Science.gov

Sample records for additional structural elements

  1. Addition of three-dimensional isoparametric elements to NASA structural analysis program (NASTRAN)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Field, E. I.; Johnson, S. E.

    1973-01-01

    Implementation is made of the three-dimensional family of linear, quadratic and cubic isoparametric solid elements into the NASA Structural Analysis program, NASTRAN. This work included program development, installation, testing, and documentation. The addition of these elements to NASTRAN provides a significant increase in modeling capability particularly for structures requiring specification of temperatures, material properties, displacements, and stresses which vary throughout each individual element. Complete program documentation is presented in the form of new sections and updates for direct insertion to the three NASTRAN manuals. The results of demonstration test problems are summarized. Excellent results are obtained with the isoparametric elements for static, normal mode, and buckling analyses.

  2. Elements of Regolith Simulant's Cost Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Douglas L.

    2009-01-01

    The cost of lunar regolith simulants is much higher than many users anticipate. After all, it is nothing more than broken rock. This class will discuss the elements which make up the cost structure for simulants. It will also consider which elements can be avoided under certain circumstances and which elements might be altered by the application of additional research and development.

  3. Addition of higher order plate and shell elements into NASTRAN computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanaswami, R.; Goglia, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    Two higher order plate elements, the linear strain triangular membrane element and the quintic bending element, along with a shallow shell element, suitable for inclusion into the NASTRAN (NASA Structural Analysis) program are described. Additions to the NASTRAN Theoretical Manual, Users' Manual, Programmers' Manual and the NASTRAN Demonstration Problem Manual, for inclusion of these elements into the NASTRAN program are also presented.

  4. Endjoints For Structural Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Harold G.; Mikulas, Martin M.; Wallsom, Richard E.

    1989-01-01

    Endjoint and connecting-node system designed for use in erection of frames. System structurally sound and simple to operate. All nodes and struts interchangeable. Nodes and struts attach to form cubic cell structures to produce beams, platforms, towers, or combinations of these. Design suitable for use in construction of space structures and such terrestrial skeletal frameworks as antenna-reflector supports, roof structures for large buildings, lookout towers, radio-transmitter towers, powerline pylons, and scaffolds.

  5. Automatic Element Addition and Deletion in Lens Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xuemin; Wang, Yongtian; Hao, Qun; Sasian, Jose

    2003-03-01

    A mechanism is established for the automatic addition and deletion of optical elements during the course of lens optimization. Two lens-form parameters, quantifying the symmetry of the optical system and the optical-power distribution among the individual lens elements, are used as criteria in this automatic procedure. Design examples are provided that demonstrate the practicability of the scheme.

  6. Biobased extreme pressure additives: Structure-property considerations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extreme pressure additives are widely used in lubricant formulations for engine oils, hydraulic fluids, gear oils, metalworking fluids, and many others. Extreme pressure additives contain selected elements such as sulfur, phosphorus, and halogens in their structures. These elements, under extreme tr...

  7. Structural Truss Elements and Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troyer, Steve; Griffis, Kurt; Shackelford, Ray

    2005-01-01

    In the field of construction, most structures are supported by several groups of truss systems working together synergistically. A "truss" is a group of centered and balanced elements combined to carry a common load (Warner, 2003). Trusses provide strength against loads and forces within a structure. Though a complex field of study, structural…

  8. Methanogenesis from wastewater stimulated by addition of elemental manganese.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Sen; Tian, Tian; Qi, Benyu; Zhou, Jiti

    2015-08-05

    This study presents a novel procedure for accelerating methanogenesis from wastewater by adding elemental manganese into the anaerobic digestion system. The results indicated that elemental manganese effectively enhanced both the methane yield and the production rate. Compared to the control test without elemental manganese, the total methane yield and production rate with 4 g/L manganese addition increased 3.4-fold (from 0.89 ± 0.03 to 2.99 ± 0.37 M/gVSS within 120 h) and 4.4-fold (from 6.2 ± 0.1 to 27.2 ± 2.2 mM/gVSS/h), respectively. Besides, more acetate consumption and less propionate generation were observed during the methanogenesis with manganese. Further studies demonstrated that the elemental manganese served as electron donors for the methanogenesis from carbon dioxide, and the final proportion of methane in the total generated gas with 4 g/L manganese addition reached 96.9%, which was 2.1-fold than that of the control (46.6%).

  9. Methanogenesis from wastewater stimulated by addition of elemental manganese

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Sen; Tian, Tian; Qi, Benyu; Zhou, Jiti

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a novel procedure for accelerating methanogenesis from wastewater by adding elemental manganese into the anaerobic digestion system. The results indicated that elemental manganese effectively enhanced both the methane yield and the production rate. Compared to the control test without elemental manganese, the total methane yield and production rate with 4 g/L manganese addition increased 3.4-fold (from 0.89 ± 0.03 to 2.99 ± 0.37 M/gVSS within 120 h) and 4.4-fold (from 6.2 ± 0.1 to 27.2 ± 2.2 mM/gVSS/h), respectively. Besides, more acetate consumption and less propionate generation were observed during the methanogenesis with manganese. Further studies demonstrated that the elemental manganese served as electron donors for the methanogenesis from carbon dioxide, and the final proportion of methane in the total generated gas with 4 g/L manganese addition reached 96.9%, which was 2.1-fold than that of the control (46.6%). PMID:26244609

  10. Element-by-element Solution Procedures for Nonlinear Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, T. J. R.; Winget, J. M.; Levit, I.

    1984-01-01

    Element-by-element approximate factorization procedures are proposed for solving the large finite element equation systems which arise in nonlinear structural mechanics. Architectural and data base advantages of the present algorithms over traditional direct elimination schemes are noted. Results of calculations suggest considerable potential for the methods described.

  11. Improved finite element methodology for integrated thermal structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechaumphai, P.; Thornton, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    An integrated thermal-structural finite element approach for efficient coupling of thermal and structural analyses is presented. New thermal finite elements which yield exact nodal and element temperature for one dimensional linear steady state heat transfer problems are developed. A nodeless variable formulation is used to establish improved thermal finite elements for one dimensional nonlinear transient and two dimensional linear transient heat transfer problems. The thermal finite elements provide detailed temperature distributions without using additional element nodes and permit a common discretization with lower order congruent structural finite elements. The accuracy of the integrated approach is evaluated by comparisons with analytical solutions and conventional finite element thermal-structural analyses for a number of academic and more realistic problems. Results indicate that the approach provides a significant improvement in the accuracy and efficiency of thermal stress analysis for structures with complex temperature distributions.

  12. Improved finite element methodology for integrated thermal structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechaumphai, P.; Thornton, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    An integrated thermal-structural finite element approach for efficient coupling of thermal and structural analysis is presented. New thermal finite elements which yield exact nodal and element temperatures for one dimensional linear steady state heat transfer problems are developed. A nodeless variable formulation is used to establish improved thermal finite elements for one dimensional nonlinear transient and two dimensional linear transient heat transfer problems. The thermal finite elements provide detailed temperature distributions without using additional element nodes and permit a common discretization with lower order congruent structural finite elements. The accuracy of the integrated approach is evaluated by comparisons with analytical solutions and conventional finite element thermal structural analyses for a number of academic and more realistic problems. Results indicate that the approach provides a significant improvement in the accuracy and efficiency of thermal stress analysis for structures with complex temperature distributions.

  13. Open-Section Composite Structural Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftin, T. A.; Smith, C. A.; Raheb, S. J.; Nowitzky, A. M.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes investigation of manufacture and mechanical properties of graphite-fiber/aluminum-matrix open-section structural elements; e.g., channels and angle bars. Conducted with view toward using such elements to build lightweight, thermally stable truss structures in outer space. Other applications transport to, and assembly at, remote or otherwise uninviting locations. Advantages include shapes permitting high packing density during shipment, convenient paths for routing tubes, hoses, and cables; accessibility of both inner and outer surfaces for repair; and ease of attachment of additional hardware. Easier and require less equipment to fabricate, and more amenable to automated fabrication and assembly at remote site. Disadvantages, not as resistant to some kinds of deformation under load.

  14. Evaluation of additive element to improve PZT piezoelectricity by using first-principles calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasoda, Yutaka; Uetsuji, Yasutomo; Tsuchiya, Kazuyoshi

    2015-12-01

    Recently, piezoelectric material has a very important potential for functional material which configure Bio-MEMS (Biological Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) actuator and sensor. Specifically, in implementation of piezoelectric material for Bio-MEMS, thin film fabrication by sputtering method is made from the viewpoint of miniaturization. Furthermore, in piezoelectric material, perovskite type material composed of ABO3 has a high piezoelectricity. Then, PZT (Lead Zirconate Titanate) as the perovskite type piezoelectric material is widely used since it is easy to produce and has high piezoelectricity. PZT has zirconium or titanium in the B site of ABO3 structure. PZT has the features such as physical properties to greatly change by change in the B site composition ratio of zirconium and titanium. Thus, the B site greatly influences physical properties and therefore function improvement by additive element is tried widely. However, experimental method to lack in economy and quantitativeness is mainstream. Therefore, application of the result is difficult and new evaluation method of B site additive element for sputtering fabrication is necessary. Accordingly, in this research, search of an additive element at low cost and quantitative from the viewpoint of energy by first-principles calculation. First of all, the additive elements which capable of substituting for a B site of PZT were searched. Next, change of piezoelectricity was evaluated by change of crystal structure in a PZT system was introduced an additive element that substitution of the B site was possible. As a result, additive elements for the PZT B site capable of improving piezoelectricity were determined.

  15. Where the Periodic Table of Elements Ends? Additional Explanations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazan, Albert

    2011-03-01

    Already 40 years ago, physicists claimed that the elements with number higher than 110 cannot exist. However at this day, Period 7 has been complete. Experiementalists syntesed 10 new syperheavy elements during only the last because. The method of synthesis is so finely developed that the experimentalists of Dubna tell about element No.150 as the higher limit of theTable of Elements (they do not provide a ground to the calculation). In contrast, our calculation are based neither on calculation of the stability of the electronic shells of the atoms, nor synthesis of the superheavy elements. Our caculation is based on study of the chemical processes, which give a new law of the Periodic Table (Albert Khazan. Upper Limit in Mendeleev's Periodic Table---Element No. 155. Svenska fysikarkivet, Stockholm, 2009). The core of the delusion of numerous scientists was that they, in their calculationsbased on Quantum Mechanics, initially set up the number of the elements (number of the protons) then calculated the atomic mass proceeding from the data. According to our theory, the atomic mass of the last element (411.66) should be calculated first, only then its number (155)!

  16. Additive Manufacturing of Functional Elements on Sheet Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaub, Adam; Ahuja, Bhrigu; Butzhammer, Lorenz; Osterziel, Johannes; Schmidt, Michael; Merklein, Marion

    Laser Beam Melting (LBM) process with its advantages of high design flexibility and free form manufacturing methodology is often applied limitedly due to its low productivity and unsuitability for mass production compared to conventional manufacturing processes. In order to overcome these limitations, a hybrid manufacturing methodology is developed combining the additive manufacturing process of laser beam melting with sheet forming processes. With an interest towards aerospace and medical industry, the material in focus is Ti-6Al-4V. Although Ti-6Al-4V is a commercially established material and its application for LBM process has been extensively investigated, the combination of LBM of Ti-6Al-4V with sheet metal still needs to be researched. Process dynamics such as high temperature gradients and thermally induced stresses lead to complex stress states at the interaction zone between the sheet and LBM structure. Within the presented paper mechanical characterization of hybrid parts will be performed by shear testing. The association of shear strength with process parameters is further investigated by analyzing the internal structure of the hybrid geometry at varying energy inputs during the LBM process. In order to compare the hybrid manufacturing methodology with conventional fabrication, the conventional methodologies subtractive machining and state of the art Laser Beam Melting is evaluated within this work. These processes will be analyzed for their mechanical characteristics and productivity by determining the build time and raw material consumption for each case. The paper is concluded by presenting the characteristics of the hybrid manufacturing methodology compared to alternative manufacturing technologies.

  17. Enumeration of Secondary Structure Element Bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, William Michael; Faulon, Jean-Loup

    2004-10-26

    A deterministic algorithm for enumeration of transmembrane protein folds is implemented. Using a set of sparse pairwise atomic distance constraints (such as those obtained from chemical cross-linking, FRET, or dipolar EPR experiments), the algorithm performs an exhaustive search of secondary structure element packing conformations distributed throughout the entire conformational space. The end result is a set of distinct protein conformations which can be scored and refined as part of a process designed for computational elucidation of transmembrane protein structures. Algorithm Overview: The ESSEB algorithm works by dividing the conforrnational space of each secondary structure element (SSE) into a set of cells. For each cell there is a representative conformation and for each atom in the SSE for which a distance restraint is available, there is an associated internal error, The internal error for a distance restraint is the maximum distance that the atom, when positioned in any conformation within a cell, can be from the atom in the representative conformation. The algorithm works recursively by positioning one representative conformation of an SSE. AdI distance restraints are checked with a tolerance that includes both the experimental and internal error. If all restraints are satisfied, every representative conformation of the next SSE is checked, otherwise, the program moves on to the next representative conformation of the current SSE. In addition to the distance restraints, other constraints on protein conformation can be enforced. These include the distance of closest approach between SSE axes, a restraint which prevents the crossover of loops connecting adjacent SSEs, and a restriction on the minimum and maximum distances between axis end-points. Any protein conformation satisfying all of the restraints is enumerated for later scoring and possible refinement. Additionally, in order to make run-times feasible, a divide-and-conquer approach is used in which

  18. Bifunctional air electrodes containing elemental iron powder charging additive

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chia-tsun; Demczyk, Brian G.; Gongaware, Paul R.

    1982-01-01

    A bifunctional air electrode for use in electrochemical energy cells is made, comprising a hydrophilic layer and a hydrophobic layer, where the hydrophilic layer essentially comprises a hydrophilic composite which includes: (i) carbon; (ii) elemental iron particles having a particle size of between about 25 microns and about 700 microns diameter; (iii) an oxygen evolution material; (iv) a nonwetting agent; and (v) a catalyst, where at least one current collector is formed into said composite.

  19. HTGR fuel element structural design considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Alloway, R.; Gorholt, W.; Ho, F.; Vollman, R.; Yu, H.

    1986-09-01

    The structural design of the large HTGR prismatic core fuel elements involve the interaction of four engineering disciplines: nuclear physics, thermo-hydraulics, structural and material science. Fuel element stress analysis techniques and the development of structural criteria are discussed in the context of an overview of the entire design process. The core of the proposed 2240 MW(t) HTGR is described as an example where the design process was used. Probabalistic stress analysis techniques coupled with probabalistic risk analysis (PRA) to develop structural criteria to account for uncertainty are described. The PRA provides a means for ensuring that the proposed structural criteria are consistent with plant investment and safety risk goals. The evaluation of cracked fuel elements removed from the Fort St. Vrain reactor in the USA is discussed in the context of stress analysis uncertainty and structural criteria development.

  20. Adaptive finite element strategies for shell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, G.; Levit, I.; Stehlin, B.; Hurlbut, B.

    1992-01-01

    The present paper extends existing finite element adaptive refinement (AR) techniques to shell structures, which have heretofore been neglected in the AR literature. Specific challenges in applying AR to shell structures include: (1) physical discontinuities (e.g., stiffener intersections); (2) boundary layers; (3) sensitivity to geometric imperfections; (4) the sensitivity of most shell elements to mesh distortion, constraint definition and/or thinness; and (5) intrinsic geometric nonlinearity. All of these challenges but (5) are addressed here.

  1. The Electronic Structure of Heavy Element Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bursten, Bruce E.

    2000-07-25

    The area of study is the bonding in heavy element complexes, and the application of more sophisticated electronic structure theories. Progress is recounted in several areas: (a) technological advances and current methodologies - Relativistic effects are extremely important in gaining an understanding of the electronic structure of compounds of the actinides, transactinides, and other heavy elements. Therefore, a major part of the continual benchmarking was the proper inclusion of the appropriate relativistic effects for the properties under study. (b) specific applications - These include organoactinide sandwich complexes, CO activation by actinide atoms, and theoretical studies of molecules of the transactinide elements. Finally, specific directions in proposed research are described.

  2. Enumeration of Secondary Structure Element Bundles

    2004-10-26

    A deterministic algorithm for enumeration of transmembrane protein folds is implemented. Using a set of sparse pairwise atomic distance constraints (such as those obtained from chemical cross-linking, FRET, or dipolar EPR experiments), the algorithm performs an exhaustive search of secondary structure element packing conformations distributed throughout the entire conformational space. The end result is a set of distinct protein conformations which can be scored and refined as part of a process designed for computational elucidationmore » of transmembrane protein structures. Algorithm Overview: The ESSEB algorithm works by dividing the conforrnational space of each secondary structure element (SSE) into a set of cells. For each cell there is a representative conformation and for each atom in the SSE for which a distance restraint is available, there is an associated internal error, The internal error for a distance restraint is the maximum distance that the atom, when positioned in any conformation within a cell, can be from the atom in the representative conformation. The algorithm works recursively by positioning one representative conformation of an SSE. AdI distance restraints are checked with a tolerance that includes both the experimental and internal error. If all restraints are satisfied, every representative conformation of the next SSE is checked, otherwise, the program moves on to the next representative conformation of the current SSE. In addition to the distance restraints, other constraints on protein conformation can be enforced. These include the distance of closest approach between SSE axes, a restraint which prevents the crossover of loops connecting adjacent SSEs, and a restriction on the minimum and maximum distances between axis end-points. Any protein conformation satisfying all of the restraints is enumerated for later scoring and possible refinement. Additionally, in order to make run-times feasible, a divide-and-conquer approach is used

  3. 41 CFR 60-2.17 - Additional required elements of affirmative action programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... elements of affirmative action programs. 60-2.17 Section 60-2.17 Public Contracts and Property Management... Action Programs § 60-2.17 Additional required elements of affirmative action programs. In addition to the elements required by § 60-2.10 through § 60-2.16, an acceptable affirmative action program must include...

  4. 41 CFR 60-2.17 - Additional required elements of affirmative action programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... elements of affirmative action programs. 60-2.17 Section 60-2.17 Public Contracts and Property Management... Action Programs § 60-2.17 Additional required elements of affirmative action programs. In addition to the elements required by § 60-2.10 through § 60-2.16, an acceptable affirmative action program must include...

  5. 41 CFR 60-2.17 - Additional required elements of affirmative action programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... elements of affirmative action programs. 60-2.17 Section 60-2.17 Public Contracts and Property Management... Action Programs § 60-2.17 Additional required elements of affirmative action programs. In addition to the elements required by § 60-2.10 through § 60-2.16, an acceptable affirmative action program must include...

  6. Superheavy Elements -- Synthesis, Structure and Reaction Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, Dieter

    2006-08-14

    The exciting results search for superheavy elements which have been achieved in the recent years have triggered a broad range of activities. Apart from experiments to attempt the synthesis of new elements, nuclear structure investigations in the transactinide region has become possibly for Z up to 108 or 110. Heavy element chemistry has successfully placed Hs in the periodic table and is no attacking element 112. The development of accelerators and experimental methods promises advances to enable the extension of these investigations in regions closer to the ''island of stability''. Mass measurements using ion traps and neutron rich unstable beam species for the systematic investigation of nuclear structure and reaction mechanisms for heavy neutron rich system are believed to complete the variety of tools in future.

  7. Structure Property Studies for Additively Manufactured Parts

    SciTech Connect

    Milenski, Helen M; Schmalzer, Andrew Michael; Kelly, Daniel

    2015-08-17

    Since the invention of modern Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes engineers and designers have worked hard to capitalize on the unique building capabilities that AM allows. By being able to customize the interior fill of parts it is now possible to design components with a controlled density and customized internal structure. The creation of new polymers and polymer composites allow for even greater control over the mechanical properties of AM parts. One of the key reasons to explore AM, is to bring about a new paradigm in part design, where materials can be strategically optimized in a way that conventional subtractive methods cannot achieve. The two processes investigated in my research were the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) process and the Direct Ink Write (DIW) process. The objectives of the research were to determine the impact of in-fill density and morphology on the mechanical properties of FDM parts, and to determine if DIW printed samples could be produced where the filament diameter was varied while the overall density remained constant.

  8. Will Finite Elements Replace Structural Mechanics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojalvo, I. U.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents a personal view regarding the need for a continued interest and activity in structural methods in general, while viewing finite elements and the computer as simply two specific tools for assisting in this endeavor. An attempt is made to provide some insight as to why finite element methods seem to have "won the war," and to give examples of their more (and less) intelligent use. Items addressed include a highlight of unnecessary limitations of many existing standard finite element codes and where it is felt that further development work is needed.

  9. 47 CFR 51.509 - Rate structure standards for specific elements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rate structure standards for specific elements... SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Pricing of Elements § 51.509 Rate structure standards for specific elements. In addition to the general rules set forth in § 51.507, rates for specific elements shall...

  10. 47 CFR 51.509 - Rate structure standards for specific elements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rate structure standards for specific elements... SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Pricing of Elements § 51.509 Rate structure standards for specific elements. In addition to the general rules set forth in § 51.507, rates for specific elements shall...

  11. 47 CFR 51.509 - Rate structure standards for specific elements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rate structure standards for specific elements... SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Pricing of Elements § 51.509 Rate structure standards for specific elements. In addition to the general rules set forth in § 51.507, rates for specific elements shall...

  12. 47 CFR 51.509 - Rate structure standards for specific elements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rate structure standards for specific elements... SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Pricing of Elements § 51.509 Rate structure standards for specific elements. In addition to the general rules set forth in § 51.507, rates for specific elements shall...

  13. The structural elements of the cosmic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Bernard J. T.; van de Weygaert, Rien

    2016-10-01

    In 1970 Zel'dovich published a far-reaching paper presenting a simple equation describing the nonlinear growth of primordial density inhomogeneities. The equation was remarkably successful in explaining the large scale structure in the Universe that we observe: a Universe in which the structure appears to be delineated by filaments and clusters of galaxies surrounding huge void regions. In order to concretise this impression it is necessary to define these structural elements through formal techniques with which we can compare the Zel'dovich model and N-body simulations with the observational data. We present an overview of recent efforts to identify voids, filaments and clusters in both the observed galaxy distribution and in numerical simulations of structure formation. We focus, in particular, on methods that involve no fine-tuning of parameters and that handle scale dependence automatically. It is important that these techniques should result in finding structures that relate directly to the dynamical mechanism of structure formation.

  14. Reporting of NSC Additional (A2) Data Elements. Updated July 29, 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Student Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Since the 2008-09 academic year, the National Student Clearinghouse has provided its participating institutions with the option to include 13 additional data elements in their enrollment submissions. These additional data elements help make Clearinghouse data more comprehensive and enable StudentTracker? participants to utilize a more robust data…

  15. Parallel processing in finite element structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.

    1987-01-01

    A brief review is made of the fundamental concepts and basic issues of parallel processing. Discussion focuses on parallel numerical algorithms, performance evaluation of machines and algorithms, and parallelism in finite element computations. A computational strategy is proposed for maximizing the degree of parallelism at different levels of the finite element analysis process including: 1) formulation level (through the use of mixed finite element models); 2) analysis level (through additive decomposition of the different arrays in the governing equations into the contributions to a symmetrized response plus correction terms); 3) numerical algorithm level (through the use of operator splitting techniques and application of iterative processes); and 4) implementation level (through the effective combination of vectorization, multitasking and microtasking, whenever available).

  16. Finite element structural redesign by large admissible perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernitsas, Michael M.; Beyko, E.; Rim, C. W.; Alzahabi, B.

    1991-01-01

    In structural redesign, two structural states are involved; the baseline (known) State S1 with unacceptable performance, and the objective (unknown) State S2 with given performance specifications. The difference between the two states in performance and design variables may be as high as 100 percent or more depending on the scale of the structure. A Perturbation Approach to Redesign (PAR) is presented to relate any two structural states S1 and S2 that are modeled by the same finite element model and represented by different values of the design variables. General perturbation equations are derived expressing implicitly the natural frequencies, dynamic modes, static deflections, static stresses, Euler buckling loads, and buckling modes of the objective S2 in terms of its performance specifications, and S1 data and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) results. Large Admissible Perturbation (LEAP) algorithms are implemented in code RESTRUCT to define the objective S2 incrementally without trial and error by postprocessing FEA results of S1 with no additional FEAs. Systematic numerical applications in redesign of a 10 element 48 degree of freedom (dof) beam, a 104 element 192 dof offshore tower, a 64 element 216 dof plate, and a 144 element 896 dof cylindrical shell show the accuracy, efficiency, and potential of PAR to find an objective state that may differ 100 percent from the baseline design.

  17. Bioinspired Cellular Structures: Additive Manufacturing and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stampfl, J.; Pettermann, H. E.; Liska, R.

    Biological materials (e.g., wood, trabecular bone, marine skeletons) rely heavily on the use of cellular architecture, which provides several advantages. (1) The resulting structures can bear the variety of "real life" load spectra using a minimum of a given bulk material, featuring engineering lightweight design principles. (2) The inside of the structures is accessible to body fluids which deliver the required nutrients. (3) Furthermore, cellular architectures can grow organically by adding or removing individual struts or by changing the shape of the constituting elements. All these facts make the use of cellular architectures a reasonable choice for nature. Using additive manufacturing technologies (AMT), it is now possible to fabricate such structures for applications in engineering and biomedicine. In this chapter, we present methods that allow the 3D computational analysis of the mechanical properties of cellular structures with open porosity. Various different cellular architectures including disorder are studied. In order to quantify the influence of architecture, the apparent density is always kept constant. Furthermore, it is shown that how new advanced photopolymers can be used to tailor the mechanical and functional properties of the fabricated structures.

  18. Structural Design Elements in Biological Materials: Application to Bioinspiration.

    PubMed

    Naleway, Steven E; Porter, Michael M; McKittrick, Joanna; Meyers, Marc A

    2015-10-01

    Eight structural elements in biological materials are identified as the most common amongst a variety of animal taxa. These are proposed as a new paradigm in the field of biological materials science as they can serve as a toolbox for rationalizing the complex mechanical behavior of structural biological materials and for systematizing the development of bioinspired designs for structural applications. They are employed to improve the mechanical properties, namely strength, wear resistance, stiffness, flexibility, fracture toughness, and energy absorption of different biological materials for a variety of functions (e.g., body support, joint movement, impact protection, weight reduction). The structural elements identified are: fibrous, helical, gradient, layered, tubular, cellular, suture, and overlapping. For each of the structural design elements, critical design parameters are presented along with constitutive equations with a focus on mechanical properties. Additionally, example organisms from varying biological classes are presented for each case to display the wide variety of environments where each of these elements is present. Examples of current bioinspired materials are also introduced for each element.

  19. Evolution of a light-harvesting protein by addition of new subunits and rearrangement of conserved elements: crystal structure of a cryptophyte phycoerythrin at 1.63-A resolution.

    PubMed

    Wilk, K E; Harrop, S J; Jankova, L; Edler, D; Keenan, G; Sharples, F; Hiller, R G; Curmi, P M

    1999-08-01

    Cryptophytes are unicellular photosynthetic algae that use a lumenally located light-harvesting system, which is distinct from the phycobilisome structure found in cyanobacteria and red algae. One of the key components of this system is water-soluble phycoerythrin (PE) 545 whose expression is enhanced by low light levels. The crystal structure of the heterodimeric alpha(1)alpha(2)betabeta PE 545 from the marine cryptophyte Rhodomonas CS24 has been determined at 1.63-A resolution. Although the beta-chain structure is similar to the alpha and beta chains of other known phycobiliproteins, the overall structure of PE 545 is novel with the alpha chains forming a simple extended fold with an antiparallel beta-ribbon followed by an alpha-helix. The two doubly linked beta50/beta61 chromophores (one on each beta subunit) are in van der Waals contact, suggesting that exciton-coupling mechanisms may alter their spectral properties. Each alpha subunit carries a covalently linked 15,16-dihydrobiliverdin chromophore that is likely to be the final energy acceptor. The architecture of the heterodimer suggests that PE 545 may dock to an acceptor protein via a deep cleft and that energy may be transferred via this intermediary protein to the reaction center.

  20. Study on automatic optical element addition or deletion in lens optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xuemin; Wang, Yongtian; Hao, Qun

    2002-09-01

    Two lens form parameters, quantifying the symmetry of the optical system and the optical power distribution among the individual lens elements, are used as the criteria for automatic element addition or deletion in lens optimization. The scheme based on the criteria is described in this paper. Design examples are provided, which demonstrate that the scheme is practicable.

  1. Electronic structure theory of the superheavy elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliav, Ephraim; Fritzsche, Stephan; Kaldor, Uzi

    2015-12-01

    High-accuracy calculations of atomic properties of the superheavy elements (SHE) up to element 122 are reviewed. The properties discussed include ionization potentials, electron affinities and excitation energies, which are associated with the spectroscopic and chemical behavior of these elements, and are therefore of considerable interest. Accurate predictions of these quantities require high-order inclusion of relativity and electron correlation, as well as large, converged basis sets. The Dirac-Coulomb-Breit Hamiltonian, which includes all terms up to second order in the fine-structure constant α, serves as the framework for the treatment; higher-order Lamb shift terms are considered in some selected cases. Electron correlation is treated by either the multiconfiguration self-consistent-field approach or by Fock-space coupled cluster theory. The latter is enhanced by the intermediate Hamiltonian scheme, allowing the use of larger model (P) spaces. The quality of the calculations is assessed by applying the same methods to lighter homologs of the SHEs and comparing with available experimental information. Very good agreement is obtained, within a few hundredths of an eV, and similar accuracy is expected for the SHEs. Many of the properties predicted for the SHEs differ significantly from what may be expected by straightforward extrapolation of lighter homologs, demonstrating that the structure and chemistry of SHEs are strongly affected by relativity. The major scientific challenge of the calculations is to find the electronic structure and basic atomic properties of the SHE and assign its proper place in the periodic table. Significant recent developments include joint experimental-computational studies of the excitation spectrum of Fm and the ionization energy of Lr, with excellent agreement of experiment and theory, auguring well for the future of research in the field.

  2. Superheavy Element Synthesis And Nuclear Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, D.; Block, M.; Burkhard, H.-G.; Heinz, S.; Hessberger, F. P.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kojouharov, I.; Mann, R.; Maurer, J.; Antalic, S.; Saro, S.; Venhart, M.; Hofmann, S.; Leino, M.; Uusitalo, J.; Nishio, K.; Popeko, A. G.; Yeremin, A. V.

    2009-08-26

    After the successful progress in experiments to synthesize superheavy elements (SHE) throughout the last decades, advanced nuclear structure studies in that region have become feasible in recent years thanks to improved accelerator, separation and detection technology. The means are evaporation residue(ER)-alpha-alpha and ER-alpha-gamma coincidence techniques complemented by conversion electron (CE) studies, applied after a separator. Recent examples of interesting physics to be discovered in this region of the chart of nuclides are the studies of K-isomers observed in {sup 252,254}No and in {sup 270}Ds.

  3. Electrical connection structure for a superconductor element

    SciTech Connect

    Lallouet, Nicolas; Maguire, James

    2010-05-04

    The invention relates to an electrical connection structure for a superconductor element cooled by a cryogenic fluid and connected to an electrical bushing, which bushing passes successively through an enclosure at an intermediate temperature between ambient temperature and the temperature of the cryogenic fluid, and an enclosure at ambient temperature, said bushing projecting outside the ambient temperature enclosure. According to the invention, said intermediate enclosure is filled at least in part with a solid material of low thermal conductivity, such as a polyurethane foam or a cellular glass foam. The invention is applicable to connecting a superconductor cable at cryogenic temperature to a device for equipment at ambient temperature.

  4. Integrated transient thermal-structural finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.; Wieting, A. R.; Tamma, K. K.

    1981-01-01

    An integrated thermal structural finite element approach for efficient coupling of transient thermal and structural analysis is presented. Integrated thermal structural rod and one dimensional axisymmetric elements considering conduction and convection are developed and used in transient thermal structural applications. The improved accuracy of the integrated approach is illustrated by comparisons with exact transient heat conduction elasticity solutions and conventional finite element thermal finite element structural analyses.

  5. EVA assembly of large space structure element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.; Bush, H. G.; Heard, W. L., Jr.; Stokes, J. W., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a test program to assess the potential of manned extravehicular activity (EVA) assembly of erectable space trusses are described. Seventeen tests were conducted in which six "space-weight" columns were assembled into a regular tetrahedral cell by a team of two "space"-suited test subjects. This cell represents the fundamental "element" of a tetrahedral truss structure. The tests were conducted under simulated zero-gravity conditions. Both manual and simulated remote manipulator system modes were evaluated. Articulation limits of the pressure suit and zero gravity could be accommodated by work stations with foot restraints. The results of this study have confirmed that astronaut EVA assembly of large, erectable space structures is well within man's capabilities.

  6. 1. Building #3, original structure and first addition, north side, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Building #3, original structure and first addition, north side, looking south. Photo shows (from left) the original 1911 structure, the 1939 infill addition, and the 1934 structure. - S. W. Shattuck Chemical Company, Incorporated, Building No. 3, 1805 South Bannock Street, Denver, Denver County, CO

  7. Finite Element Estimation of Meteorite Structural Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Kenneth Arthur

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the project titled Asteroid Threat Assessment at NASA Ames Research Center is to develop risk assessment tools. The expertise in atmospheric entry in the Entry Systems and Technology Division is being used to describe the complex physics of meteor breakup in the atmosphere. The breakup of a meteor is dependent on its structural properties, including homogeneity of the material. The present work describes an 11-week effort in which a literature survey was carried for structural properties of meteoritic material. In addition, the effect of scale on homogeneity isotropy was studied using a Monte Carlo approach in Nastran. The properties were then in a static structural response simulation of an irregularly-shape meteor (138-scale version of Asteroid Itokawa). Finally, an early plan was developed for doctoral research work at Georgia Tech. in the structural failure fragmentation of meteors.

  8. Faxing Structures to the Moon: Freeform Additive Construction System (FACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, A. Scott; Wilcox, Brian; McQuin, Christopher; Townsend, Julie; Rieber, Richard; Barmatz, Martin; Leichty, John

    2013-01-01

    Using the highly articulated All-Terrain Hex-Limbed Extra-Terrestrial Explorer (ATHLETE) robotic mobility system as a precision positioning tool, a variety of print head technologies can be used to 3D print large-scale in-situ structures on planetary surfaces such as the moon or Mars. In effect, in the same way CAD models can be printed in a 3D printer, large-scale structures such as walls, vaults, domes, berms, paving, trench walls, and other insitu derived elements can be FAXed to the planetary surface and built in advance of the arrival of crews, supplementing equipment and materials brought from earth. This paper discusses the ATHLETE system as a mobility / positioning platform, and presents several options for large-scale additive print head technologies, including tunable microwave "sinterator" approaches and in-situ concrete deposition. The paper also discusses potential applications, such as sintered-in-place habitat shells, radiation shielding, road paving, modular bricks, and prefabricated construction components.

  9. Co-digestion of manure and industrial waste--The effects of trace element addition.

    PubMed

    Nordell, Erik; Nilsson, Britt; Nilsson Påledal, Sören; Karisalmi, Kaisa; Moestedt, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Manure is one of the most common substrates for biogas production. Manure from dairy- and swine animals are often considered to stabilize the biogas process by contributing nutrients and trace elements needed for the biogas process. In this study two lab-scale reactors were used to evaluate the effects of trace element addition during co-digestion of manure from swine- and dairy animals with industrial waste. The substrate used contained high background concentrations of both cobalt and nickel, which are considered to be the most important trace elements. In the reactor receiving additional trace elements, the volatile fatty acids (VFA) concentration was 89% lower than in the control reactor. The lower VFA concentration contributed to a more digested digestate, and thus lower methane emissions in the subsequent storage. Also, the biogas production rate increased with 24% and the biogas production yield with 10%, both as a result of the additional trace elements at high organic loading rates. All in all, even though 50% of the feedstock consisted of manure, trace element addition resulted in multiple positive effects and a more reliable process with stable and high yield.

  10. Elements of Regolith Simulant's Cost Structure--Why Rock Is NOT Cheap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Douglas L.

    2009-01-01

    The cost of lunar regolith simulants is much higher than many users anticipate. After all, it is nothing more than broken rock. This class will discuss the elements which make up the cost structure for simulants. It will also consider which elements can be avoided under certain circumstances and which elements might be altered by the application of additional research and development.

  11. Integrated transient thermal-structural finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Decahaumphai, P.; Tamma, K. K.; Wieting, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    An integrated thermal-structural finite element approach for efficient coupling of transient thermal and structural analysis is presented. New integrated thermal-structural rod and one dimensional axisymmetric elements considering conduction and convection are developed and used in transient thermal-structural applications. The improved accuracy of the integrated approach is illustrated by comparisons with exact transient heat conduction-elasticity solutions and conventional finite element thermal-finite element structural analyses. Results indicate that the approach offers significant potential for further development with other elements.

  12. Describing the essential elements of a professional practice structure.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Sue; Lankshear, Sara

    2003-01-01

    The proliferation of program management coupled with the Introduction of the Regulated Health Professions Act, prompted many healthcare organizations in Ontario to introduce professional practice models. In addition, the Magnet Hospitals research (Kramer and Schmalenberg 1988) identified the existence of a professional practice model as a key element for recruitment and retention of professional staff. Professional practice models were introduced to address issues of accountability, identity and overlapping scopes of practice as experienced by healthcare professionals and organizations across the continuum of care. The authors of this paper describe exploratory work done through the Professional Practice Network of Ontario to identify the essential elements of the "ideal" professional practice structure, key areas of challenge and strategies for adapting these elements into an organization. The paper presents a list of 16 essential elements of an ideal professional practice structure with a further discussion on four key areas consistently identified as areas of challenge. This paper is intended to report, not the findings of a formal research study, but rather the result of facilitated dialogue among professional practice leaders in Ontario. The information will be of interest to healthcare organizations across the continuum of care and to professional associations and academic institutions, as we all address the challenges of creating a quality work environment that supports and fosters excellence in professional practice.

  13. 41 CFR 60-2.17 - Additional required elements of affirmative action programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Additional required elements of affirmative action programs. 60-2.17 Section 60-2.17 Public Contracts and Property Management... management to ensure the effective implementation of the affirmative action program. (b) Identification...

  14. 41 CFR 60-2.17 - Additional required elements of affirmative action programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Additional required elements of affirmative action programs. 60-2.17 Section 60-2.17 Public Contracts and Property Management... management to ensure the effective implementation of the affirmative action program. (b) Identification...

  15. Mineral elements of subtropical tree seedlings in response to elevated carbon dioxide and nitrogen addition.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenjuan; Zhou, Guoyi; Liu, Juxiu; Zhang, Deqiang; Liu, Shizhong; Chu, Guowei; Fang, Xiong

    2015-01-01

    Mineral elements in plants have been strongly affected by increased atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations and nitrogen (N) deposition due to human activities. However, such understanding is largely limited to N and phosphorus in grassland. Using open-top chambers, we examined the concentrations of potassium (K), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), aluminum (Al), copper (Cu) and manganese (Mn) in the leaves and roots of the seedlings of five subtropical tree species in response to elevated CO2 (ca. 700 μmol CO2 mol(-1)) and N addition (100 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)) from 2005 to 2009. These mineral elements in the roots responded more strongly to elevated CO2 and N addition than those in the leaves. Elevated CO2 did not consistently decrease the concentrations of plant mineral elements, with increases in K, Al, Cu and Mn in some tree species. N addition decreased K and had no influence on Cu in the five tree species. Given the shifts in plant mineral elements, Schima superba and Castanopsis hystrix were less responsive to elevated CO2 and N addition alone, respectively. Our results indicate that plant stoichiometry would be altered by increasing CO2 and N deposition, and K would likely become a limiting nutrient under increasing N deposition in subtropics. PMID:25794046

  16. Elements of the cellular metabolic structure

    PubMed Central

    De la Fuente, Ildefonso M.

    2015-01-01

    A large number of studies have demonstrated the existence of metabolic covalent modifications in different molecular structures, which are able to store biochemical information that is not encoded by DNA. Some of these covalent mark patterns can be transmitted across generations (epigenetic changes). Recently, the emergence of Hopfield-like attractor dynamics has been observed in self-organized enzymatic networks, which have the capacity to store functional catalytic patterns that can be correctly recovered by specific input stimuli. Hopfield-like metabolic dynamics are stable and can be maintained as a long-term biochemical memory. In addition, specific molecular information can be transferred from the functional dynamics of the metabolic networks to the enzymatic activity involved in covalent post-translational modulation, so that determined functional memory can be embedded in multiple stable molecular marks. The metabolic dynamics governed by Hopfield-type attractors (functional processes), as well as the enzymatic covalent modifications of specific molecules (structural dynamic processes) seem to represent the two stages of the dynamical memory of cellular metabolism (metabolic memory). Epigenetic processes appear to be the structural manifestation of this cellular metabolic memory. Here, a new framework for molecular information storage in the cell is presented, which is characterized by two functionally and molecularly interrelated systems: a dynamic, flexible and adaptive system (metabolic memory) and an essentially conservative system (genetic memory). The molecular information of both systems seems to coordinate the physiological development of the whole cell. PMID:25988183

  17. The use of elemental powder mixes in laser-based additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Rodney Michael

    This study examines the use and functionality of laser depositing alloys from mixes of elemental metallic powders. Through the use of laser-based additive manufacturing (LAM), near net-shaped 3-Dimensional metallic parts can be produced in a layer-by-layer fashion. It is customary for pre-alloyed powders to be used in this process. However, mixes of elemental powders can be used to produce alloys that are formed during the deposition process. This alternative technique requires that the elemental powders adequately mix during deposition for a homogeneous deposit to be produced. Cost savings and versatility are among several of the advantages to using elemental powder mixes in LAM. Representative alloys of 316 and 430 Stainless Steel (SS) and Ti-6Al-4V were produced with elemental powder mixes during this research. These deposits were then compared to deposits of the same material manufactured with pre-alloyed powder. Comparison between the two types of samples included; EDS analysis to examine chemical homogeneity, metallography techniques to compare microstructures, and finally hardness testing to observe mechanical properties. The enthalpy of mixing is also discussed as this can impact the resulting homogeneity of deposits produced with mixes of elemental powders. Some differences were observed between the two types of deposits for 430 SS and Ti-6Al-4V. Results indicate that deposits fabricated with mixes of elemental powders can be produced to an equivalent quality of pre-alloyed powder deposits for 316 SS. This research also proposes potential alloys that could be considered for use in an elemental powder mixing technique.

  18. Addition of organic amendments contributes to C sequestration in trace element contaminated soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Mar Montiel Rozas, María; Panettier, Marco; Madejón Rodríguez, Paula; Madejón Rodríguez, Engracia

    2015-04-01

    ha ¯¹. Thus, results revealed the effect of amendments. Values of net balance show an increase in C sequestered in amended plots. The retention of carbon in soluble and total forms was reflected in the increase in time. According to the results, application of leonardite (a more stabilized amendment) seems to entail a greater retention of carbon in soil than in the case of biosolid compost. Restoration strategies have multiple benefits for the ecosystem. In our case, the use of organic amendments decreased trace element toxicity, improved soil structure and microbial communities, and contribute to retain C in terrestrial ecosystems.

  19. Function of sperm chromatin structural elements in fertilization and development

    PubMed Central

    Ward, W. Steven

    2010-01-01

    Understanding how DNA is packaged in the mammalian sperm cell has important implications for human infertility as well as for the cell biology. Recent advances in the study of mammalian sperm chromatin structure and function have altered our perception of this highly condensed, inert chromatin. Sperm DNA is packaged very tightly to protect the DNA during the transit that occurs before fertilization. However, this condensation cannot sacrifice chromosomal elements that are essential for the embryo to access the correct sequences of the paternal genome for proper initiation of the embryonic developmental program. The primary levels of the sperm chromatin structure can be divided into three main categories: the large majority of DNA is packaged by protamines, a smaller amount (2–15%) retains histone-bound chromatin and the DNA is attached to the nuclear matrix at roughly 50 kb intervals. Current data suggest that the latter two structural elements are transferred to the paternal pronucleus after fertilization where they have important functional roles. The nuclear matrix organization is essential for DNA replication, and the histone-bound chromatin identifies genes that are important for embryonic development. These data support the emerging view of the sperm genome as providing, in addition to the paternal DNA sequence, a structural framework that includes molecular regulatory factors that are required for proper embryonic development. PMID:19748904

  20. Interior detail of structural elements section; camera facing east. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior detail of structural elements section; camera facing east. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Supply Building, Walnut Avenue, southeast corner of Walnut Avenue & Fifth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  1. Enhancing Surface Finish of Additively Manufactured Titanium and Cobalt Chrome Elements Using Laser Based Finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gora, Wojciech S.; Tian, Yingtao; Cabo, Aldara Pan; Ardron, Marcus; Maier, Robert R. J.; Prangnell, Philip; Weston, Nicholas J.; Hand, Duncan P.

    Additive manufacturing (AM) offers the possibility of creating a complex free form object as a single element, which is not possible using traditional mechanical machining. Unfortunately the typically rough surface finish of additively manufactured parts is unsuitable for many applications. As a result AM parts must be post-processed; typically mechanically machined and/or and polished using either chemical or mechanical techniques (both of which have their limitations). Laser based polishing is based on remelting of a very thin surface layer and it offers potential as a highly repeatable, higher speed process capable of selective area polishing, and without any waste problems (no abrasives or liquids). In this paper an in-depth investigation of CW laser polishing of titanium and cobalt chrome AM elements is presented. The impact of different scanning strategies, laser parameters and initial surface condition on the achieved surface finish is evaluated.

  2. The Distinct Element Method - Application to Structures in Jointed Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.P.; Glen, L.; Blair, S.; Heuze, F.

    2001-11-30

    The Distinct Element Method (DEM) is a meshfree method with applications to rock mechanics, mining sciences, simulations of nuclear repositories, and the stability of underground structures. Continuum mesh-based methods have been applied successfully to many problems in geophysics. Even if the geology includes fractures and faults, when sufficiently large length scales are considered a continuum approximation may be sufficient. However, a large class of problems exist where individual rock joints must be taken into account. This includes problems where the structures of interest have sizes comparable with the block size. In addition, it is possible that while the structure may experience loads which do no measurable damage to individual blocks, some joints may fail. This may launch smaller blocks as dangerous projectiles or even cause total failure of a tunnel. Traditional grid-based continuum approaches are wholly unsuited to this class of problem. It is possible to introduce discontinuities or slide lines into existing grid-based methods, however, such limited approaches can break down when new contacts form between blocks. The distinct element method (DEM) is an alternative, meshfree approach. The DEM can directly approximate the block structure of the jointed rock using arbitrary polyhedra. Using this approach, preexisting joints are readily incorporated into the DEM model. In addition, the method detects all new contacts between blocks resulting from relative block motion. We will describe the background of the DEM and review previous application of the DEM to geophysical problems. Finally we present preliminary results from a investigation into the stability of underground structures subjected to dynamic loading.

  3. Analysis of the laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing process through experimental measurement and finite element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, Alexander Jay

    The objective in this work is to provide rigourous experimental measurements to aid in the development of laser powder bed fusion (LPBF) additive manufacturing (AM). A specialized enclosed instrumented measurement system is designed to provide in situ experimental measurements of temperature and distortion. Experiments include comparisons of process parameters, materials and LPBF machines. In situ measurements of distortion and temperature made throughout the build process highlight inter-layer distortion effects previously undocumented for laser powder bed fusion. Results from these experiments are also be implemented in the development and validation of finite element models of the powder bed build process. Experimental analysis is extended from small-scale to larger part-scale builds where experimental post-build measurements are used in analysis of distortion profiles. Experimental results provided from this study are utilized in the validation of a finite element model capable of simulating production scale parts. The validated finite element model is then implemented in the analysis of the part to provide information regarding the distortion evolution process. A combination of experimental measurements and simulation results are used to identify the mechanism that results in the measured distortion profile for this geometry. Optimization of support structure primarily focuses on the minimization of material use and scan time, but no information regarding failure criteria for support structure is available. Tensile test samples of LPBF built support structure are designed, built, and tested to provide measurements of mechanical properties of the support structure. Experimental tests show that LPBF built support structure has only 30-40% of the ultimate tensile strength of solid material built in the same machine. Experimental measurement of LPBF built support structure provides clear failure criteria to be utilized in the future design and implementation of

  4. Analysis of random structure-acoustic interaction problems using coupled boundary element and finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Pates, Carl S., III

    1994-01-01

    A coupled boundary element (BEM)-finite element (FEM) approach is presented to accurately model structure-acoustic interaction systems. The boundary element method is first applied to interior, two and three-dimensional acoustic domains with complex geometry configurations. Boundary element results are very accurate when compared with limited exact solutions. Structure-interaction problems are then analyzed with the coupled FEM-BEM method, where the finite element method models the structure and the boundary element method models the interior acoustic domain. The coupled analysis is compared with exact and experimental results for a simplistic model. Composite panels are analyzed and compared with isotropic results. The coupled method is then extended for random excitation. Random excitation results are compared with uncoupled results for isotropic and composite panels.

  5. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  6. Effects of extreme pressure additive chemistry on rolling element bearing surface durability

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Ryan D.; Nixon, H. P.; Darragh, Craig V.; Howe, Jane Y; Coffey, Dorothy W

    2007-01-01

    Lubricant additives have been known to affect rolling element bearing surface durability for many years. Tapered roller bearings were used in fatigue testing of lubricants formulated with gear oil type additive systems. These systems have sulfur- and phosphoruscontaining compounds used for gear protection as well as bearing lubrication. Several variations of a commercially available base additive formulation were tested having modified sulfur components. The variations represent a range of ''active'' extreme pressure (EP) chemistries. The bearing fatigue test results were compared with respect to EP formulation and test conditions. Inner ring near-surface material in selected test bearings was evaluated on two scales: the micrometer scale using optical metallography and the nanometer scale using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Focused-ion beam (FIB) techniques were used for TEM specimen preparation. Imaging and chemical analysis of the bearing samples revealed near-surface material and tribofilm characteristics. These results are discussed with respect to the relative fatigue lives.

  7. Aircraft detection based on probability model of structural elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Long; Jiang, Zhiguo

    2014-11-01

    Detecting aircrafts is important in the field of remote sensing. In past decades, researchers used various approaches to detect aircrafts based on classifiers for overall aircrafts. However, with the development of high-resolution images, the internal structures of aircrafts should also be taken into consideration now. To address this issue, a novel aircrafts detection method for satellite images based on probabilistic topic model is presented. We model aircrafts as the connected structural elements rather than features. The proposed method contains two major steps: 1) Use Cascade-Adaboost classier to identify the structural elements of aircraft firstly. 2) Connect these structural elements to aircrafts, where the relationships between elements are estimated by hierarchical topic model. The model places strict spatial constraints on structural elements which can identify differences between similar features. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach.

  8. Nuclear microscopy of sperm cell elemental structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bench, Graham S.; Balhorn, Rod; Friz, Alexander M.

    1995-05-01

    Theories suggest there is a link between protamine concentrations in individual sperm and male fertility. Previously, biochemical analyses have used pooled samples containing millions of sperm to determine protamine concentrations. These methods have not been able to determine what percentage of morphologically normal sperm are biochemically defective and potentially infertile. Nuclear microscopy has been utilized to measure elemental profiles at the single sperm level. By measuring the amount of phosphorus and sulfur, the total DNA and protamine content in individual sperm from fertile bull and mouse semen have been determined. These values agree with results obtained from other biochemical analyses. Nuclear microscopy shows promise for measuring elemental profiles in the chromatin of individual sperm. The technique may be able to resolve theories regarding the importance of protamines to male fertility and identify biochemical defects responsible for certain types of male infertility.

  9. Nuclear microscopy of sperm cell elemental structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bench, G.S.; Balhorn, R.; Friz, A.M.; Freeman, S.P.H.T.

    1994-09-28

    Theories suggest there is a link between protamine concentrations in individual sperm and male fertility. Previously, biochemical analyses have used pooled samples containing millions of sperm to determine protamine concentrations. These methods have not been able to determine what percentage of morphologically normal sperm are biochemically defective and potentially infertile. Nuclear microscopy has been utilized to measure elemental profiles at the single sperm level. By measuring the amount of phosphorus and sulfur, the total DNA and protamine content in individual sperm from fertile bull and mouse semen have been determined. These values agree with results obtained from other biochemical analyses. Nuclear microscopy shows promise for measuring elemental profiles in the chromatin of individual sperm. The technique may be able to resolve theories regarding the importance of protamines to male fertility and identify biochemical defects responsible for certain types of male infertility.

  10. Impact of Zn, Mg, Ni and Co elements on glass alteration: Additive effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aréna, H.; Godon, N.; Rébiscoul, D.; Podor, R.; Garcès, E.; Cabie, M.; Mestre, J.-P.

    2016-03-01

    The minor elements present in the nuclear glass composition or coming from the groundwater of the future repository may impact glass alteration. In this study, the effects of Zn, Mg, Ni and Co on the International Simple Glass (ISG) alteration were studied throughout 511 days of aqueous leaching experiments. The aim was to determine their additive or competitive effect on glass alteration and the nature of the alteration products. The four elements were introduced separately or altogether in solution as XCl2 chloride salts (X = Zn, Mg, Ni or Co) with monthly additions to compensate for their consumption. The alteration kinetics were determined by leachate analyses (ICP-AES) and alteration products were characterized in terms of composition, morphology and microstructure (SEM, TEM-EDX, ToF-SIMS and XRD). Results indicate that when they are introduced separately, Zn, Mg, Ni and Co have the same qualitative and quantitative effect on glass alteration kinetics and on pH: they form secondary phases leading to a pH decrease and a significant increase in glass alteration. The secondary phases were identified as silicates of the added X element: trioctahedral smectites with a stoichiometry of[(Si(4-a) Ala) (X(3-b) Alb) O10 (OH)2](a+b)- [Xc Nad Cae] (2c+d+2e)+ with a = 0.11 to 0.45, b = 0.00 to 0.29, c = 0, d = 0.19 to 0.74 and e = 0.10 to 0.14. . It was shown that as pH stabilizes at a minimum value, X-silicates no longer precipitate, thus leading to a significant drop in the glass alteration rate. This pH value depends on X and it has been identified as being 8 for Mg-silicates, probably around 7.3 for Ni and Co-silicates and less than 6.2 for Zn-silicates. When tested together, the effects of these four elements on glass alteration are additive and lead to the formation of a mix of X-silicates that precipitate as long as their constitutive elements are available and the pH is above their respective minimum value. This study brings new quantitative information about the

  11. Work of Adhesion in Al/SiC Composites with Alloying Element Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xin; Fan, Tongxiang; Zhang, Di

    2013-11-01

    In the current work, a general methodology was proposed to demonstrate how to calculate the work of adhesion in a reactive multicomponent alloy/ceramic system. Applying this methodology, the work of adhesion of Al alloy/SiC systems and the influence of different alloying elements were predicted. Based on the thermodynamics of interfacial reaction and calculation models for component activities, the equilibrium compositions of the melts in Al alloy/SiC systems were calculated. Combining the work of adhesion models for reactive metal/ceramic systems, the work of adhesion in Al alloy/SiC systems both before and after the reaction was calculated. The results showed that the addition of most alloying elements, such as Mg, Si, and Mn, could increase the initial work of adhesion, while Fe had a slightly decreasing effect. As for the equilibrium state, the additions of Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Ti, and La could increase the equilibrium work of adhesion, but the additions of Mg and Zn had an opposite effect. Si was emphasized due to its suppressing effect on the interfacial reaction.

  12. Structuring Numbers 1 to 20: Developing Facile Addition and Subtraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellemor-Collins, David; Wright, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The Numeracy Intervention Research Project (NIRP) aims to develop assessment and instructional tools for use with low-attaining 3rd- and 4th-graders. The NIRP approach to instruction in addition and subtraction in the range 1 to 20 is described. The approach is based on a notion of structuring numbers, which draws on the work of Freudenthal and…

  13. Structural Elements in Franz Kafka's "The Metamorphosis."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Scott

    1993-01-01

    Notes that Kafka's "The Metamorphosis" is not only a masterpiece of modern literature but also a work that exemplifies many ideas of structural family therapy. Examines how Kafka's novella embodies concepts such as parentified children, enmeshment, intergenerational boundaries, coalitions and triangles, structural dysfunction, and structural…

  14. The Wavelet Element Method. Part 2; Realization and Additional Features in 2D and 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, Claudio; Tabacco, Anita; Urban, Karsten

    1998-01-01

    The Wavelet Element Method (WEM) provides a construction of multiresolution systems and biorthogonal wavelets on fairly general domains. These are split into subdomains that are mapped to a single reference hypercube. Tensor products of scaling functions and wavelets defined on the unit interval are used on the reference domain. By introducing appropriate matching conditions across the interelement boundaries, a globally continuous biorthogonal wavelet basis on the general domain is obtained. This construction does not uniquely define the basis functions but rather leaves some freedom for fulfilling additional features. In this paper we detail the general construction principle of the WEM to the 1D, 2D and 3D cases. We address additional features such as symmetry, vanishing moments and minimal support of the wavelet functions in each particular dimension. The construction is illustrated by using biorthogonal spline wavelets on the interval.

  15. Laser Additive Melting and Solidification of Inconel 718: Finite Element Simulation and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, John; Ladani, Leila; Sadowski, Magda

    2016-03-01

    The field of powdered metal additive manufacturing is experiencing a surge in public interest finding uses in aerospace, defense, and biomedical industries. The relative youth of the technology coupled with public interest makes the field a vibrant research topic. The authors have expanded upon previously published finite element models used to analyze the processing of novel engineering materials through the use of laser- and electron beam-based additive manufacturing. In this work, the authors present a model for simulating fabrication of Inconel 718 using laser melting processes. Thermal transport phenomena and melt pool geometries are discussed and validation against experimental findings is presented. After comparing experimental and simulation results, the authors present two correction correlations to transform the modeling results into meaningful predictions of actual laser melting melt pool geometries in Inconel 718.

  16. Seawater-derived rare earth element addition to abyssal peridotites during serpentinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisby, Carl; Bizimis, Michael; Mallick, Soumen

    2016-04-01

    Serpentinized abyssal peridotites are evidence for active communication between the Earth's hydrosphere and the upper mantle, where exchange and retention of both major and trace elements occur. Bulk rock Nd isotopes in serpentinized abyssal peridotites imply interaction of seawater with the peridotite. In contrast, the Nd isotopes of clinopyroxenes from serpentinized abyssal peridotites retain their primary magmatic signature. It is currently unclear if, how and where seawater-derived Nd and other REE are being added or exchanged with the mantle peridotite minerals during serpentinization. To remedy this knowledge gap, we present in situ trace and major element concentrations, bulk rock and sequential leaching experiment trace element concentrations as well as Nd, Sr isotope data on refertilized and depleted serpentinized abyssal peridotites from the Southwest Indian Ridge. The secondary serpentine matrix and magnetite veins in these peridotites have elevated LREE concentrations, with variable negative Ce anomalies and large Rb, Sr, Pb and U enrichments that resemble seawater trace element patterns. The LREE concentrations in the serpentine phase are higher than those expected for the primary mantle mineralogy (olivine, orthopyroxene) based on data from relic clinopyroxenes and equilibrium partition coefficients. These data are consistent with seawater-derived REE addition to the peridotite during serpentinization. The bulk rocks have more radiogenic Sr and more unradiogenic Nd isotopes than their clinopyroxene (up to 8 εNd units lower than clinopyroxene). Sequential leaching experiments designed to mobilize secondary carbonates and Fe-oxides show even more unradiogenic Nd isotope ratios in the leachates than the bulk rock and clinopyroxene, approaching seawater compositions (up to 15 εNd units lower than clinopyroxene). Mass balance calculations using trace elements or Nd isotopes suggest that up to 30% of the bulk peridotite Nd budget is of seawater origin and

  17. The design of impact absorbing structures for additive manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan-Craddock, J.; Brackett, D.; Wildman, R.; Hague, R.

    2012-08-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is increasingly becoming a viable manufacturing process due to dramatic advantages that it facilitates in the area of design complexity. This paper investigates the potential of additively manufactured lattice structures for the application of tailored impact absorption specifically for conformal body protection. It explores lattice cell types based on foam microstructures and assesses their suitability for impact absorption. The effect of varying the cell strut edge design is also investigated. The implications of scaling these cells up for AM are discussed as well as the design issues regarding the handling of geometric complexity and the requirement for body conformity. The suitability of AM materials for this application is also discussed.

  18. Nuclear microscopy of sperm cell elemental structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bench, G.S.

    1994-12-31

    Theories have suggested that there is a link between protamine concentrations in individual sperm and sperm fertility. At present, biochemical analyses have only been performed on bulk populations and existing methods have not been able to determine what percentage of morphologically normal sperm are biochemically defective and potentially infertile. As part of an investigation into male sperm fertility, nuclear microscopy has been utilized to measure elemental profiles at the single sperm level. By measuring the ratio of Phosphorus to Sulfur the authors have been able to determine the amount of protamine 1 and protamine 2 in individual cells from bulk fertile samples of bull and mouse sperm. Preliminary results show that, for each species, the relative amounts of protamine 1 and protamine 2 in morphologically normal sperm agree well with expected values.

  19. Finite element analysis of an inflatable torus considering air mass structural element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajbhiye, S. C.; Upadhyay, S. H.; Harsha, S. P.

    2014-01-01

    Inflatable structures, also known as gossamer structures, are at high boom in the current space technology due to their low mass and compact size comparing to the traditional spacecraft designing. Internal pressure becomes the major source of strength and rigidity, essentially stiffen the structure. However, inflatable space based membrane structure are at high risk to the vibration disturbance due to their low structural stiffness and material damping. Hence, the vibration modes of the structure should be known to a high degree of accuracy in order to provide better control authority. In the past, most of the studies conducted on the vibration analysis of gossamer structures used inaccurate or approximate theories in modeling the internal pressure. The toroidal shaped structure is one of the important key element in space application, helps to support the reflector in space application. This paper discusses the finite-element analysis of an inflated torus. The eigen-frequencies are obtained via three-dimensional small-strain elasticity theory, based on extremum energy principle. The two finite-element model (model-1 and model-2) have cases have been generated using a commercial finite-element package. The structure model-1 with shell element and model-2 with the combination of the mass of enclosed fluid (air) added to the shell elements have been taken for the study. The model-1 is computed with present analytical approach to understand the convergence rate and the accuracy. The convergence study is made available for the symmetric modes and anti-symmetric modes about the centroidal-axis plane, meeting the eigen-frequencies of an inflatable torus with the circular cross section. The structural model-2 is introduced with air mass element and analyzed its eigen-frequency with different aspect ratio and mode shape response using in-plane and out-plane loading condition are studied.

  20. 113. Stage level floor structure. In addition to the movable ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    113. Stage level floor structure. In addition to the movable sections, there were hinged slots that could be opened in the stage floor (see sheet 4 of 9, note 4; sheet 5 of 9, note 2; and sheet 7 of 9, note 1). A remaining cast iron bracket is visible in the left foreground of the photograph. The actual structure for a hinged section is visible in the background, to the right of center. The hydraulic ram (type D) visible below the floor level is the south ram in the middle row; the view is facing north. - Auditorium Building, 430 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  1. Oxygen additions in serial femtosecond crystallographic protein structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jimin

    2016-10-01

    In principle, serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) could yield data sets that are completely free of the effects caused by slow, radiation-induced chemical reactions, for example, oxygen additions, responsible for radiation damage. However, experimental evidence is presented here that SFX data sets obtained by techniques that expose different parts of the same specimen to single pulses of radiation do not have this property, even if the specimen in question is frozen. The diffraction image of each such crystal obtained with the first pulse of radiation is certain to represent the structure of a protein that has not been modified chemically, but all of the images obtained subsequently from the same crystal will represent structures that have been modified to a lesser or greater extent by oxygen additions because of the rapid diffusion of oxygenic free radicals through the specimen. The higher the level of oxygen additions a crystal suffers during data collection, the poorer the statistical quality of data set obtained from it will, and the higher the free R-factors of the resulting structural model. PMID:27438534

  2. Optimum element density studies for finite-element thermal analysis of hypersonic aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Olona, Timothy; Muramoto, Kyle M.

    1990-01-01

    Different finite element models previously set up for thermal analysis of the space shuttle orbiter structure are discussed and their shortcomings identified. Element density criteria are established for the finite element thermal modelings of space shuttle orbiter-type large, hypersonic aircraft structures. These criteria are based on rigorous studies on solution accuracies using different finite element models having different element densities set up for one cell of the orbiter wing. Also, a method for optimization of the transient thermal analysis computer central processing unit (CPU) time is discussed. Based on the newly established element density criteria, the orbiter wing midspan segment was modeled for the examination of thermal analysis solution accuracies and the extent of computation CPU time requirements. The results showed that the distributions of the structural temperatures and the thermal stresses obtained from this wing segment model were satisfactory and the computation CPU time was at the acceptable level. The studies offered the hope that modeling the large, hypersonic aircraft structures using high-density elements for transient thermal analysis is possible if a CPU optimization technique was used.

  3. Interior detail of third level structural elements at south end; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior detail of third level structural elements at south end; camera facing west. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Supply Building, Walnut Avenue, southeast corner of Walnut Avenue & Fifth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  4. Interior view of third floor structural elements; camera facing south. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of third floor structural elements; camera facing south. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Supply Building, Walnut Avenue, southeast corner of Walnut Avenue & Fifth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  5. Storage Area (1942 section), looking east, showing concrete structural elements ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Storage Area (1942 section), looking east, showing concrete structural elements and wall opening to vaults - Fort McNair, Film Store House, Fort Lesley J. McNair, P Street between Third & Fourth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  6. 16. DETAIL VIEW OF TYPICAL STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS; CROSSBAY 3 BETWEEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. DETAIL VIEW OF TYPICAL STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS; CROSSBAY 3 BETWEEN D & E BAYS; LOOKING WSW. (Ryan) - Watervliet Arsenal, Building No. 135, Gillespie Road, South of Parker Road, Watervliet, Albany County, NY

  7. Nuclear structure notes on element 115 decay chains

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, D. Sarmiento, L. G.; Forsberg, U.

    2015-10-15

    Hitherto collected data on more than hundred α-decay chains stemming from element 115 are combined to probe some aspects of the underlying nuclear structure of the heaviest atomic nuclei yet created in the laboratory.

  8. 11. Detail, southeast corner, showing decorative elements of main structure, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Detail, southeast corner, showing decorative elements of main structure, and window at the second story of the hose tower. - Independent Hose Company No. 3, Nineteenth & Belmont Streets, Bellaire, Belmont County, OH

  9. Simulation of Powder Layer Deposition in Additive Manufacturing Processes Using the Discrete Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Herbold, E. B.; Walton, O.; Homel, M. A.

    2015-10-26

    This document serves as a final report to a small effort where several improvements were added to a LLNL code GEODYN-­L to develop Discrete Element Method (DEM) algorithms coupled to Lagrangian Finite Element (FE) solvers to investigate powder-­bed formation problems for additive manufacturing. The results from these simulations will be assessed for inclusion as the initial conditions for Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) simulations performed with ALE3D. The algorithms were written and performed on parallel computing platforms at LLNL. The total funding level was 3-­4 weeks of an FTE split amongst two staff scientists and one post-­doc. The DEM simulations emulated, as much as was feasible, the physical process of depositing a new layer of powder over a bed of existing powder. The DEM simulations utilized truncated size distributions spanning realistic size ranges with a size distribution profile consistent with realistic sample set. A minimum simulation sample size on the order of 40-­particles square by 10-­particles deep was utilized in these scoping studies in order to evaluate the potential effects of size segregation variation with distance displaced in front of a screed blade. A reasonable method for evaluating the problem was developed and validated. Several simulations were performed to show the viability of the approach. Future investigations will focus on running various simulations investigating powder particle sizing and screen geometries.

  10. Structural elements of the Sulu Sea, Philippines

    SciTech Connect

    Hinz, K.; Block, M.; Kudrass, H.R.; Meyer, H. , Hannover )

    1994-07-01

    The structure and tectonic history of the Sulu Sea are described on the basis of seismic reflection data combined with the findings of onshore and offshore geological studies, and the results of ODP Leg 124 drilling. Closing of a hypothetical Mesozoic proto-South China Sea associated with the formation of oceanic crustal splinters in the late Eocene followed by southward subduction and, in turn, progressive collision of the north Palawan continental terrane with the micro-continental Borneo plate since the middle Miocene, resulted in the formation of the structurally complex Sulu-Borneo collision belt. The latter comprises north Sabah, southern and central Palawan, and the northwest Sulu basin. Fracturing of the Borneo micro-continental plate into the Sulu and Cagayan ridges initiated the opening of the southeast Sulu basin during the late Oligocene through the early Miocene. Collision of the north Palawan continental terrane with Cagayan Ridge in the late early Miocene and oblique collision of these blocks with the central Philippines resulted in the still ongoing closing of the southeast Sulu basin since the middle or late Miocene. Closing of the southeast Sulu basin began with the formation of an oceanic crustal slab.

  11. Survey and development of finite elements for nonlinear structural analysis. Volume 2: Nonlinear shell finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The development of two new shell finite elements for applications to large deflection problems is considered. The elements in question are doubly curved and of triangular and quadrilateral planform. They are restricted to small strains of elastic materials, and can accommodate large rotations. The elements described, which are based on relatively simple linear elements, make use of a new displacement function approach specifically designed for strongly nonlinear problems. The displacement function development for nonlinear applications is based on certain beam element formulations, and the strain-displacement equations are of a shallow shell type. Additional terms were included in these equations in an attempt to avoid the large errors characteristic of shallow shell elements in certain types of problems. An incremental nonlinear solution procedure specifically adopted to the element formulation was developed. The solution procedure is of combined incremental and total Lagrangian type, and uses a new updating scheme. A computer program was written to evaluate the developed formulations. This program can accommodate small element groups in arbitrary arrangements. Two simple programs were successfully solved. The results indicate that this new type of element has definite promise and should be a fruitful area for further research.

  12. Effects of nitrate addition and iron speciation on trace element transfer in coastal food webs under phosphate and iron enrichment.

    PubMed

    Li, Shun-Xing; Liu, Feng-Jiao; Zheng, Feng-Ying; Zuo, Yue-Gang; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2013-06-01

    Coastal organisms are often exposed to both iron enrichment and eutrophication. Trace elements transfer in coastal food webs are critical for marine life and therefore influence coastal ecosystem function and the global carbon cycle. However, how these exposures affect algal element uptake and the subsequent element transfer to marine copepods (Tigriopus japonicus) is unknown. Here we investigated the effects of nitrate addition and iron speciation (Fe (OH)3 or EDTA-Fe) on the biological uptake of Cu, Zn, and Se under phosphate and iron enrichment, using Thalassiosira weissflogii, Skeletonema costatum, and Chlorella vulgaris as model marine algae. Algal element adsorption/absorption generally increased with increasing macronutrient concentrations. Algal element assimilation efficiencies depended on iron speciation and marine algae species. Element assimilation efficiencies of copepods were significantly correlated to the intracellular element concentrations in algal cells. Element uptake and transfer were controlled by eutrophication, iron speciation, and algal species in coastal food webs.

  13. Effects of nitrate addition and iron speciation on trace element transfer in coastal food webs under phosphate and iron enrichment.

    PubMed

    Li, Shun-Xing; Liu, Feng-Jiao; Zheng, Feng-Ying; Zuo, Yue-Gang; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2013-06-01

    Coastal organisms are often exposed to both iron enrichment and eutrophication. Trace elements transfer in coastal food webs are critical for marine life and therefore influence coastal ecosystem function and the global carbon cycle. However, how these exposures affect algal element uptake and the subsequent element transfer to marine copepods (Tigriopus japonicus) is unknown. Here we investigated the effects of nitrate addition and iron speciation (Fe (OH)3 or EDTA-Fe) on the biological uptake of Cu, Zn, and Se under phosphate and iron enrichment, using Thalassiosira weissflogii, Skeletonema costatum, and Chlorella vulgaris as model marine algae. Algal element adsorption/absorption generally increased with increasing macronutrient concentrations. Algal element assimilation efficiencies depended on iron speciation and marine algae species. Element assimilation efficiencies of copepods were significantly correlated to the intracellular element concentrations in algal cells. Element uptake and transfer were controlled by eutrophication, iron speciation, and algal species in coastal food webs. PMID:23332676

  14. Structure of ternary additive hard-sphere fluid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malijevský, Alexander; Malijevský, Anatol; Yuste, Santos B.; Santos, Andrés; López de Haro, Mariano

    2002-12-01

    Monte Carlo simulations on the structural properties of ternary fluid mixtures of additive hard spheres are reported. The results are compared with those obtained from a recent analytical approximation [S. B. Yuste, A. Santos, and M. López de Haro, J. Chem. Phys. 108, 3683 (1998)] to the radial distribution functions of hard-sphere mixtures and with the results derived from the solution of the Ornstein-Zernike integral equation with both the Martynov-Sarkisov and the Percus-Yevick closures. Very good agreement between the results of the first two approaches and simulation is observed, with a noticeable improvement over the Percus-Yevick predictions especially near contact.

  15. Additive manufacturing of ceramic structures by laser engineered net shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Fangyong; Wu, Dongjiang; Ma, Guangyi; Zhang, Bi

    2015-11-01

    Ceramic is an important material with outstanding physical properties whereas impurities and porosities generated by traditional manufacturing methods limits its further industrial applications. In order to solve this problem, direct fabrication of Al2O3 ceramic structures is conducted by laser engineered net shaping system and pure ceramic powders. Grain refinement strengthening method by doping ZrO2 and dispersion strengthening method by doping SiC are proposed to suppress cracks in fabricating Al2O3 structure. Phase compositions, microstructures as well as mechanical properties of fabricated specimens are then analyzed. The results show that the proposed two methods are effective in suppressing cracks and structures of single-bead wall, arc and cylinder ring are successfully deposited. Stable phase of α-Al2O3 and t-ZrO2 are obtained in the fabricated specimens. Micro-hardness higher than 1700 HV are also achieved for both Al2O3 and Al2O3/ZrO2, which are resulted from fine directional crystals generated by the melting-solidification process. Results presented indicate that additive manufacturing is a very attractive technique for the production of high-performance ceramic structures in a single step.

  16. Effects of heavy metal and other elemental additives to activated sludge on growth of Eisenia foetida

    SciTech Connect

    Hartenstein, R.; Neuhauser, E.F.; Narahara, A.

    1981-09-01

    The approximate level at which added concentrations of certain elements would cause an activated sludge to induce a toxic effect upon the growth of Eisenia foetida was determined. During 43 trials on sludge samples obtained throughout 1 year of study, earthworms grew from 3 to 10 mg live wt at hatching to 792 mg +- 18% (mean +- C.V.) in 8 weeks, when sludge was 24/sup 0/C and contained no additives. None of several elements commonly used in microbial growth media enhanced the growth rate of the earthworm. At salt concentrations up to about 6.6% on a dry wt basis, none of six anions tested was in and of itself toxic, while five of 15 cations - Co, Hg, Cu, Ni, and Cd - appeared specifically to inhibit growth rate or cause death. Manganese, Cr, and Pb were innocuous even at the highest levels of application - 22,000, 46,000, and 52,000 mg/kg, respectively. Neither the anionic nor cationic component of certain salts, such as NaCl or NH/sub 4/Cl, could be said to inhibit growth, which occurred only at high concentrations of these salts (about 3.3 and/or 6.6%). Below 7 mmho/cm, toxicity could not be correlated with electrolytic conductance, though higher values may help to explain the nonspecific growth inhibitory effects of salts like NaCl and KCl. Nor could toxicity ever be ascribed to hydrogen ion activity, since sludge pH was not altered even at the highest salt dose. It is concluded that except under very extreme conditions, the levels of heavy metals and salts generally found in activated sludges will not have an adverse affect on the growth of E. foetida.

  17. Assumed--stress hybrid elements with drilling degrees of freedom for nonlinear analysis of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this research project is to develop assumed-stress hybrid elements with rotational degrees of freedom for analyzing composite structures. During the first year of the three-year activity, the effort was directed to further assess the AQ4 shell element and its extensions to buckling and free vibration problems. In addition, the development of a compatible 2-node beam element was to be accomplished. The extensions and new developments were implemented in the Computational Structural Mechanics Testbed COMET. An assessment was performed to verify the implementation and to assess the performance of these elements in terms of accuracy. During the second and third years, extensions to geometrically nonlinear problems were developed and tested. This effort involved working with the nonlinear solution strategy as well as the nonlinear formulation for the elements. This research has resulted in the development and implementation of two additional element processors (ES22 for the beam element and ES24 for the shell elements) in COMET. The software was developed using a SUN workstation and has been ported to the NASA Langley Convex named blackbird. Both element processors are now part of the baseline version of COMET.

  18. Probabilistic Finite Element Analysis & Design Optimization for Structural Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deivanayagam, Arumugam

    This study focuses on implementing probabilistic nature of material properties (Kevlar® 49) to the existing deterministic finite element analysis (FEA) of fabric based engine containment system through Monte Carlo simulations (MCS) and implementation of probabilistic analysis in engineering designs through Reliability Based Design Optimization (RBDO). First, the emphasis is on experimental data analysis focusing on probabilistic distribution models which characterize the randomness associated with the experimental data. The material properties of Kevlar® 49 are modeled using experimental data analysis and implemented along with an existing spiral modeling scheme (SMS) and user defined constitutive model (UMAT) for fabric based engine containment simulations in LS-DYNA. MCS of the model are performed to observe the failure pattern and exit velocities of the models. Then the solutions are compared with NASA experimental tests and deterministic results. MCS with probabilistic material data give a good prospective on results rather than a single deterministic simulation results. The next part of research is to implement the probabilistic material properties in engineering designs. The main aim of structural design is to obtain optimal solutions. In any case, in a deterministic optimization problem even though the structures are cost effective, it becomes highly unreliable if the uncertainty that may be associated with the system (material properties, loading etc.) is not represented or considered in the solution process. Reliable and optimal solution can be obtained by performing reliability optimization along with the deterministic optimization, which is RBDO. In RBDO problem formulation, in addition to structural performance constraints, reliability constraints are also considered. This part of research starts with introduction to reliability analysis such as first order reliability analysis, second order reliability analysis followed by simulation technique that

  19. Tuning structure and mobility of solvation shells surrounding tracer additives

    SciTech Connect

    Carmer, James; Jain, Avni; Bollinger, Jonathan A.; Truskett, Thomas M.; Swol, Frank van

    2015-03-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations and a stochastic Fokker-Planck equation based approach are used to illuminate how position-dependent solvent mobility near one or more tracer particle(s) is affected when tracer-solvent interactions are rationally modified to affect corresponding solvation structure. For tracers in a dense hard-sphere fluid, we compare two types of tracer-solvent interactions: (1) a hard-sphere-like interaction, and (2) a soft repulsion extending beyond the hard core designed via statistical mechanical theory to enhance tracer mobility at infinite dilution by suppressing coordination-shell structure [Carmer et al., Soft Matter 8, 4083–4089 (2012)]. For the latter case, we show that the mobility of surrounding solvent particles is also increased by addition of the soft repulsive interaction, which helps to rationalize the mechanism underlying the tracer’s enhanced diffusivity. However, if multiple tracer surfaces are in closer proximity (as at higher tracer concentrations), similar interactions that disrupt local solvation structure instead suppress the position-dependent solvent dynamics.

  20. Tuning structure and mobility of solvation shells surrounding tracer additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmer, James; Jain, Avni; Bollinger, Jonathan A.; van Swol, Frank; Truskett, Thomas M.

    2015-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations and a stochastic Fokker-Planck equation based approach are used to illuminate how position-dependent solvent mobility near one or more tracer particle(s) is affected when tracer-solvent interactions are rationally modified to affect corresponding solvation structure. For tracers in a dense hard-sphere fluid, we compare two types of tracer-solvent interactions: (1) a hard-sphere-like interaction, and (2) a soft repulsion extending beyond the hard core designed via statistical mechanical theory to enhance tracer mobility at infinite dilution by suppressing coordination-shell structure [Carmer et al., Soft Matter 8, 4083-4089 (2012)]. For the latter case, we show that the mobility of surrounding solvent particles is also increased by addition of the soft repulsive interaction, which helps to rationalize the mechanism underlying the tracer's enhanced diffusivity. However, if multiple tracer surfaces are in closer proximity (as at higher tracer concentrations), similar interactions that disrupt local solvation structure instead suppress the position-dependent solvent dynamics.

  1. LINE-1 Elements in Structural Variation and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Christine R.; Garcia-Perez, José Luis; Badge, Richard M.; Moran, John V.

    2014-01-01

    The completion of the human genome reference sequence ushered in a new era for the study and discovery of human transposable elements. It now is undeniable that transposable elements, historically dismissed as junk DNA, have had an instrumental role in sculpting the structure and function of our genomes. In particular, long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) and short interspersed elements (SINEs) continue to affect our genome, and their movement can lead to sporadic cases of disease. Here, we briefly review the types of transposable elements present in the human genome and their mechanisms of mobility. We next highlight how advances in DNA sequencing and genomic technologies have enabled the discovery of novel retrotransposons in individual genomes. Finally, we discuss how L1-mediated retrotransposition events impact human genomes. PMID:21801021

  2. Finite Element Model Development and Validation for Aircraft Fuselage Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, Ralph D.; Fleming, Gary A.; Pappa, Richard S.; Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    2000-01-01

    The ability to extend the valid frequency range for finite element based structural dynamic predictions using detailed models of the structural components and attachment interfaces is examined for several stiffened aircraft fuselage structures. This extended dynamic prediction capability is needed for the integration of mid-frequency noise control technology. Beam, plate and solid element models of the stiffener components are evaluated. Attachment models between the stiffener and panel skin range from a line along the rivets of the physical structure to a constraint over the entire contact surface. The finite element models are validated using experimental modal analysis results. The increased frequency range results in a corresponding increase in the number of modes, modal density and spatial resolution requirements. In this study, conventional modal tests using accelerometers are complemented with Scanning Laser Doppler Velocimetry and Electro-Optic Holography measurements to further resolve the spatial response characteristics. Whenever possible, component and subassembly modal tests are used to validate the finite element models at lower levels of assembly. Normal mode predictions for different finite element representations of components and assemblies are compared with experimental results to assess the most accurate techniques for modeling aircraft fuselage type structures.

  3. Honeycomb Structures of Transition Metal-Group 6A Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataca, Can; Sahin, Hasan; Akturk, Ethem; Ciraci, Salim

    2010-03-01

    In this study, we investigated the structural, electronic, magnetic properties and stability of MoS2 like honeycomb structures, namely MX2 where M is a transition metal atom (Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Nb, Mo, W) and two group (X) 6A elements (O, S, Se, Te) in a unit cell, using first-principles density functional theory. The structure consists of three layers, two for group 6A elements and one for the transition metal atom. The stabilities of various new structures are further testified by phonon dispersion analysis. Unlike graphene, some of the new honeycomb structures resulted in magnetic ground states. It is also noted that metallic honeycomb structures also exist.

  4. Future Launch Vehicle Structures - Expendable and Reusable Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obersteiner, M. H.; Borriello, G.

    2002-01-01

    Further evolution of existing expendable launch vehicles will be an obvious element influencing the future of space transportation. Besides this reusability might be the change with highest potential for essential improvement. The expected cost reduction and finally contributing to this, the improvement of reliability including safe mission abort capability are driving this idea. Although there are ideas of semi-reusable launch vehicles, typically two stages vehicles - reusable first stage or booster(s) and expendable second or upper stage - it should be kept in mind that the benefit of reusability will only overwhelm if there is a big enough share influencing the cost calculation. Today there is the understanding that additional technology preparation and verification will be necessary to master reusability and get enough benefits compared with existing launch vehicles. This understanding is based on several technology and system concepts preparation and verification programmes mainly done in the US but partially also in Europe and Japan. The major areas of necessary further activities are: - System concepts including business plan considerations - Sub-system or component technologies refinement - System design and operation know-how and capabilities - Verification and demonstration oriented towards future mission mastering: One of the most important aspects for the creation of those coming programmes and activities will be the iterative process of requirements definition derived from concepts analyses including economical considerations and the results achieved and verified within technology and verification programmes. It is the intention of this paper to provide major trends for those requirements focused on future launch vehicles structures. This will include the aspects of requirements only valid for reusable launch vehicles and those common for expendable, semi-reusable and reusable launch vehicles. Structures and materials is and will be one of the

  5. Automated Finite Element Modeling of Wing Structures for Shape Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Michael Stephen

    1993-01-01

    The displacement formulation of the finite element method is the most general and most widely used technique for structural analysis of airplane configurations. Modem structural synthesis techniques based on the finite element method have reached a certain maturity in recent years, and large airplane structures can now be optimized with respect to sizing type design variables for many load cases subject to a rich variety of constraints including stress, buckling, frequency, stiffness and aeroelastic constraints (Refs. 1-3). These structural synthesis capabilities use gradient based nonlinear programming techniques to search for improved designs. For these techniques to be practical a major improvement was required in computational cost of finite element analyses (needed repeatedly in the optimization process). Thus, associated with the progress in structural optimization, a new perspective of structural analysis has emerged, namely, structural analysis specialized for design optimization application, or.what is known as "design oriented structural analysis" (Ref. 4). This discipline includes approximation concepts and methods for obtaining behavior sensitivity information (Ref. 1), all needed to make the optimization of large structural systems (modeled by thousands of degrees of freedom and thousands of design variables) practical and cost effective.

  6. Augmented weak forms and element-by-element preconditioners: Efficient iterative strategies for structural finite elements. A preliminary study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, A.; Hughes, T. J. R.

    1984-01-01

    A weak formulation in structural analysis that provides well conditioned matrices suitable for iterative solutions is presented. A mixed formulation ensures the proper representation of the problem and the constitutive relations are added in a penalized form. The problem is solved by a double conjugate gradient algorithm combined with an element by element approximate factorization procedure. The double conjugate gradient strategy resembles Uzawa's variable-length type algorithms the main difference is the presence of quadratic terms in the mixed variables. In the case of shear deformable beams these terms ensure that the proper finite thickness solution is obtained.

  7. Galerkin finite element scheme for magnetostrictive structures and composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Kidambi Srinivasan

    The ever increasing-role of magnetostrictives in actuation and sensing applications is an indication of their importance in the emerging field of smart structures technology. As newer, and more complex, applications are developed, there is a growing need for a reliable computational tool that can effectively address the magneto-mechanical interactions and other nonlinearities in these materials and in structures incorporating them. This thesis presents a continuum level quasi-static, three-dimensional finite element computational scheme for modeling the nonlinear behavior of bulk magnetostrictive materials and particulate magnetostrictive composites. Models for magnetostriction must deal with two sources of nonlinearities-nonlinear body forces/moments in equilibrium equations governing magneto-mechanical interactions in deformable and magnetized bodies; and nonlinear coupled magneto-mechanical constitutive models for the material of interest. In the present work, classical differential formulations for nonlinear magneto-mechanical interactions are recast in integral form using the weighted-residual method. A discretized finite element form is obtained by applying the Galerkin technique. The finite element formulation is based upon three dimensional eight-noded (isoparametric) brick element interpolation functions and magnetostatic infinite elements at the boundary. Two alternative possibilities are explored for establishing the nonlinear incremental constitutive model-characterization in terms of magnetic field or in terms of magnetization. The former methodology is the one most commonly used in the literature. In this work, a detailed comparative study of both methodologies is carried out. The computational scheme is validated, qualitatively and quantitatively, against experimental measurements published in the literature on structures incorporating the magnetostrictive material Terfenol-D. The influence of nonlinear body forces and body moments of magnetic origin

  8. New Ground-State Crystal Structure of Elemental Boron.

    PubMed

    An, Qi; Reddy, K Madhav; Xie, Kelvin Y; Hemker, Kevin J; Goddard, William A

    2016-08-19

    Elemental boron exhibits many polymorphs in nature based mostly on an icosahedral shell motif, involving stabilization of 13 strong multicenter intraicosahedral bonds. It is commonly accepted that the most thermodynamic stable structure of elemental boron at atmospheric pressure is the β rhombohedral boron (β-B). Surprisingly, using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, we found that pure boron powder contains grains of two different types, the previously identified β-B containing a number of randomly spaced twins and what appears to be a fully transformed twinlike structure. This fully transformed structure, denoted here as τ-B, is based on the Cmcm orthorhombic space group. Quantum mechanics predicts that the newly identified τ-B structure is 13.8  meV/B more stable than β-B. The τ-B structure allows 6% more charge transfer from B_{57} units to nearby B_{12} units, making the net charge 6% closer to the ideal expected from Wade's rules. Thus, we predict the τ-B structure to be the ground state structure for elemental boron at atmospheric pressure. PMID:27588864

  9. New Ground-State Crystal Structure of Elemental Boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Qi; Reddy, K. Madhav; Xie, Kelvin Y.; Hemker, Kevin J.; Goddard, William A.

    2016-08-01

    Elemental boron exhibits many polymorphs in nature based mostly on an icosahedral shell motif, involving stabilization of 13 strong multicenter intraicosahedral bonds. It is commonly accepted that the most thermodynamic stable structure of elemental boron at atmospheric pressure is the β rhombohedral boron (β -B ). Surprisingly, using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, we found that pure boron powder contains grains of two different types, the previously identified β -B containing a number of randomly spaced twins and what appears to be a fully transformed twinlike structure. This fully transformed structure, denoted here as τ -B , is based on the C m c m orthorhombic space group. Quantum mechanics predicts that the newly identified τ -B structure is 13.8 meV /B more stable than β -B . The τ -B structure allows 6% more charge transfer from B57 units to nearby B12 units, making the net charge 6% closer to the ideal expected from Wade's rules. Thus, we predict the τ -B structure to be the ground state structure for elemental boron at atmospheric pressure.

  10. Detail of array structural elements through axis of array, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of array structural elements through axis of array, looking north-northeast - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Columbia Falls Radar Site Receive Sector Two Antenna Array, At the end of Shadagee Ridge Road, Columbia Falls, Washington County, ME

  11. Finite element forced vibration analysis of rotating cyclic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elchuri, V.; Smith, G. C. C.

    1981-01-01

    A capability was added to the general purpose finite element program NASTRAN Level 17.7 to conduct forced vibration analysis of tuned cyclic structures rotating about their axes of symmetry. The effects of Coriolis and centripetal accelerations together with those due to linear acceleration of the axis of rotation were included. The theoretical development of this capability is presented.

  12. Structural optimization of thin shells using finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the present work was the structural optimization of thin shell structures that are subjected to stress and displacement constraints. In order to accomplish this, the structural optimization computer program DESAP1 was modified and improved. In the static analysis part of the DESAP1 computer program the torsional spring elements, which are used to analyze thin, shallow shell structures, were eliminated by modifying the membrane stiffness matrix of the triangular elements in the local coordinate system and adding a fictitious rotational stiffness matrix. This simplified the DESAP1 program input, improved the accuracy of the analysis, and saved computation time. In the optimization part of the DESAP1 program the stress ratio formula, which redesigns the thickness of each finite element of the structure, was solved by an analytical method. This scheme replaced the iterative solution that was previously used in the DESAP1 program, thus increasing the accuracy and speed of the design. The modified program was used to design a thin, cylindrical shell structure with optimum weight, and the results are reported in this paper.

  13. The computational structural mechanics testbed generic structural-element processor manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, Gary M.; Nour-Omid, Shahram

    1990-01-01

    The usage and development of structural finite element processors based on the CSM Testbed's Generic Element Processor (GEP) template is documented. By convention, such processors have names of the form ESi, where i is an integer. This manual is therefore intended for both Testbed users who wish to invoke ES processors during the course of a structural analysis, and Testbed developers who wish to construct new element processors (or modify existing ones).

  14. Using support vector machines to improve elemental ion identification in macromolecular crystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Morshed, Nader; Echols, Nathaniel; Adams, Paul D.

    2015-05-01

    A method to automatically identify possible elemental ions in X-ray crystal structures has been extended to use support vector machine (SVM) classifiers trained on selected structures in the PDB, with significantly improved sensitivity over manually encoded heuristics. In the process of macromolecular model building, crystallographers must examine electron density for isolated atoms and differentiate sites containing structured solvent molecules from those containing elemental ions. This task requires specific knowledge of metal-binding chemistry and scattering properties and is prone to error. A method has previously been described to identify ions based on manually chosen criteria for a number of elements. Here, the use of support vector machines (SVMs) to automatically classify isolated atoms as either solvent or one of various ions is described. Two data sets of protein crystal structures, one containing manually curated structures deposited with anomalous diffraction data and another with automatically filtered, high-resolution structures, were constructed. On the manually curated data set, an SVM classifier was able to distinguish calcium from manganese, zinc, iron and nickel, as well as all five of these ions from water molecules, with a high degree of accuracy. Additionally, SVMs trained on the automatically curated set of high-resolution structures were able to successfully classify most common elemental ions in an independent validation test set. This method is readily extensible to other elemental ions and can also be used in conjunction with previous methods based on a priori expectations of the chemical environment and X-ray scattering.

  15. TU elements: a heterogeneous family of modularly structured eucaryotic transposons.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman-Liebermann, B; Liebermann, D; Kedes, L H; Cohen, S N

    1985-01-01

    We describe here a family of foldback transposons found in the genome of the higher eucaryote, the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Two major classes of TU elements have been identified by analysis of genomic DNA and TU element clones. One class consists of largely similar elements with long terminal inverted repeats (IVRs) containing outer and inner domains and sharing a common middle segment that can undergo deletions. Some of these elements contain insertions. The second class is highly heterogeneous, with many different middle segments nonhomologous to those of the first-class and variable-sized inverted repeats that contain only an outer domain. The middle and insertion segments of both classes carry sequences that also are found unassociated from the inverted repeats at many other genomic locations. We conclude that the TU elements are modular structures composed of inverted repeats plus other sequence domains that are themselves members of different families of dispersed repetitive sequences. Such modular elements may have a role in the dispersion and rearrangement of genomic DNA segments. Images PMID:2987685

  16. Curved Thermopiezoelectric Shell Structures Modeled by Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ho-Jun

    2000-01-01

    "Smart" structures composed of piezoelectric materials may significantly improve the performance of aeropropulsion systems through a variety of vibration, noise, and shape-control applications. The development of analytical models for piezoelectric smart structures is an ongoing, in-house activity at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field focused toward the experimental characterization of these materials. Research efforts have been directed toward developing analytical models that account for the coupled mechanical, electrical, and thermal response of piezoelectric composite materials. Current work revolves around implementing thermal effects into a curvilinear-shell finite element code. This enhances capabilities to analyze curved structures and to account for coupling effects arising from thermal effects and the curved geometry. The current analytical model implements a unique mixed multi-field laminate theory to improve computational efficiency without sacrificing accuracy. The mechanics can model both the sensory and active behavior of piezoelectric composite shell structures. Finite element equations are being implemented for an eight-node curvilinear shell element, and numerical studies are being conducted to demonstrate capabilities to model the response of curved piezoelectric composite structures (see the figure).

  17. Structural health monitoring system design using finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stinemates, D. W.; Bennett, J. G.

    2002-01-01

    The project described in this report was performed to couple experimental and analytical techniques in the field of structural health monitoring and damage identification. To do this, a finite element model was constructed of a simulated three-story building used for damage identification experiments. The model was used in conjunction with data from the physical structure to research damage identification algorithms. Of particular interest was modeling slip in joints as a function of bolt torque and predicting the smallest change of torque that could be detected experimentally. After being validated with results from the physical structure, the model was used to produce data to test the capabilities of damage identification algorithms. This report describes the finite element model constructed, the results obtained, and proposed future use of the model.

  18. Finite element thermo-viscoplastic analysis of aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, Ajay K.; Dechaumphai, Pramote; Thornton, Earl A.

    1990-01-01

    The time-dependent thermo-viscoplastic response of aerospace structures subjected to intense aerothermal loads is predicted using the finite-element method. The finite-element analysis uses the Bodner-Partom unified viscoplastic constitutive relations to determine rate-dependent nonlinear material behavior. The methodology is verified by comparison with experimental data and other numerical results for a uniaxially-loaded bar. The method is then used (1) to predict the structural response of a rectangular plate subjected to line heating along a centerline, and (2) to predict the thermal-structural response of a convectively-cooled engine cowl leading edge subjected to aerodynamic shock-shock interference heating. Compared to linear elastic analysis, the viscoplastic analysis results in lower peak stresses and regions of plastic deformations.

  19. Finite element solution of transient fluid-structure interaction problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everstine, Gordon C.; Cheng, Raymond S.; Hambric, Stephen A.

    1991-01-01

    A finite element approach using NASTRAN is developed for solving time-dependent fluid-structure interaction problems, with emphasis on the transient scattering of acoustic waves from submerged elastic structures. Finite elements are used for modeling both structure and fluid domains to facilitate the graphical display of the wave motion through both media. For the liquid, the use of velocity potential as the fundamental unknown results in a symmetric matrix equation. The approach is illustrated for the problem of transient scattering from a submerged elastic spherical shell subjected to an incident tone burst. The use of an analogy between the equations of elasticity and the wave equation of acoustics, a necessary ingredient to the procedure, is summarized.

  20. Finite element simulation of adaptive aerospace structures with SMA actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frautschi, Jason; Seelecke, Stefan

    2003-07-01

    The particular demands of aerospace engineering have spawned many of the developments in the field of adaptive structures. Shape memory alloys are particularly attractive as actuators in these types of structures due to their large strains, high specific work output and potential for structural integration. However, the requisite extensive physical testing has slowed development of potential applications and highlighted the need for a simulation tool for feasibility studies. In this paper we present an implementation of an extended version of the M'ller-Achenbach SMA model into a commercial finite element code suitable for such studies. Interaction between the SMA model and the solution algorithm for the global FE equations is thoroughly investigated with respect to the effect of tolerances and time step size on convergence, computational cost and accuracy. Finally, a simulation of a SMA-actuated flexible trailing edge of an aircraft wing modeled with beam elements is presented.

  1. Finite-element thermo-viscoplastic analysis of aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, Ajay; Dechaumphai, Pramote; Thornton, Earl A.

    1990-01-01

    The time-dependent thermo-viscoplastic response of aerospace structures subjected to intense aerothermal loads is predicted using the finite-element method. The finite-element analysis uses the Bodner-Partom unified viscoplastic constitutive relations to determine rate-dependent nonlinear material behavior. The methodology is verified by comparison with experimental data and other numerical results for a uniaxially-loaded bar. The method is then used (1) to predict the structural response of a rectangular plate subjected to line heating along a centerline, and (2) to predict the thermal-structural response of a convectively-cooled engine cowl leading edge subjected to aerodynamic shock-shock interference heating. Compared to linear elastic analysis, the viscoplastic analysis results in lower peak stresses and regions of plastic deformations.

  2. Identification of Secondary Structure Elements in Intermediate Resolution Density Maps

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Matthew L.; Ju, Tao; Chiu, Wah

    2007-01-01

    An increasing number of structural studies of large macromolecular complexes, both in X-ray crystallography and electron cryomicroscopy, have resulted in intermediate resolution (5–10 Å) structures. Despite being limited in resolution, significant structural and functional information may be extractable from these maps. To aid in the analysis and annotation of these complexes, we have developed SSEhunter, a tool for the quantitative detection of α-helices and β-sheets. Based on density skeletonization, local geometry calculations and a template-based search, SSEhunter has been tested and validated on a variety of simulated and authentic subnanometer resolution density maps. The result is a robust, user-friendly approach that allows users to quickly visualize, assess and annotate intermediate resolution density maps. Beyond secondary structure element identification, the skeletonization algorithm in SSEhunter provides secondary structure topology, potentially useful in leading to structural models of individual molecular components directly from the density. PMID:17223528

  3. Analytical 3-D p-element for quadrilateral plates—Part 1: Thick isotropic plate structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, B.; Leung, A. Y. T.; Li, Q. S.; Lu, J. W. Z.; Zhang, X. C.

    2007-06-01

    An analytical three-dimensional (3-D) p-version element for the vibration analysis of arbitrary quadrilateral thick plates is presented. With the additional hierarchical shape functions and analytically integrated element matrices, the computed accuracy is considerably improved. The computed natural frequencies of cantilever and simply supported square plates show that the convergence rate of the present element is very fast with respect to the number of hierarchical terms and it can predict very accurate modes. The element is applicable to the free vibration analysis of quadrilateral, polygonal plates as well as 3-D space structures. The continuous wavelet transform (CWT) is applied for the identification of damping ratios. Based on the Rayleigh damping model, the damped vibration response is obtained. A simple experiment is performed to verify the predicted vibration responses. The results show that the proposed element is also efficient for the vibration response analysis of plates.

  4. Aircraft wing structural design optimization based on automated finite element modelling and ground structure approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weizhu; Yue, Zhufeng; Li, Lei; Wang, Peiyan

    2016-01-01

    An optimization procedure combining an automated finite element modelling (AFEM) technique with a ground structure approach (GSA) is proposed for structural layout and sizing design of aircraft wings. The AFEM technique, based on CATIA VBA scripting and PCL programming, is used to generate models automatically considering the arrangement of inner systems. GSA is used for local structural topology optimization. The design procedure is applied to a high-aspect-ratio wing. The arrangement of the integral fuel tank, landing gear and control surfaces is considered. For the landing gear region, a non-conventional initial structural layout is adopted. The positions of components, the number of ribs and local topology in the wing box and landing gear region are optimized to obtain a minimum structural weight. Constraints include tank volume, strength, buckling and aeroelastic parameters. The results show that the combined approach leads to a greater weight saving, i.e. 26.5%, compared with three additional optimizations based on individual design approaches.

  5. The effect of trace element addition to mono-digestion of grass silage at high organic loading rates.

    PubMed

    Wall, David M; Allen, Eoin; Straccialini, Barbara; O'Kiely, Padraig; Murphy, Jerry D

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated the effect of trace element addition to mono-digestion of grass silage at high organic loading rates. Two continuous reactors were compared. The first mono-digested grass silage whilst the second operated in co-digestion, 80% grass silage with 20% dairy slurry (VS basis). The reactors were run for 65weeks with a further 5weeks taken for trace element supplementation for the mono-digestion of grass silage. The co-digestion reactor reported a higher biomethane efficiency (1.01) than mono-digestion (0.90) at an OLR of 4.0kgVSm(-3)d(-1) prior to addition of trace elements. Addition of cobalt, iron and nickel, led to an increase in the SMY in mono-digestion of grass silage by 12% to 404LCH4kg(-1)VS and attained a biomethane efficiency of 1.01.

  6. Simplified Finite Element Modelling of Acoustically Treated Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carfagni, M.; Citti, P.; Pierini, M.

    1997-07-01

    The application of non-optimized damping and phono-absorbent materials to automotive systems has not proved fully satisfactory in abating noise and vibration. The objective of this work was to develop a simple finite element modelling procedure that would allow optimizing structures such as a car body-in-white in terms of vibroacoustic behavior from the design stage. A procedure was developed to determine the modifications to be made in the mass, stiffness and damping characteristics in the finite element (FE) modelling of a metal structure meshed with shell elements so that the model would describe the behavior of the acoustically treated structure. To validate the modifications, a numerical-experimental comparison of the velocities on the vibrating surface was carried out, followed by a numerical-experimental comparison of the sound pressures generated by the vibrating plate. In the comparison a simple monopole model was used, in which each area of vibrating surface could be likened to a point source. The simulation and experimental procedures, previously validated for the metal structure, were then applied to multi-layered panels. Good agreement between the experimental and simulated velocities and sound pressures resulted for all the multi-layered panel configurations examined.

  7. Finite Element Based HWB Centerbody Structural Optimization and Weight Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gern, Frank H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a scalable structural model suitable for Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) centerbody analysis and optimization. The geometry of the centerbody and primary wing structure is based on a Vehicle Sketch Pad (VSP) surface model of the aircraft and a FLOPS compatible parameterization of the centerbody. Structural analysis, optimization, and weight calculation are based on a Nastran finite element model of the primary HWB structural components, featuring centerbody, mid section, and outboard wing. Different centerbody designs like single bay or multi-bay options are analyzed and weight calculations are compared to current FLOPS results. For proper structural sizing and weight estimation, internal pressure and maneuver flight loads are applied. Results are presented for aerodynamic loads, deformations, and centerbody weight.

  8. A Curved, Elastostatic Boundary Element for Plane Anisotropic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S.; Klang, Eric C.

    2001-01-01

    The plane-stress equations of linear elasticity are used in conjunction with those of the boundary element method to develop a novel curved, quadratic boundary element applicable to structures composed of anisotropic materials in a state of plane stress or plane strain. The curved boundary element is developed to solve two-dimensional, elastostatic problems of arbitrary shape, connectivity, and material type. As a result of the anisotropy, complex variables are employed in the fundamental solution derivations for a concentrated unit-magnitude force in an infinite elastic anisotropic medium. Once known, the fundamental solutions are evaluated numerically by using the known displacement and traction boundary values in an integral formulation with Gaussian quadrature. All the integral equations of the boundary element method are evaluated using one of two methods: either regular Gaussian quadrature or a combination of regular and logarithmic Gaussian quadrature. The regular Gaussian quadrature is used to evaluate most of the integrals along the boundary, and the combined scheme is employed for integrals that are singular. Individual element contributions are assembled into the global matrices of the standard boundary element method, manipulated to form a system of linear equations, and the resulting system is solved. The interior displacements and stresses are found through a separate set of auxiliary equations that are derived using an Airy-type stress function in terms of complex variables. The capabilities and accuracy of this method are demonstrated for a laminated-composite plate with a central, elliptical cutout that is subjected to uniform tension along one of the straight edges of the plate. Comparison of the boundary element results for this problem with corresponding results from an analytical model show a difference of less than 1%.

  9. Experimental validation of finite element and boundary element methods for predicting structural vibration and radiated noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seybert, A. F.; Wu, T. W.; Wu, X. F.

    1994-01-01

    This research report is presented in three parts. In the first part, acoustical analyses were performed on modes of vibration of the housing of a transmission of a gear test rig developed by NASA. The modes of vibration of the transmission housing were measured using experimental modal analysis. The boundary element method (BEM) was used to calculate the sound pressure and sound intensity on the surface of the housing and the radiation efficiency of each mode. The radiation efficiency of each of the transmission housing modes was then compared to theoretical results for a finite baffled plate. In the second part, analytical and experimental validation of methods to predict structural vibration and radiated noise are presented. A rectangular box excited by a mechanical shaker was used as a vibrating structure. Combined finite element method (FEM) and boundary element method (BEM) models of the apparatus were used to predict the noise level radiated from the box. The FEM was used to predict the vibration, while the BEM was used to predict the sound intensity and total radiated sound power using surface vibration as the input data. Vibration predicted by the FEM model was validated by experimental modal analysis; noise predicted by the BEM was validated by measurements of sound intensity. Three types of results are presented for the total radiated sound power: sound power predicted by the BEM model using vibration data measured on the surface of the box; sound power predicted by the FEM/BEM model; and sound power measured by an acoustic intensity scan. In the third part, the structure used in part two was modified. A rib was attached to the top plate of the structure. The FEM and BEM were then used to predict structural vibration and radiated noise respectively. The predicted vibration and radiated noise were then validated through experimentation.

  10. Torque sensor having a spoked sensor element support structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Boris J. (Inventor); Schier, J. Alan (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Piezoelectric sensor devices are attached across pairs of circularly arranged spokes arrayed on the periphery of an annular ring. The sensor devices each include a preloaded steel ball mounting arrangement for mounting a piezoelectric sensor element. A first circular interface plate on one side of the sensor structure attaches to alternate one of the spokes, and a circular interface plate on the opposite side of the same diameter as the first interface plate attaches to the remaining spokes.

  11. Control of Gas Tungsten Arc welding pool shape by trace element addition to the weld pool

    DOEpatents

    Heiple, C.R.; Burgardt, P.

    1984-03-13

    An improved process for Gas Tungsten Arc welding maximizes the depth/width ratio of the weld pool by adding a sufficient amount of a surface active element to insure inward fluid flow, resulting in deep, narrow welds. The process is especially useful to eliminate variable weld penetration and shape in GTA welding of steels and stainless steels, particularly by using a sulfur-doped weld wire in a cold wire feed technique.

  12. Structural changes in gluten protein structure after addition of emulsifier. A Raman spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, Evelina G.; Gómez, Analía V.; Añón, María C.; Puppo, María C.

    2011-06-01

    Food protein product, gluten protein, was chemically modified by varying levels of sodium stearoyl lactylate (SSL); and the extent of modifications (secondary and tertiary structures) of this protein was analyzed by using Raman spectroscopy. Analysis of the Amide I band showed an increase in its intensity mainly after the addition of the 0.25% of SSL to wheat flour to produced modified gluten protein, pointing the formation of a more ordered structure. Side chain vibrations also confirmed the observed changes.

  13. A new axi-symmetric element for thin walled structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, Rui P. R.; Yoon, Jeong Whan; Dick, Robert E.

    2010-03-01

    A new axi-symmetric finite element for thin walled structures is presented in this work. It uses the solid-shell element’s concept with only a single element and multiple integration points along the thickness direction. The cross-section of the element is composed of four nodes with two degrees of freedom each. The proposed formulation overcomes many locking pathologies including transverse shear locking, Poisson’s locking and volumetric locking. For transverse shear locking, the formulation uses the selective reduced integration technique, for Poisson’s locking it uses the enhanced assumed strain (EAS) method with only one enhancing variable. The B-bar approach is used to eliminate the isochoric deformations in the hourglass field while the EAS method is used to alleviate the volumetric locking in the constant part of the deformation tensor. Several examples are shown to demonstrate the performance and accuracy of the proposed element with special focus on the numerical simulations for the beverage can industry.

  14. The effect of selected alloying element additions on properties of Mg-based alloy as bioimplants: A literature review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li-Nan; Hou, Zeng-Tao; Ye, Xin; Xu, Zhao-Bin; Bai, Xue-Ling; Shang, Peng

    2013-09-01

    This review investigates the current application limitations of Mg and Mg alloys. The key issues hindering the application of biodegradable Mg alloys as implants are their fast degradation rate and biological consideration. We have discussed the effect of some selected alloying element additions on the properties of the Mg-based alloy, especially the nutrient elements in human (Zn, Mn, Ca, Sr). Different grain sizes, phase constituents and distributions consequently influence the mechanical properties of the Mg alloys. Solution strengthening and precipitation strengthening are enhanced by the addition of alloying elements, generally improving the mechanical properties. Besides, the hot working process can also improve the mechanical properties. Combination of different processing steps is suggested to be adopted in the fabrication of Mg-based alloys. Corrosion properties of these Mg-based alloys have been measured in vitro and in vivo. The degradation mechanism is also discussed in terms of corrosion types, rates, byproducts and response of the surrounding tissues. Moreover, the clinical response and requirements of degradable implants are presented, especially for the nutrient elements (Ca, Mn, Zn, Sr). This review provides information related to different Mg alloying elements and presents the promising candidates for an ideal implant.

  15. Teachers' Personal Agency: Making Sense of Slope through Additive Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Janet G.; Gerson, Hope

    2007-01-01

    In the context of a three-year professional development program in mathematics, practicing elementary teachers persistently engaged in collaborative inquiry and reflection to build connected meanings for slope. One teacher invented a compelling representation for slope as a process of repeated addition, using Cuisenaire rods, based on teachers'…

  16. Automated identification of elemental ions in macromolecular crystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Echols, Nathaniel Morshed, Nader; Afonine, Pavel V.; McCoy, Airlie J.; Read, Randy J.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Adams, Paul D.

    2014-04-01

    The solvent-picking procedure in phenix.refine has been extended and combined with Phaser anomalous substructure completion and analysis of coordination geometry to identify and place elemental ions. Many macromolecular model-building and refinement programs can automatically place solvent atoms in electron density at moderate-to-high resolution. This process frequently builds water molecules in place of elemental ions, the identification of which must be performed manually. The solvent-picking algorithms in phenix.refine have been extended to build common ions based on an analysis of the chemical environment as well as physical properties such as occupancy, B factor and anomalous scattering. The method is most effective for heavier elements such as calcium and zinc, for which a majority of sites can be placed with few false positives in a diverse test set of structures. At atomic resolution, it is observed that it can also be possible to identify tightly bound sodium and magnesium ions. A number of challenges that contribute to the difficulty of completely automating the process of structure completion are discussed.

  17. Dynamic Shape Reconstruction of Three-Dimensional Frame Structures Using the Inverse Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gherlone, Marco; Cerracchio, Priscilla; Mattone, Massimiliano; Di Sciuva, Marco; Tessler, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    A robust and efficient computational method for reconstructing the three-dimensional displacement field of truss, beam, and frame structures, using measured surface-strain data, is presented. Known as shape sensing , this inverse problem has important implications for real-time actuation and control of smart structures, and for monitoring of structural integrity. The present formulation, based on the inverse Finite Element Method (iFEM), uses a least-squares variational principle involving strain measures of Timoshenko theory for stretching, torsion, bending, and transverse shear. Two inverse-frame finite elements are derived using interdependent interpolations whose interior degrees-of-freedom are condensed out at the element level. In addition, relationships between the order of kinematic-element interpolations and the number of required strain gauges are established. As an example problem, a thin-walled, circular cross-section cantilevered beam subjected to harmonic excitations in the presence of structural damping is modeled using iFEM; where, to simulate strain-gauge values and to provide reference displacements, a high-fidelity MSC/NASTRAN shell finite element model is used. Examples of low and high-frequency dynamic motion are analyzed and the solution accuracy examined with respect to various levels of discretization and the number of strain gauges.

  18. Penalty-Based Finite Element Interface Technology for Analysis of Homogeneous and Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Averill, Ronald C.

    2002-01-01

    An effective and robust interface element technology able to connect independently modeled finite element subdomains has been developed. This method is based on the use of penalty constraints and allows coupling of finite element models whose nodes do not coincide along their common interface. Additionally, the present formulation leads to a computational approach that is very efficient and completely compatible with existing commercial software. A significant effort has been directed toward identifying those model characteristics (element geometric properties, material properties, and loads) that most strongly affect the required penalty parameter, and subsequently to developing simple 'formulae' for automatically calculating the proper penalty parameter for each interface constraint. This task is especially critical in composite materials and structures, where adjacent sub-regions may be composed of significantly different materials or laminates. This approach has been validated by investigating a variety of two-dimensional problems, including composite laminates.

  19. Finite element modeling for validation of structural damage identification experimentation.

    SciTech Connect

    Stinemates, D. W.; Bennett, J. G.

    2001-01-01

    The project described in this report was performed to couple experimental and analytical techniques in the field of structural health monitoring and darnage identification. To do this, a finite dement model was Constructed of a simulated three-story building used for damage identification experiments. The model was used in conjunction with data from thie physical structure to research damage identification algorithms. Of particular interest was modeling slip in joints as a function of bolt torque and predicting the smallest change of torque that could be detected experimentally. After being validated with results from the physical structure, the model was used to produce data to test the capabilities of damage identification algorithms. This report describes the finite element model constructed, the results obtained, and proposed future use of the model.

  20. Effects of reactive element additions and sulfur removal on the oxidation behavior of FECRAL alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Stasik, M.C.; Pettit, F.S.; Meier, G.H. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Ashary, A. ); Smialek, J.L. )

    1994-12-15

    The results of this study have shown that desulfurization of FeCrAl alloys by hydrogen annealing can result in improvements in cyclic oxidation comparable to that achieved by doping with reactive elements. Moreover, specimens of substantial thicknesses can be effectively desulfurized because of the high diffusivity of sulfur in bcc iron alloys. The results have also shown that there is less stress generation during the cyclic oxidation of Y-doped FeCrAl compared to Ti-doped or desulfurized FeCrAl. This indicates that the growth mechanism, as well as the strength of the oxide/alloy interface, influences the ultimate oxidation morphology and stress state which will certainly affect the length of time the alumina remains protective.

  1. Validation of finite element and boundary element methods for predicting structural vibration and radiated noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seybert, A. F.; Wu, X. F.; Oswald, Fred B.

    1992-01-01

    Analytical and experimental validation of methods to predict structural vibration and radiated noise are presented. A rectangular box excited by a mechanical shaker was used as a vibrating structure. Combined finite element method (FEM) and boundary element method (BEM) models of the apparatus were used to predict the noise radiated from the box. The FEM was used to predict the vibration, and the surface vibration was used as input to the BEM to predict the sound intensity and sound power. Vibration predicted by the FEM model was validated by experimental modal analysis. Noise predicted by the BEM was validated by sound intensity measurements. Three types of results are presented for the total radiated sound power: (1) sound power predicted by the BEM modeling using vibration data measured on the surface of the box; (2) sound power predicted by the FEM/BEM model; and (3) sound power measured by a sound intensity scan. The sound power predicted from the BEM model using measured vibration data yields an excellent prediction of radiated noise. The sound power predicted by the combined FEM/BEM model also gives a good prediction of radiated noise except for a shift of the natural frequencies that are due to limitations in the FEM model.

  2. Refinement by shifting secondary structure elements improves sequence alignments.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jing; Pei, Jimin; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Grishin, Nick V

    2015-03-01

    Constructing a model of a query protein based on its alignment to a homolog with experimentally determined spatial structure (the template) is still the most reliable approach to structure prediction. Alignment errors are the main bottleneck for homology modeling when the query is distantly related to the template. Alignment methods often misalign secondary structural elements by a few residues. Therefore, better alignment solutions can be found within a limited set of local shifts of secondary structures. We present a refinement method to improve pairwise sequence alignments by evaluating alignment variants generated by local shifts of template-defined secondary structures. Our method SFESA is based on a novel scoring function that combines the profile-based sequence score and the structure score derived from residue contacts in a template. Such a combined score frequently selects a better alignment variant among a set of candidate alignments generated by local shifts and leads to overall increase in alignment accuracy. Evaluation of several benchmarks shows that our refinement method significantly improves alignments made by automatic methods such as PROMALS, HHpred and CNFpred. The web server is available at http://prodata.swmed.edu/sfesa. PMID:25546158

  3. Refinement by shifting secondary structure elements improves sequence alignments

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Jing; Pei, Jimin; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Grishin, Nick V.

    2015-01-01

    Constructing a model of a query protein based on its alignment to a homolog with experimentally determined spatial structure (the template) is still the most reliable approach to structure prediction. Alignment errors are the main bottleneck for homology modeling when the query is distantly related to the template. Alignment methods often misalign secondary structural elements by a few residues. Therefore, better alignment solutions can be found within a limited set of local shifts of secondary structures. We present a refinement method to improve pairwise sequence alignments by evaluating alignment variants generated by local shifts of template-defined secondary structures. Our method SFESA is based on a novel scoring function that combines the profile-based sequence score and the structure score derived from residue contacts in a template. Such a combined score frequently selects a better alignment variant among a set of candidate alignments generated by local shifts and leads to overall increase in alignment accuracy. Evaluation of several benchmarks shows that our refinement method significantly improves alignments made by automatic methods such as PROMALS, HHpred and CNFpred. The web server is available at http://prodata.swmed.edu/sfesa. PMID:25546158

  4. Using support vector machines to improve elemental ion identification in macromolecular crystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Morshed, Nader; Echols, Nathaniel; Adams, Paul D.

    2015-04-25

    In the process of macromolecular model building, crystallographers must examine electron density for isolated atoms and differentiate sites containing structured solvent molecules from those containing elemental ions. This task requires specific knowledge of metal-binding chemistry and scattering properties and is prone to error. A method has previously been described to identify ions based on manually chosen criteria for a number of elements. Here, the use of support vector machines (SVMs) to automatically classify isolated atoms as either solvent or one of various ions is described. Two data sets of protein crystal structures, one containing manually curated structures deposited with anomalous diffraction data and another with automatically filtered, high-resolution structures, were constructed. On the manually curated data set, an SVM classifier was able to distinguish calcium from manganese, zinc, iron and nickel, as well as all five of these ions from water molecules, with a high degree of accuracy. Additionally, SVMs trained on the automatically curated set of high-resolution structures were able to successfully classify most common elemental ions in an independent validation test set. This method is readily extensible to other elemental ions and can also be used in conjunction with previous methods based on a priori expectations of the chemical environment and X-ray scattering.

  5. Using support vector machines to improve elemental ion identification in macromolecular crystal structures

    DOE PAGES

    Morshed, Nader; Echols, Nathaniel; Adams, Paul D.

    2015-04-25

    In the process of macromolecular model building, crystallographers must examine electron density for isolated atoms and differentiate sites containing structured solvent molecules from those containing elemental ions. This task requires specific knowledge of metal-binding chemistry and scattering properties and is prone to error. A method has previously been described to identify ions based on manually chosen criteria for a number of elements. Here, the use of support vector machines (SVMs) to automatically classify isolated atoms as either solvent or one of various ions is described. Two data sets of protein crystal structures, one containing manually curated structures deposited with anomalousmore » diffraction data and another with automatically filtered, high-resolution structures, were constructed. On the manually curated data set, an SVM classifier was able to distinguish calcium from manganese, zinc, iron and nickel, as well as all five of these ions from water molecules, with a high degree of accuracy. Additionally, SVMs trained on the automatically curated set of high-resolution structures were able to successfully classify most common elemental ions in an independent validation test set. This method is readily extensible to other elemental ions and can also be used in conjunction with previous methods based on a priori expectations of the chemical environment and X-ray scattering.« less

  6. Using support vector machines to improve elemental ion identification in macromolecular crystal structures

    PubMed Central

    Morshed, Nader; Echols, Nathaniel; Adams, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    In the process of macromolecular model building, crystallographers must examine electron density for isolated atoms and differentiate sites containing structured solvent molecules from those containing elemental ions. This task requires specific knowledge of metal-binding chemistry and scattering properties and is prone to error. A method has previously been described to identify ions based on manually chosen criteria for a number of elements. Here, the use of support vector machines (SVMs) to automatically classify isolated atoms as either solvent or one of various ions is described. Two data sets of protein crystal structures, one containing manually curated structures deposited with anomalous diffraction data and another with automatically filtered, high-resolution structures, were constructed. On the manually curated data set, an SVM classifier was able to distinguish calcium from manganese, zinc, iron and nickel, as well as all five of these ions from water molecules, with a high degree of accuracy. Additionally, SVMs trained on the automatically curated set of high-resolution structures were able to successfully classify most common elemental ions in an independent validation test set. This method is readily extensible to other elemental ions and can also be used in conjunction with previous methods based on a priori expectations of the chemical environment and X-ray scattering. PMID:25945580

  7. Conductivity and structure of bilinear organic addition compounds

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    The relationship between crystal structures and metallic conductivities of linear organic materials such as tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane is explained in terms of strong lateral elastic interactions between chains. A microdomain model is presented in which at high temperatures there are, in general, two coexisting phases on each stacked molecular chain. The ordering of (in general, four) phases on two interacting chains leads to a variety of phase transitions at low temperatures. By examining temperature-dependent electrical conductivities and magnetic susceptibilities one can establish the character of each such transition. PMID:16592359

  8. Disentangling effects of nuclear structure in heavy element formation.

    PubMed

    Hinde, D J; Thomas, R G; du Rietz, R; Diaz-Torres, A; Dasgupta, M; Brown, M L; Evers, M; Gasques, L R; Rafiei, R; Rodriguez, M D

    2008-05-23

    Forming the same heavy compound nucleus with different isotopes of the projectile and target elements allows nuclear structure effects in the entrance channel (resulting in static deformation) and in the dinuclear system to be disentangled. Using three isotopes of Ti and W, forming 232Cm, with measurement spanning the capture barrier energies, alignment of the heavy prolate deformed nucleus is shown to be the main reason for the broadening of the mass distribution of the quasifission fragments as the beam energy is reduced. The complex, consistently evolving mass-angle correlations that are observed carry more information than the integrated mass or angular distributions, and should severely test models of quasifission.

  9. Disentangling Effects of Nuclear Structure in Heavy Element Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Hinde, D. J.; Thomas, R. G.; Rietz, R. du; Diaz-Torres, A.; Dasgupta, M.; Brown, M. L.; Evers, M.; Gasques, L. R.; Rafiei, R.; Rodriguez, M. D.

    2008-05-23

    Forming the same heavy compound nucleus with different isotopes of the projectile and target elements allows nuclear structure effects in the entrance channel (resulting in static deformation) and in the dinuclear system to be disentangled. Using three isotopes of Ti and W, forming {sup 232}Cm, with measurement spanning the capture barrier energies, alignment of the heavy prolate deformed nucleus is shown to be the main reason for the broadening of the mass distribution of the quasifission fragments as the beam energy is reduced. The complex, consistently evolving mass-angle correlations that are observed carry more information than the integrated mass or angular distributions, and should severely test models of quasifission.

  10. SPAR data set contents. [finite element structural analysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, S. W.

    1981-01-01

    The contents of the stored data sets of the SPAR (space processing applications rocket) finite element structural analysis system are documented. The data generated by each of the system's processors are stored in a data file organized as a library. Each data set, containing a two-dimensional table or matrix, is identified by a four-word name listed in a table of contents. The creating SPAR processor, number of rows and columns, and definitions of each of the data items are listed for each data set. An example SPAR problem using these data sets is also presented.

  11. Power flows and Mechanical Intensities in structural finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hambric, Stephen A.

    1989-01-01

    The identification of power flow paths in dynamically loaded structures is an important, but currently unavailable, capability for the finite element analyst. For this reason, methods for calculating power flows and mechanical intensities in finite element models are developed here. Formulations for calculating input and output powers, power flows, mechanical intensities, and power dissipations for beam, plate, and solid element types are derived. NASTRAN is used to calculate the required velocity, force, and stress results of an analysis, which a post-processor then uses to calculate power flow quantities. The SDRC I-deas Supertab module is used to view the final results. Test models include a simple truss and a beam-stiffened cantilever plate. Both test cases showed reasonable power flow fields over low to medium frequencies, with accurate power balances. Future work will include testing with more complex models, developing an interactive graphics program to view easily and efficiently the analysis results, applying shape optimization methods to the problem with power flow variables as design constraints, and adding the power flow capability to NASTRAN.

  12. The Effect of Emphasizing Mathematical Structure in the Acquisition of Whole Number Computation Skills (Addition and Subtraction) By Seven- and Eight-Year Olds: A Clinical Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uprichard, A. Edward; Collura, Carolyn

    This investigation sought to determine the effect of emphasizing mathematical structure in the acquisition of computational skills by seven- and eight-year-olds. The meaningful development-of-structure approach emphasized closure, commutativity, associativity, and the identity element of addition; the inverse relationship between addition and…

  13. Alu element-containing RNAs maintain nucleolar structure and function.

    PubMed

    Caudron-Herger, Maïwen; Pankert, Teresa; Seiler, Jeanette; Németh, Attila; Voit, Renate; Grummt, Ingrid; Rippe, Karsten

    2015-11-12

    Non-coding RNAs play a key role in organizing the nucleus into functional subcompartments. By combining fluorescence microscopy and RNA deep-sequencing-based analysis, we found that RNA polymerase II transcripts originating from intronic Alu elements (aluRNAs) were enriched in the nucleolus. Antisense-oligo-mediated depletion of aluRNAs or drug-induced inhibition of RNA polymerase II activity disrupted nucleolar structure and impaired RNA polymerase I-dependent transcription of rRNA genes. In contrast, overexpression of a prototypic aluRNA sequence increased both nucleolus size and levels of pre-rRNA, suggesting a functional link between aluRNA, nucleolus integrity and pre-rRNA synthesis. Furthermore, we show that aluRNAs interact with nucleolin and target ectopic genomic loci to the nucleolus. Our study suggests an aluRNA-based mechanism that links RNA polymerase I and II activities and modulates nucleolar structure and rRNA production.

  14. Ice cream structural elements that affect melting rate and hardness.

    PubMed

    Muse, M R; Hartel, R W

    2004-01-01

    Statistical models were developed to reveal which structural elements of ice cream affect melting rate and hardness. Ice creams were frozen in a batch freezer with three types of sweetener, three levels of the emulsifier polysorbate 80, and two different draw temperatures to produce ice creams with a range of microstructures. Ice cream mixes were analyzed for viscosity, and finished ice creams were analyzed for air cell and ice crystal size, overrun, and fat destabilization. The ice phase volume of each ice cream were calculated based on the freezing point of the mix. Melting rate and hardness of each hardened ice cream was measured and correlated with the structural attributes by using analysis of variance and multiple linear regression. Fat destabilization, ice crystal size, and the consistency coefficient of the mix were found to affect the melting rate of ice cream, whereas hardness was influenced by ice phase volume, ice crystal size, overrun, fat destabilization, and the rheological properties of the mix.

  15. Crystal structure of advanced lithium titanate with lithium oxide additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Tsuyoshi; Sasaki, Kazuya; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Hayashi, Kimio; Suzuki, Akihiro; Hashimoto, Takuya; Terai, Takayuki

    2009-04-01

    Li 2TiO 3 is one of the most promising candidates among solid breeder materials proposed for fusion reactors. However, the mass of Li 2TiO 3 was found to decrease with time in the sweep gas mixed with hydrogen. This mass change indicates that the oxygen content of the sample decreased, suggesting the change from Ti 4+ to Ti 3+. In the present paper, the crystal structure and the non-stoichiometry of Li 2TiO 3 added with Li 2O have been extensively investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetry. In the case of the Li 2TiO 3 samples used in the present study, LiO-C 2H 5 or LiO-i-C 3H 7 and Ti(O-i-C 3H 7) 4 were mixed in the proportion corresponding to the molar ratio Li 2O/TiO 2 of either 2.00 or 1.00. In thermogravimetry, the mass of this sample decreased with time due to lithium deficiency, where no presence of oxygen deficiency was indicated.

  16. Ab initio random structure search for 13-atom clusters of fcc elements.

    PubMed

    Chou, J P; Hsing, C R; Wei, C M; Cheng, C; Chang, C M

    2013-03-27

    The 13-atom metal clusters of fcc elements (Al, Rh, Ir, Ni, Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag, Au) were studied by density functional theory calculations. The global minima were searched for by the ab initio random structure searching method. In addition to some new lowest-energy structures for Pd13 and Au13, we found that the effective coordination numbers of the lowest-energy clusters would increase with the ratio of the dimer-to-bulk bond length. This correlation, together with the electronic structures of the lowest-energy clusters, divides the 13-atom clusters of these fcc elements into two groups (except for Au13, which prefers a two-dimensional structure due to the relativistic effect). Compact-like clusters that are composed exclusively of triangular motifs are preferred for elements without d-electrons (Al) or with (nearly) filled d-band electrons (Ni, Pd, Cu, Ag). Non-compact clusters composed mainly of square motifs connected by some triangular motifs (Rh, Ir, Pt) are favored for elements with unfilled d-band electrons.

  17. Structural and Functional Studies of the Promoter Element for Dengue Virus RNA Replication ▿

    PubMed Central

    Lodeiro, María F.; Filomatori, Claudia V.; Gamarnik, Andrea V.

    2009-01-01

    The 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR) of the dengue virus (DENV) genome contains two defined elements essential for viral replication. At the 5′ end, a large stem-loop (SLA) structure functions as the promoter for viral polymerase activity. Next to the SLA, there is a short stem-loop that contains a cyclization sequence known as the 5′ upstream AUG region (5′UAR). Here, we analyzed the secondary structure of the SLA in solution and the structural requirements of this element for viral replication. Using infectious DENV clones, viral replicons, and in vitro polymerase assays, we defined two helical regions, a side stem-loop, a top loop, and a U bulge within SLA as crucial elements for viral replication. The determinants for SLA-polymerase recognition were found to be common in different DENV serotypes. In addition, structural elements within the SLA required for DENV RNA replication were also conserved among different mosquito- and tick-borne flavivirus genomes, suggesting possible common strategies for polymerase-promoter recognition in flaviviruses. Furthermore, a conserved oligo(U) track present downstream of the SLA was found to modulate RNA synthesis in transfected cells. In vitro polymerase assays indicated that a sequence of at least 10 residues following the SLA, upstream of the 5′UAR, was necessary for efficient RNA synthesis using the viral 3′UTR as template. PMID:19004935

  18. Hybrid Residual Flexibility/Mass-Additive Method for Structural Dynamic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinker, M. L.

    2003-01-01

    A large fixture was designed and constructed for modal vibration testing of International Space Station elements. This fixed-base test fixture, which weighs thousands of pounds and is anchored to a massive concrete floor, initially utilized spherical bearings and pendulum mechanisms to simulate Shuttle orbiter boundary constraints for launch of the hardware. Many difficulties were encountered during a checkout test of the common module prototype structure, mainly due to undesirable friction and excessive clearances in the test-article-to-fixture interface bearings. Measured mode shapes and frequencies were not representative of orbiter-constrained modes due to the friction and clearance effects in the bearings. As a result, a major redesign effort for the interface mechanisms was undertaken. The total cost of the fixture design, construction and checkout, and redesign was over $2 million. Because of the problems experienced with fixed-base testing, alternative free-suspension methods were studied, including the residual flexibility and mass-additive approaches. Free-suspension structural dynamics test methods utilize soft elastic bungee cords and overhead frame suspension systems that are less complex and much less expensive than fixed-base systems. The cost of free-suspension fixturing is on the order of tens of thousands of dollars as opposed to millions, for large fixed-base fixturing. In addition, free-suspension test configurations are portable, allowing modal tests to be done at sites without modal test facilities. For example, a mass-additive modal test of the ASTRO-1 Shuttle payload was done at the Kennedy Space Center launch site. In this Technical Memorandum, the mass-additive and residual flexibility test methods are described in detail. A discussion of a hybrid approach that combines the best characteristics of each method follows and is the focus of the study.

  19. Element decoupling of 7T dipole body arrays by EBG metasurface structures: Experimental verification.

    PubMed

    Hurshkainen, Anna A; Derzhavskaya, Tatyana A; Glybovski, Stanislav B; Voogt, Ingmar J; Melchakova, Irina V; van den Berg, Cornelis A T; Raaijmakers, Alexander J E

    2016-08-01

    Metasurfaces are artificial electromagnetic boundaries or interfaces usually implemented as two-dimensional periodic structures with subwavelength periodicity and engineered properties of constituent unit cells. The electromagnetic bandgap (EBG) effect in metasurfaces prevents all surface modes from propagating in a certain frequency band. While metasurfaces provide a number of important applications in microwave antennas and antenna arrays, their features are also highly suitable for MRI applications. In this work we perform a proof-of-principle experiment to study finite structures based on mushroom-type EBG metasurfaces and employ them for suppression of inter-element coupling in dipole transceive array coils for body imaging at 7T. We firstly show experimentally that employment of mushroom structures leads to reduction of coupling between adjacent closely-spaced dipole antenna elements of a 7T transceive body array, which reduces scattering losses in neighboring channels. The studied setup consists of two active fractionated dipole antennas previously designed by the authors for body imaging at 7T. These are placed on top of a body-mimicking phantom and equipped with the manufactured finite-size periodic structure tuned to have EBG properties at the Larmor frequency of 298MHz. To improve the detection range of the B1+ field distribution of the top elements, four additional elements were positioned along the bottom side of the phantom. Bench measurements of a scattering matrix showed that coupling between the two top elements can be considerably reduced depending on the distance to the EBG structure. On the other hand, the measurements performed on a 7T MRI machine indicated redistribution of the B1+ field due to interaction between the dipoles with the structure. When the structure is located just over two closely spaced dipoles, one can reach a very high isolation improvement of -14dB accompanied by a strong field redistribution. In contrast, when put at a

  20. Element decoupling of 7 T dipole body arrays by EBG metasurface structures: Experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurshkainen, Anna A.; Derzhavskaya, Tatyana A.; Glybovski, Stanislav B.; Voogt, Ingmar J.; Melchakova, Irina V.; van den Berg, Cornelis A. T.; Raaijmakers, Alexander J. E.

    2016-08-01

    Metasurfaces are artificial electromagnetic boundaries or interfaces usually implemented as two-dimensional periodic structures with subwavelength periodicity and engineered properties of constituent unit cells. The electromagnetic bandgap (EBG) effect in metasurfaces prevents all surface modes from propagating in a certain frequency band. While metasurfaces provide a number of important applications in microwave antennas and antenna arrays, their features are also highly suitable for MRI applications. In this work we perform a proof-of-principle experiment to study finite structures based on mushroom-type EBG metasurfaces and employ them for suppression of inter-element coupling in dipole transceive array coils for body imaging at 7 T. We firstly show experimentally that employment of mushroom structures leads to reduction of coupling between adjacent closely-spaced dipole antenna elements of a 7 T transceive body array, which reduces scattering losses in neighboring channels. The studied setup consists of two active fractionated dipole antennas previously designed by the authors for body imaging at 7 T. These are placed on top of a body-mimicking phantom and equipped with the manufactured finite-size periodic structure tuned to have EBG properties at the Larmor frequency of 298 MHz. To improve the detection range of the B1 + field distribution of the top elements, four additional elements were positioned along the bottom side of the phantom. Bench measurements of a scattering matrix showed that coupling between the two top elements can be considerably reduced depending on the distance to the EBG structure. On the other hand, the measurements performed on a 7 T MRI machine indicated redistribution of the B1 + field due to interaction between the dipoles with the structure. When the structure is located just over two closely spaced dipoles, one can reach a very high isolation improvement of -14 dB accompanied by a strong field redistribution. In contrast, when put

  1. Element decoupling of 7T dipole body arrays by EBG metasurface structures: Experimental verification.

    PubMed

    Hurshkainen, Anna A; Derzhavskaya, Tatyana A; Glybovski, Stanislav B; Voogt, Ingmar J; Melchakova, Irina V; van den Berg, Cornelis A T; Raaijmakers, Alexander J E

    2016-08-01

    Metasurfaces are artificial electromagnetic boundaries or interfaces usually implemented as two-dimensional periodic structures with subwavelength periodicity and engineered properties of constituent unit cells. The electromagnetic bandgap (EBG) effect in metasurfaces prevents all surface modes from propagating in a certain frequency band. While metasurfaces provide a number of important applications in microwave antennas and antenna arrays, their features are also highly suitable for MRI applications. In this work we perform a proof-of-principle experiment to study finite structures based on mushroom-type EBG metasurfaces and employ them for suppression of inter-element coupling in dipole transceive array coils for body imaging at 7T. We firstly show experimentally that employment of mushroom structures leads to reduction of coupling between adjacent closely-spaced dipole antenna elements of a 7T transceive body array, which reduces scattering losses in neighboring channels. The studied setup consists of two active fractionated dipole antennas previously designed by the authors for body imaging at 7T. These are placed on top of a body-mimicking phantom and equipped with the manufactured finite-size periodic structure tuned to have EBG properties at the Larmor frequency of 298MHz. To improve the detection range of the B1+ field distribution of the top elements, four additional elements were positioned along the bottom side of the phantom. Bench measurements of a scattering matrix showed that coupling between the two top elements can be considerably reduced depending on the distance to the EBG structure. On the other hand, the measurements performed on a 7T MRI machine indicated redistribution of the B1+ field due to interaction between the dipoles with the structure. When the structure is located just over two closely spaced dipoles, one can reach a very high isolation improvement of -14dB accompanied by a strong field redistribution. In contrast, when put at a

  2. Displacement measurements in structural elements by optical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Peña, Rolando; Cibrián-Ortiz de Anda, Rosa María.; Pino-Velazquez, Angel J.; Soler-de la Cruz, José; González-Jorge, Yhoama

    2000-08-01

    Speckle metrology and holographic interferometry (HI) have been used in several civil engineering applications. We present the results obtained by applying speckle photography (SP) to the study of two quadratic shearwalls with different boundary conditions, and the potential of the technique in the study of this kind of structures is described. The analysis of Young's fringes obtained with this technique at certain points on each shearwall provides the whole field of displacement measurements. HI has been used to measure the three components of absolute displacement, verifying that the bulging phenomenon does not affect the in-plane components when the applied load remains on the same plane as the shearwall. A qualitative analysis is carried out following an electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) technique. The results obtained by optical techniques are compared to the numerical results obtained by the finite element method (FEM), finding good correlation between them in all the cases.

  3. Nonlinear analysis of structures. [within framework of finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armen, H., Jr.; Levine, H.; Pifko, A.; Levy, A.

    1974-01-01

    The development of nonlinear analysis techniques within the framework of the finite-element method is reported. Although the emphasis is concerned with those nonlinearities associated with material behavior, a general treatment of geometric nonlinearity, alone or in combination with plasticity is included, and applications presented for a class of problems categorized as axisymmetric shells of revolution. The scope of the nonlinear analysis capabilities includes: (1) a membrane stress analysis, (2) bending and membrane stress analysis, (3) analysis of thick and thin axisymmetric bodies of revolution, (4) a general three dimensional analysis, and (5) analysis of laminated composites. Applications of the methods are made to a number of sample structures. Correlation with available analytic or experimental data range from good to excellent.

  4. [Error structure and additivity of individual tree biomass model for four natural conifer species in Northeast China].

    PubMed

    Dogn, Li-hu; Li, Feng-ri; Song, Yu-wen

    2015-03-01

    Based on the biomass data of 276 sampling trees of Pinus koraiensis, Abies nephrolepis, Picea koraiensis and Larix gmelinii, the mono-element and dual-element additive system of biomass equations for the four conifer species was developed. The model error structure (additive vs. multiplicative) of the allometric equation was evaluated using the likelihood analysis, while nonlinear seemly unrelated regression was used to estimate the parameters in the additive system of biomass equations. The results indicated that the assumption of multiplicative error structure was strongly supported for the biomass equations of total and tree components for the four conifer species. Thus, the additive system of log-transformed biomass equations was developed. The adjusted coefficient of determination (Ra 2) of the additive system of biomass equations for the four conifer species was 0.85-0.99, the mean relative error was between -7.7% and 5.5%, and the mean absolute relative error was less than 30.5%. Adding total tree height in the additive systems of biomass equations could significantly improve model fitting performance and predicting precision, and the biomass equations of total, aboveground and stem were better than biomass equations of root, branch, foliage and crown. The precision of each biomass equation in the additive system varied from 77.0% to 99.7% with a mean value of 92.3% that would be suitable for predicting the biomass of the four natural conifer species.

  5. Effects of trace element addition on process stability during anaerobic co-digestion of OFMSW and slaughterhouse waste.

    PubMed

    Moestedt, J; Nordell, E; Shakeri Yekta, S; Lundgren, J; Martí, M; Sundberg, C; Ejlertsson, J; Svensson, B H; Björn, A

    2016-01-01

    This study used semi-continuous laboratory scale biogas reactors to simulate the effects of trace-element addition in different combinations, while degrading the organic fraction of municipal solid waste and slaughterhouse waste. The results show that the combined addition of Fe, Co and Ni was superior to the addition of only Fe, Fe and Co or Fe and Ni. However, the addition of only Fe resulted in a more stable process than the combined addition of Fe and Co, perhaps indicating a too efficient acidogenesis and/or homoacetogenesis in relation to a Ni-deprived methanogenic population. The results were observed in terms of higher biogas production (+9%), biogas production rates (+35%) and reduced VFA concentration for combined addition compared to only Fe and Ni. The higher stability was supported by observations of differences in viscosity, intraday VFA- and biogas kinetics as well as by the 16S rRNA gene and 16S rRNA of the methanogens.

  6. Structural and ferromagnetic properties of an orthorhombic phase of MnBi stabilized with Rh additions

    DOE PAGES

    Taufour, Valentin; Thimmaiah, Srinivasa; March, Stephen; Saunders, Scott; Sun, Kewei; Lamichhane, Tej Nath; Kramer, Matthew J.; Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-28

    The article addresses the possibility of alloy elements in MnBi which may modify the thermodynamic stability of the NiAs-type structure without significantly degrading the magnetic properties. The addition of small amounts of Rh and Mn provides an improvement in the thermal stability with some degradation of the magnetic properties. The small amounts of Rh and Mn additions in MnBi stabilize an orthorhombic phase whose structural and magnetic properties are closely related to the ones of the previously reported high-temperature phase of MnBi (HT MnBi). The properties of the HT MnBi, which is stable between 613 and 719 K, have notmore » been studied in detail because of its transformation to the stable low-temperature MnBi (LT MnBi), making measurements near and below its Curie temperature difficult. The Rh-stabilized MnBi with chemical formula Mn1.0625–xRhxBi [x=0.02(1)] adopts a new superstructure of the NiAs/Ni2In structure family. It is ferromagnetic below a Curie temperature of 416 K. The critical exponents of the ferromagnetic transition are not of the mean-field type but are closer to those associated with the Ising model in three dimensions. The magnetic anisotropy is uniaxial; the anisotropy energy is rather large, and it does not increase when raising the temperature, contrary to what happens in LT MnBi. The saturation magnetization is approximately 3μB/f.u. at low temperatures. Thus, while this exact composition may not be application ready, it does show that alloying is a viable route to modifying the stability of this class of rare-earth-free magnet alloys.« less

  7. Structural and ferromagnetic properties of an orthorhombic phase of MnBi stabilized with Rh additions

    SciTech Connect

    Taufour, Valentin; Thimmaiah, Srinivasa; March, Stephen; Saunders, Scott; Sun, Kewei; Lamichhane, Tej Nath; Kramer, Matthew J.; Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-28

    The article addresses the possibility of alloy elements in MnBi which may modify the thermodynamic stability of the NiAs-type structure without significantly degrading the magnetic properties. The addition of small amounts of Rh and Mn provides an improvement in the thermal stability with some degradation of the magnetic properties. The small amounts of Rh and Mn additions in MnBi stabilize an orthorhombic phase whose structural and magnetic properties are closely related to the ones of the previously reported high-temperature phase of MnBi (HT MnBi). The properties of the HT MnBi, which is stable between 613 and 719 K, have not been studied in detail because of its transformation to the stable low-temperature MnBi (LT MnBi), making measurements near and below its Curie temperature difficult. The Rh-stabilized MnBi with chemical formula Mn1.0625–xRhxBi [x=0.02(1)] adopts a new superstructure of the NiAs/Ni2In structure family. It is ferromagnetic below a Curie temperature of 416 K. The critical exponents of the ferromagnetic transition are not of the mean-field type but are closer to those associated with the Ising model in three dimensions. The magnetic anisotropy is uniaxial; the anisotropy energy is rather large, and it does not increase when raising the temperature, contrary to what happens in LT MnBi. The saturation magnetization is approximately 3μB/f.u. at low temperatures. Thus, while this exact composition may not be application ready, it does show that alloying is a viable route to modifying the stability of this class of rare-earth-free magnet alloys.

  8. Influence of Finite Element Size in Residual Strength Prediction of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satyanarayana, Arunkumar; Bogert, Philip B.; Karayev, Kazbek Z.; Nordman, Paul S.; Razi, Hamid

    2012-01-01

    The sensitivity of failure load to the element size used in a progressive failure analysis (PFA) of carbon composite center notched laminates is evaluated. The sensitivity study employs a PFA methodology previously developed by the authors consisting of Hashin-Rotem intra-laminar fiber and matrix failure criteria and a complete stress degradation scheme for damage simulation. The approach is implemented with a user defined subroutine in the ABAQUS/Explicit finite element package. The effect of element size near the notch tips on residual strength predictions was assessed for a brittle failure mode with a parametric study that included three laminates of varying material system, thickness and stacking sequence. The study resulted in the selection of an element size of 0.09 in. X 0.09 in., which was later used for predicting crack paths and failure loads in sandwich panels and monolithic laminated panels. Comparison of predicted crack paths and failure loads for these panels agreed well with experimental observations. Additionally, the element size vs. normalized failure load relationship, determined in the parametric study, was used to evaluate strength-scaling factors for three different element sizes. The failure loads predicted with all three element sizes provided converged failure loads with respect to that corresponding with the 0.09 in. X 0.09 in. element size. Though preliminary in nature, the strength-scaling concept has the potential to greatly reduce the computational time required for PFA and can enable the analysis of large scale structural components where failure is dominated by fiber failure in tension.

  9. Finite element-finite difference thermal/structural analysis of large space truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Andrew H.; Arelt, Joseph E.; Eskew, William F.; Rogers, Karen M.

    1992-01-01

    A technique of automated and efficient thermal-structural processing of truss structures that interfaces the finite element and finite difference method was developed. The thermal-structural analysis tasks include development of the thermal and structural math models, thermal analysis, development of an interface and data transfer between the models, and finally an evaluation of the thermal stresses and displacements in the structure. Consequently, the objective of the developed technique was to minimize the model development time, in order to assure an automatic transfer of data between the thermal and structural models as well as to minimize the computer resources needed for the analysis itself. The method and techniques described are illustrated on the thermal/structural analysis of the Space Station Freedom main truss.

  10. Structural Variation of Alu Element and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Songmi; Cho, Chun-Sung; Han, Kyudong

    2016-01-01

    Transposable elements are one of major sources to cause genomic instability through various mechanisms including de novo insertion, insertion-mediated genomic deletion, and recombination-associated genomic deletion. Among them is Alu element which is the most abundant element, composing ~10% of the human genome. The element emerged in the primate genome 65 million years ago and has since propagated successfully in the human and non-human primate genomes. Alu element is a non-autonomous retrotransposon and therefore retrotransposed using L1-enzyme machinery. The 'master gene' model has been generally accepted to explain Alu element amplification in primate genomes. According to the model, different subfamilies of Alu elements are created by mutations on the master gene and most Alu elements are amplified from the hyperactive master genes. Alu element is frequently involved in genomic rearrangements in the human genome due to its abundance and sequence identity between them. The genomic rearrangements caused by Alu elements could lead to genetic disorders such as hereditary disease, blood disorder, and neurological disorder. In fact, Alu elements are associated with approximately 0.1% of human genetic disorders. The first part of this review discusses mechanisms of Alu amplification and diversity among different Alu subfamilies. The second part discusses the particular role of Alu elements in generating genomic rearrangements as well as human genetic disorders. PMID:27729835

  11. A New Axi-Symmetric Element for Thin Walled Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, Rui P. R.; Yoon, Jeong Whan; Dick, Robert E.

    2010-06-01

    A new axi-symmetric finite element for sheet metal forming applications is presented in this work. It uses the solid-shell element's concept with only a single element layer and multiple integration points along the thickness direction. The cross section of the element is composed of four nodes with two degrees of freedom each. The proposed formulation overcomes major locking pathologies including transverse shear locking, Poisson's locking and volumetric locking. Some examples are shown to demonstrate the performance and accuracy of the proposed element with special focus on the numerical simulations for the beverage can industry.

  12. Effect of non-structural elements on the dynamic behaviour of moment-resisting framed structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlo Ponzo, Felice; Ditommaso, Rocco; Auletta, Gianluca

    2015-04-01

    Effects of earthquakes on building structures have studied from many researchers on the recent scientific and technique literature. The phenomenon is clear: inertia forces are governed from structural and non-structural stiffness and masses. The distribution of seismic lateral loads and their magnitude are strongly correlated to the fundamental period of the structure. Therefore, an accurate evaluation of the fundamental period is a crucial aspect for both static and dynamic seismic analyses. In fact, the fundamental period determines the global seismic demand through the spectral acceleration directly evaluated from the linear and/or nonlinear acceleration response spectra (provided from codes or derived from detailed analyses of site effects). Recent earthquakes highlighted the significant effects derived from the interaction between structural and non-structural elements on the main dynamic parameters of a structure and on the lateral distribution of the inertial forces. Usually, non-structural elements acts together with the structural elements, adding both masses and stiffness. Using numerical and experimental campaigns, many researchers have studied the effects of infill walls on the dynamic behaviour of buildings and several simplified models have been proposed to take into account the presence of non-structural elements within linear and nonlinear numerical models. As example, Kliner and Bertero tested a 1/3 scaled structure (moment-resisting infilled frame model) and determine its behaviour during earthquakes. They found that the infills increased the stiffness of the frame in about 5 times. Consequently, in these cases the fundamental period reduces and the inertia forces generally increases. Meharabi et al. tested a 6-storey, three bay, reinforced concrete moment resisting frame, designed according to the provision of UBC-91, and they shown that the lateral force resistance of an infilled frame was higher than that of bare frame. It was concluded that a

  13. Organization of the Rosy Locus in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER: Further Evidence in Support of a CIS-Acting Control Element Adjacent to the Xanthine Dehydrogenase Structural Element

    PubMed Central

    McCarron, M.; O'Donnell, J.; Chovnick, A.; Bhullar, B. S.; Hewitt, J.; Candido, E. P. M.

    1979-01-01

    The present report summarizes our recent progress in the genetic dissection of an elementary genetic unit in a higher organism, the rosy locus (ry:3–52.0) in Drosophila melanogaster. Pursuing the hypothesis that the rosy locus includes a noncoding control region, as well as a structural element coding for the xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) peptide, experiments are described that characterize and map a rosy locus variant associated with much lower than normal levels of XDH activity. Experiments are described that fail to relate this phenotype to alteration in the structure of the XDH peptide, but clearly associate this character with variation in number of molecules of XDH per fly. Large-scale fine-structure recombination experiments locate the genetic basis for this variation in the number of molecules of XDH per fly to a site immediately to the left of the XDH structural element within a region previously designated as the XDH control element. Moreover, experiments clearly separate this "underproducer" variant site from a previously described "overproducer" site within the control region. Examination of enzyme activity in electrophoretic gels of appropriate heterozygous genotypes demonstrates the cis-acting nature of this variation in the number of molecules of XDH. A revision of the map of the rosy locus, structural and control elements is presented in light of the additional mapping data now available. PMID:109351

  14. Three dimensional stereolithography models of cancellous bone structures from muCT data: testing and validation of finite element results.

    PubMed

    Dobson, C A; Sisias, G; Phillips, R; Fagan, M J; Langton, C M

    2006-04-01

    Stereolithography (STL) models of complex cancellous bone structures have been produced from three-dimensional micro-computed tomography data sets of human cancellous bone histological samples from four skeletal sites. The STL models have been mechanically tested and the derived stiffness compared with that predicted by finite element analysis. The results show a strong correlation (R2 = 0.941) between the predicted and calculated stiffnesses of the structures and show promise for the use of STL as an additional technique to complement the use of finite element models, for the assessment of the mechanical properties of complex cancellous bone structures.

  15. Finite element modeling of multilayered structures of fish scales.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Mei Qiang; Allison, Paul G; Rodriguez, Rogie I; Moser, Robert D; Kennedy, Alan J

    2014-12-01

    The interlinked fish scales of Atractosteus spatula (alligator gar) and Polypterus senegalus (gray and albino bichir) are effective multilayered armor systems for protecting fish from threats such as aggressive conspecific interactions or predation. Both types of fish scales have multi-layered structures with a harder and stiffer outer layer, and softer and more compliant inner layers. However, there are differences in relative layer thickness, property mismatch between layers, the property gradations and nanostructures in each layer. The fracture paths and patterns of both scales under microindentation loads were different. In this work, finite element models of fish scales of A. spatula and P. senegalus were built to investigate the mechanics of their multi-layered structures under penetration loads. The models simulate a rigid microindenter penetrating the fish scales quasi-statically to understand the observed experimental results. Study results indicate that the different fracture patterns and crack paths observed in the experiments were related to the different stress fields caused by the differences in layer thickness, and spatial distribution of the elastic and plastic properties in the layers, and the differences in interface properties. The parametric studies and experimental results suggest that smaller fish such as P. senegalus may have adopted a thinner outer layer for light-weighting and improved mobility, and meanwhile adopted higher strength and higher modulus at the outer layer, and stronger interface properties to prevent ring cracking and interface cracking, and larger fish such as A. spatula and Arapaima gigas have lower strength and lower modulus at the outer layers and weaker interface properties, but have adopted thicker outer layers to provide adequate protection against ring cracking and interface cracking, possibly because weight is less of a concern relative to the smaller fish such as P. senegalus. PMID:25300062

  16. Finite element modeling of multilayered structures of fish scales.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Mei Qiang; Allison, Paul G; Rodriguez, Rogie I; Moser, Robert D; Kennedy, Alan J

    2014-12-01

    The interlinked fish scales of Atractosteus spatula (alligator gar) and Polypterus senegalus (gray and albino bichir) are effective multilayered armor systems for protecting fish from threats such as aggressive conspecific interactions or predation. Both types of fish scales have multi-layered structures with a harder and stiffer outer layer, and softer and more compliant inner layers. However, there are differences in relative layer thickness, property mismatch between layers, the property gradations and nanostructures in each layer. The fracture paths and patterns of both scales under microindentation loads were different. In this work, finite element models of fish scales of A. spatula and P. senegalus were built to investigate the mechanics of their multi-layered structures under penetration loads. The models simulate a rigid microindenter penetrating the fish scales quasi-statically to understand the observed experimental results. Study results indicate that the different fracture patterns and crack paths observed in the experiments were related to the different stress fields caused by the differences in layer thickness, and spatial distribution of the elastic and plastic properties in the layers, and the differences in interface properties. The parametric studies and experimental results suggest that smaller fish such as P. senegalus may have adopted a thinner outer layer for light-weighting and improved mobility, and meanwhile adopted higher strength and higher modulus at the outer layer, and stronger interface properties to prevent ring cracking and interface cracking, and larger fish such as A. spatula and Arapaima gigas have lower strength and lower modulus at the outer layers and weaker interface properties, but have adopted thicker outer layers to provide adequate protection against ring cracking and interface cracking, possibly because weight is less of a concern relative to the smaller fish such as P. senegalus.

  17. Finite Elements in Ab Initio Electronic-Structure Calulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pask, J. E.; Sterne, P. A.

    Over the course of the past two decades, the density functional theory (DFT) (see e.g., [1]) of Hohenberg, Kohn, and Sham has proven to be an accurate and reliable basis for the understanding and prediction of a wide range of materials properties from first principles (ab initio), with no experimental input or empirical parameters. However, the solution of the Kohn-Sham equations of DFT is a formidable task and this has limited the range of physical systems which can be investigated by such rigorous, quantum mechanical means. In order to extend the interpretive and predictive power of such quantum mechanical theories further into the domain of "real materials", involving nonstoichiometric deviations, defects, grain boundaries, surfaces, interfaces, and the like; robust and efficient methods for the solution of the associated quantum mechanical equations are critical. The finite-element (FE) method (see e.g., [2]) is a general method for the solution of partial differential and integral equations which has found wide application in diverse fields ranging from particle physics to civil engineering. Here, we discuss its application to large-scale ab initio electronic-structure calculations.

  18. Parallel Finite Element Domain Decomposition for Structural/Acoustic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Duc T.; Tungkahotara, Siroj; Watson, Willie R.; Rajan, Subramaniam D.

    2005-01-01

    A domain decomposition (DD) formulation for solving sparse linear systems of equations resulting from finite element analysis is presented. The formulation incorporates mixed direct and iterative equation solving strategics and other novel algorithmic ideas that are optimized to take advantage of sparsity and exploit modern computer architecture, such as memory and parallel computing. The most time consuming part of the formulation is identified and the critical roles of direct sparse and iterative solvers within the framework of the formulation are discussed. Experiments on several computer platforms using several complex test matrices are conducted using software based on the formulation. Small-scale structural examples are used to validate thc steps in the formulation and large-scale (l,000,000+ unknowns) duct acoustic examples are used to evaluate the ORIGIN 2000 processors, and a duster of 6 PCs (running under the Windows environment). Statistics show that the formulation is efficient in both sequential and parallel computing environmental and that the formulation is significantly faster and consumes less memory than that based on one of the best available commercialized parallel sparse solvers.

  19. Slave finite elements for nonlinear analysis of engine structures, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gellin, S.

    1991-01-01

    A 336 degrees of freedom slave finite element processing capability to analyze engine structures under severe thermomechanical loading is presented. Description of the theoretical development and demonstration of that element is presented in this volume.

  20. A finite element formulation for scattering from electrically large 2-dimensional structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Daniel C.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    A finite element formulation is given using the scattered field approach with a fictitious material absorber to truncate the mesh. The formulation includes the use of arbitrary approximation functions so that more accurate results can be achieved without any modification to the software. Additionally, non-polynomial approximation functions can be used, including complex approximation functions. The banded system that results is solved with an efficient sparse/banded iterative scheme and as a consequence, large structures can be analyzed. Results are given for simple cases to verify the formulation and also for large, complex geometries.

  1. Structure of a conjugative element in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayakumar, M.N.; Priebe, S.D.; Guild, W.R.

    1986-06-01

    The authors have cloned and mapped a 69-kilobase (kb) region of the chromosome of Streptococcus pneumoniae DP1322, which carries the conjugative Omega(cat-tet) insertion from S. pneumoniae BM6001. This element proved to be 65.5 kb in size. Location of the junctions was facilitated by cloning a preferred target region from the wild-type strain Rx1 recipient genome. This target site was preferred by both the BM6001 element and the cat-erm-tet element from Streptococcus agalactiae B109. Within the BM6001 element cat and tet were separated by 30 kb, and cat was flanked by two copies of a sequence that was also present in the recipient strain Rx1 DNA. Another sequence at least 2.4 kb in size was found inside the BM6001 element and at two places in the Rx1 genome. Its role is unknown. The ends of the BM6001 element appear to be the same as those of the B109 element, both as seen after transfer to S. pneumoniae and as mapped by others in pDP5 after transposition in Streptococcus faecalis. No homology is seen between the ends of the BM6001 element and no evidence found suggesting that it ever circularizes.

  2. Ulysses transposable element of Drosophila shows high structural similarities to functional domains of retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Evgen'ev, M B; Corces, V G; Lankenau, D H

    1992-06-01

    We have determined the DNA structure of the Ulysses transposable element of Drosophila virilis and found that this transposon is 10,653 bp and is flanked by two unusually large direct repeats 2136 bp long. Ulysses shows the characteristic organization of LTR-containing retrotransposons, with matrix and capsid protein domains encoded in the first open reading frame. In addition, Ulysses contains protease, reverse transcriptase, RNase H and integrase domains encoded in the second open reading frame. Ulysses lacks a third open reading frame present in some retrotransposons that could encode an env-like protein. A dendrogram analysis based on multiple alignments of the protease, reverse transcriptase, RNase H, integrase and tRNA primer binding site of all known Drosophila LTR-containing retrotransposon sequences establishes a phylogenetic relationship of Ulysses to other retrotransposons and suggests that Ulysses belongs to a new family of this type of elements.

  3. Effects of heavy-element settling on solar neutrino fluxes and interior structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proffitt, Charles R.

    1994-01-01

    We consider the effects of gravitational settling of both He and heavier elements on the predicted solar neutrino fluxes and interior sound speed and density profiles. We find that while the structural changes that result from the inclusion of both He and heavy-element settling are only slightly larger than the changes resulting from the inclusion of He settling alone, the additional increases in expected neutrino fluxes are of comparable size. Our preferred model with both He and heavy-element settling has neutrino count rates of 9.0 SNU for Cl-37 detectors and 137 SNU for Ga-71 detectors, as compared to 7.1 and 127 SNU for a comparable model without any diffusive separation, or 8.0 and 132 SNU for a model that includes He settling alone. We suggest that the correction factors by which the predicted neutrino fluxes of solar models calculated without including the effects of diffusion should be multiplied are 1.25 +/- 0.08 for Cl detectors, 1.07 +/- 0.02 for Ga detectors, and 1.28 +/- 0.09 for the B-8 flux (1 sigma errors). Comparison of internal sound speed and density profiles strongly suggests that the additional changes in calculated p-mode oscillation frequencies due to the inclusion of heavy-element settling will be small compared to the changes that result from He settling alone, especially for the higher degree modes. All models with diffusive separation give much better agreement with the observed depth of the convection zone than do nondiffusive models. The model that includes both He and heavy-element settling requires an initial He mass fraction Y = 0.280 and has a surface He abundance of Y = 0.251 at the solar age.

  4. A Taylor-Galerkin finite element algorithm for transient nonlinear thermal-structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Earl A.; Dechaumphai, Pramote

    1985-01-01

    A Taylor-Galerkin finite element solution algorithm for transient nonlinear thermal-structural analysis of large, complex structural problems subjected to rapidly applied thermal-structural loads is described. The two-step Taylor-Galerkin algorithm is an application of an algorithm recently developed for problems in compressible fluid dynamics. The element integrals that appear in the algorithm can be evaluated in closed form for two and three dimensional elements.

  5. The structure of the human peripherin gene (PRPH) and identification of potential regulatory elements

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, J.; Ley, C.A.; Parysek, L.M.

    1994-07-15

    The authors determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the coding region of the human peripherin gene (PRPH), as well as 742 bp 5{prime} to the cap site and 584 bp 3{prime} to the stop codon, and compared its structure and sequence to the rat and mouse genes. The overall structure of 9 exons separated by 8 introns is conserved among these three mammalian species. The nucleotide sequences of the human peripherin gene exons were 90% identical to the rat gene sequences, and the predicted human peripherin protein differed from rat peripherin at only 18 of 475 amino acid residues. Comparison of the 5{prime} flanking regions of the human peripherin gene and rodent genes revealed extensive areas of high homology. Additional conserved segments were found in introns 1 and 2. Within the 5{prime} region, potential regulatory sequences, including a nerve growth factor negative regulatory element, a Hox protein binding site, and a heat shock element, were identified in all peripherin genes. The positional conservation of each element suggests that they may be important in the tissue-specific, developmental-specific, and injury-specific expression of the peripherin gene. 24 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. A solid-shell Cosserat point element ( SSCPE) for elastic thin structures at finite deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabareen, Mahmood; Mtanes, Eli

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a new solid-shell element using the Cosserat point theory for modeling thin elastic structures at finite deformations. The point-wise Green-Lagrange strain tensor is additively decomposed into homogeneous and inhomogeneous parts. Only the latter part of the strain tensor is modified by the assumed natural strain ANS concept to avoid both curvature-thickness locking and transverse shear locking. To the authors' knowledge, such modification has not been applied yet in the literature, and here it is referred to as the assumed natural inhomogeneous strain ANIS concept. Moreover, a new methodology for determining the constitutive coefficients of the strain energy function, which controls the inhomogeneous deformations, is proposed. The resulting coefficients ensure both accuracy, robustness, and elimination of all locking pathologies in the solid-shell Cosserat point element ( SSCPE). The performance of the developed SSCPE is verified and tested via various benchmark problems and compared to other solid, shell, and solid-shell elements. These examples demonstrate that the SSCPE is accurate, robust, stable, free of locking, and can be used for modeling thin structures at both small and finite deformations.

  7. Genomic and structural organization of Drosophila melanogaster G elements.

    PubMed Central

    Di Nocera, P P; Graziani, F; Lavorgna, G

    1986-01-01

    The properties and the genomic organization of G elements, a moderately repeated DNA family of D. melanogaster, are reported. G elements lack terminal repeats, generate target site duplications at the point of insertion and exhibit at one end a stretch of A residues of variable length. In a large number of recombinant clones analyzed G elements occur in tandem arrays, interspersed with specific ribosomal DNA (rDNA) segments. This arrangement results from the insertion of members of the G family within the nontranscribed spacer (NTS) of rDNA units. Similarity of the site of integration of G elements to that of ribosomal DNA insertions suggests that distinct DNA sequences might have been inserted into rDNA through a partly common pathway. Images PMID:3003691

  8. Interaction of characteristic structural elements of persimmon tannin with Chinese cobra PLA2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Zhong, Li; Zhou, Bin; Chen, Jin-yu; Li, Chun-mei

    2013-11-01

    To more fully understand the mechanism by which persimmon tannin (PT) inhibited phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and the structural requirements of PT for the inhibition, the interactions between PLA2 and seven characteristic structural elements of PT including epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), myricetin, epicatechin-3-gallate (ECG), epicatechin-3-gallate-(4β → 8, 2β → O → 7)-epicatechin-3-gallate (A-type ECG dimer), epigallocatechin-3-gallate-(4β → 8, 2β → O → 7)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (A-type EGCG dimer), epicatechin-(4β → 8, 2β → O → 7)-epicatechin (A-type EC dimer) and epicatechin-(4β → 8)-epicatechin (B-type EC dimer) were studied by enzymatic and spectroscopic methods. Molecular docking was also used to explore the possible residues involved in the interactions. The results revealed that A-type EGCG dimer and A-type ECG dimer showed higher inhibitory effects on the catalytic activity of PLA2 than monomers and B-type dimer. They induced greater conformational changes in PLA2 than other structural elements. In addition, molecular docking studies revealed that expect for lysine residues, other residues such as Trp18, Try27, Gly29, His47 and Tyr63 were involved in the interactions. We propose that A-type EGCG and ECG dimer units may be structural requirements for the interaction between PT and PLA2. Our data provide an additional structural basis for anti-PLA2 activity of persimmon tannin.

  9. Can the Isolated-Elements Strategy Be Improved by Targeting Points of High Cognitive Load for Additional Practice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayres, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Reducing problem complexity by isolating elements has been shown to be an effective instructional strategy. Novices, in particular, benefit from learning from worked examples that contain partially interacting elements rather than worked examples that provide full interacting elements. This study investigated whether the isolating-elements…

  10. Three new crystal structures in the Na-Pb system: solving structures without additional experimental input.

    PubMed

    Ward, Logan; Michel, Kyle; Wolverton, Chris

    2015-09-01

    The structures of three Na-Pb compounds, γ, δ and δ', have remained incompletely solved for nearly 60 years. The space group, lattice parameters and positions of the Pb atoms of these three structures have been determined, but the positions of the Na atoms are still unknown. In this work, the First-Principles Assisted Structure Solution (FPASS) method [Meredig & Wolverton (2013). Nat. Mater. 12, 123-127] has been used to complete the description of these three structures using only experimental information available from the literature as input. The paper also discusses the relative advantages of constrained crystal structure prediction tools, like FPASS, in comparison to conventional crystal structure prediction methods in reference to their abilities to complete the solution of other unsolved structures. PMID:26317197

  11. Formation and finite element analysis of tethered bilayer lipid structures.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Kwang Joo; Valincius, Gintaras; Liao, Wei-Ching; Hu, Xin; Wen, Xuejin; Lee, Andrew; Yu, Bo; Vanderah, David J; Lu, Wu; Lee, L James

    2010-12-01

    Rapid solvent exchange of an ethanolic solution of diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPhyPC) in the presence of a mixed self-assembled monolayer (SAM) [thiolipid/β-mercaptoethanol (βME) (3/7 mol/mol) on Au] shows a transition from densely packed tethered bilayer lipid membranes [(dp)tBLMs], to loosely packed tethered bilayer lipid membranes [(lp)tBLMs], and tethered bilayer liposome nanoparticles (tBLNs) with decreasing DPhyPC concentration. The tethered lipidic constructs in the aqueous medium were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Finite element analysis (FEA) was applied to interpret spectral EIS features without referring to equivalent circuit modeling. Using structural data obtained earlier from neutron reflectometry and dielectric constants of lipid bilayers, we reproduced experimentally observed features of the electrochemical impedance (EI) spectra of complex surface constructs involving small pinhole defects, large membrane-free patches, and bound liposomes. We demonstrated by FEA that highly insulating (dp)tBLMs with low-defect density exhibit EI spectra in the shape of a perfect semicircle with or without low-frequency upward "tails" in the Cole-Cole representation. Such EI spectra were observed at DPhyPC concentrations of >5 × 10(-3) mol L(-1). While AFM was not able to visualize very small lateral defects in such films, EI spectra unambiguously signaled their presence by increased low frequency "tails". Using FEA we demonstrate that films with large diameter visible defects (>25 nm by AFM) produce EI spectral features consisting of two semicircles of comparable size. Such films were typically obtained at DPhyPC concentrations of <5 × 10(-3) mol L(-1). At DPhyPC concentrations of <1.0 × 10(-3) mol L(-1) the planar bilayer structures were replaced by ellipsoidal liposomes with diameters ranging from 50 to 500 nm as observed in AFM images. Despite the distinct surface morphology change, the EI

  12. Formation and finite element analysis of tethered bilayer lipid structures.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Kwang Joo; Valincius, Gintaras; Liao, Wei-Ching; Hu, Xin; Wen, Xuejin; Lee, Andrew; Yu, Bo; Vanderah, David J; Lu, Wu; Lee, L James

    2010-12-01

    Rapid solvent exchange of an ethanolic solution of diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPhyPC) in the presence of a mixed self-assembled monolayer (SAM) [thiolipid/β-mercaptoethanol (βME) (3/7 mol/mol) on Au] shows a transition from densely packed tethered bilayer lipid membranes [(dp)tBLMs], to loosely packed tethered bilayer lipid membranes [(lp)tBLMs], and tethered bilayer liposome nanoparticles (tBLNs) with decreasing DPhyPC concentration. The tethered lipidic constructs in the aqueous medium were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Finite element analysis (FEA) was applied to interpret spectral EIS features without referring to equivalent circuit modeling. Using structural data obtained earlier from neutron reflectometry and dielectric constants of lipid bilayers, we reproduced experimentally observed features of the electrochemical impedance (EI) spectra of complex surface constructs involving small pinhole defects, large membrane-free patches, and bound liposomes. We demonstrated by FEA that highly insulating (dp)tBLMs with low-defect density exhibit EI spectra in the shape of a perfect semicircle with or without low-frequency upward "tails" in the Cole-Cole representation. Such EI spectra were observed at DPhyPC concentrations of >5 × 10(-3) mol L(-1). While AFM was not able to visualize very small lateral defects in such films, EI spectra unambiguously signaled their presence by increased low frequency "tails". Using FEA we demonstrate that films with large diameter visible defects (>25 nm by AFM) produce EI spectral features consisting of two semicircles of comparable size. Such films were typically obtained at DPhyPC concentrations of <5 × 10(-3) mol L(-1). At DPhyPC concentrations of <1.0 × 10(-3) mol L(-1) the planar bilayer structures were replaced by ellipsoidal liposomes with diameters ranging from 50 to 500 nm as observed in AFM images. Despite the distinct surface morphology change, the EI

  13. The Least Squares Stochastic Finite Element Method in Structural Stability Analysis of Steel Skeletal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiński, M.; Szafran, J.

    2015-05-01

    The main purpose of this work is to verify the influence of the weighting procedure in the Least Squares Method on the probabilistic moments resulting from the stability analysis of steel skeletal structures. We discuss this issue also in the context of the geometrical nonlinearity appearing in the Stochastic Finite Element Method equations for the stability analysis and preservation of the Gaussian probability density function employed to model the Young modulus of a structural steel in this problem. The weighting procedure itself (with both triangular and Dirac-type) shows rather marginal influence on all probabilistic coefficients under consideration. This hybrid stochastic computational technique consisting of the FEM and computer algebra systems (ROBOT and MAPLE packages) may be used for analogous nonlinear analyses in structural reliability assessment.

  14. Structural Responses and Finite Element Modeling of Hakka Tulou Rammed Earth Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sranislawski, Daniel

    Hakka Tulous are rammed earth structures that have survived the effects of aging and natural elements upwards of even over a thousand years. These structures have housed the Hakka people of the Fujian Province, China in natural yet modern housing that has provided benefits over newer building materials. The key building material, rammed earth, which is used for the walls of the Hakka Tulou structures, has provided structural stability along with thermal comfort to the respective inhabitants of the Hakka Tulous. Through material testing and analysis this study has examined how the Tulou structures have maintained their structural stability while also providing thermal comfort. Reports of self healing cracks in the rammed earth walls were also analyzed for their validity in this study. The study has found that although the story of the self healing crack cannot be validated, there is reason to believe that with the existence of lime, some type of autogenous healing could occur on a small scale. The study has also found, through the use of nondestructive testing, that both the internal wooden systems (flooring, roof, and column support) and the rammed earth walls, are still structurally sound. Also, rammed earth's high thermal mass along with the use of sufficient shading has allowed for a delay release of heat energy from the walls of the Tulous, thus providing thermal comfort that can be felt during both night and day temperatures. The Hakka Tulou structures have been found to resist destruction from natural disasters such as strong earthquakes even when more modern construction has not. Through finite element modeling, this study has shown that the high volume of rammed earth used in the construction of the Hakka Tulous helps dissipate lateral force energy into much lower stresses for the rammed earth wall. This absorption of lateral force energy allows the rammed earth structures to survive even the strongest of earthquakes experienced in the region. The Hakka

  15. Recent advances and progress towards an integrated interdisciplinary thermal-structural finite element technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namburu, Raju R.; Tamma, Kumar K.

    1993-01-01

    An integrated finite element approach is presented for interdisciplinary thermal-structural problems. Of the various numerical approaches, finite element methods with direct time integration procedures are most widely used for these nonlinear problems. Traditionally, combined thermal-structural analysis is performed sequentially by transferring data between thermal and structural analysis. This approach is generally effective and routinely used. However, to solve the combined thermal-structural problems, this approach results in cumbersome data transfer, incompatible algorithmic representations, and different discretized element formulations. The integrated approach discussed in this paper effectively combines thermal and structural fields, thus overcoming the above major shortcomings. The approach follows Lax-Wendroff type finite element formulations with flux and stress based representations. As a consequence, this integrated approach uses common algorithmic representations and element formulations. Illustrative test examples show that the approach is effective for integrated thermal-structural problems.

  16. An atomic view of additive mutational effects in a protein structure

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, M.M.; Terwilliger, T.C.

    1996-04-01

    Substitution of a single amino acid in a protein will often lead to substantial changes in properties. If these properties could be altered in a rational way then proteins could be readily generated with functions tailored to specific uses. When amino acid substitutions are made at well-separated locations in a single protein, their effects are generally additive. Additivity of effects of amino acid substitutions is very useful because the properties of proteins with any combination of substitutions can be inferred directly from those of the proteins with single changes. It would therefore be of considerable interest to have a means of knowing whether substitutions at a particular pair of sites in a protein are likely to lead to additive effects. The structural basis for additivity of effects of mutations on protein function was examined by determining crystal structures of single and double mutants in the hydrophobic core of gene V protein. Structural effects of mutations were found to be cumulative when two mutations were made in a single protein. Additivity occurs in this case because the regions structurally affected by mutations at the two sites do not overlap even though the sites are separated by only 9 {angstrom}. Structural distortions induced by mutations in gene V protein decrease rapidly, but not isotropically, with distance from the site of mutation. It is anticipated that cases where structural and functional effects of mutations will be additive could be identified simply by examining whether the regions structurally affected by each component mutation overlap.

  17. The Associative Structure of Memory for Multi-Element Events

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The hippocampus is thought to be an associative memory “convergence zone,” binding together the multimodal elements of an experienced event into a single engram. This predicts a degree of dependency between the retrieval of the different elements comprising an event. We present data from a series of studies designed to address this prediction. Participants vividly imagined a series of person–location–object events, and memory for these events was assessed across multiple trials of cued retrieval. Consistent with the prediction, a significant level of dependency was found between the retrieval of different elements from the same event. Furthermore, the level of dependency was sensitive both to retrieval task, with higher dependency during cued recall than cued recognition, and to subjective confidence. We propose a simple model, in which events are stored as multiple pairwise associations between individual event elements, and dependency is captured by a common factor that varies across events. This factor may relate to between-events modulation of the strength of encoding, or to a process of within-event “pattern completion” at retrieval. The model predicts the quantitative pattern of dependency in the data when changes in the level of guessing with retrieval task and confidence are taken into account. Thus, we find direct behavioral support for the idea that memory for complex multimodal events depends on the pairwise associations of their constituent elements and that retrieval of the various elements corresponding to the same event reflects a common factor that varies from event to event. PMID:23915127

  18. An Innovative Structural Mode Selection Methodology: Application for the X-33 Launch Vehicle Finite Element Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hidalgo, Homero, Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An innovative methodology for determining structural target mode selection and mode selection based on a specific criterion is presented. An effective approach to single out modes which interact with specific locations on a structure has been developed for the X-33 Launch Vehicle Finite Element Model (FEM). We presented Root-Sum-Square (RSS) displacement method computes resultant modal displacement for each mode at selected degrees of freedom (DOF) and sorts to locate modes with highest values. This method was used to determine modes, which most influenced specific locations/points on the X-33 flight vehicle such as avionics control components, aero-surface control actuators, propellant valve and engine points for use in flight control stability analysis and for flight POGO stability analysis. Additionally, the modal RSS method allows for primary or global target vehicle modes to also be identified in an accurate and efficient manner.

  19. Experimentally validated finite element model of electrocaloric multilayer ceramic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, N. A. S. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk Correia, T. M. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk; Rokosz, M. K. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk

    2014-07-28

    A novel finite element model to simulate the electrocaloric response of a multilayer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) under real environment and operational conditions has been developed. The two-dimensional transient conductive heat transfer model presented includes the electrocaloric effect as a source term, as well as accounting for radiative and convective effects. The model has been validated with experimental data obtained from the direct imaging of MLCC transient temperature variation under application of an electric field. The good agreement between simulated and experimental data, suggests that the novel experimental direct measurement methodology and the finite element model could be used to support the design of optimised electrocaloric units and operating conditions.

  20. FINITE ELEMENT MODELS FOR COMPUTING SEISMIC INDUCED SOIL PRESSURES ON DEEPLY EMBEDDED NUCLEAR POWER PLANT STRUCTURES.

    SciTech Connect

    XU, J.; COSTANTINO, C.; HOFMAYER, C.

    2006-06-26

    PAPER DISCUSSES COMPUTATIONS OF SEISMIC INDUCED SOIL PRESSURES USING FINITE ELEMENT MODELS FOR DEEPLY EMBEDDED AND OR BURIED STIFF STRUCTURES SUCH AS THOSE APPEARING IN THE CONCEPTUAL DESIGNS OF STRUCTURES FOR ADVANCED REACTORS.

  1. Finite element analysis of structural engineering problems using a viscoplastic model incorporating two back stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, Vinod K.; Halford, Gary R.

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of a viscoplastic model incorporating two back stresses and a drag strength is investigated for performing nonlinear finite element analyses of structural engineering problems. To demonstrate suitability for nonlinear structural analyses, the model is implemented into a finite element program and analyses for several uniaxial and multiaxial problems are performed. Good agreement is shown between the results obtained using the finite element implementation and those obtained experimentally. The advantages of using advanced viscoplastic models for performing nonlinear finite element analyses of structural components are indicated.

  2. Elemental and structural studies at the bone-cartilage interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaabar, W.; Daar, E.; Bunk, O.; Farquharson, M. J.; Laklouk, A.; Bailey, M.; Jeynes, C.; Gundogdu, O.; Bradley, D. A.

    2011-10-01

    Micro-Proton Induced X-ray Emission (μ-PIXE) and Proton Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) techniques were employed in the investigation of trace and essential elements distribution in normal and diseased human femoral head sections affected by osteoarthritis (OA). PIGE was exploited in the determination of elements of low atomic number z<15 such as Na and F whereas elements with z>15 viz Ca, Z, P and S were determined by PIXE. Accumulations of key elements in the bone and cartilage sections were observed, significant S and Na concentrations being found in the cartilage region particularly in normal tissues. Zn showed enhanced concentrations at the bone-cartilage interface. At a synchrotron facility, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) was utilized on a decalcified human femoral head section affected by OA, direct measurements being made of spatial alterations of collagen fibres. The SAXS results showed a slight decrease in the axial periodicity between normal collagen type I and that in diseased tissue in various sites, in contrast with the findings of others.

  3. Hypersonic vehicle structural weight prediction using parametric modeling, finite element modeling, and structural optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Dung A.; Koshiba, David A.; Moses, Paul L.

    1993-04-01

    Detailed structural analysis/optimization is required in the conceptual design stage because of the combination of aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic environment. This is a time and manpower consuming activity which is exasperated by constant vehicle moldline changes as a configuration matures. A simple parametric math model is presented that takes into consideration static loads and the geometry and structural weight of a baseline hypersonic vehicle in predicting the structural weight of a new configuration scaled from the baseline. The approach in developing the math model was to consider a generic parametric cross-sectional geometry that could be used to approximate the baseline geometry and to predict the behavior of this baselne when it is scaled to provide performance and design benefits. This mathematical model, calibrated to finite element analysis and structural optimization sizing results, provides accurate weight prediction for a new configuration which has been moderately scaled from a thoroughly analyzed baseline configuration. This paper will present the structural optimization weight results and the math model weight predictions for a baseline configuration and 15 scaled configurations.

  4. Structure-property effects of tantalum additions to nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckel, R. W.; Pletka, B. J.; Koss, D. A.; Jackson, M. R.

    1982-01-01

    The characterization of the effect of Ta on the structure of Ni base superalloys, the determination of the effects of Ta (structure) variations on the mechanical, thermal, and oxidation behavior, and the identification of alloying elements which have potential as substitutes for Ta are investigated. Mar M247 type alloys are emphasized; nominal and analyzed compositions of ten alloys under study are given. X-ray and composition analysis are being used to determine the partitioning of alloying elements between gamma, gamma primes, and MC (cubic) as a function of Ta content. The diffusional interactions of the Mar M247-type alloys with as cast beta + gamma alloys are studied to determine the effects of Ta on alloy/coating degradation.

  5. Mechanical end joint system for structural column elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, H. G.; Wallsom, R. E. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A mechanical end joint system, useful for the transverse connection of strut elements to a common node, comprises a node joint half with a semicircular tongue and groove, and a strut joint half with a semicircular tongue and groove. The two joint halves are engaged transversely and the connection is made secure by the inherent physical property characteristics of locking latches and/or by a spring-actioned shaft. A quick release mechanism provides rapid disengagement of the joint halves.

  6. Application of Finite Element Method to Analyze Inflatable Waveguide Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    A Finite Element Method (FEM) is presented to determine propagation characteristics of deformed inflatable rectangular waveguide. Various deformations that might be present in an inflatable waveguide are analyzed using the FEM. The FEM procedure and the code developed here are so general that they can be used for any other deformations that are not considered in this report. The code is validated by applying the present code to rectangular waveguide without any deformations and comparing the numerical results with earlier published results.

  7. Extension of the Limits of the Xdh Structural Element in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Gelbart, William; McCarron, Margaret; Chovnick, Arthur

    1976-01-01

    Experiments expanding the array of mutants affecting the xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) structural element in Drosophila melanogaster are described. These include rosy eye color mutants which exhibit interallelic complementation, and mutants with normal eye color but lowered levels of XDH. Evidence is presented which argues that these are structural alterations in the enzyme. Recombination experiments were performed using these mutants as well as some electrophoretic variants. The two ends of the rosy locus are marked with mutant sites which are clearly structural in nature; the XDH structural element and the rosy null mutant map are completely concordant. A possible procedure to recover control element mutants is described. PMID:826444

  8. Manufacturing processes for fabricating graphite/PMR 15 polyimide structural elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheppard, C. H.; Hoggatt, J. T.; Symonds, W. A.

    1979-01-01

    Investigations were conducted to obtain commercially available graphite/PMR-15 polyimide prepreg, develop an autoclave manufacturing process, and demonstrate the process by manufacturing structural elements. Controls were established on polymer, prepreg, composite fabrication, and quality assurance, Successful material quality control and processes were demonstrated by fabricating major structural elements including flat laminates, hat sections, I beam sections, honeycomb sandwich structures, and molded graphite reinforced fittings. Successful fabrication of structural elements and simulated section of the space shuttle aft body flap shows that the graphite/PMR-15 polyimide system and the developed processes are ready for further evaluation in flight test hardware.

  9. A Procedure for Modeling Structural Component/Attachment Failure Using Transient Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Jegley, Dawn C. (Technical Monitor)

    2007-01-01

    Structures often comprise smaller substructures that are connected to each other or attached to the ground by a set of finite connections. Under static loading one or more of these connections may exceed allowable limits and be deemed to fail. Of particular interest is the structural response when a connection is severed (failed) while the structure is under static load. A transient failure analysis procedure was developed by which it is possible to examine the dynamic effects that result from introducing a discrete failure while a structure is under static load. The failure is introduced by replacing a connection load history by a time-dependent load set that removes the connection load at the time of failure. The subsequent transient response is examined to determine the importance of the dynamic effects by comparing the structural response with the appropriate allowables. Additionally, this procedure utilizes a standard finite element transient analysis that is readily available in most commercial software, permitting the study of dynamic failures without the need to purchase software specifically for this purpose. The procedure is developed and explained, demonstrated on a simple cantilever box example, and finally demonstrated on a real-world example, the American Airlines Flight 587 (AA587) vertical tail plane (VTP).

  10. Enzyme-mononucleotide interactions: three different folds share common structural elements for ATP recognition.

    PubMed Central

    Denessiouk, K. A.; Lehtonen, J. V.; Johnson, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    Three ATP-dependent enzymes with different folds, cAMP-dependent protein kinase, D-Ala:D-Ala ligase and the alpha-subunit of the alpha2beta2 ribonucleotide reductase, have a similar organization of their ATP-binding sites. The most meaningful similarity was found over 23 structurally equivalent residues in each protein and includes three strands each from their beta-sheets, in addition to a connecting loop. The equivalent secondary structure elements in each of these enzymes donate four amino acids forming key hydrogen bonds responsible for the common orientation of the "AMP" moieties of their ATP-ligands. One lysine residue conserved throughout the three families binds the alpha-phosphate in each protein. The common fragments of structure also position some, but not all, of the equivalent residues involved in hydrophobic contacts with the adenine ring. These examples of convergent evolution reinforce the view that different proteins can fold in different ways to produce similar structures locally, and nature can take advantage of these features when structure and function demand it, as shown here for the common mode of ATP-binding by three unrelated proteins. PMID:10082373

  11. Development of Additive Construction Technologies for Application to Development of Lunar/Martian Surface Structures Using In-Situ Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werkheiser, Niki J.; Fiske, Michael R.; Edmunson, Jennifer E.; Khoshnevis, Berokh

    2015-01-01

    For long-duration missions on other planetary bodies, the use of in situ materials will become increasingly critical. As human presence on these bodies expands, so must the breadth of the structures required to accommodate them including habitats, laboratories, berms, radiation shielding for natural radiation and surface reactors, garages, solar storm shelters, greenhouses, etc. Planetary surface structure manufacturing and assembly technologies that incorporate in situ resources provide options for autonomous, affordable, pre-positioned environments with radiation shielding features and protection from micrometeorites, exhaust plume debris, and other hazards. The ability to use in-situ materials to construct these structures will provide a benefit in the reduction of up-mass that would otherwise make long-term Moon or Mars structures cost prohibitive. The ability to fabricate structures in situ brings with it the ability to repair these structures, which allows for the self-sufficiency and sustainability necessary for long-duration habitation. Previously, under the auspices of the MSFC In-Situ Fabrication and Repair (ISFR) project and more recently, under the jointly-managed MSFC/KSC Additive Construction with Mobile Emplacement (ACME) project, the MSFC Surface Structures Group has been developing materials and construction technologies to support future planetary habitats with in-situ resources. One such additive construction technology is known as Contour Crafting. This paper presents the results to date of these efforts, including development of novel nozzle concepts for advanced layer deposition using this process. Conceived initially for rapid development of cementitious structures on Earth, it also lends itself exceptionally well to the automated fabrication of planetary surface structures using minimally processed regolith as aggregate, and binders developed from in situ materials as well. This process has been used successfully in the fabrication of

  12. The Use of Additive Manufacturing for Fabrication of Multi-Function Small Satellite Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Horais, Brian J; Love, Lonnie J; Dehoff, Ryan R

    2013-01-01

    The use of small satellites in constellations is limited only by the growing functionality of smallsats themselves. Additive manufacturing provides exciting new design opportunities for development of multifunction CubeSat structures that integrate such functions as propulsion and thermal control into the satellite structures themselves. Manufacturing of these complex multifunction structures is now possible in lightweight, high strength, materials such as titanium by using existing electron beam melting additive manufacturing processes. However, the use of today's additive manufacturing capabilities is often cost-prohibitive for small companies due to the large capital investments required. To alleviate this impediment the U.S. Department of Energy has established a Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) at their Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Tennessee that provides industry access to a broad range of energy-efficient additive manufacturing equipment for collaborative use by both small and large organizations. This paper presents a notional CubeSat multifunction design that integrates the propulsion system into a three-unit (3U) CubeSat structure. The full-scale structure has been designed and fabricated at the ORNL MDF. The use of additive manufacturing for spacecraft fabrication is opening up many new possibilities in design and fabrication capabilities for what had previously been impossible structures to fabricate.

  13. Modeling the Structure of Complex Aluminosilicate Glasses: The Effect of Zinc Addition.

    PubMed

    Bernasconi, Andrea; Dapiaggi, Monica; Pavese, Alessandro; Agostini, Giovanni; Bernasconi, Maurizio; Bowron, Daniel T

    2016-03-10

    An empirical potential structure refinement of neutron and X-ray diffraction data combined with extended absorption fine structure evidence has been applied to the investigation of two distinct sets of complex aluminosilicate glasses containing different quantities of zinc. Data come from (i) neutron and X-ray total scattering experiments, which have been performed at the ISIS neutron spallation source (SANDALS beamline) and at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ID11 beamline), and (ii) EXAFS experiments which have been performed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BM23 beamline). By careful examination of the modeled ensemble of atoms, a wide range of structural information has been extracted: coordination numbers, bond distances, cluster sizes, type of oxygen sharing, and the preference of large cations to adopt a charge-compensating role. The first series of glasses, which is characterized by a fixed network modifier element content (i.e., Na), shows how the introduction of Zn at the expense of Si and Al network forming elements does not significantly alter the polymerization degree, as a result of its dominant 4-fold coordination. In the case of the second series, which is characterized by fixed network forming element content (i.e., Si and Al), it is shown how the replacement of a network modifier element (i.e., Ca) with the introduction of Zn does not change the propensity of Zn to be mainly 4-fold coordinated by promoting the network. Where appropriate the experimental results have been compared with classical theoretical approaches such as stoichiometric models based on Zachariasen's rules and computational routines. PMID:26848740

  14. Elemental and structural studies of the rat galactose cataract

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, C.V.; Unakar, N.J.; Bagchi, M.; Chylack, L.T. Jr.; Jampel, R.S.; Bobrowski, W.F.; Dang, L.; Tsui, J.Y.; Harding, D. )

    1989-01-01

    A series of rat galactose lenses, from 1 to 20 days on the 50% galactose diet, were frozen in the whole eye, and fractured from pole to pole in the frozen state. Lyophilized half-lenses were prepared for analysis by energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). Following elemental analysis, some specimens were embedded and sectioned for histological studies. Elemental X-ray maps, and/or profiles, were made for K, Na, Cl, Ca, P, and S. As early as two days on the galactose diet, a crescent-shaped region (streak) of Cl, Na, and Ca gain, and K loss develops near the equatorial surface. Between this region and the equatorial surface are the nucleated differentiating fiber cells which maintain low Cl, Na, and Ca, and high K (viable equatorial zone, VEZ). With time the streak expands anteriorly, centrally and posteriorly, eventually (by 20 days) including most of the lens. The VEZ, including the epithelium, however, is non-reactive to the galactose diet, which is deleterious to the fully differentiated fiber cells. Eventually, the VEZ undergoes a characteristic morphological change, apparently due in part to changes in its physical environment.

  15. Elemental and structural studies of the rat galactose cataract.

    PubMed

    Harding, C V; Unakar, N J; Bagchi, M; Chylack, L T; Jampel, R S; Bobrowski, W F; Dang, L; Tsui, J Y; Harding, D

    1989-01-01

    A series of rat galactose lenses, from 1 to 20 days on the 50% galactose diet, were frozen in the whole eye, and fractured from pole to pole in the frozen state. Lyophilized half-lenses were prepared for analysis by energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). Following elemental analysis, some specimens were embedded and sectioned for histological studies. Elemental X-ray maps, and/or profiles, were made for K, Na, Cl, Ca, P, and S. As early as two days on the galactose diet, a crescent-shaped region ("streak") of Cl, Na, and Ca gain, and K loss develops near the equatorial surface. Between this region and the equatorial surface are the nucleated differentiating fiber cells which maintain low Cl, Na, and Ca, and high K (viable equatorial zone, VEZ). With time the "streak" expands anteriorly, centrally and posteriorly, eventually (by 20 days) including most of the lens. The VEZ, including the epithelium, however, is non-reactive to the galactose diet, which is deleterious to the fully differentiated fiber cells. Eventually, the VEZ undergoes a characteristic morphological change, apparently due in part to changes in its physical environment.

  16. Effect of stabilizing additives on the structure and hydration of proteins: a study involving monoclinic lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Saraswathi, N T; Sankaranarayanan, R; Vijayan, M

    2002-07-01

    In pursuance of a long-range programme on the hydration, mobility and action of proteins, the structural basis of the stabilizing effect of sugars and polyols is being investigated. With two crystallographically independent molecules with slightly different packing environments in the crystal, monoclinic lysozyme constitutes an ideal system for exploring the problem. The differences in the structure and hydration of the two molecules provide a framework for examining the changes caused by stabilizing additives. Monoclinic crystals were grown under native conditions and also in the presence of 10% sucrose, 15% trehalose, 10% trehalose, 10% sorbitol and 5% glycerol. The crystal structures were refined at resolutions ranging from 1.8 to 2.1 A. The average B values, and hence the mobility of the structure, are lower in the presence of additives than in the native crystals. However, a comparison of the structures indicates that the effect of the additives on the structure and the hydration shell around the protein molecule is considerably less than that caused by differences in packing. It is also less than that caused by the replacement of NaNO(3) by NaCl as the precipitant in the crystallization experiments. This result is not in conformity with the commonly held belief that additives exert their stabilizing effect through the reorganization of the hydration shell, at least as far as the ordered water molecules are concerned.

  17. Nondestructive evaluation of critical composite material structural elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, John C., Jr.; Lesko, John J.; Weyers, R.

    1996-11-01

    A small span bridge that has suffered corrosive deterioration of a number of the steel structural members is in the process of being rehabilitated with glass and carbon fiber reinforced, pultruded polymer structural beams. As part of a comprehensive research program to develop methods for modeling long term durability of the composite material, nondestructive evaluation if being used to provide a preliminary assessment of the initial condition of the beams as well as to monitor the deterioration of the beams during service.

  18. Effect of the addition of low rare earth elements (lanthanum, neodymium, cerium) on the biodegradation and biocompatibility of magnesium.

    PubMed

    Willbold, Elmar; Gu, Xuenan; Albert, Devon; Kalla, Katharina; Bobe, Katharina; Brauneis, Maria; Janning, Carla; Nellesen, Jens; Czayka, Wolfgang; Tillmann, Wolfgang; Zheng, Yufeng; Witte, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth elements are promising alloying element candidates for magnesium alloys used as biodegradable devices in biomedical applications. Rare earth elements have significant effects on the high temperature strength as well as the creep resistance of alloys and they improve magnesium corrosion resistance. We focused on lanthanum, neodymium and cerium to produce magnesium alloys with commonly used rare earth element concentrations. We showed that low concentrations of rare earth elements do not promote bone growth inside a 750 μm broad area around the implant. However, increased bone growth was observed at a greater distance from the degrading alloys. Clinically and histologically, the alloys and their corrosion products caused no systematic or local cytotoxicological effects. Using microtomography and in vitro experiments, we could show that the magnesium-rare earth element alloys showed low corrosion rates, both in in vitro and in vivo. The lanthanum- and cerium-containing alloys degraded at comparable rates, whereas the neodymium-containing alloy showed the lowest corrosion rates.

  19. Effect of the addition of low rare earth elements (lanthanum, neodymium, cerium) on the biodegradation and biocompatibility of magnesium.

    PubMed

    Willbold, Elmar; Gu, Xuenan; Albert, Devon; Kalla, Katharina; Bobe, Katharina; Brauneis, Maria; Janning, Carla; Nellesen, Jens; Czayka, Wolfgang; Tillmann, Wolfgang; Zheng, Yufeng; Witte, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth elements are promising alloying element candidates for magnesium alloys used as biodegradable devices in biomedical applications. Rare earth elements have significant effects on the high temperature strength as well as the creep resistance of alloys and they improve magnesium corrosion resistance. We focused on lanthanum, neodymium and cerium to produce magnesium alloys with commonly used rare earth element concentrations. We showed that low concentrations of rare earth elements do not promote bone growth inside a 750 μm broad area around the implant. However, increased bone growth was observed at a greater distance from the degrading alloys. Clinically and histologically, the alloys and their corrosion products caused no systematic or local cytotoxicological effects. Using microtomography and in vitro experiments, we could show that the magnesium-rare earth element alloys showed low corrosion rates, both in in vitro and in vivo. The lanthanum- and cerium-containing alloys degraded at comparable rates, whereas the neodymium-containing alloy showed the lowest corrosion rates. PMID:25278442

  20. Terrestrial exposure of oilfield flowline additives diminish soil structural stability and remediative microbial function.

    PubMed

    George, S J; Sherbone, J; Hinz, C; Tibbett, M

    2011-10-01

    Onshore oil production pipelines are major installations in the petroleum industry, stretching many thousands of kilometres worldwide which also contain flowline additives. The current study focuses on the effect of the flowline additives on soil physico-chemical and biological properties and quantified the impact using resilience and resistance indices. Our findings are the first to highlight deleterious effect of flowline additives by altering some fundamental soil properties, including a complete loss of structural integrity of the impacted soil and a reduced capacity to degrade hydrocarbons mainly due to: (i) phosphonate salts (in scale inhibitor) prevented accumulation of scale in pipelines but also disrupted soil physical structure; (ii) glutaraldehyde (in biocides) which repressed microbial activity in the pipeline and reduced hydrocarbon degradation in soil upon environmental exposure; (iii) the combinatory effects of these two chemicals synergistically caused severe soil structural collapse and disruption of microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons.

  1. Rapid detection of delamination areas in laminated structural elements by means of optically monitored strain solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenova, I. V.; Belashov, A. V.; Dreiden, G. V.; Petrov, N. V.; Samsonov, A. M.

    2015-05-01

    Modern structural elements are often made of laminated polymer materials or composites on the base of polymer matrices. The proper functioning of these elements may be of vital importance especially in automotive and aerospace industries, in gas and oil transportation. The major problem in their performance is a possibility of a sudden and irreversible delamination caused by various factors. We propose and study a NDT approach aimed to detect delamination areas in adhesively bonded layered structural elements made of different materials. The proposed approach is evaluated by use of holographic detection and monitoring of the evolution of bulk strain solitons generated in such structures.

  2. Elemental and structural studies at the bone-cartilage interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, D. A.; Kaabar, W.; Gundogdu, O.

    2012-02-01

    The techniques μProton-Induced X-and γ-ray Emission, μ-PIXE and μ-PIGE, were used to investigate trace and essential element distributions in sections of normal and osteoarthritic (OA) human femoral head. μ-PIGE yielded 2-D mappings of Na and F while Ca, Z, P and S were mapped by μ-PIXE. The concentration of chondroitin sulphate supporting functionality in healthy cartilage is significantly reduced in OA samples. Localised Zn points to osteoblastic/osteoclastic activity at the bone-cartilage interface. Small-angle X-ray scattering applied to decalcified OA-affected tissue showed spatial alterations of collagen fibres of decreased axial periodicity compared to normal collagen type I.

  3. The cyclic oxidation resistance at 1200 C of beta-NiAl, FeAl, and CoAl alloys with selected third element additions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.; Titran, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The intermetallic compounds Beta-NiAl, FeAl, and CoAl were tested in cyclic oxidation with selected third element alloy additions. Tests in static air for 200 1-hr cycles at 1200 C indicated by specific weight change/time data and x-ray diffraction analysis that the 5 at percent alloy additions did not significantly improve the oxidation resistance over the alumina forming baseline alloys without the additions. Many of the alloy additions were actually deleterious. Ta and Nb were the only alloy additions that actually altered the nature of the oxide(s) formed and still maintained the oxidation resistance of the protective alumina scale.

  4. sp3-hybridized framework structure of group-14 elements discovered by genetic algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2014-05-01

    Group-14 elements, including C, Si, Ge, and Sn, can form various stable and metastable structures. Finding new metastable structures of group-14 elements with desirable physical properties for new technological applications has attracted a lot of interest. Using a genetic algorithm, we discovered a new low-energy metastable distorted sp3-hybridized framework structure of the group-14 elements. It has P42/mnm symmetry with 12 atoms per unit cell. The void volume of this structure is as large as 139.7Å3 for Si P42/mnm, and it can be used for gas or metal-atom encapsulation. Band-structure calculations show that P42/mnm structures of Si and Ge are semiconducting with energy band gaps close to the optimal values for optoelectronic or photovoltaic applications. With metal-atom encapsulation, the P42/mnm structure would also be a candidate for rattling-mediated superconducting or used as thermoelectric materials.

  5. TAP 2: A finite element program for thermal analysis of convectively cooled structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.

    1980-01-01

    A finite element computer program (TAP 2) for steady-state and transient thermal analyses of convectively cooled structures is presented. The program has a finite element library of six elements: two conduction/convection elements to model heat transfer in a solid, two convection elements to model heat transfer in a fluid, and two integrated conduction/convection elements to represent combined heat transfer in tubular and plate/fin fluid passages. Nonlinear thermal analysis due to temperature-dependent thermal parameters is performed using the Newton-Raphson iteration method. Transient analyses are performed using an implicit Crank-Nicolson time integration scheme with consistent or lumped capacitance matrices as an option. Program output includes nodal temperatures and element heat fluxes. Pressure drops in fluid passages may be computed as an option. User instructions and sample problems are presented in appendixes.

  6. Optimal placement of active elements in control augmented structural synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepulveda, A. E.; Jin, I. M.; Schmit, L. A., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A methodology for structural/control synthesis is presented in which the optimal location of active members is treated in terms of (0,1) variables. Structural member sizes, control gains and (0,1) placement variables are treated simultaneously as design variables. Optimization is carried out by generating and solving a sequence of explicit approximate problems using a branch and bound strategy. Intermediate design variable and intermediate response quantity concepts are used to enhance the quality of the approximate design problems. Numerical results for example problems are presented to illustrate the efficacy of the design procedure set forth.

  7. Photographic Atlas and Three-Dimensional Reconstruction of the Holotype Skull of Euhelopus zdanskyi with Description of Additional Cranial Elements

    PubMed Central

    Poropat, Stephen F.; Kear, Benjamin P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Euhelopus zdanskyi is one of relatively few sauropod taxa known from an almost complete skull and mandible. Recent phylogenetic analyses suggest that Euhelopus is a somphospondylan titanosauriform, and that it is a member of the clade (Euhelopodidae) which is the sister taxon to the hugely successful, dominantly Cretaceous sauropod group Titanosauria. Methodology/Principal Findings The skull elements of Euhelopus were CT scanned at Uppsala Akademiska Sjukhuset. Three-dimensional models of the elements were constructed from the DICOM data using Mimics 14.0, InVesalius 3.0, and GeoMagic Studio 2012, the skull was rearticulated in Rhinoceros 4.0, and the final version was rendered in GeoMagic Studio 2012. Conclusions/Significance The fact that relatively complete sauropod skulls are so rare in the fossil record, particularly among titanosauriforms, means that the skulls that are known should be as thoroughly described and well-illustrated as possible. This contribution supplements previous descriptions of the cranial elements of Euhelopus, one of the few euhelopodid taxa for which cranial material is known, by presenting a comprehensive photographic atlas of the skull elements to facilitate a better understanding of their morphology. We describe several elements which have been overlooked in past studies of Euhelopus, and also provide as accurate a reconstruction of the skull as possible (in the absence of the braincase), the most significant components of which are the articulations of the palate and the mandible. PMID:24278222

  8. Energy flow prediction in built-up structures through a hybrid finite element/wave and finite element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Y.; Collet, M.; Ichchou, M.; Li, L.; Bareille, O.; Dimitrijevic, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a rapid and accurate numerical tool for the energy flow evaluation in a periodic substructure from the near-field to the far-field domain. Here we suppose that the near-field part contains a point source characterized by the injected power in the structure. The near-field part is then modeled by Finite Element Method (FEM) while the periodic structure and the far-field part are regarded as waveguides and modeled by an enhanced Wave and Finite Element Method (WFEM). Enhancements are made on the eigenvalue scheme, the condensation of the unit cell and the consideration of a reduced wave basis. Efforts are made to adapt substructures modeled by different strategies in a multi-scale manner such that the final matrices dimensions of the built-up structure are largely reduced. The method is then validated numerically and theoretically. An application is presented, where a structural dynamical system coupled with periodic resistive piezoelectric shunts is discussed.

  9. Evaluation of elements loading in the metal structures of powered support units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitenko, M. S.

    2016-10-01

    In the paper the evaluation results of elements loading in the metal structures of powered support units are presented performed in the laboratory and plant conditions using the developed test samples of portable strain-gauge transducers on the basis of a spring element and a mobile multifunctional automated strain-gauge system.

  10. Crystal structure of a DNA aptamer bound to PvLDH elucidates novel single-stranded DNA structural elements for folding and recognition

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sung-Jin; Ban, Changill

    2016-01-01

    Structural elements are key elements for understanding single-stranded nucleic acid folding. Although various RNA structural elements have been documented, structural elements of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) have rarely been reported. Herein, we determined a crystal structure of PvLDH in complex with a DNA aptamer called pL1. This aptamer folds into a hairpin-bulge contact by adopting three novel structural elements, viz, DNA T-loop-like motif, base–phosphate zipper, and DNA G·G metal ion zipper. Moreover, the pL1:PvLDH complex shows unique properties compared with other protein:nucleic acid complexes. Generally, extensive intermolecular hydrogen bonds occur between unpaired nucleotides and proteins for specific recognitions. Although most protein-interacting nucleotides of pL1 are unpaired nucleotides, pL1 recognizes PvLDH by predominant shape complementarity with many bridging water molecules owing to the combination of three novel structural elements making protein-binding unpaired nucleotides stable. Moreover, the additional set of Plasmodium LDH residues which were shown to form extensive hydrogen bonds with unpaired nucleotides of 2008s does not participate in the recognition of pL1. Superimposition of the pL1:PvLDH complex with hLDH reveals steric clashes between pL1 and hLDH in contrast with no steric clashes between 2008s and hLDH. Therefore, specific protein recognition mode of pL1 is totally different from that of 2008s. PMID:27725738

  11. A Taylor-Galerkin finite element algorithm for transient nonlinear thermal-structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.

    1986-01-01

    A Taylor-Galerkin finite element method for solving large, nonlinear thermal-structural problems is presented. The algorithm is formulated for coupled transient and uncoupled quasistatic thermal-structural problems. Vectorizing strategies ensure computational efficiency. Two applications demonstrate the validity of the approach for analyzing transient and quasistatic thermal-structural problems.

  12. Structure-preserving spectral element method in attenuating seismic wave modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Wenjun; Zhang, Huai

    2016-04-01

    This work describes the extension of the conformal symplectic method to solve the damped acoustic wave equation and the elastic wave equations in the framework of the spectral element method. The conformal symplectic method is a variation of conventional symplectic methods to treat non-conservative time evolution problems which has superior behaviors in long-time stability and dissipation preservation. To construct the conformal symplectic method, we first reformulate the damped acoustic wave equation and the elastic wave equations in their equivalent conformal multi-symplectic structures, which naturally reveal the intrinsic properties of the original systems, especially, the dissipation laws. We thereafter separate each structures into a conservative Hamiltonian system and a purely dissipative ordinary differential equation system. Based on the splitting methodology, we solve the two subsystems respectively. The dissipative one is cheaply solved by its analytic solution. While for the conservative system, we combine a fourth-order symplectic Nyström method in time and the spectral element method in space to cover the circumstances in realistic geological structures involving complex free-surface topography. The Strang composition method is adopted thereby to concatenate the corresponding two parts of solutions and generate the completed numerical scheme, which is conformal symplectic and can therefore guarantee the numerical stability and dissipation preservation after a large time modeling. Additionally, a relative larger Courant number than that of the traditional Newmark scheme is found in the numerical experiments in conjunction with a spatial sampling of approximately 5 points per wavelength. A benchmark test for the damped acoustic wave equation validates the effectiveness of our proposed method in precisely capturing dissipation rate. The classical Lamb problem is used to demonstrate the ability of modeling Rayleigh-wave propagation. More comprehensive

  13. Finite element analysis and optimization of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, Jan

    1990-01-01

    Linearly elastic fiber reinforced composite discs and laminates in plane stress with variable local orientation and concentration of one or two fiber fields embedded in the matrix material, are considered. The thicknesses and the domain of the discs or laminates are assumed to be given, together with prescribed boundary conditions and in-plane loading along the edge. The problem under study consists in determining throughout the structural domain the optimum orientations and concentrations of the fiber fields in such a way as to maximize the integral stiffness of the composite disc or laminate under the seven loading. Minimization of the integral stiffness can also be performed. The optimization is performed subject to a prescribed bound on the total cost or weight of the composite that for given unit cost factors or specific weights determines the amounts of fiber and matrix materials in the structure. Examples are presented.

  14. Probabilistic structural analysis using a general purpose finite element program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riha, D. S.; Millwater, H. R.; Thacker, B. H.

    1992-07-01

    This paper presents an accurate and efficient method to predict the probabilistic response for structural response quantities, such as stress, displacement, natural frequencies, and buckling loads, by combining the capabilities of MSC/NASTRAN, including design sensitivity analysis and fast probability integration. Two probabilistic structural analysis examples have been performed and verified by comparison with Monte Carlo simulation of the analytical solution. The first example consists of a cantilevered plate with several point loads. The second example is a probabilistic buckling analysis of a simply supported composite plate under in-plane loading. The coupling of MSC/NASTRAN and fast probability integration is shown to be orders of magnitude more efficient than Monte Carlo simulation with excellent accuracy.

  15. Effect of Stitching on Debonding in Composite Structural Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Glaessgen, E. H.

    2001-01-01

    Stitched multiaxial warp knit materials have been suggested as viable alternatives to laminated prepreg materials for large aircraft structures such as wing skins. Analyses have been developed to quantify the effectiveness of stitching for reducing strain energy release rates in skin-stiffener debond, lap joint and sandwich debond configurations. Strain energy release rates were computed using the virtual crack closure technique. In all configurations, the stitches were shown to significantly reduce the strain energy release rate.

  16. Finite Element Prediction of Acoustic Scattering and Radiation from Submerged Elastic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everstine, G. C.; Henderson, F. M.; Lipman, R. R.

    1984-01-01

    A finite element formulation is derived for the scattering and radiation of acoustic waves from submerged elastic structures. The formulation uses as fundamental unknowns the displacement in the structure and a velocity potential in the field. Symmetric coefficient matrices result. The outer boundary of the fluid region is terminated with an approximate local wave-absorbing boundary condition which assumes that outgoing waves are locally planar. The finite element model is capable of predicting only the near-field acoustic pressures. Far-field sound pressure levels may be determined by integrating the surface pressures and velocities over the wet boundary of the structure using the Helmholtz integral. Comparison of finite element results with analytic results show excellent agreement. The coupled fluid-structure problem may be solved with general purpose finite element codes by using an analogy between the equations of elasticity and the wave equation of linear acoustics.

  17. Recognition on space photographs of structural elements of Baja California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, W.

    1971-01-01

    Gemini and Apollo photographs provide illustrations of known structural features of the peninsula and some structures not recognized previously. An apparent transform relationship between strike-slip and normal faulting is illustrated by the overlapping vertical photographs of northern Baja California. The active Agua Blanca right-lateral strike-slip fault trends east-southeastward to end at the north end of the Valle San Felipe and Valle Chico. The uplands of the high Sierra San Pedro Martir are a low-relief surface deformed by young faults, monoclines, and warps, which mostly produce west-facing steps and slopes; the topography is basically structural. The Sierra Cucapas of northeasternmost Baja California and the Colorado River delta of northwesternmost Sonora are broken by northwest-trending strike-slip faults. A strike-slip fault is inferred to trend northward obliquely from near Cabo San Lucas to La Paz, thence offshore until it comes ashore again as the Bahia Concepcion strike-slip fault.

  18. Finite Macro-Element Mesh Deformation in a Structured Multi-Block Navier-Stokes Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.

    2005-01-01

    A mesh deformation scheme is developed for a structured multi-block Navier-Stokes code consisting of two steps. The first step is a finite element solution of either user defined or automatically generated macro-elements. Macro-elements are hexagonal finite elements created from a subset of points from the full mesh. When assembled, the finite element system spans the complete flow domain. Macro-element moduli vary according to the distance to the nearest surface, resulting in extremely stiff elements near a moving surface and very pliable elements away from boundaries. Solution of the finite element system for the imposed boundary deflections generally produces smoothly varying nodal deflections. The manner in which distance to the nearest surface has been found to critically influence the quality of the element deformation. The second step is a transfinite interpolation which distributes the macro-element nodal deflections to the remaining fluid mesh points. The scheme is demonstrated for several two-dimensional applications.

  19. Mechanical properties and phase composition of potential biodegradable Mg-Zn-Mn-base alloys with addition of rare earth elements

    SciTech Connect

    Stulikova, Ivana; Smola, Bohumil

    2010-10-15

    Mechanical properties and creep resistance of the MgY4Zn1Mn1 alloy in the as cast as well as in the T5 condition were compared to those of the MgCe4Zn1Mn1 alloy in the same conditions. Yield tensile stress and ultimate tensile strength of the MgY4Zn1Mn1 alloy are slightly better in the temperature range 20 deg. C-400 deg. C than these of the MgCe4Zn1Mn1 alloy. Better thermal stability of ultimate tensile strength was observed in the T5 treated MgCe4Zn1Mn1 alloy than in this material in the as cast condition. An outstanding creep resistance at 225 deg. C-350 deg. C found in the MgY4Zn1Mn1 alloy is due to the existence of the 18R long period stacking structure persisting in this alloy even a long heat treatment of 500 deg. C/32 h. No similar stacking effects happen when Ce substitutes Y in approximately the same concentration. The creep resistance deteriorates considerably in the MgCe4Zn1Mn1 alloy. Rectangular particles of the equilibrium Mg{sub 12}Ce phase dominate in the microstructure of as cast as well as of high temperature heat-treated MgCe4Zn1Mn1 alloy. A population of small oval particles containing Mg and Zn develops additionally during annealing of this alloy. These particles pin effectively dislocations and can be responsible for the better thermal stability of the T5 treated material.

  20. Structural evaluation of mixer pump installed in Tank 241-AN-107 for caustic addition project

    SciTech Connect

    Leshikar, G.A.

    1995-06-16

    This report documents the structural analysis and evaluation of a mixer pump and caustic addition system to be used in Tank 107-AN. This pump will be installed in the central pump pit of this double- shell tank for the purpose of bringing the hydroxide ion concentration into compliance with Tank Farm operating specifications.

  1. Consistent linearization of the element-independent corotational formulation for the structural analysis of general shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rankin, C. C.

    1988-01-01

    A consistent linearization is provided for the element-dependent corotational formulation, providing the proper first and second variation of the strain energy. As a result, the warping problem that has plagued flat elements has been overcome, with beneficial effects carried over to linear solutions. True Newton quadratic convergence has been restored to the Structural Analysis of General Shells (STAGS) code for conservative loading using the full corotational implementation. Some implications for general finite element analysis are discussed, including what effect the automatic frame invariance provided by this work might have on the development of new, improved elements.

  2. Erbium-doped fiber amplifier elements for structural analysis sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanna-Hawver, P.; Kamdar, K. D.; Mehta, S.; Nagarajan, S.; Nasta, M. H.; Claus, R. O.

    1992-01-01

    The use of erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFA's) in optical fiber sensor systems for structural analysis is described. EDFA's were developed for primary applications as periodic regenerator amplifiers in long-distance fiber-based communication systems. Their in-line amplification performance also makes them attractive for optical fiber sensor systems which require long effective lengths or the synthesis of special length-dependent signal processing functions. Sensor geometries incorporating EDFA's in recirculating and multiple loop sensors are discussed. Noise and polarization birefringence are also considered, and the experimental development of system components is discussed.

  3. Structural Elements in a Persistent Identifier Infrastructure and Resulting Benefits for the Earth Science Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigel, T.; Toussaiant, F.; Stockhause, M.; Höck, H.; Kindermann, S.; Lautenschlager, M.; Ludwig, T.

    2012-12-01

    break if individual links become unavailable. Secondly, a single service cannot interpret links if downstream solutions differ in their implementation schemas. Emerging efforts driven by the European Persistent Identifier Consortium (EPIC) aim to establish a default mechanism for structural elements at the Handle level. We motivate to make applications, which take part in the data lifecycle, aware of data derivation provenance and let them provide additional elements to the provenance graph. Since they are also Handles, DataCite DOIs can act as a corner stone and provide an entry point to discover the provenance graph. References B. Lawrence, C. Jones, B. Matthews, S. Pepler, and S. Callaghan, "Citation and peer review of data: Moving towards formal data publication," Int. J. of Digital Curation, vol. 6, no. 2, 2011. L. Moreau, "The foundations for provenance on the web," Foundations and Trends® in Web Science, vol. 2, no. 2-3, pp. 99-241, 2010. F. Toussaint, T. Weigel, H. Thiemann, H. Höck, M. Stockhause: "Application Examples for Handle System Usage", submitted to AGU 2012 session IN009.

  4. Effective Simulation of Delamination in Aeronautical Structures Using Shells and Cohesive Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Carlos G.; Camanho, Pedro P.; Turon, Albert

    2007-01-01

    A cohesive element for shell analysis is presented. The element can be used to simulate the initiation and growth of delaminations between stacked, non-coincident layers of shell elements. The procedure to construct the element accounts for the thickness offset by applying the kinematic relations of shell deformation to transform the stiffness and internal force of a zero-thickness cohesive element such that interfacial continuity between the layers is enforced. The procedure is demonstrated by simulating the response and failure of the Mixed Mode Bending test and a skin-stiffener debond specimen. In addition, it is shown that stacks of shell elements can be used to create effective models to predict the inplane and delamination failure modes of thick components. The results indicate that simple shell models can retain many of the necessary predictive attributes of much more complex 3D models while providing the computational efficiency that is necessary for design.

  5. Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness Mapping technique for identifying nonlinear structural elements from frequency response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Zheng, G. T.

    2016-02-01

    A simple and general Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness Mapping technique is proposed for identifying the parameters or the mathematical model of a nonlinear structural element with steady-state primary harmonic frequency response functions (FRFs). The Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness is defined as the complex ratio between the internal force and the displacement response of unknown element. Obtained with the test data of responses' frequencies and amplitudes, the real and imaginary part of Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness are plotted as discrete points in a three dimensional space over the displacement amplitude and the frequency, which are called the real and the imaginary Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness map, respectively. These points will form a repeatable surface as the Equivalent Dynamic stiffness is only a function of the corresponding data as derived in the paper. The mathematical model of the unknown element can then be obtained by surface-fitting these points with special functions selected by priori knowledge of the nonlinear type or with ordinary polynomials if the type of nonlinearity is not pre-known. An important merit of this technique is its capability of dealing with strong nonlinearities owning complicated frequency response behaviors such as jumps and breaks in resonance curves. In addition, this technique could also greatly simplify the test procedure. Besides there is no need to pre-identify the underlying linear parameters, the method uses the measured data of excitation forces and responses without requiring a strict control of the excitation force during the test. The proposed technique is demonstrated and validated with four classical single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) numerical examples and one experimental example. An application of this technique for identification of nonlinearity from multiple-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) systems is also illustrated.

  6. Stress analysis of gas turbine engine structures using the boundary element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. B.; Snow, D. W.; Banerjee, P. K.

    1985-01-01

    The theory of the boundary element method is briefly reviewed with particular reference to the feasibility of elastic and inelastic three-dimensional stress analysis of complex structures characteristic of gas turbine engine components. Particular requirements of gas turbine analysis are defined, and examples of the use of a boundary element code designed for the three-dimensional stress analysis of turbine components are presented. It is shown that the general-purpose boundary element code can accurately and efficiently analyze many of the gas turbine engine structures.

  7. Ten-Structure as Strategy of Addition 1-20 by Involving Spatial Structuring Ability for First Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmah, Ummy; Putri, Ratu Ilma Indra; Somakim

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to design learning activities that can support students to develop strategies for the addition of number 1 to 20 in the first grade by involving students' spatial structuring ability. This study was conducted in Indonesia by involving 27 students. In this paper, one of three activities is discussed namely ten-box activity.…

  8. STARS: A general-purpose finite element computer program for analysis of engineering structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, K. K.

    1984-01-01

    STARS (Structural Analysis Routines) is primarily an interactive, graphics-oriented, finite-element computer program for analyzing the static, stability, free vibration, and dynamic responses of damped and undamped structures, including rotating systems. The element library consists of one-dimensional (1-D) line elements, two-dimensional (2-D) triangular and quadrilateral shell elements, and three-dimensional (3-D) tetrahedral and hexahedral solid elements. These elements enable the solution of structural problems that include truss, beam, space frame, plane, plate, shell, and solid structures, or any combination thereof. Zero, finite, and interdependent deflection boundary conditions can be implemented by the program. The associated dynamic response analysis capability provides for initial deformation and velocity inputs, whereas the transient excitation may be either forces or accelerations. An effective in-core or out-of-core solution strategy is automatically employed by the program, depending on the size of the problem. Data input may be at random within a data set, and the program offers certain automatic data-generation features. Input data are formatted as an optimal combination of free and fixed formats. Interactive graphics capabilities enable convenient display of nodal deformations, mode shapes, and element stresses.

  9. The Application of Quasi-Mean-Element-Method to LEO under Additional Perturbation due to Change of Coordinate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jing-shi; Liu, Lin

    2010-10-01

    The perturbation caused by the oscillation of Earth's equator plane must be taken into account when working on the motion of satellite on a low Earth orbit (LEO) in the geocentric celestial coordinate system. Since 1960 s, an intermediate orbit coordinate system using true equator and mean equinox (TEME) is introduced. It effectively solves the problem and has been widely used in various applications till today. But this traditional reference frame is purely conceptual and has always been a headache when performing the transition between these systems especially for those who are unfamiliar with celestial frames. As proved in a previous paper, it is possible to avoid the intermediate TEME frame, and conversions between osculating elements and mean elements can be completed in a consistent geocentric celestial coordinate system where only short-period terms are required. In this paper, after including the improved secular and long-period terms, the quasi-mean-element-method is available to predict the orbit analytically, reaching the accuracy of 10 -6 in Earth's radius. And all these can be done in the same celestial frame. The results suggest that the celestial coordinate system (J2000.0 nowadays) can be used throughout any applications without having to introduce TEME system as intermediate frame any more.

  10. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnasissance of the Trinidad NTMS Quadrangle, Colorado, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, S.S. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Uranium and other elemental data resulting from the Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Trinidad National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) quadrangle, Colorado, by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) are reported herein. This study was conducted as part of the United States Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE), which is designed to provide improved estimates of the availability and economics of nuclear fuel resources and to make available to industry information for use in exploration and development of uranium resources. The HSSR data will ultimately be integrated with other NURE data (e.g., airborne radiometric surveys and geological investigations) to complete the entire NURE program. This report is a supplement to the HSSR uranium evaluation report for the Trinidad quadrange (Morris et al, 1978), which presented the field and uranium data for the 1060 water and 1240 sediment samples collected from 1768 locations in the quadrangle. The earlier report contains an evaluation of the uranium concentrations of the samples as well as descriptions of the geology, hydrology, climate, and uranium occurrences of the quadrange. This supplement presents the sediment field and uranium data again and the analyses of 42 other elements in the sediments. All uranium samples were redetermined by delayed-neutron counting (DNC) when the sediment samples were analyzed for 31 elements by neutron activation. For 99.6% of the sediment samples analyzed, the differences between the uranium contents first determined (Morris et al, 1978) and the analyses reported herein are less than 10%.

  11. ExSer: A standalone tool to mine protein data bank (PDB) for secondary structural elements

    PubMed Central

    Vignesh, Dhandapani; Daniel, Paul; Raja, Natarajan; Balasubramanian, Ponnusamy; Arul, Loganathan

    2010-01-01

    Detailed structural analysis of protein necessitates investigation at primary, secondary and tertiary levels, respectively. Insight into protein secondary structures pave way for understanding the type of secondary structural elements involved (α-helices, β-strands etc.), the amino acid sequence that encode the secondary structural elements, number of residues, length and, percentage composition of the respective elements in the protein. Here we present a standalone tool entitled “ExSer” which facilitate an automated extraction of the amino acid sequence that encode for the secondary structural regions of a protein from the protein data bank (PDB) file. Availability ExSer is freely downloadable from http://code.google.com/p/tool-exser/ PMID:20975886

  12. PLANS; a finite element program for nonlinear analysis of structures. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pifko, A.; Armen, H., Jr.; Levy, A.; Levine, H.

    1977-01-01

    The PLANS system, rather than being one comprehensive computer program, is a collection of finite element programs used for the nonlinear analysis of structures. This collection of programs evolved and is based on the organizational philosophy in which classes of analyses are treated individually based on the physical problem class to be analyzed. Each of the independent finite element computer programs of PLANS, with an associated element library, can be individually loaded and used to solve the problem class of interest. A number of programs have been developed for material nonlinear behavior alone and for combined geometric and material nonlinear behavior. The usage, capabilities, and element libraries of the current programs include: (1) plastic analysis of built-up structures where bending and membrane effects are significant, (2) three dimensional elastic-plastic analysis, (3) plastic analysis of bodies of revolution, and (4) material and geometric nonlinear analysis of built-up structures.

  13. A work softening joint element used in dynamic analysis of soil-structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toki, Kenzo; Yongen, Cai; Zhendong, Zhao

    1989-11-01

    This paper introduces an elasto-plastic joint element characterised by strain hardening and softening in the analysis of dynamic soil-structure interaction. The phenomena of separation and sliding on the contact surface between soil and structure can be better simulated and the process can also be described. The interaction problems in a typical soil-structure system are analyzed in terms of elasto-plastic joint element as well as elastic ones. The results show that the elasto-plastic joint element is much better than the elastic one in modelling, especially in that the relative displacements accross the joint element can be much greater than that of the elastic case. Separation and sliding are not only related to the coefficient of friction and cohesion but also to their changes with plastic volumetric strain.

  14. The interaction between the yeast telomerase RNA and the Est1 protein requires three structural elements

    PubMed Central

    Lubin, Johnathan W.; Tucey, Timothy M.; Lundblad, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the telomerase enzyme is composed of a 1.3-kb TLC1 RNA that forms a complex with Est2 (the catalytic subunit) and two regulatory proteins, Est1 and Est3. Previous work has identified a conserved 5-nt bulge, present in a long helical arm of TLC1, which mediates binding of Est1 to TLC1. However, increased expression of Est1 can bypass the consequences of removal of this RNA bulge, indicating that there are additional binding site(s) for Est1 on TLC1. We report here that a conserved single-stranded internal loop immediately adjacent to the bulge is also required for the Est1–RNA interaction; furthermore, a TLC1 variant that lacks this internal loop but retains the bulge cannot be suppressed by Est1 overexpression, arguing that the internal loop may be a more critical element for Est1 binding. An additional structural feature consisting of a single-stranded region at the base of the helix containing the bulge and internal loop also contributes to recognition of TLC1 by Est1, potentially by providing flexibility to this helical arm. Association of Est1 with each of these TLC1 motifs was assessed using a highly sensitive biochemical assay that simultaneously monitors the relative levels of the Est1 and Est2 proteins in the telomerase complex. The identification of three elements of TLC1 that are required for Est1 association provides a detailed view of this particular protein–RNA interaction. PMID:22847816

  15. The interaction between the yeast telomerase RNA and the Est1 protein requires three structural elements.

    PubMed

    Lubin, Johnathan W; Tucey, Timothy M; Lundblad, Victoria

    2012-09-01

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the telomerase enzyme is composed of a 1.3-kb TLC1 RNA that forms a complex with Est2 (the catalytic subunit) and two regulatory proteins, Est1 and Est3. Previous work has identified a conserved 5-nt bulge, present in a long helical arm of TLC1, which mediates binding of Est1 to TLC1. However, increased expression of Est1 can bypass the consequences of removal of this RNA bulge, indicating that there are additional binding site(s) for Est1 on TLC1. We report here that a conserved single-stranded internal loop immediately adjacent to the bulge is also required for the Est1-RNA interaction; furthermore, a TLC1 variant that lacks this internal loop but retains the bulge cannot be suppressed by Est1 overexpression, arguing that the internal loop may be a more critical element for Est1 binding. An additional structural feature consisting of a single-stranded region at the base of the helix containing the bulge and internal loop also contributes to recognition of TLC1 by Est1, potentially by providing flexibility to this helical arm. Association of Est1 with each of these TLC1 motifs was assessed using a highly sensitive biochemical assay that simultaneously monitors the relative levels of the Est1 and Est2 proteins in the telomerase complex. The identification of three elements of TLC1 that are required for Est1 association provides a detailed view of this particular protein-RNA interaction.

  16. Characterization of Effect of Support Structures in Laser Additive Manufacturing of Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järvinen, Jukka-Pekka; Matilainen, Ville; Li, Xiaoyun; Piili, Heidi; Salminen, Antti; Mäkelä, Ismo; Nyrhilä, Olli

    Laser additive manufacturing (LAM) of stainless steel is a layer wisetechnology for fabricating 3D parts from metal powder via selectively melting powder with laser beam. Support structures play a significant role in LAM process as they help to remove heat away from the process and on the other hand hold the work piece in its place. A successful design of support structures can help to achievea building process fast and inexpensive with high quality. Aimof this study was to characterize the usability of two types of support structures: web and tube supports. Purpose of this studywas also to analyze how suitable they are in two industrial application cases: case for dental application and case for jewelry application. It was concluded that the removability of web supports was much better than tube supports. It was noticed that support structures are an important part of LAM process and they strongly affect the manufacturability and the end quality of the part.

  17. Electronic structure and dynamics of elements at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2011-03-01

    Electronic structure and dynamics information of materials under high pressure has been very scarce due to the experimental difficulties. The standard electronic probes using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is limited to vacuum pressures. The optical probes that can reach high-pressure samples through the diamond windows, on the other hand, are limited by the energy accessibility (5 eV) andnear - zeromomentumtransfer , q = (4 π /λ0) sinθ . Theseproblemscanbeovercomebythenewlyadvanced , two - photon , inelastic , xray , scattering (IXS) spectroscopywhichuseshighenergyxrays (~ 10 4 eV) toprovidetheatomic - levelmomentumtransferandtoenter (withenergy E) andexit (withenergy E0) thepressurevessel . Theelectronicspectraarerevealedbyanalyzingthexrayenergylossbetweenthetwophotons , ω = E -E0 . UsingIXSfacilitiesatthird - generationsynchrotronsource , westudiedelectronicstructureanddynamicsoftwoelementsathighpressuresinadiamond - anvilcell : i . e . , He , thewidest - gapinsulator , andNa , thearchetypalfree - electronmetal . At 11.9 - 17.9 GPainasinglecrystal 4 He , weobservedrichelectronexcitationspectra , includingacut - offedgeabove 23 eV , asharpexcitonpeakshowinglinearvolumedependence , andaseriesofexcitationsandcontinuumat 26 to 45 eV . Wedeterminedelectronicdispersionalongthe 100 directionovertwoBrillouinzones , andprovidedaquantitativepictureoftheheliumexcitonbeyondthesimplifiedWannier - Frenkeldescription . At 1.6 - 4.39 GPainapolycrystallineNasample , weobservedthesharpplasmonpeakatlow q anditsdispersionbeyondthecritical q c . Theplasmonshiftstohigherenergyundercompressionanddrasticreductionof rs . Ab-initio theoretical calculations are conducted for interpretation of the experimental results. The speaker would like to acknowledge collaborating researchers: R. Ahuja, Y. Cai, P. Chow, Y. Ding, P. Eng, R.J. Hemley, C.C. Kao, S. Lebegue, W.L. Mao, E.L. Shirley, J. Shu, & Y. Xiao.

  18. Mechanical end joint system for connecting structural column elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Harold G. (Inventor); Mikulas, Martin M., Jr. (Inventor); Wallsom, Richard E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A mechanical end joint system is presented that eliminates the possibility of free movements between the joint halves during loading or vibration. Both node joint body (NJB) and column end joint body (CEJB) have cylindrical engaging ends. Each of these ends has an integral semicircular tongue and groove. The two joint halves are engaged transversely - the tongue of the NJB mating with the groove of the CEJB and vice versa. The joint system employs a spring loaded internal latch mechanism housed in the CEJB. During mating, this mechanism is pushed away from the NJB and enters the NJB when mating is completed. In order to lock the joint and add a preload across the tongue and groove faces, an operating ring collar is rotated through 45 deg causing an internal mechanism to compress a Belleville washer preload mechanism. This causes an equal and opposite force to be exerted on the latch bolt and the latch plunger. This force presses the two joint halves tightly together. In order to prevent inadvertent disassembly, a secondary lock is also engaged when the joint is closed. Plungers are carried in the operating ring collar. When the joint is closed, the plungers fall into tracks on the CEJB, which allows the joint to be opened only when the operating ring collar and plungers are pushed directly away from the joining end. One application of this invention is the rapid assembly and disassembly of diverse skeletal framework structures which is extremely important in many projects involving the exploration of space.

  19. Osmium-Isotope and Platinum-Group-Element Systematics of Impact-Melt Rocks, Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure, Virginia, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seung Ryeol; Wright Horton, J., Jr.; Walker, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    Osmium (Os) isotopes and platinum-group elements (PGEs) are useful for geochemically identifying a meteoritic component within impact structures, because meteorites are typically characterized by low (187)Os/(188)Os ratios and high PGE concentrations. In contrast, most types of crustal target rocks have high radiogenic Os and very low PGE concentrations. We have examined Os isotope and PGE systematics of impact-melt rocks and pre-impact target rocks from a 2004 test hole in the late Eocene Chesapeake Bay impact structure and from nearby coreholes. Our goal is to determine the proportion of the projectile component in the melt rock Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  20. Finite element modeling of composite piezoelectric structures with MSC/NASTRAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Brian D.; Babuska, Vit

    1997-06-01

    Techniques for modeling structures containing piezoelectric ceramics with MSC/NASTRAN are presented. Unlike other finite element programs such as ANSYS and ABAQUS, MSC/NASTRAN offers no piezoelectric coupled-field elements with which to model smart structures directly. Rather, the analogy between piezoelectric strain and thermally induced strain, which allows temperature change to model piezoelectric voltage actuation, must be used. The application and limitations of this method are discussed. To overcome some of the limitations in modeling piezoelectric effects with the thermal analogy, one and two dimensional finite elements which include piezoelectric coupling were developed and integrated into MSC/NASTRAN as dummy elements. The dummy elements offer an alternative method for modeling piezoelectric structural members. As actuators, the elements support charge and voltage actuation in both static and dynamic analyses. When used as sensors, both strain and strain rate outputs are supported. The elements can be used for modal, transient, and frequency response solutions and facilitate combined thermal and piezoelectric loading.

  1. Surface element-mapping of three dimensional structures by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beresko, Christian; Kohns, Peter; Ankerhold, Georg

    2014-09-01

    During lateral mapping with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) the focal position of the plasma-generating laser needs to be kept stable on the sample surface area to be probed. Therefore, three-dimensional structures like edged surfaces require a permanent re-focusing. We describe a new auto-focusing technique to perform surface elemental mapping with LIBS by correcting the focusing lens-to-sample distance using a direct monitoring of the LIBS signal intensity. This method allows the scanning of surfaces with strong height fluctuations of several millimeters without the need of any additional devices. The auto-focusing method is valuable for LIBS applications made on complex-shaped samples or simply to improve the measurement reproducibility. Applications are LIBS analyses of samples exhibiting drill holes or steep edges. Our procedure does not need a constant focal plane and follows the topographic profile of the sample surface. Impurities and material inclusions are well detected. From the topographic information additionally obtained, a three-dimensional image of the sample can be deduced. Depth resolution is limited by the Rayleigh range of the LIBS laser light. The method is best suited for low energy laser pulses with high repetition rate and infrared emission.

  2. Systematic Discovery of Structural Elements Governing Mammalian mRNA Stability

    PubMed Central

    Goodarzi, Hani; Najafabadi, Hamed S.; Oikonomou, Panos; Greco, Todd M.; Fish, Lisa; Salavati, Reza; Cristea, Ileana M.; Tavazoie, Saeed

    2012-01-01

    Decoding post-transcriptional regulatory programs in RNA is a critical step in the larger goal to develop predictive dynamical models of cellular behavior. Despite recent efforts1–3, the vast landscape of RNA regulatory elements remain largely uncharacterized. A longstanding obstacle is the contribution of local RNA secondary structure in defining interaction partners in a variety of regulatory contexts, including but not limited to transcript stability3, alternative splicing4 and localization3. There are many documented instances where the presence of a structural regulatory element dictates alternative splicing patterns (e.g. human cardiac troponin T) or affects other aspects of RNA biology5. Thus, a full characterization of post-transcriptional regulatory programs requires capturing information provided by both local secondary structures and the underlying sequence3,6. We have developed a computational framework based on context-free grammars3,7 and mutual information2 that systematically explores the immense space of small structural elements and reveals motifs that are significantly informative of genome-wide measurements of RNA behavior. The application of this framework to genome-wide mammalian mRNA stability data revealed eight highly significant elements with substantial structural information, for the strongest of which we showed a major role in global mRNA regulation. Through biochemistry, mass-spectrometry, and in vivo binding studies, we identified HNRPA2B1 as the key regulator that binds this element and stabilizes a large number of its target genes. Ultimately, we created a global post-transcriptional regulatory map based on the identity of the discovered linear and structural cis-regulatory elements, their regulatory interactions and their target pathways. This approach can also be employed to reveal the structural elements that modulate other aspects of RNA behavior. PMID:22495308

  3. Kinematics and dynamics of deployable structures with scissor-like-elements based on screw theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuantao; Wang, Sanmin; Mills, James K.; Zhi, Changjian

    2014-07-01

    Because the deployable structures are complex multi-loop structures and methods of derivation which lead to simpler kinematic and dynamic equations of motion are the subject of research effort, the kinematics and dynamics of deployable structures with scissor-like-elements are presented based on screw theory and the principle of virtual work respectively. According to the geometric characteristic of the deployable structure examined, the basic structural unit is the common scissor-like-element(SLE). First, a spatial deployable structure, comprised of three SLEs, is defined, and the constraint topology graph is obtained. The equations of motion are then derived based on screw theory and the geometric nature of scissor elements. Second, to develop the dynamics of the whole deployable structure, the local coordinates of the SLEs and the Jacobian matrices of the center of mass of the deployable structure are derived. Then, the equivalent forces are assembled and added in the equations of motion based on the principle of virtual work. Finally, dynamic behavior and unfolded process of the deployable structure are simulated. Its figures of velocity, acceleration and input torque are obtained based on the simulate results. Screw theory not only provides an efficient solution formulation and theory guidance for complex multi-closed loop deployable structures, but also extends the method to solve dynamics of deployable structures. As an efficient mathematical tool, the simper equations of motion are derived based on screw theory.

  4. Incommensurate host-guest structures in compressed elements: Hume—Rothery effects as origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtyareva, V. F.

    2015-11-01

    Discovery of the incommensurate structure in the element Ba under pressure 15 years ago was followed by findings of a series of similar structures in other compressed elements. Incommensurately modulated structures of the host-guest type consist of a tetragonal host structure and a guest structure. The guest structure forms chains of atoms embedded in the channels of host atoms so that the axial ratio of these subcells along the c axis is not rational. Two types of the host-guest structures have been found so far: with the host cells containing 8 atoms and 16 atoms; in these both types the guest cells contain 2 atoms. These crystal structures contain a non-integer number of atoms in their unit cell: tI11* in Bi, Sb, As, Ba, Sr, Sc and tI19* in Na, K, Rb. We consider here a close structural relationship of these host-guest structures with the binary alloy phase Au3Cd5-tI32. This phase is related to the family of the Hume-Rothery phases that is stabilized by the Fermi sphere-Brillouin zone interaction. From similar considerations for alkali and alkaline-earth elements a necessary condition for structural stability emerges in which the valence electrons band overlaps with the upper core electrons and the valence electron count increases under compression.

  5. Finite element based electrostatic-structural coupled analysis with automated mesh morphing

    SciTech Connect

    OWEN,STEVEN J.; ZHULIN,V.I.; OSTERGAARD,D.F.

    2000-02-29

    A co-simulation tool based on finite element principles has been developed to solve coupled electrostatic-structural problems. An automated mesh morphing algorithm has been employed to update the field mesh after structural deformation. The co-simulation tool has been successfully applied to the hysteric behavior of a MEMS switch.

  6. Sensitivity of high strain rate of structural elements in relation to dynamics properties of material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruszka, Leopold; Vorobiov, Iurii S.; Ovcharova, Nataliia Iu.

    2015-09-01

    Protective structures such as process chambers, protective boxes, facing elements of vehicles, personal protection equipment, motors cases etc. widely used in modern technology has been tested in the following project. Under the influence of impact loads, the three-dimensional dynamic stress-strain state with finite dynamic displacements and deformations has arised. The deformations occur in the elastic- plastic stage. In the analysis of the high-rate deformations, the dynamic properties of the materials, which are determined based on experimental data should be taken into account. The dynamic stress state of structural elements depends essentially on the dynamic properties of the materials used. The problem is solved using the finite element method, which takes into account the specifics of the process. Boundary conditions in the element nodes must satisfy the equality movement as well as derivatives. The formed function allows to describe continuous and smooth stress changes. The numerical analysis of the dynamic stress-strain state of structural elements under impact loads, takes into account different dynamic properties of the materials. A series of numerical calculations allows to reveal the features of high-rate deformation elements of protective structures and makes recommendations to improve their dynamic strength under different loading conditions.

  7. Delamination of impacted composite structures by cohesive zone interface elements and tiebreak contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Fatih; Hadavinia, Homayoun; Donchev, Todor; Bhonge, Prasannakumar S.

    2012-12-01

    Maximising impact protection of fibre reinforced plastic (FRP) laminated composite structures and predicting and preventing the negative effects of impact on these structures are paramount design criteria for ground and space vehicles. In this paper the low velocity impact response of these structures will be investigated. The current work is based on the application of explicit finite element software for modelling the behaviour of laminated composite plates under low velocity impact loading and it explores the impact, post impact and failure of these structures. Three models, namely thick shell elements with cohesive interface, solid elements with cohesive interface, and thin shell elements with tiebreak contact, were all developed in the explicit nonlinear finite element code LS-DYNA. The FEA results in terms of force and energy are validated with experimental studies in the literature. The numerical results are utilized in providing guidelines for modelling and impact simulation of FRP laminated composites, and recommendations are provided in terms of modelling and simulation parameters such as element size, number of shell sub-laminates, and contact stiffness scale factors.

  8. Addition of lipid to the photosynthetic membrane: effects on membrane structure and energy transfer

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    We have carried out a series of experiments in which the lipid composition of the photosynthetic membrane has been altered by the addition of lipid from a defined source under experimental conditions. Liposomes prepared by sonication are mixed with purified photosynthetic membranes obtained from spinach chloroplasts and are taken through cycles of freezing and thawing. Several lines of evidence, including gel electrophoresis and freeze-fracture electron microscopy, indicate that an actual addition of lipid has taken place. Structural analysis by freeze-fracture shows that intramembrane particles are widely separated after the addition of large amounts of lipid, with one exception: large hexagonal lattices of particles appear in some regions of the membrane. These lattices are identical in appearance with lattices formed from a single purified component of the membrane known as chlorophyll-protein complex II. The suggestion that the presence of such lattices in lipid-enriched membranes reflects a profound rearrangement of photosynthetic structures has been confirmed by analysis of the fluorescence emission spectra of natural and lipid- enriched membranes. Specifically, lipid addition in each of the cases we have studied results in the apparent detachment of chlorophyll- protein complex II from photosynthetic reaction centers. It is concluded that specific arrangements of components in the photosynthetic membrane, necessary for the normal functioning of the membrane in the light reaction of photosynthesis, can be regulated to a large extent by the lipid content of the membrane. PMID:7298712

  9. Impact ignition of aluminum-teflon based energetic materials impregnated with nano-structured carbon additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappagantula, Keerti; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Hunt, Emily M.

    2012-07-01

    The inclusion of graphene into composite energetic materials to enhance their performance is a new area of interest. Studies have shown that the addition of graphene significantly enhances the thermal transport properties of an energetic composite, but how graphene influences the composite's ignition sensitivity has not been studied. The objective of this study is to examine the influence of carbon additives in composite energetic material composed of aluminum and polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon™) on ignition sensitivity due to low velocity, drop weight impact. Specifically, three forms of carbon additives were investigated and selected based on different physical and structural properties: spherically shaped amorphous nano particles of carbon, cylindrically shaped multi walled carbon nanotubes, and sheet like graphene flakes. Results show an interesting trend: composites consisting of carbon nanotubes are significantly more sensitive to impact ignition and require the lowest ignition energy. In contrast, graphene is least sensitive to ignition exhibiting negligible reduction in ignition energy with low concentrations of graphene additive. While graphene does not significantly sensitize the energetic composite to ignition, graphene does, however, result in greater overall reactivity as observed through images of the reaction. The enhanced thermal transport properties of graphene containing composites may promote greater energy transport once ignited, but those properties do not also increase ignition sensitivity. These results and the understanding of the structural arrangement of particles within a composite as a key parameter affecting impact ignition sensitivity will have an impact on the safe handling and use of composite energetic materials.

  10. Effect of an iodine-containing additive on the composition, structure, and morphology of chemically deposited lead selenide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, Z. I.; Bakanov, V. M.; Maskaeva, L. N.; Markov, V. F.; Voronin, V. I.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of an ammonium iodide additive on the elemental and phase compositions, structural parameters, and surface morphology of lead selenide films synthesized by chemical deposition from aqueous solutions has been studied using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. It has been established that the obtained PbSe films have a multiphase structure. The iodine content of the films is directly proportional to the NH4I concentration in the reaction mixture and increases linearly with an increase in this concentration to 0.25 mol/L. No individual iodine-containing phases have been detected in the film structure. However, the introduction of iodine leads to an increase in the PbSe phase lattice parameter from ˜6.11 to ˜6.16 Å and to a decrease in the crystal grain size to ˜ 20 nm. It has been found that there is a correlation between the grain size, lattice parameter, and ammonium iodide concentration in the reaction mixture, which can be explained by changes in the film growth mechanism at the initial growth steps.

  11. Challenges in Integrating Nondestructive Evaluation and Finite Element Methods for Realistic Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Baaklini, George Y.; Zagidulin, Dmitri; Rauser, Richard W.

    2000-01-01

    Capabilities and expertise related to the development of links between nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and finite element analysis (FEA) at Glenn Research Center (GRC) are demonstrated. Current tools to analyze data produced by computed tomography (CT) scans are exercised to help assess the damage state in high temperature structural composite materials. A utility translator was written to convert velocity (an image processing software) STL data file to a suitable CAD-FEA type file. Finite element analyses are carried out with MARC, a commercial nonlinear finite element code, and the analytical results are discussed. Modeling was established by building MSC/Patran (a pre and post processing finite element package) generated model and comparing it to a model generated by Velocity in conjunction with MSC/Patran Graphics. Modeling issues and results are discussed in this paper. The entire process that outlines the tie between the data extracted via NDE and the finite element modeling and analysis is fully described.

  12. Phosphate addition and plant species alters microbial community structure in acidic upland grassland soil.

    PubMed

    Rooney, Deirdre C; Clipson, Nicholas J W

    2009-01-01

    Agricultural improvement (addition of fertilizers, liming) of seminatural acidic grasslands across Ireland and the UK has resulted in significant shifts in floristic composition, soil chemistry, and microbial community structure. Although several factors have been proposed as responsible for driving shifts in microbial communities, the exact causes of such changes are not well defined. Phosphate was added to grassland microcosms to investigate the effect on fungal and bacterial communities. Plant species typical of unimproved grasslands (Agrostis capillaris, Festuca ovina) and agriculturally improved grasslands (Lolium perenne) were grown, and phosphate was added 25 days after seed germination, with harvesting after a further 50 days. Phosphate addition significantly increased root biomass (p < 0.001) and shoot biomass (p < 0.05), soil pH (by 0.1 U), and microbial activity (by 5.33 mg triphenylformazan [TPF] g(-1) soil; p < 0.001). A slight decrease (by 0.257 mg biomass-C g(-1) soil; p < 0.05) in microbial biomass after phosphate addition was found. The presence of plant species significantly decreased soil pH (p < 0.05; by up to 0.2 U) and increased microbial activity (by up to 6.02 mg TPF g(-1) soil) but had no significant effect on microbial biomass. Microbial communities were profiled using automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis. Multidimensional scaling plots and canonical correspondence analysis revealed that phosphate addition and its interactions with upland grassland plant species resulted in considerable changes in the fungal and bacterial communities of upland soil. The fungal community structure was significantly affected by both phosphate (R = 0.948) and plant species (R = 0.857), and the bacterial community structure was also significantly affected by phosphate (R = 0.758) and plant species (R = 0.753). Differences in microbial community structure following P addition were also revealed by similarity percentage analysis. These data suggest

  13. On using moving windows in finite element time domain simulation for long accelerator structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, L.-Q.; Candel, Arno; Ng, Cho; Ko, Kwok

    2010-12-10

    A finite element moving window technique is developed to simulate the propagation of electromagnetic waves induced by the transit of a charged particle beam inside large and long structures. The window moving along with the beam in the computational domain adopts high-order finite element basis functions through p refinement and/or a high-resolution mesh through h refinement so that a sufficient accuracy is attained with substantially reduced computational costs. Algorithms to transfer discretized fields from one mesh to another, which are the keys to implementing a moving window in a finite element unstructured mesh, are presented. Numerical experiments are carried out using the moving window technique to compute short-range wakefields in long accelerator structures. The results are compared with those obtained from the normal finite element time domain (FETD) method and the advantages of using the moving window technique are discussed.

  14. Structural Element Testing in Support of the Design of the NASA Composite Crew Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, Sotiris; Jackson, Wade C.; Thesken, John C.; Schleicher, Eric; Wagner, Perry; Kirsch, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    In January 2007, the NASA Administrator and Associate Administrator for the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate chartered the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) to design, build, and test a full-scale Composite Crew Module (CCM). For the design and manufacturing of the CCM, the team adopted the building block approach where design and manufacturing risks were mitigated through manufacturing trials and structural testing at various levels of complexity. Following NASA's Structural Design Verification Requirements, a further objective was the verification of design analysis methods and the provision of design data for critical structural features. Test articles increasing in complexity from basic material characterization coupons through structural feature elements and large structural components, to full-scale structures were evaluated. This paper discusses only four elements tests three of which include joints and one that includes a tapering honeycomb core detail. For each test series included are specimen details, instrumentation, test results, a brief analysis description, test analysis correlation and conclusions.

  15. Typical structural elements of seismicity and impact crater morphology identified in GIS ENDDB digital models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikheeva, Anna

    2014-05-01

    The subject database of the ENDDB system (Earth's Natural Disasters Database) is a combination of the EISC catalog (Earth's impact structures Catalog [1]) and seismological data of more than 60 earthquake catalogs (EC). ENDDB geographic subsystem uses the NASA ASTER GDEM data arrays to obtain a high-resolution (1 arc-second) shaded relief model, as well as the digital mapping technology, which consists in shading surface points according to their brightness controlled by the illumination angle. For example, the identifying impact craters by means of ENDDB begins with selecting the optimum base colors of the image, the parameters of illumination and shadow depth for constructing a shaded model on a regular grid of values. This procedure allows obtaining precise 3D images of the terrain and gravity patterns, and, moreover, furnishes data for recognizing standard morphological elements according to which impact structures can be visually detected. For constructing a shaded gravity anomaly with the ENDDB tools, Global marine gravity data (of models V16.1 and V18.1 [2]) are embedded into the system. These models, which are arrays of gravity pixel values, are of the resolution increased from the equator to the poles, being 30 arc-seconds per point on average. This resolution is the same as in the more recent V21.1 model. Due to these data, new morphological elements typical of impact structures, which are expressed in the shaded elevation and gravity models (identified using the ENDDB visualization tools) was found and compared in hundreds of craters from the EISC-catalog: tail-shaped asymmetry of relief, heart-shaped geometry of craters, and tail-shaped gravity lows [3] and so on. New diagnostic criteria associated with typical morphological elements revealed with advanced image processing technologies are very important to confirm the impact origin for many potential craters. The basic hypothesis of the impact-explosive tectonics [4] is that meteorite craters on the

  16. Measuring Productive Elements of Multi-Word Phrase Vocabulary Knowledge among Children with English as an Additional or Only Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sara A.; Murphy, Victoria A.

    2015-01-01

    Vocabulary plays a critical role in language and reading development for children, particularly those learning English as an additional language (EAL) (Stahl & Nagy, 2006). Previous research on vocabulary has mainly focused on measuring individual words without considering multi-word phrase knowledge, despite evidence that these items occur…

  17. Effects of Additional Elements on the Evolution of Second Phases in 9-12% cr Steel and Resulting Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jiling; Yu, Hui; Yoo, Dae-Hwang; Huynh, Quocbao; Shin, Keesam; Kim, Minsoo; Kang, Sungtae

    Investigated in this study are precipitate evolution with and without addition of W, Co, and B in two kinds of 9-12% Cr steels (named as A and B) used for power plants after various aging time and temperature using OM, SEM, TEM, etc. Three kinds of precipitates (Cr-rich M23C6, Nb-rich and V-rich MX, W-rich and Mo-rich Laves phase) were observed and investigated in the two alloys. Upon aging, the area fraction of M23C6 increased whereas that of Laves phases decreased despite of increase in size. The area fraction of W-rich Laves phase was much higher than that of Mo-rich Laves phase, indicating that W addition, compared to that of Mo addition, is more powerful in the formation of Laves phase precipitation (specimen A). The martensitic microstructure of specimen B was more stable than that of specimen A due to the addition of cobalt and boron. The tensile test and impact test were measured and studied in relation to the long term aging effect.

  18. Finite element model reduction application to parametric studies and optimization of rotorcraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashemi-Kia, M.; Toossi, M.

    1990-01-01

    As a result of this work, a reduction procedure has been developed which can be applied to large finite element model of airframe type structures. This procedure, which is tailored to be used with MSC/NASTRAN finite element code, is applied to the full airframe dynamic finite element model of AH-64A Attack Helicopter. The applicability of the resulting reduced model to parametric and optimization studies is examined. Through application of the design sensitivity analysis, the viability and efficiency of this reduction technique has been demonstrated in a vibration reduction study.

  19. The Structural Basis for Promoter −35 Element Recognition by the Group IV σ Factors

    PubMed Central

    Lane, William J; Darst, Seth A

    2006-01-01

    The control of bacterial transcription initiation depends on a primary σ factor for housekeeping functions, as well as alternative σ factors that control regulons in response to environmental stresses. The largest and most diverse subgroup of alternative σ factors, the group IV extracytoplasmic function σ factors, directs the transcription of genes that regulate a wide variety of responses, including envelope stress and pathogenesis. We determined the 2.3-Å resolution crystal structure of the −35 element recognition domain of a group IV σ factor, Escherichia coli σE4, bound to its consensus −35 element, GGAACTT. Despite similar function and secondary structure, the primary and group IV σ factors recognize their −35 elements using distinct mechanisms. Conserved sequence elements of the σE −35 element induce a DNA geometry characteristic of AA/TT-tract DNA, including a rigid, straight double-helical axis and a narrow minor groove. For this reason, the highly conserved AA in the middle of the GGAACTT motif is essential for −35 element recognition by σE4, despite the absence of direct protein–DNA interactions with these DNA bases. These principles of σE4/−35 element recognition can be applied to a wide range of other group IV σ factors. PMID:16903784

  20. A finite element approach for large motion dynamic analysis of multibody structures in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Che-Wei

    1989-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element formulation for modeling the transient dynamics of constrained multibody space sructures with truss-like configurations is presented. Convected coordinate systems are used to define rigid-body motion of individual elements in the system. These systems are located at one end of each element and are oriented such that one axis passes through the other end of the element. Deformation of each element, relative to its convected coordinate system, is defined by cubic flexural shape functions as used in finite element methods of structural analysis. The formulation is oriented toward joint dominated structures and places the generalized coordinates at the joint. A transformation matrix is derived to integrate joint degree-of-freedom into the equations of motion of the element. Based on the derivation, a general-purpose code LATDYN (Large Angle Transient DYNamics) was developed. Two examples are presented to illustrate the application of the code. For the spin-up of a flexible beam, results are compared with existing solutions available in the literature. For the deployment of one bay of a deployable space truss (the Minimast), results are verified by the geometric knowledge of the system and converged solution of a successively refined model.

  1. Special element approach for calculating the vibratory response of adhesively bonded and composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, N. E.; Griffin, J. H.

    1994-02-01

    An approach is presented that may be used to calculate the natural frequencies and loss factors of composite sandwich beams or beams containing adhesively bonded joints. The approach uses special finite elements to represent either composite or joint elements and the modal strain energy method to calculate the loss factor for each vibratory mode of interest. The special element represents a section of the composite beam or the overlap joint as an element with four nodes. Its properties are calculated by using a generalization of the shape function concept from finite elements in which the shape function (displacement fields) in the special elements are determined by performing static stress analysis on the special element's substructure. The resulting special element has only a small number of degrees of freedom and, yet, accurately represents the geometrically complex substructure. Results obtained using this approach on sandwich beams compare well with an analytical solution published in the literature. In addition, it correlates reasonably well with data taken from tests on adhesively bonded beams.

  2. Probabilistic buckling analysis of the beam steel structures subjected to fire by the stochastic finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świta, P.; Kamiński, M.

    2016-05-01

    The main purpose is to present the stochastic perturbation-based Finite Element Method analysis of the stability in the issues related to the influence of high temperature resulting from a fire directly connected with the reliability analysis of such structures. The thin-walled beam structures with constant cross-sectional thickness are uploaded with typical constant loads, variable loads and, additionally, a temperature increase and we look for the first critical value equivalent to the global stability loss. Such an analysis is carried out in the probabilistic context to determine as precisely as possible the safety margins according to the civil engineering Eurocode statements. To achieve this goal we employ the additional design-oriented Finite Element Method program and computer algebra system to get the analytical polynomial functions relating the critical pressure (or force) and several random design parameters; all the models are state-dependent as we consider an additional reduction of the strength parameters due to the temperature increase. The first four probabilistic moments of the critical forces are computed assuming that the input random parameters have all Gaussian probability functions truncated to the positive values only. Finally, the reliability index is calculated according to the First Order Reliability Method (FORM) by an application of the limit function as a difference in-between critical pressure and maximum compression stress determined in the given structures to verify their durability according to the demands of EU engineering designing codes related to the fire situation.

  3. Dynamic and thermal response finite element models of multi-body space structural configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edighoffer, Harold H.

    1987-01-01

    Presented is structural dynamics modeling of two multibody space structural configurations. The first configuration is a generic space station model of a cylindrical habitation module, two solar array panels, radiator panel, and central connecting tube. The second is a 15-m hoop-column antenna. Discussed is the special joint elimination sequence used for these large finite element models, so that eigenvalues could be extracted. The generic space station model aided test configuration design and analysis/test data correlation. The model consisted of six finite element models, one of each substructure and one of all substructures as a system. Static analysis and tests at the substructure level fine-tuned the finite element models. The 15-m hoop-column antenna is a truss column and structural ring interconnected with tension stabilizing cables. To the cables, pretensioned mesh membrane elements were attached to form four parabolic shaped antennae, one per quadrant. Imposing thermal preloads in the cables and mesh elements produced pretension in the finite element model. Thermal preload variation in the 96 control cables was adjusted to maintain antenna shape within the required tolerance and to give pointing accuracy.

  4. Bim from Laser Clouds and Finite Element Analysis: Combining Structural Analysis and Geometric Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barazzetti, L.; Banfi, F.; Brumana, R.; Gusmeroli, G.; Oreni, D.; Previtali, M.; Roncoroni, F.; Schiantarelli, G.

    2015-02-01

    This paper describes the use of BIM models derived from point clouds for structural simulation based on Finite Element Analysis (FEA). Although BIM interoperability has reached a significant level of maturity, the density of laser point clouds provides very detailed BIM models that cannot directly be used in FEA software. The rationalization of the BIM towards a new finite element model is not a simple reduction of the number of nodes. The interconnections between the different elements and their materials require a particular attention: BIM technology includes geometrical aspects and structural considerations that allow one to understand and replicate the constructive elements and their mutual interaction. The information must be accurately investigated to obtain a finite element model suitable for a complete and detailed structural analysis. The aim of this paper is to prove that a drastic reduction of the quality of the BIM model is not necessary. Geometric data encapsulated into dense point clouds can be taken into consideration also for finite element analysis.

  5. Effect of reduction of strategic Columbium addition in 718 Alloy on the structure and properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegler, K. R.; Wallace, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    A series of alloys was developed having a base composition similar to Inconel 718, with reduced Cb levels of 3.00 and 1.10 wt% Cb. Substitutions of 3.0% W, 3.0W + 0.9V or Mo increased from 3.0% to 5.8% were made for the Cb in these alloys. Two additional alloys, one containing 3.49% Cb and 1.10% Ti and another containing 3.89% Cb and 1.29% Ti were also studied. Tensile properties at rooom and elevated temperatures, stress-rupture tests, and an analysis of extracted phases were carried out for each of the alloys. Additions of solid solution elements to a reduced Cb alloy had no significant effect on the properties of the alloys under either process condition. The solution and age alloys with substitutions of 1.27% i at 3.89% Cb had tensile properties similar top hose of the original alloy and stress-rupture properties superior to the original alloy. The improved stress-rupture properties were the result of significant precipitation of Ni3Ti-gamma prime in the alloy, which is more stable than gamma' at the elevated temperatures. At lower temperatures, the new alloy benefits from gamma' strengthening. With more precise control and proper processing, the reduced Cb direct-age alloy could substitute for Alloy 718 in high strength applications.

  6. Is the structural diversity of tripeptides sufficient for developing functional food additives with satisfactory multiple bioactivities?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-Hui; Liu, Yong-Le; Ning, Jing-Heng; Yu, Jian; Li, Xiang-Hong; Wang, Fa-Xiang

    2013-05-01

    Multifunctional peptides have attracted increasing attention in the food science community because of their therapeutic potential, low toxicity and rapid intestinal absorption. However, previous study demonstrated that the limited structural variations make it difficult to optimize dipeptide molecules in a good balance between desirable and undesirable properties (F. Tian, P. Zhou, F. Lv, R. Song, Z. Li, J. Pept. Sci. 13 (2007) 549-566). In the present work, we attempt to answer whether the structural diversity is sufficient for a tripeptide to have satisfactory multiple bioactivities. Statistical test, structural examination and energetic analysis confirm that peptides of three amino acids long can bind tightly to human angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and thus exert significant antihypertensive efficacy. Further quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling and prediction of all 8000 possible tripeptides reveal that their ACE-inhibitory potency exhibits a good (positive) relationship to antioxidative activity, but has only a quite modest correlation with bitterness. This means that it is possible to find certain tripeptide entities possessing the optimal combination of strong ACE-inhibitory potency, high antioxidative activity and weak bitter taste, which are the promising candidates for developing multifunctional food additives with satisfactory multiple bioactivities. The marked difference between dipeptide and tripeptide can be attributed to the fact that the structural diversity of peptides increases dramatically with a slight change in sequence length.

  7. A role of BNLT compound addition on structure and properties of PZT ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaita, P.; Watcharapasorn, A.; Jiansirisomboon, S.

    2010-09-01

    In this research, effects of lead-free bismuth sodium lanthanum titanate (BNLT) addition on structure and properties of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics were investigated. PZT ceramics with addition of 0.1-3.0 wt%BNLT were fabricated by a solid-state mixed oxide method and sintering at 1050-1200 °C for 2 h to obtain dense ceramics with at least 96% of theoretical density. X-ray diffraction indicated that complete solid solution occurred for all compositions. Phase identification showed both tetragonal and rhombohedral perovskite structure of PZT with no BNLT phase detected. Scanning electron micrographs of fractured PZT/BNLT ceramics showed equiaxed grain shape with both transgranular and intergranular fracture modes. Addition of BNLT was also found to reduce densification and effectively limited grain growth of PZT ceramic. Optimum Hv and KIC values were found to be 4.85 GPa and 1.56 MPa.m 1/2 for PZT/0.5 wt%BNLT sample. Among PZT/BNLT samples, room temperature dielectric constant seemed to be improved with increasing BNLT content. The maximum piezoelectric coefficient values were observed in pure PZT ceramic and were slightly decreased in BNLT-added samples. Small reduction of remanent polarization and coercive field in hysteresis loops was observed in BNLT-added samples, indicating a slightly suppressed ferroelectric interaction in this material system.

  8. Conserved Structural Elements in the V3 Crown of HIV-1 gp120

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, X.; Burke, V; Totrov, M; Williams, C; Cardozo, T; Gorny, M; Zolla-Pazner, S; Kong, X

    2010-01-01

    Binding of the third variable region (V3) of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 to the cell-surface coreceptors CCR5 or CXCR4 during viral entry suggests that there are conserved structural elements in this sequence-variable region. These conserved elements could serve as epitopes to be targeted by a vaccine against HIV-1. Here we perform a systematic structural analysis of representative human anti-V3 monoclonal antibodies in complex with V3 peptides, revealing that the crown of V3 has four conserved structural elements: an arch, a band, a hydrophobic core and the peptide backbone. These are either unaffected by or are subject to minimal sequence variation. As these regions are targeted by cross-clade neutralizing human antibodies, they provide a blueprint for the design of vaccine immunogens that could elicit broadly cross-reactive protective antibodies.

  9. Salinas - An implicit finite element structural dynamics code developed for massively parallel platforms

    SciTech Connect

    BHARDWAJ, MANLJ K.; REESE,GARTH M.; DRIESSEN,BRIAN; ALVIN,KENNETH F.; DAY,DAVID M.

    2000-04-06

    As computational needs for structural finite element analysis increase, a robust implicit structural dynamics code is needed which can handle millions of degrees of freedom in the model and produce results with quick turn around time. A parallel code is needed to avoid limitations of serial platforms. Salinas is an implicit structural dynamics code specifically designed for massively parallel platforms. It computes the structural response of very large complex structures and provides solutions faster than any existing serial machine. This paper gives a current status of Salinas and uses demonstration problems to show Salinas' performance.

  10. Shape and Stress Sensing of Multilayered Composite and Sandwich Structures Using an Inverse Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerracchio, Priscilla; Gherlone, Marco; Di Sciuva, Marco; Tessler, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The marked increase in the use of composite and sandwich material systems in aerospace, civil, and marine structures leads to the need for integrated Structural Health Management systems. A key capability to enable such systems is the real-time reconstruction of structural deformations, stresses, and failure criteria that are inferred from in-situ, discrete-location strain measurements. This technology is commonly referred to as shape- and stress-sensing. Presented herein is a computationally efficient shape- and stress-sensing methodology that is ideally suited for applications to laminated composite and sandwich structures. The new approach employs the inverse Finite Element Method (iFEM) as a general framework and the Refined Zigzag Theory (RZT) as the underlying plate theory. A three-node inverse plate finite element is formulated. The element formulation enables robust and efficient modeling of plate structures instrumented with strain sensors that have arbitrary positions. The methodology leads to a set of linear algebraic equations that are solved efficiently for the unknown nodal displacements. These displacements are then used at the finite element level to compute full-field strains, stresses, and failure criteria that are in turn used to assess structural integrity. Numerical results for multilayered, highly heterogeneous laminates demonstrate the unique capability of this new formulation for shape- and stress-sensing.

  11. An identification method for enclosed voids restriction in manufacturability design for additive manufacturing structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shutian; Li, Quhao; Chen, Wenjiong; Tong, Liyong; Cheng, Gengdong

    2015-06-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) technologies, such as selective laser sintering (SLS) and fused deposition modeling (FDM), have become the powerful tools for direct manufacturing of complex parts. This breakthrough in manufacturing technology makes the fabrication of new geometrical features and multiple materials possible. Past researches on designs and design methods often focused on how to obtain desired functional performance of the structures or parts, specific manufacturing capabilities as well as manufacturing constraints of AM were neglected. However, the inherent constraints in AM processes should be taken into account in design process. In this paper, the enclosed voids, one type of manufacturing constraints of AM, are investigated. In mathematics, enclosed voids restriction expressed as the solid structure is simplyconnected. We propose an equivalent description of simply-connected constraint for avoiding enclosed voids in structures, named as virtual temperature method (VTM). In this method, suppose that the voids in structure are filled with a virtual heating material with high heat conductivity and solid areas are filled with another virtual material with low heat conductivity. Once the enclosed voids exist in structure, the maximum temperature value of structure will be very high. Based upon this method, the simplyconnected constraint is equivalent to maximum temperature constraint. And this method can be easily used to formulate the simply-connected constraint in topology optimization. The effectiveness of this description method is illustrated by several examples. Based upon topology optimization, an example of 3D cantilever beam is used to illustrate the trade-off between manufacturability and functionality. Moreover, the three optimized structures are fabricated by FDM technology to indicate further the necessity of considering the simply-connected constraint in design phase for AM.

  12. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Newcastle NTMS quadrangle, Wyoming, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, S.J.; Sandoval, W.F.; Gallimore, D.L.; Talcott, C.L.; Martinez, R.G.; Minor, M.E.; Mills, C.F.

    1980-06-01

    During the summer and fall of 1977, 533 water and 1226 sediment samples were collected from 1740 locations within the 18,000 km/sup 2/ area of the Newcastle quadrangle, Wyoming. Water samples were collected from wells and springs; sediment samples were collected from stream channels and from springs. Each water sample was analyzed for uranium, and each sediment sample was analyzed for 43 elements, including uranium and thorium. Uranium concentrations in water samples range from below the detection limit of 0.02 ppB to 702.26 ppB and have a median of 1.73 ppB and a mean of 11.76 ppB. Water samples containing high uranium concentrations (>20 ppB) generally are associated with known uranium mining activity or units known to be uranium bearing. About one-third of the water samples containing high uranium concentrations were collected from locations within the Pumpkin Buttes and Turnercrest-Ross Districts. Nearly half of the water samples containing high uranium concentrations were collected from locations just west of the Monument Hill and Highland Flats-Box Creek Districts. Similar anomalous uranium concentrations in this region have been reported updip from Exxon's Highland uranium deposits. High uranium concentrations were also found associated with the Lance Creek-Old Woman Anticline District.

  13. Geometric identification and damage detection of structural elements by terrestrial laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Tsung-Chin; Liu, Yu-Wei; Su, Yu-Min

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, three-dimensional (3D) terrestrial laser scanning technologies with higher precision and higher capability are developing rapidly. The growing maturity of laser scanning has gradually approached the required precision as those have been provided by traditional structural monitoring technologies. Together with widely available fast computation for massive point cloud data processing, 3D laser scanning can serve as an efficient structural monitoring alternative for civil engineering communities. Currently most research efforts have focused on integrating/calculating the measured multi-station point cloud data, as well as modeling/establishing the 3D meshes of the scanned objects. Very little attention has been spent on extracting the information related to health conditions and mechanical states of structures. In this study, an automated numerical approach that integrates various existing algorithms for geometric identification and damage detection of structural elements were established. Specifically, adaptive meshes were employed for classifying the point cloud data of the structural elements, and detecting the associated damages from the calculated eigenvalues in each area of the structural element. Furthermore, kd-tree was used to enhance the searching efficiency of plane fitting which were later used for identifying the boundaries of structural elements. The results of geometric identification were compared with M3C2 algorithm provided by CloudCompare, as well as validated by LVDT measurements of full-scale reinforced concrete beams tested in laboratory. It shows that 3D laser scanning, through the established processing approaches of the point cloud data, can offer a rapid, nondestructive, remote, and accurate solution for geometric identification and damage detection of structural elements.

  14. Interactive effects between N addition and disturbance on boreal forest ecosystem structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordin, Annika; Strengbom, Joachim; From, Fredrik

    2014-05-01

    In management of boreal forests, nitrogen (N) enrichment from atmospheric deposition or from forest fertilization can appear in combination with land-use related disturbances, i.e. tree harvesting by clear-felling. Long-term interactive effects between N enrichment and disturbance on boreal forest ecosystem structure and function are, however, poorly known. We investigated effects of N enrichment by forest fertilization done > 25 years ago on forest understory species composition in old-growth (undisturbed) forests, and in forests clear-felled 10 years ago (disturbed). In clear-felled forests we also investigated effects of the previous N addition on growth of tree saplings. The results show that the N enrichment effect on the understory species composition was strongly dependent on the disturbance caused by clear-felling. In undisturbed forests, there were small or no effects on understory species composition from N addition. In contrast, effects were large in forests first exposed to N addition and subsequently disturbed by clear-felling. Effects of N addition differed among functional groups of plants. Abundance of graminoids increased (+232%) and abundance of dwarf shrubs decreased (-44%) following disturbance in N fertilized forests. For vascular plants, the two perturbations had contrasting effects on α-(within forests) and β-diversity (among forests): in disturbed forests, N addition reduced, or had no effect on α-diversity, while β-diversity increased. For bryophytes, negative effects of disturbance on α-diversity were smaller in N fertilized forests than in forests not fertilized, while neither N addition nor disturbance had any effects on β-diversity. Moreover, sapling growth in forests clear-felled 10 years ago was significantly higher in previously N fertilized forests than in forests not fertilized. Our study show that effects of N addition on plant communities may appear small, short-lived, or even absent until exposed to a disturbance. This

  15. Structural Health Monitoring Using High-Density Fiber Optic Strain Sensor and Inverse Finite Element Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez, Sixto L.; Tessler, Alexander; Quach, Cuong C.; Cooper, Eric G.; Parks, Jeffrey; Spangler, Jan L.

    2005-01-01

    In an effort to mitigate accidents due to system and component failure, NASA s Aviation Safety has partnered with industry, academia, and other governmental organizations to develop real-time, on-board monitoring capabilities and system performance models for early detection of airframe structure degradation. NASA Langley is investigating a structural health monitoring capability that uses a distributed fiber optic strain system and an inverse finite element method for measuring and modeling structural deformations. This report describes the constituent systems that enable this structural monitoring function and discusses results from laboratory tests using the fiber strain sensor system and the inverse finite element method to demonstrate structural deformation estimation on an instrumented test article

  16. STARS: An integrated general-purpose finite element structural, aeroelastic, and aeroservoelastic analysis computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Kajal K.

    1991-01-01

    The details of an integrated general-purpose finite element structural analysis computer program which is also capable of solving complex multidisciplinary problems is presented. Thus, the SOLIDS module of the program possesses an extensive finite element library suitable for modeling most practical problems and is capable of solving statics, vibration, buckling, and dynamic response problems of complex structures, including spinning ones. The aerodynamic module, AERO, enables computation of unsteady aerodynamic forces for both subsonic and supersonic flow for subsequent flutter and divergence analysis of the structure. The associated aeroservoelastic analysis module, ASE, effects aero-structural-control stability analysis yielding frequency responses as well as damping characteristics of the structure. The program is written in standard FORTRAN to run on a wide variety of computers. Extensive graphics, preprocessing, and postprocessing routines are also available pertaining to a number of terminals.

  17. Effect of boron addition on the structure and magnetic properties of CoPt nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Khemjeen, Yutthaya; Pinitsoontorn, Supree Chompoosor, Apiwat

    2015-05-07

    The effect of B addition on CoPt nanoparticles was investigated. The CoPt-B nanoparticles were synthesized by means of the polyol process. Transmission electron microscopy has shown that the as-synthesized particles have a spherical morphology with average size about 2–3 nm. The X-ray absorption spectroscopy and the X-ray diffraction technique showed the effect of B concentration on phase transformation. The addition of B at up to 60% promoted the formation of the L1{sub 0} phase when the nanoparticles were subjected to annealing at 600 °C. If the B content is higher than 60%, the phase transition is suppressed. The evidence of B addition on the structure of CoPt nanoparticles was further supported by the magnetic measurements. The results show that the coercivity of the annealed CoPt-B nanoparticles was enhanced by the B additions from 20% to 60%, with the maximum coercivity of 12 000 Oe for the CoPt-40%B sample.

  18. Response of bacterial community structure and function to experimental rainwater additions in a coastal eutrophic embayment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teira, Eva; Hernando-Morales, Víctor; Martínez-García, Sandra; Figueiras, Francisco G.; Arbones, Belén; Álvarez-Salgado, Xosé Antón

    2013-03-01

    Although recognized as a potentially important source of both inorganic and organic nutrients, the impact of rainwater on microbial populations from marine planktonic systems has been poorly assessed. The effect of rainwater additions on bacterioplankton metabolism and community composition was evaluated in microcosm experiments enclosing natural marine plankton populations from the Ría de Vigo (NW Spain). The experiments were conducted during three different seasons (spring, autumn and winter) using rainwater collected at three different locations: marine, urban and rural sites. Bacterial abundance and production significantly increased up to 1.3 and 1.8-fold, respectively, after urban rainwater additions in spring, when ambient nutrient concentration was very low. Overall, the increments in bacterial production were higher than those in bacterial respiration, which implies that a higher proportion of carbon consumed by bacteria would be available to higher trophic levels. The response of the different bacterial groups to distinct rainwater types differed between seasons. The most responsive bacterial groups were Betaproteobacteria which significantly increased their abundance after urban (in spring and winter) and marine (in spring) rainwater additions, and Bacteroidetes which positively responded to all rainwater treatments in spring and to urban rainwater in autumn. Gammaproteobacteria and Roseobacter responded only to urban (in spring) and marine (in winter) rainwater treatment, respectively. The responses to rainwater additions were moderate and transient, and the resulting bacterial community structure was not importantly altered.

  19. A finite element method for time varying geometry in multibody structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housner, J. M.; Wu, S. C.; Chang, C. W.

    1988-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element formulation using convected coordinates is presented for the multibody dynamics of truss-like configurations. Unlike existing formulations, the present one does not superimpose nonlinear rigid body kinematics with linear structural mode shapes, an approach that has recently been shown to be grossly inaccurate under certain conditions. Instead, the finite element method is extended to treat large motions/deformations. The formulation is oriented toward joint dominated structures and places the generalized coordinates at the joints. For the planar spin-up of a flexible beam, results are compared with those derived from a commercially available computer program. The two programs predict nearly identical results.

  20. Applications of a global nuclear-structure model to studies of the heaviest elements

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R.

    1993-10-01

    We present some new results on heavy-element nuclear-structure properties calculated on the basis of the finite-range droplet model and folded-Yukawa single-particle potential. Specifically, we discuss calculations of nuclear ground-state masses and microscopic corrections, {alpha}-decay properties, {beta}-decay properties, fission potential-energy surfaces, and spontaneous-fission half-lives. These results, obtained in a global nuclear-structure approach, are particularly reliable for describing the stability properties of the heaviest elements.

  1. [Developing a finite element model of human head with true anatomic structure mandible].

    PubMed

    Ma, Chunsheng; Zhang, Haizhong; Du, Huiliang; Huang, Shilin; Zhang, Jinhuan

    2005-02-01

    A finite element model of human mandible is developed from CT scan images by the technologies of three-dimensional reconstruction, image processing and meshing. The mandible model is connected to one modified head model of Hybrid III dummy with joint according to the anatomic structure and mechanical characteristics of the temporomandibular joint. Then a finite element model of the human head with the true anatomic structure mandible is developed. This model has been validated with the cadaver test results. It can be used in researches on the mechanism of craniofacial blunt-impact injury and on the assessment of injury severity. PMID:15762115

  2. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Newcastle NTMS Quadrangle, Wyoming, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, S.J.; Sandoval, W.F.; Gallimore, D.L.; Talcott, C.L.; Martinez, R.G.; Minor, M.E.; Mills, C.F.

    1980-06-01

    Water and sediment samples were collected and each water sample was analyzed for U, and each sediment sample was analyzed for 43 elements, including U and Th. Uranium concentrations in water samples range from below the detection limit of 0.02 ppB to 702.26 ppB and have a median of 1.73 ppB and a mean of 11.76 ppB. Water samples containing high uranium concentrations generally are associated with known uranium mining activity or units known to be uranium bearing. About one-third of the water samples containing high uranium concentrations were collected from locations within the Pumpkin Buttes and Turnercrest-Ross Districts. Nearly half of the water samples containing high uranium concentrations were collected from locations just west of the Monument Hill and Highland Flats-Box Creek Districts. Similar anomalous uranium concentrations in this region have been reported updip from Exxon's Highland uranium deposits. High uranium concentrations were also found associated with the Lance Creek-Old Woman Anticline District. Uranium concentrations in sediment samples range from 1.14 to 220.70 ppM and have a median of 3.37 ppM and a mean of 4.03 ppM. Throughout the major uranium mining districts of the Powder River Basin, sediment samples with high uranium concentrations were collected from dry streams located near wells producing water samples with high uranium concentrations. High uranium concentrations were also found associated with the Lance Creek oil field where uranium mineralization is known in the White River formation. High uranium concentrations were also found in sediment samples in areas where uranium mineralization is not known. These samples are from dry streams in areas underlain by the White River formation, the Niobrara formation, and the Pierre, Carlisle, Belle Fourche, and Mowry shales.

  3. The domain structure and distribution of Alu elements in long noncoding RNAs and mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eugene Z; Wespiser, Adam R; Caffrey, Daniel R

    2016-02-01

    Approximately 75% of the human genome is transcribed and many of these spliced transcripts contain primate-specific Alu elements, the most abundant mobile element in the human genome. The majority of exonized Alu elements are located in long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) and the untranslated regions of mRNA, with some performing molecular functions. To further assess the potential for Alu elements to be repurposed as functional RNA domains, we investigated the distribution and evolution of Alu elements in spliced transcripts. Our analysis revealed that Alu elements are underrepresented in mRNAs and lncRNAs, suggesting that most exonized Alu elements arising in the population are rare or deleterious to RNA function. When mRNAs and lncRNAs retain exonized Alu elements, they have a clear preference for Alu dimers, left monomers, and right monomers. mRNAs often acquire Alu elements when their genes are duplicated within Alu-rich regions. In lncRNAs, reverse-oriented Alu elements are significantly enriched and are not restricted to the 3' and 5' ends. Both lncRNAs and mRNAs primarily contain the Alu J and S subfamilies that were amplified relatively early in primate evolution. Alu J subfamilies are typically overrepresented in lncRNAs, whereas the Alu S dimer is overrepresented in mRNAs. The sequences of Alu dimers tend to be constrained in both lncRNAs and mRNAs, whereas the left and right monomers are constrained within particular Alu subfamilies and classes of RNA. Collectively, these findings suggest that Alu-containing RNAs are capable of forming stable structures and that some of these Alu domains might have novel biological functions.

  4. Creating a Test-Validated Finite-Element Model of the X-56A Aircraft Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi; Truong, Samson

    2014-01-01

    Small modeling errors in a finite-element model will eventually induce errors in the structural flexibility and mass, thus propagating into unpredictable errors in the unsteady aerodynamics and the control law design. One of the primary objectives of the X-56A Multi-Utility Technology Testbed aircraft is the flight demonstration of active flutter suppression and, therefore, in this study, the identification of the primary and secondary modes for the structural model tuning based on the flutter analysis of the X-56A aircraft. The ground-vibration test-validated structural dynamic finite-element model of the X-56A aircraft is created in this study. The structural dynamic finite-element model of the X-56A aircraft is improved using a model-tuning tool. In this study, two different weight configurations of the X-56A aircraft have been improved in a single optimization run. Frequency and the cross-orthogonality (mode shape) matrix were the primary focus for improvement, whereas other properties such as c.g. location, total weight, and off-diagonal terms of the mass orthogonality matrix were used as constraints. The end result was an improved structural dynamic finite-element model configuration for the X-56A aircraft. Improved frequencies and mode shapes in this study increased average flutter speeds of the X-56A aircraft by 7.6% compared to the baseline model.

  5. Creating a Test Validated Structural Dynamic Finite Element Model of the X-56A Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi; Truong, Samson

    2014-01-01

    Small modeling errors in the finite element model will eventually induce errors in the structural flexibility and mass, thus propagating into unpredictable errors in the unsteady aerodynamics and the control law design. One of the primary objectives of the Multi Utility Technology Test-bed, X-56A aircraft, is the flight demonstration of active flutter suppression, and therefore in this study, the identification of the primary and secondary modes for the structural model tuning based on the flutter analysis of the X-56A aircraft. The ground vibration test-validated structural dynamic finite element model of the X-56A aircraft is created in this study. The structural dynamic finite element model of the X-56A aircraft is improved using a model tuning tool. In this study, two different weight configurations of the X-56A aircraft have been improved in a single optimization run. Frequency and the cross-orthogonality (mode shape) matrix were the primary focus for improvement, while other properties such as center of gravity location, total weight, and offdiagonal terms of the mass orthogonality matrix were used as constraints. The end result was a more improved and desirable structural dynamic finite element model configuration for the X-56A aircraft. Improved frequencies and mode shapes in this study increased average flutter speeds of the X-56A aircraft by 7.6% compared to the baseline model.

  6. Theory of structure and hyperfine properties of anomalous muonium in elemental semiconductors: Diamond, silicon, and germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Sahoo, N.; Sulaiman, S. B.; Mishra, K. C.; Das, T. P.

    1989-06-15

    A number of possible models for the anomalous muonium (Mu/sup */)center in the elemental semiconductors diamond, silicon, and germanium areinvestigated in detail, both with respect to their stabilities and abilities toexplain the extensive available experimental hyperfine-interaction data, thelatter being the major focus of the present work. Using the unrestrictedHartree-Fock cluster procedure, the electronic structures and potential-energycurves associated with muon positions are obtained for the different models.The results are utilized to obtain hyperfine properties associated with themuon and its neighboring nuclei, including vibrational effects associated withthe muon. Our results show that stability considerations favor both thevacancy-associated (VA) and bond-centered (BC) models for Mu/sup */.The VA model explains all the experimentally observed features of the muonhyperfine properties and provides reasonably good quantitative agreement withexperiment. However, questions remain regarding its formation and ability toexplain level-crossing resonance (LCR) data. On the other hand, although the BCmodel appears to explain the experimental features from LCR measurements, inits present form, it seriously overestimates the strengths of the muonhyperfine interactions as compared to experiment, by more than an order ofmagnitude in some cases. Additionally, it does not explain the trend fromdiamond through germanium. On the basis of the results in this paper for the VAand BC models, the direction for future investigations for understanding thenature of the Mu/sup */ center is commented on.

  7. CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Simulation of SET Operation in Phase-Change Random Access Memories with Heater Addition and Ring-Type Contactor for Low-Power Consumption by Finite Element Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yue-Feng; Song, Zhi-Tang; Ling, Yun; Liu, Yan; Feng, Song-Lin

    2009-11-01

    A three-dimensional finite element model for phase change random access memory (PCRAM) is established for comprehensive electrical and thermal analysis during SET operation. The SET behaviours of the heater addition structure (HS) and the ring-type contact in bottom electrode (RIB) structure are compared with each other. There are two ways to reduce the RESET current, applying a high resistivity interfacial layer and building a new device structure. The simulation results indicate that the variation of SET current with different power reduction ways is little. This study takes the RESET and SET operation current into consideration, showing that the RIB structure PCRAM cell is suitable for future devices with high heat efficiency and high-density, due to its high heat efficiency in RESET operation.

  8. EBSD analysis of magnesium addition on inclusion formation in SS400 structural steel

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Sin-Jie; Su, Yen-Hao Frank; Lu, Muh-Jung; Kuo, Jui-Chao

    2013-08-15

    In this study, the effect of magnesium addition on the inclusion formation in SS400 steel was investigated. The experimental specimens with and without Mg addition treatment were compared. The microstructure was observed using optical microscopy after etching with 3% nital. The morphology and chemical composition of the inclusions were analyzed via scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry. The lattice structure and orientation of the inclusions were identified by electron backscattering diffraction. The average size of inclusions in SS400 was between 0.67 and 0.75 μm, and between 0.65 and 0.68 μm in SS400 + Mg. The 2 ppm Mg addition resulted in the oxide formation change from Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to MgO·Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and in the inclusion formation change from Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–MnS to MgO·Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–MnS. Moreover, a simple-phase MnS with an average grain size of 1 μm to 2 μm was observed in rod-like, globular, and polyhedron forms. - Highlights: • The effect of magnesium addition was investigated for SS400 steel. • 2 ppm Mg addition changes the inclusion formation from Al2O3-MnS to MgO·Al2O3-MnS. • MnS observed in inclusions exhibits rod-like, globular, and polyhedron forms.

  9. A finite element approach for the dynamic analysis of joint-dominated structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Che-Wei; Wu, Shih-Chin

    1991-01-01

    A finite element method to model dynamic structural systems undergoing large rotations is presented. The dynamic systems are composed of rigid joint bodies and flexible beam elements. The configurations of these systems are subject to change due to the relative motion in the joints among interconnected elastic beams. A body fixed reference is defined for each joint body to describe the joint body's displacements. Using the finite element method and the kinematic relations between each flexible element and its corotational reference, the total displacement field of an element, which contains gross rigid as well as elastic effects, can be derived in terms of the translational and rotational displacements of the two end nodes. If one end of an element is hinged to a joint body, the joint body's displacements and the hinge degree of freedom at the end are used to represent the nodal displacements. This results in a highly coupled system of differential equations written in terms of hinge degrees of freedom as well as the rotational and translational displacements of joint bodies and element nodes.

  10. Structural basis of VDR–DNA interactions on direct repeat response elements

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Paul L.; Gewirth, Daniel T.

    2002-01-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) forms homo- or heterodimers on response elements composed of two hexameric half-sites separated by 3 bp of spacer DNA. We describe here the crystal structures at 2.7–2.8 Å resolution of the VDR DNA-binding region (DBD) in complex with response elements from three different promoters: osteopontin (SPP), canonical DR3 and osteocalcin (OC). These structures reveal the chemical basis for the increased affinity of VDR for the SPP response element, and for the poor stability of the VDR–OC complex, relative to the canonical DR3 response element. The homodimeric protein–protein interface is stabilized by van der Waals interactions and is predominantly non-polar. An extensive α-helix at the C-terminal end of the VDR DBD resembles that found in the thyroid hormone receptor (TR), and suggests a mechanism by which VDR and TR discriminate among response elements. Selective structure-based mutations in the asymmetric homodimeric interface result in a VDR DBD protein that is defective in homodimerization but now forms heterodimers with the 9-cis retinoic acid receptor (RXR) DBD. PMID:11980721

  11. Three Dimensional Viscous Finite Element Formulation For Acoustic Fluid Structure Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lei; White, Robert D.; Grosh, Karl

    2010-01-01

    A three dimensional viscous finite element model is presented in this paper for the analysis of the acoustic fluid structure interaction systems including, but not limited to, the cochlear-based transducers. The model consists of a three dimensional viscous acoustic fluid medium interacting with a two dimensional flat structure domain. The fluid field is governed by the linearized Navier-Stokes equation with the fluid displacements and the pressure chosen as independent variables. The mixed displacement/pressure based formulation is used in the fluid field in order to alleviate the locking in the nearly incompressible fluid. The structure is modeled as a Mindlin plate with or without residual stress. The Hinton-Huang’s 9-noded Lagrangian plate element is chosen in order to be compatible with 27/4 u/p fluid elements. The results from the full 3d FEM model are in good agreement with experimental results and other FEM results including Beltman’s thin film viscoacoustic element [2] and two and half dimensional inviscid elements [21]. Although it is computationally expensive, it provides a benchmark solution for other numerical models or approximations to compare to besides experiments and it is capable of modeling any irregular geometries and material properties while other numerical models may not be applicable. PMID:20174602

  12. Investigation of an investment casting method combined with additive manufacturing methods for manufacturing lattice structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodira, Ganapathy D.

    Cellular metals exhibit combinations of mechanical, thermal and acoustic properties that provide opportunities for various implementations and applications; light weight aerospace and automobile structures, impact and noise absorption, heat dissipation, and heat exchange. Engineered cell topologies enable one to control mechanical, thermal, and acoustic properties of the gross cell structures. A possible way to manufacture complex 3D metallic cellular solids for mass production with a relatively low cost, the investment casting (IC) method may be used by combining the rapid prototyping (RP) of wax or injection molding. In spite of its potential to produce mass products of various 3D cellular metals, the method is known to have significant casting porosity as a consequence of the complex cellular topology which makes continuous fluid's access to the solidification interface difficult. The effects of temperature on the viscosity of the fluids were studied. A comparative cost analysis between AM-IC and additive manufacturing methods is carried out. In order to manufacture 3D cellular metals with various topologies for multi-functional applications, the casting porosity should be resolved. In this study, the relations between casting porosity and processing conditions of molten metals while interconnecting with complex cellular geometries are investigated. Temperature and pressure conditions on the rapid prototyping -- investment casting (RP-IC) method are reported, thermal stresses induced are also studied. The manufactured samples are compared with those made by additive manufacturing methods.

  13. Reversible intermolecular E-H oxidative addition to a geometrically deformed and structurally dynamic phosphorous triamide.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; McCarthy, Sean M; Lai, Ting Yi; Yennawar, Hemant P; Radosevich, Alexander T

    2014-12-17

    The synthesis and reactivity of geometrically constrained tricoordinate phosphorus (σ(3)-P) compounds supported by tridentate triamide chelates (N[o-NR-C6H4]2(3-); R = Me or (i)Pr) are reported. Studies indicate that 2 (P{N[o-NMe-C6H4]2}) adopts a Cs-symmetric structure in the solid state. Variable-temperature NMR studies demonstrate a low-energy inversion at phosphorus in solution (ΔG(‡)(exptl)(298) = 10.7(5) kcal/mol), for which DFT calculations implicate an edge-inversion mechanism via a metastable C2-symmetric intermediate. In terms of reactivity, compound 2 exhibits poor nucleophilicity, but undergoes oxidative addition at ambient temperature of diverse O-H- and N-H-containing compounds (including alcohols, phenols, carboxylic acids, amines, and anilines). The resulting pentacoordinate adducts 2·[H][OR] and 2·[H][NHR] are characterized by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography, and their structures (which span the pseudorotation coordinate between trigonal bipyramidal and square planar) are evaluated in terms of negative hyperconjugation. At elevated temperatures, the oxidative addition is shown to be reversible for volatile alcohols and amines.

  14. Finite element thermal-structural analysis of cable-stiffened space structues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.; Pandey, A. K.

    1984-01-01

    Finite element thermal-structural analyses of large, cable-stiffened space structures are presented. A computational scheme for the calculation of prestresses in the cable-stiffened structures is also described. The determination of thermal loads on orbiting space structures due to environment heating is discussed briefly. Three finite element structural analysis techniques are presented for the analysis of prestressed structures. Linear, stress stiffening, and large displacement analysis techniques were investigated. These three techniques were employed for analysis of prestressed cable structures at different prestress levels. The analyses produced similar results at small prestress, but at higher prestress, differences between the results became significant. For the cable-stiffened structures studied, the linear analysis technique may not provide acceptable results. The stress stiffening analysis technique may yield results of acceptable accuracy depending upon the level of prestress. The large displacement analysis technique produced accurate results over a wide range of prestress and is recommended as a general analysis technique for thermal-structural analysis of cable-stiffened space structures.

  15. Additive contour of porcelain veneers: a key element in enamel preservation, adhesion, and esthetics for aging dentition.

    PubMed

    Magne, P; Douglas, W H

    1999-01-01

    Esthetics and function are equal concerns when restoring the anterior dentition. Modern concepts in restorative dentistry have brought new solutions through bonded porcelain veneers that are stress distributors and involve the crown of the tooth as a whole in supporting occlusal force and masticatory function. This recovery of the original biomechanics of the intact tooth, the biomimetic principle, is particularly valuable when considering the restoration of an aging dentition. Both function and appearance are affected by the senescent changes of the aging teeth. Erosion and surface wear lead to a progressive thinning of enamel, ultimately leading to increased crown flexibility and higher surface strains. It appears therefore that the restoration of tooth volume will not only re-establish the original and youthful appearance of the smile but will also allow the biomimetic recovery of the crown. The final treatment outcome strongly depends on the therapeutic approach chosen, the driving force of which should be the preservation of the thin remaining enamel. While a number of preparation techniques will expose dentin to a great extent, the principle of enamel preservation can still be fulfilled by the use of a specific approach. This article describes a treatment method which includes the use of a diagnostic template. This type of work strategy, documented with clinical cases, integrates additive wax-ups and acrylic mock-ups. The latter will provide a significant amount of diagnostic information and economy of tooth substrate, the importance of which cannot be overestimated in the completion, functionality, and longevity of the final restoration.

  16. Effect of Quarterly Element Addition of Cobalt on Phase Transformation Characteristics of Cu-Al-Ni Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saud, Safaa Najah; Abu Bakar, Tuty Asma; Hamzah, Esah; Ibrahim, Mustafa Khaleel; Bahador, Abollah

    2015-08-01

    In the current study, a new type of Cu-based shape memory alloys with the function of shape memory effect was successfully produced with the introduction of high-purity Co precipitates between the phases of Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy. The microstructure, transformation characteristics, and mechanical properties were systematically investigated by means of differential scanning calorimetry, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), a tensile test, a hardness test, and a shape memory effect test. The typical microstructures show that a new phase was formed, known as the γ 2 phase, and the volume friction and the size of this phase were gradually increased with the increasing Co content. According to the results of the XRD and EDS, it was confirmed that the γ 2 phase represents a compound of Al75Co22Ni3. However, the presence of γ 2 phase in the modified alloys was found to result in an increase of the transformation temperatures in comparison with the unmodified alloy. Nevertheless, it was found that with 1 wt pct of Co addition, a maximum ductility of 7 pct was achieved, corresponding to an increase in the strain recovery by the shape memory effect to 95 pct with respect to the unmodified alloy of 50 pct.

  17. Structural Anomaly Detection Using Fiber Optic Sensors and Inverse Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quach, Cuong C.; Vazquez, Sixto L.; Tessler, Alex; Moore, Jason P.; Cooper, Eric G.; Spangler, Jan. L.

    2005-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is investigating a variety of techniques for mitigating aircraft accidents due to structural component failure. One technique under consideration combines distributed fiber optic strain sensing with an inverse finite element method for detecting and characterizing structural anomalies anomalies that may provide early indication of airframe structure degradation. The technique identifies structural anomalies that result in observable changes in localized strain but do not impact the overall surface shape. Surface shape information is provided by an Inverse Finite Element Method that computes full-field displacements and internal loads using strain data from in-situ fiberoptic sensors. This paper describes a prototype of such a system and reports results from a series of laboratory tests conducted on a test coupon subjected to increasing levels of damage.

  18. Pounding Effects on the Earthquake Response of Adjacent Reinforced Concrete Structures Strengthened by Cable Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liolios, Angelos; Liolios, Asterios; Hatzigeorgiou, George; Radev, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    A numerical approach for estimating the effects of pounding (seismic interaction) on the response of adjacent Civil Engineering structures is presented. Emphasis is given to reinforced concrete (RC) frames of existing buildings which are seismically strengthened by cable-elements. A double discretization, in space by the Finite Element Method and in time by a direct incremental approach is used. The unilateral behaviours of both, the cable-elements and the interfaces contact-constraints, are taken strictly into account and result to inequality constitutive conditions. So, in each time-step, a non-convex linear complementarity problem is solved. It is found that pounding and cable strengthening have significant effects on the earthquake response and, hence, on the seismic upgrading of existing adjacent RC structures.

  19. Soil microbial community structure and nitrogen cycling responses to agroecosystem management and carbon substrate addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthrong, S. T.; Buckley, D. H.; Drinkwater, L. E.

    2011-12-01

    Fertilizer application in conventional agriculture leads to N saturation and decoupled soil C and N cycling, whereas organic practices, e.g. complex rotations and legume incorporation, often results in increased SOM and tightly coupled cycles of C and N. These legacy effects of management on soils likely affect microbial community composition and microbial process rates. This project tested if agricultural management practices led to distinct microbial communities and if those communities differed in ability to utilize labile plant carbon substrates and to produce more plant available N. We addressed several specific questions in this project. 1) Do organic and conventional management legacies on similar soils produce distinct soil bacterial and fungal community structures and abundances? 2) How do these microbial community structures change in response to carbon substrate addition? 3) How do the responses of the microbial communities influence N cycling? To address these questions we conducted a laboratory incubation of organically and conventionally managed soils. We added C-13 labelled glucose either in one large dose or several smaller pulses. We extracted genomic DNA from soils before and after incubation for TRFLP community fingerprinting. We measured C in soil pools and respiration and N in soil extracts and leachates. Management led to different compositions of bacteria and fungi driven by distinct components in organic soils. Biomass did not differ across treatments indicating that differences in cycling were due to composition rather than abundance. C substrate addition led to convergence in bacterial communities; however management still strongly influenced the difference in communities. Fungal communities were very distinct between managements and plots with substrate addition not altering this pattern. Organic soils respired 3 times more of the glucose in the first week than conventional soils (1.1% vs 0.4%). Organic soils produced twice as much

  20. Synthesis of Ti-Ta alloys with dual structure by incomplete diffusion between elemental powders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Li, Kaiyang; Wu, Hong; Song, Min; Wang, Wen; Li, Nianfeng; Tang, Huiping

    2015-11-01

    In this work, powder metallurgical (PM) Ti-Ta alloys were sintered using blended elemental powders. A dual structure, consisting of Ti-rich and Ta-rich zones, was formed due to the insufficient diffusion between Ti and Ta powders. The microstructure, mechanical properties and in vitro biological properties of the alloys were studied. Results indicated that the alloys have inhomogenous microstructures and compositions, but the grain structures were continuous from the Ti-rich zone to the Ta-rich zone. The Ta-rich zone exhibited a much finer grain size than the Ti-rich zone. The alloys had a high relative density in the range of 95-98%, with the porosity increasing with the content of Ta due to the increased difficulty in sintering and the formation of Kirkendall pores. The alloys had a good combination of low elastic modulus and high tensile strength. The strength of alloys was almost doubled compared to that of the ingot metallurgy alloys with the same compositions. The low elastic modulus was due to the residual pores and the alloying effect of Ta, while the high tensile strength resulted from the strengthening effects of solid solution, fine grain size and α phase. The alloys had a high biocompatibility due to the addition of Ta, and were suitable for the attachment of cells due to the surface porosity. It was also indicated that PM Ti-(20-30)Ta alloys are promising for biomedical applications after the evaluations of both the mechanical and the biological properties. PMID:26275506

  1. Synthesis of Ti-Ta alloys with dual structure by incomplete diffusion between elemental powders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Li, Kaiyang; Wu, Hong; Song, Min; Wang, Wen; Li, Nianfeng; Tang, Huiping

    2015-11-01

    In this work, powder metallurgical (PM) Ti-Ta alloys were sintered using blended elemental powders. A dual structure, consisting of Ti-rich and Ta-rich zones, was formed due to the insufficient diffusion between Ti and Ta powders. The microstructure, mechanical properties and in vitro biological properties of the alloys were studied. Results indicated that the alloys have inhomogenous microstructures and compositions, but the grain structures were continuous from the Ti-rich zone to the Ta-rich zone. The Ta-rich zone exhibited a much finer grain size than the Ti-rich zone. The alloys had a high relative density in the range of 95-98%, with the porosity increasing with the content of Ta due to the increased difficulty in sintering and the formation of Kirkendall pores. The alloys had a good combination of low elastic modulus and high tensile strength. The strength of alloys was almost doubled compared to that of the ingot metallurgy alloys with the same compositions. The low elastic modulus was due to the residual pores and the alloying effect of Ta, while the high tensile strength resulted from the strengthening effects of solid solution, fine grain size and α phase. The alloys had a high biocompatibility due to the addition of Ta, and were suitable for the attachment of cells due to the surface porosity. It was also indicated that PM Ti-(20-30)Ta alloys are promising for biomedical applications after the evaluations of both the mechanical and the biological properties.

  2. Calculation of the hyperfine structure of the superheavy elements Z=119 and Z=120{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, T. H.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2009-10-15

    The hyperfine-structure constants of the lowest s and p{sub 1/2} states of superheavy elements Z=119 and Z=120{sup +} are calculated using ab initio approach. Core polarization and dominating correlation effects are included to all orders. Breit and quantum electrodynamic effects are also considered. Similar calculations for Cs, Fr, Ba{sup +}, and Ra{sup +} are used to control the accuracy. The dependence of the hyperfine-structure constants on the nuclear radius is discussed.

  3. Novel technique for internal structure and elemental distribution analyses of granular sludge from reactors for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaolei; Cao, Hongbin; Sheng, Yuxing; You, Haixia; Zhang, Yi

    2013-03-01

    A novel technique for internal structure and elemental distribution analyses of granular sludge is presented. Sludge samples were freeze-dried and embedded in epoxy resin to form a module, which were then ground and polished to obtain sequential cross-sections. The cross-sections were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). SEM observations showed that one granule was formed having several cores with different inorganic minerals, rather than a single core. EDX results indicate that the main elements of the granules are O, Ca, Mg, and P. In addition, the distribution areas of calcium and magnesium in the granule do not coincide. PMID:23160739

  4. Simulation of wind effects on tall structures by finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Masood

    2016-06-01

    In the present study finite element method is used to predict the wind forces on a tall structure. The governing equations of mass and momentum with boundary conditions are solved. The κ- ɛ turbulence model is utilized to calculate the turbulence viscosity. The results are independent from the generated mesh. The numerical results are validated with American Society of Civil Engineering standards.

  5. Biomechanical investigation into the structural design of porous additive manufactured cages using numerical and experimental approaches.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pei-I; Hsu, Ching-Chi; Chen, San-Yuan; Wu, Tsung-Han; Huang, Chih-Chieh

    2016-09-01

    Traditional solid cages have been widely used in posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) surgery. However, solid cages significantly affect the loading mechanism of the human spine due to their extremely high structural stiffness. Previous studies proposed and investigated porous additive manufactured (AM) cages; however, their biomechanical performances were analyzed using oversimplified bone-implant numerical models. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the outer shape and inner porous structure of the AM cages. The outer shape of the AM cages was discovered using a simulation-based genetic algorithm; their inner porous structure was subsequently analyzed parametrically using T10-S1 multilevel spine models. Finally, six types of the AM cages, which were manufactured using selective laser melting, were tested to validate the numerical outcomes. The subsidence resistance of the optimum design was superior to the conventional cage designs. A porous AM cage with a pillar diameter of 0.4mm, a pillar angle of 40°, and a porosity of between 69% and 80% revealed better biomechanical performances. Both the numerical and experimental outcomes can help surgeons to understand the biomechanics of PLIF surgery combined with the use of AM cages. PMID:27392226

  6. Effect of surfactant addition on ultrasonic leaching of trace elements from plant samples in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowska-Burnecka, Jolanta; Jankowiak, Urszula; Zyrnicki, Wieslaw; Anna Wilk, Kazimiera

    2004-04-01

    The applicability of surfactants in sample preparation of plant materials followed by analysis by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry has been examined. Reference materials (INCT-MPH-2-Mixed Polish Herbs, INCT-TL-1 black tea leaves and CTA-VTL-2 -Virginia tobacco leaves) and commercially available tea leaves were analyzed. Effects of addition surfactants (Triton X-100, didodecyldimethylammonium bromide and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) on efficiency of ultrasonic leaching of elements from the plant samples and on plasma parameters were investigated. Low concentrations of the surfactants in solutions did not affect, in practice, analytical line intensities and the nebulization process. Quantitative recovery of some elements could be obtained by ultrasonic diluted acid leaching with the aid of surfactants. However, the element recovery depended on type of surfactant, as well as element and sample material. Plasma parameters, i.e. the excitation temperatures of Ar I, Fe II and Ca II as well as the electron number density and the Mg II/Mg I intensity ratio did not vary significantly due to the surfactants in solutions.

  7. Numerical simulation of the fatigue behavior of additive manufactured titanium porous lattice structures.

    PubMed

    Zargarian, A; Esfahanian, M; Kadkhodapour, J; Ziaei-Rad, S

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the effects of cell geometry and relative density on the high-cycle fatigue behavior of Titanium scaffolds produced by selective laser melting and electron beam melting techniques were numerically investigated by finite element analysis. The regular titanium lattice samples with three different unit cell geometries, namely, diamond, rhombic dodecahedron and truncated cuboctahedron, and the relative density range of 0.1-0.3 were analyzed under uniaxial cyclic compressive loading. A failure event based algorithm was employed to simulate fatigue failure in the cellular material. Stress-life approach was used to model fatigue failure of both bulk (struts) and cellular material. The predicted fatigue life and the damage pattern of all three structures were found to be in good agreement with the experimental fatigue investigations published in the literature. The results also showed that the relationship between fatigue strength and cycles to failure obeyed the power law. The coefficient of power function was shown to depend on relative density, geometry and fatigue properties of the bulk material while the exponent was only dependent on the fatigue behavior of the bulk material. The results also indicated the failure surface at an angle of 45° to the loading direction. PMID:26706539

  8. Numerical simulation of the fatigue behavior of additive manufactured titanium porous lattice structures.

    PubMed

    Zargarian, A; Esfahanian, M; Kadkhodapour, J; Ziaei-Rad, S

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the effects of cell geometry and relative density on the high-cycle fatigue behavior of Titanium scaffolds produced by selective laser melting and electron beam melting techniques were numerically investigated by finite element analysis. The regular titanium lattice samples with three different unit cell geometries, namely, diamond, rhombic dodecahedron and truncated cuboctahedron, and the relative density range of 0.1-0.3 were analyzed under uniaxial cyclic compressive loading. A failure event based algorithm was employed to simulate fatigue failure in the cellular material. Stress-life approach was used to model fatigue failure of both bulk (struts) and cellular material. The predicted fatigue life and the damage pattern of all three structures were found to be in good agreement with the experimental fatigue investigations published in the literature. The results also showed that the relationship between fatigue strength and cycles to failure obeyed the power law. The coefficient of power function was shown to depend on relative density, geometry and fatigue properties of the bulk material while the exponent was only dependent on the fatigue behavior of the bulk material. The results also indicated the failure surface at an angle of 45° to the loading direction.

  9. DYCAST: A finite element program for the crash analysis of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pifko, A. B.; Winter, R.; Ogilvie, P.

    1987-01-01

    DYCAST is a nonlinear structural dynamic finite element computer code developed for crash simulation. The element library contains stringers, beams, membrane skin triangles, plate bending triangles and spring elements. Changing stiffnesses in the structure are accounted for by plasticity and very large deflections. Material nonlinearities are accommodated by one of three options: elastic-perfectly plastic, elastic-linear hardening plastic, or elastic-nonlinear hardening plastic of the Ramberg-Osgood type. Geometric nonlinearities are handled in an updated Lagrangian formulation by reforming the structure into its deformed shape after small time increments while accumulating deformations, strains, and forces. The nonlinearities due to combined loadings are maintained, and stiffness variation due to structural failures are computed. Numerical time integrators available are fixed-step central difference, modified Adams, Newmark-beta, and Wilson-theta. The last three have a variable time step capability, which is controlled internally by a solution convergence error measure. Other features include: multiple time-load history tables to subject the structure to time dependent loading; gravity loading; initial pitch, roll, yaw, and translation of the structural model with respect to the global system; a bandwidth optimizer as a pre-processor; and deformed plots and graphics as post-processors.

  10. P element temperature-specific transposition: a model for possible regulation of mobile elements activity by pre-mRNA secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Gultyaev, A; Redchuk, T; Korolova, A; Kozeretska, I

    2014-01-01

    P element is a DNA transposon, known to spread in genome using transposase activity. Its activity is tissue-specific and normally observed at high temperatures within 24 degrees C to 29 degrees C. Here, we present a predicted RNA secondary structure domain of P element pre-mRNA which could potentially regulate the temperature sensitivity of the P element activity. In canonical P elements, the structure is a small hairpin with double-helical part interrupted by a symmetric loop and a mismatch. In M type P elements, the A.A mismatch is substituted by an A-U base pair, stabilizing the structure. The hairpin structure covers the region involving the IVS-3 5' splice site and both pseudo-splice sites F1 and F2. While the IVS-3 and F1 binding sites of U1 snRNA are located in the double-stranded part of the structure, the F2 site is exposed in the hairpin loop. The formation of this structure may interfere with landing of U1 snRNA on IVS-3 site, while F2 is positioned for the interaction. Alignment of P element sequences supports the proposed existence of the hairpin, showing high similarity for this region. The hairpin structure, stable at low temperatures, may prevent correct IVS-3 splicing. Conversely, temperature-induced destabilization of the hairpin structure may result in the splicing at the proper IVS-3 splice site. Taking into account the increasing amount of data demonstrating the important influence of RNA folding on phenotypes determined by alternative splicing a model for possible regulation of the activity of mobile elements by pre-mRNA secondary structure seems intriguing.

  11. A hybrid-mixed finite element formulation for the geometrically exact analysis of three-dimensional framed structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, H. A. F. A.; Pimenta, P. M.; Almeida, J. P. M.

    2011-11-01

    This paper addresses the development of a hybrid-mixed finite element formulation for the quasi-static geometrically exact analysis of three-dimensional framed structures with linear elastic behavior. The formulation is based on a modified principle of stationary total complementary energy, involving, as independent variables, the generalized vectors of stress-resultants and displacements and, in addition, a set of Lagrange multipliers defined on the element boundaries. The finite element discretization scheme adopted within the framework of the proposed formulation leads to numerical solutions that strongly satisfy the equilibrium differential equations in the elements, as well as the equilibrium boundary conditions. This formulation consists, therefore, in a true equilibrium formulation for large displacements and rotations in space. Furthermore, this formulation is objective, as it ensures invariance of the strain measures under superposed rigid body rotations, and is not affected by the so-called shear-locking phenomenon. Also, the proposed formulation produces numerical solutions which are independent of the path of deformation. To validate and assess the accuracy of the proposed formulation, some benchmark problems are analyzed and their solutions compared with those obtained using the standard two-node displacement/ rotation-based formulation.

  12. Genomic-scale comparison of sequence- and structure-based methods of function prediction: Does structure provide additional insight?

    PubMed Central

    Fetrow, Jacquelyn S.; Siew, Naomi; Di Gennaro, Jeannine A.; Martinez-Yamout, Maria; Dyson, H. Jane; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    A function annotation method using the sequence-to-structure-to-function paradigm is applied to the identification of all disulfide oxidoreductases in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. The method identifies 27 sequences as potential disulfide oxidoreductases. All previously known thioredoxins, glutaredoxins, and disulfide isomerases are correctly identified. Three of the 27 predictions are probable false-positives. Three novel predictions, which subsequently have been experimentally validated, are presented. Two additional novel predictions suggest a disulfide oxidoreductase regulatory mechanism for two subunits (OST3 and OST6) of the yeast oligosaccharyltransferase complex. Based on homology, this prediction can be extended to a potential tumor suppressor gene, N33, in humans, whose biochemical function was not previously known. Attempts to obtain a folded, active N33 construct to test the prediction were unsuccessful. The results show that structure prediction coupled with biochemically relevant structural motifs is a powerful method for the function annotation of genome sequences and can provide more detailed, robust predictions than function prediction methods that rely on sequence comparison alone. PMID:11316881

  13. The effect of tissue structure and soil chemistry on trace element uptake in fossils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinz, Emily A.; Kohn, Matthew J.

    2010-06-01

    Trace element profiles for common divalent cations (Sr, Zn, Ba), rare-earth elements (REE), Y, U, and Th were measured in fossil bones and teeth from the c. 25 ka Merrell locality, Montana, USA, by using laser-ablation ICP-MS. Multiple traverses in teeth were transformed into 2-D trace element maps for visualizing structural influences on trace element uptake. Trace element compositions of different soils from the fossil site were also analyzed by solution ICP-MS, employing progressive leaches that included distilled H 2O, 0.1 M acetic acid, and microwave digestion in concentrated HCl-HNO 3. In teeth, trace element uptake in enamel is 2-4 orders of magnitude slower than in dentine, forming an effective trace element barrier. Uptake in dentine parallel to the dentine-enamel interface is enhanced by at least 2 orders of magnitude compared to transverse, causing trace element "plumes" down the tooth core. In bone, U, Ba and Sr are nearly homogeneous, implying diffusivities ˜5 orders of magnitude faster than in enamel and virtually complete equilibration with host soils. In contrast all REE show strong depletions inward, with stepwise linear segments in log-normal or inverse complementary error function plots; these data require a multi-medium diffusion model, with about 2 orders of magnitude difference in slowest vs. fastest diffusivities. Differences in REE diffusivities in bone (slow) vs. dentine (fast) reflect different partition coefficients ( Kd's). Although acid leaches and bulk digestion of soils yield comparable fossil-soil Kd's among different elements, natural solutions are expected to be neutral to slightly basic. Distilled H 2O leachates instead reveal radically different Kd's in bone for REE than for U-Sr-Ba, suggest orders of magnitude lower effective diffusivities for REE, and readily explain steep vs. flat profiles for REE vs. U-Sr-Ba, respectively. Differences among REE Kd's and diffusivities may explain inward changes in Ce anomalies. Acid washes

  14. Properties of Inconel 625 Mesh Structures Grown by Electron Beam Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    List III, Frederick Alyious; Dehoff, Ryan R; Lowe, Larry E; Sames, William J

    2014-01-01

    Relationships between electron beam parameters (beam current, beam speed, and beam focus) and physical properties (mass, diameter, elastic modulus, and yield strength) have been investigated for Inconel 625 mesh cubes fabricated using an additive manufacturing technology based on electron beam melting. The elastic modulus and yield strength of the mesh cubes have been systematically varied by approximately a factor of ten by changing the electron beam parameters. Simple models have been used to understand better these relationships. Structural anisotropies of the mesh associated with the layered build architecture have been observed and may contribute, along with microstructural anisotropies, to the anisotropic mechanical properties of the mesh. Knowledge of this kind is likely applicable to other metal and alloy systems and is essential to rapidly realize the full potential of this burgeoning technology.

  15. Application and testing of additive manufacturing for mirrors and precision structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Michael; Acreman, Martyn; Vettese, Tom; Myatt, Ray; Thompson, Mike

    2015-09-01

    Additive Manufacturing (aka AM, and 3-D printing) is widely touted in the media as the foundation for the next industrial revolution. Beneath the hype, AM does indeed offer profound advantages in lead-time, dramatically reduced consumption of expensive raw materials, while enabling new and innovative design forms that cannot be produced by other means. General Dynamics and their industry partners have begun to embrace this technology for mirrors and precision structures used in the aerospace, defense, and precision optical instrumentation industries. Aggressively lightweighted, open and closed back test mirror designs, 75-150 mm in size, were first produced by AM from several different materials. Subsequent optical finishing and test experiments have exceeded expectations for density, surface finish, dimensional stability and isotropy of thermal expansion on the optical scale of measurement. Materials currently under examination include aluminum, titanium, beryllium, aluminum beryllium, Inconel 625, stainless steel/bronze, and PEKK polymer.

  16. Structural and biocompatibility properties of dextran from Weissella cibaria JAG8 as food additive.

    PubMed

    Tingirikari, Jagan Mohan Rao; Kothari, Damini; Shukla, Rishikesh; Goyal, Arun

    2014-09-01

    Dextran produced from Weissella cibaria JAG8 was purified and characterized. The molecular mass of dextran as determined by the gel filtration and copper bicinchoninate method was approximately, 800 kDa. Monosaccharide analysis revealed that the polysaccharide comprised only glucose units. Dynamic light scattering study confirmed the mono-disperse nature of dextran with hydrodynamic radius of 900 nm. Surface morphology study of dextran by scanning electron microscopy showed the porous web like structure. Cytotoxicity studies on human cervical cancer (HeLa) cell line showed non-toxic and biocompatible nature of dextran. The relative browning for dextran from W. cibaria JAG8 was similar to commercial prebiotic Nutraflora P-95 and 3-fold lower than Raftilose P-95. Synthesis of dextran by dextransucrase treated, sucrose-supplemented skimmed milk revealed the promising potential of dextran as a food additive.

  17. Structure-property relationships in ABA copolymer gels with A homopolymer additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, Michelle; Rottsolk, Rebecca; Page, Kirt; Shull, Kenneth

    2009-03-01

    ABA acrylic triblock copolymers with poly(methyl methacrylate) endblocks and poly(butyl acrylate) midblocks transition from free flowing liquids to elastic solids with decreasing temperature in alcohol solvents. Homopolymer PMMA chains can be solubilized in the micelle cores if they are shorter than the endblocks. Indentation and compression tests were used to determine gel's modulus and large strain behavior. Gels with volume fractions of PMMA less than ˜0.2 are highly elastic and have moduli dictated by stretching of bridging midblocks. At higher PMMA contents, gels exhibit greater permanent deformation and moduli over an order of magnitude larger than would be expected from rubber elasticity alone. Small angle X-ray and neutron scattering and mean field simulations were used to correlate changes in gel structure and micelle morphology with the addition of homopolymer.

  18. Tailoring of Boehmite-Derived Aluminosilicate Aerogel Structure and Properties: Influence of Ti Addition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.; Guo, Haiquan; Sheets, Erik J.; Miller, Derek R.; Newlin, Katy N.

    2010-01-01

    Aluminosilicate aerogels offer potential for extremely low thermal conductivities at temperatures greater than 900 C, beyond where silica aerogels reach their upper temperature limits. Aerogels have been synthesized at various Al:Si ratios, including mullite compositions, using Boehmite (AlOOH) as the Al source, and tetraethoxy orthosilicate as the Si precursor. The Boehmite-derived aerogels are found to form by a self-assembly process of AlOOH crystallites, with Si-O groups on the surface of an alumina skeleton. Morphology, surface area and pore size varies with the crystallite size of the starting Boehmite powder, as well as with synthesis parameters. Ternary systems, including Al-Si-Ti aerogels incorporating a soluble Ti precursor, are possible with careful control of pH. The addition of Ti influences sol viscosity, gelation time pore structure and pore size distribution, as well as phase formation on heat treatment.

  19. Structural health monitoring using time reversal and cracked rod spectral element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucena, R. L.; Dos Santos, J. M. C.

    2016-10-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) has received substantial attention in the last decades. Damage detection methods based on dynamic analysis seem to be appropriate to detect large damages, but fail for small ones. Alternative methods use elastic wave propagation allowing a quick and long range test. In this paper, a new approach based on the combination of Time Reversal Method (TRM) and Spectral Element Method (SEM) is proposed to perform structural damage detection. The main novelty is to combine wave-based spectral element model together with time reversal signal processing. Although the methodology is evaluated by numerical simulation, this combination of numerical modeling and time reversal signal processing can be applied as an experimental approach to provide a useful tool for damage detection. Simulated examples of the damage detection method using rod-like structures are illustrated and the results discussed and compared with those from literature.

  20. Proton NMR assignment and secondary structural elements of human transforming growth factor. alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.C.; Mueller, L.; Jeffs, P.W. )

    1989-01-24

    The {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of human transforming growth factor {alpha} (hTGF-{alpha}) has been completely assigned, and secondary structural elements have been identified as a preliminary step in determining the structure of this protein by distance geometry methods. Many of these structural elements closely correspond to those previously found in a truncated human EGF and murine EGF. These include the presence of an antiparallel {beta}-sheet between residues G19 and C34 with a type I {beta}-turn at V25-D28, a type II {beta}-turn at H35-Y38, and another short {beta}-sheet between residues Y38-V39 and H45-A46.

  1. [The structural organization of the receptor elements and organs of the land mollusk Pomatia elegans (Prosobranchia)].

    PubMed

    Zaĭtseva, O V

    1996-01-01

    The general structural organization, receptor and nervous elements of tentacular sensory organs, statocysts, eyes, osphradium as well as receptor elements of skin of body and head were investigated in the land prosobranch mollusk Pomatias elegans. The structure of eyes, statocysts and osphradium of P. elegans, with the exception of some details, does not differ principally from the structure of corresponding sensory organs of the primarily water-dwelling Prosobranchia. The head tentacles are complex, specialized sensory formations, similar to tentacular organs of land pulmonates. They had a specialized sensory area, featured in the apex of the tentacle, and apical and basal tentacular ganglia. The glomerula-like formations are revealed in the neuropile of the apical tentacular ganglion. Almost all the receptor cells in skin and sensory organs of P. elegans are intra-epithelial. The regularities of evolution of chemosensory systems of gastropods arising at multiple land intrusion are discussed.

  2. Structural Basis for Promoter ;#8722;10 Element Recognition by the Bacterial RNA Polymerase [sigma] Subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Feklistov, Andrey; Darst, Seth A.

    2011-12-15

    The key step in bacterial promoter opening is recognition of the -10 promoter element (T-{sub 12}A-{sub 11}T-{sub 10}A-{sub 9}A-{sub 8}T{sub -7} consensus sequence) by the RNA polymerase {alpha} subunit. We determined crystal structures of {alpha} domain 2 bound to single-stranded DNA bearing -10 element sequences. Extensive interactions occur between the protein and the DNA backbone of every -10 element nucleotide. Base-specific interactions occur primarily with A{sub -11} and T{sub -7}, which are flipped out of the single-stranded DNA base stack and buried deep in protein pockets. The structures, along with biochemical data, support a model where the recognition of the -10 element sequence drives initial promoter opening as the bases of the nontemplate strand are extruded from the DNA double-helix and captured by {alpha}. These results provide a detailed structural basis for the critical roles of A{sub -11} and T{sub -7} in promoter melting and reveal important insights into the initiation of transcription bubble formation.

  3. Raman spectroscopic evaluation of meat batter structural changes induced by thermal treatment and salt addition.

    PubMed

    Herrero, A M; Carmona, P; López-López, I; Jiménez-Colmenero, F

    2008-08-27

    Raman spectroscopy, texture, proximate composition, and water binding analysis were carried out to evaluate the effect of thermal treatment and/or salt addition to meat batter. For this purpose, different meat batters were elaborated: control meat batter (no salt) and meat batters with low (1.0%) and high (2.5%) NaCl content with and without thermal treatment (70 degrees C/30 min). Increase (P < 0.05) in penetration force and hardness upon heating was observed. Results also showed hardness increasing (P < 0.05) as a function of salt addition in heated meat batter. Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in alpha-helix content accompanied by an increase (P < 0.05) in beta-sheets resulting from heating. Significant (P < 0.05) correlations were found between these secondary structural changes in meat proteins and water binding and textural properties of meat batter. In this way, a significant correlation was found between beta-sheets, salt content, hardness, and chewiness in heated samples.

  4. Essential Structural Requirements and Additive Effects for Flavonoids to Scavenge Methylglyoxal.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xi; Chen, Huadong; Zhu, Yingdong; Sedighi, Rashin; Ho, Chi-Tang; Sang, Shengmin

    2014-04-01

    Reactive dicarbonyl species, such as methylglyoxal (MGO), are considered as the major precursors of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which are believed to be one of the physiological causes of diabetes and its complications. Scavenging of reactive dicarbonyl species using naturally occurring flavonoids has been proposed as an effective way to prevent diabetic complications. To elucidate the structural requirements of flavonoids in scavenging MGO, seven flavonoids (quercetin, luteolin, epicatechin, genistein, daidzein, apigenin, and phloretin) and five sub-components of the flavonoids (gallic acid, phloroglucinol, pyrogallol, pyrocatechol, and resorcinol) were examined in this study. Our results showed the following: (1) 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene (pyrogallol) has higher MGO scavenging activity than 1,3,5-trihydroxybenzene and 1,2- and 1,3-dihydroxybenzene, and substitution at position 5 of pyrogallol diminished the scavenging activity, indicating that position 5 is the active site of pyrogallol; (2) the A ring is the active site of flavonoids in contributing the MGO-trapping efficacy, and the hydroxyl group at C-5 on the A ring enhances the trapping efficacy; (3) the double bond between C-2 and C-3 on the C ring could facilitate the trapping efficacy; and (4) the number of hydroxyl groups on the B ring does not significantly influence the trapping efficacy. In addition, we found there is an additive effect in MGO trapping by two common flavonoids, quercetin and phloretin, indicating that flavonoid-enriched foods and beverages hold great promise to prevent the development of diabetic complications.

  5. Application of finite-element-based solution technologies for viscoplastic structural analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, V. K.

    1990-01-01

    Finite-element solution technology developed for use in conjunction with advanced viscoplastic models is described. The development of such solution technology is necessary for performing stress/life analyses of engineering structural problems where the complex geometries and loadings make the conventional analytical solutions difficult. The versatility of the solution technology is demonstrated by applying it to viscoplastic models possessing different mathematical structures and encompassing isotropic and anisotropic material. The computational results qualitatively replicate deformation behavior observed in experiments on prototypical structural components.

  6. Children's Understanding of the Additive Composition of Number and of the Decimal Structure: What Is the Relationship?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs, Georgina; Squire, Sarah; Bryant, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Nunes and Bryant (Children doing mathematics, Blackwell, Oxford, 1996) proposed that an understanding of the additive composition of number could be a precursor to an understanding of the decimal structure. If this is so, children should achieve an understanding of additive composition before they can handle the decimal structure. The aim of our…

  7. effect of hydrogen addition and burner diameter on the stability and structure of lean, premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Kelsey Leigh

    Low swirl burners (LSBs) have gained popularity in heating and gas power generation industries, in part due to their proven capacity for reducing the production of NOx, which in addition to reacting to form smog and acid rain, plays a central role in the formation of the tropospheric ozone layer. With lean operating conditions, LSBs are susceptible to combustion instability, which can result in flame extinction or equipment failure. Extensive work has been performed to understand the nature of LSB combustion, but scaling trends between laboratory- and industrial-sized burners have not been established. Using hydrogen addition as the primary method of flame stabilization, the current work presents results for a 2.54 cm LSB to investigate potential effects of burner outlet diameter on the nature of flame stability, with focus on flashback and lean blowout conditions. In the lean regime, the onset of instability and flame extinction have been shown to occur at similar equivalence ratios for both the 2.54 cm and a 3.81 cm LSB and depend on the resolution of equivalence ratios incremented. Investigations into flame structures are also performed. Discussion begins with a derivation for properties in a multicomponent gas mixture used to determine the Reynolds number (Re) to develop a condition for turbulent intensity similarity in differently-sized LSBs. Based on this requirement, operating conditions are chosen such that the global Reynolds number for the 2.54 cm LSB is within 2% of the Re for the 3.81 cm burner. With similarity obtained, flame structure investigations focus on flame front curvature and flame surface density (FSD). As flame structure results of the current 2.54 cm LSB work are compared to results for the 3.81 cm LSB, no apparent relationship is shown to exist between burner diameter and the distribution of flame surface density. However, burner diameter is shown to have a definite effect on the flame front curvature. In corresponding flow conditions, a

  8. Electronic Structure and Gas-Phase Behaviour of the Heaviest Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Pershina, V.; Anton, J.; Jacob, T.; Borschevsky, A.

    2010-04-30

    Electronic structures and gas-phase adsorption behaviour of the heaviest elements 112, 113 and 114 and of their lighter homologs Hg, Tl and Pb is studied on the basis of ab initio Dirac-Coulomb atomic and four-component Density Functional Theory molecular and cluster calculations. The heaviest elements were shown to have low adsorption enthalpies on Teflon and should, therefore, be well transported through Teflon capillaries from the target chamber to the chemistry set up. Adsorption enthalpies of these elements on the Au(111) surface are predicted as -44.5 kJ/mol, -158.6 kJ/mol and -68.5 kJ/mol, respectively, giving the following sequence in the adsorption temperatures 113>114>112.

  9. Acoustic coupled fluid-structure interactions using a unified fast multipole boundary element method.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Daniel R; Duncan, Alec J

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a numerical model for the acoustic coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) of a submerged finite elastic body using the fast multipole boundary element method (FMBEM). The Helmholtz and elastodynamic boundary integral equations (BIEs) are, respectively, employed to model the exterior fluid and interior solid domains, and the pressure and displacement unknowns are coupled between conforming meshes at the shared boundary interface to achieve the acoustic FSI. The low frequency FMBEM is applied to both BIEs to reduce the algorithmic complexity of the iterative solution from O(N(2)) to O(N(1.5)) operations per matrix-vector product for N boundary unknowns. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the algorithmic and memory complexity of the method, which are shown to be in good agreement with the theoretical estimates, while the solution accuracy is comparable to that achieved by a conventional finite element-boundary element FSI model.

  10. Intelligent control of a highly flexible robotic structure with hundreds of motor elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcelik, Selahattin; Blackburn, Michael

    2005-05-01

    As the number of the degrees of motion freedom increase in a robotic system, so grows the difficulty of control. We describe a model of a novel highly flexible robotic architecture composed of hundreds of motor elements, each associated with a unique degree of motion freedom. This new robotic architecture possesses a variably compliant structure that allows for the controlled distribution of loads and forces, and for the maintenance of different conformations. We then suggest two methods of intelligent control to manage the many motor elements. One method derives from neural networks, the other involves algorithms inspired by the biological immune system. Both methods are based on the system's perception of its own kinematics, and later self-prediction of the forces generated by coordinated subsets of motor elements that accomplish robot mobility and other work upon the environment.

  11. Acoustic coupled fluid-structure interactions using a unified fast multipole boundary element method.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Daniel R; Duncan, Alec J

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a numerical model for the acoustic coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) of a submerged finite elastic body using the fast multipole boundary element method (FMBEM). The Helmholtz and elastodynamic boundary integral equations (BIEs) are, respectively, employed to model the exterior fluid and interior solid domains, and the pressure and displacement unknowns are coupled between conforming meshes at the shared boundary interface to achieve the acoustic FSI. The low frequency FMBEM is applied to both BIEs to reduce the algorithmic complexity of the iterative solution from O(N(2)) to O(N(1.5)) operations per matrix-vector product for N boundary unknowns. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the algorithmic and memory complexity of the method, which are shown to be in good agreement with the theoretical estimates, while the solution accuracy is comparable to that achieved by a conventional finite element-boundary element FSI model. PMID:25920865

  12. Analytical modeling and modular simulation of feedline system elements with fluid/structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Kenneth T.; Krautheim, F. J.; Naylor, Bret A.; Walker, Bruce K.; Nayfeh, Adnan H.; Khosla, Prem K.

    The design and verification of sophisticated health monitoring and control algorithms for advanced space propulsion systems requires the development of high fidelity mathematical models of their dynamic behavior and efficient digital simulations of this behavior. In this paper, we report progress on an effort to develop integrated mathematical models of feedline system elements that form a part of liquid propulsion systems. In particular, we examine the modeling of the axial, torsional, and transverse dynamics of feedline elements containing liquid propellant flow, where the modeling specifically accounts for the flow/structure interactions that occur in such elements. We also discuss the implementation of these relationships by digital simulation code modules based upon solving the equations by the method of characteristics. Results are presented to demonstrate the code modules. We also discuss an ongoing effort to construct an object-oriented simulation framework to study the feasibility and performance of object-oriented approaches to the implementation of a dynamic simulation.

  13. Coupling equivalent plate and finite element formulations in multiple-method structural analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, Gary L.; Norwood, Keith

    1994-01-01

    A coupled multiple-method analysis procedure for use late in conceptual design or early in preliminary design of aircraft structures is described. Using this method, aircraft wing structures are represented with equivalent plate models, and structural details such as engine/pylon structure, landing gear, or a 'stick' model of a fuselage are represented with beam finite element models. These two analysis methods are implemented in an integrated multiple-method formulation that involves the assembly and solution of a combined set of linear equations. The corresponding solution vector contains coefficients of the polynomials that describe the deflection of the wing and also the components of translations and rotations at the joints of the beam members. Two alternative approaches for coupling the methods are investigated; one using transition finite elements and the other using Lagrange multipliers. The coupled formulation is applied to the static analysis and vibration analysis of a conceptual design model of a fighter aircraft. The results from the coupled method are compared with corresponding results from an analysis in which the entire model is composed of finite elements.

  14. Energy Finite Element Analysis Developments for Vibration Analysis of Composite Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahopoulos, Nickolas; Schiller, Noah H.

    2011-01-01

    The Energy Finite Element Analysis (EFEA) has been utilized successfully for modeling complex structural-acoustic systems with isotropic structural material properties. In this paper, a formulation for modeling structures made out of composite materials is presented. An approach based on spectral finite element analysis is utilized first for developing the equivalent material properties for the composite material. These equivalent properties are employed in the EFEA governing differential equations for representing the composite materials and deriving the element level matrices. The power transmission characteristics at connections between members made out of non-isotropic composite material are considered for deriving suitable power transmission coefficients at junctions of interconnected members. These coefficients are utilized for computing the joint matrix that is needed to assemble the global system of EFEA equations. The global system of EFEA equations is solved numerically and the vibration levels within the entire system can be computed. The new EFEA formulation for modeling composite laminate structures is validated through comparison to test data collected from a representative composite aircraft fuselage that is made out of a composite outer shell and composite frames and stiffeners. NASA Langley constructed the composite cylinder and conducted the test measurements utilized in this work.

  15. Structural Rearrangements in CHO Cells After Disruption of Individual Cytoskeletal Elements and Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Jokhadar, Špela Zemljič; Derganc, Jure

    2015-04-01

    Cellular structural integrity is provided primarily by the cytoskeleton, which comprises microtubules, actin filaments, and intermediate filaments. The plasma membrane has been also recognized as a mediator of physical forces, yet its contribution to the structural integrity of the cell as a whole is less clear. In order to investigate the relationship between the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton, we selectively disrupted the plasma membrane and each of the cytoskeletal elements in Chinese hamster ovary cells and assessed subsequent changes in cellular structural integrity. Confocal microscopy was used to visualize cytoskeletal rearrangements, and optical tweezers were utilized to quantify membrane tether extraction. We found that cholesterol depletion from the plasma membrane resulted in rearrangements of all cytoskeletal elements. Conversely, the state of the plasma membrane, as assessed by tether extraction, was affected by disruption of any of the cytoskeletal elements, including microtubules and intermediate filaments, which are located mainly in the cell interior. The results demonstrate that, besides the cytoskeleton, the plasma membrane is an important contributor to cellular integrity, possibly by acting as an essential framework for cytoskeletal anchoring. In agreement with the tensegrity model of cell mechanics, our results support the notion of the cell as a prestressed structure. PMID:25395197

  16. Development of an integrated BEM approach for hot fluid structure interaction: BEST-FSI: Boundary Element Solution Technique for Fluid Structure Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dargush, G. F.; Banerjee, P. K.; Shi, Y.

    1992-01-01

    As part of the continuing effort at NASA LeRC to improve both the durability and reliability of hot section Earth-to-orbit engine components, significant enhancements must be made in existing finite element and finite difference methods, and advanced techniques, such as the boundary element method (BEM), must be explored. The BEM was chosen as the basic analysis tool because the critical variables (temperature, flux, displacement, and traction) can be very precisely determined with a boundary-based discretization scheme. Additionally, model preparation is considerably simplified compared to the more familiar domain-based methods. Furthermore, the hyperbolic character of high speed flow is captured through the use of an analytical fundamental solution, eliminating the dependence of the solution on the discretization pattern. The price that must be paid in order to realize these advantages is that any BEM formulation requires a considerable amount of analytical work, which is typically absent in the other numerical methods. All of the research accomplishments of a multi-year program aimed toward the development of a boundary element formulation for the study of hot fluid-structure interaction in Earth-to-orbit engine hot section components are detailed. Most of the effort was directed toward the examination of fluid flow, since BEM's for fluids are at a much less developed state. However, significant strides were made, not only in the analysis of thermoviscous fluids, but also in the solution of the fluid-structure interaction problem.

  17. Crystal Structure of the Lysine Riboswitch Regulatory mRNA Element*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Garst, Andrew D.; Héroux, Annie; Rambo, Robert P.; Batey, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    Riboswitches are metabolite-sensitive elements found in mRNAs that control gene expression through a regulatory secondary structural switch. Along with regulation of lysine biosynthetic genes, mutations within the lysine-responsive riboswitch (L-box) play a role in the acquisition of resistance to antimicrobial lysine analogs. To understand the structural basis for lysine binding, we have determined the 2.8Å resolution crystal structure of lysine bound to the Thermotoga maritima asd lysine riboswitch ligand-binding domain. The structure reveals a complex architecture scaffolding a binding pocket completely enveloping lysine. Mutations conferring antimicrobial resistance cluster around this site as well as highly conserved long range interactions, indicating that they disrupt lysine binding or proper folding of the RNA. Comparison of the free and bound forms by x-ray crystallography, small angle x-ray scattering, and chemical probing reveals almost identical structures, indicating that lysine induces only limited and local conformational changes upon binding. PMID:18593706

  18. Crystal structure of the lysine riboswitch regulatory mRNA element.

    PubMed

    Garst, Andrew D; Héroux, Annie; Rambo, Robert P; Batey, Robert T

    2008-08-15

    Riboswitches are metabolite-sensitive elements found in mRNAs that control gene expression through a regulatory secondary structural switch. Along with regulation of lysine biosynthetic genes, mutations within the lysine-responsive riboswitch (L-box) play a role in the acquisition of resistance to antimicrobial lysine analogs. To understand the structural basis for lysine binding, we have determined the 2.8 angstroms resolution crystal structure of lysine bound to the Thermotoga maritima asd lysine riboswitch ligand-binding domain. The structure reveals a complex architecture scaffolding a binding pocket completely enveloping lysine. Mutations conferring antimicrobial resistance cluster around this site as well as highly conserved long range interactions, indicating that they disrupt lysine binding or proper folding of the RNA. Comparison of the free and bound forms by x-ray crystallography, small angle x-ray scattering, and chemical probing reveals almost identical structures, indicating that lysine induces only limited and local conformational changes upon binding. PMID:18593706

  19. Crystal Structure of the Lysine Riboswitch Regulatory mRNA Element

    SciTech Connect

    Garst, A.; Heroux, A; Rambo, R; Batey, R

    2008-01-01

    Riboswitches are metabolite-sensitive elements found in mRNAs that control gene expression through a regulatory secondary structural switch. Along with regulation of lysine biosynthetic genes, mutations within the lysine-responsive riboswitch (L-box) play a role in the acquisition of resistance to antimicrobial lysine analogs. To understand the structural basis for lysine binding, we have determined the 2.8{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of lysine bound to the Thermotoga maritima asd lysine riboswitch ligand-binding domain. The structure reveals a complex architecture scaffolding a binding pocket completely enveloping lysine. Mutations conferring antimicrobial resistance cluster around this site as well as highly conserved long range interactions, indicating that they disrupt lysine binding or proper folding of the RNA. Comparison of the free and bound forms by x-ray crystallography, small angle x-ray scattering, and chemical probing reveals almost identical structures, indicating that lysine induces only limited and local conformational changes upon binding.

  20. Development of Finite Elements for Two-Dimensional Structural Analysis Using the Integrated Force Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaljevic, Igor; Patnaik, Surya N.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    1996-01-01

    The Integrated Force Method has been developed in recent years for the analysis of structural mechanics problems. This method treats all independent internal forces as unknown variables that can be calculated by simultaneously imposing equations of equilibrium and compatibility conditions. In this paper a finite element library for analyzing two-dimensional problems by the Integrated Force Method is presented. Triangular- and quadrilateral-shaped elements capable of modeling arbitrary domain configurations are presented. The element equilibrium and flexibility matrices are derived by discretizing the expressions for potential and complementary energies, respectively. The displacement and stress fields within the finite elements are independently approximated. The displacement field is interpolated as it is in the standard displacement method, and the stress field is approximated by using complete polynomials of the correct order. A procedure that uses the definitions of stress components in terms of an Airy stress function is developed to derive the stress interpolation polynomials. Such derived stress fields identically satisfy the equations of equilibrium. Moreover, the resulting element matrices are insensitive to the orientation of local coordinate systems. A method is devised to calculate the number of rigid body modes, and the present elements are shown to be free of spurious zero-energy modes. A number of example problems are solved by using the present library, and the results are compared with corresponding analytical solutions and with results from the standard displacement finite element method. The Integrated Force Method not only gives results that agree well with analytical and displacement method results but also outperforms the displacement method in stress calculations.

  1. Modular structural elements in the replication origin region of Tetrahymena rDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Du, C; Sanzgiri, R P; Shaiu, W L; Choi, J K; Hou, Z; Benbow, R M; Dobbs, D L

    1995-01-01

    Computer analyses of the DNA replication origin region in the amplified rRNA genes of Tetrahymena thermophila identified a potential initiation zone in the 5'NTS [Dobbs, Shaiu and Benbow (1994), Nucleic Acids Res. 22, 2479-2489]. This region consists of a putative DNA unwinding element (DUE) aligned with predicted bent DNA segments, nuclear matrix or scaffold associated region (MAR/SAR) consensus sequences, and other common modular sequence elements previously shown to be clustered in eukaryotic chromosomal origin regions. In this study, two mung bean nuclease-hypersensitive sites in super-coiled plasmid DNA were localized within the major DUE-like element predicted by thermodynamic analyses. Three restriction fragments of the 5'NTS region predicted to contain bent DNA segments exhibited anomalous migration characteristic of bent DNA during electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gels. Restriction fragments containing the 5'NTS region bound Tetrahymena nuclear matrices in an in vitro binding assay, consistent with an association of the replication origin region with the nuclear matrix in vivo. The direct demonstration in a protozoan origin region of elements previously identified in Drosophila, chick and mammalian origin regions suggests that clusters of modular structural elements may be a conserved feature of eukaryotic chromosomal origins of replication. Images PMID:7784181

  2. Distinct Structural Elements Dictate the Specificity of the Type III Pentaketide Synthase from Neurospora crassa

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin-Pitel, Sheryl B.; Zhang, Houjin; Vu, Trang; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Zhao, Huimin; Nair, Satish K.

    2009-01-15

    The fungal type III polyketide synthase 2'-oxoalkylresorcyclic acid synthase (ORAS) primes with a range of acyl-Coenzyme A thioesters (C{sub 4}--C{sub 20}) and extends using malonyl-Coenzyme A to produce pyrones, resorcinols, and resorcylic acids. To gain insight into this unusual substrate specificity and product profile, we have determined the crystal structures of ORAS to 1.75 {angstrom} resolution, the Phe-252{yields}Gly site-directed mutant to 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, and a binary conplex of ORAS with eicosanoic acid to 2.0 {angstrom} resolution. The structures reveal a distinct rearrangement of structural elements near the active site that allows accomodation of long-chain fatty acid esters and a reorientation of the gating mechanism that controls cyclization and polyketide chain length. The roles of these structural elements are further elucidated by characterization of various structure-based site-directed variants. These studies establish an unexpected plasticity to the PKS fold, unanticipated from structural studies of other members of this enzyme family.

  3. Optimal design of a shape memory alloy actuated composite structure with iterative finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widdle, Richard D., Jr.; Grimshaw, Matthew T.; Shome, Moushumi

    2009-03-01

    A method is described for solving an inverse design problem to find the unassembled, stress-free component shapes of a structure thatis integrally actuated with shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators. Morphing and multifunctional structures are of interest in the aerospace industry becasue of the potential for improving structural and aerodynamic performance across multiple operating conditions. The focus of this work is on structures that are morphed with SMA flexural actuators. For the case where the geometry is known for unassembled components, assembly can be simulated to find the assembled shapes of the morphing structure. In the usual design case, however, only the desired shapes as assembled are known in multiple actuation states, and the corresponding unassembled shapes must be determined by an iterative solution process. An iterative finite element analysis approach to this problem is reported here. First an initial guess for the unassembled shapes is made and assembly is simulated with the finite element method. The resulting shapes are found for both SMA phases and compared with the desired shapes. A gradient-based optimization method is employed to update the initial geometry and iteration continues until the desired shapes are achieved. A simplified method of modeling the SMA material behavior is used for computational efficiently. It is found that this approach provides a practical way to solve the inverse design problem for structures that are integrally actuated with SMA material.

  4. Changes in bacterial diversity and community structure following pesticides addition to soil estimated by cultivation technique.

    PubMed

    Cycoń, Mariusz; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2009-07-01

    An experiment was conducted under laboratory conditions to investigate the effect of increasing concentrations of fenitrothion (2, 10 and 200 mg a.i./kg soil), diuron (1.5, 7.5 and 150 mg a.i./kg soil) and thiram (3.5, 17.5 and 350 mg a.i./kg soil) on soil respiration, bacterial counts and changes in culturable fraction of soil bacteria. To ascertain these changes, the community structure, bacterial biodiversity and process of colony formation, based on the r/K strategy concept, EP- and CD-indices and the FOR model, respectively, were determined. The results showed that the measured parameters were generally unaffected by the lowest dosages of pesticides, corresponding to the recommended field rates. The highest dosages of fenitrothion and thiram suppressed the peak SIR by 15-70% and 20-80%, respectively, while diuron increased respiration rate by 17-25% during the 28-day experiment. Also, the total numbers of bacteria increased in pesticide-treated soils. However, the reverse effect on day 1 and, in addition, in case of the highest dosages of insecticide on days 14 and 28, was observed. Analysis of the community structure revealed that in all soil treatments bacterial communities were generally dominated by K-strategists. Moreover, differences in the distribution of individual bacteria classes and the gradual domination of bacteria populations belonging to r-strategists during the experiment, as compared to control, was observed. However, on day 1, at the highest pesticide dosages, fast growing bacteria constituted only 1-10% of the total colonies number during 48 h of plate incubation, whereas in remaining samples they reached from 20 to 40% of total cfu. This effect, in case of fenitrothion, lasted till the end of the experiment. At the highest dosages of fenitrothion, diuron and at all dosages of thiram the decrease of biodiversity, as indicated by EP- and CD-indices on day 1, was found. At the next sampling time, no significant retarding or stimulating effect

  5. Critical review of the safety assessment of nano-structured silica additives in food.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Hans Christian; Suter, Mark; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2016-01-01

    The development of nano-materials is viewed as one of the most important technological advances of the 21st century and new applications of nano-sized particles in the production, processing, packaging or storage of food are expected to emerge soon. This trend of growing commercialization of engineered nano-particles as part of modern diet will substantially increase oral exposure. Contrary to the proven benefits of nano-materials, however, possible adverse health effects have generally received less attention. This problem is very well illustrated by nano-structured synthetic amorphous silica (SAS), which is a common food additive since several decades although the relevant risk assessment has never been satisfactorily completed. A no observed adverse effect level of 2500 mg SAS particles/kg body weight per day was derived from the only available long-term administration study in rodents. However, extrapolation to a safe daily intake for humans is problematic due to limitations of this chronic animal study and knowledge gaps as to possible local intestinal effects of SAS particles, primarily on the gut-associated lymphoid system. This uncertainty is aggravated by digestion experiments indicating that dietary SAS particles preserve their nano-sized structure when reaching the intestinal lumen. An important aspect is whether food-borne particles like SAS alter the function of dendritic cells that, embedded in the intestinal mucosa, act as first-line sentinels of foreign materials. We conclude that nano-particles do not represent a completely new threat and that most potential risks can be assessed following procedures established for conventional chemical hazards. However, specific properties of food-borne nano-particles should be further examined and, for that purpose, in vitro tests with decision-making cells of the immune system are needed to complement existing in vivo studies. PMID:27287345

  6. Critical review of the safety assessment of nano-structured silica additives in food.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Hans Christian; Suter, Mark; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2016-06-10

    The development of nano-materials is viewed as one of the most important technological advances of the 21st century and new applications of nano-sized particles in the production, processing, packaging or storage of food are expected to emerge soon. This trend of growing commercialization of engineered nano-particles as part of modern diet will substantially increase oral exposure. Contrary to the proven benefits of nano-materials, however, possible adverse health effects have generally received less attention. This problem is very well illustrated by nano-structured synthetic amorphous silica (SAS), which is a common food additive since several decades although the relevant risk assessment has never been satisfactorily completed. A no observed adverse effect level of 2500 mg SAS particles/kg body weight per day was derived from the only available long-term administration study in rodents. However, extrapolation to a safe daily intake for humans is problematic due to limitations of this chronic animal study and knowledge gaps as to possible local intestinal effects of SAS particles, primarily on the gut-associated lymphoid system. This uncertainty is aggravated by digestion experiments indicating that dietary SAS particles preserve their nano-sized structure when reaching the intestinal lumen. An important aspect is whether food-borne particles like SAS alter the function of dendritic cells that, embedded in the intestinal mucosa, act as first-line sentinels of foreign materials. We conclude that nano-particles do not represent a completely new threat and that most potential risks can be assessed following procedures established for conventional chemical hazards. However, specific properties of food-borne nano-particles should be further examined and, for that purpose, in vitro tests with decision-making cells of the immune system are needed to complement existing in vivo studies.

  7. Application of Flame-Sprayed Coatings as Heating Elements for Polymer-Based Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopera-Valle, Adrián; McDonald, André

    2015-10-01

    Flame-sprayed nickel-chromium-aluminum-yttrium (NiCrAlY) and nickel-chromium (NiCr) coatings were deposited on fiber-reinforced polymer composites for use as heating elements of structures that were exposed to cold environments. Electrical current was applied to the coatings to increase the surface temperature by way of Joule heating. The surface temperature profiles of the coatings were measured under free and forced convection conditions at different ambient temperatures, ranging from -25 to 23 °C. It was found that at ambient air temperatures below 0 °C, the surface temperature of the coating remained above 0 °C for both the forced and free convection conditions, and there was a nearly homogeneous temperature distribution over the coating surface. This suggests that flame-sprayed coatings could be used as heating elements to mitigate ice accretion on structures, without the presence of areas of localized high temperature.

  8. Modified Immersed Finite Element Method For Fully-Coupled Fluid-Structure Interations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingshi; Zhang, Lucy T

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we develop a "modified" immersed finite element method (mIFEM), a non-boundary-fitted numerical technique, to study fluid-structure interactions. Using this method, we can more precisely capture the solid dynamics by solving the solid governing equation instead of imposing it based on the fluid velocity field as in the original immersed finite element (IFEM). Using the IFEM may lead to severe solid mesh distortion because the solid deformation is been over-estimated, especially for high Reynolds number flows. In the mIFEM, the solid dynamics is solved using appropriate boundary conditions generated from the surrounding fluid, therefore produces more accurate and realistic coupled solutions. We show several 2-D and 3-D testing cases where the mIFEM has a noticeable advantage in handling complicated fluid-structure interactions when the solid behavior dominates the fluid flow.

  9. Three-dimensionality of space in the structure of the periodic table of chemical elements

    SciTech Connect

    Veremeichik, T. F.

    2006-07-15

    The effect of the dimension of the 3D homogeneous and isotropic Euclidean space, and the electron spin on the self-organization of the electron systems of atoms of chemical elements is considered. It is shown that the finite dimension of space creates the possibility of periodicity in the structure of an electron cloud, while the value of the dimension determines the number of stable systems of electrons at different levels of the periodic table of chemical elements and some characteristics of the systems. The conditions for the stability of systems of electrons and the electron system of an atom as a whole are considered. On the basis of the results obtained, comparison with other hierarchical systems (nanostructures and biological structures) is performed.

  10. Exact finite element method analysis of viscoelastic tapered structures to transient loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spyrakos, Constantine Chris

    1987-01-01

    A general method is presented for determining the dynamic torsional/axial response of linear structures composed of either tapered bars or shafts to transient excitations. The method consists of formulating and solving the dynamic problem in the Laplace transform domain by the finite element method and obtaining the response by a numerical inversion of the transformed solution. The derivation of the torsional and axial stiffness matrices is based on the exact solution of the transformed governing equation of motion, and it consequently leads to the exact solution of the problem. The solution permits treatment of the most practical cases of linear tapered bars and shafts, and employs modeling of structures with only one element per member which reduces the number of degrees of freedom involved. The effects of external viscous or internal viscoelastic damping are also taken into account.

  11. Electromagnetic and structural coupled finite element analysis of active control in an anti-vibration device

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamoto, Eiji; Chen, Q.M.; Takeuchi, Hitoshi; Brauer, J.R.

    1997-03-01

    An active control model of an anti-vibration device is analyzed using a coupled electromagnetic and structural finite element technique. The model consists of two parallel conducting wires moving in a uniform magnetic field. Displacement and velocity of the wires are detected and transformed into voltages. Those voltages are fed back to each wire to control the motion by Lorentz force. Calculated response of the motion is shown to agree with the theory of the equivalent mechanical model.

  12. Testing the Big Bang: Light elements, neutrinos, dark matter and large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, David N.

    1991-01-01

    Several experimental and observational tests of the standard cosmological model are examined. In particular, a detailed discussion is presented regarding: (1) nucleosynthesis, the light element abundances, and neutrino counting; (2) the dark matter problems; and (3) the formation of galaxies and large-scale structure. Comments are made on the possible implications of the recent solar neutrino experimental results for cosmology. An appendix briefly discusses the 17 keV thing and the cosmological and astrophysical constraints on it.

  13. A generalized threading model using integer programming that allows for secondary structure element deletion.

    PubMed

    Ellrott, Kyle; Guo, Jun-tao; Olman, Victor; Xu, Ying

    2006-01-01

    Integer programming is a combinatorial optimization method that has been successfully applied to the protein threading problem. We seek to expand the model optimized by this technique to allow for a more accurate description of protein threading. We have developed and implemented an expanded model of integer programming that has the capability to model secondary structure element deletion, which was not possible in previous version of integer programming based optimization. PMID:17503397

  14. Simulation of Turbulent Flow in a Complex Passage with a Vibrating Structure by Finite Element Formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L. X.; Guo, Y.

    A modeling of the turbulent flow in a complex passage with dynamical fluid-structure interaction (FSI) is established on the generalized variational principle. A monolithic coupling method on the finite element formulations (FEM) is used to realize numerical computation of the flow with dynamical FSI. The comparisons with LES show that the results on the FEM formulations suggested in this paper are favorable, and the computing effort is economical.

  15. Additional Constraints on the Shallow Seismic Velocity Structure of the Atlantis Massif Oceanic Core Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henig, A. S.; Blackman, D. K.; Harding, A. J.; Kent, G. M.; Canales, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    We investigate the detailed structure of the uppermost ~km of Atlantis Massif, an oceanic core complex at 30°N on the Mid Atlantic Ridge, using pre-existing multichannel seismic data. The Synthetic On- Bottom Experiment (SOBE) method that we employ downward continues both the shots and receivers to a depth just above the seafloor. This allows us to pick refracted arrivals recorded on the streamer at very-near offset, providing constraints from rays that are received within the 300-2000 m range that was unavailable to earlier studies where standard shot gathers had been analyzed. Thus, we can better model the upper few hundred meters of the section which, in turn, adds confidence for determining the deeper (400-1500 m) structure. New work on a ridge-parallel line has been added to last year's work on a cross-axis line over the Central Dome of the massif. Tomographic results are similar for these crossing lines: a thin (100-150 m) low velocity (< 3 km/s) layer caps the dome; high horizontal gradients (>1.25 s-1) occur in local (1-2 km wide) regions within these 6-8 km long subsections of the MCS lines analyzed to date; and very high vertical velocity gradients, greater than 3.75 s-1, occur within the km just below the exposed detachment in these areas. We obtain general agreement with Canales et al., 2008, results over the Central Dome but our models suggest a finer scale lateral heterogeneity. We have begun analysis of additional and extended MCS lines over the domal core of the massif and our priority for this presentation is to assess the detailed structure of the Southern Ridge. In at least some areas the thin, low velocity layer contrasts sufficiently with underlying material that a clear refracted arrival is visible in supergathers. We will determine whether the low velocity layer persists over the whole dome or if it is restricted to the Central Dome. An important question is whether its thickness on the Southern Ridge, if it exists there, differs from that

  16. Combinatorial reshaping of a lipase structure for thermostability: additive role of surface stabilizing single point mutations.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Singh, Ranvir; Kaur, Jagdeep

    2014-05-16

    Thermostable lipases are of high priority for industrial applications. In the present study, targeted improvement of the thermostability of a lipase from metagenomic origin was examined by using a combinatorial protein engineering approach exploring additive effects of single amino acid substitutions. A variant (LipR5) was generated after combination of two thermostabilizing mutations (R214C & N355K). Thermostability of the variant enzyme was analyzed by half-life measurement and circular dichroism (CD). To assess whether catalytic properties were affected by mutation, the optimal reaction conditions were determined. The protein LipR5, displayed optimum activity at 50°C and pH 8.0. It showed two fold enhancement in thermostability (at 60°C) as compared to LipR3 (R214C) and nearly 168 fold enhancement as compared to parent enzyme (LipR1). Circular dichroism and fluorescence study suggest that the protein structure had become more rigid and stable to denaturation. Study of 3D model suggested that Lys355 was involved in formation of a Hydrogen bond with OE1 of Glu284. Lys355 was also making salt bridge with OE2 of Glu284. PMID:24751523

  17. Influencing the structure of block copolymer micelles with small molecule additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Megan; Singh, Avantika; Cooksey, Tyler; Kidd, Bryce; Piemonte, Rachele; Wang, Shu; Mai Le, Kim; Madsen, Louis

    Amphiphilic block copolymer micelles in water are under broad exploration for drug delivery applications due to their high loading capacity and targeted drug delivery. We aim to understand the kinetic and thermodynamic processes that underlie the self-assembly of diblock copolymer micelle systems. The present work focuses on diblock copolymers containing poly(ethylene oxide) (a hydrophilic polymer) and polycaprolactone (a hydrophobic polymer), which spontaneously self-assemble into spherical micelles in water. Addition of a common good solvent (a co-solvent) for both of the constituting blocks, such as tetrahydrofuran (THF), reduces the interfacial tension at the core-corona interface. We are currently investigating the effect of this phenomenon on the micelle structural properties, using small-angle scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance. We have characterized the hydrodynamic radius, core radius, corona thickness, aggregation number, degree of swelling of the micelle core with the co-solvent, and unimer (free chain) concentration, as a function of the co-solvent concentration. Fundamental knowledge from these studies will inform design of drug delivery systems by allowing us to tailor micelle properties for optimal cargo loading.

  18. A new structure of two-dimensional allotropes of group V elements.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Luo, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    The elemental two-dimensional (2D) materials such as graphene, silicene, germanene, and black phosphorus have attracted considerable attention due to their fascinating physical properties. Structurally they possess the honeycomb or distorted honeycomb lattices, which are composed of six-atom rings. Here we find a new structure of 2D allotropes of group V elements composed of eight-atom rings, which we name as the octagonal tiling (OT) structure. First-principles calculations indicate that these allotropes are dynamically stable and are also thermally stable at temperatures up to 600 K. These allotropes are semiconductors with band gaps ranging from 0.3 to 2.0 eV, thus they are potentially useful in near- and mid-infrared optoelectronic devices. OT-Bi is also a 2D topological insulator (TI) with a band gap of 0.33 eV, which is the largest among the reported elemental 2D TIs, and this gap can be increased further by applying compressive strains. PMID:27150010

  19. A new structure of two-dimensional allotropes of group V elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ping; Luo, Weidong

    2016-05-01

    The elemental two-dimensional (2D) materials such as graphene, silicene, germanene, and black phosphorus have attracted considerable attention due to their fascinating physical properties. Structurally they possess the honeycomb or distorted honeycomb lattices, which are composed of six-atom rings. Here we find a new structure of 2D allotropes of group V elements composed of eight-atom rings, which we name as the octagonal tiling (OT) structure. First-principles calculations indicate that these allotropes are dynamically stable and are also thermally stable at temperatures up to 600 K. These allotropes are semiconductors with band gaps ranging from 0.3 to 2.0 eV, thus they are potentially useful in near- and mid-infrared optoelectronic devices. OT-Bi is also a 2D topological insulator (TI) with a band gap of 0.33 eV, which is the largest among the reported elemental 2D TIs, and this gap can be increased further by applying compressive strains.

  20. A new structure of two-dimensional allotropes of group V elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ping; Luo, Weidong

    The elemental two-dimensional (2D) materials such as graphene, silicene, germanene, and black phosphorus have attracted considerable attention due to their fascinating physical properties. Structurally they possess the honeycomb or distorted honeycomb lattices, which are composed of six-atom rings. Here we find a new structure of 2D allotropes of group V elements composed of eight-atom rings, which we name as the octagonal tiling (OT) structure. First-principles calculations indicate that these allotropes are dynamically stable and are also thermally stable at temperatures up to 600 K. These allotropes are semiconductors with band gaps ranging from 0.3 to 2.0 eV, thus they are potentially useful in near- and mid-infrared optoelectronic devices. OT-Bi is also a 2D topological insulator (TI) with a band gap of 0.33 eV, which is the largest among the reported elemental 2D TIs, and this gap can be increased further by applying compressive strains.

  1. A new structure of two-dimensional allotropes of group V elements

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Luo, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    The elemental two-dimensional (2D) materials such as graphene, silicene, germanene, and black phosphorus have attracted considerable attention due to their fascinating physical properties. Structurally they possess the honeycomb or distorted honeycomb lattices, which are composed of six-atom rings. Here we find a new structure of 2D allotropes of group V elements composed of eight-atom rings, which we name as the octagonal tiling (OT) structure. First-principles calculations indicate that these allotropes are dynamically stable and are also thermally stable at temperatures up to 600 K. These allotropes are semiconductors with band gaps ranging from 0.3 to 2.0 eV, thus they are potentially useful in near- and mid-infrared optoelectronic devices. OT-Bi is also a 2D topological insulator (TI) with a band gap of 0.33 eV, which is the largest among the reported elemental 2D TIs, and this gap can be increased further by applying compressive strains. PMID:27150010

  2. Material nature versus structural nurture: the embodied carbon of fundamental structural elements.

    PubMed

    Purnell, P

    2012-01-01

    The construction industry is under considerable legislative pressure to reduce its CO(2) emissions. The current focus is on operational CO(2) emissions, but as these are compulsorily reduced, the embodied CO(2) of structural components, overwhelmingly attributable to the material from which they are manufactured, will become of greater interest. Choice of structural materials for minimal embodied CO(2) is currently based either on subjective narrative arguments, or values of embodied CO(2) per unit volume or mass. Here we show that such arguments are invalid. We found that structural design parameters (dimensions, section choice, and load capacity) for fundamental structural components (simple beams and columns) are at least as important as material choice with regard to their effect on embodied CO(2) per unit load capacity per unit dimension, which can vary over several decades within and between material choices. This result demonstrates that relying on apparently objective analyses based on embodied CO(2) per unit volume or mass will not lead to minimum carbon solutions; a formal definition of the correct functional unit for embodied CO(2) must be used. In short, there is no such thing as a green structural material. PMID:22084900

  3. Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Volatile Trace Elements in H Chondrites: Implications for Parent Body Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, S. F.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1993-07-01

    The perception among meteoriticists is that contents of the volatile trace elements systematically decrease with shock and particularly petrologic type. This perception affects views that investigators have of the early history and structure of the H chondrite parent body. Measurement of a variety of volatile trace elements in a statistically significant number of samples accompanied by chemometric data analysis techniques developed for interpretation of trace- element data [1] should maximize the amount of genetic information available from the volatile trace elements and offer clues to the early thermal history of the H chondrite parent body. Volatile trace-element data exist for 58 H chondrite falls: the complete dataset includes Co, Rb, Ag, Se, Cs, Te, Zn, Cd, Bi, Tl, and In (listed in increasing order of volatility) [2,3]. This dataset includes 13 H4, 32 H5, and 13 H6 chondrites, which cover the full range of shock facies from a through f. To examine the effect that shock has on volatile trace-element concentrations in H4-6 chondrites, we have compared data for the least-shocked samples (shock facies a-b) with the most shocked samples (shock facies c-f) using both univariate (Student's t-test) and multivariate techniques (linear discriminant analysis). The results demonstrate no reason to doubt the null hypothesis of no difference in volatile trace-element composition between shocked and unshocked H4-6 chondrites at any reasonable significance level. This situation contrasts sharply with the strong difference found between shocked and unshocked L chondrites [4]. The role of shock in establishing volatile trace- element contents in H and L chondrites clearly differs. Univariate comparisons between H4, H5, and H6 chondrites demonstrate that only Cs varies significantly with petrologic type (prob. > F 0.0006) with concentration decreasing monotonically with increasing petrographic type. Box- and-whisker plots of volatile trace-element contents reveal a general

  4. Structural characterization and regulatory element analysis of the heart isoform of cytochrome c oxidase VIa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wan, B.; Moreadith, R. W.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    In order to investigate the mechanism(s) governing the striated muscle-specific expression of cytochrome c oxidase VIaH we have characterized the murine gene and analyzed its transcriptional regulatory elements in skeletal myogenic cell lines. The gene is single copy, spans 689 base pairs (bp), and is comprised of three exons. The 5'-ends of transcripts from the gene are heterogeneous, but the most abundant transcript includes a 5'-untranslated region of 30 nucleotides. When fused to the luciferase reporter gene, the 3.5-kilobase 5'-flanking region of the gene directed the expression of the heterologous protein selectively in differentiated Sol8 cells and transgenic mice, recapitulating the pattern of expression of the endogenous gene. Deletion analysis identified a 300-bp fragment sufficient to direct the myotube-specific expression of luciferase in Sol8 cells. The region lacks an apparent TATA element, and sequence motifs predicted to bind NRF-1, NRF-2, ox-box, or PPAR factors known to regulate other nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins are not evident. Mutational analysis, however, identified two cis-elements necessary for the high level expression of the reporter protein: a MEF2 consensus element at -90 to -81 bp and an E-box element at -147 to -142 bp. Additional E-box motifs at closely located positions were mutated without loss of transcriptional activity. The dependence of transcriptional activation of cytochrome c oxidase VIaH on cis-elements similar to those found in contractile protein genes suggests that the striated muscle-specific expression is coregulated by mechanisms that control the lineage-specific expression of several contractile and cytosolic proteins.

  5. A Six-Node Curved Triangular Element and a Four-Node Quadrilateral Element for Analysis of Laminated Composite Aerospace Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, C. Wayne; Breiner, David M.; Gupta, Kajal K. (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    Mathematical development and some computed results are presented for Mindlin plate and shell elements, suitable for analysis of laminated composite and sandwich structures. These elements use the conventional 3 (plate) or 5 (shell) nodal degrees of freedom, have no communicable mechanisms, have no spurious shear energy (no shear locking), have no spurious membrane energy (no membrane locking) and do not require arbitrary reduction of out-of-plane shear moduli or under-integration. Artificial out-of-plane rotational stiffnesses are added at the element level to avoid convergence problems or singularity due to flat spots in shells. This report discusses a 6-node curved triangular element and a 4-node quadrilateral element. Findings show that in regular rectangular meshes, the Martin-Breiner 6-node triangular curved shell (MB6) is approximately equivalent to the conventional 8-node quadrilateral with integration. The 4-node quadrilateral (MB4) has very good accuracy for a 4-node element, and may be preferred in vibration analysis because of narrower bandwidth. The mathematical developments used in these elements, those discussed in the seven appendices, have been applied to elements with 3, 4, 6, and 10 nodes and can be applied to other nodal configurations.

  6. A Finite Element Procedure for Calculating Fluid-Structure Interaction Using MSC/NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chargin, Mladen; Gartmeier, Otto

    1990-01-01

    This report is intended to serve two purposes. The first is to present a survey of the theoretical background of the dynamic interaction between a non-viscid, compressible fluid and an elastic structure is presented. Section one presents a short survey of the application of the finite element method (FEM) to the area of fluid-structure-interaction (FSI). Section two describes the mathematical foundation of the structure and fluid with special emphasis on the fluid. The main steps in establishing the finite element (FE) equations for the fluid structure coupling are discussed in section three. The second purpose is to demonstrate the application of MSC/NASTRAN to the solution of FSI problems. Some specific topics, such as fluid structure analogy, acoustic absorption, and acoustic contribution analysis are described in section four. Section five deals with the organization of the acoustic procedure flowchart. Section six includes the most important information that a user needs for applying the acoustic procedure to practical FSI problems. Beginning with some rules concerning the FE modeling of the coupled system, the NASTRAN USER DECKs for the different steps are described. The goal of section seven is to demonstrate the use of the acoustic procedure with some examples. This demonstration includes an analytic verification of selected FE results. The analytical description considers only some aspects of FSI and is not intended to be mathematically complete. Finally, section 8 presents an application of the acoustic procedure to vehicle interior acoustic analysis with selected results.

  7. Designing synthetic RNAs to determine the relevance of structural motifs in picornavirus IRES elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Chamorro, Javier; Lozano, Gloria; Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Ramajo, Jorge; Dotu, Ivan; Clote, Peter; Martinez-Salas, Encarnacion

    2016-04-01

    The function of Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) elements is intimately linked to their RNA structure. Viral IRES elements are organized in modular domains consisting of one or more stem-loops that harbor conserved RNA motifs critical for internal initiation of translation. A conserved motif is the pyrimidine-tract located upstream of the functional initiation codon in type I and II picornavirus IRES. By computationally designing synthetic RNAs to fold into a structure that sequesters the polypyrimidine tract in a hairpin, we establish a correlation between predicted inaccessibility of the pyrimidine tract and IRES activity, as determined in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Our data supports the hypothesis that structural sequestration of the pyrimidine-tract within a stable hairpin inactivates IRES activity, since the stronger the stability of the hairpin the higher the inhibition of protein synthesis. Destabilization of the stem-loop immediately upstream of the pyrimidine-tract also decreases IRES activity. Our work introduces a hybrid computational/experimental method to determine the importance of structural motifs for biological function. Specifically, we show the feasibility of using the software RNAiFold to design synthetic RNAs with particular sequence and structural motifs that permit subsequent experimental determination of the importance of such motifs for biological function.

  8. Designing synthetic RNAs to determine the relevance of structural motifs in picornavirus IRES elements

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Chamorro, Javier; Lozano, Gloria; Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Ramajo, Jorge; Dotu, Ivan; Clote, Peter; Martinez-Salas, Encarnacion

    2016-01-01

    The function of Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) elements is intimately linked to their RNA structure. Viral IRES elements are organized in modular domains consisting of one or more stem-loops that harbor conserved RNA motifs critical for internal initiation of translation. A conserved motif is the pyrimidine-tract located upstream of the functional initiation codon in type I and II picornavirus IRES. By computationally designing synthetic RNAs to fold into a structure that sequesters the polypyrimidine tract in a hairpin, we establish a correlation between predicted inaccessibility of the pyrimidine tract and IRES activity, as determined in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Our data supports the hypothesis that structural sequestration of the pyrimidine-tract within a stable hairpin inactivates IRES activity, since the stronger the stability of the hairpin the higher the inhibition of protein synthesis. Destabilization of the stem-loop immediately upstream of the pyrimidine-tract also decreases IRES activity. Our work introduces a hybrid computational/experimental method to determine the importance of structural motifs for biological function. Specifically, we show the feasibility of using the software RNAiFold to design synthetic RNAs with particular sequence and structural motifs that permit subsequent experimental determination of the importance of such motifs for biological function. PMID:27053355

  9. PRI-Modeler: extracting RNA structural elements from PDB files of protein-RNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyungsook; Nepal, Chirag

    2007-05-01

    A complete understanding of protein and RNA structures and their interactions is important for determining the binding sites in protein-RNA complexes. Computational approaches exist for identifying secondary structural elements in proteins from atomic coordinates. However, similar methods have not been developed for RNA, due in part to the very limited structural data so far available. We have developed a set of algorithms for extracting and visualizing secondary and tertiary structures of RNA and for analyzing protein-RNA complexes. These algorithms have been implemented in a web-based program called PRI-Modeler (protein-RNA interaction modeler). Given one or more protein data bank files of protein-RNA complexes, PRI-Modeler analyzes the conformation of the RNA, calculates the hydrogen bond (H bond) and van der Waals interactions between amino acids and nucleotides, extracts secondary and tertiary RNA structure elements, and identifies the patterns of interactions between the proteins and RNAs. This paper presents PRI-Modeler and its application to the hydrogen bond and van der Waals interactions in the most representative set of protein-RNA complexes. The analysis reveals several interesting interaction patterns at various levels. The information provided by PRI-Modeler should prove useful for determining the binding sites in protein-RNA complexes. PRI-Modeler is accessible at http://wilab.inha.ac.kr/primodeler/, and supplementary materials are available in the analysis results section at http://wilab.inha.ac.kr/primodeler/.

  10. Perspectives Of Employment Of Pultruded FRP Structural Elements In Seismic Engineering Field

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Salvatore; Silvestri, Mirko

    2008-07-08

    Today the employment of FRP material in structural engineering is in common use, with excellent results in term of applications especially as reinforcement of existing structures. This success is related to the very reduced weight of FRP material, to its performance in term of strength and durability and thanks to the easy use in technical application. There is a modern way to use this material disguised as structural pultruded element (with weight equal to 1600-1800 kg/m{sup 3}) in new constructions, local reinforcements and in other seismic applications. Actually the international technical and scientific literature in form of draft, recommendations and researches on this topic is very rich also taking into account Italian contribution. Some interesting applications of all FRP structures in seismic engineering field are showed in this research in real terms and in form of capability.

  11. Perspectives Of Employment Of Pultruded FRP Structural Elements In Seismic Engineering Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Salvatore; Silvestri, Mirko

    2008-07-01

    Today the employment of FRP material in structural engineering is in common use, with excellent results in term of applications especially as reinforcement of existing structures. This success is related to the very reduced weight of FRP material, to its performance in term of strength and durability and thanks to the easy use in technical application. There is a modern way to use this material disguised as structural pultruded element (with weight equal to 1600-1800 kg/m3) in new constructions, local reinforcements and in other seismic applications. Actually the international technical and scientific literature in form of draft, recommendations and researches on this topic is very rich also taking into account Italian contribution. Some interesting applications of all FRP structures in seismic engineering field are showed in this research in real terms and in form of capability.

  12. Phase Structure and Site Preference Behavior of Ternary Alloying Additions to PdTi and PtTi Shape-Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Mosca, Hugo O.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2006-01-01

    The phasc structure and concentration dependence of the lattice parameter and energy of formation of ternary Pd-'I-X and Pt-Ti-X alloys for a large number of ternary alloying additions X (X = Na, Mg, Al, Si, Sc. V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Ag, Cd, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir) are investigated with an atomistic modeling approach. In addition, a detailed description of the site preference behavior of such additions showing that the elements can be grouped according to their absolute preference for a specific site, regardless of concentration, or preference for available sites in the deficient sublattice is provided.

  13. Theoretical Studies of the Electronic Structure of the Compounds of the Actinide Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Hay, P. Jeffrey; Li, Jun; Blaudeau, Jean-Philippe; Bursten, Bruce E.

    2006-02-02

    In this chapter, we will present an overview of the theoretical and computational developments that have increased our understanding of the electronic structure of actinide-containing molecules and ions. The application of modern electronic structure methodologies to actinide systems remains one of the great challenges in quantum chemistry; indeed, as will be discussed below, there is no other portion of the periodic table that leads to the confluence of complexity with respect to the calculation of ground- and excited-state energies, bonding descriptions, and molecular properties. But there is also no place in the periodic table in which effective computational modeling of electronic structure can be more useful. The difficulties in creating, isolating, and handling many of the actinide elements provide an opportunity for computational chemistry to be an unusually important partner in developing the chemistry of these elements. The importance of actinide electronic structure begins with the earliest studies of uranium chemistry and predates the discovery of quantum mechanics. The fluorescence of uranyl compounds was observed as early as 1833 (Jørgensen and Reisfeld, 1983), a presage of the development of actinometry as a tool for measuring photochemical quantum yields. Interest in nuclear fuels has stimulated tremendous interest in understanding the properties, including electronic properties, of small actinide-containing molecules and ions, especially the oxides and halides of uranium and plutonium. The synthesis of uranocene in 1968 (Streitwieser and Mu¨ ller-Westerhoff, 1968) led to the flurry of activity in the organometallic chemistry of the actinides that continues today. Actinide organometallics (or organoactinides) are nearly always molecular systems and are often volatile, which makes them amenable to an arsenal of experimental probes of molecular and electronic structure (Marks and Fischer, 1979). Theoretical and computational studies of the electronic

  14. Finite element prediction of seismic response modification of monumental structures utilizing base isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanos, Konstantinos; Anifantis, Nikolaos; Kakavas, Panayiotis

    2015-05-01

    The analysis of the mechanical behavior of ancient structures is an essential engineering task concerning the preservation of architectural heritage. As many monuments of classical antiquity are located in regions of earthquake activity, the safety assessment of these structures, as well as the selection of possible restoration interventions, requires numerical models capable of correctly representing their seismic response. The work presented herein was part of a research project in which a better understanding of the dynamics of classical column-architrave structures was sought by means of numerical techniques. In this paper, the seismic behavior of ancient monumental structures with multi-drum classical columns is investigated. In particular, the column-architrave classical structure under strong ground excitations was represented by a finite element method. This approach simulates the individual rock blocks as distinct rigid blocks interconnected with slidelines and incorporates seismic isolation dampers under the basement of the structure. Sliding and rocking motions of individual stone blocks and drums are modeled utilizing non-linear frictional contact conditions. The seismic isolation is modeled through the application of pad bearings under the basement of the structure. These pads are interpreted by appropriate rubber and steel layers. Time domain analyses were performed, considering the geometric and material non-linear behavior at the joints and the characteristics of pad bearings. The deformation and failure modes of drum columns subject to seismic excitations of various types and intensities were analyzed. The adverse influence of drum imperfections on structural safety was also examined.

  15. Finite-Element Extrapolation of Myocardial Structure Alterations Across the Cardiac Cycle in Rats.

    PubMed

    David Gomez, Arnold; Bull, David A; Hsu, Edward W

    2015-10-01

    Myocardial microstructures are responsible for key aspects of cardiac mechanical function. Natural myocardial deformation across the cardiac cycle induces measurable structural alteration, which varies across disease states. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) has become the tool of choice for myocardial structural analysis. Yet, obtaining the comprehensive structural information of the whole organ, in 3D and time, for subject-specific examination is fundamentally limited by scan time. Therefore, subject-specific finite-element (FE) analysis of a group of rat hearts was implemented for extrapolating a set of initial DT-MRI to the rest of the cardiac cycle. The effect of material symmetry (isotropy, transverse isotropy, and orthotropy), structural input, and warping approach was observed by comparing simulated predictions against in vivo MRI displacement measurements and DT-MRI of an isolated heart preparation at relaxed, inflated, and contracture states. Overall, the results indicate that, while ventricular volume and circumferential strain are largely independent of the simulation strategy, structural alteration predictions are generally improved with the sophistication of the material model, which also enhances torsion and radial strain predictions. Moreover, whereas subject-specific transversely isotropic models produced the most accurate descriptions of fiber structural alterations, the orthotropic models best captured changes in sheet structure. These findings underscore the need for subject-specific input data, including structure, to extrapolate DT-MRI measurements across the cardiac cycle.

  16. Finite-Element Extrapolation of Myocardial Structure Alterations Across the Cardiac Cycle in Rats

    PubMed Central

    David Gomez, Arnold; Bull, David A.; Hsu, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial microstructures are responsible for key aspects of cardiac mechanical function. Natural myocardial deformation across the cardiac cycle induces measurable structural alteration, which varies across disease states. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) has become the tool of choice for myocardial structural analysis. Yet, obtaining the comprehensive structural information of the whole organ, in 3D and time, for subject-specific examination is fundamentally limited by scan time. Therefore, subject-specific finite-element (FE) analysis of a group of rat hearts was implemented for extrapolating a set of initial DT-MRI to the rest of the cardiac cycle. The effect of material symmetry (isotropy, transverse isotropy, and orthotropy), structural input, and warping approach was observed by comparing simulated predictions against in vivo MRI displacement measurements and DT-MRI of an isolated heart preparation at relaxed, inflated, and contracture states. Overall, the results indicate that, while ventricular volume and circumferential strain are largely independent of the simulation strategy, structural alteration predictions are generally improved with the sophistication of the material model, which also enhances torsion and radial strain predictions. Moreover, whereas subject-specific transversely isotropic models produced the most accurate descriptions of fiber structural alterations, the orthotropic models best captured changes in sheet structure. These findings underscore the need for subject-specific input data, including structure, to extrapolate DT-MRI measurements across the cardiac cycle. PMID:26299478

  17. Improved accuracy for finite element structural analysis via an integrated force method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, S. N.; Hopkins, D. A.; Aiello, R. A.; Berke, L.

    1992-01-01

    A comparative study was carried out to determine the accuracy of finite element analyses based on the stiffness method, a mixed method, and the new integrated force and dual integrated force methods. The numerical results were obtained with the following software: MSC/NASTRAN and ASKA for the stiffness method; an MHOST implementation method for the mixed method; and GIFT for the integrated force methods. The results indicate that on an overall basis, the stiffness and mixed methods present some limitations. The stiffness method generally requires a large number of elements in the model to achieve acceptable accuracy. The MHOST method tends to achieve a higher degree of accuracy for course models than does the stiffness method implemented by MSC/NASTRAN and ASKA. The two integrated force methods, which bestow simultaneous emphasis on stress equilibrium and strain compatibility, yield accurate solutions with fewer elements in a model. The full potential of these new integrated force methods remains largely unexploited, and they hold the promise of spawning new finite element structural analysis tools.

  18. A rigid surface boundary element for soil-structure interaction analysis in the direct time domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizos, D. C.

    Many soil-structure interaction problems involve studies of single or multiple rigid bodies of arbitrary shape and soil media. The commonly used boundary element methods implement the equations of the rigid body in a form that depends on the particulars of the geometry and requires partitioning and condensation of the associated algebraic system of equations. The present work employs the direct time domain B-Spline BEM for 3D elastodynamic analysis and presents an efficient implementation of rigid bodies of arbitrary shape in contact with, or embedded in, elastic media. The formulation of a rigid surface boundary element introduced herein is suitable for direct superposition in the BEM system of algebraic equations. Consequently, solutions are computed in a single analysis step, eliminating, thus, the need for partitioning of the system of equations. Computational efficiency is also achieved due to the extremely sparse form of the associated coefficient matrices. The proposed element can be used for the modeling of single or multiple rigid bodies of arbitrary shape within the framework of the BEM method. The efficiency and general nature of the proposed element is demonstrated through applications related to the dynamic analysis of rigid surface and embedded foundations and their interaction with embedded rigid bodies of arbitrary shape.

  19. Improved accuracy for finite element structural analysis via a new integrated force method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Hopkins, Dale A.; Aiello, Robert A.; Berke, Laszlo

    1992-01-01

    A comparative study was carried out to determine the accuracy of finite element analyses based on the stiffness method, a mixed method, and the new integrated force and dual integrated force methods. The numerical results were obtained with the following software: MSC/NASTRAN and ASKA for the stiffness method; an MHOST implementation method for the mixed method; and GIFT for the integrated force methods. The results indicate that on an overall basis, the stiffness and mixed methods present some limitations. The stiffness method generally requires a large number of elements in the model to achieve acceptable accuracy. The MHOST method tends to achieve a higher degree of accuracy for course models than does the stiffness method implemented by MSC/NASTRAN and ASKA. The two integrated force methods, which bestow simultaneous emphasis on stress equilibrium and strain compatibility, yield accurate solutions with fewer elements in a model. The full potential of these new integrated force methods remains largely unexploited, and they hold the promise of spawning new finite element structural analysis tools.

  20. Application of the Wave and Finite Element Method to Calculate Sound Transmission Through Cylindrical Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingan, Michael J.; Yang, Yi; Mace, Brian R.

    2016-09-01

    This paper concerns the prediction of sound transmission through a cylindrical structure. The problem considered is that of sound generated by a line source located exterior to a two-dimensional circular cylinder which produces sound waves which transmit through the cylinder to an internal medium. An analytical solution is presented for the case of sound transmission through a thin cylindrical shell, by modelling the shell response using the Flugge- Byrne-Lur'ye equations. This solution is then compared to calculations where the response of the cylinder is calculated using the Wave and Finite Element (WFE) method. The WFE method involves modelling a small segment of a structure using traditional finite element (FE) methods. The mass and stiffness matrices of the segment are then used to calculate the response of the structure to excitation by an acoustic field. The WFE approach for calculating sound transmission is validated by comparison with the analytic solution. Formulating analytic solutions for more complicated structures can be cumbersome whereas using a numerical technique, such as the WFE method, is relatively straightforward.

  1. Design Optimization of Laminated Composite Structures Using Explicit Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mika, Krista

    Laminated composite materials are used in aerospace, civil and mechanical structural systems due to their superior material properties compared to the constituent materials as well as in comparison to traditional materials such as metals. Laminate structures are composed of multiple orthotropic material layers bonded together to form a single performing part. As such, the layup design of the material largely influences the structural performance. Optimization techniques such as the Genetic Algorithm (GA), Differential Evolution (DE), the Method of Feasible Directions (MFD), and others can be used to determine the optimal laminate composite material layup. In this thesis, sizing, shape and topology design optimization of laminated composites is carried out. Sizing optimization, such as the layer thickness, topology optimization, such as the layer orientation and material and the number of layers present, and shape optimization of the overall composite part contribute to the design optimization process of laminates. An optimization host program written in C++ has been developed to implement the optimization methodology of both population based and numerical gradient based methods. The performance of the composite structural system is evaluated through explicit finite element analysis of shell elements carried out using LS-DYNA. Results from numerical examples demonstrate that optimization design processes can significantly improve composite part performance through implementation of optimum material layup and part shape.

  2. Validating finite element models of composite aerospace structures for damage detection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, J. A.; Kosmatka, J. B.; Hemez, François M.; Farrar, Charles R.

    2006-03-01

    Carbon-fiber-reinforced-polymer (CFRP) composites represent the future for advanced lightweight aerospace structures. However, reliable and cost-effective techniques for structural health monitoring (SHM) are needed. Modal and vibration-based analysis, when combined with validated finite element (FE) models, can provide a key tool for SHM. Finite element models, however, can easily give spurious and misleading results if not finely tuned and validated. These problems are amplified in complex structures with numerous joints and interfaces. A small series of all-composite test pieces emulating wings from a lightweight all-composite Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) have been developed to support damage detection and SHM research. Each wing comprises two CFRP prepreg and Nomex honeycomb co-cured skins and two CFRP prepreg spars bonded together in a secondary process using a structural adhesive to form the complete wings. The first of the set is fully healthy while the rest have damage in the form of disbonds built into the main spar-skin bondline. Detailed FE models were created of the four structural components and the assembled structure. Each wing component piece was subjected to modal characterization via vibration testing using a shaker and scanning laser Doppler vibrometer before assembly. These results were then used to correlate the FE model on a component-basis, through fitting and optimization of polynomial meta-models. Assembling and testing the full wing provided subsequent data that was used to validate the numerical model of the entire structure, assembled from the correlated component models. The correlation process led to the following average percent improvement between experimental and FE frequencies of the first 20 modes for each piece: top skin 10.98%, bottom skin 45.62%, main spar 25.56%, aft spar 10.79%. The assembled wing model with no further correlation showed an improvement of 32.60%.

  3. Adaptive finite element modeling of direct current resistivity in 2-D generally anisotropic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bo; Li, Yuguo; Liu, Ying

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an adaptive finite element (FE) algorithm for direct current (DC) resistivity modeling in 2-D generally anisotropic conductivity structures. Our algorithm is implemented on an unstructured triangular mesh that readily accommodates complex structures such as topography and dipping layers and so on. We implement a self-adaptive, goal-oriented grid refinement algorithm in which the finite element analysis is performed on a sequence of refined grids. The grid refinement process is guided by an a posteriori error estimator. The problem is formulated in terms of total potentials where mixed boundary conditions are incorporated. This type of boundary condition is superior to the Dirichlet type of conditions and improves numerical accuracy considerably according to model calculations. We have verified the adaptive finite element algorithm using a two-layered earth with azimuthal anisotropy. The FE algorithm with incorporation of mixed boundary conditions achieves high accuracy. The relative error between the numerical and analytical solutions is less than 1% except in the vicinity of the current source location, where the relative error is up to 2.4%. A 2-D anisotropic model is used to demonstrate the effects of anisotropy upon the apparent resistivity in DC soundings.

  4. Integrated force method - Compatibility conditions of structural mechanics for finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Berke, Laszlo; Gallagher, Richard H.

    1991-01-01

    The equilibrium equations and the compatibility conditions are fundamental to the analyses of structures. However, anyone who undertakes even a cursory generic study of the compatibility conditions can discover, with little effort, that historically this facet of structural mechanics had not been adequately researched by the profession. Now the compatibility conditions (CC's) have been researched and are understood to a great extent. For finite element discretizations, the CC's are banded and can be divided into three distinct categories: (1) the interface CC's, (2) the cluster or field CC's, and (3) the external CC's. The generation of CC's requires the separating of a local region, then writing the deformation displacement relation (ddr) for the region, and finally, the eliminating of the displacements from the ddr. The procedure to generate all three types of CC's is presented and illustrated through examples of finite element models. The uniqueness of the CC's thus generated is shown. The utilization of CC's has resulted in the novel integrated force method (IFM). The solution that is obtained by the IFM converges with a significantly fewer number of elements, compared to the stiffness and the hybrid methods.

  5. Global functions in global-local finite-element analysis of localized stresses in prismatic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dong, Stanley B.

    1989-01-01

    An important consideration in the global local finite-element method (GLFEM) is the availability of global functions for the given problem. The role and mathematical requirements of these global functions in a GLFEM analysis of localized stress states in prismatic structures are discussed. A method is described for determining these global functions. Underlying this method are theorems due to Toupin and Knowles on strain energy decay rates, which are related to a quantitative expression of Saint-Venant's principle. It is mentioned that a mathematically complete set of global functions can be generated, so that any arbitrary interface condition between the finite element and global subregions can be represented. Convergence to the true behavior can be achieved with increasing global functions and finite-element degrees of freedom. Specific attention is devoted to mathematically two-dimensional and three-dimensional prismatic structures. Comments are offered on the GLFEM analysis of NASA flat panel with a discontinuous stiffener. Methods for determining global functions for other effects are also indicated, such as steady-state dynamics and bodies under initial stress.

  6. Superheavy Element Chemistry by Relativistic Density Functional Theory Electronic Structure Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsevskii, A. V.; Polyaev, A. V.; Demidov, Yu. A.; Mosyagin, N. S.; Lomachuk, Yu. V.; Titov, A. V.

    2015-06-01

    Two-component density functional theory in its non-collinear formulation combined with the accurate relativistic electronic structure model defined by shape-consistent small-core pseudopotentials (PP/RDFT) provides a robust basis of efficient computational schemes for predicting energetic and structural properties of complex polyatomic systems including superheavy elements (SHEs). Because of the exceptional role of thermochromatography in the experiments on the "chemical" identification of SHEs with atomic numbers Z ≥ 112, we focus on the description of the adsorption of single SHE atoms on the surfaces of solids through cluster modeling of adsorption complexes. In some cases our results differ significantly from those of previous theoretical studies. The results of systematic comparative studies on chemical bonding in simple molecules of binary compounds of SHEs and their nearest homologs with most common light elements, obtained at the PP/RDFT level and visualized through the "chemical graphs", provide the understanding of the general chemistry of SHEs which at present cannot be derived from the experimental data. These results are used to discuss the main trends in changing chemical properties of the elements in the given group of the periodic table and demonstrate the specificity of SHEs.

  7. A Spectral Element Approach for Modeling of Wave-Based Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte, Rolf T.; Fritzen, Claus-Peter

    2010-09-30

    During the last decades, guided waves have shown great potential for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) applications. These waves can be excited and sensed by piezoelectric elements that can be permanently attached onto a structure offering online monitoring capability. As the setup of wave based SHM systems may be very difficult and time consuming there is a growing demand for efficient simulation tools providing the opportunity to design wave based SHM systems in a virtual environment. As usually high frequency waves are used, the associated short wavelength leads to the necessity of a very dense mesh, which makes conventional finite elements not well suited for this purpose. Therefore a flat shell spectral element approach is presented in this contribution. By including electromechanical coupling an SHM system can be simulated entirely from actuator voltage to sensor voltage. The focus of this contribution is the analysis of the effect of delaminations on propagating waves. A forward increment Lagrange multiplier method is used to simulate contact within the delaminated area. A model validation is performed using measured data of an anisotropic CFRP-plate.

  8. Hoxb-2 transcriptional activation in rhombomeres 3 and 5 requires an evolutionarily conserved cis-acting element in addition to the Krox-20 binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Vesque, C; Maconochie, M; Nonchev, S; Ariza-McNaughton, L; Kuroiwa, A; Charnay, P; Krumlauf, R

    1996-01-01

    Segmentation is a key feature of the development of the vertebrate hindbrain where it involves the generation of repetitive morphological units termed rhombomeres (r). Hox genes are likely to play an essential role in the specification of segmental identity and we have been investigating their regulation. We show here that the mouse and chicken Hoxb-2 genes are dependent for their expression in r3 and r5 on homologous enhancer elements and on binding to this enhancer of the r3/r5-specific transcriptional activator Krox-20. Among the three Krox-20 binding sites of the mouse Hoxb-2 enhancer, only the high-affinity site is absolutely necessary for activity. In contrast, we have identified an additional cis-acting element, Box1, essential for r3/r5 enhancer activity. It is conserved both in sequence and in position respective to the high-affinity Krox-20 binding site within the mouse and chicken enhancers. Furthermore, a short 44 bp sequence spanning the Box1 and Krox-20 sites can act as an r3/r5 enhancer when oligomerized. Box1 may therefore constitute a recognition sequence for another factor cooperating with Krox-20. Taken together, these data demonstrate the conservation of Hox gene regulation and of Krox-20 function during vertebrate evolution. Images PMID:8895582

  9. Structural damage detection using higher-order finite elements and a scanning laser vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Si

    In contrast to conventional non-destructive evaluation methods, dynamics-based damage detection methods are capable of rapid integrity evaluation of large structures and have received considerable attention from aerospace, mechanical, and civil engineering communities in recent years. However, the identifiable damage size using dynamics-based methods is determined by the number of sensors used, level of measurement noise, accuracy of structural models, and signal processing techniques. In this thesis we study dynamics of structures with damage and then derive and experimentally verify new model-independent structural damage detection methods that can locate small damage to structures. To find sensitive damage detection parameters we develop a higher-order beam element that enforces the continuity of displacements, slopes, bending moments, and shear forces at all nodes, and a higher-order rectangular plate element that enforces the continuity of displacements, slopes, and bending and twisting moments at all nodes. These two elements are used to study the dynamics of beams and plates. Results show that high-order spatial derivatives of high-frequency modes are important sensitive parameters that can locate small structural damage. Unfortunately the most powerful and popular structural modeling technique, the finite element method, is not accurate in predicting high-frequency responses. Hence, a model-independent method using dynamic responses obtained from high density measurements is concluded to be the best approach. To increase measurement density and reduce noise a Polytec PI PSV-200 scanning laser vibrometer is used to provide non-contact, dense, and accurate measurements of structural vibration velocities. To avoid the use of structural models and to extract sensitive detection parameters from experimental data, a brand-new structural damage detection method named BED (Boundary-Effect Detection) is developed for pinpointing damage locations using Operational

  10. Maize Adh-1 promoter sequences control anaerobic regulation: addition of upstream promoter elements from constitutive genes is necessary for expression in tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, J.G.; Llewellyn, D.J.; Dennis, E.S.; Peacock, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    The promoter region of a maize alcohol dehydrogenase gene (Adh-1) was linked to a reporter gene encoding chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) and transformed stably into tobacco cells using T-DNA vectors. No CAT enzyme activity could be detected in transgenic tobacco plants unless upstream promoter elements from the octopine synthase gene or the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter were supplied in addition to the maize promoter region. CAT enzyme activity and transcription of the chimaeric gene were then readily detected after anaerobic induction. The first 247 bp upstream of the translation initiation codon of the maize Adh-1 gene were sufficient to impose anaerobic regulation on the hybrid gene and S1 nuclease mapping confirmed mRNA initiation is from the normal maize Adh-1 transcription start point. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6. PMID:15981329

  11. Structural design optimization of racing motor boat based on nonlinear finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ha Cheol; Kim, Tae-Jun; Jang, Chang Doo

    2010-12-01

    Since 1980's, optimum design techniques for ship structural design have been developed to the preliminary design which aims at minimum weight or minimum cost design of mid-ship section based on analytic structural analysis. But the optimum structural design researches about the application for the detail design of local structure based on FEA have been still insufficient. This paper presents optimization technique for the detail design of a racing motor boat. To improve the performance and reduce the damage of a real existing racing boat, direct structural analyses; static and non-linear transient dynamic analyses, were carried out to check the constraints of minimum weight design. As a result, it is shown that the optimum structural design of a racing boat has to be focused on reducing impulse response from pitching motion than static response because the dynamic effect is more dominant. Optimum design algorithm based on nonlinear finite element analysis for a racing motor boat was developed and coded to ANSYS, and its applicability for actual structural design was verifed.

  12. Finite element analysis of steady and transiently moving/rolling nonlinear viscoelastic structure. Part 1: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, Joe

    1986-01-01

    In a three part series of papers, a generalized finite element analysis scheme is developed to handle the steady and transient response of moving/rolling nonlinear viscoelastic structure. This paper considers the development of the moving/rolling element strategy, including the effects of large deformation kinematics and viscoelasticity modelled by fractional integro-differential operators. To improve the solution strategy, a special hierarchical constraint procedure is developed for the case of steady rolling/translating as well as a transient scheme involving the use of a Grunwaldian representation of the fractional operator. In the second and third parts of the paper, 3-D extensions are developed along with transient contact strategies enabling the handling of impacts with obstructions. Overall, the various developments are benchmarked via comprehensive 2- and 3-D simulations. These are correlated with experimental data to define modelling capabilities.

  13. Development of a moderately sized finite element program for nonlinear structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisler, W. E.

    1977-01-01

    AGGIE 1 is a computer program for predicting the linear and nonlinear, static and dynamic structural response of two- and three-dimensional continuum solids. The program is based on isoparametric finite elements and allows for 2-D plane stress, plane strain, and axisymmetric analyses and general 3-D analyses. Large strain kinematics is based on the total Lagrangian formulation. Materially nonlinear models include several elastic-plastic work-hardening models as well as an incompressible Mooney-Rivlin model. Included in this report is a brief description of the theoretical bases of the program, the material models used, the element library and the overall program organization. Instructions for data input preparation are given in detail. Several sample problems are given along with the required program input and program generated solutions.

  14. Experiments on Nuclear Structure and Synthesis of Superheavy Elements at SHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Hessberger, F. P.

    2007-02-26

    Experiments to synthesize isotopes of heaviest elements and to investigate as well their production mechanisms as their nuclear properties have been performed during the past three decades at the velocty filter SHIP. Isotopes of six so far unknown elements with atomic numbers Z = 107-112 have been identified, excitation functions for production of transactinide isotopes in so-called 'cold' fusion reactions, using Pb- or Bi- targets and 'medium' heavy projectiles from 50Ti to 64Ni have been measured. In recent years experiments also concentrated on nuclear structure investigations by means of evaporation residue (ER)-{gamma}- or {alpha}-{gamma}-decay spectroscopy resulting in systematic studies of low lying Nilsson levels in odd mass nuclei and identification of high lying (E* > 1 MeV) isomeric states in neutron deficient nobelium isotopes.

  15. [Mobile genetic element MDG4 (gypsy) in Drosophila melanogaster. Features of structure and regulation of transposition].

    PubMed

    Kusulidu, L K; Karpova, N N; Razorenova, O V; Glukhov, I A; Kim, A I; Liubomirskaia, N V; Il'in, Iu V

    2001-12-01

    Distribution of two structural functional variants of the MDG4 (gypsy) mobile genetic element was examined in 44 strains of Drosophila melanogaster. The results obtained suggest that less transpositionally active MDG4 variant is more ancient component of the Drosophila genome. Using Southern blotting, five strains characterized by increased copy number of MDG4 with significant prevalence of the active variant over the less active one were selected for further analysis. Genetic analysis of these strains led to the suggestion that some of them carry factors that mobilize MDG4 independently from the cellular flamenco gene known to be responsible for transposition of this element. Other strains probably contained a suppressor of the flam- mutant allele causing active transpositions of the MDG4. Thus, the material for studying poorly examined relationships between the retrovirus and the host cell genome was obtained. PMID:11785284

  16. Comb structure analysis of the capacitive sensitive element in MEMS-accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalimov, Andrew; Timoshenkov, Sergey; Korobova, Natalia; Golovinskiy, Maxim; Timoshenkov, Alexey; Zuev, Egor; Berezueva, Svetlana; Kosolapov, Andrey

    2015-05-01

    In this paper analysis of comb design for the sensing element MEMS accelerometer with longitudinal displacement of the inertial mass under the influence of acceleration to obtain the necessary parameters for the further construction of an electronic circuit for removal and signal processing has been done. Fixed on the stator the inertia mass has the ability to move under the influence of acceleration along the longitudinal structure. As a result the distance between the fixed and movable combs, and hence the capacitance in the capacitors have been changed. Measuring the difference of these capacitances you can estimate the value of the applied acceleration. Furthermore, managing combs that should apply an electrostatic force for artificial deviation of the inertial mass may be used for the initial sensitive elements culling. Also in this case there is a change of capacitances, which can be measured by the comb and make a decision about the spoilage presence or absence.

  17. Construction of minimum energy high-order Helmholtz bases for structured elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Caio F.; Suzuki, Jorge L.; Bittencourt, Marco L.

    2016-02-01

    We present a construction procedure for high-order expansion bases for structured finite elements specific for the operator under consideration. The procedure aims to obtain bases in such way that the condition numbers for the element matrices are almost constant or have a moderate increase in terms of the polynomial order. The internal modes of the mass and stiffness matrices are made simultaneously diagonal and the minimum energy concept is used to make the boundary modes orthogonal to the internal modes. The performance of the proposed bases is compared to the standard basis using Jacobi polynomials. This is performed through numerical examples for Helmholtz problem and transient linear elasticity employing explicit and implicit time integration algorithms and the conjugate gradient method with diagonal, SSOR and Gauss-Seidel pre-conditioners. The sparsity patterns, conditioning and solution costs are investigated. A significant speedup and reduction in the number of iterations are obtained when compared to the standard basis.

  18. BEAM: A finite element program for the collapse analysis of vehicle structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimpoeru, S. J.

    1994-06-01

    BEAM (Beam Element Analysis with Mechanisms) is a finite element program for the analysis of the collapse of vehicle structures. BEAM can quickly estimate the collapse load and plastic hinge locations in three-dimensional thin-walled frames that would collapse in bending. Such information can be combined with separate rigid-plastic modelling to enable the large-deflection design of vehicle frameworks so that their collapse in roll-over accidents, for instance, can be prevented. One advantage of BEAM is that it allows a user to define his own experimentally or analytically determined loads and moments as failure criteria. The theory and operation of BEAM are presented and its application to the modelling of a collapsing two-dimensional frame is described.

  19. Heat induced transformation of fossil mastodon ivory into turquoise 'odontolite'. Structural and elemental characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiche, I.; Vignaud, C.; Menu, M.

    2000-10-01

    The present work deals with the structural and elemental analysis of turquoise mineral imitations as 'odontolite' or bone turquoise by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDX) and particle induced X-ray and γ-ray emission (PIXE-PIGE). The aim of the work is to evidence the former deliberate transformation of fossilised ivory by man in order to transform them into semi-precious stones. We show that the crystal structure of 'odontolite' artefacts consisting of fluorapatite (Ca 5(PO 4) 3F) corresponds to that of heated fossil mastodon ivory (12-15 million years old). Metallic traces detected by PIXE-PIGE in these 'odontolites' are discussed in order to explain their role for coloration. Other more greenish turquoise imitations have a bone-like structure and composition, and carbonate-hydroxylapatite. The presence of copper salts at the surface is responsible for their green coloration.

  20. Structural Anomalies Detected in Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Combined Nondestructive Evaluation and Finite Element Analysis (NDE and FEA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Baaklini, George Y.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2003-01-01

    Most reverse engineering approaches involve imaging or digitizing an object and then creating a computerized reconstruction that can be integrated, in three dimensions, into a particular design environment. The rapid prototyping technique builds high-quality physical prototypes directly from computer-aided design files. This fundamental technique for interpreting and interacting with large data sets is being used here via Velocity2 (an integrated image-processing software, ref. 1) using computed tomography (CT) data to produce a prototype three-dimensional test specimen model for analyses. A study at the NASA Glenn Research Center proposes to use these capabilities to conduct a combined nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and finite element analysis (FEA) to screen pretest and posttest structural anomalies in structural components. A tensile specimen made of silicon nitrite (Si3N4) ceramic matrix composite was considered to evaluate structural durability and deformity. Ceramic matrix composites are being sought as candidate materials to replace nickel-base superalloys for turbine engine applications. They have the unique characteristics of being able to withstand higher operating temperatures and harsh combustion environments. In addition, their low densities relative to metals help reduce component mass (ref. 2). Detailed three-dimensional volume rendering of the tensile test specimen was successfully carried out with Velocity2 (ref. 1) using two-dimensional images that were generated via computed tomography. Subsequent, three-dimensional finite element analyses were performed, and the results obtained were compared with those predicted by NDE-based calculations and experimental tests. It was shown that Velocity2 software can be used to render a three-dimensional object from a series of CT scan images with a minimum level of complexity. The analytical results (ref. 3) show that the high-stress regions correlated well with the damage sites identified by the CT scans

  1. An automatic granular structure generation and finite element analysis of heterogeneous semi-solid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, Hamid; Larouche, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    The quality of cast metal products depends on the capacity of the semi-solid metal to sustain the stresses generated during the casting. Predicting the evolution of these stresses with accuracy in the solidification interval should be highly helpful to avoid the formation of defects like hot tearing. This task is however very difficult because of the heterogeneous nature of the material. In this paper, we propose to evaluate the mechanical behaviour of a metal during solidification using a mesh generation technique of the heterogeneous semi-solid material for a finite element analysis at the microscopic level. This task is done on a two-dimensional (2D) domain in which the granular structure of the solid phase is generated surrounded by an intergranular and interdendritc liquid phase. Some basic solid grains are first constructed and projected in the 2D domain with random orientations and scale factors. Depending on their orientation, the basic grains are combined to produce larger grains or separated by a liquid film. Different basic grain shapes can produce different granular structures of the mushy zone. As a result, using this automatic grain generation procedure, we can investigate the effect of grain shapes and sizes on the thermo-mechanical behaviour of the semi-solid material. The granular models are automatically converted to the finite element meshes. The solid grains and the liquid phase are meshed properly using quadrilateral elements. This method has been used to simulate the microstructure of a binary aluminium-copper alloy (Al-5.8 wt% Cu) when the fraction solid is 0.92. Using the finite element method and the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state for the liquid phase, the transient mechanical behaviour of the mushy zone under tensile loading has been investigated. The stress distribution and the bridges, which are formed during the tensile loading, have been detected.

  2. A Pilot Study to Examine the Effect of Additional Structured Outdoor Playtime on Preschoolers' Physical Activity Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alhassan, Sofiya; Nwaokelemeh, Ogechi; Lyden, Kate; Goldsby, TaShauna; Mendoza, Albert

    2013-01-01

    The impact of additional structured outdoor playtime on preschoolers'; physical activity (PA) level is unclear. The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the effects of increasing structured outdoor playtime on preschoolers'; PA levels. Eight full-day classrooms (n = 134 children) from two preschool programmes were randomised into a treatment…

  3. PLANS: A finite element program for nonlinear analysis of structures. Volume 1: Theoretical manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pifko, A.; Levine, H. S.; Armen, H., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The PLANS system is described which is a finite element program for nonlinear analysis. The system represents a collection of special purpose computer programs each associated with a distinct physical problem class. Modules of PLANS specifically referenced and described in detail include: (1) REVBY, for the plastic analysis of bodies of revolution; (2) OUT-OF-PLANE, for the plastic analysis of 3-D built-up structures where membrane effects are predominant; (3) BEND, for the plastic analysis of built-up structures where bending and membrane effects are significant; (4) HEX, for the 3-D elastic-plastic analysis of general solids; and (5) OUT-OF-PLANE-MG, for material and geometrically nonlinear analysis of built-up structures. The SATELLITE program for data debugging and plotting of input geometries is also described. The theoretical foundations upon which the analysis is based are presented. Discussed are the form of the governing equations, the methods of solution, plasticity theories available, a general system description and flow of the programs, and the elements available for use.

  4. A new EXAFS method for the local structure analysis of low-Z elements.

    PubMed

    Isomura, Noritake; Kamada, Masao; Nonaka, Takamasa; Nakamura, Eiken; Takano, Takumi; Sugiyama, Harue; Kimoto, Yasuji

    2016-01-01

    A unique analytical method is proposed for local structure analysis via extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The measurement of electron energy distribution curves at various excitation photon energies using an electron energy analyzer is applied to determine a specific elemental Auger spectrum. To demonstrate the method, the N K-edge EXAFS spectra for a silicon nitride film were obtained via simultaneous measurement of the N KLL Auger and background spectra using dual-energy windows. The background spectrum was then used to remove the photoelectrons and secondary electron mixing in the energy distribution curves. The spectrum obtained following this subtraction procedure represents the `true' N K-edge EXAFS spectrum without the other absorptions that are observed in total electron yield N K-edge EXAFS spectra. The first nearest-neighbor distance (N-Si) derived from the extracted N K-edge EXAFS oscillation was in good agreement with the value derived from Si K-edge analysis. This result confirmed that the present method, referred to as differential electron yield (DEY)-EXAFS, is valid for deriving local surface structure information for low-Z elements. PMID:26698075

  5. Nonlinear dynamic fluid-structure interaction calculations with coupled finite element and finite volume programs

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.W.; Kashiwa, B.A.; Meier, R.W.; Bishop, S.

    1994-08-01

    Two- and three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction computer programs for the simulation of nonlinear dynamics were developed and applied to a number of problems. The programs were created by coupling Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian finite volume fluid dynamics programs with strictly Lagrangian finite element structural dynamics programs. The resulting coupled programs can use either fully explicit or implicit time integration. The implicit time integration is accomplished by iterations of the fluid dynamics pressure solver and the structural dynamics system solver. The coupled programs have been used to solve problems involving incompressible fluids, membrane and shell elements, compressible multiphase flows, explosions in both air and water, and large displacements. In this paper, we present the approach used for the coupling and describe test problems that verify the two-dimensional programs against an experiment and an analytical linear problem. The experiment involves an explosion underwater near an instrumented thin steel plate. The analytical linear problem is the vibration of an infinite cylinder surrounded by an incompressible fluid to a given radius.

  6. Nonlinear dynamic fluid-structure interaction calculations with coupled finite element and finite volume programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, M. W.; Kashiwa, B. A.; Meier, R. W.; Bishop, S.

    1994-07-01

    Two- and three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction computer programs for the simulation of nonlinear dynamics were developed and applied to a number of problems. The programs were created by coupling Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian finite volume fluid dynamics programs with strictly Lagrangian finite element structural dynamics programs. The resulting coupled programs can use either fully explicit or implicit time integration. The implicit time integration is accomplished by iterations of the fluid dynamics pressure solver and the structural dynamics system solver. The coupled programs have been used to solve problems involving incompressible fluids, membrane and shell elements, compressible multiphase flows, explosions in both air and water, and large displacements. In this paper, we present the approach used for the coupling and describe test problems that verify the two-dimensional programs against an experiment and an analytical linear problem. The experiment involves an explosion underwater near an instrumented thin steel plate. The analytical linear problem is the vibration of an infinite cylinder surrounded by an incompressible fluid to a given radius.

  7. Finite Element Analysis of Layered Fiber Composite Structures Accounting for the Material's Microstructure and Delamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stier, Bertram; Simon, Jaan-Willem; Reese, Stefanie

    2015-04-01

    The present paper focuses on composite structures which consist of several layers of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP). For such layered composite structures, delamination constitutes one of the major failure modes. Predicting its initiation is essential for the design of these composites. Evaluating stress-strength relation based onset criteria requires an accurate representation of the through-the-thickness stress distribution, which can be particularly delicate in the case of shell-like structures. Thus, in this paper, a solid-shell finite element formulation is utilized which allows to incorporate a fully three-dimensional material model while still being suitable for applications involving thin structures. Moreover, locking phenomena are cured by using both the EAS and the ANS concept, and numerical efficiency is ensured through reduced integration. The proposed anisotropic material model accounts for the material's micro-structure by using the concept of structural tensors. It is validated by comparison to experimental data as well as by application to numerical examples.

  8. Interactive editing of 3D geological structures and tectonic history sketching via a rigid element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Gautier; Caumon, Guillaume; Jessell, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Numerical models of geological structures are generally built with a geometrical approach, which lacks an explicit representation of the deformation history and may lead to incompatible structures. We advocate that the deformation history should be investigated and represented from the very first steps of the modelling process, provided that a series of rapid, interactive or automated, deformation tools are available for local editing, forward modelling and restoration. In this paper, we define the specifications of such tools and emphasise the need for rapidity and robustness. We briefly review the different applications of deformation tools in geomodelling and the existing deformation algorithms. We select a deformation algorithm based on rigid elements, first presented in the Computer Graphics community, which we refer to as Reed. It is able to rapidly deform any kind of geometrical object, including points, lines or volumes, with an approximated mechanical behaviour. The objects to be deformed are embedded in rigid cells whose displacement is optimised by minimising a global cost function with respect to displacement boundary conditions. This cost function measures the difference in displacement between neighbouring elements. The embedded objects are then deformed based on their original position with respect to the rigid elements. We present the basis of our implementation of this algorithm and highlight its ability to fulfil the specifications we defined. Its application to geomodelling specific problems is illustrated through the construction of a synthetic structural model of multiply deformed layers with a forward modelling approach. A special boundary condition adapted to restore large folds is also presented and applied to the large anticline of Han-sur-Lesse, Belgium, which demonstrates the ability of this method to efficiently perform a volumetric restoration without global projections.

  9. Impact of zeolite-based nanomodified additive on the structure and strength of the cement stone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, A. D.; Filippova, K. E.

    2015-01-01

    Portland cement is the main binder in the building materials industry; its properties strongly influence properties of mortars and concretes. Some regions experience difficulties with delivery and storage of Portland cement, raising the need to develop an effective additive from the available raw materials. Such materials for the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) are zeolite-containing rocks. Studies have shown that introducing of dibutylphthalate to the composition of modified additive during mechanochemical activation leads to achievement of up to 11% of total amount particles with the size of 3-30 nm. After introducing 0.5% of the obtained additives, the compressive strength of cement-sand slurry samples increases up to 28%. Positive effect of additives introduction is also observed at high flow rate of water (W / C = 0.7). Gaining strength reaches 23%, allowing the efficient use of additive for movable mixtures with enhanced strength properties. In general, the proposed supplement allows reducing the water flow in the solution without decreasing its mobility, and increasing strength properties, which makes it possible to obtain a whole class of solutions of modified cement binder. The market value of the developed additives is 18 rubles per 1 kg, making sound competition in the market of modifying additives.

  10. Inferring upper-mantle structure by full waveform tomography with the spectral element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekić, V.; Romanowicz, B.

    2011-05-01

    Mapping the elastic and anelastic structure of the Earth's mantle is crucial for understanding the temperature, composition and dynamics of our planet. In the past quarter century, global tomography based on ray theory and first-order perturbation methods has imaged long-wavelength elastic velocity heterogeneities of the Earth's mantle. However, the approximate techniques upon which global tomographers have traditionally relied become inadequate when dealing with crustal structure, as well as short-wavelength or large amplitude mantle heterogeneity. The spectral element method, on the other hand, permits accurate calculation of wave propagation through highly heterogeneous structures, and is computationally economical when coupled with a normal mode solution and applied to a restricted region of the Earth such as the upper mantle (SEM). Importantly, SEM allows a dramatic improvement in accounting for the effects of crustal structure. Here, we develop and apply a new hybrid method of tomography, which allows us to leverage the accuracy of SEM to model fundamental and higher-mode long period (>60 s) waveforms. We then present the first global model of upper-mantle velocity and radial anisotropy developed using SEM. Our model, SEMum, confirms that the long-wavelength mantle structure imaged using approximate semi-analytic techniques is robust and representative of the Earth's true structure. Furthermore, it reveals structures in the upper mantle that were not clearly seen in previous global tomographic models. We show that SEMum favourably compares to and rivals the resolving power of continental-scale studies. This new hybrid approach to tomography can be applied to a larger and higher-frequency data set in order to gain new insights into the structure of the lower mantle and more robustly map seismic structure at the regional and smaller scales.

  11. Program design by a multidisciplinary team. [for structural finite element analysis on STAR-100 computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voigt, S.

    1975-01-01

    The use of software engineering aids in the design of a structural finite-element analysis computer program for the STAR-100 computer is described. Nested functional diagrams to aid in communication among design team members were used, and a standardized specification format to describe modules designed by various members was adopted. This is a report of current work in which use of the functional diagrams provided continuity and helped resolve some of the problems arising in this long-running part-time project.

  12. Programs for transferring data between a relational data base and a finite element structural analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, S. C.

    1982-01-01

    An interface system for passing data between a relational information management (RIM) data base complex and engineering analysis language (EAL), a finite element structural analysis program is documented. The interface system, implemented on a CDC Cyber computer, is composed of two FORTRAN programs called RIM2EAL and EAL2RIM. The RIM2EAL reads model definition data from RIM and creates a file of EAL commands to define the model. The EAL2RIM reads model definition and EAL generated analysis data from EAL's data library and stores these data dirctly in a RIM data base. These two interface programs and the format for the RIM data complex are described.

  13. Testing the big bang: Light elements, neutrinos, dark matter and large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N. Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1991-06-01

    In this series of lectures, several experimental and observational tests of the standard cosmological model are examined. In particular, detailed discussion is presented regarding nucleosynthesis, the light element abundances and neutrino counting; the dark matter problems; and the formation of galaxies and large-scale structure. Comments will also be made on the possible implications of the recent solar neutrino experimental results for cosmology. An appendix briefly discusses the 17 keV thing'' and the cosmological and astrophysical constraints on it. 126 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Determination of total, commonality, and uniqueness of interpreted structural elements from remotely sensed data in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenfield, G.H.

    1986-01-01

    Statistical analysis is conducted to determine the unique value of real- and synthetic-aperture side-looking airborne radar (SLAR) to detect interpreted structural elements. SLAR images were compared to standard and digitally enhanced Landsat multispectral scanner (MSS) images and to aerial photographs. After interpretation of the imagery, data were cumulated by total length in miles and by frequency of counts. Maximum uniqueness is obtained first from real-aperture SLAR, 58.3% of total, and, second, from digitally enhanced Landsat MSS images, 54.1% of total. ?? 1986 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  15. Research on optimization of cooling structure of LED element (The 2nd report)

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, T.; Sakate, Y.; Hashimoto, R.; Takashina, T.; Kanematsu, H.; Utsumi, Y.

    2014-02-20

    This report shows a design guideline on the parts dimension of LED light bulb for heat transfer. LED light bulb is popular owing to the high efficiency and long life. However, LED element is a point heat source. Therefore, LED light bulb has some problems about heat transfer when it is used for lighting. It sometimes causes deterioration by the raise of local temperature, resulting in lowering of efficiency and shorter life. Thus the thermal analysis focused on the number of element, all parts thickness, length, and radiant heat was studied, as systematic report on the points has not been found. In this report, heat radiation was taken into account in the thermal analysis in addition to natural heat convection. Furthermore the temperature of a heat sink model for LED light bulb was measured with thermocouples and thermo-viewer to verify the calculation. The emissivity of aluminum used for the calculation was 0.4. As the result of analysis, it was found that the maximum temperature was mainly influenced by ring length, ring diameter and disk thickness as a design guideline. Concretely, longer length, larger diameter and thicker disk gave lower temperature of LED element. The temperatures of the best and worst model were around 70 °C and 120 °C respectively in the above condition. The temperatures calculated were consistent with those in experiment.

  16. Research on optimization of cooling structure of LED element (The 2nd report)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Sakate, Y.; Hashimoto, R.; Takashina, T.; Kanematsu, H.; Utsumi, Y.

    2014-02-01

    This report shows a design guideline on the parts dimension of LED light bulb for heat transfer. LED light bulb is popular owing to the high efficiency and long life. However, LED element is a point heat source. Therefore, LED light bulb has some problems about heat transfer when it is used for lighting. It sometimes causes deterioration by the raise of local temperature, resulting in lowering of efficiency and shorter life. Thus the thermal analysis focused on the number of element, all parts thickness, length, and radiant heat was studied, as systematic report on the points has not been found. In this report, heat radiation was taken into account in the thermal analysis in addition to natural heat convection. Furthermore the temperature of a heat sink model for LED light bulb was measured with thermocouples and thermo-viewer to verify the calculation. The emissivity of aluminum used for the calculation was 0.4. As the result of analysis, it was found that the maximum temperature was mainly influenced by ring length, ring diameter and disk thickness as a design guideline. Concretely, longer length, larger diameter and thicker disk gave lower temperature of LED element. The temperatures of the best and worst model were around 70 °C and 120 °C respectively in the above condition. The temperatures calculated were consistent with those in experiment.

  17. Are Molecular Vibration Patterns of Cell Structural Elements Used for Intracellular Signalling?

    PubMed Central

    Jaross, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Background: To date the manner in which information reaches the nucleus on that part within the three-dimensional structure where specific restorative processes of structural components of the cell are required is unknown. The soluble signalling molecules generated in the course of destructive and restorative processes communicate only as needed. Hypothesis: All molecules show temperature-dependent molecular vibration creating a radiation in the infrared region. Each molecule species has in its turn a specific frequency pattern under given specific conditions. Changes in their structural composition result in modified frequency patterns of the molecules in question. The main structural elements of the cell membrane, of the endoplasmic reticulum, of the Golgi apparatus, and of the different microsomes representing the great variety of polar lipids show characteristic frequency patterns with peaks in the region characterised by low water absorption. These structural elements are very dynamic, mainly caused by the creation of signal molecules and transport containers. By means of the characteristic radiation, the area where repair or substitution services are needed could be identified; this spatial information complements the signalling of the soluble signal molecules. Based on their resonance properties receptors located on the outer leaflet of the nuclear envelope should be able to read typical frequencies and pass them into the nucleus. Clearly this physical signalling must be blocked by the cell membrane to obviate the flow of information into adjacent cells. Conclusion: If the hypothesis can be proved experimentally, it should be possible to identify and verify characteristic infrared frequency patterns. The application of these signal frequencies onto cells would open entirely new possibilities in medicine and all biological disciplines specifically to influence cell growth and metabolism. Similar to this intracellular system, an extracellular signalling system

  18. Effects of meat addition on pasta structure, nutrition and in vitro digestibility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Hamid, Nazimah; Kantono, Kevin; Pereira, Loveena; Farouk, Mustafa M; Knowles, Scott O

    2016-12-15

    In our study, semolina flour was substituted with beef emulsion (EM) at three different levels of 15, 30 and 45% (w/w) to develop a pasta with enhanced nutritional profile. The protein, fat, and water content significantly increased with addition of meat. The addition of meat enhanced the pasta gluten network. The redness and yellowness of cooked pasta increased with meat addition. Tensile strength increased from 0.018N/mm(2) in the control sample to 0.046N/mm(2) in 45% beef emulsion (45EM) sample. All meat-containing samples had significantly higher elasticity than control (0.039N/mm(2)). GI significantly decreased and IVPD value increased in 45EM sample. Five essential amino acids (leucine, lysine, methionine, threonine, tryptophan) in pasta digesta increased significantly with increasing meat addition.

  19. Effects of meat addition on pasta structure, nutrition and in vitro digestibility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Hamid, Nazimah; Kantono, Kevin; Pereira, Loveena; Farouk, Mustafa M; Knowles, Scott O

    2016-12-15

    In our study, semolina flour was substituted with beef emulsion (EM) at three different levels of 15, 30 and 45% (w/w) to develop a pasta with enhanced nutritional profile. The protein, fat, and water content significantly increased with addition of meat. The addition of meat enhanced the pasta gluten network. The redness and yellowness of cooked pasta increased with meat addition. Tensile strength increased from 0.018N/mm(2) in the control sample to 0.046N/mm(2) in 45% beef emulsion (45EM) sample. All meat-containing samples had significantly higher elasticity than control (0.039N/mm(2)). GI significantly decreased and IVPD value increased in 45EM sample. Five essential amino acids (leucine, lysine, methionine, threonine, tryptophan) in pasta digesta increased significantly with increasing meat addition. PMID:27451161

  20. Multilevel micro-structuring of glassy carbon for precision glass molding of diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prater, Karin; Dukwen, Julia; Scharf, Toralf; Herzig, Hans Peter; Plöger, Sven; Hermerschmidt, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    A consumer market for diffractive optical elements in glass can only be created if high efficient elements are available at affordable prices. In diffractive optics the efficiency and optical properties increases with the number of levels used, but in the same way the costs are multiplied by the number if fabrication steps. Replication of multilevel diffractive optical elements in glass would allow cost efficient fabrication but a suitable mold material is needed. Glassy carbon shows a high mechanical strength, thermal stability and non-sticking adhesion properties, which makes it an excellent candidate as mold material for precision compression molding of low and high glass-transition temperature materials. We introduce an 8 level micro structuring process for glassy carbon molds with standard photolithography and a Ti layer as hard mask for reactive ion etching. The molds were applied to thermal imprinting onto low and high transition temperature glass. Optical performance was tested for the molded samples with different designs for laser beamsplitters. The results show a good agreement to the design specification. Our result allow us to show limitations of our fabrication technique and we discussed the suitability of precision glass molding for cost efficient mass production with a high quality.

  1. A finite element beam-model for efficient simulation of large-scale porous structures.

    PubMed

    Stauber, Martin; Huber, Martin; Van Lenthe, G Harry; Boyd, Steven K; Müller, Ralph

    2004-02-01

    This paper presents a new method for the generation of a beam finite element (FE) model from a three-dimensional (3D) data set acquired by micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). This method differs from classical modeling of trabecular bone because it models a specific sample only and differs from conventional solid hexahedron element-based FE approaches in its computational efficiency. The stress-strain curve, characterizing global mechanical properties of a porous structure, could be well predicted (R(2)=0.92). Furthermore, validation of the method was achieved by comparing local displacements of element nodes with the displacements directly measured by time-lapsed imaging methods of failure, and these measures were in good agreement. The presented model is a first step in modeling specific samples for efficient strength analysis by FE modeling. We believe that with upcoming high-resolution in-vivo imaging methods, this approach could lead to a novel and accurate tool in the risk assessment for osteoporotic fractures.

  2. Effect of additives on the structure, nanomorphology and efficiency of PCPDTBT: PC71BM solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, Shogo; Palanisamy, Kumar; Kannappan, Santhakumar; Ochiai, Shizuyasu

    2012-08-01

    We investigated the effect of additives on the morphology of a poly[2,6-(4,4-bis-(2-ethylhexyl)-4H-cyclopenta[2,1-b;3,4-b']dithiophene)-alt-4,7-(2,1,3-benzothiadiazole)] (PCPDTBT):(6,6)-phenyl C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) blended onto a surface of poly (3, 4-ethylendioxythiophene): poly(styrensulfonate)(PEDOT:PSS) to form photoactive films. Films of PCPDTBT: PC71-BM bulk heterojunctions were prepared by spin-coating from a solution in chlorobenzene (CB) and were processed with and without the addition of 2%, 4%, and 6 vol% 1-chloro naphthalene (CN) or 1, 8-octanedithiol (ODT) as additives. For all samples, the PCPDTBT:PC71BM molar ratio was 1:2 (wt%), and the additives in 1 ml were prepared with a concentration of 30 mg of PCPDTBT:PC71BM. Optical absorption spectroscopy measurements of the films indicated shifts in the absorption peaks in the range from 500-800 nm which was attributed to PCPDTBT. XRay diffraction (XRD) was used to investigate the nature of the molecular stacking in the polymer thin films. Topographic images which were obtained by using an atomic force microscope, of the PCPDTBT:PC71BM layers with 2 vol% ODT additive, were found to have the highest surface roughness. The best performing device shows a power conversion efficiency of 2.15% for a 2-vol% ODT additive.

  3. The nuclear receptors NUR77 and SF1 play additive roles with c-JUN through distinct elements on the mouse Star promoter.

    PubMed

    Martin, Luc J; Tremblay, Jacques J

    2009-02-01

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein plays an essential role in steroid biosynthesis in steroidogenic cells. It is involved in the transport of cholesterol through the mitochondrial membrane where the first step of steroidogenesis occurs. Star gene expression in testicular Leydig cells is regulated by the pituitary LH through the cAMP signaling pathway. So far, several transcription factors have been implicated in the regulation of Star promoter activity in these cells. These include the nuclear receptors NUR77 and SF1, AP-1 family members (particularly c-JUN), GATA4, C/EBPbeta, DLX5/6, and CREB. Some of these factors were also shown to act in a cooperative manner to further enhance Star promoter activity. Here, we report that NUR77 and c-JUN have additive effects on the Star promoter. These effects were abolished only when both elements, NUR77 at -95 bp and AP-1 at -78 bp, were mutated. Consistent with this, in vitro co-immunoprecipitation revealed that NUR77 and c-JUN interact and that this interaction is mediated through part of the ligand binding domain of NUR77. Furthermore, we found that SF1 could cooperate with c-JUN on the mouse Star promoter but this cooperation involved different regulatory elements. Collectively, our data not only provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms that control mouse Star transcription in Leydig cells but also reveal a novel mechanism for the regulation of NR4A1-dependent genes in tissues where NUR77 and c-JUN factors are co-expressed.

  4. Electronic Structure Calculations for Heavy Elements: Radon (Z=86) and Francium (Z=87)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koufos, Alexander; Papaconstantopoulos, Dimitrios

    2010-03-01

    Electronic structure calculations allow scientists to predict the properties of solids without the use of physical material. Although the ability to manipulate matter has improved dramatically within the past couple decades, some matter is still hard to study. Modern computers not only let us study this matter, but allow us to do it more quickly and just as accurately. The electronic structure of two rare and mostly unstudied elements, Radon (Z=86) and Francium (Z=87), has been calculated. The augmented plane wave (APW) method with local density approximation (LDA) functional as well as the linearized augmented plane wave (LAPW) method with both LDA and generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals were used to perform the calculations. Francium total energy calculations gave the fcc structure slightly below the bcc structure with a minimal energy difference of δE=0.33mRy. The difference found is consistent with other alkali metal total energy calculations which do not verify the bcc structure to be the ground state. Radon was predicted to be an insulator with a gap of 0.931 Ry similar to the other noble gases.

  5. Telomere Capping Proteins are Structurally Related to RPA with an additional Telomere-Specific Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Gelinas, A.; Paschini, M; Reyes, F; Heroux, A; Batey, R; Lundblad, V; Wuttke, D

    2009-01-01

    Telomeres must be capped to preserve chromosomal stability. The conserved Stn1 and Ten1 proteins are required for proper capping of the telomere, although the mechanistic details of how they contribute to telomere maintenance are unclear. Here, we report the crystal structures of the C-terminal domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Stn1 and the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Ten1 proteins. These structures reveal striking similarities to corresponding subunits in the replication protein A complex, further supporting an evolutionary link between telomere maintenance proteins and DNA repair complexes. Our structural and in vivo data of Stn1 identify a new domain that has evolved to support a telomere-specific role in chromosome maintenance. These findings endorse a model of an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of DNA maintenance that has developed as a result of increased chromosomal structural complexity.

  6. Crystal Structure of NFAT Bound to the HIV-1 LTR Tandem κB Enhancer Element

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, Darren L.; Barthel, Kristen K.B.; Wu, Yongqing; Kalhor, Reza; Stroud, James C.; Giffin, Michael J.; Chen, Lin

    2008-05-27

    Here, we have determined the crystal structure of the DNA binding domain of NFAT bound to the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) tandem {kappa}B enhancer element of 3.05 {angstrom} resolution. NFAT binds as a dimer to the upstream {kappa}B site (Core II), but as a monomer to the 3' end of the downstream {kappa}B site (Core I). The DNA shows a significant bend near the 5' end of Core I, where a lysine residue from NFAT bound to the 3' end of Core II inserts into the minor groove and seems to cause DNA bases to flip out. Consistent with this structural feature, the 5' end of Core I become hypersensitive to dimethylsulfate in the in vivo footprinting upon transcriptional activation of the HIV-1 LTR. Our studies provide a basis for futher investigating the functional mechanism of NFAT in HIV-1 transcription and replication.

  7. Finite Element Modeling for the Structural Analysis of Al-Cu Laser Beam Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartel, Udo; Ilin, Alexander; Bantel, Christoph; Gibmeier, Jens; Michailov, Vesselin

    Laser beam welding of aluminum and copper (Al-Cu) materials is a cost efficient joining technology to produce e.g. connector elements for battery modules. Distortion low connections can be achieved, which have electrical favorable properties. Numerical simulation of the laser beam welding process of Al-Cu dissimilar materials can provide further insight into principal process mechanisms and mechanical response of the joint parts. In this paper a methodology is introduced to investigate the structural behavior of Al-Cu joints in overlap joint with respect to welding distortions and residual stresses. First the material model of the homogeneous base materials are validated. Next, a generic material model approach is used to simulate the structural behavior of heterogeneous Al-Cu connections.

  8. Coupled mixed-field laminate theory and finite element for smart piezoelectric composite shell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, Dimitris A.

    1996-01-01

    Mechanics for the analysis of laminated composite shells with piezoelectric actuators and sensors are presented. A new mixed-field laminate theory for piezoelectric shells is formulated in curvilinear coordinates which combines single-layer assumptions for the displacements and a layerwise representation for the electric potential. The resultant coupled governing equations for curvilinear piezoelectric laminates are described. Structural mechanics are subsequently developed and an 8-node finite-element is formulated for the static and dynamic analysis of adaptive composite structures of general laminations containing piezoelectric layers. Evaluations of the method and comparisons with reported results are presented for laminated piezoelectric-composite plates, a closed cylindrical shell with a continuous piezoceramic layer and a laminated composite semi-circular cantilever shell with discrete cylindrical piezoelectric actuators and/or sensors.

  9. Conformational characterization of the intrinsically disordered protein Chibby: Interplay between structural elements in target recognition.

    PubMed

    Killoran, Ryan C; Sowole, Modupeola A; Halim, Mohammad A; Konermann, Lars; Choy, Wing-Yiu

    2016-08-01

    The protein Chibby (Cby) is an antagonist of the Wnt signaling pathway, where it inhibits the binding between the transcriptional coactivator β-catenin and the Tcf/Lef transcription factors. The 126 residue Cby is partially disordered; its N-terminal half is unstructured while its C-terminal half comprises a coiled-coil domain. Previous structural analyses of Cby using NMR spectroscopy suffered from severe line broadening for residues within the protein's C-terminal half, hindering detailed characterization of the coiled-coil domain. Here, we use hydrogen/deuterium exchange-mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to examine Cby's C-terminal half. Results reveal that Cby is divided into three structural elements: a disordered N-terminal half, a coiled-coil domain, and a C-terminal unstructured extension consisting of the last ∼ 25 residues (which we term C-terminal extension). A series of truncation constructs were designed to assess the roles of individual structural elements in protein stability and Cby binding to TC-1, a positive regulator of the Wnt signaling pathway. CD and NMR data show that Cby maintains coiled-coil structure upon deletion of either disordered region. NMR and ITC binding experiments between Cby and TC-1 illustrate that the interaction is retained upon deletion of either Cby's N-terminal half or its C-terminal extension. Intriguingly, Cby's C-terminal half alone binds to TC-1 with significantly greater affinity compared to full-length Cby, implying that target binding of the coiled-coil domain is affected by the flanking disordered regions. PMID:27082063

  10. Effects of 5f-elements on electronic structures and spectroscopic properties of gold superatom model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-08-01

    5f-elements encaged in a gold superatomic cluster are capable of giving rise to unique optical properties due to their hyperactive valence electrons and great radial components of 5f/6d orbitals. Herein, we review our first-principles studies on electronic structures and spectroscopic properties of a series of actinide-embedded gold superatomic clusters with different dimensions. The three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) superatom clusters possess the 18-electron configuration of 1S21P61D10 and 10-electron configuration of 1S21P41D4, respectively. Importantly, their electronic absorption spectra can also be effectively explained by the superatom orbitals. Specifically, the charge transfer (CT) transitions involved in surface-enhance Raman spectroscopy (SERS) spectra for 3D and 2D structures are both from the filled 1D orbitals, providing the enhancement factors of the order of ∼ 104 at 488 nm and ∼ 105 at 456 nm, respectively. This work implies that the superatomic orbital transitions involved in 5f-elements can not only lead to a remarkable spectroscopic performance, but also a new direction for optical design in the future. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11374004), the Science and Technology Development Program of Jilin Province, China (Grant No. 20150519021JH), the Fok Ying Tung Education Foundation, China (Grant No. 142001), and the Support from the High Performance Computing Center (HPCC) of Jilin University, China.

  11. Blood lead: Its effect on trace element levels and iron structure in hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, C.; Li, Y.; Li, Y. L.; Zou, Y.; Zhang, G. L.; Normura, M.; Zhu, G. Y.

    2008-08-01

    Lead is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant that induce a broad range of physiological and biochemical dysfunctions. The purpose of this study was to investigate its effects on trace elements and the iron structure in hemoglobin. Blood samples were collected from rats that had been exposed to lead. The concentration of trace elements in whole blood and blood plasma was determined by ICP-MS and the results indicate that lead exists mainly in the red blood cells and only about 1-3% in the blood plasma. Following lead exposure, the concentrations of zinc and iron in blood decrease, as does the hemoglobin level. This indicates that the heme biosynthetic pathway is inhibited by lead toxicity and that lead poisoning-associated anemia occurs. The selenium concentration also decreases after lead exposure, which may lead to an increased rate of free radical production. The effect of lead in the blood on iron structure in hemoglobin was determined by EXAFS. After lead exposure, the Fe-O bond length increases by about 0.07 Å and the Fe-Np bond length slightly increases, but the Fe-N ɛ bond length remains unchanged. This indicates that the blood content of Hb increases, but that the content of HbO 2 decreases.

  12. A Highly Flexible, Automated System Providing Reliable Sample Preparation in Element- and Structure-Specific Measurements.

    PubMed

    Vorberg, Ellen; Fleischer, Heidi; Junginger, Steffen; Liu, Hui; Stoll, Norbert; Thurow, Kerstin

    2016-10-01

    Life science areas require specific sample pretreatment to increase the concentration of the analytes and/or to convert the analytes into an appropriate form for the detection and separation systems. Various workstations are commercially available, allowing for automated biological sample pretreatment. Nevertheless, due to the required temperature, pressure, and volume conditions in typical element and structure-specific measurements, automated platforms are not suitable for analytical processes. Thus, the purpose of the presented investigation was the design, realization, and evaluation of an automated system ensuring high-precision sample preparation for a variety of analytical measurements. The developed system has to enable system adaption and high performance flexibility. Furthermore, the system has to be capable of dealing with the wide range of required vessels simultaneously, allowing for less cost and time-consuming process steps. However, the system's functionality has been confirmed in various validation sequences. Using element-specific measurements, the automated system was up to 25% more precise compared to the manual procedure and as precise as the manual procedure using structure-specific measurements.

  13. Effects of 5f-elements on electronic structures and spectroscopic properties of gold superatom model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-08-01

    5f-elements encaged in a gold superatomic cluster are capable of giving rise to unique optical properties due to their hyperactive valence electrons and great radial components of 5f/6d orbitals. Herein, we review our first-principles studies on electronic structures and spectroscopic properties of a series of actinide-embedded gold superatomic clusters with different dimensions. The three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) superatom clusters possess the 18-electron configuration of 1S21P61D10 and 10-electron configuration of 1S21P41D4, respectively. Importantly, their electronic absorption spectra can also be effectively explained by the superatom orbitals. Specifically, the charge transfer (CT) transitions involved in surface-enhance Raman spectroscopy (SERS) spectra for 3D and 2D structures are both from the filled 1D orbitals, providing the enhancement factors of the order of ˜ 104 at 488 nm and ˜ 105 at 456 nm, respectively. This work implies that the superatomic orbital transitions involved in 5f-elements can not only lead to a remarkable spectroscopic performance, but also a new direction for optical design in the future. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11374004), the Science and Technology Development Program of Jilin Province, China (Grant No. 20150519021JH), the Fok Ying Tung Education Foundation, China (Grant No. 142001), and the Support from the High Performance Computing Center (HPCC) of Jilin University, China.

  14. Finite Element Simulation of Low Velocity Impact Damage on an Aeronautical Carbon Composite Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemanle Sanga, Roger Pierre; Garnier, Christian; Pantalé, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    Low velocity barely visible impact damage (BVID) in laminated carbon composite structures has a major importance for aeronautical industries. This contribution leads with the development of finite element models to simulate the initiation and the propagation of internal damage inside a carbon composite structure due by a low velocity impact. Composite plates made from liquid resin infusion process (LRI) have been subjected to low energy impacts (around 25 J) using a drop weight machine. In the experimental procedure, the internal damage is evaluated using an infrared thermographic camera while the indentation depth of the face is measured by optical measurement technique. In a first time we developed a robust model using homogenised shells based on degenerated tri-dimensional brick elements and in a second time we decided to modelize the whole stacking sequence of homogeneous layers and cohesive interlaminar interfaces in order to compare and validate the obtained results. Both layer and interface damage initiation and propagation models based on the Hashin and the Benzeggagh-Kenane criteria have been used for the numerical simulations. Comparison of numerical results and experiments has shown the accuracy of the proposed models.

  15. Performance analysis of high quality parallel preconditioners applied to 3D finite element structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kolotilina, L.; Nikishin, A.; Yeremin, A.

    1994-12-31

    The solution of large systems of linear equations is a crucial bottleneck when performing 3D finite element analysis of structures. Also, in many cases the reliability and robustness of iterative solution strategies, and their efficiency when exploiting hardware resources, fully determine the scope of industrial applications which can be solved on a particular computer platform. This is especially true for modern vector/parallel supercomputers with large vector length and for modern massively parallel supercomputers. Preconditioned iterative methods have been successfully applied to industrial class finite element analysis of structures. The construction and application of high quality preconditioners constitutes a high percentage of the total solution time. Parallel implementation of high quality preconditioners on such architectures is a formidable challenge. Two common types of existing preconditioners are the implicit preconditioners and the explicit preconditioners. The implicit preconditioners (e.g. incomplete factorizations of several types) are generally high quality but require solution of lower and upper triangular systems of equations per iteration which are difficult to parallelize without deteriorating the convergence rate. The explicit type of preconditionings (e.g. polynomial preconditioners or Jacobi-like preconditioners) require sparse matrix-vector multiplications and can be parallelized but their preconditioning qualities are less than desirable. The authors present results of numerical experiments with Factorized Sparse Approximate Inverses (FSAI) for symmetric positive definite linear systems. These are high quality preconditioners that possess a large resource of parallelism by construction without increasing the serial complexity.

  16. Influencing the arc and the mechanical properties of the weld metal in GMA-welding processes by additive elements on the wire electrode surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesling, V.; Schram, A.; Müller, T.; Treutler, K.

    2016-03-01

    Under the premise of an increasing scarcity of raw materials and increasing demands on construction materials, the mechanical properties of steels and its joints are gaining highly important. In particular high- and highest-strength steels are getting in the focus of the research and the manufacturing industry. To the same extent, the requirements for filler metals are increasing as well. At present, these low-alloy materials are protected by a copper coating (<1μm) against corrosion. In addition, the coating realizes a good ohmic contact and good sliding properties between the welding machine and the wire during the welding process. By exchanging the copper with other elements it should be possible to change the mechanical properties of the weld metal and the arc stability during gas metal arc welding processes and keep the basic functions of the coating nearly untouched. On a laboratory scale solid wire electrodes with coatings of various elements and compounds such as titanium oxide were made and processed with a Gas Metal Arc Welding process. During the processing a different process behavior between the wire electrodes, coated and original, could be observed. The influences ranges from greater/shorter arc-length over increasing/decreasing droplets to larger/smaller arc foot point. Furthermore, the weld metal of the coated electrodes has significantly different mechanical and technological characteristics as the weld metal from the copper coated ground wire. The yield strength and tensile strength can be increased by up to 50%. In addition, the chemical composition of the weld metal was influenced by the application of coatings with layer thicknesses to 15 microns in the lower percentage range (up to about 3%). Another effect of the coating is a modified penetration. The normally occurring “argon finger” can be suppressed or enhanced by the choice of the coating. With the help of the presented studies it will be shown that Gas Metal Arc Welding processes

  17. Specialized chromatin structure domain boundary elements flanking a Drosophila heat shock gene locus are under torsional strain in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jupe, E R; Sinden, R R; Cartwright, I L

    1995-02-28

    An in vivo assay employing psoralen cross-linking was used to investigate the presence of unrestrained supercoiling in DNA sequences located in nontranscribed regions flanking the 3' ends of the pair of divergent heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) genes at locus 87A7 of Drosophila. Two of the regions examined contain sequences comprising the previously defined specialized chromatin structure elements (scs and scs'). Both of these putative chromosomal domain boundaries exhibited very similar levels of unrestrained negative supercoiling that remained high regardless of the transcriptional status of the hsp70 genes. The steric accessibility of the scs region before heat shock was 3-fold higher than either flanking region (consistent with its previously documented DNase I hypersensitivity); this increased an additional 2-fold following hsp70 gene activation without a concomitant rise in the accessibility of flanking regions. Most notably, a sequence which lies outside the presumed 87A7 domain, as defined by the centromere-proximal scs element, exhibited no detectable torsional tension regardless of gene activity in the domain. A sequence located just inside the scs region displayed a low level of tension that was also essentially unaffected by transcription, consistent with data obtained previously for a similarly situated fragment at the centromere-distal scs' location. The existence of a highly localized region of supercoiling within the scs and scs' sequences might be related to their activity in vivo as insulators of chromosomal position effects in Drosophila. PMID:7873544

  18. Contrasting effects of alpha and beta globin regulatory elements on chromatin structure may be related to their different chromosomal environments.

    PubMed Central

    Craddock, C F; Vyas, P; Sharpe, J A; Ayyub, H; Wood, W G; Higgs, D R

    1995-01-01

    Expression of the human alpha and beta globin gene clusters is regulated by remote sequences, referred to as HS -40 and the beta-locus control region (beta-LCR) that lie 5-40 kb upstream of the genes they activate. Because of their common ancestry, similar organization and coordinate expression it has often been assumed that regulation of the globin gene clusters by HS -40 and the beta-LCR occurs via similar mechanisms. Using interspecific hybrids containing chromosomes with naturally occurring deletions of HS -40 we have shown that, in contrast to the beta-LCR, this element exerts no discernible effect on long-range chromatin structure and in addition does not influence formation of DNase I hypersensitive sites at the alpha globin promoters. These differences in the behaviour of HS -40 and the beta-LCR may reflect their contrasting influence on gene expression in transgenic mice and may result from the differing requirements of these elements in their radically different, natural chromosomal environments; the alpha cluster lying within a region of constitutively 'open' chromatin and the beta cluster in a segment of chromatin which opens in a tissue-specific manner. Differences in the hierarchical control of the alpha and beta globin clusters may exemplify more general differences in the regulation of eukaryotic genes which lie in similar open or closed chromosomal regions. Images PMID:7737123

  19. Priming word order by thematic roles: no evidence for an additional involvement of phrase structure.

    PubMed

    Pappert, Sandra; Pechmann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Three experiments are reported that studied the priming of word order in German. Experiment 1 demonstrated priming of the order of case-marked verb arguments. However, order of noun phrases and order of thematic roles were confounded. In Experiment 2, we therefore aimed at disentangling the impact of these two possible factors. By using primes that differed from targets in phrase structure but were parallel with regard to the order of thematic roles, we nevertheless found priming demonstrating the critical impact of thematic roles. Experiment 3 replicated the priming effects from Experiments 1 and 2 within participants and revealed no evidence for a modulation of priming by phrase structure. Consequently, our findings suggest that word order priming crucially depends on the structural outline of thematic roles rather than on the linearization of phrases.

  20. Studies on the Food Additive Propyl Gallate: Synthesis, Structural Characterization, and Evaluation of the Antioxidant Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrido, Jorge; Garrido, E. Manuela; Borges, Fernanda

    2012-01-01

    Antioxidants are additives largely used in industry for delaying, retarding, or preventing the development of oxidative deterioration. Propyl gallate (E310) is a phenolic antioxidant extensively used in the food, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries. A series of lab experiments have been developed to teach students about the importance and…

  1. Influence of Additive and Multiplicative Structure and Direction of Comparison on the Reversal Error

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    González-Calero, José Antonio; Arnau, David; Laserna-Belenguer, Belén

    2015-01-01

    An empirical study has been carried out to evaluate the potential of word order matching and static comparison as explanatory models of reversal error. Data was collected from 214 undergraduate students who translated a set of additive and multiplicative comparisons expressed in Spanish into algebraic language. In these multiplicative comparisons…

  2. Guided ultrasonic waves in the cylindrical layer-substrate structures. Application to the control of the massive machine elements with cylindrical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ouahdani, M.; Sidki, M.; Ramdani, A.

    2005-12-01

    This paper presents a study of the ultrasonic wave propagation in a cylindrical layer-substrate structure of an infinite length. We determine the dispersion curves of the structure, the displacements field in the structure and the impact of the contact quality between the layer and the substrate. The industrial application aimed by our study is the control of the massive machine elements with cylindrical cavities coated and exposed to corrosion. The obtained results show that some modes of propagation are insensitive to the layer thickness. Therefore, these modes can be generated during the ultrasonic control of the layer. In addition, for the dimensions considered here, the second mode of propagation is the most adapted for the detection of defects in the vicinity of the internal layer wall. In addition, our study shows the possibility of characterization of the quality of contact between the layer and the substrate from the analysis of dispersion curves of the structure.

  3. Trace Element Geochemistry of Matrix Glass from the Bedout Impact Structure,Canning Basin NW Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poreda, R. J.; Basu, A. R.; Chakrabarti, R.; Becker, L.

    2004-12-01

    We report on geochemical and petrographic analysis of separated matrix glass from Lagrange-1 and Bedout-1 drill cores that penetrated the Bedout structure offshore NW Australia. The results support the conclusion that the Bedout structure was produced by a a major ET impact at the end-Permian that generated shock melted glass and impact breccias (Becker et al., Science, v.304, p.1469, 2004) The Bedout structure is a 30 km, circular, 1.5 km uplifted basment high that occurs on the passive margin offshore NW Australia. The isolated feature, covered by 3 km of Triassic to Recent sediments,is not consistent with any typical volcanic province (i.e. arc or hotspot volcanism). This hypothesis is supported by the unique mineralogy and chemistry of the matrix glass. At Lagrange, major elements crudely resemble low-K, Fe-Ti basalts while the trace element patterns have two distinct signatures. The lower 250 m of Lagrange (3260 - 3010 m depth) have essentially flat REE and "spider" patterns that superficially resemble some E-MORB; a signal not typically found in arc, hotspot or continental margin settings. The upper 150 meters (3000 - 2850m) of Lagrange and the entire Bedout core (3030 - 3070m) have similar light REE-enriched patterns but low levels of alkalis, alkaline-earths and high field strength elements. Again, the chemistry is not consistent with an arc or hotspot setting, based on the low Ba and extremely low Sr (30-110 ppm) concentrations. Based on the geophysical, chemical and petrologic evidence, we hypothesize that the Bedout structure formed as the result` of an ET impact with Permian age rift margin basalts and continental sediment. The basalts did not completely melt as evidenced by the abundance of large (1 mm) An50 plagioclase,that exist as both crystalline plag and shock melted maskelynite. Plagioclase is the major repository of Sr in basalts and the lack of a plagioclase contribution to the melt glass is reflected in the low Sr abundance. Shock

  4. Structure and micro-computed tomography-based finite element modeling of Toucan beak.

    PubMed

    Seki, Yasuaki; Mackey, Mason; Meyers, Marc A

    2012-05-01

    Bird beaks are one of the most fascinating sandwich composites in nature. Their design is composed of a keratinous integument and a bony foam core. We evaluated the structure and mechanical properties of a Toucan beak to establish structure-property relationships. We revealed the hierarchical structure of the Toucan beak by microscopy techniques. The integument consists of 50 μm polygonal keratin tiles with ~7.5 nm embedded intermediate filaments. The branched intermediate filaments were visualized by TEM tomography techniques. The bony foam core or trabecular bone is a closed-cell foam, which serves as a stiffener for the beak. The tridimensional foam structure was reconstructed by μ-CT scanning to create a model for the finite element analysis (FEA). The mechanical response of the beak foam including trabeculae and cortical shell was measured in tension and compression. We found that Young's modulus is 3 (S.D. 2.2) GPa for the trabeculae and 0.3 (S.D. 0.2) GPa for the cortical shell. After obtaining the material parameters, the deformation and microscopic failure of foam were calculated by FEA. The calculations agree well with the experimental results. PMID:22498278

  5. Application of the wave finite element method to reinforced concrete structures with damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Masri, Evelyne; Ferguson, Neil; Waters, Timothy

    2016-09-01

    Vibration based methods are commonly deployed to detect structural damage using sensors placed remotely from potential damage sites. Whilst many such techniques are modal based there are advantages to adopting a wave approach, in which case it is essential to characterise wave propagation in the structure. The Wave Finite Element method (WFE) is an efficient approach to predicting the response of a composite waveguide using a conventional FE model of a just a short segment. The method has previously been applied to different structures such as laminated plates, thinwalled structures and fluid-filled pipes. In this paper, the WFE method is applied to a steel reinforced concrete beam. Dispersion curves and wave mode shapes are first presented from free wave solutions, and these are found to be insensitive to loss of thickness in a single reinforcing bar. A reinforced beam with localised damage is then considered by coupling an FE model of a short damaged segment into the WFE model of the undamaged beam. The fundamental bending, torsion and axial waves are unaffected by the damage but some higher order waves of the cross section are significantly reflected close to their cut-on frequencies. The potential of this approach for detecting corrosion and delamination in reinforced concrete beams will be investigated in future work.

  6. Simulation of plasmonic and photonic crystal structures using finite-element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sen

    In this thesis, the Finite-Element Method (FEM) was utilized to simulate and design the optimal nanostructures for better performances of Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) and lasing. FEM proved its effectiveness in the calculations of target physical models to optimize the model geometry or theoretically validate experimental observations. In chapter 1 and 2, the fundamental theorem of SERS and photonic crystal cavity were introduced and discussed. The most used optical structures for the two effects, metal/dielectric SPP structure and dielectric photonic crystal structure, were introduced as examples. Equations stem from Maxwell equations were derived and discussed to clarify the concepts of SERS and PCC. In chapter 3, the FEM method was carried out to simulate the SERS performance of Au nano-bowl/SiO2/Au nanoparticle structure. The electric field distributions and Raman enhancement factors of models in real experiments were calculated and analyzed theoretically. The simulation result on Raman enhancement factors showed consistency with the experimental observations. In chapter 4, the design process of silicon nitride photonic crystal cavity was introduced and the simulation results were discussed. Using L3 geometrical model, the FEM method successfully revealed the relations between key optical properties, such as quality factor and resonant wavelength, and geometrical parameter selections. The simulations were also helpful in determination of the optimal parameter selection in L3 PCC model for further experimental fabrication.

  7. Structure-aided prediction of mammalian transcription factor complexes in conserved non-coding elements.

    PubMed

    Guturu, Harendra; Doxey, Andrew C; Wenger, Aaron M; Bejerano, Gill

    2013-12-19

    Mapping the DNA-binding preferences of transcription factor (TF) complexes is critical for deciphering the functions of cis-regulatory elements. Here, we developed a computational method that compares co-occurring motif spacings in conserved versus unconserved regions of the human genome to detect evolutionarily constrained binding sites of rigid TF complexes. Structural data were used to estimate TF complex physical plausibility, explore overlapping motif arrangements seldom tackled by non-structure-aware methods, and generate and analyse three-dimensional models of the predicted complexes bound to DNA. Using this approach, we predicted 422 physically realistic TF complex motifs at 18% false discovery rate, the majority of which (326, 77%) contain some sequence overlap between binding sites. The set of mostly novel complexes is enriched in known composite motifs, predictive of binding site configurations in TF-TF-DNA crystal structures, and supported by ChIP-seq datasets. Structural modelling revealed three cooperativity mechanisms: direct protein-protein interactions, potentially indirect interactions and 'through-DNA' interactions. Indeed, 38% of the predicted complexes were found to contain four or more bases in which TF pairs appear to synergize through overlapping binding to the same DNA base pairs in opposite grooves or strands. Our TF complex and associated binding site predictions are available as a web resource at http://bejerano.stanford.edu/complex.

  8. Additive Promotion of Viral Internal Ribosome Entry Site-Mediated Translation by Far Upstream Element-Binding Protein 1 and an Enterovirus 71-Induced Cleavage Product

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chuan-Tien; Kung, Yu-An; Li, Mei-Ling; Lee, Kuo-Ming; Liu, Shih-Tung; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2016-01-01

    The 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of the enterovirus 71 (EV71) RNA genome contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) that is indispensable for viral protein translation. Due to the limited coding capacity of their RNA genomes, EV71 and other picornaviruses typically recruit host factors, known as IRES trans-acting factors (ITAFs), to mediate IRES-dependent translation. Here, we show that EV71 viral proteinase 2A is capable of cleaving far upstream element-binding protein 1 (FBP1), a positive ITAF that directly binds to the EV71 5' UTR linker region to promote viral IRES-driven translation. The cleavage occurs at the Gly-371 residue of FBP1 during the EV71 infection process, and this generates a functional cleavage product, FBP11-371. Interestingly, the cleavage product acts to promote viral IRES activity. Footprinting analysis and gel mobility shift assay results showed that FBP11-371 similarly binds to the EV71 5' UTR linker region, but at a different site from full-length FBP1; moreover, FBP1 and FBP11-371 were found to act additively to promote IRES-mediated translation and virus yield. Our findings expand the current understanding of virus-host interactions with regard to viral recruitment and modulation of ITAFs, and provide new insights into translational control during viral infection. PMID:27780225

  9. An Interface-Enriched eXtended Finite Element-Level Set Simulation of Solutal Melting of Additive Powder Particles during Transient Liquid Phase Bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoneim, A.; Hunedy, J.; Ojo, O. A.

    2013-02-01

    A new numerical simulation model is developed by using an interface-enriched eXtended Finite Element-Level Set (XFE-LS) method to study the solute-induced melting of additive powder particles (APPs) during transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding. The robust model captures rapidly occurring concurrent interfacial events at multiple propagating liquid-solid interfaces to simulate the melting behavior. In contrast to the critical assumption in analytical models, numerical calculations show that solute-transport into the APPs during the equilibration of the liquid composition is a significant factor that affects the APPs melting behavior. Also, the study shows that the solute-transport dependence of extent of APPs melting is influenced by the kinetics of solid-state solute diffusion within the particles. The understanding generated by the numerical analysis has resulted in the use of interlayer powder mixture that contains base-alloy APPs to produce single crystal TLP joint that has matching crystallographic orientations with single crystal substrate material, at a substantially reduced processing time, which has been previously considered unfeasible.

  10. Grain refinement in heavy rare earth element-free sintered Nd–Fe–B magnets by addition of a small amount of molybdenum

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin Woo; Lee, Won Suk; Byun, Jong Min; Kim, Young Do; Kim, Se Hoon

    2015-05-07

    We employed a modified refractory-metal-addition method to achieve higher coercivity and remanence in heavy rare earth element (HREE)-free Nd–Fe–B sintered magnets. This process involved inducing the formation of a homogeneous secondary phase at the grain boundaries during sintering, making it possible to control the intergrain diffusion by adding small amounts of Mo, a refractory metal. To control the microstructure of the secondary phase effectively, a metal organic compound of the refractory metal was coated on the surfaces of the particles of an HREE-free Nd–Fe–B powder. The average grain size after this process was 5.60 μm, which was approximately 1.8 μm smaller than that of the HREE-free sintered Nd–Fe–B magnets (7.4 μm). The coercivity of the magnets prepared through this process could be increased from 11.88 kOe to 13.91 kOe without decreasing their remanence.

  11. Analytical and Experimental Studies of the Seismic Performance of Reinforced Concrete Structural Wall Boundary Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilson, Christopher William

    Following the February 27, 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake, an international effort was undertaken to better understand reasons for observed damage to concrete structural walls in buildings located in the affected region of Chile and to address potential design implications. The Chilean building code for concrete structures is based on the U.S. ACI 318 building code; however, based on the observed performance of over 400 buildings in the March 1985 earthquake-impacted Vina del Mar, Chilean Code NCh433.Of96 included an exception that special boundary elements (SBEs)---which are commonly required for walls in U.S. buildings---need not be provided. By taking exception to the special boundary element detailing provisions, the Chilean code allowed thin wall boundary zones with relatively large (typically 20 cm) spacing of transverse reinforcement (essentially unconfined) to be constructed. Given these differences, the 2010 earthquake is an excellent opportunity to assess the performance of reinforced concrete buildings designed using modern codes similar to those used in the United States. Data from damaged and undamaged buildings, as well as from parametric and experimental studies, are used to provide recommendations to improve the efficacy of U.S. provisions designed to inhibit structural damage at wall boundaries. Seven Chilean buildings were selected to investigate the performance of boundary elements during the 2010 earthquake. Several walls from each of the seven buildings were chosen to evaluate the ACI 318-11 Section 21.9.6.2 displacement-based trigger equation for determining if SBEs would have been required and if observed damage was consistent with the evaluation result (i.e., SBE required, no damage; SBE required, damage observed). The propensity of boundary longitudinal reinforcement to buckle was also investigated, taking into consideration the influence of boundary transverse reinforcement configuration and longitudinal reinforcement strain history. In

  12. The influence of melt structure on trace element partitioning near the peridotite solidus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaetani, Glenn A.

    This experimental study examines the mineral/melt partitioning of Na, Ti, La, Sm, Ho, and Lu among high-Ca clinopyroxene, plagioclase, and silicate melts analogous to varying degrees of peridotite partial melting. Experiments performed at a pressure of 1.5 GPa and temperatures of 1,285 to 1,345 °C produced silicate melts saturated with high-Ca clinopyroxene, plagioclase and/or spinel, and, in one case, orthopyroxene and garnet. Partition coefficients measured in experiments in which clinopyroxene coexists with basaltic melt containing 18 to 19 wt% Al2O3 and up to 3 wt% Na2O are consistent with those determined experimentally in a majority of the previous studies, with values of 0.05 for the light rare earths and of 0.70 for the heavy rare earths. The magnitudes of clinopyroxene/melt partition coefficients for the rare earth elements correlate with pyroxene composition in these experiments, and relative compatibilities are consistent with the effects of lattice strain energy. Clinopyroxene/melt partition coefficients measured in experiments in which the melt contains 20 wt% Al2O3 and 4 to 8 wt% Na2O are unusually large (e.g., values for Lu of up to 1.33+/-0.05) and are not consistent with the dependence on pyroxene composition found in previous studies. The magnitudes of the partition coefficients measured in these experiments correlate with the degree of polymerization of the melt, rather than with crystal composition, indicating a significant melt structural influence on trace element partitioning. The ratio of non-bridging oxygens to tetrahedrally coordinated cations (NBO/T) in the melt provides a measure of this effect; melt structure has a significant influence on trace element compatibility only for values of NBO/T less than 0.49. This result suggests that when ascending peridotite intersects the solidus at relatively low pressures ( 1.5 GPa or less), the compatibility of trace elements in the residual solid varies significantly during the initial stages of

  13. Inferring the elastic structure of the Earth's mantle using the spectral element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekic, Vedran

    Mapping the elastic and anelastic structure of the Earth's mantle is crucial for understanding the temperature, composition and dynamics of our planet. Extracting the information contained in seismic waveforms is the key to constraining the elastic and anelastic structure within the Earth, and is the goal of our work. In the past quarter century, global tomography based on ray theory and first-order perturbation methods has imaged long-wavelength velocity heterogeneities of the Earth's mantle. However, the approximate techniques upon which global tomographers have traditionally relied become inadequate when dealing with crustal structure, as well as short-wavelength or large amplitude mantle heterogeneity. The spectral element method, on the other hand, permits accurate calculation of wave propagation through highly heterogeneous structures, and is computationally economical when coupled with a normal mode solution and applied to a restricted region of the earth such as the upper mantle (SEM: Capdeville et al., 2003). Importantly, SEM allows a dramatic improvement in accounting for the effects of crustal structure. Here, we develop and apply a new hybrid method of tomography, which allows us to leverage the accuracy of SEM to model fundamental and high-mode long period (>60s) waveforms. We then present the first global model of upper mantle velocity and radial anisotropy developed using SEM. Our model, SEMum, confirms that the long-wavelength mantle structure imaged using approximate semi-analytic techniques is robust and representative of the Earth's true structure. Furthermore, it reveals structures in the upper mantle that were not clearly seen in previous global tomographic models, providing new constraints on the temperature, composition as well as flow in the mantle. We show that applying a clustering analysis to the absolute shear wave-speed profiles offers a powerful new way of exploring the relationship between surface expressions of tectonics and their

  14. Structure and genomic organization of I elements involved in I-R hybrid dysgenesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Crozatier, M; Vaury, C; Busseau, I; Pelisson, A; Bucheton, A

    1988-10-11

    I-R hybrid dysgenesis in D. melanogaster is controlled by transposable elements known as I factors which terminate at their 3' ends by an A-rich sequence. Inducer strains contain active I factors. Both reactive and inducer stocks possess defective I elements. We have cloned various I elements from both categories of strains. The I elements having recently transposed in inducer strains have a structure closely related to that of active I factors. However we have isolated one such I element that is truncated at its 5' end. The I elements common to reactive and inducer strains are affected by various rearrangements and many point mutations. They do not appear to be simple derivatives of complete I factors.

  15. Effect of biodiesel addition on microbial community structure in a simulated fuel storage system.

    PubMed

    Restrepo-Flórez, Juan-Manuel; Bassi, Amarjeet; Rehmann, Lars; Thompson, Michael R

    2013-11-01

    Understanding changes in microbial structure due to biodiesel storage is important both for protecting integrity of storage systems and fuel quality management. In this work a simulated storage system was used to study the effect of biodiesel (0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%) on a microbial population, which was followed by community level physiological profiling (CLPP), 16s rDNA analysis and plating in selective media. Results proved that structure and functionality were affected by biodiesel. CLPP showed at least three populations: one corresponding to diesel, one to biodiesel and one to blends of diesel and biodiesel. Analysis of 16s rDNA revealed that microbial composition was different for populations growing in diesel and biodiesel. Genera identified are known for degradation of hydrocarbons and emulsifier production. Maximum growth was obtained in biodiesel; however, microbial counts in standard media were lower for this samples. Acidification of culture media was observed at high biodiesel concentration.

  16. Structure alterations in Al-Y-based metallic glasses with La and Ni addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X. M.; Wang, X. D.; Yu, Q.; Cao, Q. P.; Zhang, D. X.; Zhang, J.; Hu, T. D.; Lai, L. H.; Xie, H. L.; Xiao, T. Q.; Jiang, J. Z.

    2016-03-01

    The atomic structures of Al89Y11, Al90Y6.5La3.5, and Al82.8Y6.07Ni8La3.13 metallic glasses have been studied by using high energy X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption fine structure combined with the ab initio molecular dynamics and reverse Monte Carlo simulations. It is demonstrated that the partial replacement of Y atoms by La has limited improvement of the glass forming ability (GFA), although La atoms reduce the ordering around Y atoms and also the fractions of icosahedron-like polyhedra centered by Al atoms. In contrast, Ni atoms can significantly improve the GFA, which are inclined to locate in the shell of polyhedra centered by Al, Y, and La atoms, mainly forming Ni-centered icosahedron-like polyhedra to enhance the spatial connectivity between clusters and suppress the crystallization.

  17. Experiments to Populate and Validate a Processing Model for Polyurethane Foam: Additional Data for Structural Foams.

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Rekha R.; Celina, Mathias C.; Giron, Nicholas Henry; Long, Kevin Nicholas; Russick, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    We are developing computational models to help understand manufacturing processes, final properties and aging of structural foam, polyurethane PMDI. Th e resulting model predictions of density and cure gradients from the manufacturing process will be used as input to foam heat transfer and mechanical models. BKC 44306 PMDI-10 and BKC 44307 PMDI-18 are the most prevalent foams used in structural parts. Experiments needed to parameterize models of the reaction kinetics and the equations of motion during the foam blowing stages were described for BKC 44306 PMDI-10 in the first of this report series (Mondy et al. 2014). BKC 44307 PMDI-18 is a new foam that will be used to make relatively dense structural supports via over packing. It uses a different catalyst than those in the BKC 44306 family of foams; hence, we expect that the reaction kineti cs models must be modified. Here we detail the experiments needed to characteriz e the reaction kinetics of BKC 44307 PMDI-18 and suggest parameters for the model based on these experiments. In additi on, the second part of this report describes data taken to provide input to the preliminary nonlinear visco elastic structural response model developed for BKC 44306 PMDI-10 foam. We show that the standard cu re schedule used by KCP does not fully cure the material, and, upon temperature elevation above 150 o C, oxidation or decomposition reactions occur that alter the composition of the foam. These findings suggest that achieving a fully cured foam part with this formulation may be not be possible through therma l curing. As such, visco elastic characterization procedures developed for curing thermosets can provide only approximate material properties, since the state of the material continuously evolves during tests.

  18. Corotational nonlinear analyses of laminated shell structures using a 4-node quadrilateral flat shell element with drilling stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Sun, Qin

    2014-06-01

    A new 4-node quadrilateral flat shell element is developed for geometrically nonlinear analyses of thin and moderately thick laminated shell structures. The flat shell element is constructed by combining a quadrilateral area coordinate method (QAC) based membrane element AGQ6-II, and a Timoshenko beam function (TBF) method based shear deformable plate bending element ARS-Q12. In order to model folded plates and connect with beam elements, the drilling stiffness is added to the element stiffness matrix based on the mixed variational principle. The transverse shear rigidity matrix, based on the first-order shear deformation theory (FSDT), for the laminated composite plate is evaluated using the transverse equilibrium conditions, while the shear correction factors are not needed. The conventional TBF methods are also modified to efficiently calculate the element stiffness for laminate. The new shell element is extended to large deflection and post-buckling analyses of isotropic and laminated composite shells based on the element independent corotational formulation. Numerical results show that the present shell element has an excellent numerical performance for the test examples, and is applicable to stiffened plates.

  19. Comparative structural morphometry and elemental composition of three marine sponges from western coast of India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Maushmi S; Shah, Bhaumik

    2014-04-01

    Three marine sponges Halichondria glabrata, Cliono lobata, and Spirastrella pachyspira from the western coastal region of India were compared for their morphometry, biochemical, and elemental composition. One-way analysis of variance was applied for spicule morphometry results. Length, width, and length:width ratio were calculated independently. The ratio of length:width varied from 35 to 42 among the grown samples, which remained in the range of 10-22 in young sample at the beginning of studies. However, no significant change was observed in spicule width compared to length. Elemental compositions of marine sponges were determined by field emission gun-scanning electron microscope. Scanning electron microscopy data revealed that the spicules of all the three sponges were mostly composed of O (47-56%) and Si (30-40%), whereas Al (14.33%) was only detected in the spicules of C. lobata. Apart from these, K, Ni, Ca, Fe, Mg, Na, and S were additionally detected in all the three samples. Presence of heavy metals in the sponges was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. Results showed that iron was present in a large amount in samples, followed by zinc, lead, and copper.

  20. Modelling of single walled carbon nanotube cylindrical structures with finite element method simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günay, E.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the modulus of elasticity and shear modulus values of single-walled carbon nanotubes SWCNTs were modelled by using both finite element method and the Matlab code. Initially, cylindrical armchair and zigzag single walled 3D space frames were demonstrated as carbon nanostructures. Thereafter, macro programs were written by the Matlab code producing the space truss for zigzag and armchair models. 3D space frames were introduced to the ANSYS software and then tension, compression and additionally torsion tests were performed on zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes with BEAM4 element in obtaining the exact values of elastic and shear modulus values. In this study, two different boundary conditions were tested and especially used in torsion loading. The equivalent shear modulus data was found by averaging the corresponding values obtained from ten different nodal points on the nanotube path. Finally, in this study it was determined that the elastic constant values showed proportional changes by increasing the carbon nanotube diameters up to a certain level but beyond this level these values remained stable.

  1. [Effects of nitrogen and water addition on soil bacterial diversity and community structure in temperate grasslands in northern China].

    PubMed

    Yang, Shan; Li, Xiao-bing; Wang, Ru-zhen; Cai, Jiang-ping; Xu, Zhu-wen; Zhang, Yu-ge; Li, Hui; Jiang, Yong

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we measured the responses of soil bacterial diversity and community structure to nitrogen (N) and water addition in the typical temperate grassland in northern China. Results showed that N addition significantly reduced microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN) under regular precipitation treatment. Similar declined trends of MBC and MBN caused by N addition were also found under increased precipitation condition. Nevertheless, water addition alleviated the inhibition by N addition. N addition exerted no significant effects. on bacterial α-diversity indices, including richness, Shannon diversity and evenness index under regular precipitation condition. Precipitation increment tended to increase bacterial α-diversity, and the diversity indices of each N gradient under regular precipitation were much lower than that of the corresponding N addition rate under increased precipitation. Correlation analysis showed that soil moisture, nitrate (NO3(-)-N) and ammonium (NH4+-N) were significantly negatively correlated with bacterial evenness index, and MBC and MBN had a significant positive correlation with bacterial richness and evenness. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) ordination illustrated that the bacterial communities were significantly separated by N addition rates, under both water ambient and water addition treatments. Redundancy analysis (RDA) revealed that soil MBC, MBN, pH and NH4+-N were the key environmental factors for shaping bacterial communities.

  2. Immersed smoothed finite element method for fluid-structure interaction simulation of aortic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianyao; Liu, G. R.; Narmoneva, Daria A.; Hinton, Robert B.; Zhang, Zhi-Qian

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a novel numerical method for simulating the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems when blood flows over aortic valves. The method uses the immersed boundary/element method and the smoothed finite element method and hence it is termed as IS-FEM. The IS-FEM is a partitioned approach and does not need a body-fitted mesh for FSI simulations. It consists of three main modules: the fluid solver, the solid solver and the FSI force solver. In this work, the blood is modeled as incompressible viscous flow and solved using the characteristic-based-split scheme with FEM for spacial discretization. The leaflets of the aortic valve are modeled as Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic materials and solved using smoothed finite element method (or S-FEM). The FSI force is calculated on the Lagrangian fictitious fluid mesh that is identical to the moving solid mesh. The octree search and neighbor-to-neighbor schemes are used to detect efficiently the FSI pairs of fluid and solid cells. As an example, a 3D idealized model of aortic valve is modeled, and the opening process of the valve is simulated using the proposed IS-FEM. Numerical results indicate that the IS-FEM can serve as an efficient tool in the study of aortic valve dynamics to reveal the details of stresses in the aortic valves, the flow velocities in the blood, and the shear forces on the interfaces. This tool can also be applied to animal models studying disease processes and may ultimately translate to a new adaptive methods working with magnetic resonance images, leading to improvements on diagnostic and prognostic paradigms, as well as surgical planning, in the care of patients.

  3. Dynamics of periodic mechanical structures containing bistable elastic elements: from elastic to solitary wave propagation.

    PubMed

    Nadkarni, Neel; Daraio, Chiara; Kochmann, Dennis M

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the nonlinear dynamics of a periodic chain of bistable elements consisting of masses connected by elastic springs whose constraint arrangement gives rise to a large-deformation snap-through instability. We show that the resulting negative-stiffness effect produces three different regimes of (linear and nonlinear) wave propagation in the periodic medium, depending on the wave amplitude. At small amplitudes, linear elastic waves experience dispersion that is controllable by the geometry and by the level of precompression. At moderate to large amplitudes, solitary waves arise in the weakly and strongly nonlinear regime. For each case, we present closed-form analytical solutions and we confirm our theoretical findings by specific numerical examples. The precompression reveals a class of wave propagation for a partially positive and negative potential. The presented results highlight opportunities in the design of mechanical metamaterials based on negative-stiffness elements, which go beyond current concepts primarily based on linear elastic wave propagation. Our findings shed light on the rich effective dynamics achievable by nonlinear small-scale instabilities in solids and structures.

  4. Simulations of Underground Structures Subjected to Dynamic Loading Using the Distinct Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, J. P.; Glenn, L. A.; Heuze, F. E.; Bonner, M. P.

    2004-07-01

    We present preliminary results from a parameter study investigating the stability of underground structures in response to explosion-induced strong ground motions. In practice, even the most sophisticated site characterization may lack key details regarding precise joint properties and orientations within the rock mass. Thus, in order to place bounds upon the predicted behavior of a given facility, an extensive series of simulations representing different realizations may be required. The influence of both construction parameters (reinforcement, rock bolts,liners) and geological parameters (joint stiffness, joint spacing and orientation, and tunnel diameter to block size ratio) must be considered. We will discuss the distinct element method (DEM) with particular emphasis on techniques for achieving improved computational efficiency, including the handling of contact detection and approaches to parallelization. We also outline the continuum approaches we employ to obtain boundary conditions for the distinct element simulations. Finally, our DEM code is used to simulate dynamic loading of a generic subterranean facility in hardrock, demonstrating the suitability of the DEM for this application.

  5. Surface geometric analysis of anatomic structures using biquintic finite element interpolation.

    PubMed

    Smith, D B; Sacks, M S; Vorp, D A; Thornton, M

    2000-06-01

    The surface geometry of anatomic structures can have a direct impact upon their mechanical behavior in health and disease. Thus, mechanical analysis requires the accurate quantification of three-dimensional in vivo surface geometry. We present a fully generalized surface fitting method for surface geometric analysis that uses finite element based hermite biquintic polynomial interpolation functions. The method generates a contiguous surface of C2 continuity, allowing computation of the finite strain and curvature tensors over the entire surface with respect to a single in-surface coordinate system. The Sobolev norm, which restricts element length and curvature, was utilized to stabilize the interpolating polynomial at boundaries and in regions of sparse data. A major advantage of the current method is its ability to fully quantify surface deformation from an unstructured grid of data points using a single interpolation scheme. The method was validated by computing both the principal curvature distributions for phantoms of known curvatures and the principal stretch and principal change of curvature distributions for a synthetic spherical patch warping into an ellipsoidal shape. To demonstrate the applicability to biomedical problems, the method was applied to quantify surface curvatures of an abdominal aortic aneurysm and the principal strains and change of curvatures of a deforming bioprosthetic heart valve leaflet. The method proved accurate for the computation of surface curvatures, as well as for strains and curvature change for a surface undergoing large deformations. PMID:10983706

  6. Myriad Triple-Helix-Forming Structures in the Transposable Element RNAs of Plants and Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Tycowski, Kazimierz T.; Shu, Mei-Di; Steitz, Joan A.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The ENE (element for nuclear expression) is a cis-acting RNA structure that protects viral or cellular noncoding (nc)RNAs from nuclear decay through triple-helix formation with the poly(A) tail or 3′-terminal A-rich tract. We expanded the roster of 9 known ENEs by bioinformatic identification of ~200 distinct ENEs that reside in transposable elements (TEs) of numerous non-metazoan and one fish species, and in four Dicistrovirus genomes. Despite variation within the ENE core, none of the predicted triple-helical stacks exceeds five base triples. Increased accumulation of reporter transcripts in human cells demonstrated functionality for representative ENEs. Location close to the poly(A) tail argues that ENEs are active in TE transcripts. Their presence in intronless but not intron-containing hAT transposase genes supports the idea that TEs acquired ENEs to counteract the RNA-destabilizing effects of intron loss, a potential evolutionary consequence of TE horizontal transfer in organisms that couple RNA silencing to splicing deficits. PMID:27134163

  7. Effect of duct obstruction on structure, elemental composition, and function of rat submandibular glands

    SciTech Connect

    Sagstroem, S.S.; Sagulin, G.B.; Roomans, G.M. )

    1989-06-01

    Obstruction of salivary glands occurs in association with a number of pathological conditions. It has been suggested that the major changes found in the salivary glands of patients with cystic fibrosis are due to obstruction of the excretory duct by viscous mucus. In the present study, the effect of excretory duct obstruction on structure, elemental composition and function of rat submandibular gland was investigated. Obstruction was effected by infusion of a fast-hardening protein emulsion in the main excretory duct. After 1 week, and more pronounced after 2 weeks of obstruction the number of granular duct cells had decreased in the obstructed gland. X-ray microanalysis showed an increase in Mg, Ca and K, and a decrease in Na levels in the acinar cells, compared to normal glands. The contralateral glands apparently underwent compensatory hypertrophy and showed a similar pattern of changes in elemental composition. The composition of pilocarpine-induced submandibular saliva was neither in the obstructed nor in the contralateral gland significantly different from that in control glands. However, the flow rate was somewhat lower. Hence, increase in cellular Ca levels in submandibular gland acinar cells in cystic fibrosis could be secondary to duct obstruction, but the present study does not support the hypothesis that duct obstruction would result in changes in the composition of saliva.

  8. Practicing Elements vs. Practicing Coordination: Changes in the Structure of Variance

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yen-Hsun; Pazin, Nemanja; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    We explored effects of practice of a two-finger accurate force production task on components of finger force variance quantified within the uncontrolled manifold (UCM) hypothesis, VUCM that had no effect on total force and VORT that affected total force. A variable task with graded instability was designed to encourage use of variable solutions. Two groups of subjects (n = 9 each) were tested prior to a 1.5-hour practice session, after the session, and two weeks later (retention test). Group-1 practiced one finger at a time, while Group-2 practiced the task with two fingers (index and middle) pressing together. Both groups showed comparable improvements in the performance indices. Both groups showed a decrease in VORT, while only Group-2 showed an increase in VUCM. These effects persisted during the retention test. The results show that practicing elements and practicing redundant groups of elements may lead to similar changes in performance, i.e. in the variability of the total force produced by the set of fingers, accompanied by dramatically different changes in the structure of variance: A drop in VUCM after the single-finger practice and an increase following the two-finger practice. The strong retention effects promise applications of the method to rehabilitation. PMID:23237469

  9. Practicing elements versus practicing coordination: changes in the structure of variance.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yen-Hsun; Pazin, Nemanja; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M; Latash, Mark L

    2012-01-01

    The authors explored effects of practice of a 2-finger accurate force production task on components of finger force variance quantified within the uncontrolled manifold (UCM) hypothesis, V(UCM), that had no effect on total force and V(ORT) that affected total force. A variable task with graded instability was designed to encourage use of variable solutions. Two groups of subjects (n = 9 each) were tested prior to a 1.5-hr practice session, after the session, and 2 weeks later (retention test). Group 1 practiced 1 finger at a time, while Group 2 practiced the task with 2 fingers (index and middle) pressing together. Both groups showed comparable improvements in the performance indices. Both groups showed a decrease in V(ORT), while only Group 2 showed an increase in V(UCM). These effects persisted during the retention test. The results show that practicing elements and practicing redundant groups of elements may lead to similar changes in performance (i.e., in the variability of the total force produced by the set of fingers), accompanied by dramatically different changes in the structure of variance: A drop in V(UCM) after the single-finger practice and an increase following the 2-finger practice. The strong retention effects promise applications of the method to rehabilitation. PMID:23237469

  10. Simulations of Underground Structures Subjected to Dynamic Loading using the Distinct Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J P; Glenn, L A; Heuze, F E; Bonner, M P

    2003-07-14

    We present preliminary results from a parameter study investigating the stability of underground structures in response to explosion-induced strong ground motions. In practice, even the most sophisticated site characterization may lack key details regarding precise joint properties and orientations within the rock mass. Thus, in order to place bounds upon the predicted behavior of a given facility, an extensive series of simulations representing different realizations may be required. The influence of both construction parameters (reinforcement, rock bolts,liners) and geological parameters (joint stiffness, joint spacing and orientation, and tunnel diameter to block size ratio) must be considered. We will discuss the distinct element method (DEM) with particular emphasis on techniques for achieving improved computational efficiency, including the handling of contact detection and approaches to parallelization. We also outline the continuum approaches we employ to obtain boundary conditions for the distinct element simulations. Finally, our DEM code is used to simulate dynamic loading of a generic subterranean facility in hardrock, demonstrating the suitability of the DEM for this application.

  11. Modifying structure-sensitive reactions by addition of Zn to Pd

    SciTech Connect

    Childers, David J.; Schweitzer, Neil M.; Kamali Shahari, Seyed Mehdi; Rioux, Robert M.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Meyer, Randall J.

    2014-10-01

    Silica-supported Pd and PdZn nanoparticles of a similar size were evaluated for neopentane hydrogenolysis/isomerization and propane hydrogenolysis/dehydrogenation. Monometallic Pd showed high neopentane hydrogenolysis selectivity. Addition of small amounts of Zn to Pd lead Pd–Zn scatters in the EXAFS spectrum and an increase in the linear bonded CO by IR. In addition, the neopentane turnover rate decreased by nearly 10 times with little change in the selectivity. Increasing amounts of Zn lead to greater Pd–Zn interactions, higher linear-to-bridging CO ratios by IR and complete loss of neopentane conversion. Pd NPs also had high selectivity for propane hydrogenolysis and thus were poorly selective for propylene. The PdZn bimetallic catalysts, however, were able to preferentially catalyze dehydrogenation, were not active for propane hydrogenolysis, and thus were highly selective for propylene formation. The decrease in hydrogenolysis selectivity was attributed to the isolation of active Pd atoms by inactive metallic Zn,demonstrating that hydrogenolysis requires a particular reactive ensemble whereas propane dehydrogenation does not.

  12. Influence of additives on the structure of surfactant-free microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Marcus, J; Touraud, D; Prévost, S; Diat, O; Zemb, T; Kunz, W

    2015-12-28

    We study the addition of electrolytes to surfactant-free microemulsions in the domain where polydisperse pre-Ouzo aggregates are present. As in previous studies, the microemulsion is the ternary system water/ethanol/1-octanol, where ethanol acts as co-solvent. Addition of electrolytes modifies the static X-ray and neutron scattering, and dynamic light scattering patterns, as well as the position of the miscibility gap, where spontaneous emulsification occurs upon dilution with water. All observations can be rationalized considering that electrolytes are either "salting out" the ethanol, which is the main component of the interface stabilizing the aggregates, or producing charge separation via the antagonistic ion effect discovered by Onuki et al. Amphiphilic electrolytes, such as sodium dodecylsulfate or sodium dietheylhexylphosphate, induce a gradual transition towards monodisperse ionic micelles with their characteristic broad scattering "peak". In these micelles the ethanol plays then the role of a cosurfactant. Dynamic light scattering can only be understood by combination of fluctuations of aggregate concentration due to the vicinity of a critical point and in-out fluctuations of ethanol. PMID:26593697

  13. Characterization of embedded fiber optic strain sensors into metallic structures via ultrasonic additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schomer, John J.; Hehr, Adam J.; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2016-04-01

    Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors measure deviation in a reflected wavelength of light to detect in-situ strain. These sensors are immune to electromagnetic interference, and the inclusion of multiple FBGs on the same fiber allows for a seamlessly integrated sensing network. FBGs are attractive for embedded sensing in aerospace applications due to their small noninvasive size and prospect of constant, real-time nondestructive evaluation. In this study, FBG sensors are embedded in aluminum 6061 via ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM), a rapid prototyping process that uses high power ultrasonic vibrations to weld similar and dissimilar metal foils together. UAM was chosen due to the desire to embed FBG sensors at low temperatures, a requirement that excludes other additive processes such as selective laser sintering or fusion deposition modeling. In this paper, the embedded FBGs are characterized in terms of birefringence losses, post embedding strain shifts, consolidation quality, and strain sensing performance. Sensors embedded into an ASTM test piece are compared against an exterior surface mounted foil strain gage at both room and elevated temperatures using cyclic tensile tests.

  14. Optimized parallel computing for cellular automaton-finite element modeling of solidification grain structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carozzani, T.; Gandin, Ch-A.; Digonnet, H.

    2014-01-01

    A numerical implementation of a three-dimensional (3D) cellular automaton (CA)-finite element (FE) model has been developed for the prediction of solidification grain structures. For the first time, it relies on optimized parallel computation to solve industrial-scale problems (centimeter to meter long) while using a sufficiently small CA grid size to predict representative structures. Several algorithm modifications and strategies to maximize parallel efficiency are introduced. Improvements on a real case simulation are measured and discussed. The CA-FE implementation here is demonstrated using 32 computing units to predict grain structure in a 2.08 m × 0.382 m × 0.382 m ingot involving 4.9 billion cells and 1.6 million grains. These numerical improvements permit tracking of local changes in texture and grain size over real-cast parts while integrating interactions with macrosegregation, heat flow and fluid flow. Full 3D is essential in all these analyses, and can be dealt with successfully using the implementation presented here.

  15. Determination of structural elements on the folding reaction of mnemiopsin by spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakiminia, Forough; Khalifeh, Khosrow; Sajedi, Reza H.; Ranjbar, Bijan

    2016-04-01

    Mnemiopsin 1 is a member of photoprotein family, made up of 206 amino acid residues. These Ca2 +-regulated photoproteins are responsible for light emission in a variety of marine cnidarians and ctenophores. They composed of an apoprotein, a single polypeptide chain of 25 kDa, molecular oxygen and the non-covalently bound chromophore. In this study, we examined whether three mutations, namely R39K, S128G and V183T affect the thermodynamic stability as well as refolding and unfolding kinetics of mnemiopsin 1. Conformational stability measurements using fluorescence and far-UV CD spectroscopies revealed that all variants unfold in multi-step manner in which the secondary and tertiary structures are lost in different steps. However kinetic studies showed that point mutation S128G destabilizes both kinetic intermediate and native conformation; while, these structural elements are stabilized in V183T. We also found that the stability of folded and intermediate states increases in R39K. We concluded that the initial packing of helical segments within the protein structure is more facilitated when Lys with smaller side chain is present in the protein chain.

  16. Reelin Exerts Structural, Biochemical and Transcriptional Regulation Over Presynaptic and Postsynaptic Elements in the Adult Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Carles; Muhaisen, Ashraf; Pujadas, Lluís; Soriano, Eduardo; Martínez, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Reelin regulates neuronal positioning and synaptogenesis in the developing brain, and adult brain plasticity. Here we used transgenic mice overexpressing Reelin (Reelin-OE mice) to perform a comprehensive dissection of the effects of this protein on the structural and biochemical features of dendritic spines and axon terminals in the adult hippocampus. Electron microscopy (EM) revealed both higher density of synapses and structural complexity of both pre- and postsynaptic elements in transgenic mice than in WT mice. Dendritic spines had larger spine apparatuses, which correlated with a redistribution of Synaptopodin. Most of the changes observed in Reelin-OE mice were reversible after blockade of transgene expression, thus supporting the specificity of the observed phenotypes. Western blot and transcriptional analyses did not show major changes in the expression of pre- or postsynaptic proteins, including SNARE proteins, glutamate receptors, and scaffolding and signaling proteins. However, EM immunogold assays revealed that the NMDA receptor subunits NR2a and NR2b, and p-Cofilin showed a redistribution from synaptic to extrasynaptic pools. Taken together with previous studies, the present results suggest that Reelin regulates the structural and biochemical properties of adult hippocampal synapses by increasing their density and morphological complexity and by modifying the distribution and trafficking of major glutamatergic components. PMID:27303269

  17. Bonding in elemental boron: a view from electronic structure calculations using maximally localized Wannier functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogitsu, Tadashi; Gygi, Francois; Reed, John; Schwegler, Eric; Galli, Giulia

    2007-03-01

    Boron exhibits the most complex structure of all elemental solids, with more than 300 atoms per unit cell arranged in interconnecting icosahedra, and some crystallographic positions occupied with a probability of less than one. The precise determination of the ground state geometry of boron---the so-called β-boron structure--has been elusive and its electronic and bonding properties have been difficult to rationalize. Using lattice model Monte Carlo optimization techniques and ab-initio simulations, we have shown that a defective, quasi-ordered β solid is the most stable structure at zero as well as finite T. In the absence of partially occupied sites (POS), the perfect β-boron crystal is unstable; the presence of POS lower its internal energy below that of an ordered α-phase, not mere an entropic effect. We present a picture of the intricate and unique bonding in boron based on maximally localized Wannier (MLWF) functions, which indicates that the presence of POS provides a subtle, yet essential spatial balance between electron deficient and fully saturated bonds. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy at the University of California/ LLNL under contract no. W-7405-Eng-48.

  18. Structural factor in bending testing of fivefold twinned nanowires revealed by finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mets, Magnus; Antsov, Mikk; Zadin, Vahur; Dorogin, Leonid M.; Aabloo, Alvo; Polyakov, Boris; Lõhmus, Rünno; Vlassov, Sergei

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we performed finite element method simulations to investigate the effect of the structure on the elastic response of Ag and Au nanowires (NWs) with a fivefold twinned crystal structure in bending tests. Two different models of a pentagonal NW were created: a ‘uniform model’ having an isotropic continuous structure and a ‘segmented model’ consisting of five anisotropic domains. Two asymmetrical mechanical test configurations were simulated: cantilevered beam bending and 3-point bending. The dimensions of the NW, the test configurations, as well as the force and the displacement ranges were based on the previously obtained experimental data. The results of the simulations demonstrated that the segmented model was stiffer than the uniform one in both of the bending tests. The effect was more pronounced for the cantilevered beam bending configuration. This fact should be taken into account in the interpretation of the increased measured Young’s modulus of pentagonal NWs in comparison to the elasticity of the same material in bulk form.

  19. Structure and magnetism in novel group IV element-based magnetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, Frank

    2013-08-14

    The project is to investigate structure, magnetism and spin dependent states of novel group IV element-based magnetic thin films and heterostructures as a function of composition and epitaxial constraints. The materials systems of interest are Si-compatible epitaxial films and heterostructures of Si/Ge-based magnetic ternary alloys grown by non-equilibrium molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) techniques, specifically doped magnetic semiconductors (DMS) and half-metallic Heusler alloys. Systematic structural, chemical, magnetic, and electrical measurements are carried out, using x-ray microbeam techniques, magnetotunneling spectroscopy and microscopy, and magnetotransport. The work is aimed at elucidating the nature and interplay between structure, chemical order, magnetism, and spin-dependent states in these novel materials, at developing materials and techniques to realize and control fully spin polarized states, and at exploring fundamental processes that stabilize the epitaxial magnetic nanostructures and control the electronic and magnetic states in these complex materials. Combinatorial approach provides the means for the systematic studies, and the complex nature of the work necessitates this approach.

  20. Role of loops connecting secondary structure elements in the stabilization of proteins isolated from thermophilic organisms

    PubMed Central

    Balasco, Nicole; Esposito, Luciana; Simone, Alfonso De; Vitagliano, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    It has been recently discovered that the connection of secondary structure elements (ββ-unit, βα- and αβ-units) in proteins follows quite stringent principles regarding the chirality and the orientation of the structural units (Koga et al., Nature 2012;491:222–227). By exploiting these rules, a number of protein scaffolds endowed with a remarkable thermal stability have been designed (Koga et al., Nature 2012;491:222–227). By using structural databases of proteins isolated from either mesophilic or thermophilic organisms, we here investigate the influence of supersecondary associations on the thermal stability of natural proteins. Our results suggest that β-hairpins of proteins from thermophilic organisms are very frequently characterized by shortenings of the loops. Interestingly, this shortening leads to states that display a very strong preference for the most common connectivity of the strands observed in native protein hairpins. The abundance of selective states in these proteins suggests that they may achieve a high stability by adopting a strategy aimed to reduce the possible conformations of the unfolded ensemble. In this scenario, our data indicate that the shortening is effective if it increases the adherence to these rules. We also show that this mechanism may operate in the stabilization of well-known protein folds (thioredoxin and RNase A). These findings suggest that future investigations aimed at defining mechanism of protein stabilization should also consider these effects. PMID:23661276