INSIGNIA OVER MAIN ENTRANCE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. DETAIL OF ART DECO STAR INSIGNIA OVER MAIN ENTRANCE. - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Building 65, Static Structural Test Laboratory, Between Eleventh & Twelfth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  13. View northwest, wharf B, timber framing, detail of cross bracing, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View northwest, wharf B, timber framing, detail of cross bracing, charred piers, recent galvanized fastenings - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  14. View south, wharf B, timber framing, detail of cross bracing, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View south, wharf B, timber framing, detail of cross bracing, recent galvanized straps, bolts and washers - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  15. 44. Detail, bridge land span outboard girder brackets carrying utility ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. Detail, bridge land span outboard girder brackets carrying utility conduit. Structure rests on granite blocks mounted on granite piers. - Broadway Bridge, Spanning Foundry Street, MBTA Yard, Fort Point Channel, & Lehigh Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  16. 9. Detail view of Gasholder House, looking N, showing valve ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Detail view of Gasholder House, looking N, showing valve house entry and members of team recording structure. - Concord Gas Light Company, Gasholder House, South Main Street, Concord, Merrimack County, NH

  17. 6. DETAIL OF ENTRY ON NORTH ELEVATION OF BUILDING 260 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL OF ENTRY ON NORTH ELEVATION OF BUILDING 260 (STORAGE STRUCTURE) IN STORAGE AREA. - Loring Air Force Base, Weapons Storage Area, Northeastern corner of base at northern end of Maine Road, Limestone, Aroostook County, ME

  18. 6. TIP TOP MINE. DETAIL OF SIDING. SOUTHWEST CORNER OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. TIP TOP MINE. DETAIL OF SIDING. SOUTHWEST CORNER OF STRUCTURE. CAMERA POINTED NORTHEAST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Tip Top Mine, West face Florida Mountain, approximately 150 feet below summit, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  19. ANOTHER DETAIL OF THE BRIDGE UNDERSIDE, IBEAM AND WOODEN CROSS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ANOTHER DETAIL OF THE BRIDGE UNDERSIDE, I-BEAM AND WOODEN CROSS BEAM CONSTRUCTION. 69 - Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad, Cajon Subdivision, Structure No. 66.4, Between Cajon Summit and Keenbrook, Devore, San Bernardino County, CA

  20. 26. Southern approach span showing detail plan, elevation, and existing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Southern approach span showing detail plan, elevation, and existing views for pier and abutment structural changes required after flood of December 1955. - Moody Bridge, Spanning South Fork Eel River, Garberville, Humboldt County, CA