Science.gov

Sample records for additional sulfur pollutant

  1. Sulfur Dioxide Pollution Monitor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    The sulfur dioxide pollution monitor described in this document is a government-owed invention that is available for licensing. The background of the invention is outlined, and drawings of the monitor together with a detailed description of its function are provided. A sample stream of air, smokestack gas or the like is flowed through a…

  2. Sulfur Dioxide Pollution Monitor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    The sulfur dioxide pollution monitor described in this document is a government-owed invention that is available for licensing. The background of the invention is outlined, and drawings of the monitor together with a detailed description of its function are provided. A sample stream of air, smokestack gas or the like is flowed through a…

  3. Improved Chromatographic Techniques for Sulfur Pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, C. H.

    1971-01-01

    This paper describes several improvements in instrumental techniques for the analysis of low ppb concentrations of sulfur gases using gas chromatography (G.C.). This work has focused on the analytical problem of ambient air monitoring of the two main sulfur gas pollutants, hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide. The most significant technical improvement that will be reported here is the newly developed silica gel column for ppb concentrations of the light sulfur gases (COS, H2S, CS2, SO2, CH3SH). A simplified inlet system will be described which improves reliability of the GC system. The flame photometric detector is used as the means of selectively and sensitively detecting the low concentrations of sulfur gases. Improvements will be described which have yielded better performance than previously reported for this application of the detector. Also included in this paper will be a report of field monitoring using this improved GC system. Reliability and repeatability of performance at the low ppb concentrations of sulfur gases will be demonstrated.

  4. Sulfur to nitrogen ratios in Ponderosa pine as bioindicators of foliar sulfur loading from air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, C.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of the research was to investigate the potential of foliar S:N ratios in Ponderosa pine as bioindicators of foliar sulfur loading in areas of long-term exposure to low levels of sulfurous air pollutants. First it was necessary to document seasonal variation in S:N ratios in trees not exposed to air pollution. Fifteen Ponderosa pines were selected at a site remote from urban and industrial sources of air pollution and the trees sampled at 18 intervals over a 15 month study period. Significant differences in sulfur and nitrogen concentrations occurred among the five needle age groups within most collections. One-year-old needles contained significantly more sulfur than other needles. Current-year needles contained more nitrogen than the three and four-year-old needles. Within each foliar age class significant differences in total sulfur content and S:N ratios occurred throughout the season. Sulfur concentrations and S:N r

  5. Sulfur pollution: an environmental study of Welland, Ontario

    Treesearch

    Michael R. Moss

    1977-01-01

    The distribution of sulfur as an environmental pollutant is analysed in the vicinity of Welland, Ontario. A biogeochemical-cycle approach enables areas of excess accumulation to be compared among all linked ecosystem components. Although the patterns of distribution are similar, the amounts of sulfur accumulated in different ecosystems, grassland and woodland, show...

  6. Effects of inorganic sulfur addition on fluxes of volatile sulfur compounds in Sphagnum peatlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demello, William Zamboni; Hines, Mark E.; Bayley, Suzanne E.

    1992-01-01

    Short and long-term impacts of increased S deposition on fluxes of volatile S compounds (VSC's) from Sphagnum peatlands were investigated in an artificially acidified (sulfuric and nitric acids) poor fen (Mire 239) at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA), Ontario, Canada. Additional experiments were conducted in a poor fen (Sallie's Fen) in Barrington, NH, USA. At Mire 239, emissions of VSC's were monitored, before and after acidification, at control (unacidified) and experimental sections within two major physiographic zones of the mire (oligotrophic and minerotrophic). The experimental segments of the mire received S amendments since 1983, in amounts equivalent to the annual S deposition in the highest polluted areas of Canada and U.S. Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) was the predominant VSC released from the mire and varied largely with time and space (i.e., from 2.5 to 127 nmol/m(sup -2)h(sup -1)). Sulfur addition did not affect DMS emissions in a period of hours to a few days, although it stimulated production of DMS and MSH in the anoxic surficial regions of the peat. DMS emissions in the experimental oligotrophic segment of the mire was approximately 3-fold greater than in the control oligotrophic segment, and approximately 10-fold greater than in the minerotrophic zones. These differences could be due to a combination of differences in types of vegetation, nutritional status, and S input. At Sallie's Fen, DMS fluxes were approximately 8 times higher from a Sphagnum site than from a bare peat site. Fluxes of VSC's were not significantly affected by sulfate amendments at both sites, while DMS and MSH concentrations increases greatly with time in the top 10 cm of the peat column. Our data indicated that although Sphagnum is not the direct source of DMS released from Sphagnum peatlands, it might play a role in regulating DMS emissions to the atmosphere.

  7. Sulfur dioxide converter and pollution arrester system

    SciTech Connect

    Montalvo, V.H.

    1983-12-06

    A sulphur dioxide converter and pollution arrester system are disclosed which involves the treatment of smoke and/or contaminated air emanating from a combustion area by passage through a zone achieving turbulence into a water spray contained first treating chamber. The turbulence zone, into which an atomized catalyst is introduced, serves to create a longer path for cooling as well as increased centrifugal motion to the solid particles in the contaminated air and also the formation of sulphur trioxide. In other words, the arrangement is such that pollution arresting action is provided in the form of ''slinging'' resulting from tangential directional movement and, when combining with the water spray in the first treating chamber, the ultimate formation of sulphuric acid. Subsequently, the contaminated air, containing amounts of sulphurous and sulphuric acids, passes through a second treating chamber, where airflow throughout the system is occasioned by action at the outlet end, such as the vacuum created by a flue and not by independent mechanical means. The arrangement serves to a twofold purpose, i.e. to minimize or arrest pollution and to convert sulphur dioxide, a component of high sulphur coal, into commercially valuable sulphuric acid.

  8. Sulfur turnover and emissions during storage of cattle slurry: effects of acidification and sulfur addition.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Jørgen; Andersen, Astrid J; Poulsen, Henrik V; Adamsen, Anders Peter S; Petersen, Søren O

    2012-01-01

    Slurry acidification using sulfuric acid reduces ammonia emissions but also affects sulfur (S) cycling. Emission of sulfur is a source of malodor and reduces the sulfur fertilizer value of the slurry. We investigated the effect of sulfate and methionine amendments, alone or in combination with acidification, on sulfur transformations in slurry and emissions of volatile sulfur compounds (VSC) during storage of fresh and aged cattle slurry. When pH was lowered to 5.5 it resulted in an almost complete inhibition of sulfate reduction. There was a huge emission of hydrogen sulfide (HS) with addition of sulfate and methionine ( < 0.01). Methanethiol (MT) was emitted in treatments with addition of methionine, especially when simultaneously acidified ( < 0.01). The large HS production in the sulfate-amended slurries resulted in little accumulation of MT and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) under neutral conditions, in contrast to acidic conditions where the degradation was inhibited and both MT and DMS accumulated. Based on odor activity values, untreated slurry had little odor development from S compounds, especially the aged slurry. Acidification did not significantly increase odor contribution from any of the compounds in fresh or aged slurry. Generally, addition of a sulfate increased the contribution from HS dramatically, whereas acidification lowered the HS contribution but increased that of MT. Thus, acidification of slurry with sulfuric acid may potentially produce more odor from S compounds than untreated slurry. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  9. Molybdenum sulfur antiwear and antioxidant lube additives

    SciTech Connect

    Coyle, C.L.; Greaney, M.A.; Stiefel, E.I.; Francis, J.N.; Beltzer, M.

    1991-02-26

    This paper discusses a lubricating composition. It comprises a major amount of an oil of lubricating viscosity; and a minor amount of an additive having the formula Mo{sub 2}L{sub 4} wherein L is a ligand selected from a xanthate and mixtures of xanthates.

  10. Low level atmospheric sulfur dioxide pollution and childhood asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, R.Y.; Li, C.K. )

    1990-11-01

    Quarterly analysis (1983-1987) of childhood asthma in Hong Kong from 13,620 hospitalization episodes in relation to levels of pollutants (SO{sub 2}, NO{sub 2}, NO, O{sub 3}, TSP, and RSP) revealed a seasonal pattern of attack rates that correlates inversely with exposure to sulfur dioxide (r = -.52, P less than .05). The same cannot be found with other pollutants. Many factors may contribute to the seasonal variation of asthma attacks. We speculate that prolonged exposure (in terms of months) to low level SO{sub 2} is one factor that might induce airway inflammation and bronchial hyperreactivity and predispose to episodes of asthma.

  11. Air pollutant sensitivity of pea plants when simulating conditions around sulfur dioxide point sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kobriger, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Peas (Pisum sativum L.) are often grown in areas where coal-powered generating stations are present and are exposed to sulfur dioxide from these stations. In addition to sulfur dioxide, ozone is nearly always present in these areas. Present studies were designed to determine sensitivity of peas to sulfur dioxide and ozone at dosages simulating those around stations in Wisconsin. Peas were exposed to several concentrations of ozone and sulfur dioxide, singly or in combination, for two hours. Injury was observed with ozone concentrations above 0.09 ..mu..l l/sup -1/ and sulfur dioxide concentrations above 0.66 ..mu..l l/sup -1/. Injury was increased by concentrations of ozone as low as 0.02 ..mu..l l/sup -1/ when in combination with sulfur dioxide, and by concentrations of sulfur dioxide as low as 0.12 ..mu..l l/sup -1/ when in combination with ozone. Peas pretreated with ozone at non-injurious concentrations prior to exposure with ozone-sulfur dioxide mixtures at injurious concentrations had less injury than those not pretreated. Reduced injury in pretreated plants was associated with stomatal closure. Plants exposed to ozone-sulfur dioxide mixtures for two hours at different times of the day were injured most at midday. Increased injury at midday was associated with increases in stomatal conductances. However, changes in injury and conductance were not associated with abscisic acid concentrations. Peas preconditioned for six days at 77% relative humidity prior to exposure with ozone and/or sulfur dioxide were injured more than those preconditioned at 36% relative humidity. Increased injury at the higher humidity was associated with greater stomatal conductances. When peas were subjected to 31 or 67% relative humidities during pollutant exposures, injury was similar.

  12. ADDITIVE TESTING FOR IMPROVED SULFUR RETENTION: PRELIMINARY REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Amoroso, J.; Fox, K.

    2011-09-07

    The Savannah River National Laboratory is collaborating with Alfred University to evaluate the potential for additives in borosilicate glass to improve sulfur retention. This preliminary report provides further background on the incorporation of sulfur in glass and outlines the experiments that are being performed by the collaborators. A simulated waste glass composition has been selected for the experimental studies. The first phase of experimental work will evaluate the impacts of BaO, PbO, and V{sub 2}O{sub 5} at concentrations of 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0 wt % on sulfate retention in simulated high level waste borosilicate glass. The second phase of experimental work will evaluate the effects of time at the melt temperature on sulfur retention. The resulting samples will be characterized to determine the amount of sulfur remaining as well as to identify the formation of any crystalline phases. The results will be used to guide the future selection of frits and glass forming chemicals in vitrifying Department of Energy wastes containing high sulfur concentrations.

  13. Seedling response to sulfur, nitrogen, and associated pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, C.E.; Mattson, K.G.; Mickler, R.A.

    1989-11-01

    In 1986, the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) established the Forest Response Program (FRP) to assess the effects of acidic deposition and associated pollutants on forests. Seedling exposure studies were initiated to determine acute effects of simulated acid deposition, ozone, and sulfur dioxide, and to identify hypothesized mechanisms be which these effects might alter tree condition and hence result in forest decline. From data available as of December 1988, altered post-exposure growth and imbalance in above- and below-ground responses to sulfur dioxide indicated changes in carbon allocation patterns. Simulated acid precipitation reduced frost hardiness of red spruce seedlings at pH 3.0 and led to higher rates of foliar tissue mortality during extreme cold. Loblolly pine showed root and stem growth decreases at ozone levels 80 ppb and higher. Of western conifers, only ponderosa pine showed consistent growth decreases due to ozone.

  14. The convention on long-range transboundary air pollution`s sulfur protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Leaf, D.

    1995-12-31

    The US is a signatory to the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe`s Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air pollution (LRTAP). The signatories to the LRTAP Convention include most European countries, as well as the US and Canada. Over the past decade two Sulfur Protocols have been negotiated under the auspices of LRTAP; both were based on acidification concerns. The first, signed in 1985, committed countries to a 30% decrease in sulfur emissions relative to a 1980 baseline. The second, signed in 1994, committed countries to a 50--80% reduction in sulfur emissions. The latest protocol was based on the effects-based concept of critical loads of sulfur for protecting ecosystems from the effects of acidification. The US did not sign either sulfur protocol, but has participated in discussions leading up to both. This paper will present a discussion of the LRTAP Convention, the two sulfur protocols, the NO{sub x} Protocol, the US-Canada relationship on acid rain, the critical loads concept, and US participation in the LRTAP process (including the relationship between the sulfur protocols and Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990). The focus will be on key scientific and policy issues.

  15. Removal of sulfur and nitrogen containing pollutants from discharge gases

    DOEpatents

    Joubert, James I.

    1986-01-01

    Oxides of sulfur and of nitrogen are removed from waste gases by reaction with an unsupported copper oxide powder to form copper sulfate. The resulting copper sulfate is dissolved in water to effect separation from insoluble mineral ash and dried to form solid copper sulfate pentahydrate. This solid sulfate is thermally decomposed to finely divided copper oxide powder with high specific surface area. The copper oxide powder is recycled into contact with the waste gases requiring cleanup. A reducing gas can be introduced to convert the oxide of nitrogen pollutants to nitrogen.

  16. Potential effects of sulfur pollutants on grape production in New York State

    SciTech Connect

    Knudson, D.A.; Viessman, S.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a prototype analysis of sulfur pollutants on graph production in New York State. Principal grape production areas for the state are defined and predictions of sulfur dioxide concentrations associated with present and projected sources are computed. Sulfur dioxide concentrations are based on the results of a multi-source dispersion model, whereas concentrations for other pollutants are derived from observations. This information is used in conjunction with results from experiments conducted to identify threshold levels of damage and/or injury to a variety of grape species to pollutants. Determination is then made whether the subject crop is at risk from present and projected concentrations of pollutants.

  17. Air pollution and asthma: clinical studies with sulfuric acid aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Utell, M.J.; Frampton, M.W.; Morrow, P.E. )

    1991-11-01

    Until recently, acid deposition has been widely considered a serious ecological problem but not a threat to human health. The controlled clinical study is an important approach in linking acidic aerosol inhalation with respiratory effects. Asthmatic patients represent a subpopulation most responsive to sulfuric acid aerosols. In a series of studies with asthmatic volunteers, several factors have been identified that may modulate the intensity of the bronchoconstrictor response to inhaled acidic aerosols. We found (1) enhancement of the bronchoconstrictor response during exercise, (2) the more acidic aerosols provoke the greatest changes in lung function, and (3) mitigation of airway responses during sulfuric acid aerosol inhalation caused by high respiratory ammonia concentrations. Additional factors influencing responsiveness await identification.

  18. Potential effects of sulfur pollutants on grape production in New York State

    SciTech Connect

    Viessman, S.M.; Knudson, D.A.; Streets, D.G.

    1982-08-01

    The purpose was to design and carry out a prototype assessment of the potential effects of sulfur pollutants on a crop of local economic significance; and, to identify the adequacy of existing research data and other information for quantifying the possible extent of adverse effects of such pollutants. Grape production in New York State was selected for this prototype assessment. The prototype assessment attempts to translate the emission characteristics of sources of sulfur pollutants into ambient concentrations of the pollutants in the vicinity of grape-producing regions. The ambient data are then compared with available dose-response data to estimate the potential effects on the grape crop.

  19. Study on thermal effects & sulfurized additives, in lubricating greases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Ami Atul

    understand the effects of the addition of sulphur from a sulfurized olefin to MoS2 through mechanical processing has been conducted. This mechanically processed additive mixed is tested through regular ASTM D2266 test. The hypothesis was to make more shear able MoS 2 layers available by using the sulphur from the olefin to form the basic FeS layer that reduces the continuous wear rate. The results have been studied using SEM and EDX imaging.

  20. Health effects of sulfur-related environmental air pollution. I. Executive summary.

    PubMed

    Heyder, J; Beck-Speier, I; Busch, B; Dirscherl, P; Heilmann, P; Ferron, G A; Josten, M; Karg, E; Kreyling, W G; Lenz, A G; Maier, K L; Miaskowski, U; Platz, S; Reitmeir, P; Schulz, H; Takenaka, S; Ziesenis, A

    1999-05-01

    The motivation of simulating real-world environmental exposure in a number of long-term studies with dogs was to address the question of whether or not perpetual inhalation of air pollutants can initiate diseases in healthy lungs and can thus contribute to the increasing prevalence of respiratory diseases in industrialized countries. The major conclusion of this article is that this question has to be answered in the negative for the simultaneous inhalation of the major constituents of combustion-related air pollution, particle-associated sulfur(IV), and particle-associated hydrogen ions. Over 13 mo, 8 healthy beagle dogs were exposed in 2 whole-body chambers daily for 16.5 h to 1 microm neutral sulfite [sulfur(IV)] particles at a mass concentration of 1.5 mg m-3 and for 6 h to 1.1 microm acidic sulfate particles carrying 15 micromol m-3 hydrogen ions into the canine lungs. This longitudinal study was characterized by repeated observations of individual respiratory response patterns. To establish baseline data the dogs were repeatedly examined preexposure while the chambers were ventilated over 16 mo with clean air. Each individual served thus as its own control. Another eight dogs served as additional controls. They were housed in 2 chambers ventilated with clean air over the entire study period of 29 mo. To assess response patterns, respiratory lung function tests were performed pre- and postexposure, segmental lung lavages were repeatedly performed to obtain epithelial lining fluid from the lungs for analysis of cell content, cell function, and biochemical indicators of lung injury, and radiolabeled test particles were used to study pathways of intrapulmonary particle elimination. At the end of the study, the lungs of all animals were morphologically and morphometrically examined. Functional and structural responses were finally compared to those observed previously as a result of a sole exposure of canine lungs to neutral sulfite particles over 10 mo (Heyder et

  1. Austrian pine injury traced to ozone and sulfur dioxide pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, E.; Leone, I.; Harkov, R.; Rhoads, A.

    1981-04-01

    A foliar disorder of Austrian pine observed in New Jersey since 1967 was found to result from a mixture of ozone and sulfur dioxide. In fumigation chamber studies, a mixture of 0.2 ppm ozone and 0.1 ppm sulfur dioxide for 6 hr reproduced symptoms observed in the field. Grafted material originating from trees that exhibitied either a sensitive or resistant response in the field gave the same differential response in the experimental fumigation. Needles of resistant trees had higher stomatal resistance and higher soluble sugar content than needles of susceptible trees.

  2. Assessment of the risk of pollution by sulfur compounds and heavy metals in soils located in the proximity of a disused for 20 years sulfur mine (SE Poland).

    PubMed

    Sołek-Podwika, Katarzyna; Ciarkowska, Krystyna; Kaleta, Dorota

    2016-09-15

    The study assessed the long-term effects of anthropogenic pressure of the sulfur industry on turf-covered soils located in the vicinity of the sulfur mine Grzybów. The study assumes that 20 years which elapsed since the end of the exploitation of sulfur is a period sufficiently long for the content of sulfur compounds in soils not to exceed the permissible level and that soil of the region can be classified as not contaminated. A part of the study involved identification of changes in the contents Stot. and SSO4(2-) in soils collected in the 1970s and early twenty-first century. It was also traced the relationship between the content of sulfur compounds and selected soil properties and estimated risk of soil environment pollution by heavy metals. Mean contents of trace elements studied amounted to 10.2-10.8 mg kg(-1) for Pb, 14.3-39.4 mg kg(-1) for Zn, 0.2-0.4 mg kg(-1) for Cd, 3.8-32.2 mg kg(-1) for Cr, 2.7-15.1 mg kg(-1) for Cu and 2.9-18.7 mg kg(-1) for Ni. Based on the results of SSO4(2-) content in soils collected at a distance of 1 km from the mine, it was found out that despite the passage of years, the amount of this type of sulfur still is increased and exceeds 0.14 g kg(-1). As the distance from the mine grew lower (from 0.017 to 0.03 g kg(-1)) average content of the sulfur form was observed. In the studied soil material we found generally positive, strong correlation between the Stot. and SSO4(2-) content and analyzed trace elements. The degree of contamination of examined soils with heavy metals was estimated on the basis of the integrated pollution index, which pointed to a moderate and low level of antropogenization of this area. In addition, the relationship between the determined characteristics of soils (Corg. contents, the fraction <0.002 mm and pH) and heavy metals confirms that the trace elements present in soils do not occur in mobile forms in the soil solution.

  3. Ice core sulfur and methanesulfonic acid (MSA) records from southern Greenland document North American and European air pollution and suggest a decline in regional biogenic sulfur emissions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasteris, D. R.; McConnell, J. R.; Burkhart, J. F.; Saltzman, E. S.

    2014-12-01

    Sulfate aerosols have an important cooling effect on the Earth because they scatter sunlight back to space and form cloud condensation nuclei. However, understanding of the atmospheric sulfur cycle is incomplete, leading to uncertainty in the assessment of past, present and future climate forcing. Here we use annually resolved observations of sulfur and methanesulfonic acid (MSA) concentration in an array of precisely dated Southern Greenland ice cores to assess the history of sulfur pollution emitted from North America and Europe and the history of biogenic sulfate aerosol derived from the North Atlantic Ocean over the last 250 years. The ice core sulfur time series is found to closely track sulfur concentrations in North American and European precipitation since records began in 1965, and also closely tracks estimated sulfur emissions since 1850 within the air mass source region as determined by back trajectory analysis. However, a decline to near-preindustrial sulfur concentrations in the ice cores after 1995 that is not so extensive in the source region emissions indicates that there has been a change in sulfur cycling over the last 150 years. The ice core MSA time series shows a decline of 60% since the 1860s, and is well correlated with declining sea ice concentrations around Greenland, suggesting that the phytoplankton source of biogenic sulfur has declined due to a loss of marginal sea ice zone habitat. Incorporating the implied decrease in biogenic sulfur in our analysis improves the match between the ice core sulfur record and the source region emissions throughout the last 150 years, and solves the problem of the recent return to near-preindustrial levels in the Greenland ice. These findings indicate that the transport efficiency of sulfur air pollution has been relatively stable through the industrial era and that biogenic sulfur emissions in the region have declined.

  4. Inconclusive evidence of Juniperus virginiana recovery following sulfur pollution reductions

    Treesearch

    Paul G. Schaberg; Gary J. Hawley; Shelly A. Rayback; Joshua M. Halman; Alexandra M. Kosiba

    2014-01-01

    Thomas et al. (1) address a question of great scientific interest: have pollution reductions mandated by the Clean Air Act improved forest health and productivity? Although answers to this question are of great importance, various aspects of this work limit its ability to address this question.

  5. Sulfur

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, elemental sulfur and the byproduct sulfuric acid were produced at 109 operations in 29 states and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Total shipments were valued at about $1.6 billion. Elemental sulfur production was 8.2 Mt (9 million st); Louisiana and Texas accounted for about 53 percent of domestic production.

  6. Impacts of a Nanosized Ceria Additive on Diesel Engine Emissions of Particulate and Gaseous Pollutants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junfeng; Nazarenko, Yevgen; Zhang, Lin; Calderon, Leonardo; Lee, Ki-Bum; Garfunkel, Eric; Schwander, Stephan; Tetley, Teresa D.; Chung, Kian Fan; Porter, Alexandra E.; Ryan, Mary; Kipen, Howard; Lioy, Paul J.; Mainelis, Gediminas

    2014-01-01

    Fuel additives incorporating nanosized ceria have been increasingly used in diesel engines as combustion promoters. However, few studies have assessed the impact of these nanotechnology-based additives on pollutant emissions. Here, we systematically compare emission rates of particulate and gaseous pollutants from a single-cylinder, four-cycle diesel engine using fuel mixes containing nanoceria of varying concentrations. The test fuels were made by adding different amounts of a commercial fuel additive Envirox into an ultralow-sulfur diesel fuel at 0 (base fuel), 0.1-, 1-, and 10-fold the manufacturer-recommended concentration of 0.5 mL Envirox per liter of fuel. The addition of Envirox resulted in ceria-concentration-dependent emission reductions of CO2, CO, total particulate mass, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, and several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. These reductions at the manufacturer-recommended doping concentration, however, were accompanied by a substantial increase of certain other air pollutants, specifically the number of ultrafine particles (+32%), NOx (+9.3%), and the particle-phase benzo[a]pyrene toxic equivalence quotient (+35%). Increasing fuel ceria concentrations also led to decreases in the size of emitted particles. Given health concerns related to ultrafine particles and NOx, our findings call for additional studies to further evaluate health risks associated with the use of nanoceria additives in various engines under various operating conditions. PMID:24144266

  7. Impacts of a nanosized ceria additive on diesel engine emissions of particulate and gaseous pollutants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junfeng; Nazarenko, Yevgen; Zhang, Lin; Calderon, Leonardo; Lee, Ki-Bum; Garfunkel, Eric; Schwander, Stephan; Tetley, Teresa D; Chung, Kian Fan; Porter, Alexandra E; Ryan, Mary; Kipen, Howard; Lioy, Paul J; Mainelis, Gediminas

    2013-11-19

    Fuel additives incorporating nanosized ceria have been increasingly used in diesel engines as combustion promoters. However, few studies have assessed the impact of these nanotechnology-based additives on pollutant emissions. Here, we systematically compare emission rates of particulate and gaseous pollutants from a single-cylinder, four-cycle diesel engine using fuel mixes containing nanoceria of varying concentrations. The test fuels were made by adding different amounts of a commercial fuel additive Envirox into an ultralow-sulfur diesel fuel at 0 (base fuel), 0.1-, 1-, and 10-fold the manufacturer-recommended concentration of 0.5 mL Envirox per liter of fuel. The addition of Envirox resulted in ceria-concentration-dependent emission reductions of CO2, CO, total particulate mass, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, and several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. These reductions at the manufacturer-recommended doping concentration, however, were accompanied by a substantial increase of certain other air pollutants, specifically the number of ultrafine particles (+32%), NO(x) (+9.3%), and the particle-phase benzo[a]pyrene toxic equivalence quotient (+35%). Increasing fuel ceria concentrations also led to decreases in the size of emitted particles. Given health concerns related to ultrafine particles and NO(x), our findings call for additional studies to further evaluate health risks associated with the use of nanoceria additives in various engines under various operating conditions.

  8. Pyrrole as a promising electrolyte additive to trap polysulfides for lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wu; Yang, Wang; Song, Ailing; Gao, Lijun; Sun, Gang; Shao, Guangjie

    2017-04-01

    Lithium-sulfur batteries are a promising energy storage devices beyond conventional lithium ion batteries. However, the ;shuttle effect; of soluble polysulfides is a major barrier between electrodes, resulting in rapid capacity fading. To address above issue, pyrrole has been investigated as an electrolyte additive to trap polysulfides. When pyrrole is added into electrolyte, a surface protective layer of polypyrrole can be formed on the sulfur cathode, which not only acts as a conductive agent to provide an effective electron conduction path but also acts as an absorbing agent and barrier layer suppressing the diffusion of polysulfide intermediates. The results demonstrate that an appropriate amount of pyrrole added into the electrolyte leads to excellent cycling stability and rate capability. Apparently, pyrrole is an effective additive for the entrapment of polysulfides of lithium-sulfur batteries.

  9. Measurement of nitrogen and sulfur pollutants in an entrained-coat gasifier

    SciTech Connect

    Price, T.D.; Hedman, P.O.; Smoot, L.D.

    1983-02-01

    Fifteen tests with a highly volatile bituminous coal were conducted in a laboratory gasifier wherein nitrogen (HCN, NH/sub 3/, NO, fuel-N) and sulfur pollutants (H/sub 2/S, SO/sub 2/, fuel-S) were measured for gas-liquid-solid samples. The samples were removed from within the gasifier by a water-quench probe at various axial and radial locations. Generally, concentrations of H/sub 2/S, HCN, and NH/sub 3/ diminished and SO/sub 2/ and NO increased as O/sub 2//coal ratio increased. Increasing steam/coal ratio suppressed all pollutant levels, partly through reduction in nitrogen and sulfur emissions from the coal. High SO/sub 2/ levels formed quickly in the gasifier, possibly from reaction with oxygen in the gas phase. Significant quantities of sulfur and nitrogen were still in the char at the gasifier exit, since carbon conversion was not complete. High SO/sub 2/ and NO levels in aft-regions were attributed to the oxidizer-rich atmosphere resulting from incomplete carbon conversion.

  10. Extreme Pressure Synergistic Mechanism of Bismuth Naphthenate and Sulfurized Isobutene Additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xin; Hu, Jianqiang; Yang, Shizhao; Xie, Feng; Guo, Li

    A four-ball tester was used to evaluate the tribological performances of bismuth naphthenate (BiNap), sulfurized isobutene (VSB), and their combinations. The results show that the antiwear properties of BiNap and VSB are not very visible, but they possess good extreme pressure (EP) properties, particularly sulfur containing bismuth additives. Synergistic EP properties of BiNap with various sulfur-containing additives were investigated. The results indicate that BiNap exhibits good EP synergism with sulfur-containing additives. The surface analytical tools, such as X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), were used to investigate the topography, composition contents, and depth profile of some typical elements on the rubbing surface. Smooth topography of wear scar further confirms that the additive showed good EP capacities, and XPS and EDX analyzes indicate that tribochemical mixed protective films composed of bismuth, bismuth oxides, sulfides, and sulfates are formed on the rubbing surface, which improves the tribological properties of lubricants. In particular, a large number of bismuth atoms and bismuth sulfides play an important role in improving the EP properties of oils.

  11. An analysis of candidates for addition to the Clean Air Act list of hazardous air pollutants.

    PubMed

    Lunder, Sonya; Woodruff, Tracey J; Axelrad, Daniel A

    2004-02-01

    There are 188 air toxics listed as hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) in the Clean Air Act (CAA), based on their potential to adversely impact public health. This paper presents several analyses performed to screen potential candidates for addition to the HAPs list. We analyzed 1086 HAPs and potential HAPs, including chemicals regulated by the state of California or with emissions reported to the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI). HAPs and potential HAPs were ranked by their emissions to air, and by toxicity-weighted (tox-wtd) emissions for cancer and noncancer, using emissions information from the TRI and toxicity information from state and federal agencies. Separate consideration was given for persistent, bioaccumulative toxins (PBTs), reproductive or developmental toxins, and chemicals under evaluation for regulation as toxic air contaminants in California. Forty-four pollutants were identified as candidate HAPs based on three ranking analyses and whether they were a PBT or a reproductive or developmental toxin. Of these, nine qualified in two or three different rankings (ammonia [NH3], copper [Cu], Cu compounds, nitric acid [HNO3], N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone, sulfuric acid [H2SO4], vanadium [V] compounds, zinc [Zn], and Zn compounds). This analysis suggests further evaluation of several pollutants for possible addition to the CAA list of HAPs.

  12. Additional role of O-acetylserine as a sulfur status-independent regulator during plant growth.

    PubMed

    Hubberten, Hans-Michael; Klie, Sebastian; Caldana, Camila; Degenkolbe, Thomas; Willmitzer, Lothar; Hoefgen, Rainer

    2012-05-01

    O-acetylserine (OAS) is one of the most prominent metabolites whose levels are altered upon sulfur starvation. However, its putative role as a signaling molecule in higher plants is controversial. This paper provides further evidence that OAS is a signaling molecule, based on computational analysis of time-series experiments and on studies of transgenic plants conditionally displaying increased OAS levels. Transcripts whose levels correlated with the transient and specific increase in OAS levels observed in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana plants 5-10 min after transfer to darkness and with diurnal oscillation of the OAS content, showing a characteristic peak during the night, were identified. Induction of a serine-O-acetyltransferase gene (SERAT) in transgenic A. thaliana plants expressing the genes under the control of an inducible promoter resulted in a specific time-dependent increase in OAS levels. Monitoring the transcriptome response at time points at which no changes in sulfur-related metabolites except OAS were observed and correlating this with the light/dark transition and diurnal experiments resulted in identification of six genes whose expression was highly correlated with that of OAS (adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate reductase 3, sulfur-deficiency-induced 1, sulfur-deficiency-induced 2, low-sulfur-induced 1, serine hydroxymethyltransferase 7 and ChaC-like protein). These data suggest that OAS displays a signalling function leading to changes in transcript levels of a specific gene set irrespective of the sulfur status of the plant. Additionally, a role for OAS in a specific part of the sulfate response can be deduced.

  13. Ecological effects of nitrogen and sulfur air pollution in the US: what do we know?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greaver, Tara L.; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Herrick, Jeffrey D.; Barber, Mary C.; Baron, Jill S.; Cosby, Bernard J.; Deerhake, Marion E.; Dennis, Robin L.; Dubois, Jean-Jacque B.; Goodale, Christine L.; Herlihy, Alan T.; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Liu, Lingli; Lynch, Jason A.; Novak, Kristopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Four decades after the passage of the US Clean Air Act, air-quality standards are set to protect ecosystems from damage caused by gas-phase nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) compounds, but not from the deposition of these air pollutants to land and water. Here, we synthesize recent scientific literature on the ecological effects of N and S air pollution in the US. Deposition of N and S is the main driver of ecosystem acidification and contributes to nutrient enrichment in many natural systems. Although surface-water acidification has decreased in the US since 1990, it remains a problem in many regions. Perturbations to ecosystems caused by the nutrient effects of N deposition continue to emerge, although gas-phase concentrations are generally not high enough to cause phytotoxicity. In all, there is overwhelming evidence of a broad range of damaging effects to ecosystems in the US under current air quality conditions.

  14. Space-based detection of missing sulfur dioxide sources of global air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLinden, Chris A.; Fioletov, Vitali; Shephard, Mark W.; Krotkov, Nick; Li, Can; Martin, Randall V.; Moran, Michael D.; Joiner, Joanna

    2016-07-01

    Sulfur dioxide is designated a criteria air contaminant (or equivalent) by virtually all developed nations. When released into the atmosphere, sulfur dioxide forms sulfuric acid and fine particulate matter, secondary pollutants that have significant adverse effects on human health, the environment and the economy. The conventional, bottom-up emissions inventories used to assess impacts, however, are often incomplete or outdated, particularly for developing nations that lack comprehensive emission reporting requirements and infrastructure. Here we present a satellite-based, global emission inventory for SO2 that is derived through a simultaneous detection, mapping and emission-quantifying procedure, and thereby independent of conventional information sources. We find that of the 500 or so large sources in our inventory, nearly 40 are not captured in leading conventional inventories. These missing sources are scattered throughout the developing world--over a third are clustered around the Persian Gulf--and add up to 7 to 14 Tg of SO2 yr-1, or roughly 6-12% of the global anthropogenic source. Our estimates of national total emissions are generally in line with conventional numbers, but for some regions, and for SO2 emissions from volcanoes, discrepancies can be as large as a factor of three or more. We anticipate that our inventory will help eliminate gaps in bottom-up inventories, independent of geopolitical borders and source types.

  15. Space-Based Detection of Missing Sulfur Dioxide Sources of Global Air Pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLinden, Chris A.; Fioletov, Vitali; Shephard, Mark W.; Krotkov, Nick; Li, Can; Martin, Randall V.; Moran, Michael D.; Joiner, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide is designated a criteria air contaminant (or equivalent) by virtually all developed nations. When released into the atmosphere, sulfur dioxide forms sulfuric acid and fine particulate matter, secondary pollutants that have significant adverse effects on human health, the environment and the economy. The conventional, bottom-up emissions inventories used to assess impacts, however, are often incomplete or outdated, particularly for developing nations that lack comprehensive emission reporting requirements and infrastructure. Here we present a satellite-based, global emission inventory for SO2 that is derived through a simultaneous detection, mapping and emission-quantifying procedure, and thereby independent of conventional information sources. We find that of the 500 or so large sources in our inventory, nearly 40 are not captured in leading conventional inventories. These missing sources are scattered throughout the developing world-over a third are clustered around the Persian Gulf-and add up to 7 to 14 Tg of SO2 yr(exp -1), or roughly 6-12% of the global anthropogenic source. Our estimates of national total emissions are generally in line with conventional numbers, but for some regions, and for SO2 emissions from volcanoes, discrepancies can be as large as a factor of three or more. We anticipate that our inventory will help eliminate gaps in bottom-up inventories, independent of geopolitical borders and source types.

  16. Controlling crystalline structure of ZnS nanocrystals only by tuning sulfur precursor addition rate.

    PubMed

    Bi, Chong; Pan, Liqing; Xu, Mei; Xiao, John Q

    2010-12-01

    Unlike previous studies that emphasize the important role of thermodynamics or surface energy on the structure stabilization of ZnS nanocrystals, we successfully controlled the crystalline structure of ZnS nanocrystals simply by tuning sulfur precursor addition rate under exactly the same other conditions. We observed the structure of as prepared ZnS nanocrystals was evolved from wurtzite into zinc blende with increasing the addition rate of sulfur precursor. The method may extend to engineer other nanomaterials with desired physicochemical properties by controlling crystalline structure. On the other hand, it also makes a new approach to understand the crucial factors that determine the growth mechanism and the crystal structure of nanomaterials in theory.

  17. [The role of additives in bio-mass coal briquette on sulfur retention enhancement].

    PubMed

    Lu, Yongqi; Xu, Kangfu; Ma, Yongliang; Wei, Tiejun; Hao, Jiming

    2002-01-30

    The research first conducted the sulfur-fixing experiment of bio-mass coal briquette in a tubular furnace. The impacts of three additives Al2O3, Fe2O3 and MnO2 on the sulfur retention by calcium-based sorbent in briquette were investigated, and only Al2O3 displayed the enhancement of sulfur retention. The TGA experiment was further carried out, and proved that the high-temperature decomposition of CaSO4 in the deoxidization atmosphere was effectively inhibited with the addition of Al2O3. The XPS and XRD analyses of briquette ash showed that due to the interaction among Al2O3, CaSO4 and CaO, the composite CaSO4.3CaO.3Al2O3 which has more thermal stability was formed. With its wrapping or binding onto the surface of CaSO4 crystal, the decomposition of CaSO4 was mitigated.

  18. Effect of sulfur additions on soil and the nutrition of wheat

    SciTech Connect

    Mahler, R.J.; Maples, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted for two years to determine the effects of four sulfur (S) sources applied at various rates on the elemental composition of Coker 747/sup 3/ wheat and on the soil S concentration. The concentration of S in plants increased by all sources of applied S. Increased S in the soil from S application decreased P concentrations in plants regardless of the S source used. Sulfur additions did not significantly affect the concentrations of Cu, Ca, Mg, or N in plants. The concentrations of Mn, Zn, and Fe in plants either increased or decreased depending on S source used. Analysis of the silt loam soil to a depth of 90 cm revealed that applied S moved readily from the surface to the lower depths and that the elemental form of S moved less rapidly than the more soluble forms of applied S.

  19. Effect of Addition of Allium hookeri on the Quality of Fermented Sausage with Meat from Sulfur Fed Pigs during Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ki-Won

    2014-01-01

    The effect of the addition of Allium hookeri on the quality of fermented sausage made with meat from sulfur fed pigs was examined, throughout a 60 d ripening period. There were two treatments in animal management: normal feed fed pigs, and sulfur fed pigs given 0.3% sulfur mixed normal feed. Fermented sausage manufactured with meat from normal feed fed pigs, and with meat from sulfur fed pigs, and 1% A. hookeri-containing fermented sausage processed with meat from sulfur fed pigs, were determined at 1 d, 15 d, 30 d, and 60 d. The meat qualities in fermented sausage were measured by DPPH radical scavenging activity (DPPH), ABTS+ radical scavenging activity (ABTS+), total phenolic acids, and total flavonoid contents. Fermented sausage made from pigs that had been fed with 0.3% sulfur was protected from oxidation by reduced free radical, as shown by the significant increase in DPPH and ABTS+ values, compared with fermented sausage made from normal feed fed pigs (p<0.05). A. hookeri-added fermented sausage with sulfur fed pork was shown to increase the values in DPPH, ABTS+, total phenolic acid, and total flavonoid contents, by comparison with both the control sausage, and sausage with sulfur fed pork, at 60 d. These results suggest that A. hookeri in meat from sulfur fed pigs could be a source of natural addition, to increase quality in the food industry. PMID:26761166

  20. The effect of sulfur re-addition on H(2) photoproduction by sulfur-deprived green algae.

    PubMed

    Kosourov, Sergey; Makarova, Valeriya; Fedorov, Alexander S; Tsygankov, Anatoly; Seibert, Michael; Ghirardi, Maria L

    2005-09-01

    Sulfur deprivation of algal cultures selectively and partially inactivates photosystem II (PSII)-catalyzed O(2) evolution, induces anaerobiosis and hydrogenase expression, and results in sustained H(2) photoproduction for several days. We show that re-addition of limiting amounts of sulfate (1-10 microM final concentration) to the cultures during the H(2)-production phase temporarily reactivates PSII photochemical and O(2)-evolution activity and re-establishes higher rates of electron transport through the photosynthetic electron transport chain. The reactivation of PSII occurs by de novo D1 protein synthesis, but does not result in the re-establishment of aerobic conditions in the reactor, detectable by dissolved-O(2) sensors. However, concomitant H(2) photoproduction is inhibited, possibly due to excessive intra-cellular levels of photosynthetically-evolved O(2). The partial recovery of electron transport rates correlates with the re-oxidation of the plastoquinone (PQ) pool, as observed by pulse-amplitude modulated (PAM) and fluorescence-induction measurements. These results show that the presence of a more oxidized PQ pool releases some of the down-regulation of electron transport caused by the anaerobic conditions.

  1. Dynamic characteristics of sulfur, iron and phosphorus in coastal polluted sediments, north China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiyao; Sheng, Yanqing; Yang, Jian; Di Bonito, Marcello; Mortimer, Robert J G

    2016-12-01

    The cycling of sulfur (S), iron (Fe) and phosphorus (P) in sediments and pore water can impact the water quality of overlying water. In a heavily polluted river estuary (Yantai, China), vertical profiles of fluxes of dissolved sulfide, Fe(2+) and dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) in sediment pore water were investigated by the Diffusive Gradients in Thin films technique (DGT). Vertical fluxes of S, Fe, P in intertidal sediment showed the availability of DRP increased while the sulfide decreased with depth in surface sediment, indicating that sulfide accumulation could enhance P release in anoxic sediment. In sites with contrasting salinity, the relative dominance of iron and sulfate reduction was different, with iron reduction dominant over sulfate reduction in the upper sediment at an intertidal site but the reverse true in a freshwater site, with the other process dominating at depth in each case. Phosphate release was largely controlled by iron reduction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Factors affecting the performance of microbial fuel cells for sulfur pollutants removal.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng; Rahunen, Nelli; Varcoe, John R; Roberts, Alexander J; Avignone-Rossa, Claudio; Thumser, Alfred E; Slade, Robert C T

    2009-03-15

    A microbial fuel cell (MFC) has been developed for removal of sulfur-based pollutants and can be used for simultaneous wastewater treatment and electricity generation. This fuel cell uses an activated carbon cloth+carbon fibre veil composite anode, air-breathing dual cathodes and the sulfate-reducing species Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. 1.16gdm(-3) sulfite and 0.97gdm(-3) thiosulfate were removed from the wastewater at 22 degrees C, representing sulfite and thiosulfate removal conversions of 91% and 86%, respectively. The anode potential was controlled by the concentration of sulfide in the compartment. The performance of the cathode assembly was affected by the concentration of protons in the cation-exchanging ionomer with which the electrocatalyst is co-bound at the three-phase (air, catalyst and support) boundary.

  3. Effects of sulfur oxide pollutants on respiratory function, particle deposition and bronchial clearance. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.

    1980-11-01

    The effects of sulfur oxide pollutants on respiratory function, particle deposition, and bronchial clearance were explored in a series of three studies, two on donkeys and one on humans. In the first study, the effects of one-hour inhalation exposures to 0.3 - 0.6 micrograms H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ aerosols in the donkey were studied in terms of alterations in pulmonary flow resistance and dynamic compliance, and changes in the regional deposition and tracheobronchial mucociliary clearance of an inert test aerosol. In the second study, the effect of chronic inhalation exposures to sulfuric acid mist upon mucociliary clearance from the lungs was studied, using the donkey as an analogue for man. Four animals were exposed one hour per day, five days per week, for six months; two to a concentration of 102 micrograms/cu m, the other to 106 micrograms/cu m. In the final study, the mucociliary particle clearance and respiratory mechanics of twelve healty nonsmokers exposed to 1/2 micrometer H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ at 0 (control), 100, 300, and 1,000 micrograms/cu m for one hour per day for four days were examined.

  4. Evidence of recovery of Juniperus virginiana trees from sulfur pollution after the Clean Air Act.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Richard B; Spal, Scott E; Smith, Kenneth R; Nippert, Jesse B

    2013-09-17

    Using dendroisotopic techniques, we show the recovery of Juniperus virginiana L. (eastern red cedar) trees in the Central Appalachian Mountains from decades of acidic pollution. Acid deposition over much of the 20th century reduced stomatal conductance of leaves, thereby increasing intrinsic water-use efficiency of the Juniperus trees. These data indicate that the stomata of Juniperus may be more sensitive to acid deposition than to increasing atmospheric CO2. A breakpoint in the 100-y δ(13)C tree ring chronology occurred around 1980, as the legacy of sulfur dioxide emissions declined following the enactment of the Clean Air Act in 1970, indicating a gradual increase in stomatal conductance (despite rising levels of atmospheric CO2) and a concurrent increase in photosynthesis related to decreasing acid deposition and increasing atmospheric CO2. Tree ring δ(34)S shows a synchronous change in the sources of sulfur used at the whole-tree level that indicates a reduced anthropogenic influence. The increase in growth and the δ(13)C and δ(34)S trends in the tree ring chronology of these Juniperus trees provide evidence for a distinct physiological response to changes in atmospheric SO2 emissions since ∼1980 and signify the positive impacts of landmark environmental legislation to facilitate recovery of forest ecosystems from acid deposition.

  5. Evidence of recovery of Juniperus virginiana trees from sulfur pollution after the Clean Air Act

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Richard B.; Spal, Scott E.; Smith, Kenneth R.; Nippert, Jesse B.

    2013-01-01

    Using dendroisotopic techniques, we show the recovery of Juniperus virginiana L. (eastern red cedar) trees in the Central Appalachian Mountains from decades of acidic pollution. Acid deposition over much of the 20th century reduced stomatal conductance of leaves, thereby increasing intrinsic water-use efficiency of the Juniperus trees. These data indicate that the stomata of Juniperus may be more sensitive to acid deposition than to increasing atmospheric CO2. A breakpoint in the 100-y δ13C tree ring chronology occurred around 1980, as the legacy of sulfur dioxide emissions declined following the enactment of the Clean Air Act in 1970, indicating a gradual increase in stomatal conductance (despite rising levels of atmospheric CO2) and a concurrent increase in photosynthesis related to decreasing acid deposition and increasing atmospheric CO2. Tree ring δ34S shows a synchronous change in the sources of sulfur used at the whole-tree level that indicates a reduced anthropogenic influence. The increase in growth and the δ13C and δ34S trends in the tree ring chronology of these Juniperus trees provide evidence for a distinct physiological response to changes in atmospheric SO2 emissions since ∼1980 and signify the positive impacts of landmark environmental legislation to facilitate recovery of forest ecosystems from acid deposition. PMID:24003125

  6. Influence of sulfur addition and S-induced wall catalytic effect on C-C bond cleavage and aromatics hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, E.; Song, C.; Schobert, H.H.

    1995-12-31

    Catalytic hydrocracking of 4-(-1-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl NMBB predominately yielded naphthalene and 4-methylbibenzyl. Sulfur addition to most catalyst precursors lead to substantially higher catalyst activity and subsequently higher conversion. In order to clarify the effect of sulfur alone on model compound conversion, NMBB was treated with sulfur in concentrations of 1.2 to 3.4 wt%, corresponding to conditions present in catalytic runs with sulfur. It was found that increasing sulfur concentrations leads to higher NMBB conversion. Furthermore, sulfur had a permanent influence on the reactor walls. It reacted with the transition metals in the steel to form a microscopic black iron sulfide layer on the surface, which could not be removed mechanically. The {open_quotes}non catalytic{close_quotes} runs after experiments with added sulfur yielded higher conversion than normal runs with new reactors. This {open_quotes}wall catalytic effect{close_quotes} can be reduced by treating sulfided reactors with hydrochloric acid for a short period of time and subsequent immersing into a base bath over night. These results demonstrate the significant influence of sulfur addition and S-induced residual wall-effect on C-C bond cleavage and hydrogenation of aromatics in batch reactors.

  7. Physiological Responses of Two Epiphytic Bryophytes to Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Sulfur Addition in a Subtropical Montane Cloud Forest.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Liu, Wen-Yao; Song, Liang; Li, Su; Wu, Yi; Shi, Xian-Meng; Huang, Jun-Biao; Wu, Chuan-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric depositions pose significant threats to biodiversity and ecosystem function. However, the underlying physiological mechanisms are not well understood, and few studies have considered the combined effects and interactions of multiple pollutants. This in situ study explored the physiological responses of two epiphytic bryophytes to combined addition of nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur. We investigated the electrical conductivity (EC), total chlorophyll concentration (Chl), nutrient stoichiometry and chlorophyll fluorescence signals in a subtropical montane cloud forest in south-west China. The results showed that enhanced fertilizer additions imposed detrimental effects on bryophytes, and the combined enrichment of simulated fertilization exerted limited synergistic effects in their natural environments. On the whole, EC, Chl, the effective quantum yield of photosystem II (ΦPSII) and photochemical quenching (qP) were the more reliable indicators of increased artificial fertilization. However, conclusions on nutrient stoichiometry should be drawn cautiously concerning the saturation uptake and nutrient interactions in bryophytes. Finally, we discuss the limitations of prevailing fertilization experiments and emphasize the importance of long-term data available for future investigations.

  8. Physiological Responses of Two Epiphytic Bryophytes to Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Sulfur Addition in a Subtropical Montane Cloud Forest

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Liu, Wen-yao; Song, Liang; Li, Su; Wu, Yi; Shi, Xian-meng; Huang, Jun-biao; Wu, Chuan-sheng

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric depositions pose significant threats to biodiversity and ecosystem function. However, the underlying physiological mechanisms are not well understood, and few studies have considered the combined effects and interactions of multiple pollutants. This in situ study explored the physiological responses of two epiphytic bryophytes to combined addition of nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur. We investigated the electrical conductivity (EC), total chlorophyll concentration (Chl), nutrient stoichiometry and chlorophyll fluorescence signals in a subtropical montane cloud forest in south-west China. The results showed that enhanced fertilizer additions imposed detrimental effects on bryophytes, and the combined enrichment of simulated fertilization exerted limited synergistic effects in their natural environments. On the whole, EC, Chl, the effective quantum yield of photosystem II (ΦPSII) and photochemical quenching (qP) were the more reliable indicators of increased artificial fertilization. However, conclusions on nutrient stoichiometry should be drawn cautiously concerning the saturation uptake and nutrient interactions in bryophytes. Finally, we discuss the limitations of prevailing fertilization experiments and emphasize the importance of long-term data available for future investigations. PMID:27560190

  9. Influence of sulfur addition and S-induced wall catalytic effects on C-C bond cleavage and aromatics hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, E.; Song, Chunshan; Schobert, H.H.

    1995-12-31

    Catalytic hydrocracking of 4-(1-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl, designated as NMBB, predominately yielded naphthalene and 4-methylbibenzyl. Sulfur addition to most catalyst precursors lead to substantially higher catalyst activity and subsequently higher conversion. NMBB was also treated with sulfur alone in the absence of catalysts in concentrations of 1.2 to 3.4 wt, corresponding to conditions present in catalytic runs with added sulfur to precursors. It was found that increasing sulfur concentrations lead to higher NMBB conversion. Furthermore, sulfur had a permanent influence on the reactor walls. It reacted with the transition metals in the stainless steel to form a microscopic black iron sulfide layer on the surface, which could not be removed mechanically. The {open_quotes}non-catalytic{close_quotes} runs which were done after experiments with added sulfur yielded higher conversions than normal runs done in new reactors. This {open_quotes}wall catalytic effect{close_quotes} can be reduced by treating sulfided reactors with hydrochloric acid for a short period of time and subsequent immersing into a base bath overnight. These results demonstrate the significant influence of sulfur addition and S-induced residual wall-effect on C-C bond cleavage and hydrogenation of aromatics in batch reactors.

  10. Sulfur-free lignins from alkaline pulping tested in mortar for use as mortar additives.

    PubMed

    Nadif, A; Hunkeler, D; Käuper, P

    2002-08-01

    Sulfur-free lignin, obtained through the acid precipitation of black liquor from the soda pulping process, has been tested as water reducer in mortar. It has also been compared to existing commercial additives such as naphthalene sulfonates and lignosulfonates. The ash content and sugar content of these lignins are low in comparison to lignosulfonates, conferring on them higher purity. A procedure for small scale testing derived from the industrial norms SN-EN196 and ASTM (Designation C230-90) is presented. Specifically, all the sulfur-free lignins tested improved the flow of the mortar. Selected flax lignins performed better than lignosulfonates though still less than naphthalene sulfonates. Furthermore, certain hemp lignins gave comparable results to the lignosulfonates. Overall, the straw lignin prepared herein is comparable in performance to commercially available lignins, such as Organocell, Alcell and Curan 100. The plant from which the lignin was isolated, and the process of the pulp mill are the primary influences on the performance of the lignin.

  11. KF addition to Cu2SnS3 thin films prepared by sulfurization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Mitsuki; Fujimoto, Junya; Yamaguchi, Toshiyuki; Sasano, Junji; Izaki, Masanobu

    2017-04-01

    Cu2SnS3 thin films were fabricated by sulfurization with KF addition and applied to photovoltaic devices. Two methods, two-stage annealing and the use of four-layer precursors, were employed, and the quantity of NaF and KF and the annealing temperature were changed. By electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), the Cu/Sn mole ratio was found to range from 0.81 to 1.51. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and Raman spectra indicated that the fabricated thin films had a monoclinic Cu2SnS3 structure. The Cu2SnS3 thin films fabricated by two-stage annealing had a close-packed structure and a pinhole-free surface morphology. The best solar cell in this study showed V oc of 293 mV, which surpassed the previously reported value.

  12. On the Ratio of Sulfur Dioxide to Nitrogen Oxides as an Indicator of Air Pollution Sources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirel, Ronit; Dayan, Uri

    2001-07-01

    The ratio of sulfur dioxide to nitrogen oxides (RSN = SO2/NOx) is one indicator of air pollution sources. The role of this ratio in source attribution is illustrated here for the Ashdod area, located in the southern coastal plain of Israel. The main sources of pollution in the area are the tall stacks of the Eshkol power plant, the stacks of oil refineries, and areal sources (stationary and mobile). The factors that affect RSN are studied using four regression models: a binary regression tree in original scale, a tree in logarithmic scale, a data partition produced by a combination of the two trees, and a linear regression model. All models have similar relative prediction error, with the combined partition best highlighting the sources of variability in RSN: (a) very low values (interquartile range of [0.12, 0.48]) are associated with traffic, (b) low values ([0.43, 1.00]) are attributed to the power plant and to daytime emissions of local industry, (c) medium values ([0.74, 1.90]) are associated with local industry emissions during cooler hours of the day and refinery emissions mainly on slow wind episodes, and (d) high values ([1.07, 4.30]) are attributed to refinery emissions during moderate to fast wind episodes. Analysis of the number of episodes of increased concentrations indicates that, during 1996 and 1997, about 42% of SO2 episodes are attributable to the power plant and 33% to the refineries. Increased-NOx episodes are mainly contributed by traffic (91%) and power plant (4.5%) emissions.

  13. Changing trends in sulfur emissions in Asia: implications for acid deposition, air pollution, and climate.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Gregory R; Streets, David G; Calori, Giuseppe; Amann, Markus; Jacobson, Mark Z; Hansen, James; Ueda, Hiromasa

    2002-11-15

    In the early 1990s, it was projected that annual SO2 emissions in Asia might grow to 80-110 Tg yr(-1) by 2020. Based on new high-resolution estimates from 1975 to 2000, we calculate that SO2 emissions in Asia might grow only to 40-45 Tg yr(-1) by 2020. The main reason for this lower estimate is a decline of SO2 emissions from 1995 to 2000 in China, which emits about two-thirds of Asian SO2. The decline was due to a reduction in industrial coal use, a slowdown of the Chinese economy, and the closure of small and inefficient plants, among other reasons. One effect of the reduction in SO2 emissions in China has been a reduction in acid deposition not only in China but also in Japan. Reductions should also improve visibility and reduce health problems. SO2 emission reductions may increase global warming, but this warming effect could be partially offset by reductions in the emissions of black carbon. How SO2 emissions in the region change in the coming decades will depend on many competing factors (economic growth, pollution control laws, etc.). However a continuation of current trends would result in sulfur emissions lower than any IPCC forecasts.

  14. The pollution status of sulfur dioxide in major urban areas of Korea between 1989 and 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Sharmila; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2014-10-01

    The pollution status of sulfur dioxide was analyzed using the datasets collected from seven major cities in Korea for the period of 1989-2010. Although there were moderate differences in SO2 levels between the cities, the temporal trends were seen to be rather distinctive between seasons or across the years. The SO2 levels consistently exhibited relative dominance during winter due to the combined effects of domestic heating and meteorological conditions. In contrast, the annual datasets underwent an abrupt decrease until the late 90s. As such, if the data are divided into two periods I (1989-1999) and II (2000-2010), the mean values were reduced considerably from a few tens of ppb (period I) to a few ppb levels (period II). This notable change is suspected to reflect the effect of gradual shift in fuel consumption patterns (e.g., from conventional fuels to cleaner renewal sources of energy). The results of the principal component analysis (PCA) indicated that emissions of SO2 are affected by the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels. According to the health risk assessment, the SO2 exposure to infants and adults should have decreased significantly from period I to period II (e.g., by 5-7 times).

  15. Additive effect of ionic liquids on the electrochemical property of a sulfur composite electrode for all-solid-state lithium-sulfur battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Shunji; Okuda, Kazuya; Machida, Nobuya; Shigematsu, Toshihiko

    2014-12-01

    We investigated additive effect of five kinds of ionic liquids, such as 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis(trifluoromethane-sulfonyl)imide [EMI][TFSI], 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium tetrafluoroborate [EMI][BF4], 1-buthyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis(trifluoromethane- sulfonyl) imide [BMI][TFSI], 1-buthyl-3-methyl-imidazolium tetrafluoroborate [BMI][BF4], and/or 1-buthyl-3-methyl-imidazolium iodide [BMI][I], on electrochemical properties of the sulfur composite electrode for all-solid-state lithium-sulfur batteries. The sulfur composite electrode that was composed of sulfur (29.9 wt%), vapor-grown carbon fiber (VGCF, 9.9 wt%), solid electrolyte (amorphous Li3PS4, 60.0 wt%), and [EMI][TFSI] (0.2 wt%) showed high initial specific capacity of 1270 mAh g-1 at 25 °C, which was calculated on the base of the weight of sulfur. To construct a laboratory-scale all-solid-state battery, amorphous Li3PS4 and meta-stable Li4.4Si alloy were used as solid electrolyte and as negative electrode materials, respectively. The laboratory-scale all-solid-state battery showed good discharge-charge cycle performance under a constant current density of 0.1 mA cm-2 (24 mA g-1) at room temperature and retained the large specific capacity more than 1230 mAh g-1 even after 50 cycles at 25 °C. The capacity after 50 cycles was about 97% of the initial capacity of the test cell.

  16. Health effects of air pollutants: Sulfuric acid, the old and the new

    SciTech Connect

    Amdur, M.O. )

    1989-05-01

    Data from exposure of experimental animals and human subjects to sulfuric acid presents a consistent picture of its toxicology. Effects on airway resistance in asthmatic subjects were well predicted by data obtained on guinea pigs. Sulfuric acid increases the irritant response to ozone in both rats and man. In donkeys, rabbits, and human subjects, sulfuric acid alters clearance of particles from the lung in a similar manner. These changes resemble those produced by cigarette smoke and could well lead to chronic bronchitis. Data obtained on guinea pigs indicate that very small amounts of sulfuric acid on the surface of ultrafine metal oxide aerosols produce functional, morphological, and biochemical pulmonary effects. Such particles are typical of those emitted from coal combustion and smelting operations. Sulfate is an unsatisfactory surrogate in existing epidemiology studies. Sulfuric acid measurement is a critical need in such studies. 31 references.

  17. Insights into the Electronic Structure of Ozone and Sulfur Dioxide from Generalized Valence Bond Theory: Addition of Hydrogen Atoms.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Beth A; Takeshita, Tyler Y; Dunning, Thom H

    2016-05-05

    Ozone (O3) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) are valence isoelectronic species, yet their properties and reactivities differ dramatically. In particular, O3 is highly reactive, whereas SO2 is chemically relatively stable. In this paper, we investigate serial addition of hydrogen atoms to both the terminal atoms of O3 and SO2 and to the central atom of these species. It is well-known that the terminal atoms of O3 are much more amenable to bond formation than those of SO2. We show that the differences in the electronic structure of the π systems in the parent triatomic species account for the differences in the addition of hydrogen atoms to the terminal atoms of O3 and SO2. Further, we find that the π system in SO2, which is a recoupled pair bond dyad, facilitates the addition of hydrogen atoms to the sulfur atom, resulting in stable HSO2 and H2SO2 species.

  18. A synthesis of the ecological effects of air pollution from nitrogen and sulfur in the U.S

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greaver, T.L.; Sullivan, T.; Herrick, J.D.; Barber, M.; Baron, J.; Cosby, B.; Deerharke, M.; Dennis, R.; Dubois, J.J.D.; Goodale, C.; Herlihy, A.; Lawrence, G.; Liu, L.; Lynch, J.; Novak, K.

    2012-01-01

    Four decades after the passage of the US Clean Air Act, air-quality standards are set to protect ecosystems from damage caused by gas-phase nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) compounds, but not from the deposition of these air pollutants to land and water. Here, we synthesize recent scientific literature on the ecological effects of N and S air pollution in the US. Deposition of N and S is the main driver of ecosystem acidification and contributes to nutrient enrichment in many natural systems. Although surface-water acidification has decreased in the US since 1990, it remains a problem in many regions. Perturbations to ecosystems caused by the nutrient effects of N deposition continue to emerge, although gas-phase concentrations are generally not high enough to cause phytotoxicity. In all, there is overwhelming evidence of a broad range of damaging effects to ecosystems in the US under current air quality conditions.

  19. Spinach and mustard greens response to soil type, sulfur addition and lithium level

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted near Weslaco, Texas (Lat. 26o 8' N, Long. 97o 57' W) between Dec. 2006 and Feb 2007 to evaluate the effect of soil type, added sulfur and lithium level on the growth and leaf nutrients, particularly biofortified levels of Li and S, in spinach and mustard gree...

  20. Effect of Greens and Soil Type, Sulfur Addition and Lithium Level on Leaf Constituents

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted near Weslaco, Texas (Lat. 26o 8' N, Long. 97o 57' W) between Dec. 2006 and Feb 2007 to evaluate the effect of soil type, added sulfur and lithium level on the growth and leaf nutrients, particularly biofortified levels of Li and S, in spinach and mustard gree...

  1. Polysulfides capture-copper additive for long cycle life lithium sulfur batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Lei; Wu, Tianpin; Lu, Jun; Ma, Lu; Zhu, Wentao; Qiu, Xinping

    2016-10-18

    Copper powder was introduced into the lithium sulfur battery system to capture intermediate polysulfides and CuxS (x = 1 or 2) species was generated depending on the chain length of polysulfides. This phenomenon was verified by X-ray absorption near edge structure technique. The results indicated that copper can be oxidized to CuS by Li2Sx (x ≥ 6), and a mixture of Cu2S and CuS was obtained when x ranges from 3 to 6. While Cu2S is eventually formed in the presence of Li2S3. After several cycles activation, the polysulfide-shuttle effect and self-discharge phenomenon which hinder the application of lithium sulfur batteries are found nearly eliminated Further experiments demonstrated that in the case of Cu2S generation, a high specific sulfur capacity of 1300 mAh g–1 could be delivered, corresponding to 77.6% sulfur utilization, while the Coulombic efficiency approximates around 100%. As a result, self-discharge experiment further demonstrated that polysulfides almost disappear in the electrolyte, which verified the polysulfide-capture capability of copper.

  2. Anthropogenic Sulfur Perturbations on Biogenic Oxidation: SO2 Additions Impact Gas-Phase OH Oxidation Products of α- and β-Pinene.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Beth; Brophy, Patrick; Brune, William H; Farmer, Delphine K

    2016-02-02

    In order to probe how anthropogenic pollutants can impact the atmospheric oxidation of biogenic emissions, we investigated how sulfur dioxide (SO2) perturbations impact the oxidation of two monoterpenes, α-and β-pinene. We used chemical ionization mass spectrometry to examine changes in both individual molecules and gas-phase bulk properties of oxidation products as a function of SO2 addition. SO2 perturbations impacted the oxidation systems of α-and β-pinene, leading to an ensemble of products with a lesser degree of oxygenation than unperturbed systems. These changes may be due to shifts in the OH:HO2 ratio from SO2 oxidation and/or to SO3 reacting directly with organic molecules. Van Krevelen diagrams suggest a shift from gas-phase functionalization by alcohol/peroxide groups to functionalization by carboxylic acid or carbonyl groups, consistent with a decreased OH:HO2 ratio. Increasing relative humidity dampens the impact of the perturbation. This decrease in oxygenation may impact secondary organic aerosol formation in regions dominated by biogenic emissions with nearby SO2 sources. We observed sulfur-containing organic compounds following SO2 perturbations of monoterpene oxidation; whether these are the result of photochemistry or an instrumental artifact from ion-molecule clustering remains uncertain. However, our results demonstrate that the two monoterpene isomers produce unique suites of oxidation products.

  3. Microplastic moves pollutants and additives to worms, reducing functions linked to health and biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Browne, Mark Anthony; Niven, Stewart J; Galloway, Tamara S; Rowland, Steve J; Thompson, Richard C

    2013-12-02

    Inadequate products, waste management, and policy are struggling to prevent plastic waste from infiltrating ecosystems [1, 2]. Disintegration into smaller pieces means that the abundance of micrometer-sized plastic (microplastic) in habitats has increased [3] and outnumbers larger debris [2, 4]. When ingested by animals, plastic provides a feasible pathway to transfer attached pollutants and additive chemicals into their tissues [5-15]. Despite positive correlations between concentrations of ingested plastic and pollutants in tissues of animals, few, if any, controlled experiments have examined whether ingested plastic transfers pollutants and additives to animals. We exposed lugworms (Arenicola marina) to sand with 5% microplastic that was presorbed with pollutants (nonylphenol and phenanthrene) and additive chemicals (Triclosan and PBDE-47). Microplastic transferred pollutants and additive chemicals into gut tissues of lugworms, causing some biological effects, although clean sand transferred larger concentrations of pollutants into their tissues. Uptake of nonylphenol from PVC or sand reduced the ability of coelomocytes to remove pathogenic bacteria by >60%. Uptake of Triclosan from PVC diminished the ability of worms to engineer sediments and caused mortality, each by >55%, while PVC alone made worms >30% more susceptible to oxidative stress. As global microplastic contamination accelerates, our findings indicate that large concentrations of microplastic and additives can harm ecophysiological functions performed by organisms.

  4. The EMECAM project: a multicentre study on air pollution and mortality in Spain: combined results for particulates and for sulfur dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Ballester, F; Saez, M; Perez-Hoyos, S; Iniguez, C; Gandarillas, A; Tobias, A; Bellido, J; Taracido, M; Arribas, F; Daponte, A; Alonso, E; Canada, A; Guillen-Grima, F; Cirera, L; Perez-Boillos, M; Saurina, C; Gomez, F; Tenias, J

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The EMECAM study is a collaborative effort to evaluate the impact of air pollution on mortality in Spain. In this paper the combined results are presented for the short term effects of particulates and sulfur dioxide on both daily mortality for all and for specific causes. Methods: The relation between daily mortality for all causes, cardiovascular diseases, and respiratory diseases, and air pollution for particulates (daily concentrations) and SO2 (24 and 1 hour concentrations) was assessed in 13 Spanish cities for the period 1990–6. With a standardised method, magnitude of association in each city was estimated by Poisson regression in a generalised additive model. Local estimates were obtained from both single and two pollutant analyses. Lastly, combined estimates for each cause and pollutant were obtained. Results: For combined results, in single pollutant models a 10 µg/m3 increase in the concentration of the mean of the concurrent and one day lag for black smoke was associated with a 0.8% (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.4 to 1.1%) increase in total mortality. The estimates for total suspended particles (TSPs) and particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter <10 µm (PM10) and total mortality were slightly lower. The same increase in concentrations of SO2 was associated with a 0.5% increase in daily deaths. For groups of specific causes, higher estimations were found, specially for respiratory conditions. Peak concentrations of SO2 showed significant associations with the three groups of mortality. When two pollutant analyses were performed, estimates for particulates, specially for black smoke, did not substantially change. The estimates for daily concentrations of SO2 were greatly reduced, but, on the contrary, the association with peak concentrations of SO2 did not show any change. Conclusions: There is an association between mortality and pollution through particulates among city populations in Spain. Peak rather than daily concentrations

  5. Polysulfides capture-copper additive for long cycle life lithium sulfur batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Jia, Lei; Wu, Tianpin; Lu, Jun; ...

    2016-10-18

    Copper powder was introduced into the lithium sulfur battery system to capture intermediate polysulfides and CuxS (x = 1 or 2) species was generated depending on the chain length of polysulfides. This phenomenon was verified by X-ray absorption near edge structure technique. The results indicated that copper can be oxidized to CuS by Li2Sx (x ≥ 6), and a mixture of Cu2S and CuS was obtained when x ranges from 3 to 6. While Cu2S is eventually formed in the presence of Li2S3. After several cycles activation, the polysulfide-shuttle effect and self-discharge phenomenon which hinder the application of lithium sulfurmore » batteries are found nearly eliminated Further experiments demonstrated that in the case of Cu2S generation, a high specific sulfur capacity of 1300 mAh g–1 could be delivered, corresponding to 77.6% sulfur utilization, while the Coulombic efficiency approximates around 100%. As a result, self-discharge experiment further demonstrated that polysulfides almost disappear in the electrolyte, which verified the polysulfide-capture capability of copper.« less

  6. Short-term association between sulfur dioxide and daily mortality: the Public Health and Air Pollution in Asia (PAPA) study.

    PubMed

    Kan, Haidong; Wong, Chit-Ming; Vichit-Vadakan, Nuntavarn; Qian, Zhengmin

    2010-04-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) has been associated with increased mortality and morbidity, but only few studies were conducted in Asian countries. Previous studies suggest that SO(2) may have adverse health effects independent of other pollutants. In the Public Health and Air Pollution in Asia (PAPA) project, the short-term associations between ambient sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) and daily mortality were examined in Bangkok, Thailand, and three Chinese cities: Hong Kong, Shanghai, and Wuhan. Poisson regression models incorporating natural spline smoothing functions were used to adjust for seasonality and other time-varying covariates. Effect estimates were obtained for each city and then for the cities combined. The impact of alternative model specifications, such as lag structure of pollutants and degree of freedom (df) for time trend, on the estimated effects of SO(2) were also examined. In both individual-city and combined analysis, significant effects of SO(2) on total non-accidental and cardiopulmonary mortality were observed. An increase of 10 microg/m(3) of 2-day moving average concentrations of SO(2) corresponded to 1.00% [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.75-1.24], 1.09% (95% CI, 0.71-1.47), and 1.47% (95% CI, 0.85-2.08) increase of total, cardiovascular and respiratory mortality, respectively, in the combined analysis. Sensitivity analyzes suggested that these findings were generally insensitive to alternative model specifications. After adjustment for PM(10) or O(3), the effect of SO(2) remained significant in three Chinese cities. However, adjustment for NO(2) diminished the associations and rendered them statistically insignificant in all four cities. In conclusion, ambient SO(2) concentration was associated with daily mortality in these four Asian cities. These associations may be attributable to SO(2) serving as a surrogate of other substances. Our findings suggest that the role of outdoor exposure to SO(2) should be investigated further in this region. (c) 2010

  7. Short-term association between sulfur dioxide and daily mortality: the Public Health and Air Pollution in Asia (PAPA) study

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Haidong; Wong, Chit-Ming; Vichit-Vadakan, Nuntavarn; Qian, Zhengmin

    2012-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) has been associated with increased mortality and morbidity, but few studies were conducted in Asian countries. Previous studies suggest that SO2 may have adverse health effects independent of other pollutants. In the Public Health and Air Pollution in Asia (PAPA) project, the short-term associations between ambient sulfur dioxide (SO2) and daily mortality were examined in Bangkok, Thailand, and three Chinese cities: Hong Kong, Shanghai, and Wuhan. Poisson regression models incorporating natural spline smoothing functions were used to adjust for seasonality and other time-varying covariates. Effect estimates were obtained for each city and then for the cities combined. The impact of alternative model specifications, such as lag structure of pollutants and degree of freedom (df) for time trend, on the estimated effects of SO2 were also examined. In both individual-city and combined analysis, significant effects of SO2 on total non-accidental and cardiopulmonary mortality were observed. An increase of 10 μg/m3 of 2-day moving average concentrations of SO2 corresponded to 1.00% [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.75-1.24], 1.09% (95% CI, 0.71-1.47), and 1.47% (95% CI, 0.85-2.08) increase of total, cardiovascular and respiratory mortality, respectively, in the combined analysis. Sensitivity analyses suggested that these findings were generally insensitive to alternative model specifications. After adjustment for PM10 or O3, the effect of SO2 remained significant in three Chinese cities. However, adjustment for NO2 diminished the associations and rendered them statistically insignificant in all four cities. In conclusion, ambient SO2 concentration was associated with daily mortality in these four Asian cities. These associations may be attributable to SO2 serving as a surrogate of other substances. Our findings suggest that the role of outdoor exposure to SO2 should be investigated further in this region. PMID:20122685

  8. Additive for lubricants and hydrocarbon fuels comprising reaction products of olefins, sulfur, hydrogen sulfide and polymeric succinimide compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Horodysky, A.G.; Law, D.A.

    1988-11-22

    This patent describes a process for making an additive for lubricants comprising co-reacting: (a) an olefin; (b) sulfur; (c) hydrogen sulfide; and (d) a polymeric succinimide selected from the group consisting of the reaction products of polymeric succinic anhydride with one or more reactants selected from the group consisting of: (a) polyethylene amines selected from the group consisting of diethylene triamines, treithylenetetramine, and tetraethylenepentamine; (b) hydroxyl containing amines, and; (c) polyols in conjunction with (a) or (b) selected from the group consisting of pentaerythritol, and trimethylol propane; at a temperature between about 130/sup 0/C and about 200/sup 0/C and a pressure of about 0 psig to about 900 psig, the reactants being reacted in a molar ratio of olefin, polymeric succinimide, and hydrogen sulfide to sulfur of about 3 to about 0.5, about 0.001, to about 0.4, and about 0.5 to about 0.7, respectively.

  9. The hetero-Diels-Alder addition of sulfur dioxide: the pseudo-chair conformation of a 4,5-dialkylsultine.

    PubMed

    Markovic, Dean; Roversi, Elena; Scoppelliti, Rosario; Vogel, Pierre; Meana, Rubén; Sordo, José A

    2003-10-17

    Even unsubstituted butadiene adds to sulfur dioxide in the hetero-Diels-Alder mode more rapidly than in the chelotropic mode. The sultine can be observed in equilibrium with the diene and the sulfur dioxide only at low temperature and in the presence of CF(3)COOH. Crystals of 4,5-dialkyl-sultine resulting from the SO(2) addition to 1,2-dimethylidenecyclohexane have been obtained at -100 degrees C and analyzed by X-ray diffraction. Quantum chemical calculations have shown that hyperconjugative interactions within the sulfinyl moiety are responsible for the anomeric effects observed in sultines that prefer pseudo-chair conformations with pseudo-axial Sdbond;O bonds.

  10. Fluoride and sulfur dioxide indoor pollution situation and control in coal-burning endemic area in Zhaotong, Yunnan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yonglin; Luo, Kunli; Li, Ling; Shahid, Muhammad Zeeshaan

    2013-10-01

    The presented study aims to investigate the gaseous fluoride and sulfur dioxide (SO2) pollution level in the kitchen, traditional flue-curing barn and outdoor environment and to find economically feasible method to reduce fluorine and sulfur release. The gaseous fluoride and SO2 concentrations in air of outdoor environment, kitchen and traditional flue-curing barn were determined in 56 households in coal-burning endemic fluorosis areas of Zhaotong. Among these, 21 households in Yujiawan Village, Zhenxiong County, Zhaotong City were chosen for this experiment to reduce gaseous fluoride and SO2 concentration in traditional flue-curing barn air by using calcined dolomitic siliceous limestone (CDSL) instead of clay mixed with coal. The result showed that: (1) gaseous fluoride and SO2 concentration in the outdoor air in Mangbu Township area was 0.51 μg dm-2ṡday and <0.05 mg m-3, respectively and in Xiaolongdong Township was 2.7 μg dm-2 day and <0.05 mg m-3, respectively while in Zhaotong City these concentration were lower than the ambient air standard (3 μg dm-2ṡday and 0.5 mg m-3, respectively). (2) The indoor gaseous fluoride concentration (3.7 μg m-3) in air of kitchen with the improved coal stove was within the reference value (10 μg m-3); SO2 concentration (0.94 mg m-3) in kitchen air had decline, but its concentration was still higher than indoor air quality standard (0.5 mg m-3). (3) Average concentration of gaseous fluoride and SO2 in air of traditional flue-curing barn of Xiaolongdong Township was 7.2 μg m-3 and 6.8 mg m-3 respectively, and in Yujiawan village were 10.1 μg m-3 and 14.4 mg m-3, respectively. (4) After using the calcined dolomitic siliceous limestone instead of clay mixed with coal, gaseous fluoride and SO2 concentration in the traditional flue-curing barn air decreased of 45% and 91%, respectively. The gaseous fluoride and SO2 pollution in the traditional flue-curing barn is very serious. The corn and chili baked by open stoves in

  11. Alteration of extracellular enzymes in pinto bean leaves upon exposure to air pollutants, ozone and sulfur dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, J.L.; Castillo, F.J.; Heath, R.L. )

    1989-01-01

    Diamine oxidase and peroxidase, associated with the wall in pinto bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var Pinto) leaves, can be washed out by vacuum infiltration and assayed without grinding the leaf. The diamine oxidase activity is inhibited in vivo by exposure of the plants to ozone (dose of 0.6 microliters per liter {times} hour), whereas the peroxidase activity associated with the wall space is stimulated. This dose does not cause obvious necrosis or chlorosis of the leaf. These alterations are greater when the dose of ozone exposure is given as a triangular pulse (a slow rise to a peak of 0.24 microliters per liter followed by a slow fall) compared to that given as a constant square wave pulse of 0.15 microliters per liter for the same 4 hour period. Exposure of the plants to sulfur dioxide (at a concentration of 0.4 microliters per liter for 4 hours) does not result in any change in the diamine oxidase or peroxidase activities, yet the total sulfhydryl content of the leaf is increased, demonstrating the entry of sulfur dioxide. These two pollutants, with different chemical reactivities, affect the activities of the extracellular enzymes in different manners. In the case of ozone exposure, the inhibition of extracellular diamine oxidase could profoundly alter the movements of polyamines from cell to cell.

  12. Treatment of air pollution control residues with iron rich waste sulfuric acid: does it work for antimony (Sb)?

    PubMed

    Okkenhaug, Gudny; Breedveld, Gijs D; Kirkeng, Terje; Lægreid, Marit; Mæhlum, Trond; Mulder, Jan

    2013-03-15

    Antimony (Sb) in air pollution control (APC) residues from municipal solid waste incineration has gained increased focus due to strict Sb leaching limits set by the EU landfill directive. Here we study the chemical speciation and solubility of Sb at the APC treatment facility NOAH Langøya (Norway), where iron (Fe)-rich sulfuric acid (∼3.6M, 2.3% Fe(II)), a waste product from the industrial extraction of ilmenite, is used for neutralization. Antimony in water extracts of untreated APC residues occurred exclusively as pentavalent antimonate, even at low pH and Eh values. The Sb solubility increased substantially at pH<10, possibly due to the dissolution of ettringite (at alkaline pH) or calcium (Ca)-antimonate. Treated APC residues, stored anoxically in the laboratory, simulating the conditions at the NOAH Langøya landfill, gave rise to decreasing concentrations of Sb in porewater, occurring exclusively as Sb(V). Concentrations of Sb decreased from 87-918μgL(-1) (day 3) to 18-69μgL(-1) (day 600). We hypothesize that an initial sorption of Sb to Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxides (green rust) and eventually precipitation of Ca- and Fe-antimonates (tripuhyite; FeSbO4) occurred. We conclude that Fe-rich, sulfuric acid waste is efficient to immobilize Sb in APC residues from waste incineration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cross-stacked carbon nanotube film as an additional built-in current collector and adsorption layer for high-performance lithium sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li; Kong, Weibang; Li, Mengya; Wu, Hengcai; Jiang, Kaili; Li, Qunqing; Zhang, Yihe; Wang, Jiaping; Fan, Shoushan

    2016-02-01

    Cross-stacked carbon nanotube (CNT) film is proposed as an additional built-in current collector and adsorption layer in sulfur cathodes for advanced lithium sulfur (Li-S) batteries. On one hand, the CNT film with high conductivity, microstructural rough surface, high flexibility and mechanical durability retains stable and direct electronic contact with the sulfur cathode materials, therefore decreasing internal resistivity and suppressing polarization of the cathode. On the other hand, the highly porous structure and the high surface area of the CNT film provide abundant adsorption points to support and confine sulfur cathode materials, alleviate their aggregation and promote high sulfur utilization. Moreover, the lightweight and compact structure of the CNT film adds no extra weight or volume to the sulfur cathode, benefitting the improvement of energy densities. Based on these characteristics, the sulfur cathode with a 100-layer cross-stacked CNT film presents excellent rate performances with capacities of 986, 922 and 874 mAh g-1 at cycling rates of 0.2C, 0.5C and 1C for sulfur loading of 60 wt%, corresponding to an improvement of 52%, 109% and 146% compared to that without a CNT film. Promising cycling performances are also demonstrated, offering great potential for scaled-up production of sulfur cathodes for Li-S batteries.

  14. Lanthanum Nitrate As Electrolyte Additive To Stabilize the Surface Morphology of Lithium Anode for Lithium-Sulfur Battery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sheng; Li, Guo-Ran; Gao, Xue-Ping

    2016-03-01

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery is regarded as one of the most promising candidates beyond conventional lithium ion batteries. However, the instability of the metallic lithium anode during lithium electrochemical dissolution/deposition is still a major barrier for the practical application of Li-S battery. In this work, lanthanum nitrate, as electrolyte additive, is introduced into Li-S battery to stabilize the surface of lithium anode. By introducing lanthanum nitrate into electrolyte, a composite passivation film of lanthanum/lithium sulfides can be formed on metallic lithium anode, which is beneficial to decrease the reducibility of metallic lithium and slow down the electrochemical dissolution/deposition reaction on lithium anode for stabilizing the surface morphology of metallic Li anode in lithium-sulfur battery. Meanwhile, the cycle stability of the fabricated Li-S cell is improved by introducing lanthanum nitrate into electrolyte. Apparently, lanthanum nitrate is an effective additive for the protection of lithium anode and the cycling stability of Li-S battery.

  15. Ammonium Additives to Dissolve Lithium Sulfide through Hydrogen Binding for High-Energy Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Pan, Huilin; Han, Kee Sung; Vijayakumar, M; Xiao, Jie; Cao, Ruiguo; Chen, Junzheng; Zhang, Jiguang; Mueller, Karl T; Shao, Yuyan; Liu, Jun

    2017-02-08

    In rechargeable Li-S batteries, the uncontrollable passivation of electrodes by highly insulating Li2S limits sulfur utilization, increases polarization, and decreases cycling stability. Dissolving Li2S in organic electrolyte is a facile solution to maintain the active reaction interface between electrolyte and sulfur cathode, and thus address the above issues. Herein, ammonium salts are demonstrated as effective additives to promote the dissolution of Li2S to 1.25 M in DMSO solvent at room temperature. NMR measurements show that the strong hydrogen binding effect of N-H groups plays a critical role in dissolving Li2S by forming complex ligands with S(2-) anions coupled with the solvent's solvating surrounding. Ammonium additives in electrolyte can also significantly improve the oxidation kinetics of Li2S, and therefore enable the direct use of Li2S as cathode material in Li-S battery system in the future. This provides a new approach to manage the solubility of lithium sulfides through cation coordination with sulfide anion.

  16. Ammonium Additives to Dissolve Lithium Sulfide through Hydrogen Binding for High-Energy Lithium–Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Huilin; Han, Kee Sung; Vijayakumar, M.; Xiao, Jie; Cao, Ruiguo; Chen, Junzheng; Zhang, Jiguang; Mueller, Karl T.; Shao, Yuyan; Liu, Jun

    2016-07-01

    In rechargeable Li-S batteries, the uncontrollable passivation of electrodes by highly insulating Li2S limits sulfur utilization, increases polarization and decreases cycling stability. Dissolving Li2S in organic electrolyte is a facile solution to maintain the active reaction interface between electrolyte and sulfur cathode, and thus address the above issues. Herein, ammonium salts are demonstrated as effective additives to promote the dissolution of Li2S to 1.25 M in DMSO solvent at room temperature. NMR measurements show that the strong hydrogen binding effect of N-H groups plays a critical role in dissolving Li2S by forming complex ligands with S2- anions coupled with the solvent’s solvating surrounding. Ammonium additives in electrolyte can also significantly improve the oxidation kinetics of Li2S, therefore enables the direct use of Li2S as cathode material in Li-S battery system in the future. This provides a new approach to manage the solubility of lithium sulfides through cation coordination with sulfide anion.

  17. Research on the additives to reduce radioactive pollutants in the building materials containing fly ash.

    PubMed

    He, Deng-liang; Yin, Guang-fu; Dong, Fa-qin; Liu, Lai-bao; Luo, Ya-jun

    2010-05-15

    Several kinds of functional additives such as barite, zeolite, ferric oxide, gypsum, and high alumina cement were introduced to prepare a low-radiation cement-based composite to reduce radioactive pollutants contained in fly ash. The effect of content and granularity of the functional additives on the release of radioactive pollutants were investigated. Composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Scan electron microscopy. The results indicate that the radioactive pollutants contained in the fly ash can be reduced by adding a proper amount of zeolite, ferric oxide, gypsum, and high alumina cement. The release of radon from fly ash decreases with a decrease in the granularity of additives. Compared with traditional cement-based composite containing fly ash, the release of radon can be reduced 64.8% in these composites, and the release of gamma-ray is decreased 45%. Based on the microstructure and phase analysis, we think that by added functional additives, there are favorable to form self-absorption of radioactivity in the interior composites. This cement-based composite will conducive to fly ash are large-scale applied in the field of building materials.

  18. Influence of different additives on the reaction between hydrated lime and sulfur dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Cunill, F.; Izquierdo, J.F.; Martinez, J.C.; Tejero, J.; Querol, J. )

    1991-11-01

    Five commercial calcium hydroxides were tested in a fixed-bed reactor for SO{sub 2} removal at bag-filter conditions. Small amounts of different additives (fly ash, NaOH, NaCl and CaCl{sub 2}) were added to the commercial Ca(OH){sub 2} which showed the greatest reactivity respect to SO{sub 2} (by a drying process). Fly ash performance was negative whereas the rest of additives enhanced the desulfurization power of the Ca(OH){sub 2}, specially NaOH (due to its basic and deliquescent character) and CaCl{sub 2} (by its delilquescence). CaCl{sub 2} has been the best additive tested at the used experimental conditions.

  19. Effect of relative humidity and additives on the reaction of sulfur dioxide with calcium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz-Alsop, R.N.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of process variables and additives on the reaction rate of Ca(OH)/sub 2/ with SO/sub 2/ at conditions similar to these encountered in the bag filters used to collect solids following flue gas desulfurization by spray drying. The effect of Ca(OH)/sub 2/ loading, temperature, relative humidity, and inlet SO/sub 2/ concentration were investigated. Of these variables, relative humidity showed the greatest impact on the reaction rate. The effect of small amounts of additives were also investigated. Of the additives tried (buffer acids, organic deliquescents, and inorganic deliquescents) deliquescent salts were the only additives that improved reactivity. A shrinking core model with zero order kinetics in SO/sub 2/ was used to model experimental data. An empirical correlation was included in the model to account for shape and surface roughness of the Ca(OH)/sub 2/ particles. The diffusion coefficient of the SO/sub 2/ through the product layer was found to increase linearly with relative humidity, and the kinetic rate constant increases exponentially with relative humidity. With a few exceptions the model was able to predict the experimental data within the margin of experimental error (+/- 10%). At high relative humidity and/or high SO/sub 2/ concentration, reaction kinetics control the overall reaction rate, while at low relative humidity and/or low SO/sub 2/ concentration, SO/sub 2/ diffusion through the product layer controls the rate. The reaction solids were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, powder x-ray diffraction, Coulter counter size distribution BET (N/sub 2/) surface area, energy dispersive spectrometry, and differential scanning calorimetry.

  20. Novel Multilayer Nanostructured Materials for Recognition of Polycyclic Aromatic Sulfur Pollutants and Express Analysis of Fuel Quality and Environmental Health by Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Eremina, Olga E; Sidorov, Alexander V; Shekhovtsova, Tatyana N; Goodilin, Eugene A; Veselova, Irina A

    2017-04-12

    A novel concept of advanced SERS (Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy) planar sensors is suggested for fast analysis of sulfur‑containing hazardous oil components and persistent pollutants. The main advantage of the proposed sensors is the utilization of an additional preconcentrating layer of optically transparent chitosan gel, which is chemically modified with appropriate π‑acceptor compounds to selectively form charge transfer complexes (CTCs) at the interface with nanostructured silver coatings. The CTCs shift absorption bands of polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles (PASHs) and other important analytes in a controllable way and thus provide a surplus enhancement of vibration modes due to resonant Raman scattering. This novel indicator system provides multiplex determination of PASHs in different forms in a small volume of oil without any tedious sample pretreatment steps. This approach opens up new possibilities of increasing either spectral and concentration sensitivity or specificity of SERS-based sensors, allowing for new developments in the fields of ecology, advanced fuel analysis and other prospective applications.

  1. Sulfur dioxide addition at crush alters Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain composition in spontaneous fermentations at two Canadian wineries.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Sydney C; Scholl, Chrystal M; Benson, Natasha L; Stone, Morgan L; Durall, Daniel M

    2017-03-06

    During winemaking, sulfur dioxide (SO2) is often added prior to the onset of alcoholic fermentation to prevent the growth of spoilage microorganisms and to create an environment that promotes the rapid colonization of the grape must by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Most recent research has focused on the impacts of SO2 additions on spoilage microorganisms or on the yeast community at a species level, but less is known about the impacts that SO2 additions have on S. cerevisiae populations. We investigated whether different levels of SO2 addition at crush (0, 20, or 40mg/L SO2) have an effect upon the relative abundance and composition of S. cerevisiae strains conducting spontaneous fermentations of two grape varietals at two commercial wineries. Yeast isolates collected from fermentations were identified to the strain level using microsatellite analysis. Commercial strains made up the majority (64-98%) of the S. cerevisiae strains isolated during fermentation, and most of these commercial strains were used as inoculants by their respective wineries. Different SO2 additions were found to significantly alter S. cerevisiae strain compositions at both wineries (p≤0.002). The results of this study demonstrate that initial SO2 addition significantly alters the S. cerevisiae strain composition in spontaneous fermentations, and highlights the dominance of commercial strains in commercial winery environments. Because different yeast strains are known to produce different chemical and sensory profiles, our findings have important implications for winemakers. In addition, adding different concentrations of SO2 may be a way for winemakers to manage or control the strain composition during spontaneous fermentations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Density functional theory study of the effects of alloying additions on sulfur adsorption on nickel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyi, Oleksandr I.; Chen, Zhong; Kulish, Vadym V.; Bai, Kewu; Wu, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Reactions of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) with Nickel/Ytrria-doped zirconia (Ni/YDZ) anode materials might cause degradation of the performance of solid oxide fuel cells when S containing fuels are used. In this paper, we employ density functional theory to investigate S adsorption on metal (M)-doped and undoped Ni(0 0 1) and Ni(1 1 1) surfaces. Based on the performed calculations, we analyze the effects of 12 alloying additions (Ag, Au, Al, Bi, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Sn, Sb, V, and Zn) on the temperature of transition between clean (S atoms do not adsorb on the surfaces) and contaminated (S atoms can adsorb on the surfaces spontaneously) M-doped Ni surfaces for different concentrations of H2S in the fuel. Predicted results are consistent with many experimental studies relevant to S poisoning of both Ni/YDZ and M-doped Ni/YDZ anode materials. This study is important to understand S poisoning phenomena and to develop new S tolerant anode materials.

  3. Advances of flue gas desulfurization technology for coal-fired boilers and strategies for sulfur dioxide pollution prevention in China

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.; Zeng, G.; Li, G.; Qiu, J.

    1999-07-01

    Coal is one of the most important kinds of energy resources at the present time and in the immediate future in China. Sulfur dioxide resulting from combustion of coal is one of the principle pollutants in the air. Control of SO{sub 2} discharge is still a major challenge for environmental protection in developing China. In this paper, research, development and application of technology of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) for coal-fired boilers in China will be reviewed with emphasis on cost-effective technology, and the development trends of FGD technology, as well as the strategy for SO{sub 2} discharge control in China, will be analyzed. A practical technology for middle-small-sized boilers developed by the primary author and the field investigation results will also be presented. At present, there are four major kinds of FGD technologies that are practical to be applied in China for their cost-effectiveness and efficiency to middle-small-sized boilers. An important development trend of the FGD technology for middle-small-sized boilers for the next decade is improvement of the existing cost-effective wet-type FGD technology, and in the future it will be the development of dry-type FGD technology. For middle-sized generating boilers, the development direction of the FGD technology is the spraying and drying process. For large-sized generating boilers, the wet-type limestone-plaster process will still be applied in the immediate future, and dry-type FGD technologies, such as ammonia with electron beam irradiation, will be developed in the future. State strategies for the control of SO{sub 2} discharge will involve the development and popularization of efficient coal-fired devices, extension of gas coal and liquefied coal, spreading coal washing, and centralized heating systems.

  4. Disruption of hardwood nutrition by sulfur dioxide, nickel, and copper air pollution near Sudbury, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Lozano, F.C.; Morrison, I.K.

    1981-04-01

    Foilage from each of four hardwood species - white birch (Betula papyifera Marsh.), red oak (Quercus rubra L.), red maple (Acer rubrum L.), and trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) - growing on sites severely and moderately damaged by fumes and dustfall and on control sites near Sudbury, Ontario, and soil from beneath the trees were sampled and analyzed for various chemical constituents. Results indicated that on sites damaged by fumes and dustfall, soils were impoverished with respect to organic matter content, exchangeable bases (particularly Ca and Mg), and trace elements (particularly Mn and Zn). Levels of S, Fe, Cu, and Ni were also increased. Foilage analysis provided additional support for the proposition that soils contained near toxic to toxic levels of Ni and Cu. If conditions improve, however, with respect to suppression of Ni or Cu supply, tree growth could be limited by the availability of Ca, Mg, or Mn, or even of N or P.

  5. Sulfate reduction in sulfuric material after re-flooding: Effectiveness of organic carbon addition and pH increase depends on soil properties.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chaolei; Fitzpatrick, Rob; Mosley, Luke M; Marschner, Petra

    2015-11-15

    Sulfuric material is formed upon oxidation of sulfidic material; it is extremely acidic, and therefore, an environmental hazard. One option for increasing pH of sulfuric material may be stimulation of bacterial sulfate reduction. We investigated the effects of organic carbon addition and pH increase on sulfate reduction after re-flooding in ten sulfuric materials with four treatments: control, pH increase to 5.5 (+pH), organic carbon addition with 2% w/w finely ground wheat straw (+C), and organic carbon addition and pH increase (+C+pH). After 36 weeks, in five of the ten soils, only treatment +C+pH significantly increased the concentration of reduced inorganic sulfur (RIS) compared to the control and increased the soil pore water pH compared to treatment+pH. In four other soils, pH increase or/and organic carbon addition had no significant effect on RIS concentration compared to the control. The RIS concentration in treatment +C+pH as percentage of the control was negatively correlated with soil clay content and initial nitrate concentration. The results suggest that organic carbon addition and pH increase can stimulate sulfate reduction after re-flooding, but the effectiveness of this treatment depends on soil properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Sulfur pollution control. Phase II. The impact of stack gas cleanup on the sulfur mining industry of Texas and Louisiana. Open file report (final)

    SciTech Connect

    Rieber, M.; Barker, J.M.; Worrall, M.

    1981-01-01

    The impacts of various (reduced) levels of Frasch sulfur production on the States of Texas and Louisiana are analyzed. The analytic time basis is 1979. Industry labor and output characteristics are developed on a company and mine basis. State and local impacts (to the level of independent school districts) are developed on a scenario basis. The measures include income, unemployment, and taxes. Some data are presented on energy and water use.

  7. Remediation of metal polluted soils by phytorremediation combined with biochar addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez, Ana; Paz-Ferreiro, Jorge; Gómez-Limón, Dulce; César Arranz, Julio; Saa, Antonio; Gascó, Gabriel

    2016-04-01

    The main objective of this work is to optimize and quantify the treatment of metal polluted soils through phytoremediation techniques combined with the addition of biochar. Biochar is a carbon rich material obtained by thermal treatment of biomass in inert atmosphere. In recent years, it has been attracted considerable interest due to their positive effect after soil addition. The use of biochar also seems appropriate for the treatment of metal-contaminated soils decreasing their mobility. Biochar properties highly depend on the raw material composition and manufacturing conditions. This paper is based on the use of manure wastes, rich in nutrients and therefore interesting raw materials for biochar production, especially when combined with phytoremediation techniques since the biochar act as conditioner and slow release fertilizer. We are very grateful to Ministerio de Economia y Competitividad (Spain) for financial support under Project CGL2014-58322-R.

  8. Fact Sheets and Additional Information Regarding the 2012 Decision to Retain the Secondary NAAQS for Nitrogen Dioxide and Sulfur Dioxide

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    On April 3, 2012, EPA sdecided to retain the current secondary national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS) for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2).This page contains a fact sheet describing that action.

  9. Sulfuric acid on Europa and the radiolytic sulfur cycle.

    PubMed

    Carlson, R W; Johnson, R E; Anderson, M S

    1999-10-01

    A comparison of laboratory spectra with Galileo data indicates that hydrated sulfuric acid is present and is a major component of Europa's surface. In addition, this moon's visually dark surface material, which spatially correlates with the sulfuric acid concentration, is identified as radiolytically altered sulfur polymers. Radiolysis of the surface by magnetospheric plasma bombardment continuously cycles sulfur between three forms: sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide, and sulfur polymers, with sulfuric acid being about 50 times as abundant as the other forms. Enhanced sulfuric acid concentrations are found in Europa's geologically young terrains, suggesting that low-temperature, liquid sulfuric acid may influence geological processes.

  10. Sulfuric acid on Europa and the radiolytic sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. W.; Johnson, R. E.; Anderson, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    A comparison of laboratory spectra with Galileo data indicates that hydrated sulfuric acid is present and is a major component of Europa's surface. In addition, this moon's visually dark surface material, which spatially correlates with the sulfuric acid concentration, is identified as radiolytically altered sulfur polymers. Radiolysis of the surface by magnetospheric plasma bombardment continuously cycles sulfur between three forms: sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide, and sulfur polymers, with sulfuric acid being about 50 times as abundant as the other forms. Enhanced sulfuric acid concentrations are found in Europa's geologically young terrains, suggesting that low-temperature, liquid sulfuric acid may influence geological processes.

  11. An overview of emissions of SO2 and NOx and the long-range transport of oxidized sulfur and nitrogen pollutants in East Asia.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yu; An, Junling; He, Youjiang; Zheng, Jun

    2016-06-01

    The long-range transport of oxidized sulfur (sulfur dioxide (SO2) and sulfate) and oxidized nitrogen (nitrogen oxides (NOx) and nitrate) in East Asia is an area of increasing scientific interest and political concern. This paper reviews various published papers, including ground- and satellite-based observations and numerical simulations. The aim is to assess the status of the anthropogenic emissions of SO2 and NOx and the long-range transport of oxidized S and N pollutants over source and downwind region. China has dominated the emissions of SO2 and NOx in East Asia and urgently needs to strengthen the control of their emissions, especially NOx emissions. Oxidized S and N pollutants emitted from China are transported to Korea and Japan, due to persistent westerly winds, in winter and spring. However, the total contributions of China to S and N pollutants across Korea and Japan were not found to be dominant over longer time scales (e.g., a year). The source-receptor relationships for oxidized S and N pollutants in East Asia varied widely among the different studies. This is because: (1) the nonlinear effects of atmospheric chemistry and deposition processes were not well considered, when calculating the source-receptor relationships; (2) different meteorological and emission data inputs and solution schemes for key physical and chemical processes were used; and (3) different temporal and spatial scales were employed. Therefore, simulations using the same input fields and similar model configurations would be of benefit, to further evaluate the source-receptor relationships of the oxidized S and N pollutants.

  12. In situ sulfur isotopes (δ(34)S and δ(33)S) analyses in sulfides and elemental sulfur using high sensitivity cones combined with the addition of nitrogen by laser ablation MC-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jiali; Hu, Zhaochu; Zhang, Wen; Yang, Lu; Liu, Yongsheng; Li, Ming; Zong, Keqing; Gao, Shan; Hu, Shenghong

    2016-03-10

    The sulfur isotope is an important geochemical tracer in diverse fields of geosciences. In this study, the effects of three different cone combinations with the addition of N2 on the performance of in situ S isotope analyses were investigated in detail. The signal intensities of S isotopes were improved by a factor of 2.3 and 3.6 using the X skimmer cone combined with the standard sample cone or the Jet sample cone, respectively, compared with the standard arrangement (H skimmer cone combined with the standard sample cone). This signal enhancement is important for the improvement of the precision and accuracy of in situ S isotope analysis at high spatial resolution. Different cone combinations have a significant effect on the mass bias and mass bias stability for S isotopes. Poor precisions of S isotope ratios were obtained using the Jet and X cones combination at their corresponding optimum makeup gas flow when using Ar plasma only. The addition of 4-8 ml min(-1) nitrogen to the central gas flow in laser ablation MC-ICP-MS was found to significantly enlarge the mass bias stability zone at their corresponding optimum makeup gas flow in these three different cone combinations. The polyatomic interferences of OO, SH, OOH were also significantly reduced, and the interference free plateaus of sulfur isotopes became broader and flatter in the nitrogen mode (N2 = 4 ml min(-1)). However, the signal intensity of S was not increased by the addition of nitrogen in this study. The laser fluence and ablation mode had significant effects on sulfur isotope fractionation during the analysis of sulfides and elemental sulfur by laser ablation MC-ICP-MS. The matrix effect among different sulfides and elemental sulfur was observed, but could be significantly reduced by line scan ablation in preference to single spot ablation under the optimized fluence. It is recommended that the d90 values of the particles in pressed powder pellets for accurate and precise S isotope analysis

  13. Effects of Platinum Additions and Sulfur Impurities on the Microstructure and Scale Adhesion Behavior of Single-Phase CVD Aluminide Bond Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, K.M.; Haynes, J.A.; Lee, W.Y.; Pint, B.A.; Wright, I.G.; Zhang, Y.

    1999-02-28

    The adhesion of alumina scales to aluminide bond coats is a life-limiting factor for some advanced thermal barrier coating systems. This study investigated the effects of aluminide bond coat sulfur and platinum contents on alumina scale adhesion and coating microstructural evolution during isothermal and cyclic oxidation testing at 1150 C. Low-sulfur NiAl and NiPtAl bond coats were fabricated by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Lowering the sulfur contents of CVD NiAl bond coatings significantly improved scale adhesion, but localized scale spallation eventually initiated along coating grain boundaries. Further improvements in scale adhesion were obtained with Pt additions. The observed influences of Pt additions included: (1) mitigation of the detrimental effects of high sulfur levels, (2) drastic reductions in void growth along the scale-metal interface, (3) alteration of the oxide-metal interface morphology, and (4) elimination of Ta-rich oxides in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scales during thermal cycling. The results of this study also suggested that the microstructure (especially the grain size) of CVD aluminide bond coatings plays a significant role in scale adhesion.

  14. Effect of the pollution control measures on PM2.5 during the 2015 China Victory Day Parade: Implication from water-soluble ions and sulfur isotope.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaokun; Guo, Qingjun; Liu, Congqiang; Strauss, Harald; Yang, Junxing; Hu, Jian; Wei, Rongfei; Tian, Liyan; Kong, Jing; Peters, Marc

    2016-11-01

    Air pollution by particulate matter is a serious problem in Beijing. Strict pollution control measures have been carried out in Beijing prior to and during the 2015 China Victory Day Parade in order to improve air quality. This distinct event provides an excellent opportunity for investigating the impact of such measures on the chemical properties of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 μm (PM2.5). The water-soluble ions as well as sulfur and oxygen isotopes of sulfate in PM2.5 collected between August 19 and September 18, 2015 (n = 31) were analyzed in order to trace the sources and formation processes of PM2.5 in Beijing. The results exhibit a decrease in concentration of water-soluble ions in PM2.5 including aerosol sulfate. In contrast, the mean values of δ(34)Ssulfate (4.7 ± 0.8‰ vs. 5.0 ± 2.0‰) and δ(18)Osulfate (18.3 ± 2.3‰ vs. 17.2 ± 6.0) in PM2.5 during the air pollution control period and the non-source control period exhibit no significant differences, which suggests that despite a reduction in concentration, the sulfate source remains identical for the two periods. It is inferred that the decrease in concentration of sulfate in PM2.5 mainly results from variations in air mass transport. Notably, the air mass during the pollution control period originated mainly from north and northeast and changed to southerly directions thereafter. The sulfur and oxygen isotopes of the sulfate point to coal combustion as the major source of sulfate in PM2.5 from the Beijing area.

  15. Emissions of toxic pollutants from compressed natural gas and low sulfur diesel-fueled heavy-duty transit buses tested over multiple driving cycles.

    PubMed

    Kado, Norman Y; Okamoto, Robert A; Kuzmicky, Paul A; Kobayashi, Reiko; Ayala, Alberto; Gebel, Michael E; Rieger, Paul L; Maddox, Christine; Zafonte, Leo

    2005-10-01

    The number of heavy-duty vehicles using alternative fuels such as compressed natural gas (CNG) and new low-sulfur diesel fuel formulations and equipped with after-treatment devices are projected to increase. However, few peer-reviewed studies have characterized the emissions of particulate matter (PM) and other toxic compounds from these vehicles. In this study, chemical and biological analyses were used to characterize the identifiable toxic air pollutants emitted from both CNG and low-sulfur-diesel-fueled heavy-duty transit buses tested on a chassis dynamometer over three transient driving cycles and a steady-state cruise condition. The CNG bus had no after-treatment, and the diesel bus was tested first equipped with an oxidation catalyst (OC) and then with a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (DPF). Emissions were analyzed for PM, volatile organic compounds (VOCs; determined on-site), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and mutagenic activity. The 2000 model year CNG-fueled vehicle had the highest emissions of 1,3-butadiene, benzene, and carbonyls (e.g., formaldehyde) of the three vehicle configurations tested in this study. The 1998 model year diesel bus equipped with an OC and fueled with low-sulfur diesel had the highest emission rates of PM and PAHs. The highest specific mutagenic activities (revertants/microg PM, or potency) and the highest mutagen emission rates (revertants/mi) were from the CNG bus in strain TA98 tested over the New York Bus (NYB) driving cycle. The 1998 model year diesel bus with DPF had the lowest VOCs, PAH, and mutagenic activity emission. In general, the NYB driving cycle had the highest emission rates (g/mi), and the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule (UDDS) had the lowest emission rates for all toxics tested over the three transient test cycles investigated. Also, transient emissions were, in general, higher than steady-state emissions. The emissions of toxic compounds from an in-use CNG transit bus (without an oxidation

  16. Pollution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowbotham, N.

    1973-01-01

    Presents the material given in one class period in a course on Environmental Studies at Chesterfield School, England. The topics covered include air pollution, water pollution, fertilizers, and insecticides. (JR)

  17. Pollution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowbotham, N.

    1973-01-01

    Presents the material given in one class period in a course on Environmental Studies at Chesterfield School, England. The topics covered include air pollution, water pollution, fertilizers, and insecticides. (JR)

  18. Mitigating the health impacts of pollution from oceangoing shipping: an assessment of low-sulfur fuel mandates.

    PubMed

    Winebrake, J J; Corbett, J J; Green, E H; Lauer, A; Eyring, V

    2009-07-01

    Concerns about health effects due to emissions from ships have magnified international policy debate regarding low-sulfur fuel mandates for marine fuel. Policy discussions center on setting sulfur content levels and the geographic specification of low-sulfur fuel use. We quantify changes in premature mortality due to emissions from ships under several sulfur emissions control scenarios. We compare a 2012 No Control scenario (assuming 2.7% or 27 000 ppm S) with three emissions control scenarios. Two control scenarios represent cases where marine fuel is limited to 0.5% S (5000 ppm) and 0.1% S (1000 ppm) content, respectively, within 200 nautical miles of coastal areas. The third control scenario represents a global limit of 0.5% S. We apply the global climate model ECHAMSSy-MESSy1-MADE to geospatial emissions inventories to determine worldwide concentrations of particular matter (PM2.5) from ocean going vessels. Using those PM2.5 concentrations in cardiopulmonary and lung cancer concentration-risk functions and population models, we estimate annual premature mortality. Without control, our central estimate is approximately 87 000 premature deaths annually in 2012. Coastal area control scenarios reduce premature deaths by approximately 33 500 for the 0.5% case and approximately 43 500 for the 0.1% case. Where fuel sulfur content is reduced globally to 0.5% S, premature deaths are reduced by approximately 41 200. These results provide important support that global health benefits are associated with low-sulfur marine fuels, and allow for relative comparison of the benefits of alternative control strategies.

  19. Polyphenols content, phenolics profile and antioxidant activity of organic red wines produced without sulfur dioxide/sulfites addition in comparison to conventional red wines.

    PubMed

    Garaguso, Ivana; Nardini, Mirella

    2015-07-15

    Wine exerts beneficial effects on human health when it is drunk with moderation. Nevertheless, wine may also contain components negatively affecting human health. Among these, sulfites may induce adverse effects after ingestion. We examined total polyphenols and flavonoids content, phenolics profile and antioxidant activity of eight organic red wines produced without sulfur dioxide/sulfites addition in comparison to those of eight conventional red wines. Polyphenols and flavonoids content were slightly higher in organic wines in respect to conventional wines, however differences did not reach statistical significance. The phenolic acids profile was quite similar in both groups of wines. Antioxidant activity was higher in organic wines compared to conventional wines, although differences were not statistically significant. Our results indicate that organic red wines produced without sulfur dioxide/sulfites addition are comparable to conventional red wines with regard to the total polyphenols and flavonoids content, the phenolics profile and the antioxidant activity.

  20. The Sulfur Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellogg, W. W.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    A model estimating the contributions of sulfur compounds by natural and human activities, and the rate of removal of sulfur from the atmosphere, is based on a review of the existing literature. Areas requiring additional research are identified. (AL)

  1. The Sulfur Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellogg, W. W.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    A model estimating the contributions of sulfur compounds by natural and human activities, and the rate of removal of sulfur from the atmosphere, is based on a review of the existing literature. Areas requiring additional research are identified. (AL)

  2. Understanding the Effects of Dilute Sulfur Additions, and Metallization, on the Thermoelectric Properties of Pnictogen Chalcogenides and their Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devender

    Realizing materials with high thermoelectric figure-of-merit ZT is an exacting challenge because it entails simultaneously obtaining a high Seebeck coefficient, a high electrical conductivity, and a low thermal conductivity, while these properties are usually unfavorably coupled. This thesis demonstrates multifold enhancements in the power factor in sulfur-doped binary and ternary pnictogen chalcogenide nanocrystals and assemblies, and describes the property enhancement mechanisms. The correlations between interfacial thermal and electronic transport, and interfacial diffusion and phase formation in metallized n- and p-type pnictogen chalcogenide structures are also revealed. We show that 400 ppm to 2 at.% sulfur doping can increase both Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity, while maintaining low thermal conductivity. Our results show that sulfur-induced property enhancements in Bi2Te 2Se are underpinned by increased density of states effective mass, unlike the mechanism of diminished bipolar charge carrier transport prevalent in sulfur-doped Bi2Te3. Exploiting such effects is anticipated to be attractive for realizing higher ZT nanomaterials. We also show that electrical contact conductivity in metallized pnictogen chalcogenide interfaces is sensitive to metal diffusion and telluride formation. In particular, Ni contacts yield the highest electrical contact conductivity and Cu the lowest, correlating with extent of metal diffusion and p-type metal-telluride formation. We finally show that pnictogen chalcogenides metallized with Sn-Ag-Cu/Ni solder-barrier bilayers exhibit ten-fold higher interfacial thermal conductance than that obtained with In/Ni bilayer metallization. Decreased interdiffusion and diminution of interfacial SnTe formation due to Ni layer correlates with the higher interfacial thermal conductance. Our findings should facilitate the design and development of pnictogen chalcogenide-based thermoelectric materials and devices.

  3. The south Karelia air pollution study: Effects of low-level expsoure to malodorous sulfur compounds on symptoms

    SciTech Connect

    Partti-Pellinen, K.; Marttila, O.; Vilkka, V.; Jaakkola, J.J. |

    1996-07-01

    Exposure to very low levels of ambient-air malodorous sulfur compounds and their effect on eye irritation, respiratory-tract symptoms, and central nervous system symptoms in adults were assessed. A cross-sectional self-administered questionnaire (response rate = 77%) was distributed during March and April 1992 to adults (n = 336) who lived in a neighborhood that contained a pulp mill and in a nonpolluted reference community (n = 380). In the exposed community, the measured annual mean concentrations of total reduced sulfur compounds and sulfur dioxide measured in two stations were 2 to 3 {mu}g/m{sup 3} and 1 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, respectively. In the reference community, the annual mean concentration of sulfur dioxide was 1 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. The residents of the community near the pulp mill reported an excess of cough, respiratory infections, and headache during the previous 4 wk, as well as during the preceding 12 mo. The relative risk for headache was increased significantly in the exposed community, compared with the reference area: the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) was 1.83 (95% confidence interval [95% Cl] = 1.06-3.15) during the previous 4 wk and 1.70 (95% Cl = 1.05-2.73) during the preceding 12 mo. The relative risk for cough was also increased during the preceding 12 mo (aOR = 1.64, 95% Cl = 1.01-2.64). These results indicated that adverse health effects of malodorous sulfur compounds occur at lower concentrations than reported previously. 25 refs., 3 tabs.

  4. A model for estimating air-pollutant uptake by forests: calculation of absorption of sulfur dioxide from dispersed sources

    Treesearch

    C. E., Jr. Murphy; T. R. Sinclair; K. R. Knoerr

    1977-01-01

    The computer model presented in this paper is designed to estimate the uptake of air pollutants by forests. The model utilizes submodels to describe atmospheric diffusion immediately above and within the canopy, and into the sink areas within or on the trees. The program implementing the model is general and can be used with only minor changes for any gaseous pollutant...

  5. Sulfur-Doped Carbon Nitride Polymers for Photocatalytic Degradation of Organic Pollutant and Reduction of Cr(VI).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yun; Yu, Zihao; Lin, Feng; Guo, Fangsong; Alamry, Khalid A; Taib, Layla A; Asiri, Abdullah M; Wang, Xinchen

    2017-04-01

    As a promising conjugated polymer, binary carbon nitride has attracted extensive attention as a metal-free and visible-light-responsive photocatalyst in the area of photon-involving purification of water and air. Herein, we report sulfur-doped polymeric carbon nitride microrods that are synthesized through thermal polymerization based on trithiocyanuric acid and melamine (TM) supramolecular aggregates. By tuning the polymerization temperature, a series of sulfur-doped carbon nitride microrods are prepared. The degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) and the reduction of hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) are selected as probe reactions to evaluate the photocatalytic activities. Results show that increasing pyrolysis temperature leads to a large specific surface area, strong visible-light absorption, and accelerated electron-hole separation. Compared to bulk carbon nitride, the highly porous sulfur-doped carbon nitride microrods fabricated at 650 °C exhibit remarkably higher photocatalytic activity for degradation of RhB and reduction of Cr(VI). This work highlights the importance of self-assembly approach and temperature-control strategy in the synthesis of photoactive materials for environmental remediation.

  6. Additive genetic variation for tolerance to estrogen pollution in natural populations of Alpine whitefish (Coregonus sp., Salmonidae).

    PubMed

    Brazzola, Gregory; Chèvre, Nathalie; Wedekind, Claus

    2014-11-01

    The evolutionary potential of natural populations to adapt to anthropogenic threats critically depends on whether there exists additive genetic variation for tolerance to the threat. A major problem for water-dwelling organisms is chemical pollution, and among the most common pollutants is 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), the synthetic estrogen that is used in oral contraceptives and that can affect fish at various developmental stages, including embryogenesis. We tested whether there is variation in the tolerance to EE2 within Alpine whitefish. We sampled spawners from two species of different lakes, bred them in vitro in a full-factorial design each, and studied growth and mortality of embryos. Exposure to EE2 turned out to be toxic in all concentrations we tested (≥1 ng/L). It reduced embryo viability and slowed down embryogenesis. We found significant additive genetic variation in EE2-induced mortality in both species, that is, genotypes differed in their tolerance to estrogen pollution. We also found maternal effects on embryo development to be influenced by EE2, that is, some maternal sib groups were more susceptible to EE2 than others. In conclusion, the toxic effects of EE2 were strong, but both species demonstrated the kind of additive genetic variation that is necessary for an evolutionary response to this type of pollution.

  7. Additive genetic variation for tolerance to estrogen pollution in natural populations of Alpine whitefish (Coregonus sp., Salmonidae)

    PubMed Central

    Brazzola, Gregory; Chèvre, Nathalie; Wedekind, Claus

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary potential of natural populations to adapt to anthropogenic threats critically depends on whether there exists additive genetic variation for tolerance to the threat. A major problem for water-dwelling organisms is chemical pollution, and among the most common pollutants is 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), the synthetic estrogen that is used in oral contraceptives and that can affect fish at various developmental stages, including embryogenesis. We tested whether there is variation in the tolerance to EE2 within Alpine whitefish. We sampled spawners from two species of different lakes, bred them in vitro in a full-factorial design each, and studied growth and mortality of embryos. Exposure to EE2 turned out to be toxic in all concentrations we tested (≥1 ng/L). It reduced embryo viability and slowed down embryogenesis. We found significant additive genetic variation in EE2-induced mortality in both species, that is, genotypes differed in their tolerance to estrogen pollution. We also found maternal effects on embryo development to be influenced by EE2, that is, some maternal sib groups were more susceptible to EE2 than others. In conclusion, the toxic effects of EE2 were strong, but both species demonstrated the kind of additive genetic variation that is necessary for an evolutionary response to this type of pollution. PMID:25553069

  8. Biodiesel production using alkaline ionic liquid and adopted as lubricity additive for low-sulfur diesel fuel.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hui; Fan, Weiyu; Li, Yang; Nan, Guozhi

    2013-07-01

    Preparation of biodiesel from vegetable oils, such as rapeseed oil, soybean oil and sunflower oil, catalyzed by an alkaline ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium imidazolide ([Bmim]Im) was investigated in this work. The results demonstrated that [Bmim]Im exhibited high activity and the yield of biodiesel was up to 95% or more when molar ratio of methanol to vegetable oil was 6:1, ionic liquid dosage was 6 wt.%, reaction temperature was 60°C, and reaction time was 60 min. After [Bmim]Im was used for the sixth time, the yield of biodiesel still remained at about 95%. The effects of the biodiesels on the lubricity of low-sulfur diesel fuel were also investigated using the High Frequency Reciprocating Rig method, and the results showed that sunflower biodiesel and soybean biodiesel had higher lubrication performance than that of rapeseed biodiesel. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The creation of pollution mapping and measurement of ambient concentration of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide with passive sampler.

    PubMed

    Akdemir, Andaç

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of nitrogen and sulfur dioxide using passive sampler over 12 months in Samsun, Turkey, are compared with SO2 and NO2 concentrations obtained from a co-located chemiluminescence analyzer. The concentrations of Sulfur and nitrogen dioxide in the ambient air during the period from November 2009 to September 2010 are analyzed. The highest value for annual NO2 and SO2 averages of passive sampler was 29.65 μg/m(3) and 21.01 μg/m(3) for exposures of 2-weeks at an industrial site. The maximum monthly concentration for SO2 was observed at the 10(th) measurement station with 44.19 μg/m(3) for August. The maximum monthly concentration for NO2 was observed on the 3(rd) measurement station with 42.83 μg/m(3) for November. A negative correlation between nitrogen dioxide concentrations and temperature (R(2) = -0.5489) was estimated. A positive correlation between nitrogen dioxide measurement with passive sampler and continuous measurement (R(2) = 0.6571) was estimated.

  10. The creation of pollution mapping and measurement of ambient concentration of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide with passive sampler

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Measurements of nitrogen and sulfur dioxide using passive sampler over 12 months in Samsun, Turkey, are compared with SO2 and NO2 concentrations obtained from a co-located chemiluminescence analyzer. The concentrations of Sulfur and nitrogen dioxide in the ambient air during the period from November 2009 to September 2010 are analyzed. Results The highest value for annual NO2 and SO2 averages of passive sampler was 29.65 μg/m3 and 21.01 μg/m3 for exposures of 2-weeks at an industrial site. The maximum monthly concentration for SO2 was observed at the 10th measurement station with 44.19 μg/m3 for August. The maximum monthly concentration for NO2 was observed on the 3rd measurement station with 42.83 μg/m3 for November. A negative correlation between nitrogen dioxide concentrations and temperature (R2 = −0.5489) was estimated. A positive correlation between nitrogen dioxide measurement with passive sampler and continuous measurement (R2 = 0.6571) was estimated. PMID:25136451

  11. Pollutant Types

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Describes the types of air pollutants, including common or criteria pollutants, and hazardous air pollutants and links to additional information. Also links to resources on other air pollution issues.

  12. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  13. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  14. Susceptibility of a carabid beetle, Pterostichus oblongopunctatus fab., from a gradient of heavy metal pollution to additional stressors.

    PubMed

    Lagisz, Malgorzata; Laskowski, Ryszard

    2007-11-01

    Insects inhabiting contaminated areas show increased susceptibility to other stressors, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether this phenomenon had a genetic basis. We investigated changes in susceptibility to food deprivation and insecticide (dimethoate) treatment of the ground beetle Pterostichus oblongopunctatus originating from four populations situated along a metal pollution gradient. To determine whether the increased susceptibility to additional stressors found in field-exposed animals from chronically metal-polluted sites had a genetic basis, our research was conducted on the second generation of laboratory-reared animals. There was no difference in susceptibility to the additional stressors indicating that the differences between populations observed in earlier studies do not have a genetic basis.

  15. Effects of meteorological conditions on sulfur dioxide air pollution in the North China plain during winters of 2006-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calkins, Chase; Ge, Cui; Wang, Jun; Anderson, Mark; Yang, Kai

    2016-12-01

    The last decade has seen frequent occurrences of severe air pollution episodes of high loading in SO2 during winters in the North China Plain (NCP). Using satellite data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), chemistry transport model (GEOS-Chem) simulations, and National Center for Environmental Predication (NCEP) meteorological reanalysis, this study examines meteorological and synoptic conditions associated with air pollution episodes during 2006-2015 winters. OMI-based SO2 data suggest a large decrease (∼30% in area average) of SO2 emissions since 2010. Statistical analysis shows that meteorological conditions associated with the top 10% of OMI-based high SO2 days are found on average to be controlled by high pressure systems with 2 m s-1 lower wind speeds, slightly warmer, 1-2 °C, temperatures and 10-20% higher relative humidities from the surface to 850 hPa. Numerical experiments with GOES-Chem nested grid simulations at 0.5° × 0.667° resolution are conducted for winters of 2009 as a control year, and 2012 and 2013 as years for sensitivity analysis. The experiments reveal that year-to-year change of winter columnar SO2 amounts and distributions in first order are linearly proportional to the change in SO2 emissions, regardless of the differences in meteorological conditions. In contrast, the surface SO2 amounts and distributions exhibit highly non-linear relationships with respect to the emissions and stronger dependence on the meteorological conditions. Longer data records of atmospheric SO2 from space combined with meteorological reanalysis are needed to further study the meteorological variations in air pollution events and the air pollution climatology in the context of climate change.

  16. Immobilization of heavy metals in polluted soils by the addition of zeolitic material synthesized from coal fly ash.

    PubMed

    Querol, Xavier; Alastuey, Andrés; Moreno, Natàlia; Alvarez-Ayuso, Esther; García-Sánchez, Antonio; Cama, Jordi; Ayora, Carles; Simón, Mariano

    2006-01-01

    The use of zeolitic material synthesized from coal fly ash for the immobilization of pollutants in contaminated soils was investigated in experimental plots in the Guadiamar Valley (SW Spain). This area was affected by a pyrite slurry spill in April 1998. Although reclamation activities were completed in a few months, residual pyrite slurry mixed with soil accounted for relatively high leachable levels of trace elements such as Zn, Pb, As, Cu, Sb, Co, Tl and Cd. Phytoremediation strategies were adopted for the final recovery of the polluted soils. The immobilization of metals had previously been undertaken to avoid leaching processes and the consequent groundwater pollution. To this end, 1100 kg of high NaP1 (Na6[(AlO2)6(SiO2)10] .15H2O) zeolitic material was synthesized using fly ash from the Teruel power plant (NE Spain), in a 10 m3 reactor. This zeolitic material was manually applied using different doses (10000-25000 kg per hectare), into the 25 cm topsoil. Another plot (control) was maintained without zeolite. Sampling was carried out 1 and 2 years after the zeolite addition. The results show that the zeolitic material considerably decreases the leaching of Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, and Zn. The sorption of metals in soil clay minerals (illite) proved to be the main cause contributing to the immobilization of these pollutants. This sorption could be a consequence of the rise in pH from 3.3 to 7.6 owing to the alkalinity of the zeolitic material added (caused by traces of free lime in the fly ash, or residual NaOH from synthesis).

  17. Comparative uptake of sulfur in sulfur dioxide and acid rain by corn (Zea mays L. )

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    This study has compared and evaluated the absorption and accumulation of sulfur from the two major forms of sulfur pollution (sulfur dioxide and sulfur containing acid rain), by seedlings of corn (Zea mays L.). Plants were exposed to matched treatments containing equivalent ..mu..moles S/treatment in sulfur dioxide or simulated acid rain containing sulfuric acid. Pollution levels were chosen to represent low, medium and high ambient pollutant concentrations (0.13, 1.3 and 130.0 ..mu..moles S/treatment). The uptake and distribution of sulfur by plants was followed by using radioactively labelled sulfur (35-S) in both pollutants. Plants were exposed to the pollutants via a single injection of sulfur dioxide or by rainfall simulators with acid rain treatments. From the sulfur dioxide concentrations evaluated (0.67; 1.00; 2.60; 6.70; and 16 ppm), maximum absorption occurred at the highest concentration while sulfur was more efficiently absorbed at lower concentrations. Absorption of sulfur by plants exposed to acid rain (pH 5.4; 4.4; 3.4; and 2.6) was higher with high sulfur/low pH treatments. pH per se, was not responsible for increased sulfur absorption at low pH treatments. Of the total sulfur associated with the plant following exposure to sulfur dioxide and acid rain, 55% and 97%, respectively was not absorbed, and could be released after one minute of a foliar wash. At each equivalent concentration of sulfur, corn seedlings absorbed significantly greater amounts of sulfur from sulfur dioxide than from acid rain.

  18. Effects of air pollution on cell membrane integrity, spectral reflectance and metal and sulfur concentrations in lichens

    SciTech Connect

    Garty, J.; Cohen, Y.; Kloog, N.; Karnieli, A.

    1997-07-01

    The fruticose lichen Ramalina duriaei is generally considered to be sensitive to air pollution. In the present study the authors sought to determine whether thalli of this lichen collected in a remote unpolluted site (the HaZorea Forest, northeast Israel) and transplanted to the Ashdod region (southwest Israel) could provide information on the quality of the air in this area. For this purpose, the concentrations of Pb, Cu, Cd, Ni, Mn, Fe, S, Ca, Mg, Na, and K were determined in in situ thalli collected in the HaZorea Forest in March 1993 and in in situ and transplanted thalli retrieved in June 1993. The concentration of these elements in R. duriaei thalli was analyzed in comparison with physiological parameters such as the integrity of cell membranes, chlorophyll content, and alterations in reflectance responses from lichen thalli. Thalli transplanted to several industrial sites in the town of Ashdod for a period of 100 d accumulated high concentrations of Pb, Cd, Ni, Fe, S, Mg, Na, Ca, and K. The concentration of S in thalli transplanted to the Ashdod region was found to correlate with damage caused to cell membranes and showed and inverse correlation with the chlorophyll content and with the reflectance response of the lichen. The electrical conductivity values corresponding to membrane integrity in the lichen thallus showed an inverse correlation with the ratio of chlorophyll a to pheophytin a, indicating the integrity of the photobiontic chlorophyll and with normalized-difference vegetation index values corresponding to the reflectance response of the thallus. The chlorophyll integrity correlated with the reflectance response. Magnesium accumulated in the lichen thalli in dusty sites and was found to correlate with damage caused to membranes.

  19. Effect of LiNO3 additive and pyrrolidinium ionic liquid on the solid electrolyte interphase in the lithium-sulfur battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barghamadi, Marzieh; Best, Adam S.; Bhatt, Anand I.; Hollenkamp, Anthony F.; Mahon, Peter J.; Musameh, Mustafa; Rüther, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery in which the ionic liquid (IL) C4mpyr-TFSI is a major component of the electrolyte has attracted much attention by researchers due to the ability of the IL to suppress the polysulfide shuttle effect, combined with advantageous properties of thermal, chemical and electrochemical stability. In a largely parallel stream of research, LiNO3 has come to be known as an additive for improving Li-S battery performance through its influence on protecting the lithium anode and beneficial interaction with the polysulfide shuttle. In this work a deeper understanding is sought of the combined effects of LiNO3 and C4mpyr-TFSI on the factors that impact Li-S cell performance. Specifically, we investigate the formation of the protective surface film on lithium anode and results are compared with those for a typical organic electrolyte for the Li-S battery, DOL:DME. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) confirms that the LiNO3 additive is vital to achieving acceptable levels of performance with the organic electrolyte. Although LiNO3 improves the performance of a battery assembled with IL containing electrolyte, it shows a higher impact in the organic electrolyte based battery. Furthermore X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra confirm the participation of C4mpyr-TFSI on the formation of the interphase layer on the anode.

  20. Hsp70 level in progeny of aging grasshoppers from variously polluted habitats and additionally exposed to zinc during diapause.

    PubMed

    Augustyniak, Maria; Tarnawska, Monika; Babczyńska, Agnieszka; Augustyniak, Michał

    2009-08-01

    The hsp70 level in the bodies of 1st instars of grasshoppers Chorthippus brunneus from unpolluted (Pilica) and polluted (Olkusz, Szopienice) sites and additionally exposed to various doses of zinc during diapause and embryonic development prior to hatching were measured by Western blotting. The main aim of our work was to assess the relationship between the age of female grasshoppers originating from variously polluted habitat and the hsp70 level in their progeny. Possible reasons for population variation in hsp70 levels were discussed. The hsp70 level in the offspring's body depended on the place of origin. The strongest expression of hsp70 was found in the bodies of larvae hatching from the eggs laid by young females from Pilica (reference site). In contrast, a low initial level of hsp70 in larvae from polluted sites, especially in young females' progeny, was observed. The application of zinc during diapause influenced the hsp70 level in grasshopper larvae; however, the direction of the changes depended on the insects' place of origin. In larvae from the reference site, and also (but to a lesser degree) from Olkusz, the increase in the hsp70 level after zinc treatment was most pronounced. Whereas in grasshoppers from Szopienice, zinc (in 100microg g(-1) dry weight of sand) did not change the hsp70 level, or (in 500microg g(-1) dry weight of sand) caused a reduction in hsp70. The differences may result from maternal effects; however, possible adaptation also cannot be excluded. To confirm this statement further studies are needed.

  1. Secondary Pollutants from Ozone Reaction with Ventilation Filters and Degradation of Filter Media Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Destaillats, Hugo; Chen, Wenhao; Apte, Michael; Li, Nuan; Spears, Michael; Almosni, Jérémie; Brunner, Gregory; Zhang, Jianshun; Fisk, William J.

    2011-05-01

    Prior research suggests that chemical processes taking place on the surface of particle filters employed in buildings may lead to the formation of harmful secondary byproducts. We investigated ozone reactions with fiberglass, polyester, cotton/polyester and polyolefin filter media, as well as hydrolysis of filter media additives. Studies were carried out on unused media, and on filters that were installed for 3 months in buildings at two different locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. Specimens from each filter media were exposed to {approx}150 ppbv ozone in a flow tube under a constant flow of dry or humidified air (50percent RH). Ozone breakthrough was recorded for each sample over periods of {approx}1000 min; the ozone uptake rate was calculated for an initial transient period and for steady-state conditions. While ozone uptake was observed in all cases, we did not observe significant differences in the uptake rate and capacity for the various types of filter media tested. Most experiments were performed at an airflow rate of 1.3 L/min (face velocity = 0.013 m/s), and a few tests were also run at higher rates (8 to 10 L/min). Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, two oxidation byproducts, were quantified downstream of each sample. Those aldehydes (m/z 31 and 45) and other volatile byproducts (m/z 57, 59, 61 and 101) were also detected in real-time using Proton-Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). Low-ppbv byproduct emissions were consistently higher under humidified air than under dry conditions, and were higher when the filters were loaded with particles, as compared with unused filters. No significant differences were observed when ozone reacted over various types of filter media. Fiberglass filters heavily coated with impaction oil (tackifier) showed higher formaldehyde emissions than other samples. Those emissions were particularly high in the case of used filters, and were observed even in the absence of ozone, suggesting that hydrolysis of additives

  2. Secondary pollutants from ozone reactions with ventilation filters and degradation of filter media additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Destaillats, Hugo; Chen, Wenhao; Apte, Michael G.; Li, Nuan; Spears, Michael; Almosni, Jérémie; Brunner, Gregory; Zhang, Jianshun (Jensen); Fisk, William J.

    2011-07-01

    Prior research suggests that chemical processes taking place on the surface of particle filters employed in buildings may lead to the formation of harmful secondary byproducts. We investigated ozone reactions with fiberglass, polyester, cotton/polyester and polyolefin filter media, as well as hydrolysis of filter media additives. Studies were carried out on unused media, and on filters that were installed for 3 months in buildings at two different locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. Specimens from each filter media were exposed to ˜150 ppbv ozone in a flow tube under a constant flow of dry or humidified air (50% RH). Ozone breakthrough was recorded for each sample over periods of ˜1000 min; the ozone uptake rate was calculated for an initial transient period and for steady-state conditions. While ozone uptake was observed in all cases, we did not observe significant differences in the uptake rate and capacity for the various types of filter media tested. Most experiments were performed at an airflow rate of 1.3 L min -1 (face velocity = 0.013 m s -1), and a few tests were also run at higher rates (8-10 L min -1). Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, two oxidation byproducts, were quantified downstream of each sample. Those aldehydes ( m/ z 31 and 45) and other volatile byproducts ( m/ z 57, 59, 61 and 101) were also detected in real-time using Proton-Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). Low-ppbv byproduct emissions were consistently higher under humidified air than under dry conditions, and were higher when the filters were loaded with particles, as compared with unused filters. No significant differences were observed when ozone reacted over various types of filter media. Fiberglass filters heavily coated with impaction oil (tackifier) showed higher formaldehyde emissions than other samples. Those emissions were particularly high in the case of used filters, and were observed even in the absence of ozone, suggesting that hydrolysis of additives, rather

  3. Elemental sulfur coarsening kinetics.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Angel A; Druschel, Gregory K

    Elemental sulfur exists is a variety of forms in natural systems, from dissolved forms (noted as S8(diss) or in water as S8(aq)) to bulk elemental sulfur (most stable as α-S8). Elemental sulfur can form via several biotic and abiotic processes, many beginning with small sulfur oxide or polysulfidic sulfur molecules that coarsen into S8 rings that then coalesce into larger forms: [Formula: see text] Formation of elemental sulfur can be possible via two primary techniques to create an emulsion of liquid sulfur in water called sulfur sols that approximate some mechanisms of possible elemental sulfur formation in natural systems. These techniques produce hydrophobic (S8(Weimarn)) and hydrophilic (S8(polysulfide)) sols that exist as nanoparticle and colloidal suspensions. These sols begin as small sulfur oxide or polysulfidic sulfur molecules, or dissolved S8(aq) forms, but quickly become nanoparticulate and coarsen into micron sized particles via a combination of classical nucleation, aggregation processes, and/or Ostwald ripening. We conducted a series of experiments to study the rate of elemental sulfur particle coarsening using dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis under different physical and chemical conditions. Rates of nucleation and initial coarsening occur over seconds to minutes at rates too fast to measure by DLS, with subsequent coarsening of S8(nano) and S8(sol) being strongly temperature dependent, with rates up to 20 times faster at 75°C compared to 20°C. The addition of surfactants (utilizing ionic and nonionic surfactants as model compounds) results in a significant reduction of coarsening rates, in addition to known effects of these molecules on elemental sulfur solubility. DLS and cryo-SEM results suggest coarsening is largely a product of ripening processes rather than particle aggregation, especially at higher temperatures. Fitting of the coarsening rate data to established models for Ostwald ripening additionally support this as a primary

  4. Fact Sheets and Additional Information Regarding the 2010 Revision to the Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Sulfur Dioxide

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Find tools for primary standards for Sulfur Dioxide, maps of nonattainment areas, an overview of the proposal, projected nonattainment areas for 2020, and a presentation on the 2011 SO2 primary NAAQS revision.

  5. The effect of additives on migration and transformation of gaseous pollutants in the vacuum pyrolysis process of waste printed circuit boards.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yibiao; Sun, Shuiyu; Liu, Jingyong; Lin, Weixiong; Chen, Nanwei; Ye, Maoyou

    2017-02-01

    The effect of six additives (CaCO3, HZSM-5, CaO, Al2O3, FeOOH and Ca(OH)2) on the generation, migration, transformation and escaping behaviours of typical gaseous pollutants in the pyrolysis process were studied by vacuum pyrolysis experiments on epoxy resin powder from waste printed circuit boards with tube furnace. The results show that the additives Al2O3, CaO, Ca(OH) 2 and FeOOH could reduce the yield of the gas phase. The removal rates of pollutants, such as benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, phenol, p-xylene, HBr, NO2 and SO2 in the gaseous products, has changed variously with the increasing percentage of the above additives. Judging from the control of gas-phase pollutant discharge, the calcium-base additives are superior to the others. Ca(OH)2 has the best inhibition effect among them. The increase of the pyrolysis temperature and vacuum degree enhanced the volatility of organic pollutants and weakened the Ca(OH)2 inhibition effect on organic pollutants, while it improved the removal rate of SO2. Under the condition of 500 °C pyrolysis temperature and 0.09 MPa vacuum degree, when the additive proportion of Ca(OH)2 was one-fifth, the average removal rate of pollutants in gas phase is up to 66.4%.

  6. Sulfur Dioxide and Material Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillette, Donald G.

    1975-01-01

    This study relates sulfur dioxide levels with material damage in heavily populated or polluted areas. Estimates of loss were determined from increased maintenance and replacement costs. The data indicate a decrease in losses during the past five years probably due to decline in pollution levels established by air quality standards. (MR)

  7. Sulfur Dioxide and Material Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillette, Donald G.

    1975-01-01

    This study relates sulfur dioxide levels with material damage in heavily populated or polluted areas. Estimates of loss were determined from increased maintenance and replacement costs. The data indicate a decrease in losses during the past five years probably due to decline in pollution levels established by air quality standards. (MR)

  8. Ultrasonic coal-wash for de-sulfurization.

    PubMed

    Ambedkar, B; Nagarajan, R; Jayanti, S

    2011-05-01

    Coal is the one of the world's most abundant fossil fuel resources. It is not a clean fuel, as it contains ash and sulfur. SOx as a pollutant are a real threat to both the ecosystem and to human health. There are numerous de-sulfurization methods to control SO(2) emissions. Nowadays, online flue gas de-sulfurization is being used as one such method to remove sulfur from coal during combustion. The biggest disadvantage associated with this method is formation of by-products (FGD gypsum). A way for effective usage of FGD gypsum has not yet been found. This will lead to acute and chronic effects to humans as well as plants. Power ultrasound can be used for the beneficiation of coal by the removal of sulfur from coal prior to coal combustion. The main effects of ultrasound in liquid medium are acoustic cavitation and acoustic streaming. The process of formation, growth and implosion of bubbles is called cavitation. Bulk fluid motion due to sound energy absorption is known as acoustic streaming. In addition, coupling of an acoustic field to water produces OH radicals, H(2)O(2), O(2), ozone and HO(2) that are strong oxidizing agents. Oxidation that occurs due to ultrasound is called Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP). It converts sulfur from coal to water-soluble sulphates. Conventional chemical-based soaking and stirring methods are compared here to ultrasonic methods of de-sulfurization. The main advantages of ultrasonic de-sulfurization over conventional methods, the mechanism involved in ultrasonic de-sulfurization and the difference between aqueous-based and solvent-based (2N HNO(3), 3-volume percentage H(2)O(2)) de-sulfurization are investigated experimentally.

  9. Sulfur Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvajal, Eliel; Santiago, Patricia; Escudero, Roberto; Mendoza, Doroteo

    2000-03-01

    We have synthetized sulfur nanowires by a template approach using nanoporous anodic alumina. High resolution electron microscopy shows that isolated sulfur nanowires (15 nanometers of diameter) present crystalline structure different to that observed in the stable bulk allotrope (orthorhombic alfa-sulfur). Melting behavior of the sulfur nanowires embedded into the nanoporous alumina matrix was studied by differential scanning calorimetry, showing again very different behavior of the nanowires compared to that of the bulk sulfur. On the other hand, in order to study the bonding configuration of the sulfur atoms in the nanowires, we will present infrared spectroscopy characterization of the nanowires confined into the nanoporous alumina. Finally, on the base of the experimental observations, we will present a structural model for the sulfur nanowires.

  10. Acidic-functionalized ionic liquid as an efficient, green and reusable catalyst for hetero-Michael addition of nitrogen, sulfur and oxygen nucleophiles to α,β-unsaturated ketones.

    PubMed

    Han, Feng; Yang, Lei; Li, Zhen; Xia, Chungu

    2012-01-14

    A series of acidic-functionalized ionic liquids were synthesized and applied to the hetero-Michael addition of nitrogen, sulfur and oxygen nucleophiles to α,β-unsaturated ketones under solvent-free conditions. Notably, 1-methylimidazolium p-toluenesulfonic ([Hmim]OTs) was found to be the most efficient catalyst and could realize "homogeneous catalysis, two-phase separation". Additionally, the catalytic system has wide substrate scope and good to excellent yields (up to 99%) could be obtained at room temperature.

  11. Influence of Sulfur on the Arsenic Phytoremediation Using Vallisneria natans (Lour.) Hara.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guoliang; Feng, Tao; Li, Zhixian; Chen, Zhang; Chen, Yuanqi; Wang, Haihua; Xiang, Yanci

    2017-07-04

    Influences of sulfur (S) on the accumulation and detoxification of arsenic (As) in Vallisneria natans (Lour.) Hara, an arsenic hyperaccumulating submerged aquatic plant, were investigated. At low sulfur levels (<20 mg/L), the thiols and As concentrations in the plant increased significantly with increasing sulfate nutrient supply. If sulfur levels were above 20 mg/L, the thiols and As concentrations in the plant did not increase further. There was a significant positive correlation between thiols and As in the plant. As(III) is the main form (>75%) present in the plant after exposure to As(V). Sulfur plays an important role in the arsenic translocation and detoxification, possibly through stimulating the synthesis of thiols and complexation of arsenite-phytochelatins. This suggests that addition of sulfur to the arsenic-contaminated water may provide a way to promote arsenic bioaccumulation in plants for phytoremediation of arsenic pollution.

  12. 46 CFR 148.04-20 - Sulfur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sulfur. 148.04-20 Section 148.04-20 Shipping COAST GUARD... Special Additional Requirements for Certain Material § 148.04-20 Sulfur. (a) When sulfur is loaded in a deep hold with general cargo in the 'tween deck hold above the sulfur, a dust proof wooden...

  13. The effect of nitrogen additions on bracken fern and its insect herbivores at sites with high and low atmospheric pollution

    Treesearch

    M.E. Jones; M.E. Fenn; T.D. Paine

    2011-01-01

    The impact of atmospheric pollution, including nitrogen deposition, on bracken fern herbivores has never been studied. Bracken fern is globally distributed and has a high potential to accumulate nitrogen in plant tissue. We examined the response of bracken fern and its herbivores to N fertilization at a high and low pollution site in forests downwind of Los Angeles,...

  14. The effect of nitrogen additions on oak foliage and herbivore communities at sites with high and low atmospheric pollution.

    PubMed

    Eatough Jones, Michele; Paine, Timothy D; Fenn, Mark E

    2008-02-01

    To evaluate plant and herbivore responses to nitrogen we conducted a fertilization study at a low and high pollution site in the mixed conifer forests surrounding Los Angeles, California. Contrary to expectations, discriminant function analysis of oak herbivore communities showed significant response to N fertilization when atmospheric deposition was high, but not when atmospheric deposition was low. We hypothesize that longer-term fertilization treatments are needed at the low pollution site before foliar N nutrition increases sufficiently to affect herbivore communities. At the high pollution site, fertilization was also associated with increased catkin production and higher densities of a byturid beetle that feeds on the catkins of oak. Leaf nitrogen and nitrate were significantly higher at the high pollution site compared to the low pollution site. Foliar nitrate concentrations were positively correlated with abundance of sucking insects, leafrollers and plutellids in all three years of the study.

  15. Sulfur-rich Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldhaber, M. B.

    2003-12-01

    Marine sediments with more than a few tenths of a percent of organic carbon, as well as organic-matter-bearing, nonmarine sediments with significant concentrations of sulfate in the depositional waters contain the mineral pyrite (FeS2). Pyrite, along with sulfur-bearing organic compounds, form indirectly through the metabolic activities of sulfate-reducing microorganisms. The geochemical transformations of sulfur in sediments leading to these products significantly impact the pathway of early sedimentary diagenesis, conditions for the localization of mineral deposits (Ohmoto and Goldhaber, 1997), the global cycling of sulfur and carbon, the abundance of oxygen in the Earth's atmosphere, and perhaps even the emergence of life on Earth (e.g., Russell and Hall, 1997). This chapter provides an overview of sedimentary-sulfur geochemistry from its microbial and abiologic pathways to the global consequences of these processes.The geochemistry of sulfur is complicated by its wide range of oxidation states (Table 1). Under oxidizing conditions (e.g., in the presence of atmospheric oxygen) sulfate, with sulfur in the +6 valence state, is the stable form of sulfur. Under reducing conditions (e.g., in the presence of H2), sulfide (S=-2 valent) is the stable oxidation state. However, a range of additional aqueous and solid-phase sulfur species exist with valences between these two end-members. What makes the study of sulfur geochemistry so exciting and challenging is that many of these intermediate-valent forms play key roles in sedimentary-sulfur transformations. Furthermore, many of these reactions are microbially mediated. As detailed below, these complex biogeochemical pathways are now yielding to research whose scope ranges from molecular to global level. Table 1. Forms of sulfur in marine sediments and their oxidation states Aqueous species or mineralFormulaOxidation state(s) of sulfur SulfideH2S(aq), HS-(aq)-2 Iron sulfideaFeS(s)-2 GreigiteFe3S4(s)-2, 0 PyriteFeS2(s)-2

  16. Soilaluminum, iron, and phosphorus dynamics in response to long-term experimental nitrogen and sulfur additions at the Bear Brook Watershed in Maine, USA

    Treesearch

    Jessica Sherman; Ivan J. Fernandez; Stephen A. Norton; Tsutomu Ohno; Lindsey E. Rustad

    2006-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) containing compounds affects soil chemistry in forested ecosystems through (1) acidification and the depletion of base cations, (2) metal mobilization, particularly aluminum (Al), and iron (Fe), (3) phosphorus (P) mobilization, and (4) N accumulation. The Bear BrookWatershed in Maine (BBWM) is a long-term paired...

  17. Sulfur revisited.

    PubMed

    Lin, A N; Reimer, R J; Carter, D M

    1988-03-01

    Sulfur is a time-honored therapeutic agent useful in a variety of dermatologic disorders. Its keratolytic action is due to formation of hydrogen sulfide through a reaction that depends upon direct interaction between sulfur particles and keratinocytes. The smaller the particle size, the greater the degree of such interaction and the greater the therapeutic efficacy. When applied topically, sulfur induces various histologic changes, including hyperkeratosis, acanthosis, and dilatation of dermal vasculature. One study showed that sulfur was comedogenic when applied onto human and rabbit skin, findings that were not reproduced in other studies. About 1% of topically applied sulfur is systemically absorbed. Adverse effects from topically applied sulfur are uncommon and are mainly limited to the skin. In infants, however, fatal outcome after extensive application has been reported.

  18. Sulfur Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariss, R.; Niki, H.

    1985-01-01

    Among the general categories of tropospheric sulfur sources, anthropogenic sources have been quantified the most accurately. Research on fluxes of sulfur compounds from volcanic sources is now in progress. Natural sources of reduced sulfur compounds are highly variable in both space and time. Variables, such as soil temperature, hydrology (tidal and water table), and organic flux into the soil, all interact to determine microbial production and subsequent emissions of reduced sulfur compounds from anaerobic soils and sediments. Available information on sources of COS, CS2, DMS, and H2S to the troposphere in the following paragraphs are summarized; these are the major biogenic sulfur species with a clearly identified role in tropospheric chemistry. The oxidation of SO2 to H2SO4 can often have a significant impact on the acidity of precipitation. A schematic representation of some important transformations and sinks for selected sulfur species is illustrated.

  19. Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Sulfur Oxides ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This draft document provides EPA’s evaluation and synthesis of the most policy-relevant science related to the health effects of sulfur oxides. When final, it will provide a critical part of the scientific foundation for EPA’s decision regarding the adequacy of the current primary (health-based) National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for sulfur dioxide. The references considered for inclusion in or cited in the external review draft ISA are available at https://hero.epa.gov/hero/sulfur-oxides. The intent of the ISA, according to the CAA, is to “accurately reflect the latest scientific knowledge expected from the presence of [a] pollutant in ambient air” (U.S. Code, 1970a, 1970b). It includes an assessment of scientific research from atmospheric sciences, exposure sciences, dosimetry, mode of action, animal and human toxicology, and epidemiology. Key information and judgments formerly found in the Air Quality Criteria Documents (AQCDs) for sulfur oxides (SOx) are included; Annexes provide additional details supporting the ISA. Together, the ISA and Annexes serve to update and revise the last SOx ISA which was published in 2008.

  20. Hydrate sulfuric acid after sulfur implantation in water ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strazzulla, G.; Baratta, G. A.; Leto, G.; Gomis, O.

    2007-12-01

    For many years an ongoing research program performed at our laboratory has had the aim to investigate the implantation of reactive ions in ices relevant to planetology by using IR spectroscopy. We present new results obtained by implanting 200 keV sulfur ions into water ice at 80 K. We have looked at the formation of sulfur-bearing molecules such as sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide and hydrogen sulfide. We find that hydrated sulfuric acid is formed with high yield ( 0.65±0.1 molecules/ion). An upper limit to the production yield of SO 2 ( Y⩽0.025 molecules/ion) has been estimated; no hydrogen sulfide has been detected. The formation of hydrogen peroxide is confirmed. Ozone is not detected. The results are discussed relevant to the inquiry on the radiolytic sulfur cycle considered responsible for the formation of sulfur-bearing molecules on the surfaces of the Galilean satellites. We demonstrate that sulfur implantation efficiently forms hydrated sulfuric acid whose observed abundance is explained as caused by an exogenic process. It is more difficult to say if the observed sulfur dioxide is quantitatively supported by only sulfur implantation; additional experimental studies are necessary along with direct observations, especially at UV wavelengths such as those that could be performed by instruments on board Hubble Space Telescope or by the forthcoming World Space Observatory (WSO/UV).

  1. AIR POLLUTION CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a chapter for John Wiley & Son's Mechanical Engineers' Handbook, and covers issues involving air pollution control. Various technologies for controlling sulfur oxides is considered including fuel desulfurization. It also considers control of nitrogen oxides including post...

  2. AIR POLLUTION CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a chapter for John Wiley & Son's Mechanical Engineers' Handbook, and covers issues involving air pollution control. Various technologies for controlling sulfur oxides is considered including fuel desulfurization. It also considers control of nitrogen oxides including post...

  3. The relationship between daily cardiovascular mortality and daily ambient concentrations of particulate pollutants (sulfur, arsenic, selenium, and mercury) and daily source contributions from coal power plants and smelters (individually, combined, and with interaction) in Phoenix, AZ, 1995-1998: A multipollutant approach to acute, time-series air pollution epidemiology: I.

    PubMed

    Wilson, William E

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this paper is to estimate the increase in risk of daily cardiovascular mortality due to an increase in the daily ambient concentration of the individual particulate pollutants sulfur (S), arsenic (As), selenium (Se), and mercury (Hg) using single-pollutant models (SPMs) and to compare this risk to the combined increase in risk due to an increase in all four pollutants by including all four pollutants in the same model (multipollutant model, MPM) and to the risks from source contributions from power plants and smelters. Individual betas in a multipollutant model (MPM) were summed to give a combined beta. Interaction was investigated with a pollutant product term. SPMs (controlling for time trends, temperature, and relative humidity), for an interquartile range (IQR) increase in the pollutant concentration on lag day 0, gave these percent excess risks (±95% confidence levels): S, 6.9% (1.3-12%); As, 2.9% (0.4-5.5%); Se, 1.4% (-1.7 to 4.6); Hg, 9.6% (4.8-14.6%). The SPM beta for S (as sulfate) was higher than found in other studies. The SPM beta for Hg gave the largest t-statistic and beta per unit mass of any pollutant studied. An (IQR) increase in all four pollutants gave an excess risk of 15.4% (7.5-23.8%), slightly smaller than the combination of S and Hg, 16.7% (9.1-24.9%). The combined beta was 71% of the sum of the four individual SPM betas, indicating a reduction in confounding among pollutants in the combined model. As and Se were shown to be noncausal; their SPM betas could be explained as confounding by S. The combined effect of several pollutants can be estimated by including the appropriate pollutants in the same statistical model, summing their individual betas to give a combined beta, and using a variance-covariance matrix to obtain the standard error. This approach identifies and reduces confounding among the species in the multipollutant model and can be used to identify confounded species that have no independent relationship with

  4. Pollution Measuring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Research Ventures, Inc.'s visiplume is a portable, microprocessor-controlled air pollution monitor for measuring sulfur dioxide emissions from fossil fuel-fired power plants, and facilities that manufacture sulfuric acid. It observes smokestack plumes at a distance from the stack obviating the expense and difficulty of installing sample collectors in each stack and later analyzing the samples.

  5. Pollution Microbiology, A Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finstein, Melvin S.

    This manual is designed for use in the laboratory phase of courses dealing with microbial aspects of pollution. It attempts to cover the subject area broadly in four major categories: (1) microorganisms in clean and polluted waters, (2) carbonaceous pollutants, (3) nitrogen, phosphorus, iron, and sulfur as pollutants, and (4) sanitary…

  6. Pollution Microbiology, A Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finstein, Melvin S.

    This manual is designed for use in the laboratory phase of courses dealing with microbial aspects of pollution. It attempts to cover the subject area broadly in four major categories: (1) microorganisms in clean and polluted waters, (2) carbonaceous pollutants, (3) nitrogen, phosphorus, iron, and sulfur as pollutants, and (4) sanitary…

  7. Lunar sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuck, David L.

    1991-01-01

    Ideas introduced by Vaniman, Pettit and Heiken in their 1988 Uses of Lunar Sulfur are expanded. Particular attention is given to uses of SO2 as a mineral-dressing fluid. Also introduced is the concept of using sulfide-based concrete as an alternative to the sulfur-based concretes proposed by Leonard and Johnson. Sulfur is abundant in high-Ti mare basalts, which range from 0.16 to 0.27 pct. by weight. Terrestrial basalts with 0.15 pct. S are rare. For oxygen recovery, sulfur must be driven off with other volatiles from ilmenite concentrates, before reduction. Troilite (FeS) may be oxidized to magnetite (Fe3O4) and SO2 gas, by burning concentrates in oxygen within a magnetic field, to further oxidize ilmenite before regrinding the magnetic reconcentration. SO2 is liquid at -20 C, the mean temperature underground on the Moon, at a minimum of 0.6 atm pressure. By using liquid SO2 as a mineral dressing fluid, all the techniques of terrestrial mineral separation become available for lunar ores and concentrates. Combination of sulfur and iron in an exothermic reaction, to form iron sulfides, may be used to cement grains of other minerals into an anhydrous iron-sulfide concrete. A sulfur-iron-aggregate mixture may be heated to the ignition temperature of iron with sulfur to make a concrete shape. The best iron, sulfur, and aggregate ratios need to be experimentally established. The iron and sulfur will be by-products of oxygen production from lunar minerals.

  8. Lunar sulfur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuck, David L.

    Ideas introduced by Vaniman, Pettit and Heiken in their 1988 Uses of Lunar Sulfur are expanded. Particular attention is given to uses of SO2 as a mineral-dressing fluid. Also introduced is the concept of using sulfide-based concrete as an alternative to the sulfur-based concretes proposed by Leonard and Johnson. Sulfur is abundant in high-Ti mare basalts, which range from 0.16 to 0.27 pct. by weight. Terrestrial basalts with 0.15 pct. S are rare. For oxygen recovery, sulfur must be driven off with other volatiles from ilmenite concentrates, before reduction. Troilite (FeS) may be oxidized to magnetite (Fe3O4) and SO2 gas, by burning concentrates in oxygen within a magnetic field, to further oxidize ilmenite before regrinding the magnetic reconcentration. SO2 is liquid at -20 C, the mean temperature underground on the Moon, at a minimum of 0.6 atm pressure. By using liquid SO2 as a mineral dressing fluid, all the techniques of terrestrial mineral separation become available for lunar ores and concentrates. Combination of sulfur and iron in an exothermic reaction, to form iron sulfides, may be used to cement grains of other minerals into an anhydrous iron-sulfide concrete. A sulfur-iron-aggregate mixture may be heated to the ignition temperature of iron with sulfur to make a concrete shape. The best iron, sulfur, and aggregate ratios need to be experimentally established. The iron and sulfur will be by-products of oxygen production from lunar minerals.

  9. Addition of PM2.5 into the National Ambient Air Quality Standards of China and the Contribution to Air Pollution Control: The Case Study of Wuhan, China

    PubMed Central

    You, Mingqing

    2014-01-01

    PM2.5 has gradually become a major environmental problem of China with its rapid economic development, urbanization, and increasing of motor vehicles. Findings and awareness of serious PM2.5 pollution make the PM2.5 a new criterion pollutant of the Chinese National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) revised in 2012. The 2012 NAAQS sets the PM2.5 concentrate limitation with the 24-hour average value and the annual mean value. Wuhan is quite typical among central and southern China in climate, economy, development level, and energy consumption. The data are cited from the official website of Wuhan Environmental Protection Bureau and cover the period from 1 January to 30 June 2013. The data definitely confirm the existence of serious PM2.5 pollution in Wuhan and indicate that the addition of PM2.5 as a criterion pollutant significantly brings down the attainment rate of air quality. The example of Wuhan reveals that local governments should take measures to reduce the emission of PM2.5 if it affects the attainment rate and the performance evaluation value of air quality. The main contribution of 2012 NAAQS is that it brings down the attainment rate of the air quality and forces local governmental officials to take the measures accordingly. PMID:24982994

  10. Addition of PM 2.5 into the national ambient air quality standards of China and the contribution to air pollution control: the case study of Wuhan, China.

    PubMed

    You, Mingqing

    2014-01-01

    PM2.5 has gradually become a major environmental problem of China with its rapid economic development, urbanization, and increasing of motor vehicles. Findings and awareness of serious PM2.5 pollution make the PM2.5 a new criterion pollutant of the Chinese National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) revised in 2012. The 2012 NAAQS sets the PM2.5 concentrate limitation with the 24-hour average value and the annual mean value. Wuhan is quite typical among central and southern China in climate, economy, development level, and energy consumption. The data are cited from the official website of Wuhan Environmental Protection Bureau and cover the period from 1 January to 30 June 2013. The data definitely confirm the existence of serious PM2.5 pollution in Wuhan and indicate that the addition of PM2.5 as a criterion pollutant significantly brings down the attainment rate of air quality. The example of Wuhan reveals that local governments should take measures to reduce the emission of PM2.5 if it affects the attainment rate and the performance evaluation value of air quality. The main contribution of 2012 NAAQS is that it brings down the attainment rate of the air quality and forces local governmental officials to take the measures accordingly.

  11. Sulfonate activation of the electrophilic reactivity of chlorine and alkyl hypochlorides by the insertion of sulfur trioxide at the C1-C1 and O-C1 bonds. Addition of chlorine chloro- and ethoxysulfate to olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Zefirov, N.S.; Koz'min, A.S.; Sorokin, V.D.; Zhdankin, V.V.

    1986-10-10

    At low temperatures (-40 to -80/sup 0/C) sulfur trioxide enters the chlorine molecule (with the formation of chlorine chlorosulfate) and the ethyl hypochlorite molecule (giving chlorine ethoxysulfate). Both new compounds are highly reactive electrophilic chlorinating reagents and add to ethylene, activated alkenes (1-hexene and cyclohexene), and deactivated olefins (methyl methacrylate, tri- and tetrachloroethylene) in methylene chloride solution at low temperatures. The addition of chlorine chlorosulfate leads to the formation of ..beta..-chloroalkyl chlorosulfates with yields of 24-85%, and the addition of chlorine ethoxysulfate leads to ..beta..-chloroalkyl ethylsulfates with yields of 65-85%. The reactions with unsymmetrical olefins lead to mixtures of the regioisomers with a preference for the products from addition according to the Markovnikov rule; the addition to cyclohexene is trans-stereospecific. The investigated processes represent a new simple approach to the production of sulfate-activated chlorinating reagents and extend the possibilities for functional substitution of olefins.

  12. Miscellaneous additives can enhance plant uptake and affect geochemical fractions of copper in a heavily polluted riparian grassland soil.

    PubMed

    Rinklebe, Jörg; Shaheen, Sabry M

    2015-09-01

    The problem of copper (Cu) pollution in riverine ecosystems is world-wide and has significant environmental, eco-toxicological, and agricultural relevance. We assessed the suitability and effectiveness of application rate of 1% of activated charcoal, bentonite, biochar, cement kiln dust, chitosan, coal fly ash, limestone, nano-hydroxyapatite, organo-clay, sugar beet factory lime, and zeolite as soil amendments together with rapeseed as bioenergy crop as a possible remediation option for a heavily Cu polluted floodplain soil (total Cu=3041.9mgkg(-1)) that has a very high proportion of sorbed/carbonate fraction (484.6mgkg(-1)) and potential mobile fraction of Cu (1611.9mgkg(-1)). Application changed distribution of Cu among geochemical fractions: alkaline materials lead to increased carbonate bounded fraction and the acid rhizosphere zone might cause release of this Cu. Thus, mobilization of Cu and uptake of Cu by rapeseed were increased compared to the control (except for organo-clay) under the prevailing conditions.

  13. Sulfur Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, B. H.

    2007-12-01

    Variations in surface tension affect the buoyancy of objects floating in a liquid. Thus an object floating in water will sink deeper in the presence of dishwater fluid. This is a very minor but measurable effect. It causes for instance ducks to drown in aqueous solutions with added surfactant. The surface tension of liquid iron is very strongly affected by the presence of sulfur which acts as a surfactant in this system varying between 1.9 and 0.4 N/m at 10 mass percent Sulfur (Lee & Morita (2002), This last value is inferred to be the maximum value for Sulfur inferred to be present in the liquid outer core. Venting of Sulfur from the liquid core manifests itself on the Earth surface by the 105 to 106 ton of sulfur vented into the atmosphere annually (Wedepohl, 1984). Inspection of surface Sulfur emission indicates that venting is non-homogeneously distributed over the Earth's surface. The implication of such large variation in surface tension in the liquid outer core are that at locally low Sulfur concentration, the liquid outer core does not wet the predominantly MgSiO3 matrix with which it is in contact. However at a local high in Sulfur, the liquid outer core wets this matrix which in the fluid state has a surface tension of 0.4 N/m (Bansal & Doremus, 1986), couples with it, and causes it to sink. This differential and diapiric movement is transmitted through the essentially brittle mantle (1024 Pa.s, Lambeck & Johnson, 1998; the maximum value for ice being about 1030 Pa.s at 0 K, in all likely hood representing an upper bound of viscosity for all materials) and manifests itself on the surface by the roughly 20 km differentiation, about 0.1 % of the total mantle thickness, between topographical heights and lows with concomitant lateral movement in the crust and upper mantle resulting in thin skin tectonics. The brittle nature of the medium though which this movement is transmitted suggests that the extremes in topography of the D" layer are similar in range to

  14. Identifying the change in atmospheric sulfur sources in China using isotopic ratios in mosses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Hua-Yun; Tang, Cong-Guo; Xiao, Hong-Wei; Liu, Xue-Yan; Liu, Cong-Qiang

    2009-08-01

    A considerable number of studies on rainwater sulfur isotopic ratios (δ34Srain) have been conducted to trace sulfur sources at a large number of sites in the past. If longitudinal studies on the isotope composition of precipitation sulfate were conducted, it is possible to relate that to changes in sulfur emissions. But direct measurement needs considerable labor and time. So, in this study, sulfur isotopic ratios in rainwater and mosses were analyzed at Guiyang and Nanchang to evaluate the possibility of using mosses as a substitute for rainwater. We found that present moss sulfur isotopic ratios were comparable to those of present rainwater. Additionally, we investigated the changes of atmospheric sulfur sources and sulfur concentrations using an isotopic graphic analysis at five industrial cities, two forested areas, and two remote areas in China. Mosses in industrial cities show a wide range of δ34S values, with the highest occurring at Chongqing (+3.9‰) and the lowest at Guiyang (-3.1‰). But as compared to those in forested and remote areas, δ34S values of mosses in all the five industrial cities are lower. On the basis of isotopic comparisons between past rainwater (reported in the literature) and present mosses, in the plot of δ34Smoss versus δ34Srain, six zones indicating different atmospheric sulfur change are separated by the 1:1 line and δ34S values of potential sulfur sources. Our results indicate that atmospheric sulfur pollution in most of the industrial cities decreased, while at the two forested areas, no significant changes were observed, and a new anxiousness coming from new energy sources (e.g., oil) appeared in some cities. Studies on the change of ambient SO2 concentrations support these results.

  15. Sulfur-doped ordered mesoporous carbons: A stability-improving sulfur host for lithium-sulfur battery cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitze, Florian; Fossum, Kjell; Xiong, Shizhao; Matic, Aleksandar; Palmqvist, Anders E. C.

    2016-06-01

    We report on sulfur-functionalized ordered mesoporous carbons aimed for lithium-sulfur battery electrode applications with improved charge capacity retention. The carbons were obtained by a hard-template strategy using a mixture of furfuryl alcohol and furfuryl mercaptan. For the application as electrode material in lithium-sulfur batteries, the carbons were additionally loaded with sulfur following a traditional melt-diffusion approach. It was found that the sulfur interacts stronger with the sulfur-functionalized carbon matrix than with the non-functionalized material. Electrodes showed very high capacity in the second discharge-charge cycle amounting to approximately 1500, 1200 and 1400 mAh/g (sulfur) for carbon materials with no, medium and high degrees of sulfur functionalization, respectively. More importantly, the sulfur-functionalization of the carbon was found to increase the capacity retention after 50 discharge-charge cycles by 8 and 5% for the carbons with medium and high degrees of sulfur-functionalization, respectively, compared to carbon with no sulfur-functionalization. We attribute this significant improvement to the presence of covalently bound sulfur groups at the internal surface of the functionalized carbon providing efficient anchoring sites for catenation to the sulfur loaded into the pores of the carbons and provide experimental support for this in the form of results from cyclic voltammetry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  16. Air Pollution Control, Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Werner, Ed.

    Authoritative reviews in seven areas of current importance in air pollution control are supplied in this volume, the first of a two-part set. Titles contained in this book are: "Dispersion of Pollutants Emitted into the Atmosphere,""The Formation and Control of Oxides of Nitrogen in Air Pollution,""The Control of Sulfur Emissions from Combustion…

  17. Air Pollution Control, Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Werner, Ed.

    Authoritative reviews in seven areas of current importance in air pollution control are supplied in this volume, the first of a two-part set. Titles contained in this book are: "Dispersion of Pollutants Emitted into the Atmosphere,""The Formation and Control of Oxides of Nitrogen in Air Pollution,""The Control of Sulfur Emissions from Combustion…

  18. Biodiversity, metabolism and applications of acidophilic sulfur-metabolizing microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Dopson, Mark; Johnson, D Barrie

    2012-10-01

    Extremely acidic, sulfur-rich environments can be natural, such as solfatara fields in geothermal and volcanic areas, or anthropogenic, such as acid mine drainage waters. Many species of acidophilic bacteria and archaea are known to be involved in redox transformations of sulfur, using elemental sulfur and inorganic sulfur compounds as electron donors or acceptors in reactions involving between one and eight electrons. This minireview describes the nature and origins of acidic, sulfur-rich environments, the biodiversity of sulfur-metabolizing acidophiles, and how sulfur is metabolized and assimilated by acidophiles under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Finally, existing and developing technologies that harness the abilities of sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing acidophiles to extract and capture metals, and to remediate sulfur-polluted waste waters are outlined. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. External Sulfur Addition in the Generation of Sulfide-rich Ni-Cu-PGE Deposits: The Importance of Focused Magma Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripley, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    Sulfide-rich Ni-Cu-PGE orebodies hosted in mafic to ultramafic igneous rocks require focused magma flow and vigorous interaction with country rocks to liberate sulfide, as well as to produce traps for immiscible sulfide liquid. In the 1.1 Ga Midcontinent Rift System (MRS), Ni-rich sulfide deposits occur in conduit systems. Variations in S and Os isotope ratios indicate that magmas which followed different crustal pathways were focused into a central conduit that supplied overlying flows and sills. The 1.3 Ga Voisey's Bay deposit in Labrador represents sulfide liquid collection in a conduit system which includes dike-like bodies and larger sub-horizontal chambers. Variable d34S values again strongly suggest that focused magma flow and turbulence in the conduit resulted in the input of magmatic pulses that had undergone S isotopic homogenization even though pelitic country rocks are characterized by a range in S isotope values from -17 to +18 ‰. A very similar physical setting characterizes the sulfide-bearing Duke Island Complex, a Cretaceous - aged Ural-Alaskan intrusion in an arc setting. Magma pulses of variable sulfur isotopic compositions were focused into a central chamber where sulfide-bearing magma spread laterally. Trapped silicate liquid was efficiently expelled, leaving sulfide-bearing ultramafic cumulates. A less turbulent environment is indicated for sheet-like intrusions that carry disseminated sulfide mineralization in the Duluth Complex within the MRS. However, the potential ore sequences were built from multiple pulses of magma of distinct S isotope values that had interacted with sulfidic country rocks characterized by different S isotope compositions. Hence, the focusing of magmas from different pathways has been essential for the generation of potential sulfide-rich ore bodies in the Duluth Complex as well.

  20. Organic Sulfur and HAP Removal from Coal with Subcritical Water

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    To date, no economically feasible organic sulfur and hazardous air pollutant (HAP) precursor removal process has been developed; however, an effective sulfur and selected HAP removal process is needed to enhance the utilization of high-sulfur coals and to comply with increasingly stringent regulations. Subcritical water has been shown by the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) researchers on this project to be an extremely effective fluid for the removal of organic sulfur from coals. A multigram reactor designed and built at the EERC for supercritical water extraction was used to scale up from milligram-sized samples to 10-20 grams of coal charge. Work performed during this project year resulted in production of low-sulfur (as low as 0.5% S) extracted coal first at supercritical conditions, i.e., 450{degrees}C and 400 atm (5880 psig), but then at conditions below the critical conditions, i.e., 420{degrees}C and 156 atm (2300 psig). Still milder conditions of 400{degrees}C and 156 atm (2300 psig) resulted in sulfur values similar to those of obtained under the supercritical conditions. IBC-102 extracted with supercritical water had a sulfur value of 0.7 wt%. Extraction of IBC-102 at subcritical conditions of 420{degrees}C and 156 atm (2300 psig) resulted in a sulfur content of 0.490A. The tar obtained from the extracted coal had sulfur values ranging from 1.4 to 6.5 wt% and when treated by catalytic desulfurization, tar was quantitatively recovered with a sulfur value of 0.6 wt%. Float-sink physical cleaning of IBC-102 with Certigrav 1.4 reduced the sulfur content of the coal to 1.5 wt% in a recovered float fraction of 83.3%. Approximately 300 lb of IBC-102 was obtained for use in preparing 100 lb of low-sulfur fuel. Float- sink cleaning on a sample of this new coal returned 87.1 wt% as float fraction, with 1.7 wt% sulfur. 158 lb of physically cleaned IBC-102 was used for the continuous process test on the pilot scale. An additional 150 lb of physically

  1. Antibotulinal efficacy of sulfur dioxide in meat.

    PubMed Central

    Tompkin, R B; Christiansen, L N; Shaparis, A B

    1980-01-01

    The addition of sodium metabisulfite as a source of sulfur dioxide delayed botulinal outgrowth in perishable canned comminuted pork when it was temperature abused at 27 degree C. The degree of inhibition was directly related to the level of sulfur dioxide. Levels greater than 100 microgram of sulfur dioxide per g were necessary to achieve significant inhibition when a target level of 100 botulinal spores per g was used. Sodium nitrite partially reduced the efficacy of the sulfur dioxide. Sulfur dioxide offers a new option for the control of botulinal outgrowth in cured or noncured meat and poultry products. PMID:6996613

  2. Instrumentation for Air Pollution Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollowell, Craig D.; McLaughlin, Ralph D.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the techniques which form the basis of current commercial instrumentation for monitoring five major gaseous atmospheric pollutants (sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, oxidants, carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbons). (JR)

  3. Instrumentation for Air Pollution Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollowell, Craig D.; McLaughlin, Ralph D.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the techniques which form the basis of current commercial instrumentation for monitoring five major gaseous atmospheric pollutants (sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, oxidants, carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbons). (JR)

  4. Characterization of Sulfur Compounds in Coffee Beans by Sulfur K-XANES Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenberg, H.; Prange, A.; Modrow, H.; Hormes, J.

    2007-02-01

    In this `feasibility study' the influence of roasting on the sulfur speciation in Mexican coffee beans was investigated by sulfur K-XANES Spectroscopy. Spectra of green and slightly roasted beans could be fitted to a linear combination of `standard' reference spectra for biological samples, whereas longer roasting obviously involves formation of additional sulfur compounds in considerable amounts.

  5. Characterization of Sulfur Compounds in Coffee Beans by Sulfur K-XANES Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenberg, H.; Hormes, J.; Prange, A.; Modrow, H.

    2007-02-02

    In this 'feasibility study' the influence of roasting on the sulfur speciation in Mexican coffee beans was investigated by sulfur K-XANES Spectroscopy. Spectra of green and slightly roasted beans could be fitted to a linear combination of 'standard' reference spectra for biological samples, whereas longer roasting obviously involves formation of additional sulfur compounds in considerable amounts.

  6. Influence of soil properties and phosphate addition on arsenic uptake from polluted soils by velvetgrass (Holcus lanatus).

    PubMed

    Lewińska, K; Karczewska, A

    2013-01-01

    Four kinds of soil material were used in a pot experiment with velvetgrass (Holcus lanatus). Two unpolluted soils: sand (S) and loam (L) were spiked with sodium arsenite (As II) and arsenate (As V), to obtain total arsenic (As) concentrations of 500 mg As kg(-1). Two other soils (ZS I, ZS III), containing 3320 and 5350 mg As kg(-1), were collected from Zloty Stok where gold and arsenic ores were mined and processed for several centuries. The effects of phosphate addition on plants growth and As uptake were investigated. Phosphate was applied to soils in the form of NH4H2PO4 at the rate 0.2 g P/kg. Average concentrations of arsenic in the shoots of velvetgrass grown in spiked soils S and L without P amendment were in the range 18-210 mg As kg(-1) d.wt., whereas those in plants grown on ZS I and ZS II soils were considerably lower, and varied in the range 11-52 mg As kg(-1) d.wt. The addition of phosphate caused a significant increase in plant biomass and therefore the total amounts of As taken up by plants, however, the differences in As concentrations in the shoots of velvetgrass amended and non-amended with phosphate were not statistically significant.

  7. Implications of sludge liquor addition for wastewater-based open pond cultivation of microalgae for biofuel generation and pollutant remediation.

    PubMed

    Osundeko, Olumayowa; Pittman, Jon K

    2014-01-01

    The growth improvement of microalgal strains in municipal secondary-treated wastewater by addition of nutrient-rich activated sludge centrate liquor was examined. Two strains (Chlorella luteoviridis and Parachlorella hussii) were tolerant to liquor, with addition of 25% liquor providing the best growth, biomass productivity and nutrient removal values. The capability of C. luteoviridis and P. hussii for full seasonal cultivation in a 150 L open pond in a temperate climate was studied, using the optimised secondary wastewater +25% liquor medium. Each strain was capable of growth all year including in autumn and winter but with strongest growth, productivity and remediation characteristics in the summer and spring. Both strains could maintain monoculture growth with no significant contamination or culture crash, demonstrating the robustness of these strains for wastewater cultivation in a northern European climate. Each strain could also be efficiently cultivated in a semi-continuous system for steady production of biomass and nutrient removal. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of relative humidity and additives on the reaction of sulfur dioxide with calcium hydroxide. Final report, January 1984-June 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz-Alsop, R.; Rochelle, G.T.

    1988-07-01

    This paper gives results of a study of the reaction of SO/sub 2/ with Ca(OH)/sub 2/ at conditions similar to those of commercial-scale bag filters: 19-74% relative humidity (RH), 30.4-95 C, and 300-4000 ppm SO/sub 2/. The study was carried out in a bench-scale reactor with powder reagent Ca(OH)/sub 2/ dispersed in silica sand. The gas phase was a mixture of N/sub 2/, SO/sub 2/, and water vapor. The effects of Ca(OH)/sub 2/ leading, temperature, RH, inlet SO/sub 2/ concentration, and additives were investigated. Of the additives tried (buffer acids, and organic and inorganic deliquescents), only the deliquescent salts improved Ca(OH)/sub 2/ reactivity toward SO/sub 2/. The improvement depends on the type and amount of salt and on the RH. The experimental data were modeled by a shrinking core model with zero-order kinetics in SO/sub 2/, using an empirical correlation to account for shape and surface roughness of the Ca(OH)/sub 2/ particles. The diffusion coefficient of the SO/sub 2/ through the product layer (De) increases linearly with RH and the amount of additive, and the kinetic rate constant (ks) increases exponentially with RH and the amount of additive.

  9. Estimation of inorganic food additive (nitrite, nitrate and sulfur dioxide), antioxidant (BHA and BHT), processing agent (propylene glycol) and sweetener (sodium saccharin) concentrations in foods and their daily intake based on official inspection results in Japan in fiscal year 1998.

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, Hajimu; Nishijima, Motohiro; Fukasawa, Yoshinobu

    2003-04-01

    The mean concentration and daily intake of inorganic food additives (nitrite, nitrate, and sulfur dioxide), antioxidants (BHA and BHT), a processing agent (propylene glycol), and a sweetener (sodium saccharin) were estimated based on the results of an analysis of 34,489 food samples obtained in official inspections by 106 local governments in Japan in fiscal year 1998. The ratios of mean concentrations of these seven food additives to each allowable limit were 20.0%, 53.9%, 15.5%, 6.2%, 0.4%, 18.5%, and 5.7%, respectively. The daily intakes of these food additives estimated from their concentrations in foods and the daily consumption of foods were 0.205, 0.532, 4.31, 0.119, 0.109, 77.5, and 7.27 mg per person, respectively. These amounts were 6.8%, 0.3%, 12.3%, 0.5%, 0.7%, 6.2%, and 2.6% of the acceptable daily intake (ADI), respectively, when body weight was assumed to be 50 kg. No remarkable differences in the daily intakes of these seven food additives or the ratios to the ADI were observed compared with the results based on the official inspections in fiscal years 1994 and 1996.

  10. A facile pollutant-free approach toward a series of nutritionally effective calcium phosphate nanomaterials for food and drink additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jieru; Chen, Xiaoyi; Yang, Xianyan; Xu, Sanzhong; Zhang, Xinli; Gou, Zhongru

    2011-03-01

    Micronutrient malnutrition is widespread and constitutes one of the main nutritional problems worldwide. Vitamins, amino acids, carbohydrates and Ca-phosphate (CaP) minerals are important to human health and disease prevention. Herein we developed a simple wet-chemical method to prepare multinary nutrients-containing CaP nanomaterials in diluted apple, orange, and grape juices. The scanning electron microscopy observation shows that these nanomaterials are short plate-like CaP nanocrystals of 500 nm in length. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption, thermogravimetric analyses confirm the different specific surface area and organic nutrient contents. The Fourier transform infrared and X-ray diffraction analyses indicate there exist similar organic groups (i.e., COO-, HN-CO) but different CaP species in the precipitates. The dissolution test in vitro simulated stomach juice pH condition indicates that these inorganic-organic nanohybrid materials are multidoped by micronutrients (such as Zn, Sr, Mg, K, vitamin c) and can be readily dissolved in the weak acidic aqueous solutions. This highly efficient utilization of fruit juice to produce CaP-based micronutrient composites may minimize the adverse side effect, so that the nanomaterials are promising as functional food/drink additives. Thus, this novel approach is environmentally and biologically friendly to produce edible nutrients while production cost is attained.

  11. Neutralization and biodegradation of sulfur mustard. Final report, October 1995-June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, S.P.; Szafraniec, L.L.; Beaudry, W.T.; Earley, J.T.; Irvine, R.L.

    1997-02-01

    The chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard was hydrolyzed to products that were biologically mineralized in sequencing batch reactors seeded with activated sludge. Greater than 90% carbon removal was achieved using laboratory scale bioreactors processing hydrolyzed munitions grade sulfur mustard obtained directly from the U.S. Chemical Stockpile. The bioreactor effluent was nontoxic and contained no detectable sulfur mustard or priority pollutants. The sulfur mustard hydrolysis biodegradation process has potential application to the congressionally mandated disposal of sulfur mustard stockpiles.

  12. PROCEEDINGS ON SYNCHROTRON RADIATION: Transfer characterization of sulfur from coal-burning emission to plant leaves by PIXE and XANES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Liang-Man; Zhang, Gui-Lin; Zhang, Yuan-Xim; Li, Yan; Lin, Jun; Liu, Wei; Cao, Qing-Chen; Zhao, Yi-Dong; Ma, Chen-Yan; Han, Yong

    2009-11-01

    The impact of coal-burning emission on sulfur in camphor leaves was investigated using Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and synchrotron radiation technique X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The PIXE results show that the sulfur concentrations in the leaves collected at the polluted site are significantly higher than those in controls. The Sulfur XANES spectra show the presence of organic (disulfides, thiols, thioethers, sulfonates and sulfoxides) and inorganic sulfur (sulfates) in the leaves. The inorganic sulfur in the leaves of camphor tree polluted by coal combustion is 15% more than that of the control site. The results suggest that the long-term coal-burning pollution resulted in an enhanced content of the total sulfur and sulfate in the leaves, and the uptake of sulfur by leaves had exceeded the metabolic requirement of plants and the excess of sulfur was stored as SO2-4. It can monitor the sulfur pollution in atmosphere.

  13. Steps Towards Controlling the "Export" of Air Pollution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Observer, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Results of a five year study to measure the movement of sulfur pollutants across Europe found these pollutants move hundreds or thousands of kilometers before being deposited in large quantities in countries far from where they originate. The need for cooperation among countries to control sulfur pollutants is stressed. (Author/MA)

  14. Steps Towards Controlling the "Export" of Air Pollution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Observer, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Results of a five year study to measure the movement of sulfur pollutants across Europe found these pollutants move hundreds or thousands of kilometers before being deposited in large quantities in countries far from where they originate. The need for cooperation among countries to control sulfur pollutants is stressed. (Author/MA)

  15. Uses of lunar sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaniman, D.; Pettit, D.; Heiken, G.

    1992-01-01

    Sulfur and sulfur compounds have a wide range of applications for their fluid, electrical, chemical, and biochemical properties. Although known abundances on the Moon are limited (approximately 0.1 percent in mare soils), sulfur is relatively extractable by heating. Coproduction of sulfur during oxygen extraction from ilmenite-rich mare soils could yield sulfur in masses up to 10 percent of the mass of oxygen produced. Sulfur deserves serious consideration as a lunar resource.

  16. Uses of lunar sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Vaniman, D.T.; Pettit, D.R.; Heiken, G.

    1988-01-01

    Sulfur and sulfur compounds have a wide range of applications for their fluid, electrical, chemical and biochemical properties. Although low in abundance on the Moon (/approximately/0.1% in mare soils), sulfur is surface-correlated and relatively extractable. Co-production of sulfur during oxygen extraction from ilmenite-rich soils could yield sulfur in masses up to 10% of the mass of oxygen produced. Sulfur deserves serious consideration as a lunar resource. 29 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Sulfur isotopic fractionation and its implication: Sulfate formation in PM2.5 and coal combustion under different conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shanli; Guo, Ziyan; Guo, Zhaobing; Guo, Qingjun; Zhang, Yanlin; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Haixiao

    2017-09-01

    In order to exactly explore sulfur source and sulfate formation under highly polluted atmosphere, we determined δ34S values of sulfate in PM2.5 and atmospheric SO2 in Nanjing region from 1 to 23 Jan. 2014. The secondary sulfate formation mechanism was discussed based on sulfur isotopic fractionation in the process of SO2 oxidation. Meanwhile, we synchronously studied δ34S values of raw coals used locally as well as sulfur isotopic fractionation during the combustion under coal burning and smoldering. The results show that δ34S average values of SO2 and sulfate in PM2.5 were 1.5‰ and 5.1‰, respectively. δ34S values of sulfate in PM2.5 were consistent with those of coals widely used in Nanjing region and Northern China, indicating coal combustion was an important sulfur source for PM2.5. Sulfur isotopic fractionation factors ranged from 1.0014 to 1.0075, implying that SO2 heterogeneous and homogeneous oxidation were coexisting during the formation of the secondary sulfate. The contribution of SO2 heterogeneous oxidation to sulfate varied from 40.7% to 64.8% during the observation period. δ34S values of coals presented moderately positive sulfur isotopic signatures due to organic sulfur in low sulfur coals were mainly formed by plant assimilation. Besides, the negative relationship between δ34S values of coals and total sulfur contents was also found. In addition, there existed a significant sulfur isotopic fractionation effect during coal combustion. Sulfate in PM2.5 in flue gas enriched 34S, while SO2 in flue gas enriched 32S. There was presence of the difference of δ34S values in PM2.5 and SO2 in flue gas between coal burning and smoldering, which was related to coal property and combustion temperature.

  18. Sulfuric acid-sulfur heat storage cycle

    DOEpatents

    Norman, John H.

    1983-12-20

    A method of storing heat is provided utilizing a chemical cycle which interconverts sulfuric acid and sulfur. The method can be used to levelize the energy obtained from intermittent heat sources, such as solar collectors. Dilute sulfuric acid is concentrated by evaporation of water, and the concentrated sulfuric acid is boiled and decomposed using intense heat from the heat source, forming sulfur dioxide and oxygen. The sulfur dioxide is reacted with water in a disproportionation reaction yielding dilute sulfuric acid, which is recycled, and elemental sulfur. The sulfur has substantial potential chemical energy and represents the storage of a significant portion of the energy obtained from the heat source. The sulfur is burned whenever required to release the stored energy. A particularly advantageous use of the heat storage method is in conjunction with a solar-powered facility which uses the Bunsen reaction in a water-splitting process. The energy storage method is used to levelize the availability of solar energy while some of the sulfur dioxide produced in the heat storage reactions is converted to sulfuric acid in the Bunsen reaction.

  19. LOW SULFUR HOME HEATING OIL DEMONSTRATION PROJECT SUMMARY REPORT.

    SciTech Connect

    BATEY, J.E.; MCDONALD, R.J.

    2005-06-01

    almost the same as predicted by past laboratory studies. Fouling deposition rates are reduced by a factor of two to three by using lower sulfur oil. This translates to a potential for substantial service cost savings by extending the interval between labor-intensive cleanings of the internal surfaces of the heating systems in these homes. In addition, the time required for annual service calls can be lowered, reducing service costs and customer inconvenience. The analyses conducted as part of this field demonstration project indicates that service costs can be reduced by up to $200 million a year nationwide by using lower sulfur oil and extending vacuum cleaning intervals depending on the labor costs and existing cleaning intervals. The ratio of cost savings to added fuel costs is economically attractive based on past fuel price differentials for the lower sulfur product. The ratio of cost savings to added costs vary widely as a function of hourly service rates and the additional cost for lower sulfur oil. For typical values, the expected benefit is a factor of two to four higher than the added fuel cost. This means that for every dollar spent on higher fuel cost, two to four dollars can be saved by lowered vacuum cleaning costs when the cleaning intervals are extended. Information contained in this report can be used by individual oil marketers to estimate the benefit to cost ratio for their specific applications. Sulfur oxide and nitrogen oxide air emissions are reduced substantially by using lower sulfur fuel oil in homes. Sulfur oxides emissions are lowered by 75 percent by switching from fuel 0.20 percent to 0.05 percent sulfur oil. This is a reduction of 63,000 tons a year nationwide. In New York State, sulfur oxide emissions are reduced by 13,000 tons a year. This translates to a total value of $12 million a year in Sulfur Oxide Emission Reduction Credits for an emission credit cost of $195 a ton. While this ''environmental cost'' dollar savings is smaller than

  20. A Conductivity Device for Measuring Sulfur Dioxide in the Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, James C.

    1972-01-01

    Described is a general electroconductivity device enabling students to determine sulfur dioxide concentration in a particular location, hopefully leading to a deeper understanding of the problem of air pollution. (DF)

  1. A Conductivity Device for Measuring Sulfur Dioxide in the Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, James C.

    1972-01-01

    Described is a general electroconductivity device enabling students to determine sulfur dioxide concentration in a particular location, hopefully leading to a deeper understanding of the problem of air pollution. (DF)

  2. 40 CFR 52.57 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions, of the rules and regulations of the State of Alabama, as adopted by the Alabama Air Pollution Control Commission on May 29, 1973, and amended on March 25, 1975, which...

  3. 40 CFR 52.57 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions, of the rules and regulations of the State of Alabama, as adopted by the Alabama Air Pollution Control Commission on May 29, 1973, and amended on March 25, 1975, which...

  4. 40 CFR 52.57 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions, of the rules and regulations of the State of Alabama, as adopted by the Alabama Air Pollution Control Commission on May 29, 1973, and amended on March 25, 1975, which...

  5. Simultaneous capture of metal, sulfur and chlorine by sorbents during fluidized bed incineration.

    PubMed

    Ho, T C; Chuang, T C; Chelluri, S; Lee, Y; Hopper, J R

    2001-01-01

    Metal capture experiments were carried out in an atmospheric fluidized bed incinerator to investigate the effect of sulfur and chlorine on metal capture efficiency and the potential for simultaneous capture of metal, sulfur and chlorine by sorbents. In addition to experimental investigation, the effect of sulfur and chlorine on the metal capture process was also theoretically investigated through performing equilibrium calculations based on the minimization of system free energy. The observed results have indicated that, in general, the existence of sulfur and chlorine enhances the efficiency of metal capture especially at low to medium combustion temperatures. The capture mechanisms appear to include particulate scrubbing and chemisorption depending on the type of sorbents. Among the three sorbents tested, calcined limestone is capable of capturing all the three air pollutants simultaneously. The results also indicate that a mixture of the three sorbents, in general, captures more metals than a single sorbent during the process. In addition, the existence of sulfur and chlorine apparently enhances the metal capture process.

  6. Air Pollution, Causes and Cures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manufacturing Chemists Association, Washington, DC.

    This commentary on sources of air pollution and air purification treatments is accompanied by graphic illustrations. Sources of carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, and hydrocarbons found in the air are discussed. Methods of removing these pollutants at their source are presented with cut-away diagrams of the facilities and technical…

  7. Properties of Sulfur Concrete.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-06

    This report summarizes the state of the art of sulfur concrete . Sulfur concrete is created by mixing molten sulfur with aggregate and allowing the...and many organic compounds. It works well as a rapid runway repair material. Sulfur concrete also has unfavorable properties. It has poor durability

  8. Acidophilic sulfur disproportionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardisty, Dalton S.; Olyphant, Greg A.; Bell, Jonathan B.; Johnson, Adam P.; Pratt, Lisa M.

    2013-07-01

    Bacterial disproportionation of elemental sulfur (S0) is a well-studied metabolism and is not previously reported to occur at pH values less than 4.5. In this study, a sediment core from an abandoned-coal-mine-waste deposit in Southwest Indiana revealed sulfur isotope fractionations between S0 and pyrite (Δ34Ses-py) of up to -35‰, inferred to indicate intense recycling of S0 via bacterial disproportionation and sulfide oxidation. Additionally, the chemistry of seasonally collected pore-water profiles were found to vary, with pore-water pH ranging from 2.2 to 3.8 and observed seasonal redox shifts expressed as abrupt transitions from Fe(III) to Fe(II) dominated conditions, often controlled by fluctuating water table depths. S0 is a common product during the oxidation of pyrite, a process known to generate acidic waters during weathering and production of acid mine drainage. The H2S product of S0 disproportionation, fractionated by up to -8.6‰, is rapidly oxidized to S0 near redox gradients via reaction with Fe(III) allowing for the accumulation of isotopically light S0 that can then become subject to further sulfur disproportionation. A mass-balance model for S0 incorporating pyrite oxidation, S0 disproportionation, and S0 oxidation readily explains the range of observed Δ34Ses-py and emphasizes the necessity of seasonally varying pyrite weathering and metabolic rates, as indicated by the pore water chemistry. The findings of this research suggest that S0 disproportionation is potentially a common microbial process at a pH < 4.5 and can create large sulfur isotope fractionations, even in the absence of sulfate reduction.

  9. Relationship between corrosion and the biological sulfur cycle: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Little, B.J.; Ray, R.I.; Pope, R.K.

    2000-04-01

    Sulfur and sulfur compounds can produce pitting, crevice corrosion, dealloying, stress corrosion cracking, and stress-oriented hydrogen-induced cracking of susceptible metals and alloys. Even though the metabolic by-products of the biological sulfur cycle are extremely corrosive, there are no correlations between numbers and types of sulfur-related organisms and the probability or rate of corrosion, Determination of specific mechanisms for corrosion caused by microbiologically mediated oxidation and reduction of sulfur and sulfur compounds is complicated by the variety of potential metabolic-energy sources and by-products; the coexistence of reduced and oxidized sulfur species; competing reactions with inorganic and organic compounds; and the versatility and adaptability of microorganisms in biofilms. The microbial ecology of sulfur-rich environments is poorly understood because of the association of aerobes and anaerobes and the mutualism or succession of heterotrophs to autotrophs. The physical scale over which the sulfur cycle influences corrosion varies with the environment. The complete sulfur cycle of oxidation and reduction reactions can take place in macroenvironments, including sewers and polluted harbors, or within the microenvironment of biofilms. In this review, reactions of sulfur and sulfur compounds resulting in corrosion were discussed in the context of environmental processes important to corrosion.

  10. Sulfur metabolism in phototrophic sulfur bacteria.

    PubMed

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Dahl, Christiane

    2009-01-01

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria are characterized by oxidizing various inorganic sulfur compounds for use as electron donors in carbon dioxide fixation during anoxygenic photosynthetic growth. These bacteria are divided into the purple sulfur bacteria (PSB) and the green sulfur bacteria (GSB). They utilize various combinations of sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate and sometimes also ferrous iron and hydrogen as electron donors. This review focuses on the dissimilatory and assimilatory metabolism of inorganic sulfur compounds in these bacteria and also briefly discusses these metabolisms in other types of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria. The biochemistry and genetics of sulfur compound oxidation in PSB and GSB are described in detail. A variety of enzymes catalyzing sulfur oxidation reactions have been isolated from GSB and PSB (especially Allochromatium vinosum, a representative of the Chromatiaceae), and many are well characterized also on a molecular genetic level. Complete genome sequence data are currently available for 10 strains of GSB and for one strain of PSB. We present here a genome-based survey of the distribution and phylogenies of genes involved in oxidation of sulfur compounds in these strains. It is evident from biochemical and genetic analyses that the dissimilatory sulfur metabolism of these organisms is very complex and incompletely understood. This metabolism is modular in the sense that individual steps in the metabolism may be performed by different enzymes in different organisms. Despite the distant evolutionary relationship between GSB and PSB, their photosynthetic nature and their dependency on oxidation of sulfur compounds resulted in similar ecological roles in the sulfur cycle as important anaerobic oxidizers of sulfur compounds.

  11. Western forests and air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R.K.; Binkley, D.; Boehm, M.

    1992-01-01

    The book addresses the relationships between air pollution in the western United States and trends in the growth and condition of Western coniferous forests. The major atmospheric pollutants to which forest in the region are exposed are sulfur and nitrogen compounds and ozone. The potential effects of atmospheric pollution on these forests include foliar injury, alteration of growth rates and patterns, soil acidification, shifts in species composition, and modification of the effects of natural stresses.

  12. Recovery of soil properties after seedlings Inoculation with AM fungi and addition of composted olive mill waste in the regeneration of a heavy metal polluted environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    curaqueo, Gustavo; Schoebitz, Mauricio; Borie, Fernando; del Mar Alguacil, Maria; Caravaca, Fuensanta; Roldan, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    A greenhouse experiment was carried out in order to investigate the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi inoculation and the use of composted olive waste (COW) on the establishment of Tetraclinis articulata and soil properties in a heavy metal polluted soil. The higher doses of COW in combination with AM fungi increased shoot and root biomass production of T. articulata by 96% and 60% respectively. These treatments trended to improve the soils properties evaluated, highlighting the C compounds and N as well as the microbiological activities. In relation to the metal translocation in T. articulata, doses of COW applied decreased the Cr, Ni and Pb contents in shoot, as well as Cr and As in root, although the most of them reached low levels and far from phytotoxic. The COW amendment aided G-mosseae-inoculated T. articulata plants to thrive in contaminated soil, mainly through an improvement in both nutrients uptake, mainly P and soil microbial function. In addition, the combined use of AM fungi plus COW could be a feasible strategy to be incorporated in phytoremediation programs; because it promotes soil properties, a better performance of plants for supporting the stress in heavy-metal contaminated soils derived from mining process, and also can be a good way for olive mill wastes disposal.

  13. Environmental Chemistry: Air and Water Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoker, H. Stephen; Seager, Spencer L.

    This is a book about air and water pollution whose chapters cover the topics of air pollution--general considerations, carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, hydrocarbons and photochemical oxidants, sulfur oxides, particulates, temperature inversions and the greenhouse effect; and water pollution--general considerations, mercury, lead, detergents,…

  14. Environmental Chemistry: Air and Water Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoker, H. Stephen; Seager, Spencer L.

    This is a book about air and water pollution whose chapters cover the topics of air pollution--general considerations, carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, hydrocarbons and photochemical oxidants, sulfur oxides, particulates, temperature inversions and the greenhouse effect; and water pollution--general considerations, mercury, lead, detergents,…

  15. Pollution's Price--The Cost in Human Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newill, Vaun A.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the detrimental effects of air pollution, and especially sulfur dioxide, on human health. Any relaxation of existing national air pollution standards because of the energy crisis could be costly in terms of the nation's health. (JR)

  16. Pollution's Price--The Cost in Human Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newill, Vaun A.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the detrimental effects of air pollution, and especially sulfur dioxide, on human health. Any relaxation of existing national air pollution standards because of the energy crisis could be costly in terms of the nation's health. (JR)

  17. Immobilization of Cu(II), Pb(II) and Cd(II) by the addition of rice straw derived biochar to a simulated polluted Ultisol.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun; Xu, Ren-kou; Jiang, Tian-yu; Li, Zhuo

    2012-08-30

    To develop new remediation methods for acidic soils polluted by heavy metals, the chemical fractions of Cu(II), Pb(II) and Cd(II) in an Ultisol with and without rice straw biochar were compared and the effect of biochar incorporation on the mobility and bioavailability of these metals was investigated. In light of the decreasing zeta potential and increasing CEC, the incorporation of biochar made the negative soil surface charge more negative. Additionally, the soil pH increased markedly after the addition of biochar. These changes in soil properties were advantageous for heavy metal immobilization in the bulk soil. The acid soluble Cu(II) and Pb(II) decreased by 19.7-100.0% and 18.8-77.0%, respectively, as the amount of biochar added increased. The descending range of acid soluble Cd(II) was 5.6-14.1%, which was much lower than that of Cu(II) and Pb(II). When 5.0 mmol/kg of these heavy metals was added, the reducible Pb(II) for treatments containing 3% and 5% biochar was 2.0 and 3.0 times higher than that of samples without biochar, while the reducible Cu(II) increased by 61.6% and 132.6% for the corresponding treatments, respectively. When 3% and 5% biochar was added, the oxidizable portion of Pb(II) increased by 1.18 and 1.94 times, respectively, while the oxidizable portion of Cu(II) increased by 8.13 and 7.16 times, respectively, primarily due to the high adsorption affinity of functional groups of biochar to Cu(II). The residual heavy metal contents were low and changed little with the incorporation of biochar. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Simulated effects of sulfur deposition on nutrient cycling in class I wilderness areas

    Treesearch

    Katherine J. Elliott; James M. Vose; Jennifer D. Knoepp; Dale W. Johnson; William T. Swank; William Jackson

    2008-01-01

    As a consequence of human land use, population growth, and industrialization, wilderness and other natural areas can be threatened by air pollution, climate change, and exotic diseases or pests. Air pollution in the form of acidic deposition is comprised of sulfuric and nitric acids and ammonium derived from emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and ammonia....

  19. Recovery of tungsten and molybdenum from sulfur--bearing material

    SciTech Connect

    Ritsko, J. E.; Acia, H. L.

    1984-11-13

    Tungsten and molybdenum are recovered from sulfur bearing material such as sulfide sludges by a pollution free process in which the sulfur bearing material is heated with agitation in an aqueous solution of sodium carbonate to form water soluble molybdenum and tungsten compounds without forming any appreciable amount of water soluble sulfur compounds. The reaction mixture is oxidized to convert partially reduced tungsten values or molybdenum values to sodium tungstate and sodium molybdate respectively. The liquid phase containing tungsten and molybdenum is separated from the solid phase containing free sulfur.

  20. Solubility of Sulfur Dioxide in Sulfuric Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, K. K.; Compton, L. E.; Lawson, D. D.

    1982-01-01

    The solubility of sulfur dioxide in 50% (wt./wt.) sulfuric acid was evaluated by regular solution theory, and the results verified by experimental measurements in the temperature range of 25 C to 70 C at pressures of 60 to 200 PSIA. The percent (wt./wt.) of sulfur dioxide in 50% (wt./wt.) sulfuric acid is given by the equation %SO2 = 2.2350 + 0.0903P - 0.00026P 10 to the 2nd power with P in PSIA.

  1. Economic Analysis of Costs Incurred from Chemical Exposures in the Workplace Resulting in Non-Carcinogenic Responses as Additional Justification for Pollution Prevention Projects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-26

    The Air Force Chief of Staff, General Merrill McPeak, and the Secretary of the Air Force, Mr. Donald Rice , further emphasized pollution prevention in...studies include in vivo animal bioassays and invitro and tissue culture tests. These studies involve the actual dosing of animals or cultures to determine...and Donald B. Rice . Air Force Pollution Prevention Program. Memorandum to all Commanders. HQ USAF, Washington D.C: 13 Nov 1991. 50. Meyer, Gary. OEHL

  2. Pulmonary response to threshold levels of sulfur dioxide (1. 0 ppm) and ozone (0. 3 ppm) (journal version)

    SciTech Connect

    Folinsbee, L.J.; Bedi, J.F.; Horvath, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    The authors exposed 22 healthy adult non-smoking men for 2 hours to either filtered air, 1.0 ppm sulfur dioxide, 0.30 ppm ozone, or the combination of 1.0 ppm sulfur dioxide plus 0.30 ppm ozone. It was hypothesized that exposure to near-threshold concentrations of these pollutants would show any interaction between the two pollutants that might have been masked by the more-obvious response to the higher concentrations of ozone used in previous studies. Each subject alternated 30-minute treadmill exercise with 10-minute rest periods for the 2 hours. Following ozone exposure alone, forced expiratory measurements (FVC, FEV-1, and FEF25-75%) were significantly decreased. The combined exposure to SO/sub 2/ plus O/sub 3/ produced similar but smaller decreases in these measures. There were small but significant differences between the ozone and the ozone plus sulfur dioxide exposure for FVC, FEV-1,-2,-3, and FEF25-75% at the end of the 2-hour exposure. It was concluded that, with these pollutant concentrations, there is no additive or synergistic effect of the two pollutants on pulmonary function.

  3. Selecting the best AOP for isoxazolyl penicillins degradation as a function of water characteristics: Effects of pH, chemical nature of additives and pollutant concentration.

    PubMed

    Villegas-Guzman, Paola; Silva-Agredo, Javier; Florez, Oscar; Giraldo-Aguirre, Ana L; Pulgarin, Cesar; Torres-Palma, Ricardo A

    2017-04-01

    To provide new insights toward the selection of the most suitable AOP for isoxazolyl penicillins elimination, the degradation of dicloxacillin, a isoxazolyl penicillin model, was studied using different advanced oxidation processes (AOPs): ultrasound (US), photo-Fenton (UV/H2O2/Fe(2+)) and TiO2 photocatalysis (UV/TiO2). Although all processes achieved total removal of the antibiotic and antimicrobial activity, and increased the biodegradability level of the solutions, significant differences concerning the mineralization extend, the pH of the solution, the pollutant concentration and the chemical nature of additives were found. UV/TiO2 reached almost complete mineralization; while ∼10% mineralization was obtained for UV/H2O2/Fe(2+) and practically zero for US. Effect of initial pH, mineral natural water and the presence of organic (glucose, 2-propanol and oxalic acid) were then investigated. UV/H2O2/Fe(2+) and US processes were improved in acidic media, while natural pH favored UV/TiO2 system. According to both the nature of the added organic compound and the process, inhibition, no effect or enhancement of the degradation rate was observed. The degradation in natural mineral water showed contrasting results according to the antibiotic concentration: US process was enhanced at low concentration of dicloxacillin followed by detrimental effects at high substrate concentrations. A contrary effect was observed during photo-Fenton, while UV/TiO2 was inhibited in all of cases. Finally, a schema illustrating the enhancement or inhibiting effects of water matrix is proposed as a tool for selecting the best process for isoxazolyl penicillins degradation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The transport of atmospheric sulfur over Cape Town

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenner, Samantha L.; Abiodun, Babatunde J.

    2013-11-01

    Cape Town, renowned for its natural beauty, is troubled by an unpleasant brown haze pollution, in which atmospheric sulfur plays a major role. This study investigates whether Cape Town is a net producer or recipient of anthropogenic sulfur pollution. In the study, two atmospheric chemistry-transport models (RegCM and WRF) are used to simulate atmospheric flow and chemistry transport over South Africa for two years (2001 and 2002). Both models reproduce the observed seasonal variability in the atmospheric flow and SO2 concentration over Cape Town. The models simulations agree on the seasonal pattern of SO2 over South Africa but disagree on that of SO4. The simulations show that ambient sulfur in Cape Town may be linked with pollutant emissions from the Mpumalanga Highveld, South Africa's most industrialized region. While part of atmospheric SO2 from the Highveld is transported at 700 hPa level toward the Indian Ocean (confirming previous studies), part is transported at low level from the Highveld toward Cape Town. In April, a band of high concentration SO2 extends between the Highveld and Cape Town, following the south coast. Extreme sulfur pollution events in Cape Town are associated with weak flow convergence or stagnant conditions over the city, both of which encourage the accumulation of pollution. However the study suggests that atmospheric sulfur is being advected from Mpumalanga Highveld to Cape Town and this may contribute to atmospheric pollution problems in Cape Town.

  5. Seeking More Effective Management of Freshwater Pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    The atmosphere contains airborne pollutants such as mercury, nitrogen oxides, and sulfur oxides released from automobiles, factories, and power plants. Similarly, land surfaces such as croplands, feedlots, logged forests, construction sites, and urban land surfaces may be reserv...

  6. Seeking More Effective Management of Freshwater Pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    The atmosphere contains airborne pollutants such as mercury, nitrogen oxides, and sulfur oxides released from automobiles, factories, and power plants. Similarly, land surfaces such as croplands, feedlots, logged forests, construction sites, and urban land surfaces may be reserv...

  7. 40 CFR 80.213 - What alternative sulfur standards and requirements apply to transmix processors and transmix...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What alternative sulfur standards and... ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.213 What alternative sulfur standards and... TGP meets the applicable sulfur standards under § 80.210 or § 80.220, prior to the TGP leaving...

  8. 40 CFR 80.213 - What alternative sulfur standards and requirements apply to transmix processors and transmix...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What alternative sulfur standards and... ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.213 What alternative sulfur standards and... TGP meets the applicable sulfur standards under § 80.210 or § 80.220, prior to the TGP leaving...

  9. 40 CFR 80.213 - What alternative sulfur standards and requirements apply to transmix processors and transmix...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What alternative sulfur standards and... ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.213 What alternative sulfur standards and... TGP meets the applicable sulfur standards under § 80.210 or § 80.220, prior to the TGP leaving...

  10. 40 CFR 80.213 - What alternative sulfur standards and requirements apply to transmix processors and transmix...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What alternative sulfur standards and... ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.213 What alternative sulfur standards and... TGP meets the applicable sulfur standards under § 80.210 or § 80.220, prior to the TGP leaving...

  11. The photophysics of naphthalene dimers controlled by sulfur bridge oxidation† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c7sc01285c Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Climent, Clàudia; Barbatti, Mario; Wolf, Michael O.; Bardeen, Christopher J.

    2017-01-01

    In this study we investigate in detail the photophysics of naphthalene dimers covalently linked by a sulfur atom. We explore and rationalize how the oxidation state of the sulfur-bridging atom directly influences the photoluminescence of the dimer by enhancing or depriving its radiative and non-radiative relaxation pathways. In particular, we discuss how oxidation controls the amount of electronic transfer between the naphthalene moieties and the participation of the SOn bridge in the low-lying electronic transitions. We identify the sulfur electron lone-pairs as crucial actors in the non-radiative decay of the excited sulfide and sulfoxide dimers, which are predicted to proceed via a conical intersection (CI). Concretely, two types of CI have been identified for these dimers, which are associated with the photo-induced pyramidal inversion and reverse fragmentation mechanisms found in aryl sulfoxide dimers. The obtained results and conclusions are general enough to be extrapolated to other sulfur-bridged conjugated dimers, therefore proportionating novel strategies in the design of strongly photoluminescent organic molecules with controlled charge transfer. PMID:28959417

  12. Graphene-wrapped sulfur nanospheres with ultra-high sulfur loading for high energy density lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ya; Guo, Jinxin; Zhang, Jun; Su, Qingmei; Du, Gaohui

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery with high theoretical energy density is one of the most promising energy storage systems for electric vehicles and intermittent renewable energy. However, due to the poor conductivity of the active material, considerable weight of the electrode is occupied by the conductive additives. Here we report a graphene-wrapped sulfur nanospheres composite (S-nanosphere@G) with sulfur content up to 91 wt% as the high energy density cathode material for Li-S battery. The sulfur nanospheres with diameter of 400-500 nm are synthesized through a solution-based approach with the existence of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Then the sulfur nanospheres are uniformly wrapped by conductive graphene sheets through the electrostatic interaction between graphene oxide and PVP, followed by reducing of graphene oxide with hydrazine. The design of graphene wrapped sulfur nanoarchitecture provides flexible conductive graphene coating with void space to accommodate the volume expansion of sulfur and to minimize polysulfide dissolution. As a result, the S-nanosphere@G nanocomposite with 91 wt% sulfur shows a reversible initial capacity of 970 mA h g-1 and an average columbic efficiency > 96% over 100 cycles at a rate of 0.2 C. Taking the total mass of electrode into account, the S-nanosphere@G composite is a promising cathode material for high energy density Li-S batteries.

  13. Biochemistry of sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Huxtable, R.J.; LaFranconi, W.M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: the chemistry of sulfur; the oxidation states of sulfur; the reduction of sulfate and the oxidation of sulfide; the sulfur cycle; oxidation of inorganic sulfide; the metabolism and functions of methionine; taurine and the oxidative metabolism of cysteine; thiols, disulfides, and thioesters; thioethers; thiamine; biotin; sulfates; inherited disorders of sulfur metabolism; cystinuria; sulfur and the metabolism of xenobiotics; general aspects of xenobiotic metabolism; glutathione and sulfation of xenobiotics; and metabolic activation as a result of sulfate conjugation.

  14. Sulfur tolerant anode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-02-01

    The goal of this program is the development of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) anode which is more tolerant of sulfur contaminants in the fuel than the current state-of-the-art nickel-based anode structures. This program addresses two different but related aspects of the sulfur contamination problem. The primary aspect is concerned with the development of a sulfur tolerant electrocatalyst for the fuel oxidation reaction. A secondary issue is the development of a sulfur tolerant water-gas-shift reaction catalyst and an investigation of potential steam reforming catalysts which also have some sulfur tolerant capabilities. These two aspects are being addressed as two separate tasks.

  15. Sulfur tolerant anode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-01

    The goal of this program is the development of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) anode which is more tolerant of sulfur contaminants in the fuel than the current state-of-the-art nickel-based anode structures. This program addresses two different but related aspects of the sulfur contamination problem. The primary aspect is concerned with the development of a sulfur tolerant electrocatalyst for the fuel oxidation reaction. A secondary issue is the development of a sulfur tolerant water-gas-shift reaction catalyst and an investigation of potential steam reforming catalysts which also have some sulfur tolerant capabilities. These two aspects are being addressed as two separate tasks.

  16. Drug Targets in Mycobacterial Sulfur Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Devayani P.; Muse, Wilson B.; Carroll, Kate S.

    2011-01-01

    The identification of new antibacterial targets is urgently needed to address multidrug resistant and latent tuberculosis infection. Sulfur metabolic pathways are essential for survival and the expression of virulence in many pathogenic bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In addition, microbial sulfur metabolic pathways are largely absent in humans and therefore, represent unique targets for therapeutic intervention. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the enzymes associated with the production of sulfated and reduced sulfur-containing metabolites in Mycobacteria. Small molecule inhibitors of these catalysts represent valuable chemical tools that can be used to investigate the role of sulfur metabolism throughout the Mycobacterial lifecycle and may also represent new leads for drug development. In this light, we also summarize recent progress in the development of inhibitors of sulfur metabolism enzymes. PMID:17970225

  17. Transformations in understanding the health impacts of air pollutants in the 20th century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimblecombe, P.

    2009-02-01

    The transformations of air pollution in the 20th century are well known. The century opened with urban atmospheres polluted by the combustion products of burning coal: smoke and sulfur dioxide. At the millennium these pollutants had almost vanished, replaced by the pollutants, both primary and secondary, a function of fossil-fuelled vehicles. However transitions in terms of health outcomes have been equally dramatic. Fine particulate matter causes notable cardiovascular problems such as increased incidence of stroke and heart attack, although the mechanism remains somewhat unclear. Cancer inducing air pollutants remain a concern, but in addition more recently there has been a rising interest in the presence of neurotoxins and endocrine disrupting substances in the environment.

  18. Sulfuric Acid on Europa

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-09-30

    Frozen sulfuric acid on Jupiter's moon Europa is depicted in this image produced from data gathered by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The brightest areas, where the yellow is most intense, represent regions of high frozen sulfuric acid concentration. Sulfuric acid is found in battery acid and in Earth's acid rain. This image is based on data gathered by Galileo's near infrared mapping spectrometer. Europa's leading hemisphere is toward the bottom right, and there are enhanced concentrations of sulfuric acid in the trailing side of Europa (the upper left side of the image). This is the face of Europa that is struck by sulfur ions coming from Jupiter's innermost moon, Io. The long, narrow features that crisscross Europa also show sulfuric acid that may be from sulfurous material extruded in cracks. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA02500

  19. Managing Air Quality - Air Pollutant Types

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Describes the types of air pollutants, including common or criteria pollutants, and hazardous air pollutants and links to additional information. Also links to resources on other air pollution issues.

  20. 40 CFR 80.200 - What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the sulfur... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.200 What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements? For the purpose...

  1. 40 CFR 80.195 - What are the gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are the gasoline sulfur standards... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.195 What are the gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers?...

  2. 40 CFR 80.195 - What are the gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the gasoline sulfur standards... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.195 What are the gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers?...

  3. 40 CFR 80.240 - What are the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... sulfur standards? 80.240 Section 80.240 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Hardship Provisions § 80.240 What are the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards? (a) The gasoline sulfur...

  4. 40 CFR 80.240 - What are the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... sulfur standards? 80.240 Section 80.240 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Hardship Provisions § 80.240 What are the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards? (a) The gasoline sulfur...

  5. 40 CFR 80.240 - What are the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... sulfur standards? 80.240 Section 80.240 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Hardship Provisions § 80.240 What are the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards? (a) The gasoline sulfur...

  6. 40 CFR 80.295 - How is a refinery sulfur baseline determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How is a refinery sulfur baseline... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Abt Program-Baseline Determination § 80.295 How is a refinery sulfur baseline determined? (a) A refinery's gasoline sulfur...

  7. 40 CFR 80.195 - What are the gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the gasoline sulfur standards... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.195 What are the gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers?...

  8. 40 CFR 80.195 - What are the gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are the gasoline sulfur standards... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.195 What are the gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers?...

  9. 40 CFR 80.295 - How is a refinery sulfur baseline determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How is a refinery sulfur baseline... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Abt Program-Baseline Determination § 80.295 How is a refinery sulfur baseline determined? (a) A refinery's gasoline sulfur...

  10. 40 CFR 80.295 - How is a refinery sulfur baseline determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How is a refinery sulfur baseline... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Abt Program-Baseline Determination § 80.295 How is a refinery sulfur baseline determined? (a) A refinery's gasoline sulfur...

  11. 40 CFR 80.295 - How is a refinery sulfur baseline determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How is a refinery sulfur baseline... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Abt Program-Baseline Determination § 80.295 How is a refinery sulfur baseline determined? (a) A refinery's gasoline sulfur...

  12. 40 CFR 80.195 - What are the gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the gasoline sulfur standards... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.195 What are the gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers?...

  13. 40 CFR 80.295 - How is a refinery sulfur baseline determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How is a refinery sulfur baseline... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Abt Program-Baseline Determination § 80.295 How is a refinery sulfur baseline determined? (a) A refinery's gasoline sulfur...

  14. 40 CFR 80.1603 - Gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gasoline sulfur standards for refiners... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur § 80.1603 Gasoline sulfur standards for refiners and importers. (a) Sulfur standards—(1) Annual average standard....

  15. 40 CFR 80.240 - What are the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... sulfur standards? 80.240 Section 80.240 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Hardship Provisions § 80.240 What are the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards? (a) The gasoline sulfur...

  16. 40 CFR 80.240 - What are the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... sulfur standards? 80.240 Section 80.240 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Hardship Provisions § 80.240 What are the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards? (a) The gasoline sulfur...

  17. 40 CFR 80.200 - What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What gasoline is subject to the sulfur... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.200 What gasoline is subject to the sulfur standards and requirements? For the purpose...

  18. Air pollution and venous thrombosis: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Liang; Wang, Qing-Yun; Cheng, Zhi-Peng; Hu, Bei; Liu, Jing-Di; Hu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to air pollution has been linked to cardiovascular and respiratory disorders. However, the effect of air pollution on venous thrombotic disorders is uncertain. We performed a meta-analysis to assess the association between air pollution and venous thrombosis. PubMed, Embase, EBM Reviews, Healthstar, Global Health, Nursing Database, and Web of Science were searched for citations on air pollutants (carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, and particulate matters) and venous thrombosis. Using a random-effects model, overall risk estimates were derived for each increment of 10 μg/m3 of pollutant concentration. Of the 485 in-depth reviewed studies, 8 citations, involving approximately 700,000 events, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All the main air pollutants analyzed were not associated with an increased risk of venous thrombosis (OR = 1.005, 95% CI = 0.998–1.012 for PM2.5; OR = 0.995, 95% CI = 0.984–1.007 for PM10; OR = 1.006, 95% CI = 0.994–1.019 for NO2). Based on exposure period and thrombosis location, additional subgroup analyses provided results comparable with those of the overall analyses. There was no evidence of publication bias. Therefore, this meta analysis does not suggest the possible role of air pollution as risk factor for venous thrombosis in general population. PMID:27600652

  19. 40 CFR Table 34 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units 34 Table 34 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units As stated in § 63.1568(c)(1), you shall meet each requirement in... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur...

  20. 40 CFR Table 35 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units 35 Table 35 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units As stated in § 63.1568(c)(1), you shall meet... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur...

  1. 40 CFR Table 35 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units 35 Table 35 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units As stated in § 63.1568(c)(1), you shall meet... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur...

  2. 40 CFR Table 31 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the data for excess oxygen. 3. Option 2: TRS limit. Each new or existing sulfur recovery unit (Claus... Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units 31 Table 31 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur...

  3. 40 CFR Table 34 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units 34 Table 34 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units As stated in § 63.1568(c)(1), you shall meet each requirement in... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur...

  4. 40 CFR Table 31 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the data for excess oxygen. 3. Option 2: TRS limit. Each new or existing sulfur recovery unit (Claus... Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units 31 Table 31 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur...

  5. 40 CFR Table 31 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units 31 Table 31 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units As stated in § 63.1568(b)(1), you shall meet each...

  6. 40 CFR Table 34 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units 34 Table 34 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units As stated in § 63.1568(c)(1), you shall meet each requirement...

  7. 78 FR 43880 - Request for Nominations of Experts for the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC) Sulfur...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ... AGENCY Request for Nominations of Experts for the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC) Sulfur... the chartered CASAC on primary (human health-based) air quality standards for sulfur oxides (SO X... six ``criteria'' air pollutants, including sulfur oxides. As a Federal Advisory Committee, the...

  8. 40 CFR Table 33 to Subpart Uuu of... - Initial Compliance With HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units 33 Table 33 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units As stated in § 63.1568(b)(5), you shall meet each requirement...

  9. Outdoor Air Pollution and Pterygium in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki Woong; Choi, Yoon Hyeong; Hwang, Sung Ha; Paik, Hae Jung; Kim, Mee Kum; Wee, Won Ryang; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2017-01-01

    We investigated relationships between outdoor air pollution and pterygium in Korean adults. This study includes 23,276 adults in population-based cross-sectional data using the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008-2011. Pterygium was assessed using slit lamp biomicroscopy. Air pollution data (humidity, particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm [PM₁₀], ozone [O₃], nitrogen dioxide [NO₂], and sulfur dioxide levels [SO₂]) for 2 years preceding the ocular examinations were acquired. Associations of multiple air pollutants with pterygium or pterygium recurrence after surgery were examined using multivariate logistic models, after adjusting for several covariates. Distributed lag models were additionally used for estimating cumulative effects of air pollution on pterygium. None of air pollution factors was significantly associated with pterygium or pterygium recurrence (each P > 0.05). Distributed lag models also showed that air pollution factors were not associated with pterygium or pterygium recurrence in 0-to-2 year lags (each P > 0.05). However, primary pterygium showed a weak association with PM10 after adjusting for covariates (odds ratio [OR] 1.23; [per 5 μg/m³ PM₁₀ increase]; P = 0.023). Aging, male sex, and greater sun exposure were associated with pterygium, while higher education level and myopia were negatively associated with pterygium (each P ≤ 0.001). Male sex and myopia were negatively associated with pterygium recurrence (each P < 0.05). In conclusion, exposure to higher PM10 levels was associated with primary pterygium, although this study observed no significant association between air pollution and overall pterygium or pterygium recurrence in Korean adults.

  10. Effects of variation of dietary sulfur on movement of sulfur in sheep rumen

    SciTech Connect

    Kandylis, K.; Bray, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    Effects of variations in dietary sulfur on rumen sulfur dynamics were studied under steady state conditions. In the first experimental period, three sheep were given 33.3 g of a pelleted diet hourly containing 1.59 g sulfur/kg (low) and in the second period the sulfur content was increased to 3.21 g/kg (high) by the addition of sodium sulfate. The daily sulfur intake was 1.158 g on the low sulfur diet and .545 g of this passed from the rumen in protein, .614 g was calculated to be absorbed from the rumen as sulfide, and .052 g was estimated to be recycled to the rumen. For sheep with daily intakes of 2.317 g sulfur, 1.212 g passed from the rumen in protein, 1.078 g was absorbed from the rumen, and .093 g was estimated to be recycled. It was estimated that 127 and 165 g microbial protein were synthesized/kg organic matter truly digested in the rumen for low and high sulfur diets, respectively. A simple model using simultaneous equations was proposed to describe rumen sulfur metabolism.

  11. Polysulfides Reactivity and its Impact on Sulfur Biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafantaris, F. C. A.; Druschel, G.

    2016-12-01

    Polysulfides are intermediate sulfur species of chain-like sulfur molecules (Sx2-) that include two sulfidic end sulfurs that encapsulate zero valent sulfur core molecules. The nucleophilic reaction of elemental sulfur with sulfide (as H2S or HS-, reaction 1), is a key process in the formation and decomposition of polysulfides: HS- + (x-1)/8 S8 <-> Sx2- + H+(1) This reaction can lead to the formation of polysulfide (forward direction), or disproportionation of polysulfide to form S8-rings (reverse direction) that quickly coarsen to sulfur nanoparticles (S8nano). The surface area of elemental sulfur particles, as well as the presence of surfactant coatings on S8nano, influences the formation kinetics of polysulfides. We employ an array of molecular methods in order to investigate S8nano coarsening processes and nucleophilic dissolution (reaction 1), incorporating electrochemical, chromatographic, spectrophotometric and spectroscopic techniques. The experimental data show that the kinetics of the reaction are influenced significantly by the surface area of the nanoparticles, the amount of the electron nucleophile (HS-), as well as the surface character of elemental sulfur (organic surfactant coating). Observed sulfur speciation in Yellowstone National Park thermal areas indicates the formation and consumption of polysulfides (forward and reverse reaction 1), to be a key control on the bioavailability of sulfur species in solution [1]. As polysulfides form during the nucleophilic dissolution of a-S8 (bulk sulfur), when acidified they decompose to S8aq and eventually S8nano, both being highly bioavailable forms of elemental sulfur. In addition to S8aq, polysulfides can also be incorporated by sulfur metabolizing microbes, as dissolved sulfur species. In summary, the nucleophilic reaction 1 appears to be a key abiotic pathway for the cycling of reduced sulfur species and the enhancement of sulfur species bioavailability. 1. Boyd and Druschel (2013) Appl. Environ

  12. Endogenous Sulfur Dioxide: A New Member of Gasotransmitter Family in the Cardiovascular System

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yaqian; Tang, Chaoshu; Du, Junbao; Jin, Hongfang

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) was previously regarded as a toxic gas in atmospheric pollutants. But it has been found to be endogenously generated from metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids in mammals through transamination by aspartate aminotransferase (AAT). SO2 could be produced in cardiovascular tissues catalyzed by its synthase AAT. In recent years, studies revealed that SO2 had physiological effects on the cardiovascular system, including vasorelaxation and cardiac function regulation. In addition, the pathophysiological effects of SO2 were also determined. For example, SO2 ameliorated systemic hypertension and pulmonary hypertension, prevented the development of atherosclerosis, and protected against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury and isoproterenol-induced myocardial injury. These findings suggested that endogenous SO2 was a novel gasotransmitter in the cardiovascular system and provided a new therapy target for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26839635

  13. Endogenous Sulfur Dioxide: A New Member of Gasotransmitter Family in the Cardiovascular System.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yaqian; Tang, Chaoshu; Du, Junbao; Jin, Hongfang

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) was previously regarded as a toxic gas in atmospheric pollutants. But it has been found to be endogenously generated from metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids in mammals through transamination by aspartate aminotransferase (AAT). SO2 could be produced in cardiovascular tissues catalyzed by its synthase AAT. In recent years, studies revealed that SO2 had physiological effects on the cardiovascular system, including vasorelaxation and cardiac function regulation. In addition, the pathophysiological effects of SO2 were also determined. For example, SO2 ameliorated systemic hypertension and pulmonary hypertension, prevented the development of atherosclerosis, and protected against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury and isoproterenol-induced myocardial injury. These findings suggested that endogenous SO2 was a novel gasotransmitter in the cardiovascular system and provided a new therapy target for cardiovascular diseases.

  14. Method oil shale pollutant sorption/NO.sub.x reburning multi-pollutant control

    DOEpatents

    Boardman, Richard D.; Carrington, Robert A.

    2008-06-10

    A method of decreasing pollutants produced in a combustion process. The method comprises combusting coal in a combustion chamber to produce at least one pollutant selected from the group consisting of a nitrogen-containing pollutant, sulfuric acid, sulfur trioxide, carbonyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, chlorine, hydroiodic acid, iodine, hydrofluoric acid, fluorine, hydrobromic acid, bromine, phosphoric acid, phosphorous pentaoxide, elemental mercury, and mercuric chloride. Oil shale particles are introduced into the combustion chamber and are combusted to produce sorbent particulates and a reductant. The at least one pollutant is contacted with at least one of the sorbent particulates and the reductant to decrease an amount of the at least one pollutant in the combustion chamber. The reductant may chemically reduce the at least one pollutant to a benign species. The sorbent particulates may adsorb or absorb the at least one pollutant. A combustion chamber that produces decreased pollutants in a combustion process is also disclosed.

  15. The global sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, D. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The results of the planetary biology microbial ecology's 1984 Summer Research Program, which examined various aspects of the global sulfur cycle are summarized. Ways in which sulfur flows through the many living and chemical species that inhabit the surface of the Earth were investigated. Major topics studied include: (1) sulfur cycling and metabolism of phototropic and filamentous sulfur bacteria; (2) sulfur reduction in sediments of marine and evaporite environments; (3) recent cyanobacterial mats; (4) microanalysis of community metabolism in proximity to the photic zone in potential stromatolites; and (5) formation and activity of microbial biofilms on metal sulfides and other mineral surfaces. Relationships between the global sulfur cycle and the understanding of the early evolution of the Earth and biosphere and current processes that affect global habitability are stressed.

  16. Sulfur removal from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Lompa-Krzymien, L.

    1985-01-01

    Coal is treated to remove both pyritic and organic sulfur by contacting with an aqueous solution comprising cupric ions at temperatures of about 140/sup 0/ C.-200/sup 0/ C. under autogenic pressure, until substantial amounts of the sulfur are solubilized, separating the coal solids, and washing the solids with water to remove soluble forms of sulfur, iron and copper therefrom. The copper can be recovered and recycled as a cupric salt.

  17. Effect of solvents on the electrochemical properties of binder-free sulfur cathode films in lithium–sulfur batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Ho-Suk; Kim, Byeong-Wook; Park, Jin-Woo; Nam, Tae-Hyun; Cho, Kwon-Koo; Kim, Ki-Won; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon; Ahn, Hyo-Jun

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • The binder-free sulfur electrode with high sulfur contents of 75 wt.% was fabricated. • The binder-free sulfur electrode using NMP solvents showed 784 mAh g{sup −1} after 40 cycles. • The solvent affect the electrochemical properties of binder-free sulfur electrode films. - Abstract: The effects of solvents on the preparation of sulfur cathodes were investigated by fabricating binder-free sulfur electrode films using three different solvents: 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP), acetonitrile, and deionized water. These solvents are commonly employed to dissolve binders used to prepare sulfur cathodes for lithium–sulfur batteries. The sulfur electrode fabricated with NMP had a higher discharge capacity and longer cycle life than the ones fabricated with acetonitrile and deionized water. Better adhesion between the current collector and the sulfur electrode accounted for the improved capacity and cycle life of the battery. In addition, the stability of the electrode in the electrolyte was a result of the solubility of sulfur in the solvent. We thus concluded that the solvents used in the fabrication of sulfur electrodes had a positive influence on the electrochemical properties of Li–S batteries.

  18. Examining food additives and spices for their anti-oxidant ability to counteract oxidative damage due to chronic exposure to free radicals from environmental pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Raul A., III

    The main objective of this work was to examine food additives and spices (from the Apiaceae family) to determine their antioxidant properties to counteract oxidative stress (damage) caused by Environmental pollutants. Environmental pollutants generate Reactive Oxygen species and Reactive Nitrogen species. Star anise essential oil showed lower antioxidant activity than extracts using DPPH scavenging. Dill Seed -- Anethum Graveolens -the monoterpene components of dill showed to activate the enzyme glutathione-S-transferase , which helped attach the antioxidant molecule glutathione to oxidized molecules that would otherwise do damage in the body. The antioxidant activity of extracts of dill was comparable with ascorbic acid, alpha-tocopherol, and quercetin in in-vitro systems. Black Cumin -- Nigella Sativa: was evaluated the method 1,1-diphenyl2-picrylhhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity. Positive correlations were found between the total phenolic content in the black cumin extracts and their antioxidant activities. Caraway -- Carum Carvi: The antioxidant activity was evaluated by the scavenging effects of 1,1'-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). Caraway showed strong antioxidant activity. Cumin -- Cuminum Cyminum - the major polyphenolic were extracted and separated by HPTLC. The antioxidant activity of the cumin extract was tested on 1,1'-diphenyl-2- picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging. Coriander -- Coriandrum Sativum - the antioxidant and free-radical-scavenging property of the seeds was studied and also investigated whether the administration of seeds curtails oxidative stress. Coriander seed powder not only inhibited the process of Peroxidative damage, but also significantly reactivated the antioxidant enzymes and antioxidant levels. The seeds also showed scavenging activity against superoxides and hydroxyl radicals. The total polyphenolic content of the seeds was found to be 12.2 galic acid equivalents (GAE)/g while the total flavonoid content

  19. 40 CFR 49.129 - Rule for limiting emissions of sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., air pollution source, ambient air, British thermal unit (Btu), coal, combustion source, continuous... sulfur dioxide (SO2) that may be emitted from certain air pollution sources operating within the Indian... applies to any person who owns or operates an air pollution source that emits, or could emit, SO2 to...

  20. 40 CFR 49.129 - Rule for limiting emissions of sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., air pollution source, ambient air, British thermal unit (Btu), coal, combustion source, continuous... sulfur dioxide (SO2) that may be emitted from certain air pollution sources operating within the Indian... applies to any person who owns or operates an air pollution source that emits, or could emit, SO2 to...

  1. 40 CFR 49.129 - Rule for limiting emissions of sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., air pollution source, ambient air, British thermal unit (Btu), coal, combustion source, continuous... sulfur dioxide (SO2) that may be emitted from certain air pollution sources operating within the Indian... applies to any person who owns or operates an air pollution source that emits, or could emit, SO2 to...

  2. 40 CFR 49.129 - Rule for limiting emissions of sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., air pollution source, ambient air, British thermal unit (Btu), coal, combustion source, continuous... sulfur dioxide (SO2) that may be emitted from certain air pollution sources operating within the Indian... applies to any person who owns or operates an air pollution source that emits, or could emit, SO2 to...

  3. Generation of Sulfur-rich, Sulfur-undersaturated Basaltic Melts in Oxidized Arc Sources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jugo, P. J.; Luth, R. W.; Richards, J. P.

    2003-12-01

    Although sulfur is a minor element in the Earth, it has a disproportionate impact because it commonly occurs as sulfide. Sulfides largely control the behavior of chalcophile (e.g., Cu, Ni) and highly siderophile elements (Ru, Rh, Pd, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, and Au) that are of interest because either they are economically important or because they provide valuable information about geochemical processes. Island arc basalts are more oxidized than basalts from other tectonic settings and therefore, in these settings, sulfur maybe present not as sulfide but as sulfate. In addition to the impact on the behavior of chalcophile and siderophile elements, sulfur speciation as sulfate may have a role on the occurrence of sulfur-rich explosive volcanism, which has been linked to significant short-term variations in global climate. However, little is known about the range in oxygen fugacity for the transition from solubility as sulfide to solubility as sulfate. We used experimental data on the solubility of sulfur in basaltic melts saturated with either sulfide or sulfate at different oxygen fugacities to model this transition. Our model shows that the ten-fold increase in the solubility of sulfur (from 0.14 wt.% to 1.5 wt.%) observed experimentally occurs at oxygen fugacities between ˜FMQ+1 and ˜FMQ+2, conditions under which many arc magmas are thought to be generated. The increase in the solubility of sulfur with increasing oxygen fugacity implies that in oxidized arc sources very low degrees of partial melting are sufficient to generate basaltic melts that are simultaneously sulfur-rich and sulfur-undersaturated. In the absence of sulfides, oxides and metallic alloys may influence the behavior of some (but not all) the highly siderophile elements whereas the chalcophile and some siderophile elements become incompatible. As a consequence, melting of oxidized sources in which sulfides are not stable would favor incorporation of metals such as Cu, Ni, Au and Pd in the melts and

  4. 40 CFR 60.4315 - What pollutants are regulated by this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for... pollutants regulated by this subpart are nitrogen oxide (NOX) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). ...

  5. 40 CFR 60.4315 - What pollutants are regulated by this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for... pollutants regulated by this subpart are nitrogen oxide (NOX) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). ...

  6. Air pollution in Europe: international policy responses

    SciTech Connect

    Sand, P.H.

    1987-12-01

    The 1979 Geneva convention on acid rain set the framework for international cooperation in controlling transboundary air pollution in Europe. Initially, the acid rain treaty focused on sulfur oxide emissions. It has since evolved to address other problems and pollutants as well. A final meeting to draft a nitrogen oxide emissions protocol will be held in February 1988.

  7. Noise Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    ... attention as other types of pollution, such as air pollution, or water pollution. The air around us is ... Air Act Overview Home Progress Cleaning the Air Air Pollution Challenges Requirements and History Role of Science and ...

  8. Large sulfur isotope fractionation does not require disproportionation.

    PubMed

    Sim, Min Sub; Bosak, Tanja; Ono, Shuhei

    2011-07-01

    The composition of sulfur isotopes in sedimentary sulfides and sulfates traces the sulfur cycle throughout Earth's history. In particular, depletions of sulfur-34 ((34)S) in sulfide relative to sulfate exceeding 47 per mil (‰) often serve as a proxy for the disproportionation of intermediate sulfur species in addition to sulfate reduction. Here, we demonstrate that a pure, actively growing culture of a marine sulfate-reducing bacterium can deplete (34)S by up to 66‰ during sulfate reduction alone and in the absence of an extracellular oxidative sulfur cycle. Therefore, similar magnitudes of sulfur isotope fractionation in sedimentary rocks do not unambiguously record the presence of other sulfur-based metabolisms or the stepwise oxygenation of Earth's surface environment during the Proterozoic.

  9. Sulfur isotope fractionation during incorporation of sulfur nucleophiles into organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Amrani, Alon; Ma, Qisheng; Ahmad, Ward Said; Aizenshtat, Zeev; Tang, Yongchun

    2008-03-21

    (34)S enrichment is shown to occur during sulfurization reactions and for the first time conclusively attributed to an isotope equilibrium effect rather than selective addition of (34)S enriched nucleophiles.

  10. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS

    SciTech Connect

    Apostolos A. Nikolopoulos; Santosh K. Gangwal; William J. McMichael; Jeffrey W. Portzer

    2003-01-01

    Conventional sulfur removal in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants involves numerous steps: COS (carbonyl sulfide) hydrolysis, amine scrubbing/regeneration, Claus process, and tail-gas treatment. Advanced sulfur removal in IGCC systems involves typically the use of zinc oxide-based sorbents. The sulfides sorbent is regenerated using dilute air to produce a dilute SO{sub 2} (sulfur dioxide) tail gas. Under previous contracts the highly effective first generation Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) for catalytic reduction of this SO{sub 2} tail gas to elemental sulfur was developed. This process is currently undergoing field-testing. In this project, advanced concepts were evaluated to reduce the number of unit operations in sulfur removal and recovery. Substantial effort was directed towards developing sorbents that could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur in an Advanced Hot Gas Process (AHGP). Development of this process has been described in detail in Appendices A-F. RTI began the development of the Single-step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP) to eliminate the use of sorbents and multiple reactors in sulfur removal and recovery. This process showed promising preliminary results and thus further process development of AHGP was abandoned in favor of SSRP. The SSRP is a direct Claus process that consists of injecting SO{sub 2} directly into the quenched coal gas from a coal gasifier, and reacting the H{sub 2}S-SO{sub 2} mixture over a selective catalyst to both remove and recover sulfur in a single step. The process is conducted at gasifier pressure and 125 to 160 C. The proposed commercial embodiment of the SSRP involves a liquid phase of molten sulfur with dispersed catalyst in a slurry bubble-column reactor (SBCR).

  11. Organic Sulfur Gas Production in Sulfidic Caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, L. A.; Engel, A. S.; Bennett, P. C.

    2001-12-01

    Lower Kane Cave, Big Horn Basin, WY, permits access to an environment where anaerobic sulfide-rich groundwater meets the aerobic vadose zone. At this interface microorganisms thrive on diverse metabolic pathways including autotrophic sulfur oxidation, sulfate reduction, and aerobic heterotrophy. Springs introduce groundwater rich in H2S to the cave where it both degasses into the cave atmosphere and is used by chemautotrophic sulfur oxidizing bacteria in the cave spring and stream habitat. The cave atmosphere in the immediate vicinity of the springs has elevated levels of CO2, H2S and methane, mirroring the higher concentration of H2S and methane in the spring water. The high CO2 concentrations are attenuated toward the two main sources of fresh air, the cave entrance and breathing holes at the rear of the cave. Conventional toxic gas monitors permit estimations of H2S concentrations, but they have severe cross sensitivity with other reduced sulfur gases, and thus are inadequate for characterization of sulfur cave gases. However employment of a field-based GC revealed elevated concentrations of carbonyl sulfide in cave atmosphere. Cultures of microorganisms collected from the cave optimized for enriching fermenters and autotrophic and heterophic sulfate reducing bacteria each produced carbonyl sulfide suggesting a biogenic in origin of the COS in addition to H2S. Enrichment cultures also produced methanethiol (methyl mercaptan) and an additional as yet undetermined volatile organic sulfur compound. In culture, the organo-sulfur compounds were less abundant than H2S, whereas in the cave atmosphere the organo-sulfur compounds were the dominant sulfur gases. Thus, these organo-sulfur gases may prove to be important sources of both reduced sulfur and organic carbon to microorganisms living on the cave wall in a subaerial habitat. Moreover groundwater has not yet been recognized as a source of sulfur gases to the atmosphere, but with the abundance of sulfidic

  12. Solvent extraction of elemental sulfur from coal and a determination of its source using stable sulfur isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackley, Keith C.; Buchanan, D.H.; Coombs, K.; Chaven, C.; Kruse, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    Hot tetrachloroethene (perchloroethylene, PCE) extracts significant amounts of elemental sulfur (So) from weathered coals but not from pristine coals. The objective of this study was to determine whether So extracted by PCE is an oxidation product of pyrite or whether it originates in some way from unstable, organically-bound sulfur. The isotopic composition of the PCE-extracted So was compared to the isotopic compositions of the pyritic and the organic sulfur in a coal. The So was shown to have an isotopic signature similar to the pyritic sulfur. Additionally, the isotopic differences observed between the pyritic, So and sulfatic sulfur were consistent with bacterial mediated oxidation of sulfide sulfur (pyrite) as the source of both the sulfatic and elemental sulfur. ?? 1990.

  13. The Phases of Sulfur.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdwhistell, Kurt R.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a demonstration that illustrates the dramatic changes that sulfur undergoes upon heating to 200 degrees centigrade and then cooling to room temperature. Supplements the demonstration of the rubberlike properties of catenasulfur made by rapid cooling of the sulfur melt in ice water. (JRH)

  14. Sulfur isotopic data

    SciTech Connect

    Rye, R.O.

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary sulfur isotope data have been determined for samples of the Vermillion Creek coal bed and associated rocks in the Vermillion Creek basin and for samples of evaporites collected from Jurassic and Triassic formations that crop out in the nearby Uinta Mountains. The data are inconclusive, but it is likely that the sulfur in the coal was derived from the evaporites.

  15. Advanced sulfur control concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K.; Turk, B.S.; Gupta, R.P.

    1995-11-01

    Regenerable metal oxide sorbents, such as zinc titanate, are being developed to efficiently remove hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gas in advanced power systems. Dilute air regeneration of the sorbents produces a tailgas containing a few percent sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}). Catalytic reduction of the SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur with a coal gas slipstream using the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) is a leading first-generation technology. Currently the DSRP is undergoing field testing at gasifier sites. The objective of this study is to develop second-generation processes that produce elemental sulfur without coal gas or with limited use. Novel approaches that were evaluated to produce elemental sulfur from sulfided sorbents include (1) sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) regeneration, (2) substoichiometric (partial) oxidation, (3) steam regeneration followed by H{sub 2}S oxidation, and (4) steam-air regeneration. Preliminary assessment of these approaches indicated that developing SO{sub 2} regeneration faced the fewest technical and economic problems among the four process options. Elemental sulfur is the only likely product of SO{sub 2} regeneration and the SO{sub 2} required for the regeneration can be obtained by burning a portion of the sulfur produced. Experimental efforts have thus been concentrated on SO{sub 2}-based regeneration processes. Results from laboratory investigations are presented and discussed.

  16. The Phases of Sulfur.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdwhistell, Kurt R.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a demonstration that illustrates the dramatic changes that sulfur undergoes upon heating to 200 degrees centigrade and then cooling to room temperature. Supplements the demonstration of the rubberlike properties of catenasulfur made by rapid cooling of the sulfur melt in ice water. (JRH)

  17. Simulation of global sulfate distribution and the influence on effective cloud drop radii with a coupled photochemistry sulfur cycle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelofs, Geert-J. A. N.; Lelieveld, Jos; Ganzeveld, Laurens

    1998-07-01

    A sulfur cycle model is coupled to a global chemistry-climate model. The simulated surface sulfate concentrations are generally within a factor of 2 of observed concentrations, and display a realistic seasonality for most background locations. However, the model tends to underestimate sulfate and overestimate surface SO2 at relatively polluted locations. A possible explanation for this is that additional oxidation reactions not considered in the model, may be important. Calculated tropospheric sulfate column abundances exceed those of previous studies, which is predominantly associated with a less efficient nucleation scavenging in wet convective updrafts. Through the simultaneous calculation of the sulfur cycle and tropospheric photochemistry, simulated H2O2 and SO2 concentrations are strongly linked, especially in polluted areas. The coupled model simulates a stronger oxidant limitation and, consequently, a smaller contribution to sulfate formation by H2O2 oxidation of SO2 when compared to sulfur cycle models that use monthly averaged oxidant distributions as input. In the polluted NH, the differences in calculated sulfate columns are largest in winter and relatively small in summer. Therefore, the coupling between the sulfur cycle and the oxidant chemistry is expected to have a minor impact on the calculation of the indirect and direct radiative forcing by sulfate. An empirical relation between sulfate concentration and cloud drop number concentration, derived from cloud measurements at Grean Dun Fell (UK), is applied to the simulated cloud and sulfate fields to derive distributions of effective could drop radii. Additionally, a relation between wind speed and cloud drop number concentration is applied over marine regions to account for the effect of seasalt aerosol on cloud formation when sulfate concentrations are relatively low. Calculated droplet radii are systematically underestimated by about 10 20% in the NH compared to satellite derived values, but they

  18. Response of radish to nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and ozone, alone and in combination

    SciTech Connect

    Reinert, R.A.; Gray, T.N.

    1981-04-01

    Effects on radish (Raphanus sativus L.) cv. Cherry Belle of nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/), sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/), and ozone (O/sub 3/) alone and in combination at 0.2 and 0.4 ppM of each pollutant were studied. There was no difference in foilage or root weight of radish between exposure durations of 3 to 6 hours, and no significant interaction of hours with air pollutant and concentration. Ozone reduced root dry weight more at 0.4 ppM than at 0.2 ppM. Sulfur dioxide depressed the root/shoot ratio at both 0.2 and 0.4 ppM; however, when NO/sub 2/ and SO/sub 2/ were both present there was synergistic depression of the root/shoot ratio at 0.4 ppM. The average O/sub 3/-induced reduction in root weight of radish (1.75 g fresh and 101 mg dry, per plant) was additive in the presence of NO/sub 2/ and SO/sub 2/. The weight of the root was reduced even though the foilage was the direct receptor of the pollutant stress.

  19. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Hu, Zhicheng

    1993-01-01

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO.sub.2 -containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO.sub.2 to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO.sub.2 in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst.

  20. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Zhicheng Hu.

    1993-09-07

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO[sub 2] in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst. 4 figures.

  1. Fibrous hybrid of graphene and sulfur nanocrystals for high-performance lithium-sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guangmin; Yin, Li-Chang; Wang, Da-Wei; Li, Lu; Pei, Songfeng; Gentle, Ian Ross; Li, Feng; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2013-06-25

    Graphene-sulfur (G-S) hybrid materials with sulfur nanocrystals anchored on interconnected fibrous graphene are obtained by a facile one-pot strategy using a sulfur/carbon disulfide/alcohol mixed solution. The reduction of graphene oxide and the formation/binding of sulfur nanocrystals were integrated. The G-S hybrids exhibit a highly porous network structure constructed by fibrous graphene, many electrically conducting pathways, and easily tunable sulfur content, which can be cut and pressed into pellets to be directly used as lithium-sulfur battery cathodes without using a metal current-collector, binder, and conductive additive. The porous network and sulfur nanocrystals enable rapid ion transport and short Li(+) diffusion distance, the interconnected fibrous graphene provides highly conductive electron transport pathways, and the oxygen-containing (mainly hydroxyl/epoxide) groups show strong binding with polysulfides, preventing their dissolution into the electrolyte based on first-principles calculations. As a result, the G-S hybrids show a high capacity, an excellent high-rate performance, and a long life over 100 cycles. These results demonstrate the great potential of this unique hybrid structure as cathodes for high-performance lithium-sulfur batteries.

  2. Regional river sulfur runoff

    SciTech Connect

    Husar, R.B.; Husar, J.D.

    1985-01-20

    The water and sulfur runoff data for 54 large river basins were assembled, covering 65% of the nondesert land area of the world. The sulfur concentration ranges from 0.5 mg S/L for the West African rivers Niger and Volta to 100 mg S/L in the Colorado River; the world average is 3.2 mg S/L. The concentrations in central and eastern Europe as well as central and eastern North America exceed 8 mg S/L. The sulfur runoff density is also highest in the river basins over these industrialized regions, exceeding 2 g S/m/sup 2//yr. However, high sulfur runoff density in excess of 3 g S/m/sup 2//yr is also measured over the Pacific islands New Zealand and New Guinea and the archipelagos of Indonesia and the Philippines. The natural background sulfur runoff was estimated by assuming that South America, Africa, Australia, and the Pacific Islands are unperturbed by man and that the average river sulfur concentration is in the range 1--3 mg S/L. Taking these background concentration values, the man-induced sulfur runoff for Europe ranges between 2 and 8 times the natural flow, and over North America, man's contribution ranges between 1 and 5 times the natural runoff. The global sulfur flow from nondesert land to the oceans and the Caspian Sea is estimated as 131 Tg S/yr, of which 46--85 Tg S/yr is attributed to natural causes. The regional river sulfur runoff pattern discussed in this paper does not have enough spatial resolution to be directly applicable to studies of the environmental effects of man-induced sulfur flows. However, it points to the continental-size regions where those perturbations are most evident and to the magnitude of the perturbations as expressed in units of the natural flows.

  3. Regional river sulfur runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husar, Rudolf B.; Husar, Janja Djukic

    1985-01-01

    The water and sulfur runoff data for 54 large river basins were assembled, covering 65% of the nondesert land area of the world. The sulfur concentration ranges from 0.5 mg S/L for the West African rivers Niger and Volta to 100 mg S/L in the Colorado River; the world average is 3.2 mg S/L. The concentrations in central and eastern Europe as well as central and eastern North America exceed 8 mg S/L. The sulfur runoff density is also highest in the river basins over these industrialized regions, exceeding 2 g S/m2/yr. However, high sulfur runoff density in excess of 3 g S/m2/yr is also measured over the Pacific islands New Zealand and New Guinea and the archipelagos of Indonesia and the Philippines. The natural background sulfur runoff was estimated by assuming that South America, Africa, Australia, and the Pacific Islands are unperturbed by man and that the average river sulfur concentration is in the range 1-3 mg S/L. Taking these background concentration values, the man-induced sulfur runoff for Europe ranges between 2 and 8 times the natural flow, and over North America, man's contribution ranges between 1 and 5 times the natural runoff. The global sulfur flow from nondesert land to the oceans and the Caspian Sea is estimated as 131 Tg S/yr, of which 46-85 Tg S/yr is attributed to natural causes. The regional river sulfur runoff pattern discussed in this paper does not have enough spatial resolution to be directly applicable to studies of the environmental effects of man-induced sulfur flows. However, it points to the continental-size regions where those perturbations are most evident and to the magnitude of the perturbations as expressed in units of the natural flows.

  4. Public Health and Air Pollution in Asia (PAPA): a multicity study of short-term effects of air pollution on mortality.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chit-Ming; Vichit-Vadakan, Nuntavarn; Kan, Haidong; Qian, Zhengmin

    2008-09-01

    Although the deleterious effects of air pollution from fossil fuel combustion have been demonstrated in many Western nations, fewer studies have been conducted in Asia. The Public Health and Air Pollution in Asia (PAPA) project assessed the effects of short-term exposure to air pollution on daily mortality in Bangkok, Thailand, and in three cities in China: Hong Kong, Shanghai, and Wuhan. Poisson regression models incorporating natural spline smoothing functions were used to adjust for seasonality and other time-varying covariates that might confound the association between air pollution and mortality. Effect estimates were determined for each city and then for the cities combined using a random effects method. In individual cities, associations were detected between most of the pollutants [nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, particulate matter < or = 10 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM(10)), and ozone] and most health outcomes under study (i.e., all natural-cause, cardiovascular, and respiratory mortality). The city-combined effects of the four pollutants tended to be equal or greater than those identified in studies conducted in Western industrial nations. In addition, residents of Asian cities are likely to have higher exposures to air pollution than those in Western industrial nations because they spend more time outdoors and less time in air conditioning. Although the social and environmental conditions may be quite different, it is reasonable to apply estimates derived from previous health effect of air pollution studies in the West to Asia.

  5. Public Health and Air Pollution in Asia (PAPA): A Multicity Study of Short-Term Effects of Air Pollution on Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chit-Ming; Vichit-Vadakan, Nuntavarn; Kan, Haidong; Qian, Zhengmin

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives Although the deleterious effects of air pollution from fossil fuel combustion have been demonstrated in many Western nations, fewer studies have been conducted in Asia. The Public Health and Air Pollution in Asia (PAPA) project assessed the effects of short-term exposure to air pollution on daily mortality in Bangkok, Thailand, and in three cities in China: Hong Kong, Shanghai, and Wuhan. Methods Poisson regression models incorporating natural spline smoothing functions were used to adjust for seasonality and other time-varying covariates that might confound the association between air pollution and mortality. Effect estimates were determined for each city and then for the cities combined using a random effects method. Results In individual cities, associations were detected between most of the pollutants [nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, particulate matter ≤ 10 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10), and ozone] and most health outcomes under study (i.e., all natural-cause, cardiovascular, and respiratory mortality). The city-combined effects of the four pollutants tended to be equal or greater than those identified in studies conducted in Western industrial nations. In addition, residents of Asian cities are likely to have higher exposures to air pollution than those in Western industrial nations because they spend more time outdoors and less time in air conditioning. Conclusions Although the social and environmental conditions may be quite different, it is reasonable to apply estimates derived from previous health effect of air pollution studies in the West to Asia. PMID:18795163

  6. Study of air pollutant detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutshall, P. L.; Bowles, C. Q.

    1974-01-01

    The application of field ionization mass spectrometry (FIMS) to the detection of air pollutants was investigated. Current methods are reviewed for measuring contaminants of fixed gases, sulfur compounds, nitrogen oxides, hydrocarbons, and particulates. Two enriching devices: the dimethyl silicone rubber membrane separator, and the selective adsorber of polyethylene foam were studied along with FIMS. It is concluded that the membrane enricher system is not a suitable method for removing air pollutants. However, the FIMS shows promise as a useable system for air pollution detection.

  7. Approaches for controlling air pollutants and their environmental impacts generated from coal-based electricity generation in China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changqing; Hong, Jinglan; Ren, Yixin; Wang, Qingsong; Yuan, Xueliang

    2015-08-01

    This study aims at qualifying air pollutants and environmental impacts generated from coal-based power plants and providing useful information for decision makers on the management of coal-based power plants in China. Results showed that approximately 9.03, 54.95, 62.08, and 12.12% of the national carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and particulate matter emissions, respectively, in 2011were generated from coal-based electricity generation. The air pollutants were mainly generated from east China because of the well-developed economy and energy-intensive industries in the region. Coal-washing technology can simply and significantly reduce the environmental burden because of the relativity low content of coal gangue and sulfur in washed coal. Optimizing the efficiency of raw materials and energy consumption is additional key factor to reduce the potential environmental impacts. In addition, improving the efficiency of air pollutants (e.g., dust, mercury, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides) control system and implementing the strict requirements on air pollutants for power plants are important ways for reducing the potential environmental impacts of coal-based electricity generation in China.

  8. Regional pollution potential in the northwestern United States.

    Treesearch

    Sue A. Ferguson; Miriam L. Rorig

    2003-01-01

    The potential for air pollution from industrial sources to reach wilderness areas throughout the Northwestern United States is approximated from monthly mean emissions, along with wind speeds and directions. A simple index is derived to estimate downwind concentration. Maps of pollution potential were generated for each pollution component (particulates, sulfur oxides...

  9. The Sources of Air Pollution and Their Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Air Pollution Control Administration (DHEW), Arlington, VA.

    The problems of air pollution and its control are discussed. Major consideration is given the sources of pollution - motor vehicles, industry, power plants, space heating, and refuse disposal. Annual emission levels of five principle pollutants - carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, hydrocarbons, and particulate matter - are listed…

  10. Process for production of synthesis gas with reduced sulfur content

    DOEpatents

    Najjar, Mitri S.; Corbeels, Roger J.; Kokturk, Uygur

    1989-01-01

    A process for the partial oxidation of a sulfur- and silicate-containing carbonaceous fuel to produce a synthesis gas with reduced sulfur content which comprises partially oxidizing said fuel at a temperature in the range of 1800.degree.-2200.degree. F. in the presence of a temperature moderator, an oxygen-containing gas and a sulfur capture additive which comprises an iron-containing compound portion and a sodium-containing compound portion to produce a synthesis gas comprising H.sub.2 and CO with a reduced sulfur content and a molten slag which comprises (i) a sulfur-containing sodium-iron silicate phase and (ii) a sodium-iron sulfide phase. The sulfur capture additive may optionally comprise a copper-containing compound portion.

  11. Perspective on Air Pollution: The Canadian Scene

    PubMed Central

    Shephard, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Despite the large ratio of land mass to population, Canada has significant air pollution problems, some being due to our cold climate, the long arctic nights, and a mineral-based economy. Routes of intoxication include the respiration of polluted air and the secondary contamination of food and water. Although pollution is often measured in terms of industrial emissions, the physician must be concerned rather with the dose of pollutants to which the individual is exposed. The principal air pollutants, in terms of emitted tonnage, are carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, hydrocarbons, particulates, and oxides of nitrogen. Sources of these various materials are discussed. PMID:20469224

  12. Sulfuric Acid on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Frozen sulfuric acid on Jupiter's moon Europa is depicted in this image produced from data gathered by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The brightest areas, where the yellow is most intense, represent regions of high frozen sulfuric acid concentration. Sulfuric acid is found in battery acid and in Earth's acid rain.

    This image is based on data gathered by Galileo's near infrared mapping spectrometer.

    Europa's leading hemisphere is toward the bottom right, and there are enhanced concentrations of sulfuric acid in the trailing side of Europa (the upper left side of the image). This is the face of Europa that is struck by sulfur ions coming from Jupiter's innermost moon, Io. The long, narrow features that crisscross Europa also show sulfuric acid that may be from sulfurous material extruded in cracks.

    Galileo, launched in 1989, has been orbiting Jupiter and its moons since December 1995. JPL manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  13. Sulfur volcanoes on Io?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Fink, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    The unusual rheological properties of sulfur are discussed in order to determine the distinctive volcanic flow morphologies which indicate the presence of sulfur volcanoes on the Saturnian satellite Io. An analysis of high resolution Voyager imagery reveals three features which are considered to be possible sulfur volcanoes: Atar Patera, Daedalus Patera, and Kibero Patera. All three features are distinguished by circular-to-oval central masses surrounded by irregular widespread flows. The central zones of the features are interpreted to be domes formed of high temperature sulfur. To confirm the interpretations of the satellite data, molten sulfur was extruded in the laboratory at a temperature of 210 C on a flat surface sloping 0.5 deg to the left. At this temperature, the sulfur formed a viscous domelike mass over the event. As parts of the mass cooled to 170 C the viscosity decreased to a runny stage, forming breakout flows. It is concluded that a case can be made for sulfur volcanoes on Io sufficient to warrant further study, and it is recommended that the upcoming Galileo mission examine these phenomena.

  14. 78 FR 5346 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Missouri; Control of Sulfur Emissions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-25

    ... Sulfur Emissions From Stationary Boilers AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed... pollutant to PM 2.5 ), from industrial boilers. EPA is approving this revision because it strengthens...

  15. Sulfide catalysts for reducing SO2 to elemental sulfur

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Yun; Yu, Qiquan; Chang, Shih-Ger

    2001-01-01

    A highly efficient sulfide catalyst for reducing sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur, which maximizes the selectivity of elemental sulfur over byproducts and has a high conversion efficiency. Various feed stream contaminants, such as water vapor are well tolerated. Additionally, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, or hydrogen sulfides can be employed as the reducing gases while maintaining high conversion efficiency. This allows a much wider range of uses and higher level of feed stream contaminants than prior art catalysts.

  16. Cytoplasmic sulfur trafficking in sulfur-oxidizing prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    Persulfide groups are chemically versatile and participate in a wide array of biochemical pathways. Although it is well documented that persulfurated proteins supply a number of important and elaborate biosynthetic pathways with sulfane sulfur, it is far less acknowledged that the enzymatic generation of persulfidic sulfur, the successive transfer of sulfur as a persulfide between multiple proteins, and the oxidation of sulfane sulfur in protein-bound form are also essential steps during dissimilatory sulfur oxidation in bacteria and archaea. Here, the currently available information on sulfur trafficking in sulfur oxidizing prokaryotes is reviewed, and the idea is discussed that sulfur is always presented to cytoplasmic oxidizing enzymes in a protein-bound form, thus preventing the occurrence of free sulfide inside of the prokaryotic cell. Thus, sulfur trafficking emerges as a central element in sulfur-oxidizing pathways, and TusA homologous proteins appear to be central and common elements in these processes.

  17. Analysis of Regional Budgets of Sulfur Species Modeled for the COSAM Exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Roelofs, G.-J.; Kasibhatla, P.; Barrie, Leonard A.; Bergmann, D.; Bridgeman, C.; Chin, M.; Christensen, J.; Easter, Richard C.; Feichter, J.; Jeuken, A.; Kjellstrom, E.; Koch, D.; Land, C.; Lohmann, U.; Rasch, P.

    2001-11-01

    The COSAM intercomparison exercise (comparison of large-scale sulfur models) was organized to compare and evaluate the performance of global sulfur cycle models. Eleven models participated, and from these models the simulated surface concentrations, vertical profiles and budget terms were submitted. This study focuses on simulated budget terms for the sources and sinks of SO2 and sulfate in three polluted regions in the Northern Hemisphere, i.e., eastern North America, Europe, and Southeast Asia. Qualitatively, features of the sulfur cycle are modeled quite consistently between models, such as the relative importance of dry deposition as a removal mechanism for SO2, the important of aqueous phase oxidation over gas phase oxidation for SO2, and the importance of wet over dry deposition for removal of sulfate aerosol. Quantitatively, however, models may show large differences, especially for cloud-related processes, i.e., aqueous phase oxidation of SO2 and sulfate wet deposition. In some cases a specific behavior can be related to the treatment of oxidants for aqueous phase SO2 oxidation, or the vertical resolution applied in models. Generally, however, the differences between models appear to be related to simulated cloud (micro-)physics and distributions, whereas differences in vertical transport efficiencies related to convection play an additional role. The estimated sulfur column burdens, lifetimes and export budgets vary between models by about a factor of 2 or 3. It can be expected that uncertainties in related effects which are derived from global sulfur model calculations, such as direct and indirect climate forcing estimates by sulfate aerosol, are at least of similar magnitude.

  18. Marine pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Albaiges, J. )

    1989-01-01

    This book covers the following topics: Transport of marine pollutants; Transformation of pollutants in the marine environment; Biological effects of marine pollutants; Sources and transport of oil pollutants in the Persian Gulf; Trace metals and hydrocarbons in Syrian coastal waters; and Techniques for analysis of trace pollutants.

  19. Sulfur "Concrete" for Lunar Applications - Sublimation Concerns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Toutanji, Houssam

    2006-01-01

    Melting sulfur and mixing it with an aggregate to form "concrete" is commercially well established and constitutes a material that is particularly well-suited for use in corrosive environments. Discovery of the mineral troilite (FeS) on the moon poses the question of extracting the sulfur for use as a lunar construction material. This would be an attractive alternative to conventional concrete as it does not require water. However, the viability of sulfur concrete in a lunar environment, which is characterized by lack of an atmosphere and extreme temperatures, is not well understood. Here it is assumed that the lunar ore can be mined, refined, and the raw sulfur melded with appropriate lunar regolith to form, for example, bricks. This study evaluates pure sulfur and two sets of small sulfur concrete samples that have been prepared using JSC-1 lunar stimulant and SiO2 powder as aggregate additions. Each set was subjected to extended periods in a vacuum environment to evaluate sublimation issues. Results from these experiments are presented and discussed within the context of the lunar environment.

  20. Sulfur "Concrete" for Lunar Applications - Sublimation Concerns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Toutanji, Houssam

    2006-01-01

    Melting sulfur and mixing it with an aggregate to form "concrete" is commercially well established and constitutes a material that is particularly well-suited for use in corrosive environments. Discovery of the mineral troilite (FeS) on the moon poses the question of extracting the sulfur for use as a lunar construction material. This would be an attractive alternative to conventional concrete as it does not require water. However, the viability of sulfur concrete in a lunar environment, which is characterized by lack of an atmosphere and extreme temperatures, is not well understood. Here it is assumed that the lunar ore can be mined, refined, and the raw sulfur melded with appropriate lunar regolith to form, for example, bricks. This study evaluates pure sulfur and two sets of small sulfur concrete samples that have been prepared using JSC-1 lunar stimulant and SiO2 powder as aggregate additions. Each set was subjected to extended periods in a vacuum environment to evaluate sublimation issues. Results from these experiments are presented and discussed within the context of the lunar environment.

  1. 40 CFR 80.1604 - Gasoline sulfur standards and requirements for parties downstream of refiners and importers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gasoline sulfur standards and... ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur § 80.1604 Gasoline sulfur standards and requirements for parties downstream of refiners and importers. (a) The sulfur standard for gasoline at any downstream location shall be...

  2. 40 CFR 80.205 - How is the annual refinery or importer average and corporate pool average sulfur level determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... average and corporate pool average sulfur level determined? 80.205 Section 80.205 Protection of... ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.205 How is the annual refinery or importer average and corporate pool average sulfur level determined? (a) The annual refinery or importer average...

  3. 40 CFR 80.205 - How is the annual refinery or importer average and corporate pool average sulfur level determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... average and corporate pool average sulfur level determined? 80.205 Section 80.205 Protection of... ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.205 How is the annual refinery or importer average and corporate pool average sulfur level determined? (a) The annual refinery or importer average...

  4. 40 CFR 80.205 - How is the annual refinery or importer average and corporate pool average sulfur level determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... average and corporate pool average sulfur level determined? 80.205 Section 80.205 Protection of... ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.205 How is the annual refinery or importer average and corporate pool average sulfur level determined? (a) The annual refinery or importer average...

  5. 40 CFR 80.205 - How is the annual refinery or importer average and corporate pool average sulfur level determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... average and corporate pool average sulfur level determined? 80.205 Section 80.205 Protection of... ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Gasoline Sulfur Standards § 80.205 How is the annual refinery or importer average and corporate pool average sulfur level determined? (a) The annual refinery or importer average...

  6. 40 CFR 80.1641 - Alternative sulfur standards and requirements that apply to importers who transport gasoline by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alternative sulfur standards and... ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur § 80.1641 Alternative sulfur standards and requirements that apply to importers... gasoline under § 80.1630, and the annual sulfur average and per-gallon cap standards otherwise...

  7. Sulfur Dioxide Designations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This area provides information on the process EPA, the states, and the tribes follow to designate areas as attainment (meeting) or nonattainment (not meeting) the sulfur dioxide air quality standards.

  8. Sulfur compounds in coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attar, A.; Corcoran, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    The literature on the chemical structure of the organic sulfur compounds (or functional groups) in coal is reviewed. Four methods were applied in the literature to study the sulfur compounds in coal: direct spectrometric and chemical analysis, depolymerization in drastic conditions, depolymerization in mild conditions, and studies on simulated coal. The data suggest that most of the organic sulfur in coal is in the form of thiophenic structures and aromatic and aliphatic sulfides. The relative abundance of the sulfur groups in bituminous coal is estimated as 50:30:20%, respectively. The ratio changes during processing and during the chemical analysis. The main effects are the transformation during processing of sulfides to the more stable thiophenic compounds and the elimination of hydrogen sulfide.

  9. Sulfur compounds in coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attar, A.; Corcoran, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    The literature on the chemical structure of the organic sulfur compounds (or functional groups) in coal is reviewed. Four methods were applied in the literature to study the sulfur compounds in coal: direct spectrometric and chemical analysis, depolymerization in drastic conditions, depolymerization in mild conditions, and studies on simulated coal. The data suggest that most of the organic sulfur in coal is in the form of thiophenic structures and aromatic and aliphatic sulfides. The relative abundance of the sulfur groups in bituminous coal is estimated as 50:30:20%, respectively. The ratio changes during processing and during the chemical analysis. The main effects are the transformation during processing of sulfides to the more stable thiophenic compounds and the elimination of hydrogen sulfide.

  10. Biotic and abiotic carbon to sulfur bond cleavage. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, J.W.

    1994-05-01

    The microbial desulfurization of organosulfur compounds occurs by unprecedented and largely unexplored biochemical processes. A study of such biotic desulfurizations can be expected to give rise to new and useful chemistry and enzymology. The potential value of understanding and harnessing these processes is seen in relation to the need for methods for the removal of organically bound sulfur from coal and the degradation of organic sulfur-containing pollutants. This research effort has been directed towards an examination of desulfurization ability in well characterized microorganisms, the isolation of bacteria with desulfurization ability from natural sources, the characterization and mechanistic evaluation of the observed biocatalytic processes, the development of biomimetic synthetic organic chemistry based on biotic desulfurization mechanisms and the design and preparation of improved coal model compounds for use in microbial selection processes. A systematic approach to studying biodesulfurizations was undertaken in which organosulfur compounds have been broken down into classes based on the oxidation state of the sulfur atom and the structure of the rest of the organic material. Microbes have been evaluated in terms of ability to degrade organosulfur compounds with sulfur in its sulfonic acid oxidation state. These compounds are likely intermediates in coal desulfurization and are present in the environment as persistent pollutants in the form of detergents. It is known that oxygen bonded to sulfur lowers the carbon-sulfur bond energy, providing a thermodynamic basis for starting with this class of compounds.

  11. No sulfur flows on Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, A. T.

    1984-05-01

    Physical and chemical properties of elemental sulfur are incompatible with the suggestion that the colored flows associated with volcanoes on Io are quenched unstable allotropes of sulfur. Either the volcanic flows are not sulfur, or some mechanism other than quenching is required to produce colored forms of sulfur in them. The properties of sulfur are unsuited to the production and survival of colored unstable allotropes on Io. The color of this object is probably due to some other material, possibly iron compounds.

  12. No sulfur flows on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, A. T.

    1984-01-01

    Physical and chemical properties of elemental sulfur are incompatible with the suggestion that the colored flows associated with volcanoes on Io are quenched unstable allotropes of sulfur. Either the volcanic flows are not sulfur, or some mechanism other than quenching is required to produce colored forms of sulfur in them. The properties of sulfur are unsuited to the production and survival of colored unstable allotropes on Io. The color of this object is probably due to some other material, possibly iron compounds.

  13. Sulfur cycling in freshwater sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klug, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Organic sulfur containing compounds represent greater than 80% of the total sulfur in sediments of eutrophic freshwater lakes. Although sedimentary sulfur is predominantly in the form of organic compounds, more sulfur is transformed by sulfate reduction than by any other process. Rates of sulfate reduction in these sediments average 7 mmol/sq m/day. This rate is 19 times greater than the net rate of production of inorganic sulfur from organic compounds on an annual basis.

  14. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, ... Ozone, a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  15. Water Pollution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, H. J. M.

    1975-01-01

    Deals with water pollution in the following categories: a global view, self purification, local pollution, difficulties in chemical analysis, and remedies for water pollution. Emphasizes the extent to which man's activities have modified the cycles of certain elements. (GS)

  16. Water Pollution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, H. J. M.

    1975-01-01

    Deals with water pollution in the following categories: a global view, self purification, local pollution, difficulties in chemical analysis, and remedies for water pollution. Emphasizes the extent to which man's activities have modified the cycles of certain elements. (GS)

  17. Separation of sulfur isotopes

    DOEpatents

    DeWitt, Robert; Jepson, Bernhart E.; Schwind, Roger A.

    1976-06-22

    Sulfur isotopes are continuously separated and enriched using a closed loop reflux system wherein sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) is reacted with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or the like to form sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO.sub.3). Heavier sulfur isotopes are preferentially attracted to the NaHSO.sub.3, and subsequently reacted with sulfuric acid (H.sub.2 SO.sub.4) forming sodium hydrogen sulfate (NaHSO.sub.4) and SO.sub.2 gas which contains increased concentrations of the heavier sulfur isotopes. This heavy isotope enriched SO.sub.2 gas is subsequently separated and the NaHSO.sub.4 is reacted with NaOH to form sodium sulfate (Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4) which is subsequently decomposed in an electrodialysis unit to form the NaOH and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 components which are used in the aforesaid reactions thereby effecting sulfur isotope separation and enrichment without objectionable loss of feed materials.

  18. Remediation of grey forest soils heavily polluted with heavy metals by means of their leaching at acidic pH followed by the soil reclamation by means of neutralization and bacterial manure addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Plamen; Groudev, Stoyan; Spasova, Irena; Nicolova, Marina

    2014-05-01

    Some grey forest soils in Western Bulgaria are heavily polluted with heavy metals (copper, lead, and zinc), arsenic, and uranium due to the infiltration of acid mine drainage generated at the abandoned uranium mine Curilo. This paper presents some results from a study about soil remediation based on the contaminants leaching from the topsoil by means of irrigation with solutions containing sulphuric acid or its in situ generation by means of sulphur-oxidizing chemolithotrophic bacteria in or without the presence of finely cut straw. These methods were tested in large scale zero suction lysimeters. The approaches based on S° and finely cut straw addition was the most efficient amongst the tested methods and for seven months of soil remediation the concentration of all soil contaminants were decreased below the relevant Maximum Admissible Concentration (MAC). Neutralization of the soil acidity was applied as a next stage of soil reclamation by adding CaCO3 and cow manure. As a result, soil pH increased from strongly acidic (2.36) to slightly acidic (6.15) which allowed subsequent addition of humic acids and bacterial manure to the topsoil. The soil habitat changed in this way facilitated the growth of microorganisms which restored the biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen and carbon to the levels typical for non-polluted grey forest soil.

  19. The Speciation of Sulfur in an Ocean on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolotov, M. Yu.; Shock, E. L.

    2002-01-01

    Stability of native sulfur, iron sulfides, and aqueous sulfur compounds is evaluated at assumed P-T conditions of the Europa's ocean floor. Pyrite, gypsum, and ferric hydroxides can coexist in contact with sulfate-rich oceanic water. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. The Speciation of Sulfur in an Ocean on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolotov, M. Yu.; Shock, E. L.

    2002-01-01

    Stability of native sulfur, iron sulfides, and aqueous sulfur compounds is evaluated at assumed P-T conditions of the Europa's ocean floor. Pyrite, gypsum, and ferric hydroxides can coexist in contact with sulfate-rich oceanic water. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. Air pollution threatens the health of children in China

    SciTech Connect

    Millman, A.; Tang, D.L.; Perera, F.P.

    2008-09-15

    China's rapid economic development has come at the cost of severe environmental degradation, most notably from coal combustion. Outdoor air pollution is associated with >300 000 deaths, 20 million cases of respiratory illness, and a health cost of >500 billion renminbi (>3% of gross domestic product) annually. The young are particularly susceptible to air pollution, yet there has been only limited recognition of its effects on children's health and development. To fill this gap, we reviewed relevant published environmental studies, biomedical and molecular/epidemiologic research, and economic and policy analyses. China relies on coal for about 70% to 75% of its energy needs, consuming 1.9 billion tons of coal each year. In addition to CO{sub 2}, the major greenhouse gas, coal burning in China emits vast quantities of particulate matter, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, sulfur dioxide, arsenic, and mercury. Seventy percent of Chinese households burn coal or biomass for cooking and heating, which contaminates indoor air. Adverse effects of combustion-related air pollution include reduced fetal and child growth, pulmonary disease including asthma, developmental impairment, and increased risk of cancer. A prospective molecular epidemiologic study of newborns in Chongqing has demonstrated direct benefits to children's health and development from the elimination of a coal-burning plant. Recognition of the full health and economic cost of air pollution to Chinese children and the benefits of pollution reduction should spur increased use of renewable energy, energy efficiency, and clean-fuel vehicles. This is a necessary investment for China's future.

  2. Pollution Detection Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Barringer Research, Inc.'s COSPEC IVB (correlation spectrometer) can sense from a considerable distance emissions from a volcanic eruption. Remote sensor is capable of measuring sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide in the atmosphere. An associated product, GASPEC, a compression of Non-dispersive Gas Filter Spectrometer, is an infrared/ultraviolet gas analyzer which can be used as either a ground based detector or in aircraft/spacecraft applications. Extremely sensitive, it is useful in air pollution investigations for detecting a variety of trace elements, vapors, which exist in the atmosphere in small amounts.

  3. Photochemical oxidants potentiate yield losses in snap beans attributable to sulfur dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Heggestad, H.E.; Bennett, J.H.

    1981-08-28

    Field-grown snap beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) were given recurring midday exposures to sulfur dioxide in open-top field chambers containing ambient photochemical oxidants. There was a linear correlation (correlation coefficient = -.99) between increasing concentrations of sulfur dioxide and the yields of snap beans. Synergism was indicated for the mixtures of ambient ozone plus sulfur dioxide, leading to threefold greater yield losses in nonfiltered air than in charcoal-filtered air (to remove the ozone). Even the lowest sulfur dioxide dose in nonfiltered air reduced the yields of Astro, a cultivar that exhibited no visible pollutant-induced foliar injury. 16 referances, 1 figure, 1 table.

  4. An Aerosol Condensation Model for Sulfur Trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, K E

    2008-02-07

    . Sulfate aerosols and mist may form in the atmosphere on tank rupture. From chemical spill data from 1990-1996, Lawuyi02 and Fingas [7] prioritize sulfuric acid as sixth most serious. During this period, they note 155 spills totaling 13 Mt, out of a supply volume of 3700 Mt. Lawuyi and Fingas [7] summarize information on three major sulfuric acid spills. On 12 February 1984, 93 tons of sulfuric acid were spilled when 14 railroad cars derailed near MacTier, Parry Sound, Ontario. On 13 December 1978, 51 railroad cars derailed near Springhill, Nova Scotia. One car, containing 93% sulfuric acid, ruptured, spilling nearly its entire contents. In July 1993, 20 to 50 tons of fuming sulfuric acid spilled at the General Chemical Corp. plant in Richmond, California, a major industrial center near San Francisco. The release occurred when oleum was being loaded into a nonfuming acid railroad tank car that contained only a rupture disk as a safety device. The tank car was overheated and this rupture disk blew. The resulting cloud of sulfuric acid drifted northeast with prevailing winds over a number of populated areas. More than 3,000 people subsequently sought medical attention for burning eyes, coughing, headaches, and nausea. Almost all were treated and released on the day of the spill. By the day after the release, another 5,000 people had sought medical attention. The spill forced the closure of five freeways in the region as well as some Bay Area Rapid Transit System stations. Apart from corrosive toxicity, there is the additional hazard that the reactions of sulfur trioxide and sulfuric acid vapors with water are extremely exothermic [10, 11]. While the vapors are intrinsically denser than air, there is thus the likelihood of strong, warming-induced buoyancy from reactions with ambient water vapor, water-containing aerosol droplets, and wet environmental surface. Nordin [12] relates just such an occurrence following the Richmond, CA spill, with the plume observed to rise to 300

  5. Process for removing sulfur from sulfur-containing gases: high calcium fly-ash

    DOEpatents

    Rochelle, Gary T.; Chang, John C. S.

    1991-01-01

    The present disclosure relates to improved processes for treating hot sulfur-containing flue gas to remove sulfur therefrom. Processes in accordance with the present invention include preparing an aqueous slurry composed of a calcium alkali source and a source of reactive silica and/or alumina, heating the slurry to above-ambient temperatures for a period of time in order to facilitate the formation of sulfur-absorbing calcium silicates or aluminates, and treating the gas with the heat-treated slurry components. Examples disclosed herein demonstrate the utility of these processes in achieving improved sulfur-absorbing capabilities. Additionally, disclosure is provided which illustrates preferred configurations for employing the present processes both as a dry sorbent injection and for use in conjunction with a spray dryer and/or bagfilter. Retrofit application to existing systems is also addressed.

  6. Sulfur Volcanoes on Io?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Fink, J.

    1985-01-01

    The unusual rheological properties of molten sulfur, in which viscosity decreases approximately four orders of magnitude as it cools from 170 to 120 C, may result in distinctive volcanic flow morphologies that allow sulfur flows and volcanoes to be identified on Io. Search of high resolution Voyager images reveals three features--Atar Patera, Daedalus Patera, and Kibero Patera--considered to be possible sulfur volcanoes based on their morphology. All three average 250 km in diameter and are distinguished by circular-to-oval central masses surrounded by irregular, widespread flows. Geometric relations indicate that the flows were emplaced after the central zone and appear to have emanated from their margins. The central zones are interpreted to be domes representing the high temperature stage of sulfur formed initially upon eruption. Rapid quenching formed a crust which preserved this phase of the emplacement. Upon cooling to 170 C, the sulfur reached a low viscosity runny stage and was released as the thin, widespread flows.

  7. Pollution Probe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chant, Donald A.

    This book is written as a statement of concern about pollution by members of Pollution Probe, a citizens' anti-pollution group in Canada. Its purpose is to create public awareness and pressure for the eventual solution to pollution problems. The need for effective government policies to control the population explosion, conserve natural resources,…

  8. Pollution Probe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chant, Donald A.

    This book is written as a statement of concern about pollution by members of Pollution Probe, a citizens' anti-pollution group in Canada. Its purpose is to create public awareness and pressure for the eventual solution to pollution problems. The need for effective government policies to control the population explosion, conserve natural resources,…

  9. Corrosion-resistant sulfur concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBee, W. C.; Sullivan, T. A.; Jong, B. W.

    1983-04-01

    Sulfur concretes have been developed by the Bureau of Mines as construction materials with physical and mechanical properties that suit them for use in acid and salt corrosive environments where conventional concretes fail. Mixture design methods were established for preparing sulfur concretes using different types of aggregates and recently developed mixed-modified sulfur cements. Bench-scale testing of the sulfur concretes has shown their potential value. Corrosion resistance, strength, and durability of sulfur concrete are superior to those of conventional materials. Field in situ evaluation tests of the sulfur concretes as replacement for conventional concrete materials are in progress in corrosive areas of 24 commercial chemical, fertilizer, and metallurgical plants.

  10. Characterization of sulfur oxidizing bacteria related to biogenic sulfuric acid corrosion in sludge digesters.

    PubMed

    Huber, Bettina; Herzog, Bastian; Drewes, Jörg E; Koch, Konrad; Müller, Elisabeth

    2016-07-18

    Biogenic sulfuric acid (BSA) corrosion damages sewerage and wastewater treatment facilities but is not well investigated in sludge digesters. Sulfur/sulfide oxidizing bacteria (SOB) oxidize sulfur compounds to sulfuric acid, inducing BSA corrosion. To obtain more information on BSA corrosion in sludge digesters, microbial communities from six different, BSA-damaged, digesters were analyzed using culture dependent methods and subsequent polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). BSA production was determined in laboratory scale systems with mixed and pure cultures, and in-situ with concrete specimens from the digester headspace and sludge zones. The SOB Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, Thiomonas intermedia, and Thiomonas perometabolis were cultivated and compared to PCR-DGGE results, revealing the presence of additional acidophilic and neutrophilic SOB. Sulfate concentrations of 10-87 mmol/L after 6-21 days of incubation (final pH 1.0-2.0) in mixed cultures, and up to 433 mmol/L after 42 days (final pH <1.0) in pure A. thiooxidans cultures showed huge sulfuric acid production potentials. Additionally, elevated sulfate concentrations in the corroded concrete of the digester headspace in contrast to the concrete of the sludge zone indicated biological sulfur/sulfide oxidation. The presence of SOB and confirmation of their sulfuric acid production under laboratory conditions reveal that these organisms might contribute to BSA corrosion within sludge digesters. Elevated sulfate concentrations on the corroded concrete wall in the digester headspace (compared to the sludge zone) further indicate biological sulfur/sulfide oxidation in-situ. For the first time, SOB presence and activity is directly relatable to BSA corrosion in sludge digesters.

  11. Refining a complex nickel alloy to remove a sulfur impurity during vacuum induction melting: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorov, V. V.; Min, P. G.

    2014-12-01

    The results of studying the refining of complexly alloyed nickel melts from sulfur during melting in a vacuum induction furnace or with the use of an oxide calcium crucible, metallic calcium added to a melt, or rare-earth metals additions (which form thermodynamically stable refractory compounds with sulfur and, thus, eliminate the harmful effect of sulfur in the alloys) are reported.

  12. 40 CFR 80.250 - How is the small refiner sulfur baseline and volume determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How is the small refiner sulfur... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Hardship Provisions § 80.250 How is the small refiner sulfur baseline and volume determined? (a)(1)...

  13. 40 CFR 80.385 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline sulfur program? 80.385 Section 80.385 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Violation Provisions § 80.385 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline sulfur program? No person shall:...

  14. 40 CFR 80.250 - How is the small refiner sulfur baseline and volume determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How is the small refiner sulfur... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Hardship Provisions § 80.250 How is the small refiner sulfur baseline and volume determined? (a)(1)...

  15. 40 CFR 80.370 - What are the sulfur reporting requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the sulfur reporting... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements § 80.370 What are the sulfur reporting requirements? Beginning with the 2004 averaging period,...

  16. 40 CFR 80.370 - What are the sulfur reporting requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are the sulfur reporting... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements § 80.370 What are the sulfur reporting requirements? Beginning with the 2004 averaging period,...

  17. 40 CFR 80.385 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gasoline sulfur program? 80.385 Section 80.385 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Violation Provisions § 80.385 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline sulfur program? No person shall:...

  18. 40 CFR 80.395 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... gasoline sulfur program? 80.395 Section 80.395 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Violation Provisions § 80.395 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline sulfur program? (a) Persons liable...

  19. 40 CFR 80.370 - What are the sulfur reporting requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the sulfur reporting... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements § 80.370 What are the sulfur reporting requirements? Beginning with the 2004 averaging period,...

  20. 40 CFR 80.190 - Who must register with EPA under the sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... sulfur program? 80.190 Section 80.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur General Information § 80.190 Who must register with EPA under the sulfur program? (a) Refiners and importers who...

  1. 40 CFR 80.245 - How does a small refiner apply for a sulfur baseline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... sulfur baseline? 80.245 Section 80.245 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Hardship Provisions § 80.245 How does a small refiner apply for a sulfur baseline? (a) Any refiner seeking...

  2. 40 CFR 80.190 - Who must register with EPA under the sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... sulfur program? 80.190 Section 80.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur General Information § 80.190 Who must register with EPA under the sulfur program? (a) Refiners and importers who...

  3. 40 CFR 80.395 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... gasoline sulfur program? 80.395 Section 80.395 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Violation Provisions § 80.395 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline sulfur program? (a) Persons liable...

  4. 40 CFR 80.245 - How does a small refiner apply for a sulfur baseline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... sulfur baseline? 80.245 Section 80.245 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Hardship Provisions § 80.245 How does a small refiner apply for a sulfur baseline? (a) Any refiner seeking...

  5. 40 CFR 80.250 - How is the small refiner sulfur baseline and volume determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How is the small refiner sulfur... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Hardship Provisions § 80.250 How is the small refiner sulfur baseline and volume determined? (a)(1)...

  6. 40 CFR 80.395 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline sulfur program? 80.395 Section 80.395 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Violation Provisions § 80.395 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline sulfur program? (a) Persons liable...

  7. 40 CFR 80.370 - What are the sulfur reporting requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are the sulfur reporting... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements § 80.370 What are the sulfur reporting requirements? Beginning with the 2004 averaging period,...

  8. 40 CFR 80.190 - Who must register with EPA under the sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... sulfur program? 80.190 Section 80.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur General Information § 80.190 Who must register with EPA under the sulfur program? (a) Refiners and importers who...

  9. 40 CFR 80.395 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gasoline sulfur program? 80.395 Section 80.395 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Violation Provisions § 80.395 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline sulfur program? (a) Persons liable...

  10. 40 CFR 80.290 - How does a refiner apply for a sulfur baseline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How does a refiner apply for a sulfur... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program-General Information § 80.290 How does a refiner apply for a sulfur baseline? (a)...

  11. 40 CFR 80.385 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... gasoline sulfur program? 80.385 Section 80.385 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Violation Provisions § 80.385 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline sulfur program? No person shall:...

  12. 40 CFR 80.250 - How is the small refiner sulfur baseline and volume determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How is the small refiner sulfur... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Hardship Provisions § 80.250 How is the small refiner sulfur baseline and volume determined? (a)(1)...

  13. 40 CFR 80.245 - How does a small refiner apply for a sulfur baseline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... sulfur baseline? 80.245 Section 80.245 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Hardship Provisions § 80.245 How does a small refiner apply for a sulfur baseline? (a) Any refiner seeking...

  14. 40 CFR 80.245 - How does a small refiner apply for a sulfur baseline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... sulfur baseline? 80.245 Section 80.245 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Hardship Provisions § 80.245 How does a small refiner apply for a sulfur baseline? (a) Any refiner seeking...

  15. 40 CFR 80.190 - Who must register with EPA under the sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... sulfur program? 80.190 Section 80.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur General Information § 80.190 Who must register with EPA under the sulfur program? (a) Refiners and importers who...

  16. 40 CFR 80.190 - Who must register with EPA under the sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... sulfur program? 80.190 Section 80.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur General Information § 80.190 Who must register with EPA under the sulfur program? (a) Refiners and importers who...

  17. 40 CFR 80.290 - How does a refiner apply for a sulfur baseline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How does a refiner apply for a sulfur... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program-General Information § 80.290 How does a refiner apply for a sulfur baseline? (a)...

  18. 40 CFR 80.245 - How does a small refiner apply for a sulfur baseline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... sulfur baseline? 80.245 Section 80.245 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Hardship Provisions § 80.245 How does a small refiner apply for a sulfur baseline? (a) Any refiner seeking...

  19. 40 CFR 80.290 - How does a refiner apply for a sulfur baseline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How does a refiner apply for a sulfur... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program-General Information § 80.290 How does a refiner apply for a sulfur baseline? (a)...

  20. 40 CFR 80.290 - How does a refiner apply for a sulfur baseline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How does a refiner apply for a sulfur... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program-General Information § 80.290 How does a refiner apply for a sulfur baseline? (a)...

  1. 40 CFR 80.385 - What acts are prohibited under the gasoline sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... gasoline sulfur program? 80.385 Section 80.385 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Violation Provisions § 80.385 What acts are prohibited under the gasoline sulfur program? No person shall:...

  2. 40 CFR 80.395 - Who is liable for violations under the gasoline sulfur program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... gasoline sulfur program? 80.395 Section 80.395 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Violation Provisions § 80.395 Who is liable for violations under the gasoline sulfur program? (a) Persons liable...

  3. 40 CFR 80.370 - What are the sulfur reporting requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the sulfur reporting... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements § 80.370 What are the sulfur reporting requirements? Beginning with the 2004 averaging period,...

  4. 40 CFR 80.290 - How does a refiner apply for a sulfur baseline?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does a refiner apply for a sulfur... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Averaging, Banking and Trading (abt) Program-General Information § 80.290 How does a refiner apply for a sulfur baseline? (a)...

  5. 40 CFR 80.250 - How is the small refiner sulfur baseline and volume determined?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How is the small refiner sulfur... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Hardship Provisions § 80.250 How is the small refiner sulfur baseline and volume determined? (a)(1)...

  6. Sulfur dioxide removal from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, P.; Ginger, E.A.

    1986-11-11

    A process is described for removal of sulfur dioxide pollutant gas from gas stream which comprises contacting the gas stream with pretreated shale in the form of an aqueous solution of aluminum sulfate including from about 0.1 to about 2.0% by weight of the pretreated shale. The pretreatment of the shale comprises the heating of the shale in the presence of a gas unable to support combustion at a temperature in a range of from about 340/sup 0/C. to about 480/sup 0/C.

  7. Advanced sulfur control concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, D.P.; Lopez-Ortiz, A.; White, J.D.; Groves, F.R. Jr.

    1995-11-01

    The primary objective of this study is the direct production of elemental sulfur during the regeneration of high temperature desulfurization sorbents. Three possible regeneration concepts were identified as a result of a literature search. The potential for elemental sulfur production from a number of candidate metal oxide sorbents using each regeneration concept was evaluated on the basis of a thermodynamic analysis. Two candidate sorbents, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CeO{sub 2} were chosen for experimental testing. The experimental test program using both electrobalance and fixed-bed reactor sis now getting underway. The objective is to determine reaction conditions--temperature, pressure, space velocity, and regeneration feed gas composition--which will maximize the yield of elemental sulfur in the regeneration product gas. Experimental results are to be used to define a conceptual desulfurization-regeneration process and to provide a preliminary economic evaluation.

  8. Sulfur activation in Hiroshima

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, G.D.; Pace, J.V. III

    1987-01-01

    In 1979, we attempted to establish the validity of source terms for the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs using experimental data on sulfur activation. Close agreement was observed between measured and calculated values for test firings of Nagasaki-type bombs. The calculated values were based on source terms developed by W.E. Preeg at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A discrepancy was found, however, when we compared calculated values for the two bombs because a 1956 report by R.R. Wilson stated that sulfur acitvation by fast neutrons in Hiroshima was approximately three times greater than in Nagasaki. Our calculations based on Preeg's source-term data predicted about equal sulfur activation in the two cities.

  9. Sodium sulfur battery seal

    DOEpatents

    Mikkor, Mati

    1981-01-01

    This disclosure is directed to an improvement in a sodium sulfur battery construction in which a seal between various battery compartments is made by a structure in which a soft metal seal member is held in a sealing position by holding structure. A pressure applying structure is used to apply pressure on the soft metal seal member when it is being held in sealing relationship to a surface of a container member of the sodium sulfur battery by the holding structure. The improvement comprises including a thin, well-adhered, soft metal layer on the surface of the container member of the sodium sulfur battery to which the soft metal seal member is to be bonded.

  10. Interstellar sulfur chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, S. S.; Huntress, W. T., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The results of a chemical model of SO, CS, and OCS chemistry in dense clouds are summarized. The results are obtained from a theoretical study of sulfur chemistry in dense interstellar clouds using a large-scale time-dependent model of gas-phase chemistry. Among the results are the following: (1) owing to activation energy, the reaction of CS with O atoms is efficient as a loss mechanism of CS during the early phases of cloud evolution or in hot and oxygen-rich sources such as the KL nebula; (2) if sulfur is not abnormally depleted in dense clouds, then the observed abundances of SO, SO2, H2S, CS, OCS, H2CS, and SiS indicate that sulfur is mostly atomic in dense clouds; and (3) OCS is stable against reactions with neutral atoms and radicals in dense clouds.

  11. Catalyst for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Yun; Yu, Qiquan; Chang, Shih-Ger

    1996-01-01

    The inventive catalysts allow for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur in smokestack scrubber environments. The catalysts have a very high sulfur yield of over 90% and space velocity of 10,000 h.sup.-1. They also have the capacity to convert waste gases generated during the initial conversion into elemental sulfur. The catalysts have inexpensive components, and are inexpensive to produce. The net impact of the invention is to make this technology practically available to industrial applications.

  12. Localized Metal Solubilization in the Rhizosphere of Salix smithiana upon Sulfur Application

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A metal-accumulating willow was grown under greenhouse conditions on a Zn/Cd-polluted soil to investigate the effects of sulfur (S0) application on metal solubility and plant uptake. Soil porewater samples were analyzed 8 times during 61 days of growth, while DGT-measured metal flux and O2 were chemically mapped at selected times. Sulfur oxidation resulted in soil acidification and related mobilization of Mn, Zn, and Cd, more pronounced in the rooted compared to bulk soil. Chemical imaging revealed increased DGT-measured Zn and Cd flux at the root-soil interface. Our findings indicated sustained microbial S0 oxidation and associated metal mobilization close to root surfaces. The localized depletion of O2 along single roots upon S0 addition indicated the contribution of reductive Mn (oxy)hydoxide dissolution with Mn eventually becoming a terminal electron acceptor after depletion of O2 and NO3–. The S0 treatments increased the foliar metal concentrations (mg kg–1 dwt) up to 10-fold for Mn, (5810 ± 593), 3.3-fold for Zn (3850 ± 87.0), and 1.7-fold for Cd (36.9 ± 3.35), but had no significant influence on biomass production. Lower metal solubilization in the bulk soils should translate into reduced leaching, offering opportunities for using S0 as environmentally favorable amendment for phytoextraction of metal-polluted soils. PMID:25782052

  13. Assessment of urban air quality in China using air pollution indices (APIs).

    PubMed

    Wang, Litao; Zhang, Pu; Tan, Shaobo; Zhao, Xiujuan; Cheng, Dandan; Wei, Wei; Su, Jie; Pan, Xuemei

    2013-02-01

    This study gathered and processed the available air quality daily reports in 86 cities throughout China in 2001-2011. Urban air quality was assessed in terms of the evolution of the key pollutants, the pollution level, and the PM10 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter < 10 microm) concentrations. The authors conclude that PM10 is the most important pollutant in Chinese cities, especially after the national sulfur dioxide (SO2) controls during the 11th Five Year Plan (FYP; 2006-2010). A notable advance was the reduction of extremely heavily polluted days with air pollution index (API) above 150 from 7% in 2001 to 1% in 2011 in the all-city average. In addition, the average API-derived PM10 concentrations continually decreased during the past 11 yr. Additionally, the pollution pattern of "more severe from south to north "in China became less obvious due to the decline of PM10 concentrations in the northern cities and the more obvious regional characteristics of air pollution. Nevertheless, more pollutants should be included in the API system to fully reflect the air quality status and guide future air pollution controls in Chinese cities. Air quality daily report, the only publicly accessible observation database in the past decade, provides valuable insight into the air quality in Chinese cities. Using this data set, this paper assesses the status and change of urban air quality in China in 2001-2011, during which great effort was made to mitigate urban air pollution. It is valuable for the further refinement of national air quality control strategies, and the needs of updating the present daily report system are implicated.

  14. Ambient air pollution and term birth weight in Texas from 1998 to 2004.

    PubMed

    Geer, Laura A; Weedon, Jeremy; Bell, Michelle L

    2012-11-01

    Previous studies have explored the association between air pollution levels and adverse birth outcomes such as lower birth weight. Existing literature suggests an association, although results across studies are not consistent. Additional research is needed to confirm the effect, investigate the exposure window of importance, and distinguish which pollutants cause harm. We assessed the association between ambient pollutant concentrations and term birth weight for 1,548,904 births in TX from 1998 to 2004. Assignment of prenatal exposure to air pollutants was based on maternal county of residence at the time of delivery. Pollutants examined included particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter < or = 10 and < or = 2.5 microm (PM10 and PM2.5), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and ozone (O3). We applied a linear model with birth weight as a continuous variable. The model was adjusted for known risk factors and region. We assessed pollutant effects by trimester to identify biological exposure window of concern, and explored interaction due to race/ethnicity. An interquartile increase in ambient pollutant concentrations of SO2 and O3 was associated with a 4.99-g (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.87-8.11) and 2. 72-g (95% CI, 1.11-4.33) decrease in birth weight, respectively. Lower birth weight was associated with exposure to O3 in the first and second trimester; whereas results were not significant for other pollutants by trimester A positive association was exhibited for PM2.5 in the first trimester. Effects estimates for PM10 and PM2.5 were inconsistent across race/ethnic groups. Current ambient air pollution levels may be increasing the risk of lower birth weight for some pollutants. These risks may be increased for certain racial/ethnic groups. Additional research including consideration of improved methodology is needed to investigate these findings. Future studies should examine the influence of residual confounding.

  15. Megacities and atmospheric pollution.

    PubMed

    Molina, Mario J; Molina, Luisa T

    2004-06-01

    About half of the world's population now lives in urban areas because of the opportunity for a better quality of life. Many of these urban centers are expanding rapidly, leading to the growth of megacities, which are defined as metropolitan areas with populations exceeding 10 million inhabitants. These concentrations of people and activity are exerting increasing stress on the natural environment, with impacts at urban, regional and global levels. In recent decades, air pollution has become one of the most important problems of megacities. Initially, the main air pollutants of concern were sulfur compounds, which were generated mostly by burning coal. Today, photochemical smog--induced primarily from traffic, but also from industrial activities, power generation, and solvents--has become the main source of concern for air quality, while sulfur is still a major problem in many cities of the developing world. Air pollution has serious impacts on public health, causes urban and regional haze, and has the potential to contribute significantly to climate change. Yet, with appropriate planning, megacities can efficiently address their air quality problems through measures such as application of new emission control technologies and development of mass transit systems. This review is focused on nine urban centers, chosen as case studies to assess air quality from distinct perspectives: from cities in the industrialized nations to cities in the developing world. While each city--its problems, resources, and outlook--is unique, the need for a holistic approach to the complex environmental problems is the same. There is no single strategy in reducing air pollution in megacities; a mix of policy measures will be needed to improve air quality. Experience shows that strong political will coupled with public dialog is essential to effectively implement the regulations required to address air quality problems.

  16. Water, sulfur dioxide and nitric acid adsorption on calcium carbonate: a transmission and ATR-FTIR study.

    PubMed

    Al-Hosney, H A; Grassian, V H

    2005-03-21

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) is a reactive component of mineral dust aerosol as well as buildings, statues and monuments. In this study, attenuated total reflection (ATR) and transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) have been used to study the uptake of water, sulfur dioxide and nitric acid on CaCO3 particles at 296 K. Under atmospheric conditions, CaCO3 particles are terminated by a Ca(OH)(CO3H) surface layer. In the presence of water vapor between 5 and 95% relative humidity (RH), water molecularly adsorbs on the Ca(OH)(CO3H) surface resulting in the formation of an adsorbed thin water film. The adsorbed water film assists in the enhanced uptake of sulfur dioxide and nitric acid on CaCO3 in several ways. Under dry conditions (near 0% RH), sulfur dioxide and nitric acid react with the Ca(OH)(CO3H) surface to form adsorbed carbonic acid (H2CO3) along with sulfite and nitrate, respectively. Adsorbed carbonic acid is stable on the surface under vacuum conditions. Once the surface saturates with a carbonic acid capping layer, there is no additional uptake of gas-phase sulfur dioxide and nitric acid. However, upon adsorption of water, carbonic acid dissociates to form gaseous carbon dioxide and there is further uptake of sulfur dioxide and nitric acid. In addition, adsorbed water increases the mobility of the ions at the surface and enhances uptake of SO2 and HNO3. In the presence of adsorbed water, CaSO3 forms islands of a crystalline hydrate whereas Ca(NO3)2 forms a deliquescent layer or micropuddles. Thus adsorbed water plays an important and multi-faceted role in the uptake of pollutant gases on CaCO3.

  17. Method for preventing sulfur emissions from vessels containing molten sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, R. H.

    1984-10-23

    Emissions from sulfur pits or other vessels containing molten sulfur are prevented or minimized by use of an air purge drawn into the vessel from the atmosphere and subsequently utilized as a portion of the oxidant required in a process for oxidizing hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur.

  18. Simultaneous activation/sulfurization method for production of sulfurized activated carbons: characterization and Hg(II) adsorption capacity.

    PubMed

    Shamsijazeyi, Hadi; Kaghazchi, Tahereh

    2014-01-01

    As an inexpensive method for modification of activated carbons (ACs), sulfurization has attracted significant attention. However, the resulting sulfurized activated carbons (SACs) often are less porous than the original ACs. In this work, we propose a new method for concurrent sulfurization/activation that can lead to preparation of SACs with more porosity than the corresponding non-sulfurized ACs. By using scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption/desorption, and iodine number experiments, the porous structure of the SACs has been compared with that of non-sulfurized ACs. The specific surface areas of SACs are higher than the corresponding ACs, regardless of the type of activation agents used. For instance, the specific surface area of SAC and AC activated with phosphoric acid is 1,637 and 1,338 m(2)/g, respectively. Additionally, sulfur contents and surface charges (pHpzc) of the SACs and non-sulfurized ACs are compared. In fact, the SACs have higher sulfur contents and more acidic surfaces. Furthermore, the Hg(II) adsorption capacity of SACs has been compared with the corresponding non-sulfurized ACs. The Hg(II) adsorption isotherms on a selected SAC is measured at different pH values and temperatures. Hg(II) adsorptions as high as 293 mg/g are observed by using SACs prepared by the method proposed in this study.

  19. Enhanced electrochemical performance of a crosslinked polyaniline-coated graphene oxide-sulfur composite for rechargeable lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, San; Jung, Young Hwa; Kim, Do Kyung

    2015-10-01

    Due to the extraordinarily high theoretical capacity of sulfur (1675 mAh g-1), the lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery has been considered a promising candidate for future high-energy battery applications. Li-S batteries, however, have suffered from limited cycle lives, mainly due to the formation of soluble polysulfides, which prevent the practical application of this attractive technology. The encapsulation of sulfur with various conductive materials has addressed this issue to some extent. Nevertheless, most approaches still present partial encapsulation of sulfur and moreover require a large quantity of conductive material (typically, >30 wt%), making the use of sulfur less desirable from the viewpoint of capacity. Here, we address these chronic issues of Li-S cells by developing a graphene oxide-sulfur composite with a thin crosslinked polyaniline (PANI) layer. Graphene oxide nanosheets with large surface area, high conductivity and a uniform conductive PANI layer, which are synthesized by a layer-by-layer method, have a synergetic interaction with a large portion of the sulfur in the active material. Furthermore, a simple crosslinking process efficiently prevents polysulfide dissolution, resulting in unprecedented electrochemical performance, even with a high sulfur content (∼75%): a high capacity retention of ∼80% is observed, in addition to 97.53% of the average Coulombic efficiency being retained after 500 cycles. The performance we demonstrate represents an advance in the field of lithium-sulfur batteries for applications such as power tools.

  20. Parameters Influencing Sulfur Speciation in Environmental Samples Using Sulfur K-Edge X-Ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure

    PubMed Central

    Pongpiachan, Siwatt; Thumanu, Kanjana; Kositanont, Charnwit; Schwarzer, Klaus; Prietzel, Jörg; Hirunyatrakul, Phoosak; Kittikoon, Itthipon

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to enhance the credibility of applying the sulfur K-edge XANES spectroscopy as an innovative “fingerprint” for characterizing environmental samples. The sensitivities of sulfur K-edge XANES spectra of ten sulfur compound standards detected by two different detectors, namely, Lytle detector (LyD) and Germanium detector (GeD), were studied and compared. Further investigation on “self-absorption” effect revealed that the maximum sensitivities of sulfur K-edge XANES spectra were achieved when diluting sulfur compound standards with boron nitride (BN) at the mixing ratio of 0.1%. The “particle-size” effect on sulfur K-edge XANES spectrum sensitivities was examined by comparing signal-to-noise ratios of total suspended particles (TSP) and particulate matter of less than 10 millionths of a meter (PM10) collected at three major cities of Thailand. The analytical results have demonstrated that the signal-to-noise ratios of sulfur K-edge XANES spectra were positively correlated with sulfate content in aerosols and negatively connected with particle sizes. The combination of hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) has proved that sulfur K-edge XANES spectrum can be used to characterize German terrestrial soils and Andaman coastal sediments. In addition, this study highlighted the capability of sulfur K-edge XANES spectra as an innovative “fingerprint” to distinguish tsunami backwash deposits (TBD) from typical marine sediments (TMS). PMID:23193498

  1. Sulfur 'Concrete' for Lunar Applications - Environmental Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.

    2008-01-01

    Commercial use of sulfur concrete on Earth is well established, particularly in corrosive, e.g., acid and salt, environments. Having found troilite (FeS) on the Moon raises the question of using extracted sulfur as a lunar construction material, an attractive alternative to conventional concrete as it does not require water. For the purpose of this Technical Memorandum, it is assumed that lunar ore is mined, refined, and the raw sulfur processed with appropriate lunar regolith to form, for example, bricks. With this stipulation, it is then noted that the viability of sulfur concrete in a lunar environment, which is characterized by lack of an atmosphere and extreme temperatures, is not well understood. The work presented here evaluates two sets of small sulfur concrete samples that have been prepared using JSC-1 lunar simulant as an aggregate addition. One set was subjected to extended periods in high vacuum to evaluate sublimation issues, and the other was cycled between room and liquid nitrogen temperatures to investigate their subsequent mechanical integrity. Results are presented from both investigations, discussed, and put into the context of the lunar environment.

  2. Rapid sulfur capture studies at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, G.A.; Lawson, W.F.; Maloney, D.J.; Shaw, D.W.

    1990-12-01

    Determine conditions that would reproduce optimum sulfur capture ( super-equilibrium'') behavior. No attempt was made to extract kinetic data for calcination or sulfur capture, as might be done in a comprehensive study of sorbent behavior. While some interesting anomalies are present in the calcination data and in the limited surface area data, no attempt was made to pursue those issues. Since little sulfur capture was observed at operating conditions where super-equilibrium'' might be expected to occur, tests were stopped when the wide range of parameters that were studied failed to produce significant sulfur capture via the super-equilibrium mechanism. Considerable space in this report is devoted to a description of the experiment, including details of the GTRC construction. This description is included because we have received requests for a detailed description of the GTRC itself, as well as the pressurized dry powder feed system. In addition, many questions about accurately sampling the sulfur species from a high-temperature, high-pressure reactor were raised during the course of this investigation. A full account of the development of the gas and particulate sampling train in thus provided. 8 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Catalysts for cleaner combustion of coal, wood and briquettes sulfur dioxide reduction options for low emission sources

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.V.

    1995-12-31

    Coal fired, low emission sources are a major factor in the air quality problems facing eastern European cities. These sources include: stoker-fired boilers which feed district heating systems and also meet local industrial steam demand, hand-fired boilers which provide heat for one building or a small group of buildings, and masonary tile stoves which heat individual rooms. Global Environmental Systems is marketing through Global Environmental Systems of Polane, Inc. catalysts to improve the combustion of coal, wood or fuel oils in these combustion systems. PCCL-II Combustion Catalysts promotes more complete combustion, reduces or eliminates slag formations, soot, corrosion and some air pollution emissions and is especially effective on high sulfur-high vanadium residual oils. Glo-Klen is a semi-dry powder continuous acting catalyst that is injected directly into the furnace of boilers by operating personnel. It is a multi-purpose catalyst that is a furnace combustion catalyst that saves fuel by increasing combustion efficiency, a cleaner of heat transfer surfaces that saves additional fuel by increasing the absorption of heat, a corrosion-inhibiting catalyst that reduces costly corrosion damage and an air pollution reducing catalyst that reduces air pollution type stack emissions. The reduction of sulfur dioxides from coal or oil-fired boilers of the hand fired stoker design and larger, can be controlled by the induction of the Glo-Klen combustion catalyst and either hydrated lime or pulverized limestone.

  4. Zeolites Remove Sulfur From Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1991-01-01

    Zeolites remove substantial amounts of sulfur compounds from diesel fuel under relatively mild conditions - atmospheric pressure below 300 degrees C. Extracts up to 60 percent of sulfur content of high-sulfur fuel. Applicable to petroleum refineries, natural-gas processors, electric powerplants, and chemical-processing plants. Method simpler and uses considerably lower pressure than current industrial method, hydro-desulfurization. Yields cleaner emissions from combustion of petroleum fuels, and protects catalysts from poisoning by sulfur.

  5. Mineral resource of the month: sulfur

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, Joyce A.

    2003-01-01

    Since domestic sulfur production peaked at nearly 11 million metric tons in 1974, the sulfur industry has undergone dramatic change. In 1974, mined sulfur produced using the Frasch hot water method provided 8 million tons of sulfur, representing 75 percent of total elemental sulfur production. (In the Frasch process, hot water is injected directly into the sulfur-containing mineral strata, melting the crystalline sulfur, which then lifts to the surface with air.) The remaining 25 percent was produced as byproduct sulfur.

  6. Investigating missing sources of sulfur at Fairbanks, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Shakya, Kabindra M; Peltier, Richard E

    2013-08-20

    We investigated disparities in elemental sulfur and inorganic sulfate concentrations in ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) data from 2005 to 2012 at a monitoring station in Fairbanks, AK. In approximately 28% of the observations from 2005 to 2012, elemental sulfur by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy significantly exceeded the inorganic sulfur by ion chromatography (IC), suggesting the presence of a significant quantity of unmeasured sulfur compounds. The mean ratio of sulfur by XRF to that by IC for only these cases was 1.22 ± 0.11. The largest discrepancies between elemental sulfur and sulfate were most frequently observed in the summer, although discrepancies were observed year round. Assuming the additional sulfur (other than inorganic sulfate) as the upper limit estimate, this work shows that organosulfur species (or the additional sulfur) account for 1.29% of organic carbon (OC) and 0.75% of PM2.5 in Fairbanks. An analysis of all available air quality system (AQS) data suggests that these recurring phenomena are linked to seasons, total carbon, inorganic nitrate, and elemental sources during cold periods and ozone during warm periods.

  7. Isotopic evidence in tree rings for historical changes in atmospheric sulfur sources.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Hidehisa; Matsuoka, Nobuaki; Momoshima, Noriyuki; Koike, Masami; Takashima, Yoshimasa

    2006-09-15

    Little is understood about the usefulness of sulfur isotopic ratios (sigma 34S) in tree rings because the sulfur content in rings is generally insufficient for analysis using conventional methods. We present sigma 34S values of the water-soluble and the organically bound sulfur fractions in rings of coniferous trees grown in Japan, analyzed using a large-volume oxygen bomb. Comparing the sigma 34S values of the organically bound fraction in tree rings with past atmospheric sulfur concentrations and with those of their sources, we find clear evidence that the sigma 34S values of the organically bound fraction in the rings are dependent upon the values of the atmospheric sulfur sources. The evidence suggests that the sigma 34S values in tree rings are a useful chronological proxy for evaluating possible causes of past atmospheric sulfur pollution.

  8. Effect of Environmental Factors on Sulfur Gas Emissions from Drywall

    SciTech Connect

    Maddalena, Randy

    2011-08-20

    Problem drywall installed in U.S. homes is suspected of being a source of odorous and potentially corrosive indoor pollutants. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission's (CPSC) investigation of problem drywall incorporates three parallel tracks: (1) evaluating the relationship between the drywall and reported health symptoms; (2) evaluating the relationship between the drywall and electrical and fire safety issues in affected homes; and (3) tracing the origin and the distribution of the drywall. To assess the potential impact on human health and to support testing for electrical and fire safety, the CPSC has initiated a series of laboratory tests that provide elemental characterization of drywall, characterization of chemical emissions, and in-home air sampling. The chemical emission testing was conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The LBNL study consisted of two phases. In Phase 1 of this study, LBNL tested thirty drywall samples provided by CPSC and reported standard emission factors for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), aldehydes, reactive sulfur gases (RSGs) and volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs). The standard emission factors were determined using small (10.75 liter) dynamic test chambers housed in a constant temperature environmental chamber. The tests were all run at 25 C, 50% relative humidity (RH) and with an area-specific ventilation rate of {approx}1.5 cubic meters per square meter of emitting surface per hour [m{sup 3}/m{sup 2}/h]. The thirty samples that were tested in Phase 1 included seventeen that were manufactured in China in 2005, 2006 and 2009, and thirteen that were manufactured in North America in 2009. The measured emission factors for VOCs and aldehydes were generally low and did not differ significantly between the Chinese and North American drywall. Eight of the samples tested had elevated emissions of volatile sulfur-containing compounds with total RSG emission factors between 32 and 258 micrograms per square meter

  9. Sulfur oxygen processes on Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R. M.; Smythe, W. D.

    1985-04-01

    The presence of allotropic sulfur as a possible major constituent of Io's surface and the properties of sulfur in combination with various sulfur-oxygen compounds believed to be present on Io's surface and in its atmosphere are studied by a series of laboratory experiments.

  10. Process for forming sulfuric acid

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Wen-Tong P.

    1981-01-01

    An improved electrode is disclosed for the anode in a sulfur cycle hydrogen generation process where sulfur dioxie is oxidized to form sulfuric acid at the anode. The active compound in the electrode is palladium, palladium oxide, an alloy of palladium, or a mixture thereof. The active compound may be deposited on a porous, stable, conductive substrate.

  11. Sulfur Oxygen Processes on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, R. M.; Smythe, W. D.

    1985-01-01

    The presence of allotropic sulfur as a possible major constituent of Io's surface and the properties of sulfur in combination with various sulfur-oxygen compounds believed to be present on Io's surface and in its atmosphere are studied by a series of laboratory experiments.

  12. Sulfur removal from high-sulfur Illinois coal by low-temperature perchloroethylene (PCE) extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, M.I.M.

    1991-01-01

    A pre-combustion coal desulfurization process at 120{degree}C using perchloroethylene (PCE) to remove up to 70% of the organic sulfur has been developed by the Midwest Ore Processing Co. (MWOPC). However, this process has not yet proven to be as successful with Illinois coals as it has for Ohio and Indiana coals. The organic sulfur removal has been achieved only with highly oxidized Illinois coals containing high sulfatic sulfur. A logical explanation for this observation is vital to successful process optimization for the use of Illinois coals. In addition, the high levels of organic sulfur removals observed by the MWOPC may be due to certain errors involved in the ASTM data interpretation; this needs verification. For example, elemental sulfur extracted by the PCE may be derived from pyrite oxidation during coal pre-oxidation, but it may be interpreted as organic sulfur removed by the PCE using ASTM analysis. The goals of this research are: (1) to independently confirm and possibly to improve the organic sulfur removal from Illinois coals with the PCE desulfurization process reported by the MWOPC, (2) to verify the forms-of-sulfur determination using the ASTM method for the PCE process evaluation, and (3) to determine the suitability of Illinois coals for use in the PCE desulfurization process. This project involves the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS), Eastern Illinois University (EIU), the University of Illinois-Urbana/Champaign (UI-UC), and the University of Kentucky, Lexington (UK). This is the first year of a two-year project.

  13. Regulation of dissimilatory sulfur oxidation in the purple sulfur bacterium allochromatium vinosum.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Frauke; Franz, Bettina; Dahl, Christiane

    2011-01-01

    In the purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum, thiosulfate oxidation is strictly dependent on the presence of three periplasmic Sox proteins encoded by the soxBXAK and soxYZ genes. It is also well documented that proteins encoded in the dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsr) operon, dsrABEFHCMKLJOPNRS, are essential for the oxidation of sulfur that is stored intracellularly as an obligatory intermediate during the oxidation of thiosulfate and sulfide. Until recently, detailed knowledge about the regulation of the sox genes was not available. We started to fill this gap and show that these genes are expressed on a low constitutive level in A. vinosum in the absence of reduced sulfur compounds. Thiosulfate and possibly sulfide lead to an induction of sox gene transcription. Additional translational regulation was not apparent. Regulation of soxXAK is probably performed by a two-component system consisting of a multi-sensor histidine kinase and a regulator with proposed di-guanylate cyclase activity. Previous work already provided some information about regulation of the dsr genes encoding the second important sulfur-oxidizing enzyme system in the purple sulfur bacterium. The expression of most dsr genes was found to be at a low basal level in the absence of reduced sulfur compounds and enhanced in the presence of sulfide. In the present work, we focused on the role of DsrS, a protein encoded by the last gene of the dsr locus in A. vinosum. Transcriptional and translational gene fusion experiments suggest a participation of DsrS in the post-transcriptional control of the dsr operon. Characterization of an A. vinosum ΔdsrS mutant showed that the monomeric cytoplasmic 41.1-kDa protein DsrS is important though not essential for the oxidation of sulfur stored in the intracellular sulfur globules.

  14. Meteoritic Sulfur Isotopic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiemens, Mark H.

    1996-01-01

    Funds were requested to continue our program in meteoritic sulfur isotopic analysis. We have recently detected a potential nucleosynthetic sulfur isotopic anomaly. We will search for potential carriers. The documentation of bulk systematics and the possible relation to nebular chemistry and oxygen isotopes will be explored. Analytical techniques for delta(sup 33), delta(sup 34)S, delta(sup 36)S isotopic analysis were improved. Analysis of sub milligram samples is now possible. A possible relation between sulfur isotopes and oxygen was detected, with similar group systematics noted, particularly in the case of aubrites, ureilites and entstatite chondrites. A possible nucleosynthetic excess S-33 has been noted in bulk ureilites and an oldhamite separate from Norton County. High energy proton (approximately 1 GeV) bombardments of iron foils were done to experimentally determine S-33, S-36 spallogenic yields for quantitation of isotopic measurements in iron meteorites. Techniques for measurement of mineral separates were perfected and an analysis program initiated. The systematic behavior of bulk sulfur isotopes will continue to be explored.

  15. Sodium sulfur battery seal

    DOEpatents

    Topouzian, Armenag

    1980-01-01

    This invention is directed to a seal for a sodium sulfur battery in which a flexible diaphragm sealing elements respectively engage opposite sides of a ceramic component of the battery which separates an anode compartment from a cathode compartment of the battery.

  16. Sulfur removal from high-sulfur Illinois coal by low-temperature perchloroethylene (PCE) extraction. Final technical report, 1 September, 1992--31 August, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, M.I.M.; Lytle, J.M.; Ruch, R.R.; Kruse, C.W.; Chaven, C.; Hackley, K.C.; Hughes, R.E.; Harvey, R.D.; Frost, J.K.; Buchanan, D.H.; Stucki, J.W.; Huffman, G.P.; Huggins, F.E.

    1993-12-31

    The Midwest Ore Processing Co. (MWOPC) has reported a precombustion coal desulfurization process using perchloroethylene (PCE) at 120 C to remove up to 70% of the organic sulfur. The purposes of this research were to independently confirm and possibly to improve the organic sulfur removal from Illinois coals with the PCE desulfurization and to verify the ASTM forms-of-sulfur determination for evaluation of the process. An additional goal was to develop a dechlorination procedure to remove excess PCE from the PCE-treated coal. A laboratory scale operation of the MWOPC PCE desulfurization process was demonstrated, and a dechlorination procedure to remove excess PCE from the PCE-treated coal was developed. The authors have determined that PCE desulfurization removed mainly elemental sulfur from coal. The higher the level of coal oxidization, the larger the amount of elemental sulfur that is removed by PCE extraction. The increased elemental sulfur during short-term preoxidation is found to be pH dependent and is attributed to coal pyrite oxidation under acidic (pH < 2) conditions. The non-ASTM sulfur analyses confirmed the hypothesis that the elemental sulfur produced by oxidation of pyrite complicates the interpretation of analytical data for PCE process evaluations when only the ASTM forms-of-sulfur is used. When the ASTM method is used alone, the elemental sulfur removed during PCE desulfurization is counted as organic sulfur. A study using model compounds suggests that mild preoxidation treatment of coal described by MWOPC for removal of organic sulfur does not produce enough oxidized organic sulfur to account for the amounts of sulfur removal reported. Furthermore, when oxidation of coal-like organosulfur compounds does occur, the products are inconsistent with production of elemental sulfur, the product reported by MWOPC. Overall, it is demonstrated that the PCE process is not suitable for organic sulfur removal.

  17. SULFUR POLYMER ENCAPSULATION.

    SciTech Connect

    KALB, P.

    2001-08-22

    Sulfur polymer cement (SPC) is a thermoplastic polymer consisting of 95 wt% elemental sulfur and 5 wt% organic modifiers to enhance long-term durability. SPC was originally developed by the U.S. Bureau of Mines as an alternative to hydraulic cement for construction applications. Previous attempts to use elemental sulfur as a construction material in the chemical industry failed due to premature degradation. These failures were caused by the internal stresses that result from changes in crystalline structure upon cooling of the material. By reacting elemental sulfur with organic polymers, the Bureau of Mines developed a product that successfully suppresses the solid phase transition and significantly improves the stability of the product. SPC, originally named modified sulfur cement, is produced from readily available, inexpensive waste sulfur derived from desulfurization of both flue gases and petroleum. The commercial production of SPC is licensed in the United States by Martin Resources (Odessa, Texas) and is marketed under the trade name Chement 2000. It is sold in granular form and is relatively inexpensive ({approx}$0.10 to 0.12/lb). Application of SPC for the treatment of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes was initially developed and patented by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in the mid-1980s (Kalb and Colombo, 1985; Colombo et al., 1997). The process was subsequently investigated by the Commission of the European Communities (Van Dalen and Rijpkema, 1989), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (Darnell, 1991), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Mattus and Mattus, 1994). SPC has been used primarily in microencapsulation applications but can also be used for macroencapsulation of waste. SPC microencapsulation has been demonstrated to be an effective treatment for a wide variety of wastes, including incinerator hearth and fly ash; aqueous concentrates such as sulfates, borates, and chlorides; blowdown solutions; soils; and sludges. It is not

  18. Air pollution modeling at road sides using the operational street pollution model--a case study in Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ngo Tho; Ketzel, Matthias; Jensen, Steen Solvang; Oanh, Nguyen Thi Kim

    2010-11-01

    In many metropolitan areas, traffic is the main source of air pollution. The high concentrations of pollutants in streets have the potential to affect human health. Therefore, estimation of air pollution at the street level is required for health impact assessment. This task has been carried out in many developed countries by a combination of air quality measurements and modeling. This study focuses on how to apply a dispersion model to cities in the developing world, where model input data and data from air quality monitoring stations are limited or of varying quality. This research uses the operational street pollution model (OSPM) developed by the National Environmental Research Institute in Denmark for a case study in Hanoi, the capital of Vietnam. OSPM predictions from five streets were evaluated against air pollution measurements of nitrogen oxides (NO(x)), sulfur dioxide (SO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and benzene (BNZ) that were available from previous studies. Hourly measurements and passive sample measurements collected over 3-week periods were compared with model outputs, applying emission factors from previous studies. In addition, so-called "backward calculations" were performed to adapt the emission factors for Hanoi conditions. The average fleet emission factors estimated can be used for emission calculations at other streets in Hanoi and in other locations in Southeast Asia with similar vehicle types. This study also emphasizes the need to further eliminate uncertainties in input data for the street-scale air pollution modeling in Vietnam, namely by providing reliable emission factors and hourly air pollution measurements of high quality.

  19. Inorganic sulfur oxidizing system in green sulfur bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Hidehiro; Ogawa, Takuro; Shiga, Michiko; Inoue, Kazuhito

    2010-06-01

    Green sulfur bacteria use various reduced sulfur compounds such as sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate as electron donors for photoautotrophic growth. This article briefly summarizes what is known about the inorganic sulfur oxidizing systems of these bacteria with emphasis on the biochemical aspects. Enzymes that oxidize sulfide in green sulfur bacteria are membrane-bound sulfide-quinone oxidoreductase, periplasmic (sometimes membrane-bound) flavocytochrome c sulfide dehydrogenase, and monomeric flavocytochrome c (SoxF). Some green sulfur bacteria oxidize thiosulfate by the multienzyme system called either the TOMES (thiosulfate oxidizing multi-enzyme system) or Sox (sulfur oxidizing system) composed of the three periplasmic proteins: SoxB, SoxYZ, and SoxAXK with a soluble small molecule cytochrome c as the electron acceptor. The oxidation of sulfide and thiosulfate by these enzymes in vitro is assumed to yield two electrons and result in the transfer of a sulfur atom to persulfides, which are subsequently transformed to elemental sulfur. The elemental sulfur is temporarily stored in the form of globules attached to the extracellular surface of the outer membranes. The oxidation pathway of elemental sulfur to sulfate is currently unclear, although the participation of several proteins including those of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase system etc. is suggested from comparative genomic analyses.

  20. Global sulfur emissions from 1850 to 2000.

    PubMed

    Stern, David I

    2005-01-01

    The ASL database provides continuous time-series of sulfur emissions for most countries in the World from 1850 to 1990, but academic and official estimates for the 1990s either do not cover all years or countries. This paper develops continuous time series of sulfur emissions by country for the period 1850-2000 with a particular focus on developments in the 1990s. Global estimates for 1996-2000 are the first that are based on actual observed data. Raw estimates are obtained in two ways. For countries and years with existing published data I compile and integrate that data. Previously published data covers the majority of emissions and almost all countries have published emissions for at least 1995. For the remaining countries and for missing years for countries with some published data, I interpolate or extrapolate estimates using either an econometric emissions frontier model, an environmental Kuznets curve model, or a simple extrapolation, depending on the availability of data. Finally, I discuss the main movements in global and regional emissions in the 1990s and earlier decades and compare the results to other studies. Global emissions peaked in 1989 and declined rapidly thereafter. The locus of emissions shifted towards East and South Asia, but even this region peaked in 1996. My estimates for the 1990s show a much more rapid decline than other global studies, reflecting the view that technological progress in reducing sulfur based pollution has been rapid and is beginning to diffuse worldwide.

  1. Microbial stabilization of sulfur-laden sorbents. Final technical report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.W.; Hillyer, D.

    1993-12-31

    Clean coal technologies that involve limestone for sulfur capture generate lime/limestone products laden with sulfur at various oxidation states. If sulfur is completely stabilized as sulfate, the spent sorbent is ready for commercial utilization as gypsum. However, the presence of reduced sulfur species requires additional processing. Thermal oxidation of reduced sulfur can result in undesirable release of SO{sub 2}. Microbial oxidation might provide an inexpensive and effective alternative. Sorbents laden with reduced forms of sulfur such as sulfide or sulfite can serve as growth substrates for sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, which convert all sulfur to sulfate. The goals of this project are the following: (1) to optimize conditions for sulfate generation from sulfide, thiosulfate, and sulfite; (2) to test and optimize the effectiveness of microbial processing on spent sorbents from flue gas desulfurization, coal gasification, and fluidized bed combustion; (3) to search for hyperalkalinophilic thiobacilli, which would be effective up to pH 11.

  2. Distribution and sources of air pollutants in the North China Plain based on on-road mobile measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yi; Zhang, Jiping; Wang, Junxia; Chen, Wenyuan; Han, Yiqun; Ye, Chunxiang; Li, Yingruo; Liu, Jun; Zeng, Limin; Wu, Yusheng; Wang, Xinfeng; Wang, Wenxing; Chen, Jianmin; Zhu, Tong

    2016-10-01

    The North China Plain (NCP) has been experiencing severe air pollution problems with rapid economic growth and urbanisation. Many field and model studies have examined the distribution of air pollutants in the NCP, but convincing results have not been achieved, mainly due to a lack of direct measurements of pollutants over large areas. Here, we employed a mobile laboratory to observe the main air pollutants in a large part of the NCP from 11 June to 15 July 2013. High median concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO2) (12 ppb), nitrogen oxides (NOx) (NO + NO2; 452 ppb), carbon monoxide (CO) (956 ppb), black carbon (BC; 5.5 µg m-3) and ultrafine particles (28 350 cm-3) were measured. Most of the high values, i.e. 95 percentile concentrations, were distributed near large cities, suggesting the influence of local emissions. In addition, we analysed the regional transport of SO2 and CO, relatively long-lived pollutants, based on our mobile observations together with wind field and satellite data analyses. Our results suggested that, for border areas of the NCP, wind from outside this area would have a diluting effect on pollutants, while south winds would bring in pollutants that have accumulated during transport through other parts of the NCP. For the central NCP, the concentrations of pollutants were likely to remain at high levels, partly due to the influence of regional transport by prevalent south-north winds over the NCP and partly by local emissions.

  3. Environmental Pollution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breitbeil, Fred W., III

    1973-01-01

    Presents a thorough overview of the many factors contributing to air and water pollution, outlines the chemical reactions involved in producing toxic end-products, and describes some of the consequences of pollutants on human health and ecosystems. (JR)

  4. Water Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    ... adjust the font size, or print this page. Water Pollution Table of Contents What is NIEHS Doing? Further Reading For Educators Introduction Water pollution is any contamination of water with chemicals ...

  5. New Targets and Inhibitors of Mycobacterial Sulfur Metabolism§

    PubMed Central

    Paritala, Hanumantharao; Carroll, Kate S.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of new antibacterial targets is urgently needed to address multidrug resistant and latent tuberculosis infection. Sulfur metabolic pathways are essential for survival and the expression of virulence in many pathogenic bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In addition, microbial sulfur metabolic pathways are largely absent in humans and therefore, represent unique targets for therapeutic intervention. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the enzymes associated with the production of sulfated and reduced sulfur-containing metabolites in Mycobacteria. Small molecule inhibitors of these catalysts represent valuable chemical tools that can be used to investigate the role of sulfur metabolism throughout the Mycobacterial lifecycle and may also represent new leads for drug development. In this light, we also summarize recent progress made in the development of inhibitors of sulfur metabolism enzymes. PMID:23808874

  6. The source and longevity of sulfur in an Icelandic flood basalt eruption plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Edmonds, Marie; Mather, Tamsin; Schmidt, Anja; Hartley, Margaret; Oppenheimer, Clive; Pope, Francis; Donovan, Amy; Sigmarsson, Olgeir; Maclennan, John; Shorttle, Oliver; Francis, Peter; Bergsson, Baldur; Barsotti, Sara; Thordarson, Thorvaldur; Bali, Eniko; Keller, Nicole; Stefansson, Andri

    2015-04-01

    The Holuhraun fissure eruption (Bárðarbunga volcanic system, central Iceland) has been ongoing since 31 August 2014 and is now the largest in Europe since the 1783-84 Laki event. For the first time in the modern age we have the opportunity to study at first hand the environmental impact of a flood basalt fissure eruption (>1 km3 lava). Flood basalt eruptions are one of the most hazardous volcanic scenarios in Iceland and have had enormous societal and economic consequences across the northern hemisphere in the past. The Laki eruption caused the deaths of >20% of the Icelandic population by environmental pollution and famine and potentially also increased European levels of mortality through air pollution by sulphur-bearing gas and aerosol. A flood basalt eruption was included in the UK National Risk Register in 2012 as one of the highest priority risks. The gas emissions from Holuhraun have been sustained since its beginning, repeatedly causing severe air pollution in populated areas in Iceland. During 18-22 September, SO2 fluxes reached 45 kt/day, a rate of outgassing rarely observed during sustained eruptions, suggesting that the sulfur loading per kg of erupted magma exceeds both that of other recent eruptions in Iceland and perhaps also other historic basaltic eruptions globally. This raises key questions regarding the origin of these prodigious quantities of sulphur. A lack of understanding of the source of this sulfur, the conversion rates of SO2 gas into aerosol, the residence times of aerosol in the plume and the dependence of these on meteorological factors is limiting our confidence in the ability of atmospheric models to forecast gas and aerosol concentrations in the near- and far-field from Icelandic flood basalt eruptions. In 2015 our group is undertaking a project funded by UK NERC urgency scheme to investigate several aspects of the sulfur budget at Holuhraun using a novel and powerful approach involving simultaneous tracking of sulfur and

  7. SOA FORMATION FROM THE IRRADIATION OF A-PINENE-NOX IN THE ABSENCE AND PRESENCE OF SULFUR DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is an important constituent in the polluted atmosphere. It is emitted from combustion sources using fuels that contain sulfur. Emissions of SO2 in the United States were reportedly 17 Tg in 1996 with most coming from coal and petroleum combustion. The pr...

  8. SOA FORMATION FROM THE IRRADIATION OF A-PINENE-NOX IN THE ABSENCE AND PRESENCE OF SULFUR DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is an important constituent in the polluted atmosphere. It is emitted from combustion sources using fuels that contain sulfur. Emissions of SO2 in the United States were reportedly 17 Tg in 1996 with most coming from coal and petroleum combustion. The pr...

  9. 40 CFR 80.415 - What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners and importers? 80.415 Section 80.415... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Attest Engagements § 80.415 What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners and importers? In addition to the...

  10. 40 CFR 80.415 - What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners and importers? 80.415 Section 80.415... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Attest Engagements § 80.415 What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners and importers? In addition to the...

  11. 40 CFR 80.415 - What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners and importers? 80.415 Section 80.415... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Attest Engagements § 80.415 What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners and importers? In addition to...

  12. 40 CFR 80.415 - What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners and importers? 80.415 Section 80.415... FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Attest Engagements § 80.415 What are the attest engagement requirements for gasoline sulfur compliance applicable to refiners and importers? In addition to...

  13. Association between air pollution and daily mortality and hospital admission due to ischaemic heart diseases in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Wilson Wai San; Wong, Tze Wai; Wong, Andromeda H. S.

    2015-11-01

    Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. The effects of air pollution on IHD mortalities have been widely reported. Fewer studies focus on IHD morbidities and PM2.5, especially in Asia. To explore the associations between short-term exposure to air pollution and morbidities and mortalities from IHD, we conducted a time series study using a generalized additive model that regressed the daily numbers of IHD mortalities and hospital admissions on daily mean concentrations of the following air pollutants: nitrogen dioxide (NO2), particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm (PM10), particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm (PM2.5), ozone (O3), and sulfur dioxide (SO2). The relative risks (RR) of IHD deaths and hospital admissions per 10 μg/m3 increase in the concentration of each air pollutant were derived in single pollutant models. Multipollutant models were also constructed to estimate their RRs controlling for other pollutants. Significant RRs were observed for all five air pollutants, ranging from 1.008 to 1.032 per 10 μg/m3 increase in air pollutant concentrations for IHD mortality and from 1.006 to 1.021 per 10 μg/m3 for hospital admissions for IHD. In the multipollutant model, only NO2 remained significant for IHD mortality while SO2 and PM2.5 was significantly associated with hospital admissions. This study provides additional evidence that mortalities and hospital admissions for IHD are significantly associated with air pollution. However, we cannot attribute these health effects to a specific air pollutant, owing to high collinearity between some air pollutants.

  14. Influence of Social-economic Activities on Air Pollutants in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaolu; Zheng, Wenfeng; Yin, Lirong; Yin, Zhengtong; Song, Lihong; Tian, Xia

    2017-08-01

    With the rapid economic development, the serious air pollution in Beijing attracts increasing attention in the last decade. Seen as one whole complex and grey system, the causal relationship between the social development and the air pollution in Beijing has been quantitatively analyzed in this paper. By using the grey relational model, the aim of this study is to explore how the socio-economic and human activities affect on the air pollution in the city of Beijing, China. Four air pollutants, as the particulate matter with size 2.5 micrometers or less (PM2.5), particulate matter with size 10 micrometers or less (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NOx), are selected as the indicators of air pollution. Additionally, fifteen socio-economic indicators are selected to account for the regional socio-economic characteristics (economy variables, energy consumption variables, pollution emissions variables, environment and construction activity variables). The results highlight that all variables are associated with the concentrations of the four selected air pollutants, but with notable differences between the air pollutants. Most of the socio-economic indicators, such as industrial output, total energy consumption are highly correlated with PM2.5, while PM10, SO2, and NOx present in general moderate correlations with most of the socio-economic variables. Contrary to other studies and reports this study reveals that vehicles and life energy do not have the strongest effect on air pollution in Beijing. This study provides useful information to reduce air pollution and support decision-making for sustainable development.

  15. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Donald L.

    1989-01-01

    Materials related to air pollution are reviewed for the period January 1987, to October 1988. The topics are pollution monitoring, air pollution, and environmental chemistry. The organization consists of two major analytical divisions: (1) gaseous methods; and (2) aerosol and particulate methods. (MVL)

  16. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, K.; And Others

    Pollution of the general environment, which exposes an entire population group for an indeterminate period of time, certainly constitutes a problem in public health. Serious aid pollution episodes have resulted in increased mortality and a possible relationship between chronic exposure to a polluted atmosphere and certain diseases has been…

  17. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilpin, Alan

    A summary of one of our most pressing environmental problems, air pollution, is offered in this book by the Director of Air Pollution Control for the Queensland (Australia) State Government. Discussion of the subject is not restricted to Queensland or Australian problems and policies, however, but includes analysis of air pollution the world over.…

  18. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Donald L.

    1989-01-01

    Materials related to air pollution are reviewed for the period January 1987, to October 1988. The topics are pollution monitoring, air pollution, and environmental chemistry. The organization consists of two major analytical divisions: (1) gaseous methods; and (2) aerosol and particulate methods. (MVL)

  19. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilpin, Alan

    A summary of one of our most pressing environmental problems, air pollution, is offered in this book by the Director of Air Pollution Control for the Queensland (Australia) State Government. Discussion of the subject is not restricted to Queensland or Australian problems and policies, however, but includes analysis of air pollution the world over.…

  20. Photochemical Formation of Sulfur-Containing Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, Jay A.; Vaida, Veronica

    2017-06-01

    In order to understand planetary climate systems, modeling the properties of atmospheric aerosols is vital. Aerosol formation plays an important role in planetary climates and is tied to feedback loops that can either warm or cool a planet. Sulfur compounds are known to play an important role in new particle aerosol formation and have been observed in a number of planetary atmospheres throughout our solar system. Our current understanding of sulfur chemistry explains much of what we observe in Earth's atmosphere; however, several discrepancies arise when comparing observations of the Venusian atmosphere with model predictions. This suggests that there are still problems in our fundamental understanding of sulfur chemistry. This is concerning given recent renewed interest in sulfate injections in the stratosphere for solar radiation management geo-engineering schemes. We investigate the role of sunlight as a potential driver of the formation of sulfur-containing aerosols. I will present recent work investigating the generation of large quantities of aerosol from the irradiation of mixtures of SO_2 with water and organic species, using a solar simulator that mimics the light that is available in the Earth's troposphere and the Venusian middle atmosphere. I will present on recent work done in our lab suggesting the formation of sulfurous acid, H_2SO_3, and describe experimental work that supports this proposed mechanism. Additionally I will present on new work showing the highly reactive nature of electronically excited SO_2 with saturated alkane species. The implications of this photochemically induced sulfur aerosol formation in the atmosphere of Earth and other planetary atmospheres will be discussed.

  1. Air Pollution Monitoring Site Selection by Multiple Criteria Decision Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Criteria air pollutants (particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, volatile organic compounds, and carbon monoxide) as well as toxic air pollutants are a global concern. A particular scenario that is receiving increased attention in the research is the exposure to t...

  2. Methodological issues in studies of air pollution and reproductive health

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the past decade there have been an increasing number of scientific studies describing possible effects of air pollution on perinatal health. These papers have mostly focused on commonly monitored air pollutants, primarily ozone (O3), particulate matter (PM), sulfur dioxide (S...

  3. Methodological issues in studies of air pollution and reproductive health

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the past decade there have been an increasing number of scientific studies describing possible effects of air pollution on perinatal health. These papers have mostly focused on commonly monitored air pollutants, primarily ozone (O3), particulate matter (PM), sulfur dioxide (S...

  4. Air Pollution Monitoring Site Selection by Multiple Criteria Decision Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Criteria air pollutants (particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, volatile organic compounds, and carbon monoxide) as well as toxic air pollutants are a global concern. A particular scenario that is receiving increased attention in the research is the exposure to t...

  5. Effects of air pollution on human exercise performance

    SciTech Connect

    Frykman, P.N.

    1988-02-01

    The pollutants commonly experienced in cities of the United States are: carbon monoxide, ozone, peroxyacetyl nitrate, aerosols, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen dioxide. Only carbon monoxide has been show to reduce exercise performance. The investigations which evaluated the impact of other pollutants on performance, may not have been sensitive enough to detect the small performance decrements caused. Suggested ways to avoid performance decrements are included.

  6. A sulfur host based on titanium monoxide@carbon hollow spheres for advanced lithium–sulfur batteries

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Zhang, Jintao; Guan, Buyuan; Wang, Da; Liu, Li-Min; Lou, Xiong Wen (David)

    2016-01-01

    Lithium–sulfur batteries show advantages for next-generation electrical energy storage due to their high energy density and cost effectiveness. Enhancing the conductivity of the sulfur cathode and moderating the dissolution of lithium polysulfides are two key factors for the success of lithium–sulfur batteries. Here we report a sulfur host that overcomes both obstacles at once. With inherent metallic conductivity and strong adsorption capability for lithium-polysulfides, titanium monoxide@carbon hollow nanospheres can not only generate sufficient electrical contact to the insulating sulfur for high capacity, but also effectively confine lithium-polysulfides for prolonged cycle life. Additionally, the designed composite cathode further maximizes the lithium-polysulfide restriction capability by using the polar shells to prevent their outward diffusion, which avoids the need for chemically bonding all lithium-polysulfides on the surfaces of polar particles. PMID:27762261

  7. A sulfur host based on titanium monoxide@carbon hollow spheres for advanced lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Zhang, Jintao; Guan, Buyuan; Wang, Da; Liu, Li-Min; Lou, Xiong Wen (David)

    2016-10-01

    Lithium-sulfur batteries show advantages for next-generation electrical energy storage due to their high energy density and cost effectiveness. Enhancing the conductivity of the sulfur cathode and moderating the dissolution of lithium polysulfides are two key factors for the success of lithium-sulfur batteries. Here we report a sulfur host that overcomes both obstacles at once. With inherent metallic conductivity and strong adsorption capability for lithium-polysulfides, titanium monoxide@carbon hollow nanospheres can not only generate sufficient electrical contact to the insulating sulfur for high capacity, but also effectively confine lithium-polysulfides for prolonged cycle life. Additionally, the designed composite cathode further maximizes the lithium-polysulfide restriction capability by using the polar shells to prevent their outward diffusion, which avoids the need for chemically bonding all lithium-polysulfides on the surfaces of polar particles.

  8. Microbial diversity in polluted harbor sediments II: Sulfate-reducing bacterial community assessment using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and clone library of dsrAB gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen; Song, Lin-sheng; Ki, Jang-Seu; Lau, Chun-Kwan; Li, Xiang-Dong; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2008-02-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are important regulators of a variety of processes in coastal marine sediments regarding organic matter turnover, biodegradation of pollutants, and sulfur and carbon cycles. Yet their community compositions have not been investigated in polluted harbor sediments. This study described the diversity and spatial variation of SRB communities in surface sediments in Victoria Harbor, Hong Kong. The spatial variation of SRB communities was described by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). The results showed that the most diversified terminal restriction fragments were found at polluted sites. In addition, cluster analysis indicated that although the SRB communities were different at the two polluted sites, they were still more similar to each other than to the two more distant reference sites. Based on a dsrAB clone library constructed at a polluted site, diversified SRB were found, represented by 30 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs). Upon comparisons among the SRB sequences detected from this study and those in the GenBank, five clades of SRB were found. Three clades belonged to the known families Desulfobacteraceae, Desulfobulbaceae, and Syntrophobacteriaceae. The majority of sequenced clones, which distantly related to sequences in the GenBank, constituted the remaining two unclassified groups, suggesting unique SRB members related to the polluted harbor environment. Statistical analyses indicated that estimated SRB richness correlated with environment factors such as sulfur content, acid volatile sulfate, and redox potential.

  9. System for Removing Pollutants from Incinerator Exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickham, David t.; Bahr, James; Dubovik, Rita; Gebhard, Steven C.; Lind, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    A system for removing pollutants -- primarily sulfur dioxide and mixed oxides of nitrogen (NOx) -- from incinerator exhaust has been demonstrated. The system is also designed secondarily to remove particles, hydrocarbons, and CO. The system is intended for use in an enclosed environment, for which a prior NOx-and-SO2-removal system designed for industrial settings would not be suitable.

  10. Air Pollutants and Health: An Epidemiologic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ember, Lois R.

    1977-01-01

    A ten year study, being conducted by the Harvard School of Public Health in six cities since 1974, is a survey of children and adults for the health effects of pollutant levels. The environment is being monitored for: (1) sulfur dioxide, (2) sulfates, and (3) respirable particulates. (BT)

  11. Air Pollutants and Health: An Epidemiologic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ember, Lois R.

    1977-01-01

    A ten year study, being conducted by the Harvard School of Public Health in six cities since 1974, is a survey of children and adults for the health effects of pollutant levels. The environment is being monitored for: (1) sulfur dioxide, (2) sulfates, and (3) respirable particulates. (BT)

  12. Sulfur plumes off Namibia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Sulfur plumes rising up from the bottom of the ocean floor produce colorful swirls in the waters off the coast of Namibia in southern Africa. The plumes come from the breakdown of marine plant matter by anaerobic bacteria that do not need oxygen to live. This image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite on April 24, 2002 Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  13. Sulfur plumes off Namibia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Sulfur plumes rising up from the bottom of the ocean floor produce colorful swirls in the waters off the coast of Namibia in southern Africa. The plumes come from the breakdown of marine plant matter by anaerobic bacteria that do not need oxygen to live. This image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite on April 24, 2002 Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  14. Advanced Sulfur Control Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K.; Portzer, J.W.; Turk, B.S.; Gupta, R.

    1996-12-31

    The primary objective of this project is to determine the feasibility of an alternate concept for the regeneration of high temperature desulfurization sorbents in which elemental sulfur, instead of SO{sub 2}, is produced. If successful, this concept will eliminate or alleviate problems caused by the highly exothermic nature of the regeneration reaction, the tendency for metal sulfate formation, and the need to treat the regeneration off-gas to prevent atmospheric SO{sub 2}, emissions. Iron and cerium-based sorbents were chosen on the basis of thermodynamic analysis to determine the feasibility of elemental sulfur production. The ability of both to remove H{sub 2}S during the sulfidation phase is less than that of zinc-based sorbents, and a two-stage desulfurization process will likely be required. Preliminary experimental work used electrobalance reactors to compare the relative rates of reaction of O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O with FeS. More detailed studies of the regeneration of FeS as well as the sulfidation of CeO{sub 2} and regeneration of Ce{sub 2}O{sub 2}S are being carried out in a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor equipped with a unique analytical system which permits semi-continuous analysis of the distribution of elemental sulfur, H{sub 2}S, and SO{sub 2} in the reaction product gas.

  15. Sulfur oxides scrubbing process

    SciTech Connect

    Reeder, P.E.

    1986-07-15

    A process is described for removing sulfur oxides and solid particulates from a gaseous effluent. The steps of the process consist of: contacting within a venturi structure a gaseous effluent containing sulfur oxides with a liquid scrubbing mixture; passing the admixture of the gaseous effluent and liquid scrubbing mixture through a constricted passage of the venturi structure to increase the velocity thereof; separating the admixture into a liquid portion and a gas portion; delivering the gas portion of the separation step to a packed tower beneath the packed section thereof; contacting the gas portion with liquid scrubbing mixture in the packed section of the tower to form a gaseous overhead effluent substantially free of sulfur oxides and a bottoms liquid; combining the bottom liquid from the packed section of the tower with the liquid portion from the separating step to form a combined liquid bottoms; adjusting the pH of the combined liquid bottoms with a basic solution to form a liquid scrubbing mixture, the basic solution selected from the group consisting of alkali metal hydroxides, ammonium hydroxide, and ammonia; and dividing the liquid scrubbing mixture into a tower bottoms products, a first recycle stream providing the liquid scrubbing mixture to the first contacting step, and a second recycle stream providing the liquid scrubbing mixture to the second contacting step.

  16. Effects of sulfur dioxide and ozone on yield and quality of potatoes: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pell, E.J.; Pearson, N.S.; Vinten-Johansen, C.; McGruer, G.; Yang, Y.

    1989-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to develop an outdoor fumigation facility designed to expose plants to ozone (O3) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) and to conduct experiments that would examine the impact of the two gases alone and in combination on field grown potato plants. Two systems of dispensing and monitoring pollutants were contrasted, one using miniature solenoid valves and the other using critical orifices. Both systems provided excellent pollutant control. The orifices were relatively inexpensive and required less maintenance than did the solenoid valve system. Two field experiments were conducted, one in 1985 and and the other in 1986. Potato plants were exposed to charcoal filtered air, nonfiltered air, nonfiltered air supplemented with O3 at levels which resulted in 1.33, 1.66 or 1.99 times ambient O3 concentrations or charcoal filtered air plus 0.14, 0.28 or 0.56 ppM SO2. There were additional treatments combining the two pollutant regimes. Ozone induced a linear reduction in yield reflected by decreases in weight and number of tubers > 6.35 cm in diameter. In general effects on number and weight of smaller tubers were not detected. Ozone also induced a decrease in the percent dry matter and reducing sugar content of potato tubers. Sulfur dioxide affected number of Grade One tubers in both years and percent dry matter and sucrose content in 1986 only. While dose-response curves for all SO2 effects fit quadratic curves the impact of SO2 doses used in these experiments were stimulatory. No important interactions were observed between O3 and SO2. 36 refs., 5 figs., 31 tabs.

  17. Air pollution problem in the Mexico City metropolitan zone: Photochemical pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, H.B.; Alvarez, P.S.; Echeverria, R.S.; Jardon, R.T.

    1997-12-31

    Mexico City Metropolitan Zone (MCMZ) represents an example of a megacity where the air pollution problem has reached an important evolution in a very short time, causing a risk in the health of a population of more than 20 million inhabitants. The atmospheric pollution problem in the MCMZ, began several decades ago, but it increased drastically in the middle of the 80`s. It is important to recognize that in the 60`s, 70`s and the first half of the 80`s the main pollutants were sulfur dioxide and total suspended particles. However since the second half of the 80`s until now, ozone is the most important air pollutant besides of the suspended particles (PM{sub 10}) and other toxic pollutants (1--8). The purpose of this paper is to discuss the evolution of the ozone atmospheric pollution problem in the MCMZ, as well as to analyze the results of several implemented air pollution control strategies.

  18. Mechanistic investigations reveal that dibromobimane extrudes sulfur from biological sulfhydryl sources other than hydrogen sulfide†Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, pH stability data for BTE, NMR spectra. See DOI: 10.1039/c4sc01875cClick here for additional data file.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Leticia A; Shen, Xinggui; McDermott, James J; Kevil, Christopher G; Pluth, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as an important biological signaling molecule in the last decade. During the growth of this field, significant controversy has arisen centered on the physiological concentrations of H2S. Recently, a monobromobimane (mBB) method has been developed for the quantification of different biologically-relevant sulfide pools. Based on the prevalence of the mBB method for sulfide quantification, we expand on this method to report the use of dibromobimane (dBB) for sulfide quantification. Reaction of H2S with dBB results in formation of highly-fluorescent bimane thioether (BTE), which is readily quantifiable by HPLC. Additionally, the reaction of sulfide with dBB to form BTE is significantly faster than the reaction of sulfide with mBB to form sulfide dibimane. Using the dBB method, BTE levels as low as 0.6 pM can be detected. Upon use of the dBB method in wild-type and CSE(-/-) mice, however, dBB reports significantly higher sulfide levels than those measured using mBB. Further investigation revealed that dBB is able to extract sulfur from other sulfhydryl sources including thiols. Based on mechanistic studies, we demonstrate that dBB extracts sulfur from thiols with α- or β-hydrogens, thus leading to higher BTE formation than from sulfide alone. Taken together, the dBB method is a highly sensitive method for H2S but is not compatible for use in studies in which other thiols are present.

  19. Using community level strategies to reduce asthma attacks triggered by outdoor air pollution: a case crossover analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence indicates that asthma attacks can be triggered by exposure to ambient air pollutants, however, detailed pollution information is missing from asthma action plans. Asthma is commonly associated with four criteria pollutants with standards derived by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. Since multiple pollutants trigger attacks and risks depend upon city-specific mixtures of pollutants, there is lack of specific guidance to reduce exposure. Until multi-pollutant statistical modeling fully addresses this gap, some guidance on pollutant attack risk is required. This study examines the risks from exposure to the asthma-related pollutants in a large metropolitan city and defines the city-specific association between attacks and pollutant mixtures. Our goal is that city-specific pollution risks be incorporated into individual asthma action plans as additional guidance to prevent attacks. Methods Case-crossover analysis and conditional logistic regression were used to measure the association between ozone, fine particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide pollution and 11,754 emergency medical service ambulance treated asthma attacks in Houston, Texas from 2004-2011. Both single and multi-pollutant models are presented. Results In Houston, ozone and nitrogen dioxide are important triggers (RR = 1.05; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.09), (RR = 1.10; 95% CI: 1.05, 1.15) with 20 and 8 ppb increase in ozone and nitrogen dioxide, respectively, in a multi-pollutant model. Both pollutants are simultaneously high at certain times of the year. The risk attributed to these pollutants differs when they are considered together, especially as concentrations increase. Cumulative exposure for ozone (0-2 day lag) is of concern, whereas for nitrogen dioxide the concern is with single day exposure. Persons at highest risk are aged 46-66, African Americans, and males. Conclusions Accounting for cumulative and concomitant outdoor

  20. Immobilization of sulfur in microgels for lithium-sulfur battery.

    PubMed

    Chang, Aiping; Wu, Qingshi; Du, Xue; Chen, Shoumin; Shen, Jing; Song, Qiuyi; Xie, Jianda; Wu, Weitai

    2016-03-25

    Immobilization of sulfur in microgels is achieved via free radical polymerization of commercial poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate in the solution of sulfur-terminated poly(3-oligo(ethylene oxide)4-thiophene), a copolymer prepared by the inverse vulcanization of S8 with allyl-terminated poly(3-oligo(ethylene oxide)4-thiophene). This microgelation leads to enhanced Li-S battery performance over the sulfur-terminated polymer.

  1. Sulfur content of hybrid poplar cuttings fumigated with sulfur dioxide

    Treesearch

    Keith F. Jensen

    1975-01-01

    Hybrid poplar cuttings were fumigated with sulfur dioxide ranging in concentration from 0.1 to 5 ppm for periods of 5 to 80 hours. At the end of the fumigation periods, the cuttings were harvested and the sulfur and chlorophyll contents of the leaves were measured. At 0.1 ppm and 0.25 ppm the sulfur content initially increased, but decreased as fumigation continued. At...

  2. Lunar Sulfur Capture System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berggren, Mark; Zubrin, Robert; Bostwick-White, Emily

    2013-01-01

    The Lunar Sulfur Capture System (LSCS) protects in situ resource utilization (ISRU) hardware from corrosion, and reduces contaminant levels in water condensed for electrolysis. The LSCS uses a lunar soil sorbent to trap over 98 percent of sulfur gases and about two-thirds of halide gases evolved during hydrogen reduction of lunar soils. LSCS soil sorbent is based on lunar minerals containing iron and calcium compounds that trap sulfur and halide gas contaminants in a fixed-bed reactor held at temperatures between 250 and 400 C, allowing moisture produced during reduction to pass through in vapor phase. Small amounts of Earth-based polishing sorbents consisting of zinc oxide and sodium aluminate are used to reduce contaminant concentrations to one ppm or less. The preferred LSCS configuration employs lunar soil beneficiation to boost concentrations of reactive sorbent minerals. Lunar soils contain sulfur in concentrations of about 0.1 percent, and halogen compounds including chlorine and fluorine in concentrations of about 0.01 percent. These contaminants are released as gases such as H2S, COS, CS2,HCl, and HF during thermal ISRU processing with hydrogen or other reducing gases. Removal of contaminant gases is required during ISRU processing to prevent hardware corrosion, electrolyzer damage, and catalyst poisoning. The use of Earth-supplied, single-use consumables to entirely remove contaminants at the levels existing in lunar soils would make many ISRU processes unattractive due to the large mass of consumables relative to the mass of oxygen produced. The LSCS concept of using a primary sorbent prepared from lunar soil was identified as a method by which the majority of contaminants could be removed from process gas streams, thereby substantially reducing the required mass of Earth-supplied consumables. The LSCS takes advantage of minerals containing iron and calcium compounds that are present in lunar soil to trap sulfur and halide gases in a fixedbed reactor

  3. Photochemical oxidant pollution and vegetation: effects of mixtures of gases, fog and particles.

    PubMed

    Olszyk, D M; Bytnerowicz, A; Takemoto, B K

    1989-01-01

    Photochemical 'smog' contains mixtures of gases (e.g. ozone, nitrogen dioxide), and dry particles (e.g. nitrates). Intermittent fog in the same geographical area can be acidic with high concentrations of nitric acid. Results from recent field studies in the Los Angeles Basin have emphasized the relative toxicity of these components of photochemical air pollution. Studies have focused on gaseous+fog or gaseous+dry particulate effects on conifers, gaseous+fog effects on crops, and the effects of trace pollutants produced during generation of ozone on crops. Data from these studies indicate that direct alterations in growth and physiological responses were observed only with gaseous pollutants (primarily ozone), or repeated applications of highly acidic fogs (pH < 2.7). Direct particle dry deposition effects are unclear. Few interactions have been found between gaseous pollutants and acidic fog. Charcoal-filtered open-top chambers are highly effective in removing pollutants in the following order: fog (100%) > peroxyacetyl nitrate > ozone > nitrogen dioxide > sulfur dioxide > nitrate ion > ammonium ion > sulfate ion. However, nitric oxide concentrations are higher in charcoal-filtered chambers than in ambient air. The studies point out the importance of considering other components of photochemical pollution in addition to ozone, especially when investigating subtle, long-term effects on vegetation.

  4. Utilization of 'elemental' sulfur by different phototrophic sulfur bacteria (Chromatiaceae, Ectothiorhodospiraceae): A sulfur K-edge XANES spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, B.; Lichtenberg, H.; Dahl, C.; Hormes, J.; Prange, A.

    2009-11-01

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria are generally able to use elemental sulfur as an electron donor for anoxygenic photosynthesis. Elemental sulfur is mainly a mixture of cyclo-octasulfur and polymeric sulfur. The purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum strongly prefers the polymeric sulfur fraction showing that sulfur speciation has a strong influence on availability of elemental sulfur. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy was used to investigate whether polymeric sulfur is also the preferred sulfur species in other purple sulfur bacteria belonging to the families Chromatiaceae and Ecothiorodospiraceae. The cultures were fed with 50 mM of elemental sulfur consisting of 68% polymeric sulfur and 30% cyclo-octasulfur. In all cultures, elemental sulfur was converted into intra- or extracellular sulfur globules, respectively, and further oxidized to sulfate. Sulfate concentrations were determined by HPLC and turbidometric assays, respectively. However, the added elemental sulfur was only partly used by the bacteria, one part of the 'elemental sulfur' remained in the cultures and was not taken up. XANES spectroscopy revealed that only the polymeric sulfur fraction was taken up by all cultures investigated. This strongly indicates that polymeric 'chain-like' sulfur is the form preferably used by phototrophic sulfur bacteria.

  5. Catalyst for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Y.; Yu, Q.; Chang, S.G.

    1996-02-27

    The inventive catalysts allow for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur in smokestack scrubber environments. The catalysts have a very high sulfur yield of over 90% and space velocity of 10,000 h{sup {minus}1}. They also have the capacity to convert waste gases generated during the initial conversion into elemental sulfur. The catalysts have inexpensive components, and are inexpensive to produce. The net impact of the invention is to make this technology practically available to industrial applications. 21 figs.

  6. Improving the reliability of road materials based on micronized sulfur composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdrakhmanova, K. K.

    2015-01-01

    The work contains the results of a nano-structural modification of sulfur that prevents polymorphic transformations from influencing the properties of sulfur composites where sulfur is present in a thermodynamic stable condition that precludes destruction when operated. It has been established that the properties of sulfur-based composite materials can be significantly improved by modifying sulfur and structuring sulfur binder by nano-dispersed fiber particles and ultra-dispersed state filler. The paper shows the possibility of modifying Tengiz sulfur by its fragmenting which ensures that the structured sulfur is structurally changed and stabilized through reinforcement by ultra-dispersed fiber particles allowing the phase contact area to be multiplied. Interaction between nano-dispersed fibers of chrysotile asbestos and sulfur ensures the implementation of the mechanical properties of chrysotile asbestos tubes in reinforced composite and its integrity provided that the surface of chrysotile asbestos tubes are highly moistened with molten sulfur and there is high adhesion between the tubes and the matrix that, in addition to sulfur, contains limestone microparticles. Ability to apply materials in severe operation conditions and possibility of exposure in both aggressive medium and mechanical loads makes produced sulfur composites required by the road construction industry.

  7. Environmental factors and atmospheric pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Frampton, M.W.; Samet, J.M.; Utell, M.J. )

    1991-12-01

    Respiratory infections result from complex interactions between the infectious organism and the host, and exposure to environmental pollutants may alter host resistance. The atmospheric pollutants implicated in respiratory infections include acidic aerosols, particles, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, sulfur dioxide, and household allergens. An extensive epidemiological literature has been established linking environmental tobacco smoke to increased occurrence of lower respiratory tract infections in children; exposure to smoke from cooking and heating fires may also increase the risk of serious infections. Experimental evidence suggests that exposure to nitrogen dioxide and acidic aerosols may impair specific host defense mechanisms. Individuals with underlying lung or heart disease, as well as infants and the elderly, are among those most susceptible to the effects of environmental pollutants. Efforts should be directed toward reducing the exposure of children to environmental tobacco smoke and products of unvented combustion while investigations continue.40 references.

  8. Sulfur Upwelling off the African Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Though these aquamarine clouds in the waters off the coast of northern Namibia may look like algae blooms, they are in fact clouds of sulfur produced by anaerobic bacteria on the ocean's floor. This image of the sulfur-filled water was taken on April 24, 2002, by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS), flying aboard the Orbview-2 satellite. The anaerobic bacteria (bacteria that can live without oxygen) feed upon algae carcasses that exist in abundance on the ocean's floor off of Namibia. As the bacteria ingest the algae husks, they produce hydrogen sulfide, which slowly builds up in the sea-floor sediments. Eventually, the hydrogen sulfide reaches the point where the sediment can no longer contain it, and it bubbles forth. When this poisonous chemical reaches the surface, it combines with the oxygen in the upper layers of the ocean to create clouds of pure sulfur. The sulfur causes the Namibian coast to smell like rotten eggs, and the hydrogen sulfide will often kill fish and drive lobsters away. For more information, read: A Bloom By Any Other Name A high-resolution (250 meters per pixel) image earlier on the 24th taken from the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) shows additional detail in the plumes. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE. MODIS image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  9. The chronic effects of sulfur mustard exposure.

    PubMed

    Rowell, Mike; Kehe, Kai; Balszuweit, Frank; Thiermann, Horst

    2009-09-01

    Whilst the acute effects of sulfur mustard have been relatively well characterised, the chronic effects of short term but significant exposures are still evolving. The approximately 30,000 Iranian victims of CW exposure from the 1980 to 1988 Iran-Iraq war who are currently being followed form a key population who are now 20 years post-exposure. The key chronic findings in this population reflect the common acute effects of sulfur mustard, and are related to the skin, eye and respiratory system. Excluding pruritus, skin changes appear to settle. Eye symptoms are slowly progressive, however a severe, rapid onset form of keratitis is seen to develop in a number of patients after a latent period of 15-20 years. The respiratory tract also shows progressive deterioration, with bronchiolitis obliterans now being considered the main pathological feature of "mustard lung". In addition, there are other potential effects of sulfur mustard exposure which become evident only in the longer term and which are being investigated, including the development of cancer, immunological and neuropsychiatric changes, and reproductive effects. Finally, a chronic effect of sulfur mustard exposure that is now becoming apparent is the wider long-term social and economic effects of these illnesses on individuals and their families.

  10. Sulfur Upwelling off the African Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Though these aquamarine clouds in the waters off the coast of northern Namibia may look like algae blooms, they are in fact clouds of sulfur produced by anaerobic bacteria on the ocean's floor. This image of the sulfur-filled water was taken on April 24, 2002, by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS), flying aboard the Orbview-2 satellite. The anaerobic bacteria (bacteria that can live without oxygen) feed upon algae carcasses that exist in abundance on the ocean's floor off of Namibia. As the bacteria ingest the algae husks, they produce hydrogen sulfide, which slowly builds up in the sea-floor sediments. Eventually, the hydrogen sulfide reaches the point where the sediment can no longer contain it, and it bubbles forth. When this poisonous chemical reaches the surface, it combines with the oxygen in the upper layers of the ocean to create clouds of pure sulfur. The sulfur causes the Namibian coast to smell like rotten eggs, and the hydrogen sulfide will often kill fish and drive lobsters away. For more information, read: A Bloom By Any Other Name A high-resolution (250 meters per pixel) image earlier on the 24th taken from the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) shows additional detail in the plumes. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE. MODIS image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  11. 33 CFR 146.45 - Pollution incidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pollution incidents. 146.45...) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES OPERATIONS OCS Facilities § 146.45 Pollution incidents. Oil pollution.... Additional provisions concerning liability and compensation because of oil pollution are contained in...

  12. 33 CFR 146.45 - Pollution incidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pollution incidents. 146.45...) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES OPERATIONS OCS Facilities § 146.45 Pollution incidents. Oil pollution.... Additional provisions concerning liability and compensation because of oil pollution are contained in...

  13. 33 CFR 146.45 - Pollution incidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pollution incidents. 146.45...) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES OPERATIONS OCS Facilities § 146.45 Pollution incidents. Oil pollution.... Additional provisions concerning liability and compensation because of oil pollution are contained in...

  14. 33 CFR 146.45 - Pollution incidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pollution incidents. 146.45...) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES OPERATIONS OCS Facilities § 146.45 Pollution incidents. Oil pollution.... Additional provisions concerning liability and compensation because of oil pollution are contained in...

  15. 33 CFR 146.45 - Pollution incidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pollution incidents. 146.45...) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES OPERATIONS OCS Facilities § 146.45 Pollution incidents. Oil pollution.... Additional provisions concerning liability and compensation because of oil pollution are contained in...

  16. Effects of ozone, sulfur dioxide, and alpha and delta races of Colletotrichum Lindemuthianum (Sacc. and Magn. ) Bri and Cav. on bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. )

    SciTech Connect

    Achwanya, O.S.

    1984-01-01

    A number of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivars were evaluated for their responses to the air pollutants ozone and sulfur dioxide singly and in combination, as well as for their reaction to the alpha and delta races of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum (Sacc. and Magn.) Bri and Cav. Variation in response to both the pollutants and the fungus was noted among the cultivars. Anthracnose caused a reduction in the biomass of some cultivars of the order of 50%. A negative correlation of (r = -0.72, p < 0.0001) was found between the disease severity and the total plant biomass. Greater than additive effects of O/sub 3/ + SO/sub 2/ mixtures were demonstrated. Chlorophyll content and biomass were found to be reliable variables for assessing treatment effects. The pollutants appeared to stimulate the disease development. Greater pollutant injury was also in the presence of the anthracnose disease. The results indicated that there was an interaction between the fungal disease and the air pollutants. Implications for evaluating bean cultivars for resistance to C. lindemuthianum under polluted atmosphere are suggested.

  17. Application of electrochemical investigation methods in high sulfur coal flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Hong; Ou Zeshen; Shi Xiuping; Shen Yanchun

    1997-12-31

    More and more attention has been paid to sulfur dioxide pollution caused by coal burning. It is important that sulfur in coal should be reduced before combustion. Flotation is an important method for the removal of pyrite from high sulfur coal. Many chemicals have been tested as a pyrite depressant. In recent years many tests have been done in the laboratory on the flotation behavior of pyrite, and the results have confirmed that the hydrophobicity of the pyrite surface is dependent on the redox potential of the pulp. The mechanism and the reaction products on the pyrite surface are discussed under various conditions. And pyrite depression in coal flotation by electrochemical control are further studied on the basis of what has been achieved. There are two methods in electrochemical control: chemical reagent and control potential by electrochemical instrument (``control potential`` for short). This paper studies pyrite depression in coal flotation by electrochemical control. The influence of sulfur removal in coal flotation has been probed by chemical reagent and control potential. Experiment shows that at low pulp potential the pyrite flotation is generally suppressed. This is new, efficient and simple method of pyrite depression without environmental pollution. The following main conclusions can be drawn from this study: (1) The control of pulp potential can regulate and lead to electrochemical reaction of the hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity on the pyrite surface; and (2) The characteristics of electrochemical methods are normal atmospheric temperature, simple technological process and strong selection.

  18. Air pollution threatens the health of children in China.

    PubMed

    Millman, Alexander; Tang, Deliang; Perera, Frederica P

    2008-09-01

    . China's rapid economic development has come at the cost of severe environmental degradation, most notably from coal combustion. Outdoor air pollution is associated with >300000 deaths, 20 million cases of respiratory illness, and a health cost of >500 billion renminbi (>3% of gross domestic product) annually. The young are particularly susceptible to air pollution, yet there has been only limited recognition of its effects on children's health and development. DATA SOURCES/DATA EXTRACTION: To fill this gap, we reviewed relevant published environmental studies, biomedical and molecular/epidemiologic research, and economic and policy analyses. China relies on coal for approximately 70% to 75% of its energy needs, consuming 1.9 billion tons of coal each year. In addition to CO(2), the major greenhouse gas, coal burning in China emits vast quantities of particulate matter, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, sulfur dioxide, arsenic, and mercury. Automobiles emit nitrogen dioxide and benzene in addition to particulate matter and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Seventy percent of Chinese households burn coal or biomass for cooking and heating, which contaminates indoor air. Adverse effects of combustion-related air pollution include reduced fetal and child growth, pulmonary disease including asthma, developmental impairment, and increased risk of cancer. A prospective molecular epidemiologic study of newborns in Chongqing has demonstrated direct benefits to children's health and development from the elimination of a coal-burning plant. Recognition of the full health and economic cost of air pollution to Chinese children and the benefits of pollution reduction should spur increased use of renewable energy, energy efficiency, and clean-fuel vehicles. This is a necessary investment for China's future.

  19. Time-Series Analyses of Air Pollution and Mortality in the United States: A Subsampling Approach

    PubMed Central

    McClellan, Roger O.; Dewanji, Anup; Turim, Jay; Luebeck, E. Georg; Edwards, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hierarchical Bayesian methods have been used in previous papers to estimate national mean effects of air pollutants on daily deaths in time-series analyses. Objectives: We obtained maximum likelihood estimates of the common national effects of the criteria pollutants on mortality based on time-series data from ≤ 108 metropolitan areas in the United States. Methods: We used a subsampling bootstrap procedure to obtain the maximum likelihood estimates and confidence bounds for common national effects of the criteria pollutants, as measured by the percentage increase in daily mortality associated with a unit increase in daily 24-hr mean pollutant concentration on the previous day, while controlling for weather and temporal trends. We considered five pollutants [PM10, ozone (O3), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and sulfur dioxide (SO2)] in single- and multipollutant analyses. Flexible ambient concentration–response models for the pollutant effects were considered as well. We performed limited sensitivity analyses with different degrees of freedom for time trends. Results: In single-pollutant models, we observed significant associations of daily deaths with all pollutants. The O3 coefficient was highly sensitive to the degree of smoothing of time trends. Among the gases, SO2 and NO2 were most strongly associated with mortality. The flexible ambient concentration–response curve for O3 showed evidence of nonlinearity and a threshold at about 30 ppb. Conclusions: Differences between the results of our analyses and those reported from using the Bayesian approach suggest that estimates of the quantitative impact of pollutants depend on the choice of statistical approach, although results are not directly comparable because they are based on different data. In addition, the estimate of the O3-mortality coefficient depends on the amount of smoothing of time trends. PMID:23108284

  20. Waste disposal and pollution control in metal manufacturing. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning industrial metal manufacturers' monitoring and control of waste disposal and pollution generators for processes other than finishing. Atmospheric emissions such as dust pollutants, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and other gases are discussed relative to effects on surrounding environment and control. Heavy metal removal, as well as wastewater treatment processes, are also included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  1. OH-radical specific addition to the antioxidant glutathione S-atom at the air-water interface - Relevance to the redox balance of the lung epithelial lining fluid and the causality of adverse health effects induced by air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colussi, A. J.; Enami, S.; Hoffmann, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Inhalation of oxidant pollutants upsets the redox balance (RB) of the lung epithelial lining fluid (ELF) by triggering the formation of reactive OH-radicals therein. RB is deemed to be controlled by the equilibrium between the most abundant ELF protective antioxidant glutathione (GSH) and its putative disulfide GSSG oxidation product. The actual species produced from the oxidation of GSH initiated by ·OH in ELF interfacial layers exposed to air, i.e., under realistic ELF conditions, however, were never identified. Here we report the online electrospray mass spectrometric detection of sulfenate (GSO-), sulfinate (GSO2-) and sulfonate (GSO3-) on the surface of aqueous GSH solutions collided with ·OH(g). We show that these products arise from ·OH specific additions to S-atoms, rather than via H-abstraction from GS-H. The remarkable specificity of ·OH in interfacial water vis-a-vis its lack of selectivity in bulk water implicates an unprecedented steering process during ·OH-GSH encounters at water interfaces. A non-specific systemic immune response to inhaled oxidants should be expected if they were initially converted into a common ·OH intermediate on the ELF (e.g., via fast Fenton chemistry) and oxidative stress signaled by the [GSH]/[GSOH] ratio.

  2. Inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and addition of composted olive-mill waste enhance plant establishment and soil properties in the regeneration of a heavy metal-polluted environment.

    PubMed

    Curaqueo, Gustavo; Schoebitz, Mauricio; Borie, Fernando; Caravaca, Fuensanta; Roldán, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    A greenhouse experiment was carried out in order to investigate the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi inoculation and the use of composted olive waste (COW) in the establishment of Tetraclinis articulata and soil properties in a heavy metal-polluted soil. The treatments assayed were as follows: AM + 0% COW, AM + 1% COW, and AM + 3% COW. The higher doses of COW in combination with AM fungi increased shoot and root biomass production of T. articulata by 96 and 60%, respectively. These treatments trended to improve the soil properties evaluated, highlighting the C compounds and N as well as the microbiological activities. In relation to the metal translocation in T. articulata, doses of COW applied decreased the Cr, Ni, and Pb contents in shoot, as well as Cr and As in root, although the most of them reached low levels and far from phytotoxic. The COW amendment aided Glomus mosseae-inoculated T. articulata plants to thrive in contaminated soil, mainly through an improvement in both nutrients uptake, mainly P and soil microbial function. In addition, the combined use of AM fungi plus COW could be a feasible strategy to be incorporated in phytoremediation programs because it promotes soil properties, a better performance of plants for supporting the stress in heavy metal-contaminated soils derived from the mining process, and also can be a good way for olive-mill waste disposal.

  3. A statistical study of the macroepidemiology of air pollution and total mortality

    SciTech Connect

    Lipfert, F.W.; Malone, R.G.; Daum, M.L.; Mendell, N.R.; Yang, Chin-Chun

    1988-04-01

    A statistical analysis of spatial patterns of 1980 US urban total mortality (all causes) was performed, evaluating demographic, socioeconomic and air pollution factors as predictors. Specific mortality predictors included cigarette smoking, drinking water hardness, heating fuel use, and 1978-1982 annual concentrations of the following air pollutants: ozone, carbon monoxide, sulfate aerosol, particulate concentrations of lead, iron, cadmium, manganese, vanadium, as well as total and fine particle mass concentrations from the inhalable particulate network (dichotomous samplers). In addition, estimates of sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, and sulfate aerosol were made for each city using the ASTRAP long-range transport diffusion model, and entered into the analysis as independent variables. Because the number of cities with valid air quality and water hardness data varied considerably by pollutant, it was necessary to consider several different data sets, ranging from 48 to 952 cities. The relatively strong associations (ca. 5--10%) shown for 1980 pollution with 1980 total mortality are generally not confirmed by independent studies, for example, in Europe. In addition, the US studies did not find those pollutants with known adverse health effects at the concentrations in question (such as ozone or CO) to be associated with mortality. The question of causality vs. circumstantial association must therefore be regarded as still unresolved. 59 refs., 20 figs., 40 tabs.

  4. Ambient air concentration of sulfur dioxide affects flight activity in bees

    SciTech Connect

    Ginevan, M.E.; Lane, D.D.; Greenberg, L.

    1980-10-01

    Three long-term (16 to 29 days) low-level (0.14 to 0.28 ppM) sulfur dioxide fumigations showed that exposure tothis gas has deleterious effects on male sweat bees (Lasioglossum zephrum). Although effects on mortality were equivocal, flight activity was definitely reduced. Because flight is necessary for successful mating behavior, the results suggest that sulfur dioxide air pollution could adversely affect this and doubtless other terrestrial insects.

  5. Sulfur dioxide control (excludes coal burning sources). (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning air pollution control technology and removal of sulfur dioxide from waste streams and atmospheres. Removal methods include flue gas desulfurization by wet or dry sorbents, electron beam processes, corona discharge, reductive gases, microbial processes, and burner injection systems. Applications to utilities, oil refineries, and the metallurgical and chemical industries are described. Control of sulfur dioxide produced from coal burning is discussed in a separate bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  6. Sulfur dioxide control (excludes coal burning sources). (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning air pollution control technology and removal of sulfur dioxide from waste streams and atmospheres. Removal methods include flue gas desulfurization by wet or dry sorbents, electron beam processes, corona discharge, reductive gases, microbial processes, and burner injection systems. Applications to utilities, oil refineries, and the metallurgical and chemical industries are described. Control of sulfur dioxide produced from coal burning is discussed in a separate bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  7. Sulfur dioxide control (excludes coal burning sources). (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning air pollution control technology and removal of sulfur dioxide from waste streams and atmospheres. Removal methods include flue gas desulfurization by wet or dry sorbents, electron beam processes, corona discharge, reductive gases, microbial processes, and burner injection systems. Applications to utilities, oil refineries, and the metallurgical and chemical industries are described. Control of sulfur dioxide produced from coal burning is discussed in a separate bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. Rethinking the Ancient Sulfur Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fike, David A.; Bradley, Alexander S.; Rose, Catherine V.

    2015-05-01

    The sulfur biogeochemical cycle integrates the metabolic activity of multiple microbial pathways (e.g., sulfate reduction, disproportionation, and sulfide oxidation) along with abiotic reactions and geological processes that cycle sulfur through various reservoirs. The sulfur cycle impacts the global carbon cycle and climate primarily through the remineralization of organic carbon. Over geological timescales, cycling of sulfur is closely tied to the redox state of Earth's exosphere through the burial of oxidized (sulfate) and reduced (sulfide) sulfur species in marine sediments. Biological sulfur cycling is associated with isotopic fractionations that can be used to trace the fluxes through various metabolic pathways. The resulting isotopic data provide insights into sulfur cycling in both modern and ancient environments via isotopic signatures in sedimentary sulfate and sulfide phases. Here, we review the deep-time δ34S record of marine sulfates and sulfides in light of recent advances in understanding how isotopic signatures are generated by microbial activity, how these signatures are encoded in marine sediments, and how they may be altered following deposition. The resulting picture shows a sulfur cycle intimately coupled to ambient carbon cycling, where sulfur isotopic records preserved in sedimentary rocks are critically dependent on sedimentological and geochemical conditions (e.g., iron availability) during deposition.

  9. Method of removing and recovering elemental sulfur from highly reducing gas streams containing sulfur gases

    DOEpatents

    Gangwal, Santosh K.; Nikolopoulos, Apostolos A.; Dorchak, Thomas P.; Dorchak, Mary Anne

    2005-11-08

    A method is provided for removal of sulfur gases and recovery of elemental sulfur from sulfur gas containing supply streams, such as syngas or coal gas, by contacting the supply stream with a catalyst, that is either an activated carbon or an oxide based catalyst, and an oxidant, such as sulfur dioxide, in a reaction medium such as molten sulfur, to convert the sulfur gases in the supply stream to elemental sulfur, and recovering the elemental sulfur by separation from the reaction medium.

  10. Effects of sulfur-metabolizing bacterial community diversity on H2S emission behavior in landfills with different operation modes.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Du, Yao; Hu, Lifang; Xu, Jing; Long, Yuyang; Shen, Dongsheng

    2016-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is one of the major contributors to offensive odors from landfills, and its concentration differs under different operation modes. This study examined the distribution of H2S emission from different landfill depths under different operation modes (anaerobic, semi-aerobic, semi-aerobic transformation, and the three operation modes with additional leachate recirculation). The microbial community (especially the sulfur-metabolizing bacterial community) was investigated using high-throughput sequencing technology. The results showed that the semi-aerobic mode could substantially lower the risks of H2S pollution in landfills, which might be because of the difference in biological processes related to sulfur metabolism driven by functional microbes. A myriad of factors are responsible for mutually shaping the sulfur-metabolizing bacterial community composition in landfills that might subsequently affect the behavior of H2S emission in landfills. The differences in abundance of the genera Acinetobacter and Paracoccus (phylum Proteobacteria) caused by environmental factors might explain the differences in H2S emission. H2S odor control could be realized if the related functional microbe diversity can be influenced by adjustments to landfill operation.

  11. Photolysis Assisted Pollution Analysis (PAPA)

    SciTech Connect

    Hanst, P.L.

    1994-12-31

    Photolysis Assisted Pollution Analysis (PAPA) combines the infrared method of gas measurement with a boost of high-speed photochemical activity. PAPA goes beyond standard infrared absorption techniques by using a compound conversion process that selects reactive gases from among the non-reactive and reveals their spectra. At the same time the technique renders invisible the spectra of water and carbon dioxide. In PAPA, three infrared spectra are recorded: the first through an empty absorption cell, the second through the cell containing sample, and the third through the cell with sample, after photochemical transformation. Ozone molecules, oxygen atoms and hydroxyl radicals are formed. From the three spectra, the computer extracts the concentrations of pollutant gases. In a single experiment, many gases may be measured. In PAPA, no calibration chemicals are needed. The calibration comes from the software package, which contains a library of digitized quantitative reference spectra. The PAPA method can measure pollutant gases down to parts-per-billion concentration levels, including especially: (1) nitrogen oxides and other nitrogen-containing pollutants, (2) organic pollutant gases, including acids, aldehydes, ethers, esters, ketones, hydrocarbons, and halogenated compounds, (3) isoprene, pinenes and other reactive hydrocarbons, (4) benzene and other aromatic compounds, including halogenated species, and (5) hydrogen sulfide, carbon disulfide, mercaptans and other sulfur-containing pollutants.

  12. Sulfur dynamics in an impoundment receiving acid mine drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Herlihy, A.T.

    1987-01-01

    To quantify the importance of bacterial sulfate reduction (SR) in an acidified system, a sulfate influx-efflux budget was constructed for Lake Anna, an impoundment receiving acid mine drainage. Forty eight percent of the entering sulfate was removed from the water column within the 2 km arm of the lake that receives the pollution. Directly measured SR equaled 200% of the sulfate removal calculated in the budget. Thus, sulfide oxidation must be an important process in these sediments. The calculated alkalinity generated by sulfate removal was more than twice that necessary to account for the observed pH increase in the impoundment. Inorganic sulfur concentrations in the sediments of the impacted arm of Lake Anna were significantly greater than those in unpolluted sections of the lake. Label experiments showed that FeS and elemental sulfur (S{degree}) were the major products of SR in the impacted sediments. Inorganic sulfur (FeS, S{degree}, and pyrite) made up to 60% to 100% of the total sediment sulfur concentration. Pyrite concentrations were high and decreased exponentially with distance from the AMD source, indicating that the pyrite is stream detrius. FeS and S{degree} concentrations were highest at a station 1 km away from the AMD inflow, indicating in situ formation. There was no evidence for the formation of organic sulfur species.

  13. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  14. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  15. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  16. 40 CFR 50.4 - National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). 50.4 Section 50.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....4 National primary ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide). (a) The level...). (c) Sulfur oxides shall be measured in the ambient air as sulfur dioxide by the reference...

  17. Gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry for the identification of organic sulfur compounds in shellfish and fish

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, M.; Miyake, Y.

    1980-11-01

    The authors determined that the organic sulfur compounds usually contained in crude oil can be used as a marker of oil pollution in shellfish and fish. Short-necked clams and eels were maintained in a controlled laboratory environment in water with suspension of crude oil. Mass spectra and mass chromatograms of short-necked clam extract showed the presence of organic sulfur compounds. Capillary column gas chromatography-mass chromatograms of crude oil and extract from the soft body of a short-necked clam showed the presence of organic sulfur compounds. Besides sulfur components, various other compounds were contained in crude oil and short-necked clam. Mass chromatograms of crude oil and the extract from eel flesh showed the presence of alkyl benzothiophene, dibenzothiophene, naphthalene, and alkyl naphthalene. Data indicated that the organic sulfur compounds and polyaromatic compounds could serve as markers of oil pollution in shellfish and fish.

  18. Sulfur dioxide control: Sulfur dioxide from coal-burning sources. (Latest citations from the NTIS data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning air pollution control technology and various methods for desulfurization of coal combustion streams. Examples include fluidized bed and other combustion modifications, and the removal of sulfur dioxide from flue gas. Proper monitoring of the effluent to meet the established atmospheric standards is also discussed. Applications in powerplants, steam boilers, furnaces, kilns, and gas turbines are presented. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. Sulfur dioxide control: Sulfur dioxide from coal burning sources. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning air pollution control technology and various methods for desulfurization of coal combustion streams. Examples include fluidized bed and other combustion modifications, and the removal of sulfur dioxide from flue gas. Proper monitoring of the effluent to meet the established atmospheric standards is also discussed. Applications in powerplants, steam boilers, furnaces, kilns, and gas turbines are presented. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. Process for removing sulfur from sulfur-containing gases

    DOEpatents

    Rochelle, Gary T.; Jozewicz, Wojciech

    1989-01-01

    The present disclosure relates to improved processes for treating hot sulfur-containing flue gas to remove sulfur therefrom. Processes in accorda The government may own certain rights in the present invention pursuant to EPA Cooperative Agreement CR 81-1531.

  1. Sulfuric acid as autocatalyst in the formation of sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Torrent-Sucarrat, Miquel; Francisco, Joseph S; Anglada, Josep M

    2012-12-26

    Sulfuric acid can act as a catalyst of its own formation. We have carried out a computational investigation on the gas-phase formation of H(2)SO(4) by hydrolysis of SO(3) involving one and two water molecules, and also in the presence of sulfuric acid and its complexes with one and two water molecules. The hydrolysis of SO(3) requires the concurrence of two water molecules, one of them acting as a catalyzer, and our results predict an important catalytic effect, ranging between 3 and 11 kcal·mol(-1) when the catalytic water molecule is substituted by a sulfuric acid molecule or one of its hydrates. In these cases, the reaction products are either bare sulfuric acid dimer or sulfuric acid dimer complexed with a water molecule. There are broad implications from these new findings. The results of the present investigation show that the catalytic effect of sulfuric acid in the SO(3) hydrolysis can be important in the Earth's stratosphere, in the heterogeneous formation of sulfuric acid and in the formation of aerosols, in H(2)SO(4) formation by aircraft engines, and also in understanding the formation of sulfuric acid in the atmosphere of Venus.

  2. Tetrasulfide extreme pressure lubricant additives

    SciTech Connect

    Gast, L.E.; Kenney, H.E.; Schwab, A.W.

    1980-08-19

    A novel class of compounds has been prepared comprising the tetrasulfides of /sup 18/C hydrocarbons, /sup 18/C fatty acids, and /sup 18/C fatty and alkyl and triglyceride esters. These tetrasulfides are useful as extreme pressure lubricant additives and show potential as replacements for sulfurized sperm whale oil.

  3. Exploring Water Pollution. Part 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    1976-01-01

    Lists over 30 outdoor science activities dealing with water formation, erosion, pollution, and other water-related topics. Provides, in addition, a selected bibliography of films, tapes, booklets and pamphlets, and filmstrips as additional reference materials. (CP)

  4. Exploring Water Pollution. Part 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    1976-01-01

    Lists over 30 outdoor science activities dealing with water formation, erosion, pollution, and other water-related topics. Provides, in addition, a selected bibliography of films, tapes, booklets and pamphlets, and filmstrips as additional reference materials. (CP)

  5. Lithium sulfur batteries and electrolytes and sulfur cathodes thereof

    DOEpatents

    Visco, Steven J.; Goncharenko, Nikolay; Nimon, Vitaliy; Petrov, Alexei; Nimon, Yevgeniy S.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.; Katz, Bruce D.; Loginova, Valentina

    2017-05-23

    Lithium sulfur battery cells that use water as an electrolyte solvent provide significant cost reductions. Electrolytes for the battery cells may include water solvent for maintaining electroactive sulfur species in solution during cell discharge and a sufficient amount of a cycle life-enhancing compound that facilitates charging at the cathode. The combination of these two components enhances one or more of the following cell attributes: energy density, power density and cycle life. For instance, in applications where cost per Watt-Hour (Wh) is paramount, such as grid storage and traction applications, the use of an aqueous electrolyte in combination with inexpensive sulfur as the cathode active material can be a key enabler for the utility and automotive industries, for example, providing a cost effective and compact solution for load leveling, electric vehicles and renewable energy storage. Sulfur cathodes, and methods of fabricating lithium sulfur cells, in particular for loading lithium sulfide into the cathode structures, provide further advantages.

  6. 40 CFR 80.350 - What alternative sulfur standards and requirements apply to importers who transport gasoline by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What alternative sulfur standards and... ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Sampling, Testing and Retention Requirements for Refiners and Importers § 80.350 What alternative sulfur standards and requirements apply to importers who transport gasoline by...

  7. 40 CFR 80.350 - What alternative sulfur standards and requirements apply to importers who transport gasoline by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What alternative sulfur standards and... ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Sampling, Testing and Retention Requirements for Refiners and Importers § 80.350 What alternative sulfur standards and requirements apply to importers who transport gasoline by...

  8. 40 CFR 80.350 - What alternative sulfur standards and requirements apply to importers who transport gasoline by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What alternative sulfur standards and... ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Sampling, Testing and Retention Requirements for Refiners and Importers § 80.350 What alternative sulfur standards and requirements apply to importers who transport gasoline by...

  9. Identification of sulfur sources and isotopic equilibria in submarine hot-springs using multiple sulfur isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, Jill M.; Ono, Shuhei; Tivey, Margaret K.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Solow, Andrew R.

    2015-07-01

    disproportionation is an additional process that contributes sulfur to a different back-arc system and to acid spring-type hydrothermal fluid circulation. At the sedimented Guaymus Basin, near-zero Δ33S values are also observed, despite negative δ34S values that indicate inputs of biogenic pyrite for some samples. In contrast with previous studies reporting isotope disequilibrium between H2S and chalcopyrite, the δ34S values of chalcopyrite sampled from the inner 1-2 mm of a chimney wall are within ±1‰ of δ34S values for H2S in the paired vent fluid, suggesting equilibrium fluid-mineral sulfur isotope exchange at 300-400 °C. Isotopic equilibrium between hydrothermal fluid H2S and precipitating chalcopyrite implies that sulfur isotopes in the chalcopyrite lining across a chimney wall may accurately record past hydrothermal activity.

  10. 40 CFR 80.591 - What are the product transfer document requirements for additives to be used in diesel fuel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... package contains a static dissipater additive and/or red dye having a sulfur content greater than 15 ppm... additive having a sulfur content greater than 15 ppm.” (ii) “This diesel fuel additive contains red dye... dissipater additive and red dye having a sulfur content greater than 15 ppm.” (4) Include the...

  11. 40 CFR 80.591 - What are the product transfer document requirements for additives to be used in diesel fuel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... package contains a static dissipater additive and/or red dye having a sulfur content greater than 15 ppm... additive having a sulfur content greater than 15 ppm.” (ii) “This diesel fuel additive contains red dye... dissipater additive and red dye having a sulfur content greater than 15 ppm.” (4) Include the...

  12. 40 CFR 80.591 - What are the product transfer document requirements for additives to be used in diesel fuel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... package contains a static dissipater additive and/or red dye having a sulfur content greater than 15 ppm... additive having a sulfur content greater than 15 ppm.” (ii) “This diesel fuel additive contains red dye... dissipater additive and red dye having a sulfur content greater than 15 ppm.” (4) Include the...

  13. 40 CFR 80.591 - What are the product transfer document requirements for additives to be used in diesel fuel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... package contains a static dissipater additive and/or red dye having a sulfur content greater than 15 ppm... additive having a sulfur content greater than 15 ppm.” (ii) “This diesel fuel additive contains red dye... dissipater additive and red dye having a sulfur content greater than 15 ppm.” (4) Include the...

  14. 40 CFR 80.591 - What are the product transfer document requirements for additives to be used in diesel fuel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... package contains a static dissipater additive and/or red dye having a sulfur content greater than 15 ppm... additive having a sulfur content greater than 15 ppm.” (ii) “This diesel fuel additive contains red dye... dissipater additive and red dye having a sulfur content greater than 15 ppm.” (4) Include the...

  15. Sulfur in Cometary Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fomenkova, M. N.

    1997-01-01

    The computer-intensive project consisted of the analysis and synthesis of existing data on composition of comet Halley dust particles. The main objective was to obtain a complete inventory of sulfur containing compounds in the comet Halley dust by building upon the existing classification of organic and inorganic compounds and applying a variety of statistical techniques for cluster and cross-correlational analyses. A student hired for this project wrote and tested the software to perform cluster analysis. The following tasks were carried out: (1) selecting the data from existing database for the proposed project; (2) finding access to a standard library of statistical routines for cluster analysis; (3) reformatting the data as necessary for input into the library routines; (4) performing cluster analysis and constructing hierarchical cluster trees using three methods to define the proximity of clusters; (5) presenting the output results in different formats to facilitate the interpretation of the obtained cluster trees; (6) selecting groups of data points common for all three trees as stable clusters. We have also considered the chemistry of sulfur in inorganic compounds.

  16. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scorer, Richard S.

    The purpose of this book is to describe the basic mechanisms whereby pollution is transported and diffused in the atmosphere. It is designed to give practitioners an understanding of basic mechanics and physics so they may have a correct basis on which to formulate their decisions related to practical air pollution control problems. Since many…

  17. Particle Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    ... EPA Air Quality Index (AQI) tells you when air pollution is likely to reach levels that could be ... high, take steps to limit the amount of air you breathe in while you're outside. ... pollution levels are usually lower. Choose easier outdoor activities ( ...

  18. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scorer, Richard S.

    The purpose of this book is to describe the basic mechanisms whereby pollution is transported and diffused in the atmosphere. It is designed to give practitioners an understanding of basic mechanics and physics so they may have a correct basis on which to formulate their decisions related to practical air pollution control problems. Since many…

  19. Air Pollution.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air quality is affected by many types of pollutants that are emitted from various sources, including stationary and mobile. These sources release both criteria and hazardous air pollutants, which cause health effects, ecological harm, and material damage. They are generally categ...

  20. Air Pollution.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air quality is affected by many types of pollutants that are emitted from various sources, including stationary and mobile. These sources release both criteria and hazardous air pollutants, which cause health effects, ecological harm, and material damage. They are generally categ...