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Sample records for additional surface water

  1. Atmospheric transport and deposition, an additional input pathway for triazine herbicides to surface waters

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, D.C.G.; Rawn, D.F.

    1996-10-01

    Although surface runoff from treated fields is regarded as the major route of entry of triazine herbicides to surface waters, other pathways such as deposition via precipitation, gas absorption and dryfall may also be important. Triazine herbicides have been detected in precipitation but there has been only a very limited amount of work on gas phase and aerosols. To examine the importance of atmospheric inputs concentrations of atrazine, cyanazine and terbuthylazine in gas phase/aerosols, precipitation, and surface waters were determined (along with other herbicides) using selected ion GC-MS. Atrazine was detected at low ng/L concentrations in surface waters (<0.04-5.3 ng/L) and precipitation (0.1-53 ng/L), and at 0.02-0.1 ng/m{sup 3} in air. Cyanazine and terbuthylazine were detected in air and infrequently in water. Highest atrazine concentrations in air were found during June each year on both gas phase and particles. Concentrations of atrazine in surface waters at both locations increased during June, even in the absence of precipitation or overland flow, presumably due to inputs from dryfall and to gas areas and boreal forest lakes due to transport and deposition. Ecological risk assessment of triazines, especially for pristine aquatic environments should include consideration of this atmospheric pathway.

  2. Enantioselective Michael Addition of Water

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Resch, Verena; Otten, Linda G; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The enantioselective Michael addition using water as both nucleophile and solvent has to date proved beyond the ability of synthetic chemists. Herein, the direct, enantioselective Michael addition of water in water to prepare important β-hydroxy carbonyl compounds using whole cells of Rhodococcus strains is described. Good yields and excellent enantioselectivities were achieved with this method. Deuterium labeling studies demonstrate that a Michael hydratase catalyzes the water addition exclusively with anti-stereochemistry. PMID:25529526

  3. Addition of surfactants in ozonated water cleaning for the suppression of functional group formation and particle adhesion on the SiO2 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jahyun; Im, Kyungtaek; Lim, Sangwoo

    2011-04-01

    Various kinds of surfactants were added to a cleaning solution and deionized (DI) water, and their effect on the suppression of organic function group formation and particle adhesion to a SiO2 surface was analyzed using multi-internal reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results implied that attached organic functional groups are affected by the chemical structure of a surfactant in DI water. Furthermore, the addition of anionic glycolic acid ethoxylate 4-tert-butylphenyl ether (GAE4E) is the most effective in terms of preventing organic group attachment and particle adhesion to the SiO2 surface, whether it was added to the cleaning solution or post-cleaning rinse water, with or without polystyrene latex particles. Moreover, it was possible to completely prevent particle adhesion to the SiO2 surface with the proper addition of GAE4E in DIO3 solution.

  4. Water based drilling mud additive

    SciTech Connect

    McCrary, J.L.

    1983-12-13

    A water based fluid additive useful in drilling mud used during drilling of an oil or gas well is disclosed, produced by reacting water at temperatures between 210/sup 0/-280/sup 0/ F. with a mixture comprising in percent by weight: gilsonite 25-30%, tannin 7-15%, lignite 25-35%, sulfonating compound 15-25%, water soluble base compound 5-15%, methylene-yielding compound 1-5%, and then removing substantially all of the remaining water to produce a dried product.

  5. Surface freezing of water.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Díaz, J L; Álvarez-Valenzuela, M A; Rodríguez-Celis, F

    2016-01-01

    Freezing, melting, evaporation and condensation of water are essential ingredients for climate and eventually life on Earth. In the present work, we show how surface freezing of supercooled water in an open container is conditioned and triggered-exclusively-by humidity in air. Additionally, a change of phase is demonstrated to be triggered on the water surface forming surface ice crystals prior to freezing of bulk. The symmetry of the surface crystal, as well as the freezing point, depend on humidity, presenting at least three different types of surface crystals. Humidity triggers surface freezing as soon as it overpasses a defined value for a given temperature, generating a plurality of nucleation nodes. An evidence of simultaneous nucleation of surface ice crystals is also provided. PMID:27330895

  6. Literature review and need for additional study of surface-water quality in the Cuyahoga Valley National Recreation Area, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Childress, C.J.

    1984-01-01

    The Cuyahoga Valley National Recreation Area encompasses about 24 miles of the middle reach of the Cuyahoga River and parts of four major tributaries -- Furnace Run, Brandywine Creek, Chippewa Creek, and TInkers Creek. Water quality in this reach does not meet Ohio water-quality standards for dissolved oxygen, fecal bacteria, ammonia, and lead. Point sources of effluent contribute contaminants. On the basis of a review of scientific and technical literature, National Park Service management goals, and water-quality data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey, three subject areas for future study are suggested: (1) The dissolved oxygen regime, (2) chemical quality of base flow, and (3) quality of storm-water runoff.

  7. Influence of type and level of water-soluble additives on drug release and surface and mechanical properties of Surelease films.

    PubMed

    Rohera, Bhagwan D; Parikh, Nilesh H

    2002-11-01

    Ethylcellulose in combination with water-soluble additives has been used in the development of microporous membrane-coated dosage forms. In the present study, application of three types of water-soluble additives, namely polyethylene glycols (PEG 400, 3350, and 8000), maltodextrins (Maltrin M150, M100, and M040 in the order of lower to higher average polymer size and molecular weight; dextrose equivalence 16.9, 11.1, and 4.8, respectively), and xylitol, as porosity modifiers in the films of a commercially available aqueous ethylcellulose dispersion (Surelease/E-7-7060 plasticized with glyceryl tricaprylate/caprate) was investigated. The effect of type and level of these additives on drug release characteristics and surface and mechanical properties of the polymeric films was studied. Each additive was incorporated at 20 and 30% levels in the polymeric dispersion based on its solids content. Ibuprofen tablets were coated using the polymeric dispersion with and without additive at 3% w/w coat level in a fluid-bed equipment. The coated tablets were evaluated for their drug release rate, coat reflectivity (gloss), Brinell hardness, and elastic modulus. Differential scanning calorimetric analysis of the films was performed to determine the physico-chemical changes in the applied film-coats. The rate of drug release, hence film porosity, was observed to be dependent on the type and level of the additive added. The molecular weight of the additive and its concentration in the polymeric dispersion had significant influence on the rate of drug release, hardness, and elasticity of the film-coats. PMID:12503524

  8. Sustaining dry surfaces under water.

    PubMed

    Jones, Paul R; Hao, Xiuqing; Cruz-Chu, Eduardo R; Rykaczewski, Konrad; Nandy, Krishanu; Schutzius, Thomas M; Varanasi, Kripa K; Megaridis, Constantine M; Walther, Jens H; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Espinosa, Horacio D; Patankar, Neelesh A

    2015-01-01

    Rough surfaces immersed under water remain practically dry if the liquid-solid contact is on roughness peaks, while the roughness valleys are filled with gas. Mechanisms that prevent water from invading the valleys are well studied. However, to remain practically dry under water, additional mechanisms need consideration. This is because trapped gas (e.g. air) in the roughness valleys can dissolve into the water pool, leading to invasion. Additionally, water vapor can also occupy the roughness valleys of immersed surfaces. If water vapor condenses, that too leads to invasion. These effects have not been investigated, and are critically important to maintain surfaces dry under water. In this work, we identify the critical roughness scale, below which it is possible to sustain the vapor phase of water and/or trapped gases in roughness valleys - thus keeping the immersed surface dry. Theoretical predictions are consistent with molecular dynamics simulations and experiments. PMID:26282732

  9. Sustaining dry surfaces under water

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Paul R.; Hao, Xiuqing; Cruz-Chu, Eduardo R.; Rykaczewski, Konrad; Nandy, Krishanu; Schutzius, Thomas M.; Varanasi, Kripa K.; Megaridis, Constantine M.; Walther, Jens H.; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Espinosa, Horacio D.; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2015-01-01

    Rough surfaces immersed under water remain practically dry if the liquid-solid contact is on roughness peaks, while the roughness valleys are filled with gas. Mechanisms that prevent water from invading the valleys are well studied. However, to remain practically dry under water, additional mechanisms need consideration. This is because trapped gas (e.g. air) in the roughness valleys can dissolve into the water pool, leading to invasion. Additionally, water vapor can also occupy the roughness valleys of immersed surfaces. If water vapor condenses, that too leads to invasion. These effects have not been investigated, and are critically important to maintain surfaces dry under water. In this work, we identify the critical roughness scale, below which it is possible to sustain the vapor phase of water and/or trapped gases in roughness valleys – thus keeping the immersed surface dry. Theoretical predictions are consistent with molecular dynamics simulations and experiments. PMID:26282732

  10. Surface texture measurement for additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triantaphyllou, Andrew; Giusca, Claudiu L.; Macaulay, Gavin D.; Roerig, Felix; Hoebel, Matthias; Leach, Richard K.; Tomita, Ben; Milne, Katherine A.

    2015-06-01

    The surface texture of additively manufactured metallic surfaces made by powder bed methods is affected by a number of factors, including the powder’s particle size distribution, the effect of the heat source, the thickness of the printed layers, the angle of the surface relative to the horizontal build bed and the effect of any post processing/finishing. The aim of the research reported here is to understand the way these surfaces should be measured in order to characterise them. In published research to date, the surface texture is generally reported as an Ra value, measured across the lay. The appropriateness of this method for such surfaces is investigated here. A preliminary investigation was carried out on two additive manufacturing processes—selective laser melting (SLM) and electron beam melting (EBM)—focusing on the effect of build angle and post processing. The surfaces were measured using both tactile and optical methods and a range of profile and areal parameters were reported. Test coupons were manufactured at four angles relative to the horizontal plane of the powder bed using both SLM and EBM. The effect of lay—caused by the layered nature of the manufacturing process—was investigated, as was the required sample area for optical measurements. The surfaces were also measured before and after grit blasting.

  11. Surface-water surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Saldi, K.A.; Dirkes, R.L.; Blanton, M.L.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the Surface water on and near the Hanford Site is monitored to determine the potential effects of Hanford operations. Surface water at Hanford includes the Columbia River, riverbank springs, ponds located on the Hanford Site, and offsite water systems directly east and across the Columbia River from the Hanford Site, and offsite water systems directly east and across the Columbia River from the Hanford Site. Columbia River sediments are also included in this discussion. Tables 5.3.1 and 5.3.2 summarize the sampling locations, sample types, sampling frequencies, and sample analyses included in surface-water surveillance activities during 1994. Sample locations are also identified in Figure 5.3.1. This section describes the surveillance effort and summarizes the results for these aquatic environments. Detailed analytical results are reported by Bisping (1995).

  12. The Fate of Carbon Draining Permafrost Soils is Controlled by Photochemical Reactions in Addition to Microbial Degradation in Arctic Surface Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kling, G. W.; Dobkowski, J.; Ward, C. P.; Crump, B. C.; Neilson, B. T.; Cory, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    Perhaps the unknown of greatest potential consequence in determining the arc of climate change in this century is the role of thawing permafrost carbon. Arctic soil temperatures are increasing and large areas of permafrost have thawed, but not all soils will thaw quietly in place. Destabilization from melting ice has caused an increase in thermokarst failures that expose buried C and release dissolved organic C (DOC) to surface waters. We found that this exposure to sunlight and surface conditions increases the reactivity of permafrost C to microbial attack by 40% compared to soil DOC held in the dark. The range of lability to microbes depends on microbial community composition and especially on prior light exposure, implying that sunlight may act as an amplification factor in converting frozen C to gases in the atmosphere. We also found that photochemical degradation accounted for the majority (up to 80%) of the degradation of DOC in the water column of lakes and streams. This was based on concurrent measurements of (1) respiration of DOM to CO2 by bacteria in the dark, (2) O2 consumed in DOM photo-oxidation, (3) CO2 produced by DOM photo-mineralization, and (4) photo-stimulated bacterial respiration. Using in-situ UV light profiles and surveys of ~70 surface waters on the North Slope of Alaska, we found that depth-integrated water column rates of photochemical DOM degradation equaled or exceeded dark bacterial respiration, by up to 7x depending on the mean depth of the water column. The total dark and light processing of DOM in these waters was estimated to be roughly 20% of the DOM exported from major rivers on the North Slope of Alaska to the Arctic Ocean. The dominant degradation pathway was the partial photo-oxidation of DOC, which was at least 2x greater than complete photo-mineralization of DOC to CO2 or than bacterial respiration to CO2. This means that the dominant fate of permafrost C released as DOC is to be partially degraded and transported through

  13. Impact of Pt additives on the surface reactions between SnO2, water vapour, CO and H2; an operando investigation.

    PubMed

    Großmann, Katharina; Wicker, Susanne; Weimar, Udo; Barsan, Nicolae

    2013-11-28

    The impact of Pt doping on the surface reactions between tin dioxide, water vapour, CO and H2 was investigated by a combination of simultaneously performed operando DRIFT (Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform) spectroscopy, DC resistance measurements and analysis of the reaction products by using a MS (Mass Spectrometer). Both undoped and Pt doped tin dioxide sensors were exposed to different test gases in synthetic air or in N2 backgrounds. The approach made it possible to identify the differences between the two materials with respect to their surface chemistry and their impact on the gas sensing performance. The main finding is that the presence of Pt changes the reaction partners' nature for water vapour and H2 on the one hand, and CO on the other hand when the sensors are operated in air. In this way the cross interference effect of humidity, which is responsible for the loss of CO sensing performance for the sensors based on undoped SnO2, is reversed. PMID:24105035

  14. SURFACE WATER EMAP PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The surface water component of the EPA Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) Western Pilot is a five-year effort to assess the ecological condition of rivers and streams across 12 states in the western United States. EMAP is designed to monitor indicators of poll...

  15. Fire extinct experiments with water mist by adding additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lijun; Zhao, Jianbo

    2011-12-01

    The effects of fire extinguishment with water mist by adding different additives were studied. Tens of chemical substances (including alkali metal salt, dilution agent and surface active agent) were selected as additives due to their different extinct mechanisms. At first the performance of fire extinguishment with single additive was studied, then the effects of the same kinds of chemical substances under the same mass fraction were compared to study their influences on the fire extinguishment factors, including extinct time, fire temperature and oxygen concentration from which the fire extinct mechanism with additives could be concluded. Based on this the experiments were conducted to study the cooperate effect of the complexity of different additives. It indicated the relations between different firefighting mechanisms and different additives were competitive. From a large number of experiments the extinct mechanism with water mist by adding additives was concluded and an optimal compounding additive was selected.

  16. Water addition, evaporation and water holding capacity of poultry litter.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, Mark W; Blackall, Patrick J; Stuetz, Richard M

    2015-12-15

    Litter moisture content has been related to ammonia, dust and odour emissions as well as bird health and welfare. Improved understanding of the water holding properties of poultry litter as well as water additions to litter and evaporation from litter will contribute to improved litter moisture management during the meat chicken grow-out. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how management and environmental conditions over the course of a grow-out affect the volume of water A) applied to litter, B) able to be stored in litter, and C) evaporated from litter on a daily basis. The same unit of measurement has been used to enable direct comparison-litres of water per square metre of poultry shed floor area, L/m(2), assuming a litter depth of 5cm. An equation was developed to estimate the amount of water added to litter from bird excretion and drinking spillage, which are sources of regular water application to the litter. Using this equation showed that water applied to litter from these sources changes over the course of a grow-out, and can be as much as 3.2L/m(2)/day. Over a 56day grow-out, the total quantity of water added to the litter was estimated to be 104L/m(2). Litter porosity, water holding capacity and water evaporation rates from litter were measured experimentally. Litter porosity decreased and water holding capacity increased over the course of a grow-out due to manure addition. Water evaporation rates at 25°C and 50% relative humidity ranged from 0.5 to 10L/m(2)/day. Evaporation rates increased with litter moisture content and air speed. Maintaining dry litter at the peak of a grow-out is likely to be challenging because evaporation rates from dry litter may be insufficient to remove the quantity of water added to the litter on a daily basis. PMID:26367067

  17. Internal Surface Water Flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murray, Mitchell H.

    1999-01-01

    Introduction The South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Program is an intergovernmental effort to reestablish and maintain the ecosystem of south Florida. One element of the restoration effort is the development of a firm scientific basis for resource decision making.The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provides scientitic information as part of the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Program. The USGS began its own project, called the South Florida Ecosystem Project in fiscal year 1995 for the purpose of gathering hydrologic, cartographic, and geologic data that relate to the mainland of south Florida, Florida Bay, and the Florida Keys and Reef ecosystems. Historical changes in water-management practices to accommodate a large and rapidly growing urban population along the Atlantic coast, as well as intensive agricultural activities, have resulted in a highly managed hydrologic system with canals, levees, and pumping stations. These structures have altered the hydology of the Everglades ecosystem on both coastal and interior lands. Surface-water flows in a direction south of Lake Okeechobee have been regulated by an extensive canal network, begun in the 1940's, to provide for drainage, flood control, saltwater intrusion control, agricultural requirements, and various environmental needs. Much of the development and subsequent monitoring of canal and river discharge south of Lake Okeechobee has traditionally emphasized the eastern coastal areas of Florida. Recently, more emphasis has been placed on providing a more accurate water budget for internal canal flows.

  18. Surface Water Records of Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division

    1962-01-01

    The surface-water records for the 1962 water year for gaging stations and miscellaneous sites within the State of Colorado are given in this report. For convenience there are also included records for a few pertinent gaging stations in bordering States. The records were collected and computed by the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey, under the direction of J. W. Odell, district engineer, Surface Water Branch.

  19. SURFACE WATER INTAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) GIS layer represents the locations of public water system (PWS) facilities in NY and NJ; every PWS has one or more facilities. Data for this layer came from the Safe Drinking Water Information System/Federal version (SDWIS/FED)...

  20. Roles of additives and surface control in slurry atomization

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    This project studies the rheology and airblast atomization of micronized coal slurries. Its major objectives are (1) to promote further understanding of the mechanisms and the roles of additives in airblast atomization of coal water slurry (CWS), and (2) to investigate the impacts of coal particle surface properties and interparticle forces on CWS rheology. We have found that the flow behavior index (n) of a suspension (or slurry) is determined by the relative importance of the interparticle van der Waals attraction and the interparticle electrostatic repulsion. The interparticle attraction, measured by the Hamaker constant scaled to the thermal energy at 25[degrees]C (A/kT), causes particle aggregation, which breaks down at high shear rates, and thus leads to slurry pseudoplastic behavior (n< 1). At a constant particle volume fraction and surface charge density (qualitatively measured by the zeta potential in deionized water), n decreases linearly as A/kT increases. The relative viscosity of the pseudoplastic suspension with respect to that of the suspending liquid is found to be independent of particle density and correlate well with the particle Peclet number which equals the particle diffusional relaxation time multiplied by shear rate. Specifically, the relative viscosities of the pseudoplastic glycerol/water coal slurry and the ethylene glycol/glycerol sand slurry, at same volume fractions as well as similar particle size distributions and liquid viscosities, as functions of the particle Peclet number fall along the same line.

  1. CONNECTICUT SURFACE WATER QUALITY CLASSIFICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a 1:24,000-scale datalayer of Surface Water Quality Classifications for Connecticut. It is comprised of two 0Shapefiles with line and polygon features. Both Shapefiles must be used together with the Hydrography datalayer. The polygon Shapefile includes surface water qual...

  2. THE FATE OF FLUOROSILICATE DRINKING WATER ADDITIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Periodically, the EPA reexamines its information on regulated drinking water contaminants to deterime if further study is required. Fluoride is one such contaminant undergoing review. The chemical literature indicates that some deficiencies exist in our understanding of the spe...

  3. Surface Water Response Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    During response to spills, or for facility planning, the vulnerability of downstream water resources is a major concern. How long and at what concentration do spilled contaminants reach downstream receptors? Models have the potential to answer these questions, but only if they ...

  4. Measuring Surface Water From Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partsch, J.; Alsdorf, D.; Rodriguez, E.; Lettenmaier, D.; Mognard, N.; Participants, T.

    2006-12-01

    Surface fresh water is essential for life, yet we have surprisingly poor knowledge of the spatial and temporal dynamics of surface fresh water discharge and changes in storage globally. For example, we are unable to answer such basic questions as "What is the spatial and temporal variability of water stored on and near the surface of all continents?" Furthermore, key societal issues, such as the susceptibility of life to flood hazards, cannot be answered with the current global, in-situ networks designed to observe river discharge at points but not flood events. The measurements required to answer these hydrologic questions are surface water area, the elevation of the water surface (h), its slope (dh/dx), and temporal change (dh/dt). Advances in remote sensing hydrology, particularly over the past 10 years and even more recently, have demonstrated that these hydraulic variables can be measured reliably from orbiting platforms. Measurements of inundated area have been used to varying degrees of accuracy as proxies for discharge, but are successful only when in-situ data are available for calibration and fail to indicate the dynamic topography of water surfaces. Radar altimeters have a rich, multi-decadal history of successfully measuring elevations of the ocean surface and are now also accepted as capable tools for measuring h along orbital profiles crossing fresh water bodies. However, altimeters are profiling tools which, because of their orbital spacings, miss too many fresh water bodies to be useful hydrologically. High spatial resolution images of dh/dt have been observed with interferometric synthetic aperture radar (SAR), but the method requires emergent vegetation to scatter radar pulses back to the receiving antenna. Essentially, existing spaceborne methods have been used to measure components of surface water hydraulics, but none of the technologies can singularly supply the water volume and hydraulic measurements that are needed to accurately model the

  5. Measuring surface water from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsdorf, Douglas E.; RodríGuez, Ernesto; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.

    2007-06-01

    Surface fresh water is essential for life, yet we have surprisingly poor knowledge of the spatial and temporal dynamics of surface freshwater discharge and changes in storage globally. For example, we are unable to answer such basic questions as "What is the spatial and temporal variability of water stored on and near the surface of all continents?" Furthermore, key societal issues, such as the susceptibility of life to flood hazards, cannot be answered with the current global, in situ networks designed to observe river discharge at points but not flood events. The measurements required to answer these hydrologic questions are surface water area, the elevation of the water surface (h), its slope (∂h/∂x), and temporal change (∂h/∂t). Advances in remote sensing hydrology, particularly over the past 10 years and even more recently, have demonstrated that these hydraulic variables can be measured reliably from orbiting platforms. Measurements of inundated area have been used to varying degrees of accuracy as proxies for discharge but are successful only when in situ data are available for calibration; they fail to indicate the dynamic topography of water surfaces. Radar altimeters have a rich, multidecadal history of successfully measuring elevations of the ocean surface and are now also accepted as capable tools for measuring h along orbital profiles crossing freshwater bodies. However, altimeters are profiling tools, which, because of their orbital spacings, miss too many freshwater bodies to be useful hydrologically. High spatial resolution images of ∂h/∂t have been observed with interferometric synthetic aperture radar, but the method requires emergent vegetation to scatter radar pulses back to the receiving antenna. Essentially, existing spaceborne methods have been used to measure components of surface water hydraulics, but none of the technologies can singularly supply the water volume and hydraulic measurements that are needed to accurately model

  6. 10. Water treatment plant, view to S. 1965 addition is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Water treatment plant, view to S. 1965 addition is in the foreground - Fort Benton Water Treatment Plant, Filtration Plant, Lots 9-13 of Block 7, Fort Benton Original Townsite at Missouri River, Fort Benton, Chouteau County, MT

  7. The effect of switchable water additives on clay settling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Shun; Lau, Ying Yin; Mercer, Sean M; Robert, Tobias; Horton, J Hugh; Jessop, Philip G

    2013-01-01

    The recycling of process water from strip mining extractions is a very relevant task both industrially and environmentally. The sedimentation of fine tailings during such processes, however, can often require long periods of time and/or the addition of flocculants which make later water recycling difficult. We propose the use of switchable water additives as reversible flocculants for clay/water suspensions. Switchable water additives are compounds such as diamines that make it possible to reversibly control the ionic strength of an aqueous solution. Addition of CO(2) to such an aqueous solution causes the ionic strength to rise dramatically, and the change is reversed upon removal of the CO(2). These additives, while in the presence of CO(2), promote the aggregation of clay tailings, reduce settling times, and greatly increase the clarity of the liberated water. The removal of CO(2) from the liberated water regenerates a low ionic strength solution that does not promote clay aggregation and settling until CO(2) is added again. Such reversible behavior would be useful in applications such as oil sands separations in which the recycled water must not promote aggregation. When added to kaolinite and montmorillonite clay suspensions, switchable water provided process waters of lower turbidity than those additives from inorganic salts or by CO(2)-treatment alone. When recollected, the switchable water supernatant was shown to be recyclable over three cycles for enhanced settling of kaolinite. PMID:22945593

  8. Stereochemistry of enzymatic water addition to C=C bonds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Otten, Linda G; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Water addition to carbon-carbon double bonds using hydratases is attracting great interest in biochemistry. Most of the known hydratases are involved in primary metabolism and to a lesser extent in secondary metabolism. New hydratases have recently been added to the toolbox, both from natural sources or artificial metalloenzymes. In order to comprehensively understand how the hydratases are able to catalyse the water addition to carbon-carbon double bonds, this review will highlight the mechanistic and stereochemical studies of the enzymatic water addition to carbon-carbon double bonds, focusing on the syn/anti-addition and stereochemistry of the reaction. PMID:25640045

  9. Surface restoration induced by lubricant additive of natural minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Gu, Jialin; Kang, Feiyu; Kong, Xianqing; Mo, Wei

    2007-07-01

    The effect of a new-fashioned lubricant additive is studied. The additive is prepared out of natural minerals containing flaky silicate, schungite and some other catalyzers. Applications of the additive obviously improve the surface mechanics properties of steel-steel friction pairs, and the nanohardness and the modulus of the friction surface are increased by 67 and 90%, respectively. The friction surface is especially examined with the high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), and an amorphous restoration film mostly made up of C with some Si or Si-O amorphous structure doped was found. Considering all research results about the restoration film, this study suggests the film is a sort of diamond-like carbon film (DLC film).

  10. Polarimetric thermal emission from periodic water surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, S. H.; Nghiem, S. V.; Kwok, R.; Wilson, W. J.; Li, F. K.; Johnson, J. T.; Kong, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental results and theoretical calculations are presented to study the polarimetric emission from water surfaces with directional features. For our ground-based Ku-band radiometer measurements, a water pool was constructed on the roof of a building in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and a fiberglass surface with periodic corrugations in one direction was impressed on the top of the water surface to create a stationary water surface underneath it. It is observed that the measured Stokes parameters of corrugated fiberglass-covered water surfaces are functions of azimuth angles and agree very well with the theoretical calculations. The theory, after being verified by the experimental data, was then used to calculate the Stokes parameters of periodic surfaces without fiberglass surface layer and with rms height of the order of wind-generated water ripples. The magnitudes of the azimuthal variation of the calculated emissivities at horizontal and vertical polarizations corresponding to the first two Stokes parameters are found to be comparable to the values measured by airborne radiometers and SSM/I. In addition, the third Stokes parameter not shown in the literature is seen to have approximately twice the magnitude of the azimuth variation of either T(sub h) or T(sub v), which may make it more sensitive to the row direction, while less susceptive to noises because the atmospheric and system noises tend to be unpolarized and are expected to be cancelled out when the third Stokes parameter is derived as the difference of two or three power measurements, as indicated by another experiment carried out at a swimming pool with complicated surroundings. The results indicate that passive polarimetry is a potential technology in the remote sensing of ocean wind vector which is a crucial component in the understanding of global climate change. Issues related to the application of microwave passive polarimetry to ocean wind are also discussed.

  11. Water at surfaces with tunable surface chemistries and the chiral imprint of water around DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Poul

    Aqueous interfaces are ubiquitous in atmospheric chemistry and biological systems but are notoriously hard to probe experimentally. Surface-specific vibrational spectroscopy offers an avenue to directly probe the vibrational modes of the water OH stretching band but this method is challenging to implement to buried surfaces. Here we present results from sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy probing the buried interface between a functionalized surface and aqueous solutions. Studying such buried surfaces offers the advantage of being able to systematically tune the surface chemistry using self-assembled monolayers, i.e. the hydrophobic and hydrophilic character, and examine the effect on the interfacial water. In addition to water at these controlled surfaces, we have initiated studying water at biological surfaces. This includes the solvation structure around DNA. X-ray experiments at cryogenic temperatures have found crystallographic water in the minor grove of DNA giving rise to the notion of a spine of hydration surrounding DNA. Such structured water should exhibit a chiral structure adapted from DNA. We investigate if such a chiral water structure exist around DNA at room temperature using chiral SFG. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under a NSF CAREER Grant (CHE-1151079).

  12. Estimating soil water retention using soil component additivity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeiliger, A.; Ermolaeva, O.; Semenov, V.

    2009-04-01

    Soil water retention is a major soil hydraulic property that governs soil functioning in ecosystems and greatly affects soil management. Data on soil water retention are used in research and applications in hydrology, agronomy, meteorology, ecology, environmental protection, and many other soil-related fields. Soil organic matter content and composition affect both soil structure and adsorption properties; therefore water retention may be affected by changes in soil organic matter that occur because of both climate change and modifications of management practices. Thus, effects of organic matter on soil water retention should be understood and quantified. Measurement of soil water retention is relatively time-consuming, and become impractical when soil hydrologic estimates are needed for large areas. One approach to soil water retention estimation from readily available data is based on the hypothesis that soil water retention may be estimated as an additive function obtained by summing up water retention of pore subspaces associated with soil textural and/or structural components and organic matter. The additivity model and was tested with 550 soil samples from the international database UNSODA and 2667 soil samples from the European database HYPRES containing all textural soil classes after USDA soil texture classification. The root mean square errors (RMSEs) of the volumetric water content estimates for UNSODA vary from 0.021 m3m-3 for coarse sandy loam to 0.075 m3m-3 for sandy clay. Obtained RMSEs are at the lower end of the RMSE range for regression-based water retention estimates found in literature. Including retention estimates of organic matter significantly improved RMSEs. The attained accuracy warrants testing the 'additivity' model with additional soil data and improving this model to accommodate various types of soil structure. Keywords: soil water retention, soil components, additive model, soil texture, organic matter.

  13. [Utility of noise addition image made by using water phantom and image addition and subtraction software].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ryo; Ogawa, Masato; Mituzono, Hiroki; Aoki, Takahiro; Hayano, Mizuho; Watanabe, Yuka

    2010-08-20

    In optimizing exposures, it is very important to evaluate the impact of image noise on image quality. To realize this, there is a need to evaluate how much image noise will make the subject disease invisible. But generally it is very difficult to shoot images of different quality in a clinical examination. Thus, a method to create a noise addition image by adding the image noise to raw data has been reported. However, this approach requires a special system, so it is difficult to implement in many facilities. We have invented a method to easily create a noise addition image by using the water phantom and image add-subtract software that accompanies the device. To create a noise addition image, first we made a noise image by subtracting the water phantom with different SD. A noise addition image was then created by adding the noise image to the original image. By using this method, a simulation image with intergraded SD can be created from the original. Moreover, the noise frequency component of the created noise addition image is as same as the real image. Thus, the relationship of image quality to SD in the clinical image can be evaluated. Although this method is an easy method of LDSI creation on image data, a noise addition image can be easily created by using image addition and subtraction software and water phantom, and this can be implemented in many facilities. PMID:20953102

  14. THE PERSISTENCE OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM IN A DRINKING WATER SYSTEM AFTER THE ADDITION OF FILTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water is increasingly recognized as a major source of pathogenic nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) associated with human infection. Our goal was to determine if the prevalence of NTM would decrease after the addition of filtration treatment to an unfiltered surface water...

  15. Surface modification of additive manufactured Ti6Al4V alloy with Ag nanoparticles: wettability and surface morphology study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudinova, E.; Surmeneva, M.; Koptioug, A.; Sharonova, A.; Loza, K.; Surmenev, R.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the use of electrophoretic deposition to modify the surface of Ti6Al4V alloy fabricated via additive manufacturing technology is reported. Poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP)-stabilized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) had a spherical shape with a diameter of the metallic core of 100±20 nm and ζ -potential -15 mV. The AgNPs- coated Ti6Al4V alloy was studied in respect with its chemical composition and surface morphology, water contact angle, hysteresis, and surface free energy. The results of SEM microphotography analysis showed that the AgNPs were homogeneously distributed over the surface. Hysteresis and water contact angle measurements revealed the effect of the deposited AgNPs layer, namely an increased water contact angle and decreased contact angle hysteresis. However, the average water contact angle was 125° for PVP-stabilized-AgNPs-coated surface, whereas ethylene glycol gave the average contact angle of 17°. A higher surface energy is observed for AgNPs-coated Ti6Al4V surface (70.17 mN/m) compared with the uncoated surface (49.07 mN/m).

  16. Water molecules orientation in surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingo, V. V.

    2000-08-01

    The water molecules orientation has been investigated theoretically in the water surface layer. The surface molecule orientation is determined by the direction of a molecule dipole moment in relation to outward normal to the water surface. Entropy expressions of the superficial molecules in statistical meaning and from thermodynamical approach to a liquid surface tension have been found. The molecules share directed opposite to the outward normal that is hydrogen protons inside is equal 51.6%. 48.4% water molecules are directed along to surface outward normal that is by oxygen inside. A potential jump at the water surface layer amounts about 0.2 volts.

  17. 3D Additive Construction with Regolith for Surface Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.

    2014-01-01

    Planetary surface exploration on Asteroids, the Moon, Mars and Martian Moons will require the stabilization of loose, fine, dusty regolith to avoid the effects of vertical lander rocket plume impingement, to keep abrasive and harmful dust from getting lofted and for dust free operations. In addition, the same regolith stabilization process can be used for 3 Dimensional ( 3D) printing, additive construction techniques by repeating the 2D stabilization in many vertical layers. This will allow in-situ construction with regolith so that materials will not have to be transported from Earth. Recent work in the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Surface Systems Office (NE-S) Swamp Works and at the University of Southern California (USC) under two NASA Innovative Advanced Concept (NIAC) awards have shown promising results with regolith (crushed basalt rock) materials for in-situ heat shields, bricks, landing/launch pads, berms, roads, and other structures that could be fabricated using regolith that is sintered or mixed with a polymer binder. The technical goals and objectives of this project are to prove the feasibility of 3D printing additive construction using planetary regolith simulants and to show that they have structural integrity and practical applications in space exploration.

  18. Roles of additives and surface control in slurry atomization

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, S.C.

    1990-01-01

    This report focuses on the effects of interparticle forces on the rheology and airblast atomization of micronized coal water slurry (CWS). We found that the CWS flow behavior index is determined by the relative importance of the interparticle van der Waals attraction and the interparticle electrostatic repulsion. The former intensifies as the Hamaker constant increases and the interparticle distance reduces while the latter increases as the particle surface charge density increases. The interparticle attraction causes particle aggregation, which breaks down at high shear rates, and thus leads to slurry pseudoplastic behavior. In contrast, the interparticle repulsion prevents particle aggregation and thus leads to Newtonian behavior. Both atomized at low atomizing air pressures (less than 270 kPa) using twin-fluid jet atomizers of various distributor designs. We found that the atomized drop sizes of micronized coal water slurries substantially decrease as the atomizing air pressure exceeds a threshold value. The effects of coal volume fraction, coal particle surface charge, liquid composition and liquid viscosity on slurry atomization can be accounted for by their effects on slurry rheology. 26 refs.

  19. SURFACE AND SUBSURFACE WATER QUALITY HYDROLOGY IN SURFACE MINED WATERSHEDS. PART I: TEXT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface mining disturbs the natural sequence of geologic strata, and, therefore, potentially modifies the quantity and quality of water on a watershed disturbed by surface mining. Such a watershed disturbed by surface mining was monitored in Colorado. In addition, surface runoff,...

  20. Influence of mineral oil and additives on microhardness and surface chemistry of magnesium oxide (001) surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Shigaki, H.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses and hardness experiments were conducted with cleaved magnesium oxide /001/ surfaces. The magnesium oxide bulk crystals were cleaved into specimens along the /001/ surface, and indentations were made on the cleaved surface in laboratory air, in nitrogen gas, or in degassed mineral oil with and without an additive while not exposing specimen surface to any other environment. The various additives examined contained sulfur, phosphorus, chlorine, or oleic acid. The sulfur-containing additive exhibited the highest hardness and smallest dislocation patterns evidencing plastic deformation; the chlorine-containing additive exhibited the lowest hardness and largest dislocation patterns evidencing plastic deformation. Hydrocarbon and chloride (MgCl2) films formed on the magnesium oxide surface. A chloride film was responsible for the lowest measured hardness.

  1. Global modeling of fresh surface water temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierkens, M. F.; Eikelboom, T.; van Vliet, M. T.; Van Beek, L. P.

    2011-12-01

    Temperature determines a range of water physical properties, the solubility of oxygen and other gases and acts as a strong control on fresh water biogeochemistry, influencing chemical reaction rates, phytoplankton and zooplankton composition and the presence or absence of pathogens. Thus, in freshwater ecosystems the thermal regime affects the geographical distribution of aquatic species through their growth and metabolism, tolerance to parasites, diseases and pollution and life history. Compared to statistical approaches, physically-based models of surface water temperature have the advantage that they are robust in light of changes in flow regime, river morphology, radiation balance and upstream hydrology. Such models are therefore better suited for projecting the effects of global change on water temperature. Till now, physically-based models have only been applied to well-defined fresh water bodies of limited size (e.g., lakes or stream segments), where the numerous parameters can be measured or otherwise established, whereas attempts to model water temperature over larger scales has thus far been limited to regression type of models. Here, we present a first attempt to apply a physically-based model of global fresh surface water temperature. The model adds a surface water energy balance to river discharge modelled by the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB. In addition to advection of energy from direct precipitation, runoff and lateral exchange along the drainage network, energy is exchanged between the water body and the atmosphere by short and long-wave radiation and sensible and latent heat fluxes. Also included are ice-formation and its effect on heat storage and river hydraulics. We used the coupled surface water and energy balance model to simulate global fresh surface water temperature at daily time steps on a 0.5x0.5 degree grid for the period 1970-2000. Meteorological forcing was obtained from the CRU data set, downscaled to daily values with ECMWF

  2. [Prevalence of Aeromonas spp. in surface water].

    PubMed

    Hernández, P; Rodríguez de García, R

    1997-03-01

    Some Aeromonas strains are well recognized enteropathogens according to microbiological, clinical, immunological and epidemiological evidence. The main source of infection seems to be untreated water, these microorganisms can be found in virtually all aquatic environments. Additionally, some Aeromonas, which include enterotoxigenic strains, are capable of rapid growth at 5 degrees C and even of producing toxins. Vegetable products irrigated with contaminated water may reach critical Aeromonas levels after being kept under refrigeration, this could represent a public health risk when they are consumed as uncooked salads. This study was pursued to evaluate such risk. Surface water samples were streaked on starch ampicillin and inositol-brilliant green-bile salts agar dishes. In addition, 100 ml of each sample were filtered through a 0.45 micron Millipore membrane filter. The filters were incubated on alkaline peptone water as enrichment media during 24 h at 35 degrees C. Enrichment broth was then streaked on the selective agars above mentioned. Isolates from both tests were identified using the API 20 E System. The prevalence of Aeromonas strains in the analyzed samples was 17.8%. A higher isolation rate was observed after the enrichment technique. Starch ampicillin agar showed a higher recuperation rate. A Veronii biotype sobria (formerly A. sobria) was isolated with higher frequency. Since this species has been associated with the greatest virulence, the use of contaminated water to irrigate vegetable products that are to be kept under refrigeration and consumed without ulterior cooking may represent a risk to the public health. PMID:9429640

  3. Wave Turbulence on Water Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, Sergey; Lukaschuk, Sergei

    2016-03-01

    We overview the wave turbulence approach by example of one physical system: gravity waves on the surface of an infinitely deep fluid. In the theoretical part of our review, we derive the nonlinear Hamiltonian equations governing the water-wave system and describe the premises of the weak wave turbulence theory. We outline derivation of the wave-kinetic equation and the equation for the probability density function, and most important solutions to these equations, including the Kolmogorov-Zakharov spectra corresponding to a direct and an inverse turbulent cascades, as well as solutions for non-Gaussian wave fields corresponding to intermittency. We also discuss strong wave turbulence as well as coherent structures and their interaction with random waves. We describe numerical and laboratory experiments, and field observations of gravity wave turbulence, and compare their results with theoretical predictions.

  4. Surface water discharges from onshore stripper wells.

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J. A.

    1998-01-16

    Under current US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules, small onshore oil producers are allowed to discharge produced water to surface waters with approval from state agencies; but small onshore gas producers, however, are prohibited from discharging produced water to surface waters. The purpose of this report is to identify those states that allow surface water discharges from small onshore oil operations and to summarize the types of permitting controls they use. It is intended that the findings of this report will serve as a rationale to encourage the EPA to revise its rules and to remove the prohibition on surface water discharges from small gas operations.

  5. Water surface capturing by image processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An alternative means of measuring the water surface interface during laboratory experiments is processing a series of sequentially captured images. Image processing can provide a continuous, non-intrusive record of the water surface profile whose accuracy is not dependent on water depth. More trad...

  6. Progressive addition lens design by optimizing NURBS surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yen-Liang; Hsu, Wei-Yao; Cheng, Yuan-Chieh; Su, Guo-Dung

    2011-10-01

    Progressive addition lenses (PAL) are used to compensate presbyopia, which is induced by losing accommodation of elder eyes. These eyes need different optical power provided by eye glasses while watching objects at different distance. A smaller optical power is required in further distance and a larger one in nearer zone. A progressive addition lens can provides different power requirements in one piece of lens. This paper introduces a whole process of PAL production, from design, fabrication, to measurement. The PAL is designed by optimizing NURBS surface. Parameters of merit function are adjusted to design lenses with different specifications. The simulation results confirm that the power distributes as expected and cylinders are controlled under an acceptable level. Besides, sample lenses have been fabricated and measured. We apply precise-machining to produce the molds for plastic injection. Then, the samples are produced by injecting polycorbonate to the molds. Finally, Ultra Accuracy 3D Profilemeter is used to measure the sample PALs. Practical examinations shows that our designs are achievable and feasible in practice use.

  7. Activities affecting surface water resources: A general overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    In November 1987, P.E.I. signed a federal/provincial work-sharing arrangement on water resource management focusing on groundwater pollution, surface water degradation and estuarine eutrophication. The surface water program was designed to identify current surface water uses and users within 12 major watersheds across the Island containing 26 individual rivers, as well as problems arising due to practices that degrade the quality of surface water and restricts its value to other user groups. This report presents a general overview of the program, covering the general characteristics of the Island; operations in agriculture, fish and wildlife, forestry, recreation, fisheries, and industry; alterations of natural features of waterways; wetlands; additional watershed activities such as hydrometric stations and subdivision development; and activities affecting surface water resources such as sedimentation sources, pollution point sources and instream obstructions.

  8. 21 CFR 173.310 - Boiler water additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...), pp. 744-745, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Boiler water additives. 173.310 Section...

  9. 21 CFR 173.310 - Boiler water additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...), pp. 744-745, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Boiler water additives. 173.310 Section...

  10. 21 CFR 173.310 - Boiler water additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...), pp. 744-745, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Boiler water additives. 173.310 Section...

  11. 21 CFR 173.310 - Boiler water additives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...), pp. 744-745, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51... accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Boiler water additives. 173.310 Section...

  12. Surface immobilization of elastin-like polypeptides using fluorinated surface modifying additives.

    PubMed

    Blit, Patrick H; Battiston, Kyle G; Woodhouse, Kimberly A; Santerre, J Paul

    2011-03-15

    Elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) surface modification represents a valuable approach for the development of biomaterials in a wide range of medical applications. In this study, ELP surface modification has been achieved through the use of elastin cross-linking peptide (ECP) bioactive fluorinated surface modifiers (ECP-BFSMs). The synthesis of low molecular weight fluorinated additives was described and their subsequent blending with a base polycarbonate urethane (PCNU) was shown to successfully enrich the surface to allow for ELP surface cross-linking via lysine moieties on the peptide segments of the ECP-BFSMs. The kinetics for the surface migration of fluorescent ECP-BFSMs was studied over a 2-week period by two-photon confocal microscopy. A decrease in advancing contact angle from 87.9° to 75.3° was observed for ECP-BFSM modified PCNU and was associated with the presence of ECP peptides on the surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrated an increase in surface atomic percent of fluorine (from 0.2 to 7.2%) and nitrogen (from 1.0 to 3.0%) associated with the surface localization of fluoro groups and amide groups associated with the peptides in the ECP-BFSMs. A further increase in surface atomic percent of nitrogen (from 3.0 to 8.3%) was observed after ELP surface cross-linking. These ELP-modified surfaces were shown to promote increased smooth muscle cell adhesion, spreading and retention over a 7-day culture period relative to their non-ELP4 analogs. This novel surface modifying additive approach may be used for various biomimetic applications since it generates a stable ECM-like surface retained onto a relatively inert fluorinated background. PMID:21268240

  13. Ground water and surface water; a single resource

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, Thomas C.; Harvey, Judson W.; Franke, O. Lehn; Alley, William M.

    1998-01-01

    The importance of considering ground water and surface water as a single resource has become increasingly evident. Issues related to water supply, water quality, and degradation of aquatic environments are reported on frequently. The interaction of ground water and surface water has been shown to be a significant concern in many of these issues. Contaminated aquifers that discharge to streams can result in long-term contamination of surface water; conversely, streams can be a major source of contamination to aquifers. Surface water commonly is hydraulically connected to ground water, but the interactions are difficult to observe and measure. The purpose of this report is to present our current understanding of these processes and activities as well as limitations in our knowledge and ability to characterize them.

  14. Surface water records of Colorado, 1961

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division

    1961-01-01

    The surface-water records for the 1961 water year for gaging stations and miscellaneous sites within the State of Colorado are given in this report. For convenience there are also included records for a few pertinent gaging stations in bordering States. The records were collected and computed by the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey, under the direction of W. T. Miller, district engineer, Surface Water Branch, succeeded by J. W. Odell.

  15. Effect of Isopropyl Alcohol Addition in Ozonated Water on the Corrosion of Tungsten Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Younghwan; Lee, June Young; Im, Kyung Taek; Lim, Sangwoo

    2009-05-01

    Acetic acid (HAc) or 2-propanol (IPA) was added to ozonated water vapor, and its ability to clean corroded Al and W surfaces was studied. No changes to the surface morphology or film thickness were observed on any of the Al films to which the ozonated water vapor cleaning process was applied, either with or without the addition of HAc and IPA. No change in the W surface was observed when it was exposed to either pure ozonated water vapor or that which had HAc-added. However, the surface morphology of the W film changed, and its thickness decreased, when it was exposed to the ozonated water vapor with added IPA. It was also noted that no corrosion occurred on the surface of W when only IPA and the water mixture vapor were injected. Given that the pH of the water with added IPA was unchanged, regardless of whether ozone feeding had occurred, it can be concluded that the main reason for the corrosion of the W film is the accelerated oxidation of W. This accelerated oxidation is a byproduct of ozone decomposition in the presence of a radical promoter, rather than the enhanced dissolution of oxidized W.

  16. Layers of Porous Superhydrophobic Surfaces for Robust Water Repellency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Farzad; Boreyko, Jonathan; Nature-Inspired Fluids; Interfaces Team

    2015-11-01

    In nature, birds exhibit multiple layers of superhydrophobic feathers that repel water. Inspired by bird feathers, we utilize porous superhydrophobic surfaces and compare the wetting and dewetting characteristics of a single surface to stacks of multiple surfaces. The superhydrophobic surfaces were submerged in water in a closed chamber. Pressurized gas was regulated to measure the critical pressure for the water to fully penetrate through the surfaces. In addition to using duck feathers, two-tier porous superhydrophobic surfaces were fabricated to serve as synthetic mimics with a controlled surface structure. The energy barrier for the wetting transition was modeled as a function of the number of layers and their orientations with respect to each other. Moreover, after partial impalement into a subset of the superhydrophobic layers, it was observed that a full dewetting transition was possible, which suggests that natural organisms can exploit their multiple layers to prevent irreversible wetting.

  17. Geochemistry of surface waters of Vojvodina, Yugoslavia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry Lyons, W.; Lent, Robert M.; Djukic, Nada; Maletin, Steven; Pujin, Vlasta; Carey, Anne E.

    1992-08-01

    Major elements data are presented for a number of surface water samples from the Vojvodina region of Yugoslavia. These include samples from the Danube and Tisa Rivers as well as from three lakes in the Pannonian Plain. The data indicate that surface waters evolved to two major water types: Na-CO 3-SO 4-Cl and Na-Cl. The chemical composition of the surface water from this region has been strongly affected by anthropogenic activities including irrigation and the direct introduction of various chemical species, especially Na and Cl. It appears that the major element chemistry of a number of lakes in this region has changed since the 1950s.

  18. Investigation of surface water behavior during glaze ice accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Turnock, Stephen R.

    1990-01-01

    A series of experimental investigations that focused on isolating the primary factors that control the behavior of unfrozen surface water during glaze ice accretion were conducted. Detailed microvideo observations were made of glaze ice accretions on 2.54 cm diam cylinders in a closed-loop refrigerated wind tunnel. Distinct zones of surface water behavior were observed; a smooth wet zone in the stagnation region with a uniform water film, a rough zone where surface tension effects caused coalescence of surface water into stationary beads, and a zone where surface water ran back as rivulets. The location of the transition from the smooth to the rough zone was found to migrate towards the stagnation point with time. Comparative tests were conducted to study the effect of the substrate thermal and roughness properties on ice accretion. The importance of surface water behavior was evaluated by the addition of a surface tension reducing agent to the icing tunnel water supply, which significantly altered the accreted glaze ice shape. Measurements were made to determine the contact angle behavior of water droplets on ice. A simple multizone modification to current glaze ice accretion models was proposed to include the observed surface roughness behavior.

  19. Gray solitons on the surface of water.

    PubMed

    Chabchoub, A; Kimmoun, O; Branger, H; Kharif, C; Hoffmann, N; Onorato, M; Akhmediev, N

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of surface gravity water waves can be described by the self-defocusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Recent observations of black solitons on the surface of water confirmed its validity for finite, below critical depth. The black soliton is a limiting case of a family of gray soliton solutions with finite amplitude depressions. Here, we report observations of gray solitons in water waves, thus, complementing our previous observations of black solitons. PMID:24580162

  20. Gray solitons on the surface of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabchoub, A.; Kimmoun, O.; Branger, H.; Kharif, C.; Hoffmann, N.; Onorato, M.; Akhmediev, N.

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of surface gravity water waves can be described by the self-defocusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Recent observations of black solitons on the surface of water confirmed its validity for finite, below critical depth. The black soliton is a limiting case of a family of gray soliton solutions with finite amplitude depressions. Here, we report observations of gray solitons in water waves, thus, complementing our previous observations of black solitons.

  1. Pesticide mitigation strategies for surface water quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pesticide residues are being increasingly detected in surface water in agricultural and urban areas. In some cases water bodies are being listed under the Clean Water Act 303(d) as impaired and Total Maximum Daily Loads are required to address the impairments in agricultural areas. Pesticides in sur...

  2. IDENTIFYING VULNERABLE SURFACE WATER UTILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was conducted to provide a mechanism and framework with which utility managers could analyze the effects of upstream discharges on source waters. Specific components of the project included selection, implementation, and demonstration of a microcomputer-based commerci...

  3. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  4. MODELING TOOLS FOR GROUND WATER-SURFACE WATER INTERACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project develops algorithms for simulating the dynamic interactions between surface water and ground water in rivers and riparian streams. The algorithms rely on physically based linear response functions which describe the exchange rates and volumes of water between the str...

  5. Tribological Behaviour of Surface Modified Copper Nanoparticles as lubricating Additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, P. J.; Yu, H. L.; Wang, H. M.; Xu, B. S.

    A special kind of surface modified copper nanoparticles was selected as the auto-reconditioning materials to in situ generate a copperized protective film on iron-base metal surfaces under designed tribological conditions. The morphologies and element distributions of the formed film were observed and determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). The micro mechanical properties and tribological behaviors were investigated by nano test system and ball- on-disc tribotester. The results show that the morphology of the protective film is smooth, the nano-hardness decreases by 46% and the friction coefficient of the copperized protective film is about 0.10. The forming mechanism of the auto-reconditioning film can be described that the copper nanoparticles deposit on the worn surfaces and form iron-copper alloy film with lower hardness and shear strength, which has better friction-reducing, antiwear and surface-optimizing behaviors.

  6. Surface Water Treatment Workshop Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Ministry of the Environment, Toronto.

    This manual was developed for use at workshops designed to increase the knowledge of experienced water treatment plant operators. Each of the fourteen lessons in this document has clearly stated behavioral objectives to tell the trainee what he should know or do after completing that topic. Areas covered in this manual include: basic water…

  7. Water and Surfaces: a Linkage Unexpectedly Profound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, Gerald H.

    The impact of surfaces on the contiguous water is thought to project no more than a few molecular layers from the surface. On the contrary, we have found that solutes are profoundly excluded from a several-hundred-micrometer-wide zone next to various hydrophilic surfaces, including gels. Such large “exclusion zones” appear to be quite general. Recent studies have shown that the underlying basis is a reorganization of interfacial water molecules into a liquid crystalline array, which then excludes solutes. The impact of this “fourth phase” of water appears to be broad, especially in biology.

  8. Roles of additives and surface control in slurry atomization

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, S.C.

    1990-07-10

    Airblast atomization of micronized coal water slurry is carried out using twin-fluid jet atomizers of various distributor designs. Drop size and size distribution are measured using the laser diffraction technique. We found that the atomized drop sizes of micronized coal water slurries substantially decrease as the atomizing air pressure exceeds a threshold value. We also found that the atomized drop size, represented by the mass median diameter (MMD) can be described by the wave mechanism-based models in terms of three non-dimensional groups, namely, slurry-to-air mass ratio, the Weber number, and the Ohnesorge number. 11 refs.

  9. Water vapor retrieval over many surface types

    SciTech Connect

    Borel, C.C.; Clodius, W.C.; Johnson, J.

    1996-04-01

    In this paper we present a study of of the water vapor retrieval for many natural surface types which would be valuable for multi-spectral instruments using the existing Continuum Interpolated Band Ratio (CIBR) for the 940 nm water vapor absorption feature. An atmospheric code (6S) and 562 spectra were used to compute the top of the atmosphere radiance near the 940 nm water vapor absorption feature in steps of 2.5 nm as a function of precipitable water (PW). We derive a novel technique called ``Atmospheric Pre-corrected Differential Absorption`` (APDA) and show that APDA performs better than the CIBR over many surface types.

  10. Evidence for water structuring forces between surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, Christopher B; Rau, Dr. Donald

    2011-01-01

    Structured water on apposing surfaces can generate significant energies due to reorganization and displacement as the surfaces encounter each other. Force measurements on a multitude of biological structures using the osmotic stress technique have elucidated commonalities that point toward an underlying hydration force. In this review, the forces of two contrasting systems are considered in detail: highly charged DNA and nonpolar, uncharged hydroxypropyl cellulose. Conditions for both net repulsion and attraction, along with the measured exclusion of chemically different solutes from these macromolecular surfaces, are explored and demonstrate features consistent with a hydration force origin. Specifically, the observed interaction forces can be reduced to the effects of perturbing structured surface water.

  11. Toward a mechanistic understanding of the effect of biochar addition on soil water retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, S.; Chang, N.; Guo, M.; Imhoff, P. T.

    2014-12-01

    Biochar (BC) is a carbon-rich product produced by thermal degradation of biomass in an oxygen-free environment, whose application to sediment is said to improve water retention. However, BC produced from different feedstocks and pyrolyzed at different temperatures have distinct properties, which may alter water retention in ways difficult to predict a priori. Our goal is to develop a mechanistic understanding of BC addition on water retention by examining the impact of BC from two feedstocks, poultry litter (PL) and hardwood (HW), on the soil-water retention curves (SWRC) of a uniform sand and a sandy loam (SL). For experiments with sand, BC and sand were sieved to the same particle size (~ 0.547 mm) to minimize effects of BC addition on particle size distribution. Experiments with SL contained the same sieved BC. PL and HW bicohars were added at 2 and 7% (w/w), and water retention was measured from 0 to -4.38 × 106 cm-H2O. Both BCs increased porosities for sand and SL, up to 39 and 13% for sand and SL, respectively, with 7% HW BC addition. The primary cause for these increases was the internal porosity of BC particles. While the matric potential for air-entry was unchanged with BC addition, BC amendment increased water retention for sand and SL in the capillary region (0 to -15,000 cm-H2O) by an average of 26 and 33 % for 7% PL and HW BC in sand, respectively, but only 7 and 14 % for 7% PL and HW BC in SL. The most dramatic influence of BC amendment on water retention occurred in the adsorption region (< -15,000 cm-H2O), where water retention increased by a factor of 11 and 22 for 7% PL and HW BC in sand, respectively, but by 140 and 190 % for 7% PL and HW BC in SL, respectively. The impact of BC on water retention in these sediments is explained primarily by the additional surface area and internal porosity of PL and HW BC particles. van Genuchten (VG) models were fitted to the water retention data. For SL where the impact of BC addition on water retention was

  12. Modeled heating and surface erosion comparing motile (gas borne) and stationary (surface coating) inert particle additives

    SciTech Connect

    Buckingham, A.C.; Siekhaus, W.J.

    1982-09-27

    The unsteady, non-similar, chemically reactive, turbulent boundary layer equations are modified for gas plus dispersed solid particle mixtures, for gas phase turbulent combustion reactions and for heterogeneous gas-solid surface erosive reactions. The exterior (ballistic core) edge boundary conditions for the solutions are modified to include dispersed particle influences on core propellant combustion-generated turbulence levels, combustion reactants and products, and reaction-induced, non-isentropic mixture states. The wall surface (in this study it is always steel) is considered either bare or coated with a fixed particle coating which is conceptually non-reactive, insulative, and non-ablative. Two families of solutions are compared. These correspond to: (1) consideration of gas-borne, free-slip, almost spontaneously mobile (motile) solid particle additives which influence the turbulent heat transfer at the uncoated steel surface and, in contrast, (2) consideration of particle-free, gas phase turbulent heat transfer to the insulated surface coated by stationary particles. Significant differences in erosive heat transfer are found in comparing the two families of solutions over a substantial range of interior ballistic flow conditions. The most effective influences on reducing erosive heat transfer appear to favor mobile, gas-borne particle additives.

  13. Subsurface And Surface Water Flow Interactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this chapter we present basic concepts and principles underlying the phenomena of groundwater and surface water interactions. Fundamental equations and analytical and numerical solutions describing stream-aquifer interactions are presented in hillslope and riparian aquifer en...

  14. Effect of AN Additive on Thermal Output during Electrolysis of Heavy Water with a Palladium Cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.; Dash, J.

    A titanium additive to a heavy water-sulfuric acid electrolyte has been found to increase the thermal output during electrolysis with a palladium foil cathode. Eight runs, about 6 h each, over a period of 16 days, gave an average of 1.8 W excess thermal power output compared with a light water control cell. This is about twice the excess obtained in co-deposition experiments. The excess thermal power output ranged from 0.5 ± 0.1 to 2.6 ± 0.1 W, which was an average of about 17% more than the input power. The additive apparently catalyzes heat-producing reactions on the surface of the palladium. After electrolysis, the Pd cathode contained localized surface concentrations of Ag, Ni, Fe, Ti, S, and Pt.

  15. Preparation and tribological properties of water-soluble copper/silica nanocomposite as a water-based lubricant additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunli; Zhang, Shengmao; Yu, Laigui; Zhang, Zhijun; Wu, Zhishen; Zhang, Pingyu

    2012-10-01

    Cu/SiO2 nanocomposite was synthesized by sol-gel method. The size, morphology and phase structure of as-prepared Cu/SiO2 nanocomposite were analyzed by means of X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy, and its ultraviolet-visible light spectrum was measured in relation to surface plasmon excitation of Cu particles. The tribological properties of as-synthesized Cu/SiO2 nanocomposite as an additive in distilled water were investigated with a four-ball machine, and the morphology and elemental composition of worn steel surfaces were examined with a scanning electron microscope and an X-ray photoelectron spectroscope. Results show that as-synthesized Cu/SiO2 nanocomposite as a lubricant additive is able to significantly improve the tribological properties of distilled water. A protective and lubricious film composed of Cu and a small amount of FeS, FeSO4 and SiO2 is formed on steel sliding surfaces lubricated by distilled water containing Cu/SiO2 nanocomposite. During friction process Cu nanoparticles can be released from Cu/SiO2 nanocomposite to fill up micro-pits and grooves of steel sliding surfaces, resulting in greatly reduced friction and wear of steel frictional pair via self-repairing. The state and thickness of the film formed on the worn surface is closely related to applied load; and Cu/SiO2 nanocomposite might be a promising water-based lubricant additive for steel-steel contact subjected to moderate load.

  16. Mars water vapor, near-surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. A.; Sharman, R. D.; Lucich, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    In a previous paper we concluded that the temperature sensors aboard the Viking landers (VL-1 and VL-2) were detecting the water vapor frost point. Analysis of one Mars year of data at both lander sites substantiates this conclusion. At VL-1 it is found that the water vapor mixing ratio is constant with height through the bulk of the atmosphere, most of the time. Exceptions are during the onset phases of the two major dust storms when temporary enhancement of near-surface vapor occurs (the same phenomenon is observed at VL-2), and some depletion of near-surface vapor during the decay phase of the first storm, possibly the second storm as well. The former suggests near-surface, northward transport of water vapor with the storms. The latter suggests adsorption of vapor on dust particles followed by surface deposition. At VL-2, severe near-surface depletion of water vapor occurs during northern autumn and winter. The residual vapor is in equilibrium with the surface condensate observed at the site during this period, indicating that the source region for the condensate must be aloft with downward transport by dust fall-out. Since the near-surface water vapor mixing ratio and concentration at VL-1 generally parallels the column abundance over VL-1 obtained by the orbiters, this suggests that VL-1 can be used to give a measure of column abundance for as long as the temperature sensors remain operational.

  17. Water resources data, New Jersey, water year 2004-volume 1. surface-water data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Centinaro, G.L.; White, B.T.; Hoppe, H.L.; Dudek, J.F.; Protz, A.R.; Reed, T.J.; Shvanda, J.C.; Watson, A.F.

    2005-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2004 water year for New Jersey are presented in three volumes, and consists of records of stage, discharge, and water-quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water-quality of ground water. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 105 gaging stations; tide summaries at 27 tidal gaging stations; stage and contents at 39 lakes and reservoirs; and diversions from 51 surface-water sources. Also included are stage and discharge for 108 crest-stage partial-record stations, stage-only at 34 tidal crest-stage gages, and discharge for 124 low-flow partial-record stations. Locations of these sites are shown in figures 8-11. Additional discharge measurements were made at 131 miscellaneous sites that are not part of the systematic data-collection program. Discontinued station tables for gaging stations, crest-stage gages, tidal crest-stage and tidal gaging stations show historical coverage. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Information System (NWIS) data collected by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). Hydrologic conditions are also described for this water year, including stream-flow, precipitation, reservoir conditions, and air temperatures.

  18. Water resources data, New Jersey, water year 2005. Volume 1 - surface-water data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, B.T.; Hoppe, H.L.; Centinaro, G.L.; Dudek, J.F.; Painter, B.S.; Protz, A.R.; Reed, T.J.; Shvanda, J.C.; Watson, A.F.

    2006-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2005 water year for New Jersey are presented in three volumes, and consists of records of stage, discharge, and water-quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water-quality of ground water. Volume 1 contains discharge records for 103 gaging stations; tide summaries at 28 tidal gaging stations; stage and contents at 34 lakes and reservoirs; and diversions from 50 surface-water sources. Also included are stage and discharge for 116 crest-stage partial-record stations, stage-only at 33 tidal crest-stage gages, and discharge for 155 low-flow partial-record stations. Locations of these sites are shown in figures 8-11. Additional discharge measurements were made at 222 miscellaneous sites that are not part of the systematic data-collection program. Discontinued station tables for gaging stations, crest-stage gages, tidal crest-stage and tidal gaging stations show historical coverage. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Information System (NWIS) data collected by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). Hydrologic conditions are also described for this water year, including stream-flow, precipitation, reservoir conditions, and air temperatures.

  19. [Roles of additives and surface control in slurry atomization

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, S.C.

    1992-06-01

    As reported in the quarterly report of March of 1992, the relative viscosity of a Newtonian Coal Water Slurry (CWS) in the presence of an anionic polymeric dispersant is an order of magnitude higher than the prediction of the well established Krieger-Dougherty Equation which describes the relative viscosity of a non-aggregated Newtonian suspension as a function of particle volume fraction. Note that the anionic dispersant is used in such a quantity that the resulting interparticle electrostatic repulsion counter-balances the interparticle van der Waals attraction. Investigation continues to determine the mechanisms of such excess energy dissipation under shear. New experimental results are presented in this report to verify the role of the anionic polymeric dispersant in such excess energy dissipation of CWS.

  20. Aflatoxin Toxicity Reduction in Feed by Enhanced Binding to Surface-Modified Clay Additives

    PubMed Central

    Jaynes, William F.; Zartman, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    Animal feeding studies have demonstrated that clay additives, such as bentonites, can bind aflatoxins in ingested feed and reduce or eliminate the toxicity. Bentonite deposits are found throughout the world and mostly consist of expandable smectite minerals, such as montmorillonite. The surfaces of smectite minerals can be treated with organic compounds to create surface-modified clays that more readily bind some contaminants than the untreated clay. Montmorillonites treated with organic cations, such as hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) and phenyltrimethylammonium (PTMA), more effectively remove organic contaminants, such as benzene and toluene, from water than untreated clay. Similarly, montmorillonite treated with PTMA (Kd = 24,100) retained more aflatoxin B1 (AfB1) from aqueous corn flour than untreated montmorillonite (Kd = 944). Feed additives that reduced aflatoxin toxicity in animal feeding studies adsorbed more AfB1 from aqueous corn flour than feed additives that were less effective. The organic cations HDTMA and PTMA are considered toxic and would not be suitable for clay additives used in feed or food, but other non-toxic or nutrient compounds can be used to prepare surface-modified clays. Montmorillonite (SWy) treated with choline (Kd = 13,800) and carnitine (Kd = 3960) adsorbed much more AfB1 from aqueous corn flour than the untreated clay (Kd = 944). A choline-treated clay prepared from a reduced-charge, high-charge montmorillonite (Kd = 20,100) adsorbed more AfB1 than the choline-treated high-charge montmorillonite (Kd = 1340) or the untreated montmorillonite (Kd = 293). Surface-modified clay additives prepared using low-charge smectites and nutrient or non-toxic organic compounds might be used to more effectively bind aflatoxins in contaminated feed or food and prevent toxicity. PMID:22069725

  1. Evidence for water structuring forces between surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Structured water on apposing surfaces can generate significant energies due to reorganization and displacement of water as the surfaces encounter each other. Force measurements on a multitude of biological structures using the osmotic stress technique have elucidated commonalities that point toward an underlying hydration force. In this review, the forces of two contrasting systems are considered in detail: highly charged DNA and nonpolar, uncharged hydroxypropyl cellulose. Conditions for both net repulsion and attraction, along with the measured exclusion of chemically different solutes from these macromolecular surfaces, are explored and demonstrate common features consistent with a hydration force origin. Specifically, the observed interaction forces can be reduced to the effects of perturbing structured surface water. PMID:22125414

  2. Free energy calculation of water addition coupled to reduction of aqueous RuO4-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tateyama, Yoshitaka; Blumberger, Jochen; Ohno, Takahisa; Sprik, Michiel

    2007-05-01

    Free energy calculations were carried out for water addition coupled reduction of aqueous ruthenate, RuO4-+H2O +e-→[RuO3(OH)2]2-, using Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. The full reaction is divided into the reduction of the tetrahedral monoanion, RuO4-+e-→RuO42-, followed by water addition, RuO42-+H2O →[RuO3(OH)2]2-. The free energy of reduction is computed from the fluctuations of the vertical energy gap using the MnO4-+e -→MnO42- reaction as reference. The free energy for water addition is estimated using constrained molecular dynamics methods. While the description of this complex reaction, in principle, involves multiple reaction coordinates, we found that reversible transformation of the reactant into the product can be achieved by control of a single reaction coordinate consisting of a suitable linear combination of atomic distances. The free energy difference of the full reaction is computed to be -0.62eV relative to the normal hydrogen electrode. This is in good agreement with the experimental value of -0.59eV, lending further support to the hypothesis that, contrary to the ruthenate monoanion, the dianion is not tetrahedral but forms a trigonal-bipyramidal dihydroxo complex in aqueous solution. We construct an approximate two-dimensional free energy surface using the coupling parameter for reduction and the mechanical constraint for water addition as variables. Analyzing this surface we find that in the most favorable reaction pathway the reduction reaction precedes water addition. The latter takes place via the protonated complex [RuO3(OH)]- and subsequent transport of the created hydroxide ion to the fifth coordination site of Ru.

  3. Turbulent flow over an interactive alternating land-water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Heerwaarden, C.; Mellado, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    The alternating land-water surface is a challenging surface to represent accurately in weather and climate models, but it is of great importance for the surface energy balance in polar regions. The complexity of this surface lies in the fact that secondary circulations, which form at the boundary of water and land, interact strongly with the surface energy balance. Due to its large heat capacity, the water temperature adapts slowly to the flow, thus the properties of the atmosphere determine the uptake of energy from the water. In order to study this complex system in a simpler way, retaining only the most essential physics, we have simplified the full surface energy balance including radiation. We have derived a boundary condition that mimics the full balance and can be formulated as a so-called Robin boundary condition: a linear combination of Dirichlet (fixed temperature) and Neumann (fixed temperature gradient) ones. By spatially varying the coefficients, we are able to express land and water using this boundary condition. We have done a series of direct numerical simulations in which we generate artificial land-water patterns from noise created from a Gaussian spectrum centered around a dominant wave number. This method creates realistic random patterns, but we are still in control of the length scales. We show that the system can manifest itself in three regimes: micro-, meso- and macro-scale. In the micro-scale, we find perfect mixing of the near-surface atmosphere that results in identical air properties over water and land. In the meso-scale, secondary circulations alter the heat exchange considerably by advecting air between land and water. In addition, they bring the surface temperature of the land closer to that of the air, thereby modulating the energy loss due to outgoing longwave radiation. In the macro-scale regime, the flow over land and water become independent of each other and only the large scale forcings determine the energy balance.

  4. Stable water layers on solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ying-Jhan; Tai, Lin-Ai; Chen, Hung-Jen; Chang, Pin; Yang, Chung-Shi; Yew, Tri-Rung

    2016-02-17

    Liquid layers adhered to solid surfaces and that are in equilibrium with the vapor phase are common in printing, coating, and washing processes as well as in alveoli in lungs and in stomata in leaves. For such a liquid layer in equilibrium with the vapor it faces, it has been generally believed that, aside from liquid lumps, only a very thin layer of the liquid, i.e., with a thickness of only a few nanometers, is held onto the surface of the solid, and that this adhesion is due to van der Waals forces. A similar layer of water can remain on the surface of a wall of a microchannel after evaporation of bulk water creates a void in the channel, but the thickness of such a water layer has not yet been well characterized. Herein we showed such a water layer adhered to a microchannel wall to be 100 to 170 nm thick and stable against surface tension. The water layer thickness was measured using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and the water layer structure was characterized by using a quantitative nanoparticle counting technique. This thickness was found for channel gap heights ranging from 1 to 5 μm. Once formed, the water layers in the microchannel, when sealed, were stable for at least one week without any special care. Our results indicate that the water layer forms naturally and is closely associated only with the surface to which it adheres. Our study of naturally formed, stable water layers may shed light on topics from gas exchange in alveoli in biology to the post-wet-process control in the semiconductor industry. We anticipate our report to be a starting point for more detailed research and understanding of the microfluidics, mechanisms and applications of gas-liquid-solid systems. PMID:26856872

  5. Computer programs for modeling flow and water quality of surface water systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorens, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    A selection of available computer programs for modeling flow and water quality in surface water systems is described. The models include programs developed as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Water Resources Division hydrologic research activities and others developed by other agencies, universities, and consulting firms. Each model description includes a statement of program use; data requirements; computer costs; availability of documentation and reference material; and a contact person for additional information. The report is intended to assist the researcher by presenting a very brief description of the surface-water models which are readily available for project use. (USGS)

  6. Water surface locomotion in tropical canopy ants.

    PubMed

    Yanoviak, S P; Frederick, D N

    2014-06-15

    Upon falling onto the water surface, most terrestrial arthropods helplessly struggle and are quickly eaten by aquatic predators. Exceptions to this outcome mostly occur among riparian taxa that escape by walking or swimming at the water surface. Here we document sustained, directional, neustonic locomotion (i.e. surface swimming) in tropical arboreal ants. We dropped 35 species of ants into natural and artificial aquatic settings in Peru and Panama to assess their swimming ability. Ten species showed directed surface swimming at speeds >3 body lengths s(-1), with some swimming at absolute speeds >10 cm s(-1). Ten other species exhibited partial swimming ability characterized by relatively slow but directed movement. The remaining species showed no locomotory control at the surface. The phylogenetic distribution of swimming among ant genera indicates parallel evolution and a trend toward negative association with directed aerial descent behavior. Experiments with workers of Odontomachus bauri showed that they escape from the water by directing their swimming toward dark emergent objects (i.e. skototaxis). Analyses of high-speed video images indicate that Pachycondyla spp. and O. bauri use a modified alternating tripod gait when swimming; they generate thrust at the water surface via synchronized treading and rowing motions of the contralateral fore and mid legs, respectively, while the hind legs provide roll stability. These results expand the list of facultatively neustonic terrestrial taxa to include various species of tropical arboreal ants. PMID:24920838

  7. The utility of surface temperature measurements for the remote sensing of surface soil water status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Idso, S. B.; Jackson, R. D.; Reginato, R. J.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments carried out on an Avondale loam soil indicated that the thermal inertia concept of soil water content detection is reasonably sound. The volumetric water contents of surface soil layers between 2 and 4 cm thick were found to be linear functions of the amplitude of the diurnal surface soil temperature wave for clear day-night periods. They were also found to be linear functions of the daily maximum value of the surface soil-air-temperature differential. Tests on three additional soils ranging from sandy loam to clay indicated that the relations determined for Avondale loam could not be accurately applied to these other soil types. When the moisture characteristic curves of each soil were used to transform water contents into pressure potentials, however, it was found that soil water pressure potential could be determined without prior knowledge of soil type, and thus its value as a potential soil water status survey tool was significantly enhanced.

  8. Burning of suspended coal-water slurry droplet with oil as combustion additive. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, S.C.

    1984-10-01

    The combustion of single coal-water slurry droplet with oil as combustion additive (CWOM) has been studied. In this study, the droplet is suspended on a fine quartz fiber and is exposed to the hot combustion product of propane (C/sub 3/H/sub 8/) and air. The results are documented in a movie series. The combustion of CWOM with various combinations of concentrations are compared with that of coal-water slurry and water-oil mixture droplets. The combustion of coal-water slurry is enhanced significantly due to the presence of emulsified kerosene. The enhancement is also dependent upon the mixing procedure during preparation of CWOM. The presence of emulsified kerosene induces local boil-off and combustion that coal particles are splashed as fire works during the early evaporation stage of droplet heat-up. After particle splashing, blow-holes appear on the droplet surface. The popcorn and swelling phenomena usually occurred in coal-water-slurry combustion is greatly reduced. Significant combustion enhancement occurs with the use of kerosene in an amount of about 15 percent of the overall CWOM. This process of using kerosene as combustion additive may provide obvious advantage for the combustion of bituminous coal-water slurry. 4 references, 6 figures.

  9. Coupled surface-water and ground-water model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, Eric D.; Wexler, Eliezer J.

    1991-01-01

    In areas with dynamic and hydraulically well connected ground-water and surface-water systems, it is desirable that stream-aquifer interaction be simulated with models of equal sophistication and accuracy. Accordingly, a new, coupled ground-water and surface-water model was developed by combining the U.S. Geological Survey models MODFLOW and BRANCH. MODFLOW is the widely used modular three-dimensional, finite-difference, ground-water model and BRANCH is a one-dimensional numerical model commonly used to simulate flow in open-channel networks. Because time steps used in ground-water modeling commonly are much longer than those used in surface-water simulations, provision has been made for handling multiple BRANCH time steps within one MODFLOW time step. Verification testing of the coupled model was done using data from previous studies and by comparing results with output from a simpler four-point implicit open-channel flow model linked with MODFLOW.

  10. Roles of additives and surface control in slurry atomization. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, S.C.

    1992-12-31

    This project studies the rheology and airblast atomization of micronized coal slurries. Its major objectives are (1) to promote further understanding of the mechanisms and the roles of additives in airblast atomization of coal water slurry (CWS), and (2) to investigate the impacts of coal particle surface properties and interparticle forces on CWS rheology. We have found that the flow behavior index (n) of a suspension (or slurry) is determined by the relative importance of the interparticle van der Waals attraction and the interparticle electrostatic repulsion. The interparticle attraction, measured by the Hamaker constant scaled to the thermal energy at 25{degrees}C (A/kT), causes particle aggregation, which breaks down at high shear rates, and thus leads to slurry pseudoplastic behavior (n< 1). At a constant particle volume fraction and surface charge density (qualitatively measured by the zeta potential in deionized water), n decreases linearly as A/kT increases. The relative viscosity of the pseudoplastic suspension with respect to that of the suspending liquid is found to be independent of particle density and correlate well with the particle Peclet number which equals the particle diffusional relaxation time multiplied by shear rate. Specifically, the relative viscosities of the pseudoplastic glycerol/water coal slurry and the ethylene glycol/glycerol sand slurry, at same volume fractions as well as similar particle size distributions and liquid viscosities, as functions of the particle Peclet number fall along the same line.

  11. Water molecule conformation outside a metal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, F.; Gabbay, I.; March, N. H.

    1981-05-01

    The effect of a metal surface on the conformation of a water molecule has been analyzed by discussing two independent effects: (i) the screening of the proton-proton repulsion, (ii) the interaction of the lone-pair orbitals with the surface. Both effects tend to increase the HOH angle. However, the interaction between the lone-pairs with the surface is the dominant effect for a water molecule approaching the surface. In particular, for a chemisorbed state this interaction is responsible for the major part of the molecule deformation. We have estimated that for H 2O chemisorbed on Ru, the HOH angle must increase from the free molecule value of 104.5° by 3.1 ± 0.5° in good agreement with the experimental evidence.

  12. Turbulent flow of oil-water emulsions with polymer additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzhai, V. N.; Monkam Clovis Le Grand, Monkam; Abdousaliamov, A. V.

    2014-08-01

    The article outlines direct and reverse oil-water emulsions. Microphotography study of these emulsions was carried out. The effect of water-soluble and oil soluble polymers on the emulsion structure and their turbulent flow velocity in cylindrical channel was investigated. It has been experimentally proven that if the fluid being transported is not homogeneous, but a two-phase oil-water emulsion, only the polymer that is compatible with dispersion medium and capable of dissolving in this medium can reduce the hydrodynamic resistance of the fluid flow. Thus, the resistance in direct emulsions can be reduced by water- soluble polyacrylamide, while oil-soluble polyhexene can be applied for reverse emulsions.

  13. Using water isotopes in the evaluation of land surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmo, Francesca; Risi, Camille; Ottlé, Catherine; Bastrikov, Vladislav; Valdayskikh, Victor; Cattani, Olivier; Jouzel, Jean; Gribanov, Konstantin; Nekrasova, Olga; Zacharov, Vyacheslav; Ogée, Jérôme; Wingate, Lisa; Raz-Yaseef, Naama

    2013-04-01

    Several studies show that uncertainties in the representation of land surface processes contribute significantly to the spread in projections for the hydrological cycle. Improvements in the evaluation of land surface models would therefore translate into more reliable predictions of future changes. The isotopic composition of water is affected by phase transitions and, for this reason, is a good tracer for the hydrological cycle. Particularly relevant for the assessment of land surface processes is the fact that bare soil evaporation and transpiration bear different isotopic signatures. Water isotopic measurement could thus be employed in the evaluation of the land surface hydrological budget. With this objective, isotopes have been implemented in the most recent version of the land surface model ORCHIDEE. This model has undergone considerable development in the past few years. In particular, a newly discretised (11 layers) hydrology aims at a more realistic representation of the soil water budget. In addition, biogeophysical processes, as, for instance, the dynamics of permafrost and of its interaction with snow and vegetation, have been included. This model version will allow us to better resolve vertical profiles of soil water isotopic composition and to more realistically simulate the land surface hydrological and isotopic budget in a broader range of climate zones. Model results have been evaluated against temperature profiles and isotopes measurements in soil and stem water at sites located in semi-arid (Yatir), temperate (Le Bray) and boreal (Labytnangi) regions. Seasonal cycles are reasonably well reproduced. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis investigates to what extent water isotopic measurements in soil water can help constrain the representation of land surface processes, with a focus on the partitioning between evaporation and transpiration. In turn, improvements in the description of this partitioning may help reduce the uncertainties in the land

  14. Salty glycerol versus salty water surface organization: bromide and iodide surface propensities.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zishuai; Hua, Wei; Verreault, Dominique; Allen, Heather C

    2013-07-25

    Salty NaBr and NaI glycerol solution interfaces are examined in the OH stretching region using broadband vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy. Raman and infrared (IR) spectroscopy are used to further understand the VSFG spectroscopic signature. The VSFG spectra of salty glycerol solutions reveal that bromide and iodide anions perturb the interfacial glycerol organization in a manner similar as that found in aqueous halide salt solutions, thus confirming the presence of bromide and iodide anions at the glycerol surface. Surface tension measurements are consistent with the surface propensity suggested by the VSFG data and also show that the surface excess increases with increasing salt concentration, similar to that of water. In addition, iodide is shown to have more surface prevalence than bromide, as has also been determined from aqueous solutions. These results suggest that glycerol behaves similarly to water with respect to surface activity and solvation of halide anions at its air/liquid interface. PMID:23663033

  15. Parametrically excited water surface ripples as ensembles of oscillons.

    PubMed

    Shats, M; Xia, H; Punzmann, H

    2012-01-20

    We show that ripples on the surface of deep water which are driven parametrically by monochromatic vertical vibration represent ensembles of oscillating solitons, or quasiparticles, rather than waves. The horizontal mobility of oscillons determines the broadening of spectral lines and transitions from chaos to regular patterns. It is found that microscopic additions of proteins to water dramatically affect the oscillon mobility and drive transitions from chaos to order. The shape of the oscillons in physical space determines the shape of the frequency spectra of the surface ripple. PMID:22400746

  16. Pollution of surface water in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Key, A.

    1956-01-01

    This paper discusses pollution of surface water in 18 European countries. For each an account is given of its physical character, population, industries, and present condition of water supplies; the legal, administrative, and technical means of controlling pollution are then described, and an outline is given of current research on the difficulties peculiar to each country. A general discussion of various aspects common to the European problem of water pollution follows; standards of quality are suggested; some difficulties likely to arise in the near future are indicated, and international collaboration, primarily by the exchange of information, is recommended to check or forestall these trends. PMID:13374532

  17. Exfoliated MoS2 in Water without Additives

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Viviane; Zhang, Renyun; Bäckström, Joakim; Dahlström, Christina; Andres, Britta; Norgren, Magnus; Andersson, Mattias; Hummelgård, Magnus; Olin, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    Many solution processing methods of exfoliation of layered materials have been studied during the last few years; most of them are based on organic solvents or rely on surfactants and other funtionalization agents. Pure water should be an ideal solvent, however, it is generally believed, based on solubility theories that stable dispersions of water could not be achieved and systematic studies are lacking. Here we describe the use of water as a solvent and the stabilization process involved therein. We introduce an exfoliation method of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) in pure water at high concentration (i.e., 0.14 ± 0.01 g L−1). This was achieved by thinning the bulk MoS2 by mechanical exfoliation between sand papers and dispersing it by liquid exfoliation through probe sonication in water. We observed thin MoS2 nanosheets in water characterized by TEM, AFM and SEM images. The dimensions of the nanosheets were around 200 nm, the same range obtained in organic solvents. Electrophoretic mobility measurements indicated that electrical charges may be responsible for the stabilization of the dispersions. A probability decay equation was proposed to compare the stability of these dispersions with the ones reported in the literature. Water can be used as a solvent to disperse nanosheets and although the stability of the dispersions may not be as high as in organic solvents, the present method could be employed for a number of applications where the dispersions can be produced on site and organic solvents are not desirable. PMID:27120098

  18. Exfoliated MoS2 in Water without Additives.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Viviane; Zhang, Renyun; Bäckström, Joakim; Dahlström, Christina; Andres, Britta; Norgren, Magnus; Andersson, Mattias; Hummelgård, Magnus; Olin, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    Many solution processing methods of exfoliation of layered materials have been studied during the last few years; most of them are based on organic solvents or rely on surfactants and other funtionalization agents. Pure water should be an ideal solvent, however, it is generally believed, based on solubility theories that stable dispersions of water could not be achieved and systematic studies are lacking. Here we describe the use of water as a solvent and the stabilization process involved therein. We introduce an exfoliation method of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) in pure water at high concentration (i.e., 0.14 ± 0.01 g L-1). This was achieved by thinning the bulk MoS2 by mechanical exfoliation between sand papers and dispersing it by liquid exfoliation through probe sonication in water. We observed thin MoS2 nanosheets in water characterized by TEM, AFM and SEM images. The dimensions of the nanosheets were around 200 nm, the same range obtained in organic solvents. Electrophoretic mobility measurements indicated that electrical charges may be responsible for the stabilization of the dispersions. A probability decay equation was proposed to compare the stability of these dispersions with the ones reported in the literature. Water can be used as a solvent to disperse nanosheets and although the stability of the dispersions may not be as high as in organic solvents, the present method could be employed for a number of applications where the dispersions can be produced on site and organic solvents are not desirable. PMID:27120098

  19. Surface properties of a single perfluoroalkyl group on water surfaces studied by surface potential measurements.

    PubMed

    Shimoaka, Takafumi; Tanaka, Yuki; Shioya, Nobutaka; Morita, Kohei; Sonoyama, Masashi; Amii, Hideki; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Kanamori, Toshiyuki; Hasegawa, Takeshi

    2016-12-01

    A discriminative study of a single perfluoroalkyl (Rf) group from a bulk material is recently recognized to be necessary toward the total understanding of Rf compounds based on a primary chemical structure. The single molecule and the bulk matter have an interrelationship via an intrinsic two-dimensional (2D) aggregation property of an Rf group, which is theorized by the stratified dipole-arrays (SDA) theory. Since an Rf group has dipole moments along many C-F bonds, a single Rf group would possess a hydrophilic-like character on the surface. To reveal the hydration character of a single Rf group, in the present study, surface potential (ΔV) measurements are performed for Langmuir monolayers of Rf-containing compounds. From a comparative study with a monolayer of a normal hydrocarbon compound, the hydration/dehydration dynamics of a lying Rf group on water has first been monitored by ΔV measurements, through which a single Rf group has been revealed to have a unique "dipole-interactive" character, which enables the Rf group interacted with the water 'surface.' In addition, the SDA theory proves to be useful to predict the 2D aggregation property across the phase transition temperature of 19°C by use of the ΔV measurements. PMID:27569518

  20. Innovative additives can increase the drilling rates of water-based muds

    SciTech Connect

    Growcock, F.B.; Sinor, L.A.; Reece, A.R.; Powers, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    Several types of organic compounds were tested as rate of penetration (ROP) enhancers for a simple gel/water mud. Experiments conducted in a full-size drilling apparatus with both rollercone and PDC bits at wellbore pressures of 1,100 and 2,000 psi indicate that a paraffin/ester mixture, several terpenes and a mixture of insoluble poly(propylene glycols), or PPGs, can all increase the ROP by 5 to 20% when added at levels of 2--4% by volume. Complementary lubricity and shale recovery studies suggest that the paraffin and terpenes function by making the steel surfaces less water-wetting, thereby reducing the tendency of partially hydrated sticky shales to adhere. The PPG mixture, on the other hand, may function primarily by interacting directly with the shales to reduce their tendency to form a sticky mass. In either case, the additives increased ROP to levels comparable to the ROP observed with pure water.

  1. Effect of addition of water-soluble chitin on amylose film.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shiho; Shimahashi, Katsumasa; Takahara, Junichi; Sunako, Michihiro; Takaha, Takeshi; Ogawa, Kozo; Kitamura, Shinichi

    2005-01-01

    Amylose films blended with chitosan, which were free from additives such as acid, salt, and plasticizer, were prepared by casting mixtures of an aqueous solution of an enzymatically synthesized amylose and that of water-soluble chitin (44.1% deacetylated). The presence of a small amount of chitin (less than 10%) increased significantly the permeability of gases (N2, O2, CO2, C2H4) and improved the mechanical parameters of amylose film; particularly, the elastic modulus and elongation of the blend films were larger than those of amylose or chitin films. No antibacterial activity was observed with either amylose or water-soluble chitin films. But amylose films having a small amount of chitin showed strong antibacterial action, suggesting a morphological change in water-soluble chitin on the film surface by blending with amylose molecule. These facts suggested the presence of a molecular complex of amylose and chitosan. PMID:16283751

  2. Global modelling of Cryptosporidium in surface water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeulen, Lucie; Hofstra, Nynke

    2016-04-01

    Introduction Waterborne pathogens that cause diarrhoea, such as Cryptosporidium, pose a health risk all over the world. In many regions quantitative information on pathogens in surface water is unavailable. Our main objective is to model Cryptosporidium concentrations in surface waters worldwide. We present the GloWPa-Crypto model and use the model in a scenario analysis. A first exploration of global Cryptosporidium emissions to surface waters has been published by Hofstra et al. (2013). Further work has focused on modelling emissions of Cryptosporidium and Rotavirus to surface waters from human sources (Vermeulen et al 2015, Kiulia et al 2015). A global waterborne pathogen model can provide valuable insights by (1) providing quantitative information on pathogen levels in data-sparse regions, (2) identifying pathogen hotspots, (3) enabling future projections under global change scenarios and (4) supporting decision making. Material and Methods GloWPa-Crypto runs on a monthly time step and represents conditions for approximately the year 2010. The spatial resolution is a 0.5 x 0.5 degree latitude x longitude grid for the world. We use livestock maps (http://livestock.geo-wiki.org/) combined with literature estimates to calculate spatially explicit livestock Cryptosporidium emissions. For human Cryptosporidium emissions, we use UN population estimates, the WHO/UNICEF JMP sanitation country data and literature estimates of wastewater treatment. We combine our emissions model with a river routing model and data from the VIC hydrological model (http://vic.readthedocs.org/en/master/) to calculate concentrations in surface water. Cryptosporidium survival during transport depends on UV radiation and water temperature. We explore pathogen emissions and concentrations in 2050 with the new Shared Socio-economic Pathways (SSPs) 1 and 3. These scenarios describe plausible future trends in demographics, economic development and the degree of global integration. Results and

  3. NANOFILTRATION FOULANTS FROM A TREATED SURFACE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The foulant from pilot nanofiltration membrane elements fed conventionally-treated surface water for 15 months was analyzed for organic, inorganic, and biological parameters. The foulant responsible for flux loss was shown to be a film layer 20 to 80 um thick with the greatest de...

  4. Observing Global Surface Water Flood Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Paul D.; Neal, Jefferey C.; Alsdorf, Douglas; Schumann, Guy J.-P.

    2014-05-01

    Flood waves moving along river systems are both a key determinant of globally important biogeochemical and ecological processes and, at particular times and particular places, a major environmental hazard. In developed countries, sophisticated observing networks and ancillary data, such as channel bathymetry and floodplain terrain, exist with which to understand and model floods. However, at global scales, satellite data currently provide the only means of undertaking such studies. At present, there is no satellite mission dedicated to observing surface water dynamics and, therefore, surface water scientists make use of a range of sensors developed for other purposes that are distinctly sub-optimal for the task in hand. Nevertheless, by careful combination of the data available from topographic mapping, oceanographic, cryospheric and geodetic satellites, progress in understanding some of the world's major river, floodplain and wetland systems can be made. This paper reviews the surface water data sets available to hydrologists on a global scale and the recent progress made in the field. Further, the paper looks forward to the proposed NASA/CNES Surface Water Ocean Topography satellite mission that may for the first time provide an instrument that meets the needs of the hydrology community.

  5. Thermodynamic properties of water solvating biomolecular surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyden, Matthias

    Changes in the potential energy and entropy of water molecules hydrating biomolecular interfaces play a significant role for biomolecular solubility and association. Free energy perturbation and thermodynamic integration methods allow calculations of free energy differences between two states from simulations. However, these methods are computationally demanding and do not provide insights into individual thermodynamic contributions, i.e. changes in the solvent energy or entropy. Here, we employ methods to spatially resolve distributions of hydration water thermodynamic properties in the vicinity of biomolecular surfaces. This allows direct insights into thermodynamic signatures of the hydration of hydrophobic and hydrophilic solvent accessible sites of proteins and small molecules and comparisons to ideal model surfaces. We correlate dynamic properties of hydration water molecules, i.e. translational and rotational mobility, to their thermodynamics. The latter can be used as a guide to extract thermodynamic information from experimental measurements of site-resolved water dynamics. Further, we study energy-entropy compensations of water at different hydration sites of biomolecular surfaces. This work is supported by the Cluster of Excellence RESOLV (EXC 1069) funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.

  6. Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeck, Steven P.; Lindstrom, Eric J.; Vaze, Parag V.; Fu, Lee-Lueng

    2012-09-01

    The Surface Water Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission was recommended in 2007 by the National Research Council's Decadal Survey, "Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond", for implementation by NASA. The SWOT mission is a partnership between two communities, the physical oceanography and the hydrology, to share high vertical accuracy and high spatial resolution topography data produced by the science payload, principally a Ka-band radar Interferometer (KaRIn). The SWOT payload also includes a precision orbit determination system consisting of GPS and DORIS receivers, a Laser Retro-reflector Assembly (LRA), a Jason-class nadir radar altimeter, and a JASON-class radiometer for tropospheric path delay corrections. The SWOT mission will provide large-scale data sets of ocean sea-surface height resolving scales of 15km and larger, allowing the characterization of ocean mesoscale and submesoscale circulation. The SWOT mission will also provide measurements of water storage changes in terrestrial surface water bodies and estimates of discharge in large (wider than 100m) rivers globally. The SWOT measurements will provide a key complement to other NASA spaceborne global measurements of the water cycle measurements by directly measuring the surface water (lakes, reservoirs, rivers, and wetlands) component of the water cycle. The SWOT mission is an international partnership between NASA and the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). The Canadian Space Agency (CSA) is also expected to contribute to the mission. SWOT is currently nearing entry to Formulation (Phase A). Its launch is targeted for October 2020.

  7. Acidification of East Siberian Arctic Shelf waters through addition of freshwater and terrestrial carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semiletov, Igor; Pipko, Irina; Gustafsson, Örjan; Anderson, Leif G.; Sergienko, Valentin; Pugach, Svetlana; Dudarev, Oleg; Charkin, Alexander; Gukov, Alexander; Bröder, Lisa; Andersson, August; Spivak, Eduard; Shakhova, Natalia

    2016-05-01

    Ocean acidification affects marine ecosystems and carbon cycling, and is considered a direct effect of anthropogenic carbon dioxide uptake from the atmosphere. Accumulation of atmospheric CO2 in ocean surface waters is predicted to make the ocean twice as acidic by the end of this century. The Arctic Ocean is particularly sensitive to ocean acidification because more CO2 can dissolve in cold water. Here we present observations of the chemical and physical characteristics of East Siberian Arctic Shelf waters from 1999, 2000-2005, 2008 and 2011, and find extreme aragonite undersaturation that reflects acidity levels in excess of those projected in this region for 2100. Dissolved inorganic carbon isotopic data and Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations of water sources using salinity and δ18O data suggest that the persistent acidification is driven by the degradation of terrestrial organic matter and discharge of Arctic river water with elevated CO2 concentrations, rather than by uptake of atmospheric CO2. We suggest that East Siberian Arctic Shelf waters may become more acidic if thawing permafrost leads to enhanced terrestrial organic carbon inputs and if freshwater additions continue to increase, which may affect their efficiency as a source of CO2.

  8. Properties of water surface discharge at different pulse repetition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruma, Hosseini, S. H. R.; Yoshihara, K.; Akiyama, M.; Sakugawa, T.; Lukeš, P.; Akiyama, H.

    2014-09-01

    The properties of water surface discharge plasma for variety of pulse repetition rates are investigated. A magnetic pulse compression (MPC) pulsed power modulator able to deliver pulse repetition rates up to 1000 Hz, with 0.5 J per pulse energy output at 25 kV, was used as the pulsed power source. Positive pulse with a point-to-plane electrode configuration was used for the experiments. The concentration and production yield of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were quantitatively measured and orange II organic dye was treated, to evaluate the chemical properties of the discharge reactor. Experimental results show that the physical and chemical properties of water surface discharge are not influenced by pulse repetition rate, very different from those observed for under water discharge. The production yield of H2O2 and degradation rate per pulse of the dye did not significantly vary at different pulse repetition rates under a constant discharge mode on water surface. In addition, the solution temperature, pH, and conductivity for both water surface and underwater discharge reactors were measured to compare their plasma properties for different pulse repetition rates. The results confirm that surface discharge can be employed at high pulse repetition rates as a reliable and advantageous method for industrial and environmental decontamination applications.

  9. Properties of water surface discharge at different pulse repetition rates

    SciTech Connect

    Ruma,; Yoshihara, K.; Hosseini, S. H. R. Sakugawa, T.; Akiyama, H.; Akiyama, M.; Lukeš, P.

    2014-09-28

    The properties of water surface discharge plasma for variety of pulse repetition rates are investigated. A magnetic pulse compression (MPC) pulsed power modulator able to deliver pulse repetition rates up to 1000 Hz, with 0.5 J per pulse energy output at 25 kV, was used as the pulsed power source. Positive pulse with a point-to-plane electrode configuration was used for the experiments. The concentration and production yield of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) were quantitatively measured and orange II organic dye was treated, to evaluate the chemical properties of the discharge reactor. Experimental results show that the physical and chemical properties of water surface discharge are not influenced by pulse repetition rate, very different from those observed for under water discharge. The production yield of H₂O₂ and degradation rate per pulse of the dye did not significantly vary at different pulse repetition rates under a constant discharge mode on water surface. In addition, the solution temperature, pH, and conductivity for both water surface and underwater discharge reactors were measured to compare their plasma properties for different pulse repetition rates. The results confirm that surface discharge can be employed at high pulse repetition rates as a reliable and advantageous method for industrial and environmental decontamination applications.

  10. Silver speciation in wastewater effluent, surface waters, and pore waters

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, N.W.H.; Kramer, J.R.

    1999-12-01

    Silver, inorganic sulfide, and thiol compounds were measured in municipal wastewater effluent, receiving waters, and pore waters from an anoxic lake sediment in order to predict silver speciation in these systems. The authors found submicromolar concentrations of inorganic sulfide even in fully oxic surface water. This inorganic sulfide is likely to exist in the form of colloidal metal sulfides, which have been shown to be stable under oxidizing conditions for periods of several hours. Inorganic sulfide in both the wastewater effluent and receiving waters was found to be 200 to 300 times in excess of silver concentrations, whereas inorganic sulfide in pore waters was 1,000 to 15,000 times in excess of silver concentrations. With sulfide in excess of silver, the authors predict silver sulfide complexes to dominate silver speciation. Thiols were present at low nanomolar levels in pore waters but were not detectable in wastewater effluent or receiving waters. Thiols do not appear to be important to silver speciation in these freshwater systems. Partitioning of silver into particular, colloidal, and dissolved size fractions showed that a significant proportion of silver is in the colloidal and dissolved phases. Dissolved phase concentrations were relatively constant in the treatment plant effluent and receiving waters, suggesting that silver in the <10-kDa size fraction is strongly complexed by ligands that are not significantly affected by aggregation or sorption processes.

  11. Improvement of pattern collapse issue by additive-added D.I. water rinse process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Keiichi; Naito, Ryoichiro; Kitada, Tomohiro; Kiba, Yukio; Yamada, Yoshiaki; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Ichikawa, Hiroyuki

    2003-06-01

    Reduction of critical dimension in lithography technology is aggressively promoted. At the same time, further resist thickness reduction is being pursued to increase the resolution capabilities of resist. However, thin film has its limitation because of etch requirements etc. As that result, the promotion of reduction results in increasing the aspect ratio, which leads to pattern collapse. It is well known that at drying step in developing process the capillary effect operates the photoresist pattern. If the force of the capillary effect is greater than the aggregation force of the resist pattern, the pattern collapse is generated. And the key parameters of the capillary effect are the space width between patterns, the aspect ratio, the contact angle of the D.I water rinse and the surface tension of rinse solution. Among these parameters the surface tension of rinse solution can be controlled by us. On the other hand, we've already reported that the penetration of TMAH and D.I water into the resist plays an important role on the lithographic latitude. For example, when we use the resist which TMA ion can be easily diffuse into, D.I water and TMA ion which are penetrated in the resist decreases the aggregation force of resist pattern and causes the pattern collapse even by the weak force against resist pattern. These results indicate that the swelling of photoresist by TMA ion and water is very important factor for controlling the pattern collapse. Currently, two methods are mainly tried to reduce the surface tension of rinse solution: SCF (Super Critical Fluid) and addition of additive to D.I water rinse. We used the latter method this time, because this technique has retrofittability and not special tool. And in this evaluation, we found that the degree of suppressing pattern collapse depends on the additive chemistry or formulation. With consideration given to process factors such as above, we investigated what factors contribute to suppressing pattern collapse

  12. Rapid recovery of cyanobacterial pigments in desiccated biological soil crusts following addition of water.

    PubMed

    Abed, Raeid M M; Polerecky, Lubos; Al-Habsi, Amal; Oetjen, Janina; Strous, Marc; de Beer, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    We examined soil surface colour change to green and hydrotaxis following addition of water to biological soil crusts using pigment extraction, hyperspectral imaging, microsensors and 13C labeling experiments coupled to matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALD-TOF MS). The topsoil colour turned green in less than 5 minutes following water addition. The concentrations of chlorophyll a (Chl a), scytonemin and echinenon rapidly increased in the top <1 mm layer while in the deeper layer, their concentrations remained low. Hyperspectral imaging showed that, in both wet and dehydrated crusts, cyanobacteria formed a layer at a depth of 0.2-0.4 mm and this layer did not move upward after wetting. 13C labeling experiments and MALDI TOF analysis showed that Chl a was already present in the desiccated crusts and de novo synthesis of this molecule started only after 2 days of wetting due to growth of cyanobacteria. Microsensor measurements showed that photosynthetic activity increased concomitantly with the increase of Chl a, and reached a maximum net rate of 92 µmol m-2 h-1 approximately 2 hours after wetting. We conclude that the colour change of soil crusts to green upon water addition was not due to hydrotaxis but rather to the quick recovery and reassembly of pigments. Cyanobacteria in crusts can maintain their photosynthetic apparatus intact even under prolonged periods of desiccation with the ability to resume their photosynthetic activities within minutes after wetting. PMID:25375172

  13. Water droplet impact on elastic superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Weisensee, Patricia B; Tian, Junjiao; Miljkovic, Nenad; King, William P

    2016-01-01

    Water droplet impact on surfaces is a ubiquitous phenomenon in nature and industry, where the time of contact between droplet and surface influences the transfer of mass, momentum and energy. To manipulate and reduce the contact time of impacting droplets, previous publications report tailoring of surface microstructures that influence the droplet - surface interface. Here we show that surface elasticity also affects droplet impact, where a droplet impacting an elastic superhydrophobic surface can lead to a two-fold reduction in contact time compared to equivalent rigid surfaces. Using high speed imaging, we investigated the impact dynamics on elastic nanostructured superhydrophobic substrates having membrane and cantilever designs with stiffness 0.5-7630 N/m. Upon impact, the droplet excites the substrate to oscillate, while during liquid retraction, the substrate imparts vertical momentum back to the droplet with a springboard effect, causing early droplet lift-off with reduced contact time. Through detailed experimental and theoretical analysis, we show that this novel springboarding phenomenon is achieved for a specific range of Weber numbers (We >40) and droplet Froude numbers during spreading (Fr >1). The observation of the substrate elasticity-mediated droplet springboard effect provides new insight into droplet impact physics. PMID:27461899

  14. Water droplet impact on elastic superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisensee, Patricia B.; Tian, Junjiao; Miljkovic, Nenad; King, William P.

    2016-07-01

    Water droplet impact on surfaces is a ubiquitous phenomenon in nature and industry, where the time of contact between droplet and surface influences the transfer of mass, momentum and energy. To manipulate and reduce the contact time of impacting droplets, previous publications report tailoring of surface microstructures that influence the droplet - surface interface. Here we show that surface elasticity also affects droplet impact, where a droplet impacting an elastic superhydrophobic surface can lead to a two-fold reduction in contact time compared to equivalent rigid surfaces. Using high speed imaging, we investigated the impact dynamics on elastic nanostructured superhydrophobic substrates having membrane and cantilever designs with stiffness 0.5–7630 N/m. Upon impact, the droplet excites the substrate to oscillate, while during liquid retraction, the substrate imparts vertical momentum back to the droplet with a springboard effect, causing early droplet lift-off with reduced contact time. Through detailed experimental and theoretical analysis, we show that this novel springboarding phenomenon is achieved for a specific range of Weber numbers (We >40) and droplet Froude numbers during spreading (Fr >1). The observation of the substrate elasticity-mediated droplet springboard effect provides new insight into droplet impact physics.

  15. Laser induced surface stress on water droplets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Neng; Lin, Zhifang; Ng, Jack

    2014-10-01

    Laser induced stress on spherical water droplets is studied. At mechanical equilibrium, the body stress vanishes therefore we consider only the surface stress. The surface stress on sub-wavelength droplets is slightly weaker along the light propagation direction. For larger droplets, due to their light focusing effect, the forward stress is significantly enhanced. For a particle roughly 3 micron in radius, when it is excited at whispering gallery mode with Q ∼ 10⁴ by a 1 Watt Gaussian beam, the stress can be enhanced by two orders of magnitude, and can be comparable with the Laplace pressure. PMID:25321955

  16. Water quality analysis of surface water: a Web approach.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Poonam; Chaurasia, Meenal; Sohony, R A; Gupta, Indrani; Kumar, R

    2013-07-01

    The chemical, physical and biological characteristics of water with respect to its suitability describe its quality. Concentration of pesticides or fertilisers degrades the water quality and affects marine life. A comprehensive environmental data information system helps to perform and complete common tasks in less time with less effort for data verification, data calculations, graph generation, and proper monitoring, which helps in the further mitigation step. In this paper, focus is given to a web-based system developed to express the quality of water in the imprecise environment of monitoring data. Water samples were analyzed for eight different surface water parameters, in which four parameters such as pH, dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, and fecal coliform were used for the water quality index calculation following MPCB Water Quality Standards of class A-II for best designated use. The analysis showed that river points in a particular year were in very bad category with certainty level of 0-38% which is unsuitable for drinking purposes; samples in bad category had certainty level that ranged from 38 to 50%; samples in medium to good category had certainty levels from 50 to 100%, and the remaining samples were in good to excellent category, suitable for drinking purposes, with certainty levels from 63 to 100%. PMID:23238782

  17. Dendrite-Free Li Deposition Using Trace-Amounts of Water as an Electrolyte Additive

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Jiangfeng; Xu, Wu; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Engelhard, Mark H.; Henderson, Wesley A.; Zhang, Yaohui; Zhang, Jiguang

    2015-07-01

    Residual water presents in nonaqueous electrolytes has been widely regarded as a detrimental factor for lithium (Li) batteries. This is because water is highly reactive with the commonly used LiPF6 salt and leads to the formation of HF that corrodes battery materials. In this work, we demonstrate that a controlled trace-amount of water (25-100 ppm) can be an effective electrolyte additive for achieving dendrite-free Li metal deposition in LiPF6-based electrolytes and avoid its detrimental effect at the same time. Detailed analyses reveal that the trace amount of HF formed by the decomposition reaction of LiPF6 with water will be electrochemically reduced during initial Li deposition process to form a uniform and dense LiF-rich SEI layer on the surface of the substrate. This LiF-rich SEI layer leads to a uniform distribution of the electric field on the substrate surface and enables uniform and dendrite-free Li deposition. Meanwhile the detrimental effect of HF is diminished due to the consumption of HF in the LiF formation process. Microscopic analysis reveals that the as-deposited dendrite-free Li films exhibit a self-aligned and highly-compacted Li nanorods structure which is consistent with their charming blue color or known as structure color. These findings clearly demonstrate a novel approach to control the nucleation and grow process of Li metal films using well-controlled trace-amount of water. They also shine the light on the effect of water on other electrodeposition processes.

  18. Atmospheric radiation model for water surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. E.; Gaskill, D. W.; Lierzer, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    An atmospheric correction model was extended to account for various atmospheric radiation components in remotely sensed data. Components such as the atmospheric path radiance which results from singly scattered sky radiation specularly reflected by the water surface are considered. A component which is referred to as the virtual Sun path radiance, i.e. the singly scattered path radiance which results from the solar radiation which is specularly reflected by the water surface is also considered. These atmospheric radiation components are coded into a computer program for the analysis of multispectral remote sensor data over the Great Lakes of the United States. The user must know certain parameters, such as the visibility or spectral optical thickness of the atmosphere and the geometry of the sensor with respect to the Sun and the target elements under investigation.

  19. Quality of Surface Water in Missouri, Water Year 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Otero-Benitez, William; Davis, Jerri V.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, designed and operates a series of monitoring stations on streams throughout Missouri known as the Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network. During the 2007 water year (October 1, 2006 through September 30, 2007), data were collected at 67 stations including two U.S. Geological Survey National Stream Quality Accounting Network stations and one spring sampled in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service. Dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, water temperature, suspended solids, suspended sediment, fecal coliform bacteria, dissolved nitrite plus nitrte, total phosphorus, dissolved and total recoverable lead and zinc, and selected pesticide data summaries are presented for 64 of these stations, which primarily have been classified in groups corresponding to the physiography of the State, main land use, or unique station types. In addition, a summary of hydrologic conditions in the State during water year 2007 is presented.

  20. Microcystins in potable surface waters: toxic effects and removal strategies.

    PubMed

    Roegner, Amber F; Brena, Beatriz; González-Sapienza, Gualberto; Puschner, Birgit

    2014-05-01

    In freshwater, harmful cyanobacterial blooms threaten to increase with global climate change and eutrophication of surface waters. In addition to the burden and necessity of removal of algal material during water treatment processes, bloom-forming cyanobacteria can produce a class of remarkably stable toxins, microcystins, difficult to remove from drinking water sources. A number of animal intoxications over the past 20 years have served as sentinels for widespread risk presented by microcystins. Cyanobacterial blooms have the potential to threaten severely both public health and the regional economy of affected communities, particularly those with limited infrastructure or resources. Our main objectives were to assess whether existing water treatment infrastructure provides sufficient protection against microcystin exposure, identify available options feasible to implement in resource-limited communities in bloom scenarios and to identify strategies for improved solutions. Finally, interventions at the watershed level aimed at bloom prevention and risk reduction for entry into potable water sources were outlined. We evaluated primary studies, reviews and reports for treatment options for microcystins in surface waters, potable water sources and treatment plants. Because of the difficulty of removal of microcystins, prevention is ideal; once in the public water supply, the coarse removal of cyanobacterial cells combined with secondary carbon filtration of dissolved toxins currently provides the greatest potential for protection of public health. Options for point of use filtration must be optimized to provide affordable and adequate protection for affected communities. PMID:24038121

  1. Optical Triangulation on Instationary Water Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulsow, C.; Maas, H.-G.; Hentschel, B.

    2016-06-01

    The measurement of water surfaces is a key task in the field of experimental hydromechanics. Established techniques are usually gauge-based and often come with a large instrumental effort and a limited spatial resolution. The paper shows a photogrammetric alternative based on the well-known laser light sheet projection technique. While the original approach is limited to surfaces with diffuse reflection properties, the developed technique is capable of measuring dynamically on reflecting instationary surfaces. Contrary to the traditional way, the laser line is not observed on the object. Instead, using the properties of water, the laser light is reflected on to a set of staggered vertical planes. The resulting laser line is observed by a camera and measured by subpixel operators. A calibration based on known still water levels provides the parameters for the translation of image space measurements into water level and gradient determination in dynamic experiments. As a side-effect of the principle of measuring the reflected laser line rather than the projected one, the accuracy can be improved by almost a factor two. In experiments a standard deviation of 0.03 mm for water level changes could be achieved. The measuring rate corresponds to the frame rate of the camera. A complete measuring system is currently under development for the Federal Waterways Engineering and Research Institute (BAW). This article shows the basic principle, potential and limitations of the method. Furthermore, several system variants optimised for different requirements are presented. Besides the geometrical models of different levels of complexity, system calibration procedures are described too. The applicability of the techniques and their accuracy potential are shown in several practical tests.

  2. Removal of perfluorooctanoate from surface water by polyaluminium chloride coagulation.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shubo; Zhou, Qin; Yu, Gang; Huang, Jun; Fan, Qing

    2011-02-01

    Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) has been detected in surface water all over the world, and little is known of its removal by coagulation in water treatment plants. In this study, polyaluminium chloride (PACl) was used to remove PFOA from surface water, and the effects of coagulant dose, solution pH, temperature, and initial turbidity on the removal of both PFOA and suspended solids (SS) from water were investigated. Since the SS had high sorption affinity for PFOA, most PFOA was adsorbed on the particles and removed via the SS removal in the coagulation process. PFOA concentrations in aqueous phase decreased with increasing initial turbidity and PACl dose, while they increased with increasing solution pH and temperature. Other perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) with different C-F chain lengths and functional groups were also compared with PFOA. It was proved that hydrophobic interaction played an important role in the adsorption of PFOA on the SS. The addition of powdered activated carbon (PAC) before the coagulation process significantly enhanced the removal efficiency of PFOA in water, and the residual PFOA concentrations in water were less than 1 μg/L after the addition of 1-16 mg/L PAC and subsequent coagulation when the initial PFOA concentrations were in the range of 0.5-3 mg/L. PMID:21163511

  3. How Water Advances on Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schellenberger, Frank; Encinas, Noemí; Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    Superliquid repellency can be achieved by nano- and microstructuring surfaces in such a way that protrusions entrap air underneath the liquid. It is still not known how the three-phase contact line advances on such structured surfaces. In contrast to a smooth surface, where the contact line can advance continuously, on a superliquid-repellent surface, the contact line has to overcome an air gap between protrusions. Here, we apply laser scanning confocal microscopy to get the first microscopic videos of water drops advancing on a superhydrophobic array of micropillars. In contrast to common belief, the liquid surface gradually bends down until it touches the top face of the next micropillars. The apparent advancing contact angle is 180°. On the receding side, pinning to the top faces of the micropillars determines the apparent receding contact angle. Based on these observations, we propose that the apparent receding contact angle should be used for characterizing superliquid-repellent surfaces rather than the apparent advancing contact angle and hysteresis. PMID:26991185

  4. How Water Advances on Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellenberger, Frank; Encinas, Noemí; Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    Superliquid repellency can be achieved by nano- and microstructuring surfaces in such a way that protrusions entrap air underneath the liquid. It is still not known how the three-phase contact line advances on such structured surfaces. In contrast to a smooth surface, where the contact line can advance continuously, on a superliquid-repellent surface, the contact line has to overcome an air gap between protrusions. Here, we apply laser scanning confocal microscopy to get the first microscopic videos of water drops advancing on a superhydrophobic array of micropillars. In contrast to common belief, the liquid surface gradually bends down until it touches the top face of the next micropillars. The apparent advancing contact angle is 180°. On the receding side, pinning to the top faces of the micropillars determines the apparent receding contact angle. Based on these observations, we propose that the apparent receding contact angle should be used for characterizing superliquid-repellent surfaces rather than the apparent advancing contact angle and hysteresis.

  5. Assessing nitrogen pressures on European surface water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grizzetti, B.; Bouraoui, F.; de Marsily, G.

    2008-12-01

    The European environmental legislation on water, in particular the 2000 Water Framework Directive, requires the evaluation of nutrient pressures and the assessment of mitigation measures at the river basin scale. Models have been identified as tools that can contribute to fulfill these requirements. The objective of this research was the implementation of a modeling approach (Geospatial Regression Equation for European Nutrient losses (GREEN)) to assess the actual nitrogen pressures on surface water quality at medium and large basin scale (European scale) using readily available data. In particular the aim was to estimate diffuse nitrogen emissions into surface waters, contributions by different sources (point and diffuse) to the nitrate load in rivers, and nitrogen retention in river systems. A comprehensive database including nutrient sources and physical watershed characteristics was built at the European scale. The modeling partially or entirely covered some of the larger and more populated European river basins, including the Danube, Rhine, Elbe, Weser, and Ems in Germany, the Seine and Rhone in France, and the Meuse basin shared by France and Belgium. The model calibration was satisfactory for all basins. The source contribution to the in-stream nitrogen load, together with the diffuse nitrogen emissions and river nitrogen retention were estimated and were found to be in the range of values reported in the literature. Finally, the model results were extrapolated to estimate the diffuse nitrogen emission and source apportionment at the European scale.

  6. The hydrochemical framework of surface water basins in southern Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yidana, Sandow Mark

    2009-04-01

    Surface water resources play a crucial role in the domestic water delivery system in Ghana. In addition, sustainable food production is based on the quality and quantity of water resources available for irrigation purposes to supplement rain-fed agricultural activities in the country. The objective of this research was to determine the main controls on the hydrochemistry of surface water resources in the southern part of Ghana and assess the quality of water from these basins for irrigation activities in the area. R-mode factor and cluster analyses were applied to 625 data points from 6 river basins in southern Ghana after the data had been log transformed and standardized for homogeneity. This study finds that surface water chemistry in the south is controlled by the chemistry of silicate mineral weathering, chemistry of rainfall, fertilizers from agricultural activities in the area, as well as the weathering of carbonate minerals. A Gibb’s diagram plotted with total dissolved solids (TDS) on the vertical axis against (Na+ + K+)/(Ca2+ + K+ + Na+) on the horizontal axis indicates that rock weathering plays a significant role in the hydrochemistry. Activity diagrams for the CaO-Na2O-Al2O-SiO2-H2O and CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O systems suggest that kaolinite is the most stable clay mineral phase in the system. In addition, an assessment of the irrigation quality of water from these basins suggests that the basins are largely low sodium—low to medium salinity basins, delivering water of acceptable quality for irrigation purposes.

  7. Field Techniques for Estimating Water Fluxes Between Surface Water and Ground Water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberry, Donald O.; LaBaugh, James W.

    2008-01-01

    This report focuses on measuring the flow of water across the interface between surface water and ground water, rather than the hydrogeological or geochemical processes that occur at or near this interface. The methods, however, that use hydrogeological and geochemical evidence to quantify water fluxes are described herein. This material is presented as a guide for those who have to examine the interaction of surface water and ground water. The intent here is that both the overview of the many available methods and the in-depth presentation of specific methods will enable the reader to choose those study approaches that will best meet the requirements of the environments and processes they are investigating, as well as to recognize the merits of using more than one approach. This report is designed to make the reader aware of the breadth of approaches available for the study of the exchange between surface and ground water. To accomplish this, the report is divided into four chapters. Chapter 1 describes many well-documented approaches for defining the flow between surface and ground waters. Subsequent chapters provide an in-depth presentation of particular methods. Chapter 2 focuses on three of the most commonly used methods to either calculate or directly measure flow of water between surface-water bodies and the ground-water domain: (1) measurement of water levels in well networks in combination with measurement of water level in nearby surface water to determine water-level gradients and flow; (2) use of portable piezometers (wells) or hydraulic potentiomanometers to measure hydraulic gradients; and (3) use of seepage meters to measure flow directly. Chapter 3 focuses on describing the techniques involved in conducting water-tracer tests using fluorescent dyes, a method commonly used in the hydrogeologic investigation and characterization of karst aquifers, and in the study of water fluxes in karst terranes. Chapter 4 focuses on heat as a tracer in hydrological

  8. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Surface Water Protection: A Watershed Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Coty, J

    2009-03-16

    This surface water protection plan (plan) provides an overview of the management efforts implemented at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that support a watershed approach to protect surface water. This plan fulfills a requirement in the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A to demonstrate a watershed approach for surface water protection that protects the environment and public health. This plan describes the use of a watershed approach within which the Laboratory's current surface water management and protections efforts have been structured and coordinated. With more than 800 million acres of land in the U.S. under federal management and stewardship, a unified approach across agencies provides enhanced resource protection and cost-effectiveness. The DOE adopted, along with other federal agencies, the Unified Federal Policy for a Watershed Approach to Federal Land and Resource Management (UFP) with a goal to protect water quality and aquatic ecosystems on federal lands. This policy intends to prevent and/or reduce water pollution from federal activities while fostering a cost-effective watershed approach to federal land and resource management. The UFP also intends to enhance the implementation of existing laws (e.g., the Clean Water Act [CWA] and National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA]) and regulations. In addition, this provides an opportunity for the federal government to serve as a model for water quality stewardship using a watershed approach for federal land and resource activities that potentially impact surface water and its uses. As a federal land manager, the Laboratory is responsible for a small but important part of those 800 million acres of land. Diverse land uses are required to support the Laboratory's mission and provide an appropriate work environment for its staff. The Laboratory comprises two sites: its main site in Livermore, California, and the Experimental Test Site (Site 300), near Tracy, California. The main site is largely

  9. Versatile antifouling polyethersulfone filtration membranes modified via surface grafting of zwitterionic polymers from a reactive amphiphilic copolymer additive.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi-Fan; Zhang, Pei-Bin; Sun, Jian; Liu, Cui-Jing; Yi, Zhuan; Zhu, Li-Ping; Xu, You-Yi

    2015-06-15

    Here we describe the development of versatile antifouling polyethersulfone (PES) filtration membranes modified via surface grafting of zwitterionic polymers from a reactive amphiphilic copolymer additive. Amphiphilic polyethersulfone-block-poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PES-b-PHEMA) was beforehand designed and used as the blending additive of PES membranes prepared by phase inversion technique. The surface enriched PHEMA blocks on membrane surface acted as an anchor to immobilize the initiating site. Poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (PSBMA) were subsequently grafted onto the PES blend membranes by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). The analysis of surface chemistry confirmed the successful grafting of zwitterionic PSBMA brushes on PES membrane surface. The resulted PES-g-PSBMA membranes were capable of separating proteins from protein solution and oil from oil/water emulsion efficiently. Furthermore, the modified membranes showed high hydrophilicity and strongly antifouling properties due to the incorporation of well-defined PSBMA layer. In addition, the PES-g-PSBMA membranes exhibited excellent blood compatibility and durability during the washing process. The developed antifouling PES membranes are versatile and can find their applications in protein filtration, blood purification and oil/water separation, etc. PMID:25752579

  10. Phosphate Ions Affect the Water Structure at Functionalized Membrane Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Aliyah; Imbrogno, Joseph; Belfort, Georges; Petersen, Poul B

    2016-09-01

    Antifouling surfaces improve function, efficiency, and safety in products such as water filtration membranes, marine vehicle coatings, and medical implants by resisting protein and biofilm adhesion. Understanding the role of water structure at these materials in preventing protein adhesion and biofilm formation is critical to designing more effective coatings. Such fouling experiments are typically performed under biological conditions using isotonic aqueous buffers. Previous studies have explored the structure of pure water at a few different antifouling surfaces, but the effect of electrolytes and ionic strength (I) on the water structure at antifouling surfaces is not well studied. Here sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy is used to characterize the interfacial water structure at poly(ether sulfone) (PES) and two surface-modified PES films in contact with 0.01 M phosphate buffer with high and low salt (Ionic strength, I= 0.166 and 0.025 M, respectively). Unmodified PES, commonly used as a filtration membrane, and modified PES with a hydrophobic alkane (C18) and with a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) were used. In the low ionic strength phosphate buffer, water was strongly ordered near the surface of the PEG-modified PES film due to exclusion of phosphate ions and the creation of a surface potential resulting from charge separation between phosphate anions and sodium cations. However, in the high ionic strength phosphate buffer, the sodium and potassium chloride (138 and 3 mM, respectively) in the phosphate buffered saline screened this charge and substantially reduced water ordering. A much smaller water ordering and subsequent reduction upon salt addition was observed for the C18-modified PES, and little water structure change was seen for the unmodified PES. The large difference in water structuring with increasing ionic strength between widely used phosphate buffer and phosphate buffered saline at the PEG interface demonstrates the importance of studying

  11. Acidic deposition and surface water chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, M. R.

    A pair of back-to-back (morning and afternoon) hydrology sessions, held December 10, 1987, at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif., covered “Predicting the Effects of Acidic Deposition on Surface Water Chemistry.” The combined sessions included four invited papers, 12 contributed papers, and a panel discussion at its conclusion. The gathering dealt with questions on a variety of aspects of modeling the effects of acidic deposition on surface water chemistry.Contributed papers included discussions on the representation of processes in models as well as limiting assumptions in model application (V. S. Tripathi et al., Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tenn., and E. C. Krug, Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign), along with problems in estimating depositional inputs to catchments and thus inputs to be used in the simulation of catchment response (M. M. Reddy et al., U.S. Geological Survey, Lakewood, Colo.; and E. A. McBean, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada). L. A. Baker et al. (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis) dealt with the problem of modeling seepage lake systems, an exceedingly important portion of the aquatic resources in Florida and parts of the upper U.S. Midwest. J. A. Hau and Y. Eckstein (Kent State University, Kent, Ohio) considered equilibrium modeling of two northern Ohio watersheds that receive very different loads of acidic deposition but are highly similar in other respects.

  12. Effects of Surface Modification Conditions on Hydrophobicity of Silica-based Coating Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Beth L; Pawel, Steven J; Hunter, Scott Robert; Haynes, James A; Hillesheim, Daniel A

    2013-01-01

    Superhydrophobic silica (SHS) powders are being evaluated as a potential additive to the polyurethane topcoats used in Chemical Agent Resistant Coating (CARC) systems, with the goal of improving water repellency and corrosion protection characteristics. The current generation of CARC topcoats is already highly loaded with solids, and thus there is a premium on minimization of the total SHS powder required to achieve the desired properties. Therefore, efficient surface modification of the silica and proper dispersion in the coating will be required. The effect of a dispersant on the surface modification of silica particles by chlorosilanes was addressed in this study. The properties of various SHS powders were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis and mass spectroscopy. Correlations between powder modification conditions and the ultimate effects of the modified particles on hydrophobicity of CARC topcoats were assessed. The use of contact and rolling angle measurements along with scanning electron microscopy are discussed as they pertain to the ability to quantify the effects of modified silicas on corrosion prevention coatings. Furthermore, a systematic approach to modifying and testing both powders and top coats of corrosion prevention systems is presented.

  13. Water and Carbon Dioxide Adsorption at Olivine Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Bylaska, Eric J.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2013-11-14

    Plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to simulate water and carbon dioxide adsorption at the (010) surface of five olivine minerals, namely, forsterite (Mg2SiO4), calcio-olivine (Ca2SiO4), tephroite (Mn2SiO4), fayalite (Fe2SiO4), and Co-olivine (Co2SiO4). Adsorption energies per water molecule obtained from energy minimizations varied from -78 kJ mol-1 for fayalite to -128 kJ mol-1 for calcio-olivine at sub-monolayer coverage and became less exothermic as coverage increased. In contrast, carbon dioxide adsorption energies at sub-monolayer coverage ranged from -20 kJ mol-1 for fayalite to -59 kJ mol-1 for calcio-olivine. Therefore, the DFT calculations show a strong driving force for carbon dioxide displacement by water at the surface of all olivine minerals in a competitive adsorption scenario. Additionally, adsorption energies for both water and carbon dioxide were found to be more exothermic for the alkaline-earth (AE) olivines than for the transition-metal (TM) olivines and to not correlate with the solvation enthalpies of the corresponding divalent cations. However, a correlation was obtained with the charge of the surface divalent cation indicating that the more ionic character of the AE cations in the olivine structure relative to the TM cations leads to greater interactions with adsorbed water and carbon dioxide molecules at the surface and thus more exothermic adsorption energies for the AE olivines. For calcio-olivine, which exhibits the highest divalent cation charge of the five olivines, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations showed that this effect leads both water and carbon dioxide to react with the surface and form hydroxyl groups and a carbonate-like species, respectively.

  14. Assessing metaldehyde concentrations in surface water catchments and implications for drinking water abstraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asfaw, Alemayehu; Shucksmith, James; Smith, Andrea; Cherry, Katherine

    2015-04-01

    Metaldehyde is an active ingredient in agricultural pesticides such as slug pellets, which are heavily applied to UK farmland during the autumn application season. There is current concern that existing drinking water treatment processes may be inadequate in reducing potentially high levels of metaldehyde in surface waters to below the UK drinking water quality regulation limit of 0.1 µg/l. In addition, current water quality monitoring methods can miss short term fluctuations in metaldehyde concentration caused by rainfall driven runoff, hampering prediction of the potential risk of exposure. Datasets describing levels, fate and transport of metaldehyde in river catchments are currently very scarce. This work presents results from an ongoing study to quantify the presence of metaldehyde in surface waters within a UK catchment used for drinking water abstraction. High resolution water quality data from auto-samplers installed in rivers are coupled with radar rainfall, catchment characteristics and land use data to i) understand which hydro-meteorological characteristics of the catchment trigger the peak migration of metaldehyde to surface waters; ii) assess the relationship between measured metaldehyde levels and catchment characteristics such as land use, topographic index, proximity to water bodies and runoff generation area; iii) describe the current risks to drinking water supply and discuss mitigation options based on modelling and real-time control of water abstraction. Identifying the correlation between catchment attributes and metaldehyde generation will help in the development of effective catchment management strategies, which can help to significantly reduce the amount of metaldehyde finding its way into river water. Furthermore, the effectiveness of current water quality monitoring strategy in accurately quantifying the generation of metaldehyde from the catchment and its ability to benefit the development of effective catchment management practices

  15. Evaluation of the EHL Film Thickness and Extreme Pressure Additives on Gear Surface Fatigue Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Dennis P.; Shimski, John

    1994-01-01

    Surface pitting fatigue life tests were conducted with seven lubricants, using AISI 9310 spur gears. The test lubricants can be classified as synthetic polyol-esters with various viscosities and additive packages. The lubricant with a viscosity that provided a specific film thickness greater than one and with an additive package produced gear surface fatigue lives that were 8.6 times that for lubricants with a viscosity that provided specific film thickness less than one. Lubricants with the same viscosity and similar additive packages gave equivalent gear surface fatigue lives.

  16. Surface Crystallization of Supercooled Water in Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabazadeh, Azadeh; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The process by which liquid cloud droplets homogeneously crystallize into ice is still not well-understood. The ice nucleation process based on the standard and classical theory of homogeneous freezing, initiates within the interior volume of a cloud droplet. Current experimental data on homogeneous freezing rates of ice in droplets of supercooled water, both in air and emulsion oil samples, show considerable scatter. For example, at -33 C, the reported volume-based freezing rates of ice in supercooled water vary by as much as 5 orders of magnitude, which is well outside the range of measurement uncertainties. Here, we show that the process of ice nucleus formation at the air (or oil)-liquid water interface may help to explain why experimental results on ice nucleation rates yield different results in different ambient phases. Our results also suggest that surface crystallization of ice in cloud droplets can explain why low amounts of supercooled water have been observed in the atmosphere near -40 C.

  17. Surface crystallization of supercooled water in clouds

    PubMed Central

    Tabazadeh, A.; Djikaev, Y. S.; Reiss, H.

    2002-01-01

    The process by which liquid cloud droplets homogeneously crystallize into ice is still not well understood. The ice nucleation process based on the standard and classical theory of homogeneous freezing initiates within the interior volume of a cloud droplet. Current experimental data on homogeneous freezing rates of ice in droplets of supercooled water, both in air and emulsion oil samples, show considerable scatter. For example, at −33°C, the reported volume-based freezing rates of ice in supercooled water vary by as many as 5 orders of magnitude, which is well outside the range of measurement uncertainties. Here, we show that the process of ice nucleus formation at the air (or oil)-liquid water interface may help to explain why experimental results on ice nucleation rates yield different results in different ambient phases. Our results also suggest that surface crystallization of ice in cloud droplets can explain why low amounts of supercooled water have been observed in the atmosphere near −40°C. PMID:12456877

  18. Protonation and Deprotonation on Water's Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colussi, A. J.; Enami, S.; Stewart, L.; Hoffmann, M. R.

    2010-12-01

    How the acidity of bulk water (pHbulk) regulates the degree of protonation of Brönsted acids and bases on water surfaces facing hydrophobic media is a key unresolved issue in chemistry and biology. We addressed experimentally the important case of the air/water interface and report the strikingly dissimilar pHbulk-dependences of the protonation/deprotonation of aqueous versus gaseous n-hexanoic acid (HxOH) determined on the surface of aqueous microjets by online electrospray mass spectrometry. We confirm that HxOH(aq) is deprotonated at pHbulk > pKa(HxOH) = 4.8, but find that the deprotonation of HxOH(g) into interfacial HxO-(s) displays two equivalence points at pHbulk ~ 2.5 and ~ 10.0. The weak base HxOH(aq) (pKa(HxOH2+) < - 4) is barely protonated at pHbulk > 1, whereas HxOH(g) is significantly protonated to HxOH2+(s) on pHbulk < 4 water, as expected from the proton affinities PA(HxOH) > PA(H2O) of gas-phase species. The exceptionally large kinetic isotope effect for the protonation of HxOH(g) on D2O/H2O: KIE = HxOH2+/HxODH+ ~ 100, is ascribed to a desolvated transition state. Since ion creation at the interface via proton transfer between H2O itself and neutral species is thermodynamically disallowed i.e., HxOH(g) is actually deprotonated by interfacial OH-(s), whereas Me3N(g) is hardly protonated by H3O+(s) on pHbulk ~ 4 - 8 water (Enami et al., J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2010, 1, 1599) we conclude that [OH-(s)] > [H3O+(s)] above pHbulk ~ 4, at variance with inferences drawn from spectroscopic signatures or model calculations of water’s surface.

  19. Relaxations and Interfacial Water Ordering at the Corundum (110) Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2010-09-17

    In situ high resolution specular X-ray reflectivity measurements were used to examine relaxations and interfacial water ordering occurring at the corundum (110)-water interface. Sample preparation affected the resulting surface structure. Annealing in air at 1373 K produced a reconstructed surface formed through an apparently ordered aluminum vacancy. The effect of the reconstruction on in-plane periodicity was not determined. The remaining aluminum sites on the surface maintain full coordination by oxygen and the surface was coated with a layer of physically adsorbed water. Ordering of water further from the surface was not observed. Acid etching of this surface and preparing a surface through annealing at 723 K both produced an unreconstructed surface with identical relaxations and water ordering. Relaxations were confined primarily to the top {approx}4 {angstrom} of the surface and were dominated by an increased distribution width of the fully occupied surface aluminum site and outward relaxation of the oxygen surface functional groups. A layer of adsorbed water fully coated the surface and occurred in two distinct sites. Water above this showed signs of layering and indicated that water ordering extended 7-10 {angstrom} from the surface. Relaxations and the arrangement of interfacial water were nearly identical on both the unreconstructed corundum and isostructural hematite (110) surfaces. Comparison to corundum and hematite (012) suggests that the arrangement of interfacial water is primarily controlled by mineral surface structure.

  20. Mathematical aspects of surface water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Walter; Wayne, Clarence E.

    2007-06-01

    The theory of the motion of a free surface over a body of water is a fascinating subject, with a long history in both applied and pure mathematical research, and with a continuing relevance to the enterprises of mankind having to do with the sea. Despite the recent advances in the field (some of which we will hear about during this Workshop on Mathematical Hydrodynamics at the Steklov Institute), and the current focus of the mathematical community on the topic, many fundamental mathematical questions remain. These have to do with the evolution of surface water waves, their approximation by model equations and by computer simulations, the detailed dynamics of wave interactions, such as would produce rogue waves in an open ocean, and the theory (partially probabilistic) of approximating wave fields over large regions by averaged `macroscopic' quantities which satisfy essentially kinetic equations of motion. In this note we would like to point out open problems and some of the directions of current research in the field. We believe that the introduction of new analytical techniques and novel points of view will play an important rôle in the future development of the area.

  1. Quality of surface water in Missouri, water year 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barr, Miya N.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, designs and operates a series of monitoring stations on streams throughout Missouri known as the Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network. During the 2009 water year (October 1, 2008, through September 30, 2009), data were collected at 75 stations-69 Ambient Water-Quality Monitoring Network stations, 2 U.S. Geological Survey National Stream Quality Accounting Network stations, 1 spring sampled in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, and 3 stations sampled in cooperation with the Elk River Watershed Improvement Association. Dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, water temperature, suspended solids, suspended sediment, fecal coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli bacteria, dissolved nitrate plus nitrite, total phosphorus, dissolved and total recoverable lead and zinc, and select pesticide compound summaries are presented for 72 of these stations. The stations primarily have been classified into groups corresponding to the physiography of the State, primary land use, or unique station types. In addition, a summary of hydrologic conditions in the State including peak discharges, monthly mean discharges, and seven-day low flow is presented.

  2. Effects of additives on volume change on melting, surface tension, and viscosity of liquid aluminum oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, J. L.; Rasmussen, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of various oxide additives on the volume change on melting, the surface tension, and the viscosity of liquid Al2O3 were studied. Additives of Sm2O3, MgO, and Y2O3 which form solid solutions, compounds, and multiphase solids with Al2O3 were studied. A review of the property data for Al2O3 and Al2O3 containing oxide additives is presented. Oxide additives to Al2O3 reduce the volume change on melting and with the exception of SiO2 lower the viscosity; surface tensions change with oxide additives, but changes vary with different container material. Viscosity and volume change on melting appeared to be significantly more important for studying the properties of liquid oxides than surface tension. Supercooling of 270 K of yttrium aluminum garnet was observed.

  3. Chapter 5: Surface water quality sampling in streams and canals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface water sampling and water quality assessments have greatly evolved in the United States since the 1970s establishment of the Clean Water Act. Traditionally, water quality referred to only the chemical characteristics of the water and its toxicological properties related to drinking water or ...

  4. Impact of Water Withdrawals from Groundwater and Surface Water on Continental Water Storage Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doell, Petra; Hoffmann-Dobrev, Heike; Portmann, Felix T.; Siebert, Stefan; Eicker, Annette; Rodell, Matthew; Strassberg, Gil

    2011-01-01

    Humans have strongly impacted the global water cycle, not only water flows but also water storage. We have performed a first global-scale analysis of the impact of water withdrawals on water storage variations, using the global water resources and use model WaterGAP. This required estimation of fractions of total water withdrawals from groundwater, considering five water use sectors. According to our assessment, the source of 35% of the water withdrawn worldwide (4300 cubic km/yr during 1998-2002) is groundwater. Groundwater contributes 42%, 36% and 27% of water used for irrigation, households and manufacturing, respectively, while we assume that only surface water is used for livestock and for cooling of thermal power plants. Consumptive water use was 1400 cubic km/yr during 1998-2002. It is the sum of the net abstraction of 250 cubic km/yr of groundwater (taking into account evapotranspiration and return flows of withdrawn surface water and groundwater) and the net abstraction of 1150 km3/yr of surface water. Computed net abstractions indicate, for the first time at the global scale, where and when human water withdrawals decrease or increase groundwater or surface water storage. In regions with extensive surface water irrigation, such as Southern China, net abstractions from groundwater are negative, i.e. groundwater is recharged by irrigation. The opposite is true for areas dominated by groundwater irrigation, such as in the High Plains aquifer of the central USA, where net abstraction of surface water is negative because return flow of withdrawn groundwater recharges the surface water compartments. In intensively irrigated areas, the amplitude of seasonal total water storage variations is generally increased due to human water use; however, in some areas, it is decreased. For the High Plains aquifer and the whole Mississippi basin, modeled groundwater and total water storage variations were compared with estimates of groundwater storage variations based on

  5. Assembled monolayers of hydrophilic particles on water surfaces.

    PubMed

    Moon, Geon Dae; Lee, Tae Il; Kim, Bongsoo; Chae, GeeSung; Kim, Jinook; Kim, SungHee; Myoung, Jae-Min; Jeong, Unyong

    2011-11-22

    A facile and quick approach to prepare self-assembled monolayers of water-dispersible particles on the water surface is presented. Particle suspensions in alcohols were dropped on a water reservoir to form long-range ordered monolayers of various particles, including spherical solid particles, soft hydrogel particles, metal nanoparticles, quantum dots, nanowires, single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), nanoplates, and nanosheets. A systematic study was conducted on the variables affecting the monolayer assembly: the solubility parameter of spreading solvents, particle concentration, zeta potential of the particles in the suspension, surface tension of the water phase, hardness of the particles, and addition of a salt in the suspension. This method requires no hydrophobic surface treatment of the particles, which is useful to exploit these monolayer films without changing the native properties of the particles. The study highlights a quick 2D colloidal assembly without cracks in the wafer scale as well as transparent conductive thin films made of SWCNTs and graphenes. PMID:21962177

  6. Surface water risk assessment of pesticides in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Teklu, Berhan M; Adriaanse, Paulien I; Ter Horst, Mechteld M S; Deneer, John W; Van den Brink, Paul J

    2015-03-01

    Scenarios for future use in the pesticide registration procedure in Ethiopia were designed for 3 separate Ethiopian locations, which are aimed to be protective for the whole of Ethiopia. The scenarios estimate concentrations in surface water resulting from agricultural use of pesticides for a small stream and for two types of small ponds. Seven selected pesticides were selected since they were estimated to bear the highest risk to humans on the basis of volume of use, application rate and acute and chronic human toxicity, assuming exposure as a result of the consumption of surface water. Potential ecotoxicological risks were not considered as a selection criterion at this stage. Estimates of exposure concentrations in surface water were established using modelling software also applied in the EU registration procedure (PRZM and TOXSWA). Input variables included physico-chemical properties, and data such as crop calendars, irrigation schedules, meteorological information and detailed application data which were specifically tailored to the Ethiopian situation. The results indicate that for all the pesticides investigated the acute human risk resulting from the consumption of surface water is low to negligible, whereas agricultural use of chlorothalonil, deltamethrin, endosulfan and malathion in some crops may result in medium to high risk to aquatic species. The predicted environmental concentration estimates are based on procedures similar to procedures used at the EU level and in the USA. Addition of aquatic macrophytes as an ecotoxicological endpoint may constitute a welcome future addition to the risk assessment procedure. Implementation of the methods used for risk characterization constitutes a good step forward in the pesticide registration procedure in Ethiopia. PMID:25481716

  7. Surface Tension Mediated Under-Water Adhesion of Rigid Spheres on Soft, Charged Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Shayandev; Das, Siddhartha

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the phenomenon of surface-tension-mediated under-water adhesion is necessary for studying a plethora of physiological and technical phenomena, such as the uptake of bacteria or nanoparticle by cells, attachment of virus on bacterial surfaces, biofouling on large ocean vessels and marine devices, etc. This adhesion phenomenon becomes highly non-trivial in case the soft surface where the adhesion occurs is also charged. Here we propose a theory for analyzing such an under-water adhesion of a rigid sphere on a soft, charged surface, represented by a grafted polyelectrolyte layer (PEL). We develop a model based on the minimization of free energy that, in addition to considering the elastic and the surface-tension-mediated adhesion energies, also accounts for the PEL electric double layer (EDL) induced electrostatic energies. We show that in the presence of surface charges, adhesion gets enhanced. This can be explained by the fact that the increase in the elastic energy is better balanced by the lowering of the EDL energy associated with the adhesion process. The entire behaviour is further dictated by the surface tension components that govern the adhesion energy.

  8. Emission of dimers from a free surface of heated water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkarev, A. A.; Polyakova, V. I.

    2014-09-01

    The emission rate of water dimers from a free surface and a wetted solid surface in various cases was calculated by a simplified Monte Carlo method with the use of the binding energy of water molecules. The binding energy of water molecules obtained numerically assuming equilibrium between the free surface of water and vapor in the temperature range of 298-438 K corresponds to the coordination number for liquid water equal to 4.956 and is close to the reference value. The calculation results show that as the water temperature increases, the free surface of water and the wetted solid surface become sources of free water dimers. At a temperature of 438 K, the proportion of dimers in the total flow of water molecules on its surface reaches 1%. It is found that in the film boiling mode, the emission rate of dimers decreases with decreasing saturation vapor. Two mechanisms of the emission are described.

  9. Methods and energy storage devices utilizing electrolytes having surface-smoothing additives

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Wu; Zhang, Jiguang; Graff, Gordon L; Chen, Xilin; Ding, Fei

    2015-11-12

    Electrodeposition and energy storage devices utilizing an electrolyte having a surface-smoothing additive can result in self-healing, instead of self-amplification, of initial protuberant tips that give rise to roughness and/or dendrite formation on the substrate and anode surface. For electrodeposition of a first metal (M1) on a substrate or anode from one or more cations of M1 in an electrolyte solution, the electrolyte solution is characterized by a surface-smoothing additive containing cations of a second metal (M2), wherein cations of M2 have an effective electrochemical reduction potential in the solution lower than that of the cations of M1.

  10. A new device for collecting time-integrated water samples from springs and surface water bodies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panno, S.V.; Krapac, I.G.; Keefer, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    A new device termed the 'seepage sampler' was developed to collect representative water samples from springs, streams, and other surface-water bodies. The sampler collects composite, time-integrated water samples over short (hours) or extended (weeks) periods without causing significant changes to the chemical composition of the samples. The water sample within the sampler remains at the ambient temperature of the water body and does not need to be cooled. Seepage samplers are inexpensive to construct and easy to use. A sampling program of numerous springs and/or streams can be designed at a relatively low cost through the use of these samplers. Transient solutes migrating through such flow systems, potentially unnoticed by periodic sampling, may be detected. In addition, the mass loading of solutes (e.g., agrichemicals) may be determined when seepage samplers are used in conjunction with discharge measurements.

  11. In vitro genotoxicity of chlorinated drinking water processed from humus-rich surface water

    SciTech Connect

    Liimatainen, A.; Grummt, T.

    1988-11-01

    Chlorination by-products of drinking waters are capable of inducing sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) and chromosome aberrations (CA) in vitro, in addition to their mutagenic activity in the Ames test. Finnish drinking waters, processed from humus-rich surface water using chlorine disinfection, have been found to be highly mutagenic in the Ames' test. The highest activities have been found in the acidic, non-volatile fraction of the water concentrates using tester strain TA100 without metabolic activation by S9mix. The mutagenicities have varied between 500 and 14,000 induced revertants per liter. These figures are one to two magnitudes higher than those reported elsewhere. The authors studied five Finnish drinking water samples for their potency to exert genotoxic effects, SCEs and CAs, in mammalian cells in vitro (human peripheral lymphocytes and Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts).

  12. Water resources data, Florida, water year 2005. Volume 3A: Southwest Florida surface water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, Richard L.; Dickman, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2005 water year in Florida consist of continuous or daily discharges for 429 streams, periodic discharge for 9 streams, continuous or daily stage for 218 streams, periodic stage for 5 streams, peak stage for 28 streams and peak discharge for 28 streams, continuous or daily elevations for 15 lakes, periodic elevations for 23 lakes; continuous ground-water levels for 401 wells, periodic ground-water levels for 1,098 wells, and quality-of-water data for 211 surface-water sites and 208 wells. The data for Southwest Florida include records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, water quality of lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 3A contains records for continuous or daily discharge for 113 streams, periodic discharge for 4 streams, continuous or daily stage for 80 streams, periodic stage for 2 stream, peak stage and discharge for 8 streams, continuous or daily elevations for 3 lakes, continous or daily elevations for 3 lakes, and quality of water for 75 surface water sites. These data represent the national Water Data System records collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating local, state, and federal agencies in Florida.

  13. Water resources data, Florida, water year 2004, volume 3A: southwest Florida surface water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, Richard L.

    2004-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2004 water year in Florida consist of continuous or daily discharges for 405 streams, periodic discharge for 12 streams, continuous daily stage for 159 streams, periodic stage for 19 streams, peak stage for 30 streams and peak discharge for 30 streams, continuous or daily elevations for 14 lakes, periodic elevations for 23 lakes; continuous ground-water levels for 408 wells, periodic ground-water levels for 1,188 wells, and quality-of-water data for 140 surface-water sites and 240 wells. The data for Southwest Florida include records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, water quality of lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. Volume 3A contains continuous or daily discharge for 104 streams, periodic discharge for 6 streams, continuous or daily stage for 36 streams, periodic stage for 14 streams, peak stage and discharge for 8 streams, continuous or daily elevations for 2 lakes, periodic elevations for 3 lakes, and quality-of-water data for 58 surface-water sites. These data represent the national Water Data System records collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating local, state, and federal agencies in Florida.

  14. Global analysis of urban surface water supply vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padowski, Julie C.; Gorelick, Steven M.

    2014-10-01

    This study presents a global analysis of urban water supply vulnerability in 71 surface-water supplied cities, with populations exceeding 750 000 and lacking source water diversity. Vulnerability represents the failure of an urban supply-basin to simultaneously meet demands from human, environmental and agricultural users. We assess a baseline (2010) condition and a future scenario (2040) that considers increased demand from urban population growth and projected agricultural demand. We do not account for climate change, which can potentially exacerbate or reduce urban supply vulnerability. In 2010, 35% of large cities are vulnerable as they compete with agricultural users. By 2040, without additional measures 45% of cities are vulnerable due to increased agricultural and urban demands. Of the vulnerable cities in 2040, the majority are river-supplied with mean flows so low (1200 liters per person per day, l/p/d) that the cities experience ‘chronic water scarcity’ (1370 l/p/d). Reservoirs supply the majority of cities facing individual future threats, revealing that constructed storage potentially provides tenuous water security. In 2040, of the 32 vulnerable cities, 14 would reduce their vulnerability via reallocating water by reducing environmental flows, and 16 would similarly benefit by transferring water from irrigated agriculture. Approximately half remain vulnerable under either potential remedy.

  15. The impact of land use on microbial surface water pollution.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Christiane; Rechenburg, Andrea; Rind, Esther; Kistemann, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Our knowledge relating to water contamination from point and diffuse sources has increased in recent years and there have been many studies undertaken focusing on effluent from sewage plants or combined sewer overflows. However, there is still only a limited amount of microbial data on non-point sources leading to diffuse pollution of surface waters. In this study, the concentrations of several indicator micro-organisms and pathogens in the upper reaches of a river system were examined over a period of 16 months. In addition to bacteria, diffuse pollution caused by Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium spp. was analysed. A single land use type predestined to cause high concentrations of all microbial parameters could not be identified. The influence of different land use types varies between microbial species. The microbial concentration in river water cannot be explained by stable non-point effluent concentrations from different land use types. There is variation in the ranking of the potential of different land use types resulting in surface water contamination with regard to minimum, median and maximum effects. These differences between median and maximum impact indicate that small-scale events like spreading manure substantially influence the general contamination potential of a land use type and may cause increasing micro-organism concentrations in the river water by mobilisation during the next rainfall event. PMID:25456147

  16. Concentration Data for Anthropogenic Organic Compounds in Ground Water, Surface Water, and Finished Water of Selected Community Water Systems in the United States, 2002-05

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, Janet M.; Delzer, Gregory C.; Kingsbury, James A.; Hopple, Jessica A.

    2007-01-01

    The National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the U.S. Geological Survey began implementing Source Water-Quality Assessments (SWQAs) in 2001 that focus on characterizing the quality of source water and finished water of aquifers and major rivers used by some of the larger community water systems (CWSs) in the United States. As used for SWQA studies, source water is the raw (ambient) water collected at the supply well prior to water treatment (for ground water) or the raw (ambient) water collected from the river near the intake (for surface water), and finished water is the water that is treated and ready to be delivered to consumers. Finished water is collected before entering the distribution system. SWQA studies are conducted in two phases, and the objectives of SWQA studies are twofold: (1) to determine the occurrence and, for rivers, seasonal changes in concentrations of a broad list of anthropogenic organic compounds (AOCs) in aquifers and rivers that have some of the largest withdrawals for drinking-water supply (phase 1), and (2) for those AOCs found to occur most frequently in source water, characterize the extent to which these compounds are present in finished water (phase 2). These objectives were met for SWQA studies by collecting ground-water and surface-water (source) samples and analyzing these samples for 258 AOCs during phase 1. Samples from a subset of wells and surface-water sites located in areas with substantial agricultural production in the watershed were analyzed for 19 additional AOCs, for a total of 277 compounds analyzed for SWQA studies. The 277 compounds were classified according to the following 13 primary use or source groups: (1) disinfection by-products; (2) fumigant-related compounds; (3) fungicides; (4) gasoline hydrocarbons, oxygenates, and oxygenate degradates; (5) herbicides and herbicide degradates; (6) insecticides and insecticide degradates; (7) manufacturing additives; (8) organic synthesis compounds; (9) pavement- and

  17. Surface-Water and Ground-Water Interactions in the Central Everglades, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, Judson W.; Newlin, Jessica T.; Krest, James M.; Choi, Jungyill; Nemeth, Eric A.; Krupa, Steven L.

    2004-01-01

    Recharge and discharge are hydrological processes that cause Everglades surface water to be exchanged for subsurface water in the peat soil and the underlying sand and limestone aquifer. These interactions are thought to be important to water budgets, water quality, and ecology in the Everglades. Nonetheless, relatively few studies of surface water and ground water interactions have been conducted in the Everglades, especially in its vast interior areas. This report is a product of a cooperative investigation conducted by the USGS and the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) aimed at developing and testing techniques that would provide reliable estimates of recharge and discharge in interior areas of WCA-2A (Water Conservation Area 2A) and several other sites in the central Everglades. The new techniques quantified flow from surface water to the subsurface (recharge) and the opposite (discharge) using (1) Darcy-flux calculations based on measured vertical gradients in hydraulic head and hydraulic conductivity of peat; (2) modeling transport through peat and decay of the naturally occurring isotopes 224Ra and 223Ra (with half-lives of 4 and 11 days, respectively); and (3) modeling transport and decay of naturally occurring and 'bomb-pulse' tritium (half-life of 12.4 years) in ground water. Advantages and disadvantages of each method for quantifying recharge and discharge were compared. In addition, spatial and temporal variability of recharge and discharge were evaluated and controlling factors identified. A final goal was to develop appropriately simplified (that is, time averaged) expressions of the results that will be useful in addressing a broad range of hydrological and ecological problems in the Everglades. Results were compared with existing information about water budgets from the South Florida Water Management Model (SFWMM), a principal tool used by the South Florida Water Management District to plan many of the hydrological aspects of the

  18. Evaluation of the Surface-Water Quantity, Surface-Water Quality, and Rainfall Data-Collection Programs in Hawaii, 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fontaine, Richard A.

    1996-01-01

    This report documents the results of an evaluation of the surface-water quantity, surface-water quality, and rainfall data-collection programs in Hawaii. Fourteen specific issues and related goals were identified for the surface-water quantity program and a geographic information systems (GIS) data base was developed summarizing information for all surface-water stream gages that have been operated in Hawaii by the U.S. Geological Survey. Changes in status, which for some gages includes discontinuing operation, need to be considered at 42 sites where data are currently collected. The current surface-water quantity data base was determined to be adequate to address only two of the 14 specific issues and related goals. Alternatives were identified to address the areas where future issues and goals could not be adequately addressed. Options include new and expanded data collection, use of regional regression analyses, hydrologic and hydraulic modeling, and analysis and publication of existing data. A total of 47 streams were identified where additional stream-gaging stations are needed. Evaluation of the surface-water quality program was limited to a description of the U.S. Geological Survey's historical and existing programs and available analyses of data. Limitations of the program are described which primarily included lack of data regarding suspended sediment, land-use effects, quality of stream discharge to oceans, background water quality and nonpoint sources of contamination. Evaluation of the rainfall data program indicated that identified future goals could be discussed as either regional, systems related, current needs, forecasting, water quality, or trend analysis related. To address these goals, data from about 2,000 rain gages, 528 of which are active, are available. Data were found to only partially meet identified goals. Alternatives discussed to address the limitations include the need for more recording gages, primarily in areas of high rainfall

  19. Global lake surface water temperatures from ATSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacCallum, Stuart; Merchant, Christopher J.; Layden, Aisling

    2013-04-01

    The ATSR Reprocessing for Climate - Lake (ARC-Lake) project applies optimal estimation (OE) retrievals and probabilistic cloud screening methods to provide lake surface water temperature (LSWT) estimates from the series of (Advanced) Along-Track Scanning Radiometers. This methodology is generic (i.e. applicable to all lakes) as variations in physical properties such as elevation, salinity, and atmospheric conditions are accounted for through the forward modelling of observed radiances. In the initial phases of ARC-Lake, LSWTs were obtained for 258 of Earth's largest lakes. In the final phase of the project, the dataset is extended by applying the OE methodology to smaller lakes, providing LSWT data from 1991 to 2012 for approximately 1000 lakes. In this presentation we will provide an overview of the ARC-Lake project, its publically available data products and some applications of these products.

  20. Surface-water availability, Tuscaloosa County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knight, Alfred L.; Davis, Marvin E.

    1975-01-01

    The average annual runoff, about 1,270 mgd (million gallons per day), originating in Tuscaloosa County is equivalent to 20 inches or 0.95 mgd per square mile. The Black Warrior and Sipsey Rivers, the largest streams in the county, have average flows of 5,230 mgd and 580 mgd, respectively, where they leave the county, and median annual 7-day low flows in excess of 150 mgd and 35 mgd, respectively. North River, Big Sandy Creek, and Hurricane Creek have average flows in excess of 100 mgd and median annual 7-day low flows in excess of 2 mgd. Surface water generally contains less than 100 mg/l (milligrams per liter) dissolved solids, less than 10 mg/l chloride, and is soft to moderately hard. Streams having the higher hardness and the higher dissolved-solids content are in eastern Tuscaloosa County.

  1. Surface Modified Particles By Multi-Step Addition And Process For The Preparation Thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Ronald Lee; Elliott, Brian John; Luebben, Silvia DeVito; Myers, Andrew William; Smith, Bryan Matthew

    2006-01-17

    The present invention relates to a new class of surface modified particles and to a multi-step surface modification process for the preparation of the same. The multi-step surface functionalization process involves two or more reactions to produce particles that are compatible with various host systems and/or to provide the particles with particular chemical reactivities. The initial step comprises the attachment of a small organic compound to the surface of the inorganic particle. The subsequent steps attach additional compounds to the previously attached organic compounds through organic linking groups.

  2. Surface water quality-assurance plan, U.S. Geological Survey, Kentucky Water Science Center, water year 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Michael S.

    2006-01-01

    This Surface Water Quality-Assurance Plan documents the standards, policies, and procedures used by the Kentucky Water Science Center for activities related to the collection, processing, storage, analysis, and publication of surface-water data.

  3. Metolachlor and atrazine fate in surface water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, P.J.; Anderson, T.A.; Coats, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    The detection of pesticides in surface water and ground water provokes concern involving human health risks associated with pesticide exposure. Monitoring studies of surface waters have detected concentrations of herbicides that exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed maximum contamination level (MCL) for drinking water. Conventional water treatment processes do not remove many herbicides. Tap water drawn from surface-water sources has been reported to contain levels of herbicides above the regulatory limits. There is current interest in the use of artificial wetlands and macrophyte-cultured ponds in waste-water-treatment systems. Aquatic plant-based water treatment systems improve waste water effluent by solid filtration and nutrient assimilation. Various aquatic plants have been shown to accumulate metals, absorb inorganic ions, and accelerate the biodegradation of complex organics. Our research evaluates the fate of metolachlor and atrazine in surface water, surface water/sediment, and surface water/aquatic plant incubation systems to study the influence of sediment and aquatic plants in the removal and biotransformation of herbicides from contaminated waters. Aquatic macrophyte systems may prove to be useful in the remediation of herbicide contaminated surface waters in water treatment facilities or in the reduction of herbicide concentrations from tile drain effluents prior to entering watersheds.

  4. Input dynamics of pesticide transformation products into surface water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Susanne; Singer, Heinz; Hollender, Juliane; Schwarzenbach, René P.; Fenner, Kathrin

    2010-05-01

    Some pesticide transformation products have been observed to occur in higher concentrations and more frequently than the parent active pesticide in surface water and groundwater. These products are often more mobile and sometimes more stable than the parent pesticide. If they also represent the major product into which the parent substance is transformed, these transformation products may dominate observed pesticide occurrences in surface water and groundwater. Their potential contribution to the overall risk to the aquatic environment caused by the use of the parent pesticide should therefore not be neglected in chemical risk and water quality assessments. The same is true for transformation products of other compound classes that might reach the soil environment, such as veterinary pharmaceuticals. However, the fate and input pathways of transformation products of soil-applied chemicals into surface water are not yet well understood, which largely prevents their appropriate inclusion into chemical risk and water quality assessments. Here, we studied whether prioritization methods based on available environmental fate data from pesticide registration dossiers in combination with basic fate models could help identify transformation products which can be found in relevant concentrations in surface and groundwater and which should therefore be included into monitoring programs. A three-box steady state model containing air, soil, and surface water compartments was used to predict relative inputs of pesticide transformation products into surface waters based on their physico-chemical and environmental fate properties. The model predictions were compared to monitoring data from a small Swiss river located in an intensely agricultural catchment (90 km2) which was flow-proportionally sampled from May to October 2008 and screened for 74 pesticides as well as 50 corresponding transformation products. Sampling mainly occurred during high discharge, but additional samples

  5. The Synergism Between Heat and Mass Transfer Additive and Advanced Surfaces in Aqueous LiBr Horizontal Tube Absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.A.

    1999-03-24

    Experiments were conducted in a laboratory to investigate the absorption of water vapor into a falling-film of aqueous lithium bromide (LiBr). A mini-absorber test stand was used to test smooth tubes and a variety of advanced tube surfaces placed horizontally in a single-row bundle. The bundle had six copper tubes; each tube had an outside diameter of 15.9-mm and a length of 0.32-m. A unique feature of the stand is its ability to operate continuously and support testing of LiBr brine at mass fractions {ge} 0.62. The test stand can also support testing to study the effect of the failing film mass flow rate, the coolant mass flow rate, the coolant temperature, the absorber pressure and the tube spacing. Manufacturers of absorption chillers add small quantities of a heat and mass transfer additive to improve the performance of the absorbers. The additive causes surface stirring which enhances the transport of absorbate into the bulk of the film. Absorption may also be enhanced with advanced tube surfaces that mechanically induce secondary flows in the falling film without increasing the thickness of the film. Several tube geometry's were identified and tested with the intent of mixing the film and renewing the interface with fresh solution from the tube wall. Testing was completed on a smooth tube and several different externally enhanced tube surfaces. Experiments were conducted over the operating conditions of 6.5 mm Hg absorber pressure, coolant temperatures ranging from 20 to 35 C and LiBr mass fractions ranging from 0.60 through 0.62. Initially the effect of tube spacing was investigated for the smooth tube surface, tested with no heat and mass transfer additive. Test results showed the absorber load and the mass absorbed increased as the tube spacing increased because of the improved wetting of the tube bundle. However, tube spacing was not a critical factor if heat and mass transfer additive was active in the mini-absorber. The additive dramatically affected

  6. Photochemical Transformation Processes in Sunlit Surface Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vione, D.

    2012-12-01

    Photochemical reactions are major processes in the transformation of hardly biodegradable xenobiotics in surface waters. They are usually classified into direct photolysis and indirect or sensitised degradation. Direct photolysis requires xenobiotic compounds to absorb sunlight, and to get transformed as a consequence. Sensitised transformation involves reaction with transient species (e.g. °OH, CO3-°, 1O2 and triplet states of chromophoric dissolved organic matter, 3CDOM*), photogenerated by so-called photosensitisers (nitrate, nitrite and CDOM). CDOM is a major photosensitiser: is it on average the main source of °OH (and of CO3-° as a consequence, which is mainly produced upon oxidation by °OH of carbonate and bicarbonate) and the only important source of 1O2 and 3CDOM* [1, 2]. CDOM origin plays a key role in sensitised processes: allochthonous CDOM derived from soil runoff and rich in fulvic and humic substances is usually more photoactive than autochthonous CDOM (produced by in-water biological processes and mainly consisting of protein-like material) or of CDOM derived from atmospheric deposition. An interesting gradual evolution of CDOM origin and photochemistry can be found in mountain lakes across the treeline, which afford a gradual transition of allochthonous- autochtonous - atmopheric CDOM when passing from trees to alpine meadows to exposed rocks [3]. Another important issue is the sites of reactive species photoproduction in CDOM. While there is evidence that smaller molecular weight fractions are more photoactive, some studies have reported considerable 1O2 reactivity in CDOM hydrophobic sites and inside particles [4]. We have recently addressed the problem and found that dissolved species in standard humic acids (hydrodynamic diameter < 0.1 μm) account for the vast majority of 1O2 and triplet states photoproduction. In hydrophobic sites of particles, the formation rate of 1O2 is considerably lower than in the solution bulk [5], but the absence

  7. Effects of extreme pressure additive chemistry on rolling element bearing surface durability

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Ryan D.; Nixon, H. P.; Darragh, Craig V.; Howe, Jane Y; Coffey, Dorothy W

    2007-01-01

    Lubricant additives have been known to affect rolling element bearing surface durability for many years. Tapered roller bearings were used in fatigue testing of lubricants formulated with gear oil type additive systems. These systems have sulfur- and phosphoruscontaining compounds used for gear protection as well as bearing lubrication. Several variations of a commercially available base additive formulation were tested having modified sulfur components. The variations represent a range of ''active'' extreme pressure (EP) chemistries. The bearing fatigue test results were compared with respect to EP formulation and test conditions. Inner ring near-surface material in selected test bearings was evaluated on two scales: the micrometer scale using optical metallography and the nanometer scale using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Focused-ion beam (FIB) techniques were used for TEM specimen preparation. Imaging and chemical analysis of the bearing samples revealed near-surface material and tribofilm characteristics. These results are discussed with respect to the relative fatigue lives.

  8. Soy Protein Isolate As Fluid Loss Additive in Bentonite-Water-Based Drilling Fluids.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei-Chun; Wu, Qinglin; Song, Kunlin; Lee, Sunyoung; Jin, Chunde; Ren, Suxia; Lei, Tingzhou

    2015-11-11

    Wellbore instability and formation collapse caused by lost circulation are vital issues during well excavation in the oil industry. This study reports the novel utilization of soy protein isolate (SPI) as fluid loss additive in bentonite-water based drilling fluids (BT-WDFs) and describes how its particle size and concentration influence on the filtration property of SPI/BT-WDFs. It was found that high pressure homogenization (HPH)-treated SPI had superior filtration property over that of native SPI due to the improved ability for the plugging pore throat. HPH treatment also caused a significant change in the surface characteristic of SPI, leading to a considerable surface interaction with BT in aqueous solution. The concentration of SPI had a significant impact on the dispersion state of SPI/BT mixtures in aquesous solution. At low SPI concentrations, strong aggregations were created, resulting in the formation of thick, loose, high-porosity and high-permeability filter cakes and high fluid loss. At high SPI concentrations, intercatlated/exfoliated structures were generated, resulting in the formation of thin, compact, low-porosity and low-permeability filter cakes and low fluid loss. The SPI/BT-WDFs exhibited superior filtration property than pure BT-WDFs at the same solid concentraion, demonstrating the potential utilization of SPI as an effective, renewable, and biodegradable fluid loss reducer in well excavation applications. PMID:26492498

  9. Characterization and analysis of surface notches on Ti-alloy plates fabricated by additive manufacturing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwai S.

    2015-12-01

    Rectangular plates of Ti-6Al-4V with extra low interstitial (ELI) were fabricated by layer-by-layer deposition techniques that included electron beam melting (EBM) and laser beam melting (LBM). The surface conditions of these plates were characterized using x-ray micro-computed tomography. The depth and radius of surface notch-like features on the LBM and EBM plates were measured from sectional images of individual virtual slices of the rectangular plates. The stress concentration factors of individual surface notches were computed and analyzed statistically to determine the appropriate distributions for the notch depth, notch radius, and stress concentration factor. These results were correlated with the fatigue life of the Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloys from an earlier investigation. A surface notch analysis was performed to assess the debit in the fatigue strength due to the surface notches. The assessment revealed that the fatigue lives of the additively manufactured plates with rough surface topographies and notch-like features are dominated by the fatigue crack growth of large cracks for both the LBM and EBM materials. The fatigue strength reduction due to the surface notches can be as large as 60%-75%. It is concluded that for better fatigue performance, the surface notches on EBM and LBM materials need to be removed by machining and the surface roughness be improved to a surface finish of about 1 μm.

  10. Effect of flame-retarding additives on surface chemistry in Li-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, N.D.; Park, I.J.; Kim, J.G.; Kim, H.S.

    2012-10-15

    This study examined the properties of 1 wt.% vinylene carbonate (VC), vinyl ethylene carbonate (VEC), and diphenyl octyl phosphate (DPOF) additive electrolytes as a promising way of beneficially improving the surface and cell resistance of Li-ion batteries. Surface film formation on the negative and positive electrodes was analyzed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In conclusion, EIS, FT-IR spectroscopy and SEM results confirmed that DPOF is an excellent additive to the electrolyte in the Li-ion batteries due to the improved co-intercalation of the solvent molecules.

  11. Macro-Invertebrate Decline in Surface Water Polluted with Imidacloprid

    PubMed Central

    Van Dijk, Tessa C.; Van Staalduinen, Marja A.; Van der Sluijs, Jeroen P.

    2013-01-01

    Imidacloprid is one of the most widely used insecticides in the world. Its concentration in surface water exceeds the water quality norms in many parts of the Netherlands. Several studies have demonstrated harmful effects of this neonicotinoid to a wide range of non-target species. Therefore we expected that surface water pollution with imidacloprid would negatively impact aquatic ecosystems. Availability of extensive monitoring data on the abundance of aquatic macro-invertebrate species, and on imidacloprid concentrations in surface water in the Netherlands enabled us to test this hypothesis. Our regression analysis showed a significant negative relationship (P<0.001) between macro-invertebrate abundance and imidacloprid concentration for all species pooled. A significant negative relationship was also found for the orders Amphipoda, Basommatophora, Diptera, Ephemeroptera and Isopoda, and for several species separately. The order Odonata had a negative relationship very close to the significance threshold of 0.05 (P = 0.051). However, in accordance with previous research, a positive relationship was found for the order Actinedida. We used the monitoring field data to test whether the existing three water quality norms for imidacloprid in the Netherlands are protective in real conditions. Our data show that macrofauna abundance drops sharply between 13 and 67 ng l−1. For aquatic ecosystem protection, two of the norms are not protective at all while the strictest norm of 13 ng l−1 (MTR) seems somewhat protective. In addition to the existing experimental evidence on the negative effects of imidacloprid on invertebrate life, our study, based on data from large-scale field monitoring during multiple years, shows that serious concern about the far-reaching consequences of the abundant use of imidacloprid for aquatic ecosystems is justified. PMID:23650513

  12. Macro-invertebrate decline in surface water polluted with imidacloprid.

    PubMed

    Van Dijk, Tessa C; Van Staalduinen, Marja A; Van der Sluijs, Jeroen P

    2013-01-01

    Imidacloprid is one of the most widely used insecticides in the world. Its concentration in surface water exceeds the water quality norms in many parts of the Netherlands. Several studies have demonstrated harmful effects of this neonicotinoid to a wide range of non-target species. Therefore we expected that surface water pollution with imidacloprid would negatively impact aquatic ecosystems. Availability of extensive monitoring data on the abundance of aquatic macro-invertebrate species, and on imidacloprid concentrations in surface water in the Netherlands enabled us to test this hypothesis. Our regression analysis showed a significant negative relationship (P<0.001) between macro-invertebrate abundance and imidacloprid concentration for all species pooled. A significant negative relationship was also found for the orders Amphipoda, Basommatophora, Diptera, Ephemeroptera and Isopoda, and for several species separately. The order Odonata had a negative relationship very close to the significance threshold of 0.05 (P = 0.051). However, in accordance with previous research, a positive relationship was found for the order Actinedida. We used the monitoring field data to test whether the existing three water quality norms for imidacloprid in the Netherlands are protective in real conditions. Our data show that macrofauna abundance drops sharply between 13 and 67 ng l(-1). For aquatic ecosystem protection, two of the norms are not protective at all while the strictest norm of 13 ng l(-1) (MTR) seems somewhat protective. In addition to the existing experimental evidence on the negative effects of imidacloprid on invertebrate life, our study, based on data from large-scale field monitoring during multiple years, shows that serious concern about the far-reaching consequences of the abundant use of imidacloprid for aquatic ecosystems is justified. PMID:23650513

  13. Sustainability of global groundwater and surface water use: past reconstruction and future projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Y.; Bierkens, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    Overuse of surface water and an increasing reliance on nonrenewable groundwater resources have been reported over various regions of the world, casting significant doubt on the sustainable water supply and food production met by irrigation. To assess the limitations of global water resources, numerous indicators have been developed, but they rarely consider nonrenewable water use. In addition, surface water over-abstraction is rarely assessed in the context of human and environmental water needs. Here, we perform a transient assessment of global groundwater and surface water use over the historical period 1960-2010 as well as the future projections of 2011-2099, using a newly developed indicator: the Blue Water Sustainability Index (BlWSI). The BlWSI incorporates both nonrenewable groundwater use and nonsustainable water use that compromises environmental flow requirements. Our results reveal an increasing trend of water consumed from nonsustainable surface water and groundwater resources over the historical period (~30%), and this increase is projected to continue further towards the end of this century (~40%). The global amount of nonsustainable water consumption has been increasing especially since the late 1990s, despite a wetter climate and increasing water availability during this period. The BlWSI is the first tool suitable for consistently evaluating the renewability and degradation of surface water and groundwater resources as a result of human water over-abstraction.

  14. 40 CFR 257.3-3 - Surface water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Water Act, as amended, 33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq., and implementing regulations, specifically 33 CFR part... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Surface water. 257.3-3 Section 257.3-3... and Practices § 257.3-3 Surface water. (a) For purposes of section 4004(a) of the Act, a...

  15. 40 CFR 258.27 - Surface water requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface water requirements. 258.27... FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Operating Criteria § 258.27 Surface water requirements. MSWLF... wetlands, that violates any requirements of the Clean Water Act, including, but not limited to,...

  16. 40 CFR 257.3-3 - Surface water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Water Act, as amended, 33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq., and implementing regulations, specifically 33 CFR part... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Surface water. 257.3-3 Section 257.3-3... and Practices § 257.3-3 Surface water. (a) For purposes of section 4004(a) of the Act, a...

  17. 40 CFR 257.3-3 - Surface water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Water Act, as amended, 33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq., and implementing regulations, specifically 33 CFR part... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface water. 257.3-3 Section 257.3-3... and Practices § 257.3-3 Surface water. (a) For purposes of section 4004(a) of the Act, a...

  18. 40 CFR 258.27 - Surface water requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Surface water requirements. 258.27... FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Operating Criteria § 258.27 Surface water requirements. MSWLF... wetlands, that violates any requirements of the Clean Water Act, including, but not limited to,...

  19. 40 CFR 257.3-3 - Surface water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Water Act, as amended, 33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq., and implementing regulations, specifically 33 CFR part... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Surface water. 257.3-3 Section 257.3-3... and Practices § 257.3-3 Surface water. (a) For purposes of section 4004(a) of the Act, a...

  20. 40 CFR 257.3-3 - Surface water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Water Act, as amended, 33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq., and implementing regulations, specifically 33 CFR part... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Surface water. 257.3-3 Section 257.3-3... and Practices § 257.3-3 Surface water. (a) For purposes of section 4004(a) of the Act, a...

  1. Instructions for measuring the rate of evaporation from water surfaces

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1898-01-01

    The ·rate of evaporation from water surfaces varies with the temperature of the water, the velocity of the wind at the water surface, and the dryness of the air. Consequently, the rate of evaporation from rivers, lakes, canals, or reservoirs varies widely in different localities and for the same locality in different seasons.

  2. 40 CFR 258.27 - Surface water requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Surface water requirements. 258.27... FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Operating Criteria § 258.27 Surface water requirements. MSWLF... wetlands, that violates any requirements of the Clean Water Act, including, but not limited to,...

  3. Floating Vegetated Mats For Improving Surface Water Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contamination of surface and ground waters is an environmental concern. Pollution from both point and nonpoint sources can render water unsuitable for use. Surface waters of concern include streams, rivers, ponds, lakes, canals, and wastewater lagoons. Lagooned wastewater from confined animal feedi...

  4. 40 CFR 258.27 - Surface water requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Surface water requirements. 258.27... FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Operating Criteria § 258.27 Surface water requirements. MSWLF... wetlands, that violates any requirements of the Clean Water Act, including, but not limited to,...

  5. 40 CFR 258.27 - Surface water requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Surface water requirements. 258.27... FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Operating Criteria § 258.27 Surface water requirements. MSWLF... wetlands, that violates any requirements of the Clean Water Act, including, but not limited to,...

  6. Adsorption structure of water molecules on the Be(0001) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yu; Li, Yanfang; Wang, Shuangxi; Zhang, Ping

    2014-06-07

    By using density functional theory calculations, we systematically investigate the adsorption of water molecules at different coverages on the Be(0001) surface. The coverage dependence of the prototype water structures and energetics for water adlayer growth are systematically studied. The structures, energetics, and electronic properties are calculated and compared with other available studies. Through our systematic investigations, we find that water molecules form clusters or chains on the Be(0001) surface at low coverages. When increasing the water coverage, water molecules tend to form a 2 × 2 hexagonal network on the Be(0001) surface.

  7. First-principles study of water desorption from montmorillonite surface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao; Meng, Yingfeng; Liu, Houbin; Yang, Mingli

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge about water desorption is important to give a full picture of water diffusion in montmorillonites (MMT), which is a driving factor in MMT swelling. The desorption paths and energetics of water molecules from the surface of MMT with trapped Li(+), Na(+) or K(+) counterions were studied using periodic density functional theory calculations. Two paths--surface and vacuum desorption--were designed for water desorption starting from a stationary structure in which water bonds with both the counterion and the MMT surface. Surface desorption is energetically more favorable than vacuum desorption due to water-surface hydrogen bonds that help stabilize the intermediate structure of water released from the counterion. The energy barriers of water desorption are in the order of Li(+) > Na(+) > K(+), which can be attributed to the short ionic radius of Li(+), which favors strong binding with the water molecule. The temperature dependence of water adsorption and desorption rates were compared based on the computed activation energies. Our calculations reveal that the water desorption on the MMT surface has a different mechanism from water adsorption, which results from surface effects favoring stabilization of water conformers during the desorption process. PMID:27083565

  8. Microbial community genomics in eastern Mediterranean Sea surface waters.

    PubMed

    Feingersch, Roi; Suzuki, Marcelino T; Shmoish, Michael; Sharon, Itai; Sabehi, Gazalah; Partensky, Frédéric; Béjà, Oded

    2010-01-01

    Offshore waters of the eastern Mediterranean Sea are one of the most oligotrophic regions on Earth in which the primary productivity is phosphorus limited. To study the unexplored function and physiology of microbes inhabiting this system, we have analyzed a genomic library from the eastern Mediterranean Sea surface waters by sequencing both termini of nearly 5000 clones. Genome recruitment strategies showed that the majority of high-scoring pairs corresponded to genomes from the Alphaproteobacteria (SAR11-like and Rhodobacterales), Cyanobacteria (Synechococcus and high-light adapted Prochlorococcus) and diverse uncultured Gammaproteobacteria. The community structure observed, as evaluated by both protein similarity scores or metabolic potential, was similar to that found in the euphotic zone of the ALOHA station off Hawaii but very different from that of deep aphotic zones in both the Mediterranean Sea and the Pacific Ocean. In addition, a strong enrichment toward phosphate and phosphonate uptake and utilization metabolism was also observed. PMID:19693100

  9. Effect of Surface-active Additives on Physical Properties of Slurries of Vapor-process Magnesium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinns, Murray L

    1955-01-01

    The presence of 3 to 5 percent surface-active additive gave the lowest Brookfield apparent viscosity, plastic viscosity, and yield value that were obtained for slurry fuels containing approximately 50 percent vapor-process magnesium in JP-1 fuel. The slurries settled little and were easily remixed. A polyoxyethylene dodecyl alcohol was the most effective of 13 additives tested in reducing the Brookfield apparent viscosity and the yield value of the slurry. The seven most effective additives all had a hydroxyl group plus an ester or polyoxethylene group in the molecule. The densities of some of the slurries were measured.

  10. Layered Double Hydroxide Nanoplatelets with Excellent Tribological Properties under High Contact Pressure as Water-Based Lubricant Additives

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongdong; Liu, Yuhong; Chen, Zhe; Wu, Bibo; Xu, Sailong; Luo, Jianbin

    2016-01-01

    High efficient and sustainable utilization of water-based lubricant is essential for saving energy. In this paper, a kind of layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoplatelets is synthesized and well dispersed in water due to the surface modification with oleylamine. The excellent tribological properties of the oleylamine-modified Ni-Al LDH (NiAl-LDH/OAm) nanoplatelets as water-based lubricant additives are evaluated by the tribological tests in an aqueous environment. The modified LDH nanoplatelets are found to not only reduce the friction but also enhance the wear resistance, compared with the water-based cutting fluid and lubricants containing other particle additives. By adding 0.5 wt% LDH nanoplatelets, under 1.5 GPa initial contact pressure, the friction coefficient, scar diameter, depth and width of the wear track dramatically decrease by 83.1%, 43.2%, 88.5% and 59.5%, respectively. It is considered that the sufficiently small size and the excellent dispersion of NiAl-LDH/OAm nanoplatelets in water are the key factors, so as to make them enter the contact area, form a lubricating film and prevent direct collision of asperity peaks. Our investigations demonstrate that the LDH nanoplatelet as a water-based lubricant additive has a great potential value in industrial application. PMID:26951794

  11. Layered Double Hydroxide Nanoplatelets with Excellent Tribological Properties under High Contact Pressure as Water-Based Lubricant Additives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongdong; Liu, Yuhong; Chen, Zhe; Wu, Bibo; Xu, Sailong; Luo, Jianbin

    2016-01-01

    High efficient and sustainable utilization of water-based lubricant is essential for saving energy. In this paper, a kind of layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoplatelets is synthesized and well dispersed in water due to the surface modification with oleylamine. The excellent tribological properties of the oleylamine-modified Ni-Al LDH (NiAl-LDH/OAm) nanoplatelets as water-based lubricant additives are evaluated by the tribological tests in an aqueous environment. The modified LDH nanoplatelets are found to not only reduce the friction but also enhance the wear resistance, compared with the water-based cutting fluid and lubricants containing other particle additives. By adding 0.5 wt% LDH nanoplatelets, under 1.5 GPa initial contact pressure, the friction coefficient, scar diameter, depth and width of the wear track dramatically decrease by 83.1%, 43.2%, 88.5% and 59.5%, respectively. It is considered that the sufficiently small size and the excellent dispersion of NiAl-LDH/OAm nanoplatelets in water are the key factors, so as to make them enter the contact area, form a lubricating film and prevent direct collision of asperity peaks. Our investigations demonstrate that the LDH nanoplatelet as a water-based lubricant additive has a great potential value in industrial application. PMID:26951794

  12. Layered Double Hydroxide Nanoplatelets with Excellent Tribological Properties under High Contact Pressure as Water-Based Lubricant Additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongdong; Liu, Yuhong; Chen, Zhe; Wu, Bibo; Xu, Sailong; Luo, Jianbin

    2016-03-01

    High efficient and sustainable utilization of water-based lubricant is essential for saving energy. In this paper, a kind of layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoplatelets is synthesized and well dispersed in water due to the surface modification with oleylamine. The excellent tribological properties of the oleylamine-modified Ni-Al LDH (NiAl-LDH/OAm) nanoplatelets as water-based lubricant additives are evaluated by the tribological tests in an aqueous environment. The modified LDH nanoplatelets are found to not only reduce the friction but also enhance the wear resistance, compared with the water-based cutting fluid and lubricants containing other particle additives. By adding 0.5 wt% LDH nanoplatelets, under 1.5 GPa initial contact pressure, the friction coefficient, scar diameter, depth and width of the wear track dramatically decrease by 83.1%, 43.2%, 88.5% and 59.5%, respectively. It is considered that the sufficiently small size and the excellent dispersion of NiAl-LDH/OAm nanoplatelets in water are the key factors, so as to make them enter the contact area, form a lubricating film and prevent direct collision of asperity peaks. Our investigations demonstrate that the LDH nanoplatelet as a water-based lubricant additive has a great potential value in industrial application.

  13. Dynamic Response of Forest Litter and Mineral Soil to Pulsed Water Additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boot, C. M.; Schaeffer, S. M.; Carbone, M. S.; Still, C. J.; Schimel, J.

    2010-12-01

    Quantifying microbial responses to drought and moisture pulses are essential to understanding terrestrial C cycling in a changing climate. Using laboratory incubations we sought to determine if water added in multiple consecutive pulses to pine forest litter and mineral soil resulted in different C dynamics than water added in a single event. Soils were collected from two sites on Santa Cruz Island located in Channel Islands National Park 40 km southwest of Santa Barbara, CA. Both sites are dominated by Bishop pine (Pinus muricata) mixed with chaparral shrubs, with a ~3-10 cm thick litter layer. The sites differ, however, in the frequency and amount of precipitation received. Following water additions as either one or three pulses (equal total volume) we measured respiration, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) over twenty-two days after the first water addition. Three days after the initial water addition in the litter samples the DOC and MBC for both treatments were not different; however, the temporal dynamics varied by site with the high precipitation site responding more quickly and with a higher magnitude than the low precipitation site. In both the litter and mineral soil respiration rate correlated with soil moisture (r2=0.91 and 0.84 respectively). Our results suggest that the water history and other site-specific characteristics were more important in the response to pulsed water additions than how the water was introduced to the system.

  14. Enhancing water removal from whole stillage by enzyme addition during fermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The removal of water from coproducts in the fuel ethanol process requires a significant energy input. In this study, the addition of cell-wall-degrading enzymes was investigated to determine whether or not the enzymes could reduce the amount of water bound within the wet grains. This would have the ...

  15. Methemoglobinemia attributable to nitrite contamination of potable water through boiler fluid additives--New Jersey, 1992 and 1996.

    PubMed

    1997-03-01

    Nitrite and nitrate ions are naturally occurring forms of nitrogen that can be present in ground and surface water and can be used as a food preservative because they inhibit the growth of Clostridium botulinum. Exposure to excessive levels of nitrite or nitrate may result in the acute syndrome of methemoglobinemia (MetHb), in which nitrite binds to hemoglobin. This report summarizes the findings of investigations of two incidents in which unintentional exposure to high doses of nitrite occurred through drinking potable water contaminated with additives to boiler conditioning fluids. PMID:9072681

  16. Redispersibility in magnetorheological fluids: Surface interactions between iron powder and wetting additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombard, Antonio J. F.; Antunes, Laís S.; Gouvêa, Douglas

    2009-02-01

    Our aim in this work was to investigate the interactions between 3 carbonyl iron powders (CIP) and different wetting additives, looking for to understand how these interactions affects the rheology and redispersibility of magnetorheological fluids (MRF). The powders were named: 'A' (uncoated), 'B' (with silica coating), and 'C' (with iron III oxide coating). The additives studied were alcohols, amines and carboxylic acids or polymeric dispersants, mainly with n-octyl or n-dodecyl hydrocarbon chains. The effect of additives concentration was also studied. We conclude that the redispersibility of MRF is strongly dependent on both carbonyl iron powder surface properties and choice and concentration of dispersing additives. The type of iron powder modification also has a significant role on the viscosity of MRF formulations additionally to the known particle size effects.

  17. Synthesis of DHA/EPA-rich phosphatidylcholine by immobilized phospholipase A1: effect of water addition and vacuum condition.

    PubMed

    Li, Daoming; Qin, Xiaoli; Wang, Weifei; Li, Zhigang; Yang, Bo; Wang, Yonghua

    2016-08-01

    DHA/EPA-rich phosphatidylcholine (PC) was successfully synthesized by immobilized phospholipase A1 (PLA1)-catalyzed transesterification of PC and DHA/EPA-rich ethyl esters in a solvent-free system. Effects of reaction temperature, water addition and substrate mass ratio on the incorporation of DHA/EPA were evaluated using response surface methods (RSM). Water addition had most significant effect on the incorporation. Reaction temperature and substrate mass ratio, however, had no significant effect on the incorporation. The maximal incorporation was 19.09 % (24 h) under the following conditions: temperature 55.7 °C, water addition 1.1 wt % and substrate mass ratio (ethyl esters/PC) 6.8:1. Furthermore, effects of water addition (from 0 to 1.25 wt %) on DHA/EPA incorporation and the composition of products were further investigated. The immobilized PLA1 was more active when water addition was above 0.5 wt %. By monitoring the reaction processes with different water addition, a possible reaction scheme was proposed for transesterification of PC with DHA/EPA-rich ethyl esters. In summary, PC and sn2-lysophosphatidylocholine (LPC) were predominant in the mixtures at early stages of reaction, whereas sn1-LPC and glycerophosphocholine (GPC) predominant at later stages. The vacuum employed after 24 h significantly increased the incorporation of DHA/EPA and the composition of PC, and the highest incorporation (30.31 %) of DHA/EPA was obtained at 72 h and the yield of PC was 47.2 %. PMID:27108109

  18. Thermal behavior of water confined in micro porous of clay mineral at additional pressure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Y.; Takemura, T.; Fujimori, H.; Nagoe, A.; Sugimoto, T.

    2014-12-01

    Water is the most familiar substance. However water has specific properties that has a crystal structure of a dozen and density of that is maximum at 277.15 K. Therefore it understands various natural phenomena to study physical properties of water. Oodo et al study physical properties of water confined in silica gel [1]. They indicate that melting point of water confined in silica gel decrease with decreasing pore size of silica gel. Also in case that pore size is less than 2 nm, water confined in silica gel is unfreezing water at low temperature. It is considered that effect of pore size prevent crystal growth of water. Therefore we are interested in water confined in clay minerals. Clay minerals have a number of water conditions. Also it is thought that water confined in clay minerals show different physical behavior to exist the domain where change with various effect. Therefore we studied a thermal properties and phase behavior of absorption water in clay minerals. In addition, we analyzed the changes in the thermal behavior of absorption water due to the effect of earth pressure that was an environmental factor in the ground. [1] Oodo & Fujimori, J. Non-Cryst. Solids, 357 (2011) 683.

  19. Effect of two-stage coagulant addition on coagulation-ultrafiltration process for treatment of humic-rich water.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Chen, Zhong-lin; Yu, Wen-zheng; Shen, Ji-min; Gregory, John

    2011-08-01

    A novel two-stage coagulant addition strategy applied in a coagulation-ultrafiltration (UF) process for treatment of humic-rich water at neutral pH was investigated in this study. When aluminum sulfate (alum) doses were set at a ratio of 3:1 added during rapid mix stage and half way through flocculation stage, the integrated process of two-stage alum addition achieved almost the same organic matter removal as that of conventional one-stage alum addition at the same overall dose. Whereas membrane fouling could be effectively mitigated by the two-stage addition exhibited by trans-membrane pressure (TMP) developments. The TMP developments were found to be primarily attributed to external fouling on membrane surface, which was closely associated with floc characteristics. The results of jar tests indicated that the average size of flocs formed in two-stage addition mode roughly reached one half larger than that in one-stage addition mode, which implied a beneficial effect on membrane fouling reduction. Moreover, the flocs with more irregular structure and lower effective density resulted from the two-stage alum addition, which caused higher porosity of cake layer formed by such flocs on membrane surface. Microscopic observations of membrane surface demonstrated that internal fouling in membrane pores could be also remarkably limited by two-stage alum addition. It is likely that the freshly formed hydroxide precipitates were distinct in surface characteristics from the aged precipitates due to formation of more active groups or adsorption of more labile aluminum species. Consequently, the flocs could further connect and aggregate to contribute to preferable properties for filtration performance of the coagulation-UF process. As a simple and efficient approach, two-stage coagulant addition strategy could have great practical significance in coagulation-membrane processes. PMID:21704354

  20. Spreading of Cholera through Surface Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertuzzo, E.; Casagrandi, R.; Gatto, M.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.; Rinaldo, A.

    2009-12-01

    Cholera epidemics are still a major public health concern to date in many areas of the world. In order to understand and forecast cholera outbreaks, one of the most important factors is the role played by the environmental matrix in which the disease spreads. We study how river networks, acting as environmental corridors for pathogens, affect the spreading of cholera epidemics. The environmental matrix in which the disease spreads is constituted by different human communities and their hydrologic interconnections. Each community is characterized by its spatial position, population size, water resources availability and hygiene conditions. By implementing a spatially explicit cholera model we seek the effects on epidemic dynamics of: i) the topology and metrics of the pathogens pathways that connect different communities; ii) the spatial distribution of the population size; and iii) the spatial distributions and quality of surface water resources and public health conditions, and how they vary with population size. The model has been applied to study the space-time evolution of a well documented cholera epidemic occurred in the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa. The epidemic lasted for two years and involved about 140,000 confirmed cholera cases. The model does well in reproducing the distribution of the cholera cases during the two outbreaks as well as their spatial spreading. We further extend the model by deriving the speed of propagation of traveling fronts in the case of uniformly distributed systems for different topologies: one and two dimensional lattices and river networks. The derivation of the spreading celerity proves instrumental in establishing the overall conditions for the relevance of spatially explicit models. The conditions are sought by comparison between spreading and disease timescales. Consider a cholera epidemic that starts from a point and spreads throughout a finite size system, it is possible to identify two different timescales: i

  1. Factors affecting response of surface waters to acidic deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.S.; Johnson, D.W.; Elwood, J.W.; Van Winkle, W.; Clapp, R.B.; Reuss, J.O.

    1986-04-01

    Knowledge of watershed hydrology and of the biogeochemical reactions and elemental pools and fluxes occurring in watersheds can be used to classify the response of watersheds and surface waters to acidic deposition. A conceptual mosel is presented for classifying watersheds into those for which (1) surface water chemistry will change rapidly with deposition quality (direct response) (2) surface water chemistry will change only slowly over time (delayed response), and (3) surface water chemistry will not change significantly, even with continued acidic deposition (capacity-protected). Techniques and data available for classification of all watersheds in a region into these categories are discussed.

  2. Olefin Metathesis Reaction in Water and in Air Improved by Supramolecular Additives.

    PubMed

    Tomasek, Jasmine; Seßler, Miriam; Gröger, Harald; Schatz, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    A range of water-immiscible commercially available Grubbs-type precatalysts can be used in ring-closing olefin metathesis reaction in high yields. The synthetic transformation is possible in pure water under ambient conditions. Sulfocalixarenes can help to boost the reactivity of the metathesis reaction by catalyst activation, improved mass transfer, and solubility of reactants in the aqueous reaction media. Additionally, the use of supramolecular additives allows lower catalyst loadings, but still high activity in pure water under aerobic conditions. PMID:26506329

  3. Effect of surface hydrophilicity on the confined water film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuhai; Ma, Liran; Zhang, Chenhui; Lu, Xinchun

    2007-12-01

    The effect of surface hydrophilicity on the water film confined within a nanogap between a smooth plate and a highly polished steel ball has been investigated. It was found that the confined water film formed the thicker lubricate film than the prediction of elastic-isoviscous lubrication theory. Experimental results indicated that the hydrophobic surface induced the thicker water film than the hydrophilic one. It is thought that the "structured" interfacial water layer is formed between the solid surfaces and the hydrophobic group induces the more ordered hydrogen-bonding network of clathrate cages which forms the thicker water film than hydrophilic one.

  4. Structure of water adsorbed on a mica surface

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung-Ho; Sposito, Garrison

    2002-01-29

    Monte Carlo simulations of hydration water on the mica (001) surface under ambient conditions revealed water molecules bound closely to the ditrigonal cavities in the surface, with a lateral distribution of approximately one per cavity, and water molecules interposed between K{sup +} counter ions in a layer situated about 2.5 {angstrom} from a surface O along a direction normal to the (001) plane. The calculated water O density profile was in quantitative agreement with recent X-ray reflectivity measurements indicating strong lateral ordering of the hydration water but liquid-like disorder otherwise.

  5. Effect of nonionic surfactant addition on Pyrex glass ablation using water-assisted CO2 laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, C. K.; Liao, M. W.; Lin, S. L.

    2010-04-01

    Pyrex glass etching using laser ablation is an important technology for the microfluid application to lab-on-a-chip devices but suffers from the formation of surface crack. In this article, the addition of nonionic surfactant to water for glass ablation using water-assisted CO2 laser processing (WACLAP) has been investigated to enhance ablation rate and to eliminate conventional surface defects of cracks in air. WACLAP for Pyrex glass ablation can reduce thermal-stress-induced crack with water cooling and hydrophilic nonionic surfactant to water can enhance ablation performance. Compared to pure water, the 15% weight percent Lauramidopropyl Betaine surfactant solutions for WACLAP can enhance ablation rate from 13.6 to 25 μm/pass of Pyrex glass ablation at a linear laser energy density of 2.11 J/cm, i.e., 24 W power, 114 mm/s scanning speed, and obtain through-wafer etching at 3.16 J/cm for 20 passes without cracks on the surface. Effect of surfactant concentration and linear energy density on WACLAP was also examined. The possible mechanism of surfactant-enhanced phenomenon was discussed by the Newton’s law of viscosity of surfactant solution.

  6. Green Approach to the Fabrication of Superhydrophobic Mesh Surface for Oil/Water Separation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fajun; Lei, Sheng; Xu, Yao; Ou, Junfei

    2015-07-20

    We report a simple and environment friendly method to fabricate superhydrophobic metallic mesh surfaces for oil/water separation. The obtained mesh surface exhibits superhydrophobicity and superoleophilicity after it was dried in an oven at 200 °C for 10 min. A rough silver layer is formed on the mesh surface after immersion, and the spontaneous adsorption of airborne carbon contaminants on the silver surface lower the surface free energy of the mesh. No low-surface-energy reagents and/or volatile organic solvents are used. In addition, we demonstrate that by using the mesh box, oils can be separated and collected from the surface of water repeatedly, and that high separation efficiencies of larger than 92 % are retained for various oils. Moreover, the superhydrophobic mesh also possesses excellent corrosion resistance and thermal stability. Hence, these superhydrophobic meshes might be good candidates for the practical separation of oil from the surface of water. PMID:26017675

  7. Ground-water/surface-water relations along Honey Creek, Washtenaw County, Michigan, 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, Denis F.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the city of Ann Arbor, Mich., investigated the ground-water/surface-water relations along the lower reaches of Honey Creek, Washtenaw County, Mich., and an unnamed tributary to Honey Creek (the discharge tributary) from June through October 2003. Streamflow in these reaches was artificially high during a naturally low-flow period due to an anthropogenic discharge. Ground-water/surface-water relations were examined by seepage runs (series of streamflow measurements for the computation of streams gains or losses) and measurements of the difference in head between the stream surface and shallow aquifer. Specific conductance and water-temperature measurements were used as ancillary data to help identify gaining and losing reaches. Three seepage runs and four runs in which hydraulic-head differences between the stream and shallow aquifer were measured (piezometer runs) were made during periods of base flow. Streamflow measurements were made at 18 sites for the seepage runs. Instream piezometers were installed at 16 sites and bank piezometers were installed at 2 sites. Two deeper instream piezometers were installed at site 13 on September 4, 2003 to collect additional data on the ground-water/surface-water relations at that site. The seepage runs indicate that the main stem of Honey Creek and the discharge tributary in the study area are overall gaining reaches. The seepage runs also indicate that smaller reaches of Honey Creek and the discharge tributary may be losing reaches and that this relation may change over time with changing hydraulic conditions. The piezometer-run measurements support the seepage-run results on the main stem, whereas piezometer-run measurements both support and conflict with seepage-run measurements on the discharge tributary. Seepage runs give an average for the reach, whereas piezometer head-difference measurements are for a specific area around the piezometer. Data that may appear to be

  8. Role of additives in wood plastic composite of water soluble monomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, K. M. Idriss; Khan, Mubarak A.; Husain, M. M.

    1994-10-01

    Wood plastic composites are prepared under radiation of 60Co gamma source with simul, a low grade wood of Bangladesh using a water soluble monomer acrylamide (AM) mixed with a swelling solvent methanol, water or methanol/water (1:1) at different compositions in the presence of a number of additives and co-additives such as NVP ( N-vinylpyrrolidone), TPGDA (tripropylene glycol diacrylate), TMPTA (trimethylol propane triacrylate), sulfuric acid, urea and copper sulfate. Polymer loading (PL) and tensile strength (TS) of the composites are measured. The role of these additives on the composites is also discussed. It is observed that nitrogen-atom containing-materials like urea, NVP and AM produce composites with the highest mechanical strength, and incorporation of copper into this system provides additional property of protection and preservation of the composites against attacks by insects and microbes.

  9. An ontology design pattern for surface water features

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sinha, Gaurav; Mark, David; Kolas, Dave; Varanka, Dalia; Romero, Boleslo E.; Feng, Chen-Chieh; Usery, E. Lynn; Liebermann, Joshua; Sorokine, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Surface water is a primary concept of human experience but concepts are captured in cultures and languages in many different ways. Still, many commonalities exist due to the physical basis of many of the properties and categories. An abstract ontology of surface water features based only on those physical properties of landscape features has the best potential for serving as a foundational domain ontology for other more context-dependent ontologies. The Surface Water ontology design pattern was developed both for domain knowledge distillation and to serve as a conceptual building-block for more complex or specialized surface water ontologies. A fundamental distinction is made in this ontology between landscape features that act as containers (e.g., stream channels, basins) and the bodies of water (e.g., rivers, lakes) that occupy those containers. Concave (container) landforms semantics are specified in a Dry module and the semantics of contained bodies of water in a Wet module. The pattern is implemented in OWL, but Description Logic axioms and a detailed explanation is provided in this paper. The OWL ontology will be an important contribution to Semantic Web vocabulary for annotating surface water feature datasets. Also provided is a discussion of why there is a need to complement the pattern with other ontologies, especially the previously developed Surface Network pattern. Finally, the practical value of the pattern in semantic querying of surface water datasets is illustrated through an annotated geospatial dataset and sample queries using the classes of the Surface Water pattern.

  10. Structure and properties of water film adsorbed on mica surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Gutian; Tan, Qiyan; Xiang, Li; Cai, Di; Zeng, Hongbo; Yi, Hong; Ni, Zhonghua; Chen, Yunfei

    2015-09-01

    The structure profiles and physical properties of the adsorbed water film on a mica surface under conditions with different degrees of relative humidity are investigated by a surface force apparatus. The first layer of the adsorbed water film shows ice-like properties, including a lattice constant similar with ice crystal, a high bearing capacity that can support normal pressure as high as 4 MPa, a creep behavior under the action of even a small normal load, and a character of hydrogen bond. Adjacent to the first layer of the adsorbed water film, the water molecules in the outer layer are liquid-like that can flow freely under the action of external loads. Experimental results demonstrate that the adsorbed water layer makes the mica surface change from hydrophilic to weak hydrophobic. The weak hydrophobic surface may induce the latter adsorbed water molecules to form water islands on a mica sheet.

  11. Geochemical Analysis of Surface Water in Rice County, Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christenson, C.; Prullage, R.; Harvey, M.; Haileab, B.; Harrison, B. K.

    2012-12-01

    Monitoring the quality of surface water is essential to protecting freshwater systems from pollution. For the past four years, Rice County, located in southeastern Minnesota, has been subject to continuous research with the objective of determining the long-term effects of farmland runoff in the water systems. During the summer of 2012, 105 samples were collected from lakes, rivers, and streams. The samples were analyzed for conductivity, nitrate, chloride, calcium, and phosphate. Results show nitrate levels exceeding EPA restrictions (ranging 10-25 ppm) at some locations in the streams along farmlands in the southeast corner of the county. These findings are consistent with past results correlating nitrate levels with farmland runoff, with potential impact on contamination of surficial aquifers as well as significant lake eutrophication observed in the state. ICP-MS results on 67 samples exhibit complex geographical trends across the county not readily attributed to anthropogenic sources. Our findings should inform residents and policy makers taking measures to improve water quality in the county. In addition, annual studies should be continued to monitor water quality in Rice County.

  12. Global measurements of sea surface temperature, wind speed and atmospheric water content from satellite microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, E. G.; Swanson, L.

    1983-01-01

    The Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) was launched on the Seasat and Nimbus 7 satellites in 1978. The SMMR has the ability to measure sea surface temperature and wind speed with the aid of microwaves. In addition, the instrument was designed to measure water vapor and cloud liquid water with better spatial resolution than previous microwave radiometers, and to make sea-ice measurements with higher precision. A description is presented of the results of global analyses of sea surface temperature, wind speed, water vapor, and cloud liquid water, taking into account data provided by the SMMR on the Seasat satellite. It is found that the SMMR data show good self-consistency, and can usefully measure global distributions of sea surface temperatures, surface winds, water vapor, and cloud liquid water.

  13. Additive manufactured polymeric 3D scaffolds with tailored surface topography influence mesenchymal stromal cells activity.

    PubMed

    Neves, Sara C; Mota, Carlos; Longoni, Alessia; Barrias, Cristina C; Granja, Pedro L; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2016-06-01

    Additive manufactured three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds with tailored surface topography constitute a clear advantage in tissue regeneration strategies to steer cell behavior. 3D fibrous scaffolds of poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)/poly(butylene terephthalate) block copolymer presenting different fiber surface features were successfully fabricated by additive manufacturing combined with wet-spinning, in a single step, without any post-processing. The optimization of the processing parameters, mainly driven by different solvent/non-solvent combinations, led to four distinct scaffold types, with average surface roughness values ranging from 0.071 ± 0.012 μm to 1.950 ± 0.553 μm, average pore sizes in the x- and y-axis between 351.1 ± 33.6 μm and 396.1 ± 32.3 μm, in the z-axis between 36.5 ± 5.3 μm and 70.7 ± 8.8 μm, average fiber diameters between 69.4 ± 6.1 μm and 99.0 ± 9.4 μm, and porosity values ranging from 60.2 ± 0.8% to 71.7 ± 2.6%. Human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) cultured on these scaffolds adhered, proliferated, and produced endogenous extracellular matrix. The effect of surface roughness and topography on hMSCs differentiation was more evident for cells seeded at lower density, where the percentage of cells in direct contact with the surface was higher compared to more densely seeded scaffolds. Under osteogenic conditions, lower surface roughness values (0.227 ± 0.035 μm) had a synergistic effect on hMSCs behavior, while chondrogenesis was favored on rougher surfaces (1.950 ± 0.553 μm). PMID:27219645

  14. Polyelectrolytes Ability in Reducing Atrazine Concentration in Water: Surface Effects

    PubMed Central

    Heijman, S. G. J.; Lopes, S. I. C.; Rietveld, L. C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the direct ability of two positively charged organic polyelectrolytes (natural-based and synthetic) to reduce the atrazine concentration in water. The adsorption study was set up using multiple glass vessels with different polymer dosing levels followed by ultrafiltration with a 1 kDa membrane. The addition of polymers exhibited a capability in reducing the atrazine concentration up to a maximum of 60% in surface-to-volume ratio experiments. In the beginning, the theoretical L-type of the isotherm of Giles' classification was expected with an increase in the dosage of the polymer. However, in this study, the conventional type of isotherm was not observed. It was found that the adsorption of the cationic polymer on the negatively charged glass surface was necessary and influential for the removal of atrazine. Surface-to-volume ratio adsorption experiments were performed to elucidate the mechanisms and the polymer configuration. The glass surface area was determined to be a limiting parameter in the adsorption mechanism. PMID:25197693

  15. Polyelectrolytes ability in reducing atrazine concentration in water: surface effects.

    PubMed

    Mohd Amin, Mohamad Faiz; Heijman, S G J; Lopes, S I C; Rietveld, L C

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the direct ability of two positively charged organic polyelectrolytes (natural-based and synthetic) to reduce the atrazine concentration in water. The adsorption study was set up using multiple glass vessels with different polymer dosing levels followed by ultrafiltration with a 1 kDa membrane. The addition of polymers exhibited a capability in reducing the atrazine concentration up to a maximum of 60% in surface-to-volume ratio experiments. In the beginning, the theoretical L-type of the isotherm of Giles' classification was expected with an increase in the dosage of the polymer. However, in this study, the conventional type of isotherm was not observed. It was found that the adsorption of the cationic polymer on the negatively charged glass surface was necessary and influential for the removal of atrazine. Surface-to-volume ratio adsorption experiments were performed to elucidate the mechanisms and the polymer configuration. The glass surface area was determined to be a limiting parameter in the adsorption mechanism. PMID:25197693

  16. Modeling the relationship between land use and surface water quality.

    PubMed

    Tong, Susanna T Y; Chen, Wenli

    2002-12-01

    It is widely known that watershed hydrology is dependent on many factors, including land use, climate, and soil conditions. But the relative impacts of different types of land use on the surface water are yet to be ascertained and quantified. This research attempted to use a comprehensive approach to examine the hydrologic effects of land use at both a regional and a local scale. Statistical and spatial analyses were employed to examine the statistical and spatial relationships of land use and the flow and water quality in receiving waters on a regional scale in the State of Ohio. Besides, a widely accepted watershed-based water quality assessment tool, the Better Assessment Science Integrating Point and Nonpoint Sources (BASINS), was adopted to model the plausible effects of land use on water quality in a local watershed in the East Fork Little Miami River Basin. The results from the statistical analyses revealed that there was a significant relationship between land use and in-stream water quality, especially for nitrogen, phosphorus and Fecal coliform. The geographic information systems (GIS) spatial analyses identified the watersheds that have high levels of contaminants and percentages of agricultural and urban lands. Furthermore, the hydrologic and water quality modeling showed that agricultural and impervious urban lands produced a much higher level of nitrogen and phosphorus than other land surfaces. From this research, it seems that the approach adopted in this study is comprehensive, covering both the regional and local scales. It also reveals that BASINS is a very useful and reliable tool, capable of characterizing the flow and water quality conditions for the study area under different watershed scales. With little modification, these models should be able to adapt to other watersheds or to simulate other contaminants. They also can be used to study the plausible impacts of global environmental change. In addition, the information on the hydrologic

  17. Effect of lubricant extreme-pressure additives on surface fatigue life of AISI 9310 spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scibbe, H. W.; Townsend, D. P.; Aron, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    Surface fatigue tests were conducted with AISI 9310 spur gears using a formulated synthetic tetraester oil (conforming to MIL-L-23699 specifications) as the lubricant containing either sulfur or phosphorus as the EP additive. Four groups of gears were tested. One group of gears tested without an additive in the lubricant acted as the reference oil. In the other three groups either a 0.1 wt % sulfur or phosphorus additive was added to the tetraester oil to enhance gear surface fatigue life. Test conditions included a gear temperature of 334 K (160 F), a maximum Hertz stress of 1.71 GPa (248 000 psi), and a speed of 10,000 rpm. The gears tested with a 0.1 wt % phosphorus additive showed pitting fatigue life 2.6 times the life of gears tested with the reference tetraester based oil. Although fatigue lives of two groups of gears tested with the sulfur additive in the oil showed improvement over the control group gear life, the results, unlike those obtained with the phosphorus oil, were not considered to be statistically significant.

  18. Molecular dynamics studies of interfacial water at the alumina surface.

    SciTech Connect

    Argyris, Dr. Dimitrios; Ho, Thomas; Cole, David

    2011-01-01

    Interfacial water properties at the alumina surface were investigated via all-atom equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations at ambient temperature. Al-terminated and OH-terminated alumina surfaces were considered to assess the structural and dynamic behavior of the first few hydration layers in contact with the substrates. Density profiles suggest water layering up to {approx}10 {angstrom} from the solid substrate. Planar density distribution data indicate that water molecules in the first interfacial layer are organized in well-defined patterns dictated by the atomic terminations of the alumina surface. Interfacial water exhibits preferential orientation and delayed dynamics compared to bulk water. Water exhibits bulk-like behavior at distances greater than {approx}10 {angstrom} from the substrate. The formation of an extended hydrogen bond network within the first few hydration layers illustrates the significance of water?water interactions on the structural properties at the interface.

  19. Effect of Surface Oxidation on Interfacial Water Structure at a Pyrite (100) Surface as Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Jiaqi; Miller, Jan D.; Dang, Liem X.; Wick, Collin D.

    2015-06-01

    In the first part of this paper, a Scanning Electron Microscopy and contact angle study of a pyrite surface (100) is reported describing the relationship between surface oxidation and the hydrophilic surface state. In addition to these experimental results, the following simulated surface states were examined using Molecular Dynamics Simulation (MDS): fresh unoxidized (100) surface; polysulfide at the (100) surface; elemental sulfur at the (100) surface. Crystal structures for the polysulfide and elemental sulfur at the (100) surface were simulated using Density Functional Theory (DFT) quantum chemical calculations. The well known oxidation mechanism which involves formation of a metal deficient layer was also described with DFT. Our MDS results of the behavior of interfacial water at the fresh and oxidized pyrite (100) surfaces without/with the presence of ferric hydroxide include simulated contact angles, number density distribution for water, water dipole orientation, water residence time, and hydrogen-bonding considerations. The significance of the formation of ferric hydroxide islands in accounting for the corresponding hydrophilic surface state is revealed not only from experimental contact angle measurements but also from simulated contact angle measurements using MDS. The hydrophilic surface state developed at oxidized pyrite surfaces has been described by MDS, on which basis the surface state is explained based on interfacial water structure. The Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), of the DOE funded work performed by Liem X. Dang. Battelle operates the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by BES.

  20. Biogeochemistry of DMS in Surface Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dacey, J. W. H.

    1997-01-01

    Dimethylsulfide (DMS) is important in influencing the formation of aerosols in the troposphere over large areas of the world's oceans. Understanding the dynamics of aerosols is important to understanding the earth's radiation balance. In evaluating the factors controlling DMS in the troposphere it is vital to understand the dynamics of DMS in the surface ocean. The biogeochemical processes controlling DMS concentration in seawater are myriad; modeling and theoretical estimation are problematic. At the beginning of this project we believed that we were on the verge of simplifying the ship-track measurement of DMS, and we proposed to deploy such a system to develop a database relating high frequency DMS measurements to biological and physicochemical and optical properties of surface water that can be quantified by remote sensing techniques. We designed a system to measure DMS concomitantly with other basic chemical and biological data in a flow-through system. The project was collaborative between Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and Bermuda Biological Station for Research (BBSR). The project on which we are reporting was budgeted for only one year with a one year no-cost extension. At WHOI our effort was directed towards designing traps which would be used to concentrate DMS from seawater and allow storage for subsequent analysis. At that time, GC systems were too large for easy long-term deployment on a research vessel like R/V Weatherbird, so we focused on simplifying the shipboard sampling procedure. Initial studies of sample recovery with high levels of DMS suggested that Carboxen 1000, a relatively new carbon molecular sieve, could be used as a stable storage medium. The affinity of Carboxen for DMS is several orders of magnitude higher than gold wool (another adsorbent used for DMS collection) on a weight or volume basis. Furthermore, Carboxen's affinity for DMS is also far less susceptible to humidity than gold wool. Unfortunately, further

  1. Water resources data, Idaho, 2004; Volume 1. Surface water records for Great Basin and Snake River basin above King Hill

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brennan, T.S.; Lehmann, A.K.; O'Dell, I.

    2005-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2004 water year for Idaho consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; discharge of irrigation diversions; and water levels and water quality of groundwater. The three volumes of this report contain discharge records for 209 stream-gaging stations and 8 irrigation diversions; stage only records for 6 stream-gaging stations; stage only for 6 lakes and reservoirs; contents only for 13 lakes and reservoirs; water-quality for 39 stream-gaging stations and partial record sites, 3 lakes sites, and 395 groundwater wells; and water levels for 425 observation network wells and 900 special project wells. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. Volumes 1 & 2 contain the surface-water and surface-water-quality records. Volume 3 contains the ground-water and ground-water-quality records. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Idaho, adjacent States, and Canada.

  2. Water resources data, Idaho, 2003; Volume 1. Surface water records for Great Basin and Snake River basin above King Hill

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brennan, T.S.; Lehmann, A.K.; O'Dell, I.

    2004-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2003 water year for Idaho consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; discharge of irrigation diversions; and water levels and water quality of groundwater. The three volumes of this report contain discharge records for 208 stream-gaging stations and 14 irrigation diversions; stage only records for 6 stream-gaging stations; stage only for 6 lakes and reservoirs; contents only for 13 lakes and reservoirs; water-quality for 50 stream-gaging stations and partial record sites, 3 lakes sites, and 398 groundwater wells; and water levels for 427 observation network wells and 900 special project wells. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. Volumes 1 & 2 contain the surface-water and surface-water-quality records. Volume 3 contains the ground-water and ground-water-quality records. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Idaho, adjacent States, and Canada.

  3. Models of Fate and Transport of Pollutants in Surface Waters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okome, Gloria Eloho

    2013-01-01

    There is the need to answer very crucial questions of "what happens to pollutants in surface waters?" This question must be answered to determine the factors controlling fate and transport of chemicals and their evolutionary state in surface waters. Monitoring and experimental methods are used in establishing the environmental states.…

  4. TOTAL ALKALINITY OF SURFACE WATERS OF THE US

    EPA Science Inventory

    This map provides a synoptic illustration of the national patterns of surface water alkalinity in the conterminous United States. Alkalinity is the most readily available measure of the acid-neutralizing capacity of surface waters and provides a reasonable estimate o...

  5. Economic Impacts of Surface Mining on Household Drinking Water Supplies

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report provides information on the economic and social impacts of contaminated surface and ground water supplies on residents and households near surface mining operations. The focus is on coal slurry contamination of water supplies in Mingo County, West Virginia, and descr...

  6. Calcium carbonate nucleation in an alkaline lake surface water, Pyramid Lake, Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.; Hoch, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Calcium concentration and calcite supersaturation (Ω) needed for calcium carbonate nucleation and crystal growth in Pyramid Lake (PL) surface water were determined during August of 1997, 2000, and 2001. PL surface water has Ω values of 10-16. Notwithstanding high Ω, calcium carbonate growth did not occur on aragonite single crystals suspended PL surface water for several months. However, calcium solution addition to PL surface-water samples caused reproducible calcium carbonate mineral nucleation and crystal growth. Mean PL surface-water calcium concentration at nucleation was 2.33 mM (n = 10), a value about nine times higher than the ambient PL surface-water calcium concentration (0.26 mM); mean Ω at nucleation (109 with a standard deviation of 8) is about eight times the PL surface-water Ω. Calcium concentration and Ω regulated the calcium carbonate formation in PL nucleation experiments and surface water. Unfiltered samples nucleated at lower Ω than filtered samples. Calcium concentration and Ω at nucleation for experiments in the presence of added particles were within one standard deviation of the mean for all samples. Calcium carbonate formation rates followed a simple rate expression of the form, rate (mM/min) = A (Ω) + B. The best fit rate equation "Rate (Δ mM/Δ min) = -0.0026 Ω + 0.0175 (r = 0.904, n = 10)" was statistically significant at greater than the 0.01 confidence level and gives, after rearrangement, Ω at zero rate of 6.7. Nucleation in PL surface water and morphology of calcium carbonate particles formed in PL nucleation experiments and in PL surface-water samples suggest crystal growth inhibition by multiple substances present in PL surface water mediates PL calcium carbonate formation, but there is insufficient information to determine the chemical nature of all inhibitors.

  7. Calcium Carbonate Nucleation in an Alkaline Lake Surface Water, Pyramid Lake, Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Hoch, A.

    2012-01-01

    Calcium concentration and calcite supersaturation (??) needed for calcium carbonate nucleation and crystal growth in Pyramid Lake (PL) surface water were determined during August of 1997, 2000, and 2001. PL surface water has ?? values of 10-16. Notwithstanding high ??, calcium carbonate growth did not occur on aragonite single crystals suspended PL surface water for several months. However, calcium solution addition to PL surface-water samples caused reproducible calcium carbonate mineral nucleation and crystal growth. Mean PL surface-water calcium concentration at nucleation was 2.33 mM (n = 10), a value about nine times higher than the ambient PL surface-water calcium concentration (0.26 mM); mean ?? at nucleation (109 with a standard deviation of 8) is about eight times the PL surface-water ??. Calcium concentration and ?? regulated the calcium carbonate formation in PL nucleation experiments and surface water. Unfiltered samples nucleated at lower ?? than filtered samples. Calcium concentration and ?? at nucleation for experiments in the presence of added particles were within one standard deviation of the mean for all samples. Calcium carbonate formation rates followed a simple rate expression of the form, rate (mM/min) = A (??) + B. The best fit rate equation "Rate (?? mM/?? min) = -0.0026 ?? + 0.0175 (r = 0.904, n = 10)" was statistically significant at greater than the 0.01 confidence level and gives, after rearrangement, ?? at zero rate of 6.7. Nucleation in PL surface water and morphology of calcium carbonate particles formed in PL nucleation experiments and in PL surface-water samples suggest crystal growth inhibition by multiple substances present in PL surface water mediates PL calcium carbonate formation, but there is insufficient information to determine the chemical nature of all inhibitors. ?? 2011 U.S. Government.

  8. Effect of Surface Energy on Freezing Temperature of Water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Anim-Danso, Emmanuel; Bekele, Selemon; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2016-07-13

    Previous studies have found that superhydrophobic surfaces are effective in delaying freezing of water droplets. However, the freezing process of water droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces depends on factors such as droplet size, surface area, roughness, and cooling rate. The role of surface energy, independent of any other parameters, in delaying freezing of water is not understood. Here, we have used infrared-visible sum frequency generation spectroscopy (SFG) to study the freezing of water next to solid substrates with water contact angles varying from 5° to 110°. We find that the freezing temperature of water decreases with increasing surface hydrophobicity only when the sample volume is small (∼10 μL). For a larger volume of water (∼300 μL), the freezing temperature is independent of surface energy. For water next to the surfaces with contact angle ≥54°, we observe a strong SFG peak associated with highly coordinated water. This research sheds new light on understanding the key factors in designing new anti-icing coatings. PMID:27314147

  9. Dynamic behavior of interfacila water at the silica surface

    SciTech Connect

    Argyris, Dr. Dimitrios; Cole, David R; Striolo, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were employed to study the dynamics properties of water at the silica-liquid interface at ambient temperature. Three different degrees of hydroxylation of a crystalline silica surface were used. To assess the water dynamic properties we calculated the residence probability and in-plane mean square displacement as a function of distance from the surface. The data indicate that water molecules at the fully hydroxylated surface remain longer, on average, in the interfacial region than in the other cases. By assessing the dynamics of molecular dipole moment and hydrogen-hydrogen vector an anisotropic reorientation was discovered for interfacial water in contact with any of the surfaces considered. However, the features of the anisotropic reorientation observed for water molecules depend strongly on the relative orientation of interfacial water molecules and their interactions with surface hydroxyl groups. On the partially hydroxylated surface, where water molecules with hydrogen-down and hydrogen-up orientation are both found, those water molecules associated with surface hydroxyl groups remain at the adsorbed locations longer and reorient slower than the other water molecules. A number of equilibrium properties, including density profiles, hydrogen bond networks, charge densities, and dipole moment densities are also reported to explain the dynamics results.

  10. Sliding friction and wear behaviors of surface-coated natural serpentine mineral powders as lubricant additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baosen; Xu, Yi; Gao, Fei; Shi, Peijing; Xu, Binshi; Wu, Yixiong

    2011-01-01

    This work aims to investigate the friction and wear properties of surface-coated natural serpentine powders (SP) suspended in diesel engine oil using an Optimal SRV oscillating friction and wear tester. The worn surface was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Results indicated that the additives can improve the wear resistance and decrease friction coefficient of carbon steel friction couples. The 0.5 wt% content of serpentine powders is found most efficient in reducing friction and wear at the load of 50 N. The SEM and XPS analysis results demonstrate that a tribofilm forms on the worn surface, which is responsible for the decrease in friction and wear, mainly with iron oxides, silicon oxides, graphite and organic compounds.

  11. A New Antiwear Additive/Surface Pretreatment for PFPE Liquid Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Wilfredo; Fusaro, Robert L.; Siebert, Mark; Keith, Theo; Jansen, Ralph; Herrera-Fierro, Pilar

    1995-01-01

    Pin-on-disk tribology experiments were conducted on a perfluoroalkylelher (PFPE) liquid lubricant with and without a new PFPE lubricant antiwear additive material, a silane. It was found that the silane provided moderate improvement in the antiwear performance of the PFPE lubricant when applied to the metallic surface as a surface coating or when added to the PFPE as a dispersion (emulsion). Slightly better results were obtained by using the combination of a surface coating and an emulsion of the silane. The silane emulsions or coatings did not affect the friction properties of the lubricant. Micro-Fourier transformation infrared (muFTIR) spectroscopy analysis was performed to study silane transfer films and the degradation of the PFPE. The silane was found to mitigate degradation of the PFPE which may have been the major reason for the improved antiwear performance observed.

  12. Evaluation of Select Surface Processing Techniques for In Situ Application During the Additive Manufacturing Build Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Book, Todd A.; Sangid, Michael D.

    2016-07-01

    Although additive manufacturing offers numerous performance advantages for different applications, it is not being used for critical applications due to uncertainties in structural integrity as a result of innate process variability and defects. To minimize uncertainty, the current approach relies on the concurrent utilization of process monitoring, post-processing, and non-destructive inspection in addition to an extensive material qualification process. This paper examines an alternative approach by evaluating the application of select surface process techniques, to include sliding severe plastic deformation (SPD) and fine particle shot peening, on direct metal laser sintering-produced AlSi10Mg materials. Each surface processing technique is compared to baseline as-built and post-processed samples as a proof of concept for surface enhancement. Initial results pairing sliding SPD with the manufacture's recommended thermal stress relief cycle demonstrated uniform recrystallization of the microstructure, resulting in a more homogeneous distribution of strain among the microstructure than as-built or post-processed conditions. This result demonstrates the potential for the in situ application of various surface processing techniques during the layerwise direct metal laser sintering build process.

  13. Synergistic and additive killing by antimicrobial factors found in human airway surface liquid.

    PubMed

    Singh, P K; Tack, B F; McCray, P B; Welsh, M J

    2000-11-01

    Airway surface liquid contains multiple factors thought to provide a first line of defense against bacteria deposited in the airways. Although the antimicrobial action of individual factors has been studied, less is known about how they work in combination. We examined the combined action of six antimicrobial peptides found in airway surface liquid. The paired combinations of lysozyme-lactoferrin, lysozyme-secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), and lactoferrin-SLPI were synergistic. The triple combination of lysozyme, lactoferrin, and SLPI showed even greater synergy. Other combinations involving the human beta-defensins, LL-37, and tobramycin (often administered to cystic fibrosis patients by inhalation) were additive. Because the airway surface liquid salt concentration may be elevated in cystic fibrosis patients, we examined the effect of salt on the synergistic combinations. As the ionic strength increased, synergistic interactions were lost. Our data suggest that the antibacterial potency of airway surface liquid may be significantly increased by synergistic and additive interactions between antimicrobial factors. These results also suggest that increased salt concentrations that may exist in cystic fibrosis could inhibit airway defenses by diminishing these synergistic interactions. PMID:11053013

  14. Evaluation of Select Surface Processing Techniques for In Situ Application During the Additive Manufacturing Build Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Book, Todd A.; Sangid, Michael D.

    2016-03-01

    Although additive manufacturing offers numerous performance advantages for different applications, it is not being used for critical applications due to uncertainties in structural integrity as a result of innate process variability and defects. To minimize uncertainty, the current approach relies on the concurrent utilization of process monitoring, post-processing, and non-destructive inspection in addition to an extensive material qualification process. This paper examines an alternative approach by evaluating the application of select surface process techniques, to include sliding severe plastic deformation (SPD) and fine particle shot peening, on direct metal laser sintering-produced AlSi10Mg materials. Each surface processing technique is compared to baseline as-built and post-processed samples as a proof of concept for surface enhancement. Initial results pairing sliding SPD with the manufacture's recommended thermal stress relief cycle demonstrated uniform recrystallization of the microstructure, resulting in a more homogeneous distribution of strain among the microstructure than as-built or post-processed conditions. This result demonstrates the potential for the in situ application of various surface processing techniques during the layerwise direct metal laser sintering build process.

  15. Modification of diamond growth chemistry and surface properties by fluorine addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Ciaran Avram

    Interest in the interactions of halogens with diamond surfaces has arisen recently following reports of diamond chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at low substrate temperatures (<500sp°C) and spontaneous nucleation when fluorine precursors were added to the growth process. This study concerns the effect of adding halogenated precursors to the conventional microwave plasma-assisted CVD growth process from theoretical and experimental perspectives. A comparison of the kinetics of hydrogen and fluorine interactions with diamond indicates that fluorine addition should enable low temperature growth of diamond films, if hydrogen abstraction kinetics limit low temperature diamond growth. To test this hypothesis, CFsb4/Hsb2, CHsb3F/Hsb2, and CHsb4/Hsb2 precursor gas mixtures were used to grow diamond films in the 600-900sp°C temperature range. Growth rates and activation energies were measured and found to be essentially independent of fluorine addition. To understand this result, molecular beam mass spectroscopy was used to determine the gas composition near the diamond surface during growth. Surprisingly, this technique revealed the absence of any active fluorine radicals. Consequently, diamond films were grown from atomic hydrogen and CHsb3 radicals using each of the aforementioned precursors, thereby yielding similar growth activation energies. These growth results indicate that the experimental conditions must be substantially modified to transport both atomic fluorine and atomic hydrogen to the diamond surface during growth. Although simultaneous transport of atomic fluorine and atomic hydrogen to the diamond surface proved difficult due to consumption by gas-phase reactions, fluorination of diamond surfaces following growth was possible using plasma techniques. Such a fluorination treatment greatly enhanced the reactivity of diamond surfaces with cesium, ultimately enabling the bonding of cesium with carbon on diamond. The enhanced field emission characteristics

  16. Sea-ice and surface water circulation, Alaskan continental shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, F. F.; Sharma, G. D.; Burns, J. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Over 1500 water samples from surface and from standard hydrographic depths were collected during June and July 1973 from Bering Sea and Gulf of Alaska. The measurement of temperature, salinity, and productivity indicated that various distinct water masses cover the Bering Sea Shelf. The suspended load in surface waters will be correlated with the ERTS-1 imagery as it becomes available to delineate the surface water circulation. The movement of ice floes in the Bering Strait and Bering Sea indicated that movement of ice varies considerably and may depend on wind stress as well as ocean currents.

  17. Herbicide Metabolites in Surface Water and Groundwater: Introduction and Overview

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Meyer, M.T.

    1996-01-01

    Several future research topics for herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water are outlined in this chapter. They are herbicide usage, chemical analysis of metabolites, and fate and transport of metabolites in surface and ground water. These three ideas follow the themes in this book, which are the summary of a symposium of the American Chemical Society on herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water. First, geographic information systems allow the spatial distribution of herbicide-use data to be combined with geochemical information on fate and transport of herbicides. Next these two types of information are useful in predicting the kinds of metabolites present and their probable distribution in surface and ground water. Finally, methods development efforts may be focused on these specific target analytes. This chapter discusses these three concepts and provides an introduction to this book on the analysis, chemistry, and fate and transport of herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water.

  18. Water adsorption on the LaMnO3 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billman, Chris R.; Wang, Yan; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2016-02-01

    Studying the adsorption of water on the metallic LaMnO3 surface can provide insight into this complicated surface-adsorbate interaction. Using density functional theory, we investigated the adsorption of a water monomer, dimer, trimer, and a monolayer on the surface. The electronic structure of ground state configurations is explored using analysis of density of states, charge density, and crystal orbital overlap populations. We found that the interaction between the surface and water molecules is stronger than hydrogen bonding between molecules, which facilitates wetting of the surface. Adsorbed water molecules form very strong hydrogen bonds, with substantially shifted OH stretch modes. For the monolayer of adsorbed water, a hint of a bilayer is observed with a height separation of only 0.2 A˚. However, simulated scanning tunneling microscopy images and vibrational spectra suggest a significant difference between the two layers due to intermolecular bonding and interaction with the substrate.

  19. Water Adsorption on the LaMnO3 Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billman, Chris; Wang, Yan; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    Studying the adsorption of water on the metallic LaMnO3 surface can provide insight into this complicated surface-adsorbate interaction. Using density functional theory, we investigated the adsorption of a water monomer, dimer, trimer and a monolayer on the surface. The electronic structure of ground state configurations is explored using analysis of density of states, charge density, and crystal orbital overlap populations. We found that the interaction between the surface and water molecules is stronger than hydrogen bonding between molecules, which facilitates wetting of the surface. Adsorbed water molecules form very strong hydrogen bonds, with substantially shifted OH stretch modes. For the monolayer of adsorbed water, a hint of a bilayer is observed with a height separation of only 0.2 Å. However, simulated scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images and vibrational spectra suggest a significant difference between the two layers due to intermolecular bonding and interaction with the substrate.

  20. Water-Mediated Interactions between Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kanduč, Matej; Schlaich, Alexander; Schneck, Emanuel; Netz, Roland R

    2016-09-01

    All surfaces in water experience at short separations hydration repulsion or hydrophobic attraction, depending on the surface polarity. These interactions dominate the more long-ranged electrostatic and van der Waals interactions and are ubiquitous in biological and colloidal systems. Despite their importance in all scenarios where the surface separation is in the nanometer range, the origin of these hydration interactions is still unclear. Using atomistic solvent-explicit molecular dynamics simulations, we analyze the interaction free energies of charge-neutral model surfaces with different elastic and water-binding properties. The surface polarity is shown to be the most important parameter that not only determines the hydration properties and thereby the water contact angle of a single surface but also the surface-surface interaction and whether two surfaces attract or repel. Elastic properties of the surfaces are less important. On the basis of surface contact angles and surface-surface binding affinities, we construct a universal interaction diagram featuring three different interaction regimes-hydration repulsion, cavitation-induced attraction-and for intermediate surface polarities-dry adhesion. On the basis of scaling arguments and perturbation theory, we establish simple combination rules that predict the interaction behavior for combinations of dissimilar surfaces. PMID:27487420

  1. Water adsorbate influence on the Cu(110) surface optical response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghbanpourasl, Amirreza; Schmidt, Wolf Gero; Denk, Mariella; Cobet, Christoph; Hohage, Michael; Zeppenfeld, Peter; Hingerl, Kurt

    2015-11-01

    Surface reflectance anisotropy may be utilized for characterizing surfaces, interfaces, and adsorption structures. Here, the reflectance anisotropy and surface dielectric functions of the thermodynamically most favored water adsorbate structures on the Cu(110) surface (i.e. hexagonal bilayers, pentagonal chains, and partially dissociated water structures) are calculated from density-functional theory and compared with recent experimental data. It is shown that the water overlayer structures modify in a geometry-specific way the optical anisotropy of the bare surface which can be exploited for in situ determination of the adsorption structures. For hexagonal bilayer overlayer geometries, strong features in the vacuum ultraviolet region are predicted. The theoretical analysis shows a noticeable influence of intraband transitions also for higher photon energies and rather slight influences of the van der Waals interaction on the spectral signatures. Water induced strain effects on the surface optical response are found to be negligible.

  2. Adsorption of n-alkane vapours at the water surface.

    PubMed

    Biscay, Frédéric; Ghoufi, Aziz; Malfreyt, Patrice

    2011-06-21

    Monte Carlo simulations are reported here to predict the surface tension of the liquid-vapour interface of water upon adsorption of alkane vapours (methane to hexane). A decrease of the surface tension has been established from n-pentane. A correlation has been evidenced between the decrease of the surface tension and the absence of specific arrangement at the water surface for n-pentane and n-hexane. The thermodynamic stability of the adsorption layer and the absence of film for longer alkanes have been checked through the calculation of a potential of mean force. This complements the work recently published [Ghoufi et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2010, 12, 5203] concerning the adsorption of methane at the water surface. The decrease of the surface tension has been interpreted in terms of the degree of hydrogen bonding of water molecules at the liquid-vapour interface upon adsorption. PMID:21584320

  3. Surface properties and water treatment capacity of surface engineered silica coated with 3-(2-aminoethyl) aminopropyltrimethoxysilane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, Peter; Keegan, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    This study's focus was on the water-based, one-pot preparation and characterisation of silica particles coated with 3-(2-aminoethyl)aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (Diamo) and the efficiency of the material in removing the pathogens Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Mycobacterium immunogenum, Vibrio cholerae, poliovirus, and Cryptosporidium parvum. The water-based processing resulted in Diamo coated silica particles with significantly increased positive surface charge as determined by zeta potential measurements. In addition, X-ray photoelectron spectrometry of pure and Diamo coated silica confirmed the presence of Diamo on the surface of the particles. Thermogravimetric measurements and chemical analysis of the silica indicated a surface concentration of amine groups of about 1 mmol/gsilica. Water treatment tests with the pathogens showed that a dose of about 10 g appeared to be sufficient to remove pathogens from pure water samples which were spiked with pathogen concentrations between about 102 and 104 cfu/mL.

  4. Surface water sulfate dynamics in the northern Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongqing; Waldon, Michael G; Meselhe, Ehab A; Arceneaux, Jeanne C; Chen, Chunfang; Harwell, Matthew C

    2009-01-01

    Sulfate contamination has been identified as a serious environmental issue in the Everglades ecosystem. However, it has received less attention compared to P enrichment. Sulfate enters the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge), a remnant of the historic Everglades, in pumped stormwater discharges with a mean concentration of approximately 50 mg L(-1), and marsh interior concentrations at times fall below a detection limit of 0.1 mg L(-1). In this research, we developed a sulfate mass balance model to examine the response of surface water sulfate in the Refuge to changes in sulfate loading and hydrological processes. Meanwhile, sulfate removal resulting from microbial sulfate reduction in the underlying sediments of the marsh was estimated from the apparent settling coefficients incorporated in the model. The model has been calibrated and validated using long-term monitoring data (1995-2006). Statistical analysis indicated that our model is capable of capturing the spatial and temporal variations in surface water sulfate concentrations across the Refuge. This modeling work emphasizes the fact that sulfate from canal discharge is impacting even the interior portions of the Refuge, supporting work by other researchers. In addition, model simulations suggest a condition of sulfate in excess of requirement for microbial sulfate reduction in the Refuge. PMID:19244495

  5. Water Quality Indicators Guide [and Teacher's Handbook]: Surface Waters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terrell, Charles R.; Perfetti, Patricia Bytnar

    This guide aids in finding water quality solutions to problems from sediment, animal wastes, nutrients, pesticides, and salts. The guide allows users to learn the fundamental concepts of water quality assessment by extracting basic tenets from geology, hydrology, biology, ecology, and wastewater treatment. An introduction and eight chapters are…

  6. Effects of Water and Nitrogen Addition on Species Turnover in Temperate Grasslands in Northern China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhuwen; Wan, Shiqiang; Ren, Haiyan; Han, Xingguo; Li, Mai-He; Cheng, Weixin; Jiang, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Global nitrogen (N) deposition and climate change have been identified as two of the most important causes of current plant diversity loss. However, temporal patterns of species turnover underlying diversity changes in response to changing precipitation regimes and atmospheric N deposition have received inadequate attention. We carried out a manipulation experiment in a steppe and an old-field in North China from 2005 to 2009, to test the hypothesis that water addition enhances plant species richness through increase in the rate of species gain and decrease in the rate of species loss, while N addition has opposite effects on species changes. Our results showed that water addition increased the rate of species gain in both the steppe and the old field but decreased the rates of species loss and turnover in the old field. In contrast, N addition increased the rates of species loss and turnover in the steppe but decreased the rate of species gain in the old field. The rate of species change was greater in the old field than in the steppe. Water interacted with N to affect species richness and species turnover, indicating that the impacts of N on semi-arid grasslands were largely mediated by water availability. The temporal stability of communities was negatively correlated with rates of species loss and turnover, suggesting that water addition might enhance, but N addition would reduce the compositional stability of grasslands. Experimental results support our initial hypothesis and demonstrate that water and N availabilities differed in the effects on rate of species change in the temperate grasslands, and these effects also depend on grassland types and/or land-use history. Species gain and loss together contribute to the dynamic change of species richness in semi-arid grasslands under future climate change. PMID:22768119

  7. Interfacial thermodynamics of confined water near molecularly rough surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Jeetain; Hummer, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    We study the effects of nanoscopic roughness on the interfacial free energy of water confined between solid surfaces. SPC/E water is simulated in confinement between two infinite planar surfaces that differ in their physical topology: one is smooth and the other one is physically rough on a nanometer length scale. The two thermodynamic ensembles considered, with constant pressure either normal or parallel to the walls, correspond to different experimental conditions. We find that molecular-scale surface roughness significantly increases the solid-liquid interfacial free energy compared to the smooth surface. For our surfaces with a water-wall interaction energy minimum of −1.2 kcal/mol, we observe a transition from a hydrophilic surface to a hydrophobic surface at a roughness amplitude of about 3 Å and a wave length of 11.6 Å, with the interfacial free energy changing sign from negative to positive. In agreement with previous studies of water near hydrophobic surfaces, we find an increase in the isothermal compressibility of water with increasing surface roughness. Interestingly, average measures of the water density and hydrogen-bond number do not contain distinct signatures of increased hydrophobicity. In contrast, a local analysis indicates transient dewetting of water in the valleys of the rough surface, together with a significant loss of hydrogen bonds, and a change in the dipole orientation toward the surface. These microscopic changes in the density, hydrogen bonding, and water orientation contribute to the large increase in the interfacial free energy, and the change from a hydrophilic to a hydrophobic character of the surface. PMID:21043431

  8. The influence of heat accumulation on the surface roughness in powder-bed additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamshidinia, Mahdi; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2015-03-01

    The influence of heat accumulation on surface roughness during powder-bed additive manufacturing was investigated. A series of Ti-6Al-4V thin plates were produced by using an identical heat input by electron beam melting® (EBM). Spacing distances of 5 mm, 10 mm, and 20 mm were used. The surface roughness of as-built thin plates was measured using a two-axis profilometer. A numerical model was developed to study the influence of spacing distance on heat accumulation. An inverse relationship between the spacing distance and surface roughness was revealed. The experimental and numerical results showed that the surface quality of buildups could be controlled not only by process parameters, but also by the arrangement of components in the buildup chamber. At a constant spacing distance, an increase in the number of powder layers resulted in the accumulation of more heat between the thin plates. An increase in the spacing distance resulted in an upward translation of the Bearing Area Curve (BAC) toward shallower depths, with a reduced core roughness depth (Rk) and peak height (Rpk). A logarithmic regression equation was established from the experimental data. This equation could be used to predict the surface roughness of parts fabricated by EBM® in the studied range of spacing distances.

  9. Water surface tension modulates the swarming mechanics of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Ke, Wan-Ju; Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Cheng, Yu-Chieh; Wu, Chih-Ching; Liu, Shih-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Many Bacillus subtilis strains swarm, often forming colonies with tendrils on agar medium. It is known that B. subtilis swarming requires flagella and a biosurfactant, surfactin. In this study, we find that water surface tension plays a role in swarming dynamics. B. subtilis colonies were found to contain water, and when a low amount of surfactin is produced, the water surface tension of the colony restricts expansion, causing bacterial density to rise. The increased density induces a quorum sensing response that leads to heightened production of surfactin, which then weakens water surface tension to allow colony expansion. When the barrier formed by water surface tension is breached at a specific location, a stream of bacteria swarms out of the colony to form a tendril. If a B. subtilis strain produces surfactin at levels that can substantially weaken the overall water surface tension of the colony, water floods the agar surface in a thin layer, within which bacteria swarm and migrate rapidly. This study sheds light on the role of water surface tension in regulating B. subtilis swarming, and provides insight into the mechanisms underlying swarming initiation and tendril formation. PMID:26557106

  10. Water surface tension modulates the swarming mechanics of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Wan-Ju; Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Cheng, Yu-Chieh; Wu, Chih-Ching; Liu, Shih-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Many Bacillus subtilis strains swarm, often forming colonies with tendrils on agar medium. It is known that B. subtilis swarming requires flagella and a biosurfactant, surfactin. In this study, we find that water surface tension plays a role in swarming dynamics. B. subtilis colonies were found to contain water, and when a low amount of surfactin is produced, the water surface tension of the colony restricts expansion, causing bacterial density to rise. The increased density induces a quorum sensing response that leads to heightened production of surfactin, which then weakens water surface tension to allow colony expansion. When the barrier formed by water surface tension is breached at a specific location, a stream of bacteria swarms out of the colony to form a tendril. If a B. subtilis strain produces surfactin at levels that can substantially weaken the overall water surface tension of the colony, water floods the agar surface in a thin layer, within which bacteria swarm and migrate rapidly. This study sheds light on the role of water surface tension in regulating B. subtilis swarming, and provides insight into the mechanisms underlying swarming initiation and tendril formation. PMID:26557106

  11. Effects of Water and Nitrogen Addition on Ecosystem Carbon Exchange in a Meadow Steppe

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunbo; Jiang, Qi; Yang, Zhiming; Sun, Wei; Wang, Deli

    2015-01-01

    A changing precipitation regime and increasing nitrogen deposition are likely to have profound impacts on arid and semiarid ecosystem C cycling, which is often constrained by the timing and availability of water and nitrogen. However, little is known about the effects of altered precipitation and nitrogen addition on grassland ecosystem C exchange. We conducted a 3-year field experiment to assess the responses of vegetation composition, ecosystem productivity, and ecosystem C exchange to manipulative water and nitrogen addition in a meadow steppe. Nitrogen addition significantly stimulated aboveground biomass and net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE), which suggests that nitrogen availability is a primary limiting factor for ecosystem C cycling in the meadow steppe. Water addition had no significant impacts on either ecosystem C exchange or plant biomass, but ecosystem C fluxes showed a strong correlation with early growing season precipitation, rather than whole growing season precipitation, across the 3 experimental years. After we incorporated water addition into the calculation of precipitation regimes, we found that monthly average ecosystem C fluxes correlated more strongly with precipitation frequency than with precipitation amount. These results highlight the importance of precipitation distribution in regulating ecosystem C cycling. Overall, ecosystem C fluxes in the studied ecosystem are highly sensitive to nitrogen deposition, but less sensitive to increased precipitation. PMID:26010888

  12. OCCURRENCE OF ENTERIC VIRUSES IN SURFACE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human enteric viruses cause a number of diseases when individuals are exposed to contaminated drinking & recreational waters. Vaccination against poliovirus has virtually eliminated poliomyelitis from the planet. Other members of enterovirus group cause numerous diseases. Hepatit...

  13. Crocodylus niloticus (Crocodilia) is highly sensitive to water surface waves.

    PubMed

    Grap, Nadja J; Monzel, Anna S; Kohl, Tobias; Bleckmann, Horst

    2015-10-01

    Crocodiles show oriented responses to water surface wave stimuli but up to now behavioral thresholds are missing. This study determines the behavioral thresholds of crocodilians to water surface waves. Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus) were conditioned to respond to single-frequency water surface wave stimuli (duration 1150 ms, frequency 15, 30, 40, 60 and 80 Hz), produced by blowing air onto the water surface. Our study shows that C. niloticus is highly sensitive to capillary water surface waves. Threshold values decreased with increasing frequency and ranged between 10.3 μm (15 Hz) and 0.5 μm (80 Hz) peak-to-peak wave amplitude. For the frequencies 15 Hz and 30 Hz the sensitivity of one spectacled caiman (Caiman crocodilus) to water surface waves was also tested. Threshold values were 12.8 μm (15 Hz) down to 1.76 μm (30 Hz), i.e. close to the threshold values of C. niloticus. The surface wave sensitivity of crocodiles is similar to the surface wave sensitivity of semi-aquatic insects and fishing spiders but does not match the sensitivity of surface-feeding fishes which is higher by one to two orders of magnitude. PMID:26153334

  14. Calcite surface structure and reactivity: molecular dynamics simulations and macroscopic surface modelling of the calcite-water interface.

    PubMed

    Wolthers, M; Di Tommaso, D; Du, Z; de Leeuw, N H

    2012-11-21

    Calcite-water interactions are important not only in carbon sequestration and the global carbon cycle, but also in contaminant behaviour in calcite-bearing host rock and in many industrial applications. Here we quantify the effect of variations in surface structure on calcite surface reactivity. Firstly, we employ classical Molecular Dynamics simulations of calcite surfaces containing an etch pit and a growth terrace, to show that the local environment in water around structurally different surface sites is distinct. In addition to observing the expected formation of more calcium-water interactions and hydrogen-bonds at lower-coordinated sites, we also observed subtle differences in hydrogen bonding around acute versus obtuse edges and corners. We subsequently used this information to refine the protonation constants for the calcite surface sites, according to the Charge Distribution MUltiSite Ion Complexation (CD-MUSIC) approach. The subtle differences in hydrogen bonding translate into markedly different charging behaviour versus pH, in particular for acute versus obtuse corner sites. The results show quantitatively that calcite surface reactivity is directly related to surface topography. The information obtained in this study is not only crucial for the improvement of existing macroscopic surface models of the reactivity of calcite towards contaminants, but also improves our atomic-level understanding of mineral-water interactions. PMID:23042085

  15. Use of ready-mixed concrete plant sludge water in concrete containing an additive or admixture.

    PubMed

    Chatveera, B; Lertwattanaruk, P

    2009-04-01

    In this study, we investigated the feasibility of using sludge water from a ready-mixed concrete plant as mixing water in concrete containing either fly ash as an additive or a superplasticizer admixture based on sulfonated naphthalene-formaldehyde condensates (SNF). The chemical and physical properties of the sludge water and the dry sludge were investigated. Cement pastes were mixed using sludge water containing various levels of total solids content (0.5, 2.5, 5, 7.5, 10, 12.5, and 15%) in order to determine the optimum content in the sludge water. Increasing the total solids content beyond 5-6% tended to reduce the compressive strength and shorten the setting time. Concrete mixes were then prepared using sludge water containing 5-6% total solids content. The concrete samples were evaluated with regard to water required, setting time, slump, compressive strength, permeability, and resistance to acid attack. The use of sludge water in the concrete mix tended to reduce the effect of both fly ash and superplasticizer. Sludge water with a total solids content of less than 6% is suitable for use in the production of concrete with acceptable strength and durability. PMID:19231063

  16. Dynamic effect of sodium-water reaction in fast flux test facility power addition sodium pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.N.; Anderson, M.J.

    1990-03-01

    The Fast Flux Facility (FFTF) is a demonstration and test facility of the sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor. A power addition'' to the facility is being considered to convert some of the dumped, unused heat into electricity generation. Components and piping systems to be added are sodium-water steam generators, sodium loop extensions from existing dump heat exchangers to sodium-water steam generators, and conventional water/steam loops. The sodium loops can be subjected to the dynamic loadings of pressure pulses that are caused by postulated sodium leaks and subsequent sodium-water reaction in the steam generator. The existing FFTF secondary pipes and the new power addition sodium loops were evaluated for exposure to the dynamic effect of the sodium-water reaction. Elastic and simplified inelastic dynamic analyses were used in this feasibility study. The results indicate that both the maximum strain and strain range are within the allowable limits. Several cycles of the sodium-water reaction can be sustained by the sodium pipes that are supported by ordinary pipe supports and seismic restraints. Expensive axial pipe restraints to withstand the sodium-water reaction loads are not needed, because the pressure-pulse-induced alternating bending stresses act as secondary stresses and the pressure pulse dynamic effect is a deformation-controlled quantity and is self-limiting. 14 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Interaction of surface and subsurface waters in the system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazukhina, Svetlana; Masloboev, Vladimir; Chudnenko, Konstantin; Bychinski, Valerii; Sandimirov, Sergey

    2010-05-01

    Purpose of the study - to assess the influence of the Khibiny massif on the formation of the chemical composition of surface and subsurface waters, generated within its boundaries using physical-chemical modeling ("Selector" software package). Objects of monitoring - rivers with sources in the upper reaches of the Khibiny massif (surface waters), and boreholes, located in these rivers' valleys (subsurface waters) have been chosen as objects of monitoring. Processes of formation of surface and subsurface waters, generated within the boundaries of the Khibiny massif, have been considered within the framework of a unified system "water-rock-atmosphere-carbon". The initial data of the model: chemical compositions of the Khibiny massif rocks and chemical analyses of atmospheric and surface waters. Besides, there have been considered Clarke concentrations S, Cl, F, C, their influence on the formation of chemical composition of water solutions; geochemical mobility of chemical elements. The previously developed model has been improved with the purpose of assessment of the influence of organic substance, either liquid or solid, on the formation of the chemical composition of water. The record of the base model of the multisystem includes 24 independent components (Al-B-Br-Ar-He-Ne-C-Ca-Cl-F-K-Mg-Mn-N-Na-P-S-Si-Sr-Cu-Zn-H-O-e), 872 dependent components, including, in a water solution - 295, in a gas phase - 76, liquid hydrocarbons - 111, solid phases, organic and mineral substances - 390. The record of solid phases of multisystem is made with consideration of the mineral composition of the Khibiny massif. Using the created model, the physical-chemical modeling of surface and subsurface water generation has been carried out: 1. The system "water-rock-atmosphere" has been studied, depending on the interaction degree (ksi) of rock with water. A model like this allowed investigating the interactions of surface waters (rivers and lakes) with rocks that form the Khibiny massif. 2

  18. Langevin Poisson-Boltzmann equation: point-like ions and water dipoles near a charged surface.

    PubMed

    Gongadze, Ekaterina; van Rienen, Ursula; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika; Iglič, Aleš

    2011-06-01

    Water ordering near a charged membrane surface is important for many biological processes such as binding of ligands to a membrane or transport of ions across it. In this work, the mean-field Poisson-Boltzmann theory for point-like ions, describing an electrolyte solution in contact with a planar charged surface, is modified by including the orientational ordering of water. Water molecules are considered as Langevin dipoles, while the number density of water is assumed to be constant everywhere in the electrolyte solution. It is shown that the dielectric permittivity of an electrolyte close to a charged surface is decreased due to the increased orientational ordering of water dipoles. The dielectric permittivity close to the charged surface is additionally decreased due to the finite size of ions and dipoles. PMID:21613667

  19. The occurrence of anti-retroviral compounds used for HIV treatment in South African surface water.

    PubMed

    Wood, Timothy Paul; Duvenage, Cornelia S J; Rohwer, Egmont

    2015-04-01

    The study and quantification of personal care products, such as pharmaceuticals, in surface water has become popular in recent years; yet very little description of these compounds' presence in South African surface water exists in the literature. Antiretrovirals (ARVs), used to treat human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are rarely considered within this field. A new method for the simultaneous quantification of 12 antiretroviral compounds in surface water using the standard addition method is described. Water samples were concentrated by a generic automated solid phase extraction method and analysed by ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). Substantial matrix effect was encountered in the samples with an average method detection limit of 90.4 ng/L. This is the first reported countrywide survey of South African surface water for the quantification of these compounds with average concentrations ranging between 26.5 and 430 ng/L. PMID:25681819

  20. Compton Scattering from Bulk and Surface of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenjie; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Vaknin, David

    2014-03-01

    Elastic and Compton scattering at grazing angle X-ray incidence from water show distinct behaviors below and above the critical angle for total reflections suggesting surface restructuring of the water surface. Using X-ray synchrotron radiation in reflectivity mode, we collect the Thomson and Compton scattering signals with energy dispersive detector at various angles near the normal to surface as a function of the angle of incidence. Analysis of the ratio between the Thomson and Compton intensity above the critical angle (which mainly probes bulk water) is a constant as expected from incoherent scattering from single water molecule, whereas the signal from the surface shows strong angular dependence on the incident angle. Although we do not fully understand the phenomena, we attribute the observation to more organized water at the interface. Ames Laboratory, DOE under contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358 and Advanced Photon Source, DOE under contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  1. Interaction Of Water Molecules With SiC(001) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Cicero, G; Catellani, A; Galli, G

    2004-08-10

    We have investigated the interaction of water molecules with the polar Si- and C- terminated surfaces of cubic Silicon Carbide by means of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations at finite temperature. Different water coverages were considered, from {1/4} to a complete monolayer. Irrespective of coverage, we find that water dissociates on the silicon terminated surfaces, leading to important changes in both its structural and electronic properties. On the contrary, the carbon terminated surface remains inert when exposed to water. We propose experiments to reveal the ionic and electronic structure of wet Si-terminated surfaces predicted by our calculations, which at full coverage are notably different from those of hydrated Si(001) substrates. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for SiC surface functionalization.

  2. Interaction between water cluster ions and mica surface

    SciTech Connect

    Ryuto, Hiromichi Ohmura, Yuki; Nakagawa, Minoru; Takeuchi, Mitsuaki; Takaoka, Gikan H.

    2014-03-15

    Water cluster ion beams were irradiated on mica surfaces to investigate the interaction between molecular cluster ions and a mica surface. The contact angle of the mica surface increased with increasing dose of the water cluster ion beam, but the increase in the contact angle was smaller than that induced by an ethanol cluster ion beam. The surface roughness also increased with increasing dose of the water cluster ion beam, whereas the intensity of K 2p x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy peaks decreased with increasing dose of the water cluster ion beam. The decrease in the number of potassium atoms together with the increase in the surface roughness may be the causes of the increase in the contact angle.

  3. Behavior of severely supercooled water drops impacting on superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitra, Tanmoy; Antonini, Carlo; Tiwari, Manish K.; Mularczyk, Adrian; Imeri, Zulkufli; Schoch, Philippe; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2014-11-01

    Surface icing, commonplace in nature and technology, has broad implications to daily life. To prevent surface icing, superhydrophobic surfaces/coatings with rationally controlled roughness features (both at micro and nano-scale) are considered to be a promising candidate. However, to fabricate/synthesize a high performance icephobic surface or coating, understanding the dynamic interaction between water and the surface during water drop impact in supercooled state is necessary. In this work, we investigate the water/substrate interaction using drop impact experiments down to -17°C. It is found that the resulting increased viscous effect of water at low temperature significantly affects all stages of drop dynamics such as maximum spreading, contact time and meniscus penetration into the superhydrophobic texture. Most interestingly, the viscous effect on the meniscus penetration into roughness feature leads to clear change in the velocity threshold for rebounding to sticking transition by 25% of supercooled drops. Swiss National Science Foundation (SNF) Grant 200021_135479.

  4. Liquid water can slip on a hydrophilic surface

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Tuan Anh; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V.; Lee, Lloyd L.; Striolo, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Understanding and predicting the behavior of water, especially in contact with various surfaces, is a scientific challenge. Molecular-level understanding of hydrophobic effects and their macroscopic consequences, in particular, is critical to many applications. Macroscopically, a surface is classified as hydrophilic or hydrophobic depending on the contact angle formed by a water droplet. Because hydrophobic surfaces tend to cause water slip whereas hydrophilic ones do not, the former surfaces can yield self-cleaning garments and ice-repellent materials whereas the latter cannot. The results presented herein suggest that this dichotomy might be purely coincidental. Our simulation results demonstrate that hydrophilic surfaces can show features typically associated with hydrophobicity, namely liquid water slip. Further analysis provides details on the molecular mechanism responsible for this surprising result. PMID:21911406

  5. Toxic risk of surface water pollution--six years of experience.

    PubMed

    Soldán, Premysl

    2003-03-01

    Assessment of an ecological quality of surface water is necessary for effective protection, abatement and successive revitalisation of river ecosystems. This quality is primarily given by biological impact of surface water pollution. Substances contained in pollution are frequently toxic to aquatic organisms. Risk of chronic impact of surface water pollution is very often underestimated due to hidden long time action of pollutants. Proper estimation of the risk is not possible from results of chemical analyses and data of substances' toxicity. Chemical analyses are not able to detect all substances presented in water including the products of reactions between them. In addition, a simultaneous presence of substances can modify their final effect on aquatic organisms. Therefore, a complex method of assessment of toxic risk of surface water pollution based on ecotoxicological approach was developed. The toxic risk of surface water pollution is determined from results of evaluation of toxic risk of organic part and inorganic part of surface water pollution. Resultant degree of toxic risk of total pollution is given by the highest degree detected in any part of the water pollution. Presented method, which is routinely used for monitoring in the Czech part of the Odra river basin, was fully standardised and published in the form of the Czech branch technical norm of water management (TNV) in the year 2000. PMID:12605913

  6. Carbon evasion from surface waters in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butman, D. E.; Stackpoole, S. M.; Clow, D. W.; Striegl, R. G.; Verdin, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    Gaseous evasion of carbon dioxide and methane from freshwater surfaces has been shown to be upwards of 50% of the total freshwater carbon flux. In many cases, surface efflux is the dominant removal pathway for carbon, however large-scale estimates remain poorly constrained. As part of the ongoing efforts to quantify the carbon sequestration potential of natural ecosystems in the US by the USGS LandCarbon Program, we present the results of a synthesis of available CO2 in streams and rivers, and CO2 and CH4 measurements in lakes across Alaska. For stream carbon, we performed modifications to a synthetic streamline dataset derived from the Elevation Derivatives for National Applications (EDNA) to reflect more recent and accurate climate. Stream and river surface areas only account for 0.54% of the total area of Alaska while preliminary data suggests lakes account for nearly 3.4%. Preliminary analysis suggests 24 Tg-C yr-1 is evaded from fluvial surfaces, with the highest fluxes located in the southeastern region of the state driven by longer periods above freezing, high annual precipitation, and steep topography. We are currently quantifying the uncertainties in these estimates as well as analyzing a new dataset on CO2 and CH4 concentrations in Alaskan lakes. We will present the first estimate for the total freshwater surface carbon flux for Alaska.

  7. Effect of dilute polymer additives on the acoustic cavitation threshold of water

    SciTech Connect

    Crum, L.A.; Brosey, J.E.

    1984-02-01

    Measurements are presented of the variation of the acoustic cavitation threshold of water with concentration of the polymer additives polyethylene oxide and guar gum. It was found that small amounts of these additives could significantly increase the cavitation threshold. A theoretical model, based upon nucleation of a gas bubble from a Harvey-type crevice in a mote or solid particle, is developed that gives good agreement with the measurements. The applicability of this approach to an explanation of cavitation index reduction in flow-generated or confined jet cavitation, when polymer additives are introduced, is discussed.

  8. Numerical study of surface water waves generated by mass movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghozlani, Belgacem; Hafsia, Zouhaier; Maalel, Khlifa

    2013-10-01

    In this paper waves generated by two-dimensional mass movement are simulated using a numerical model based on the full hydrodynamic coupling between rigid-body motion and ambient fluid flow. This approach has the capability to represent the dynamics of the moving rigid body, which avoids the need to prescribe the body velocity based on the data measurements. This model is implemented in the CFX code and uses the Reynolds average Navier-Stokes equations solver coupled to the recently developed immersed solid technique. The latter technique allows us to follow implicitly the motion of the solid block based on the rigid body solver. The volume-of-fluid method is used to track the free surface locations. The accuracy of the present model is firstly examined against the simple physical case of a freely falling rigid body into water reproducing Scott Russell's solitary waves. More complex and realistic simulations of aerial and submarine mass-movement, simulated by a rigid wedge sliding into water along a 45° slope, are then performed. Simulated results of the aerial mass movement show the complex flow patterns in terms of the velocity fields and free surface profiles. Results are in good agreement with the available experimental data. In addition, the physical processes associated with the generation of water wave by two-dimensional submarine mass-movement are explored. The effects of the initial submergence and specific gravity on the slide mass kinematics and maximum wave amplitude are investigated. The terminal velocity and initial acceleration of the slide mass are well predicted when compared to experimental results. It is found that the initial submergence did not have a significant effect on the initial acceleration of the slide block centre of mass. However, it depends nonlinearly\\vadjust{\

  9. Density functional theory study of the effects of alloying additions on sulfur adsorption on nickel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyi, Oleksandr I.; Chen, Zhong; Kulish, Vadym V.; Bai, Kewu; Wu, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Reactions of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) with Nickel/Ytrria-doped zirconia (Ni/YDZ) anode materials might cause degradation of the performance of solid oxide fuel cells when S containing fuels are used. In this paper, we employ density functional theory to investigate S adsorption on metal (M)-doped and undoped Ni(0 0 1) and Ni(1 1 1) surfaces. Based on the performed calculations, we analyze the effects of 12 alloying additions (Ag, Au, Al, Bi, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Sn, Sb, V, and Zn) on the temperature of transition between clean (S atoms do not adsorb on the surfaces) and contaminated (S atoms can adsorb on the surfaces spontaneously) M-doped Ni surfaces for different concentrations of H2S in the fuel. Predicted results are consistent with many experimental studies relevant to S poisoning of both Ni/YDZ and M-doped Ni/YDZ anode materials. This study is important to understand S poisoning phenomena and to develop new S tolerant anode materials.

  10. Releasing-addition method for the flame-photometric determination of calcium in thermal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowe, J.J.

    1963-01-01

    Study of the interferences of silica and sulfate in the flame-photometric determination of calcium in thermal waters has led to the development of a method requiring no prior chemical separations. The interference effects of silica, sulfate, potassium, sodium, aluminum, and phosphate are overcome by an addition technique coupled with the use of magnesium as a releasing agent. ?? 1963.

  11. Measurements of Water Surface Snow Lines in Classical Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blevins, Sandra M.; Pontoppidan, Klaus M.; Banzatti, Andrea; Zhang, Ke; Najita, Joan R.; Carr, John S.; Salyk, Colette; Blake, Geoffrey A.

    2016-02-01

    We present deep Herschel-PACS spectroscopy of far-infrared water lines from a sample of four protoplanetary disks around solar-mass stars, selected to have strong water emission at mid-infrared wavelengths. By combining the new Herschel spectra with archival Spitzer-IRS spectroscopy, we retrieve a parameterized radial surface water vapor distribution from 0.1 to 100 au using two-dimensional dust and line radiative transfer modeling. The surface water distribution is modeled with a step model composed of a constant inner and outer relative water abundance and a critical radius at which the surface water abundance is allowed to change. We find that the four disks have critical radii of ˜3-11 au, at which the surface water abundance decreases by at least 5 orders of magnitude. The measured values for the critical radius are consistently smaller than the location of the surface snow line, as predicted by the observed spectral energy distribution. This suggests that the sharp drop-off of the surface water abundance is not solely due to the local gas-solid balance, but may also be driven by the deactivation of gas-phase chemical pathways to water below 300 K. Assuming a canonical gas-to-dust ratio of 100, as well as coupled gas and dust temperatures Tgas = Tdust, the best-fit inner water abundances become implausibly high (0.01-1.0 {{{{H}}}2}-1). Conversely, a model in which the gas and dust temperatures are decoupled leads to canonical inner-disk water abundances of ˜ {10}-4 {{{H}}}2-1, while retaining gas-to-dust ratios of 100. That is, the evidence for gas-dust decoupling in disk surfaces is stronger than for enhanced gas-to-dust ratios.

  12. Water sorption of CH3- and CF3-Bis-GMA based resins with additives

    PubMed Central

    PRAKKI, Anuradha; CILLI, Renato; VIEIRA, Ian Matos; DUDUMAS, Kristina; PEREIRA, José Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effect of additives on the water sorption characteristics of Bis-GMA based copolymers and composites containing TEGDMA, CH3Bis-GMA or CF3Bis-GMA. Material and methods Fifteen experimental copolymers and corresponding composites were prepared combining Bis-GMA and TEGDMA, CH3Bis-GMA or CF3Bis-GMA, with aldehyde or diketone (24 and 32 mol%) totaling 30 groups. For composites, barium aluminosilicate glass and pyrogenic silica was added to comonomer mixtures. Photopolymerization was effected by 0.2 wt% each of camphorquinone and N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine. Specimen densities in dry and water saturated conditions were obtained by Archimedes' method. Water sorption and desorption were evaluated in a desorption-sorption-desorption cycle. Water uptake (%WU), water desorption (%WD), equilibrium solubility (ES; µg/mm3), swelling (f) and volume increase (%V) were calculated using appropriate equations. Results All resins with additives had increased %WU and ES. TEGDMA-containing systems presented higher %WU, %WD, ES, f and %V values, followed by resins based on CH3Bis-GMA and CF3Bis-GMA. Conclusions Aldehyde and diketone led to increases in the water sorption characteristics of experimental resins. PMID:23032211

  13. Study of stability and thermodynamic properties of water-in-diesel nanoemulsion fuels with nano-Al additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Rakhi N.; More, Utkarsh; Malek, Naved; Chakraborty, Mousumi; Parikh, Parimal A.

    2015-11-01

    The present work addresses the formation of water-in-diesel (W/D) nanoemulsion by blending different percentages of water along with nano-Al additive in various propositions to enhance the combustion characteristics. The roles of various surfactants such as Sorbitan monooleate (Span 80), Triton X-100, Tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide, and newly synthesized and characterized dicationic surfactants were discussed based upon their ability to stabilize the nanoemulsions. Surface active properties of the surfactants were determined by measuring their interfacial tension and subsequently by measuring the critical micelle concentration of the surfactants. Triton X-100 was found to be the most efficient surfactant for the current water-in-diesel nanoemulsion as it stabilized the suspensions for more than 8 h. Particle size analysis proved emulsion size to be in the order of nanometer, and zeta potential values were found to have neutral behavior at water-diesel interface. Experimental studies confirmed that that blends W/D [1 % (vol.) water] and W/DA [1 % (vol.) water, 0.1 % (wt.) nano-Al] were thermodynamically stable.

  14. Investigation of surface water behavior during glaze ice accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Turnock, Stephen R.

    1988-01-01

    Microvideo observations of glaze ice accretions on 1-in-diameter cylinders in a closed-loop refrigerated wind tunnel were obtained to study factors controlling the behavior of unfrozen surface water during glaze ice accretion. Three zones of surface water behavior were noted, each with a characteristic roughness. The effect of substrate thermal and roughness properties on ice accretions was also studied. The contact angle and hysteresis were found to increase sharply at temperatures just below 0 C, explaining the high resistance to motion of water beads observed on accreting glaze ice surfaces. Based on the results, a simple multizone modification to the current glaze ice accretion model is proposed.

  15. Thin Water Films at Multifaceted Hematite Particle Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Boily, Jean-François; Yeşilbaş, Merve; Uddin, Munshi Md Musleh; Baiqing, Lu; Trushkina, Yulia; Salazar-Alvarez, Germàn

    2015-12-01

    Mineral surfaces exposed to moist air stabilize nanometer- to micrometer-thick water films. This study resolves the nature of thin water film formation at multifaceted hematite (α-Fe2O3) nanoparticle surfaces with crystallographic faces resolved by selected area electron diffraction. Dynamic vapor adsorption (DVA) in the 0-19 Torr range at 298 K showed that these particles stabilize water films consisting of up to 4-5 monolayers. Modeling of these data predicts water loadings in terms of an "adsorption regime" (up to 16 H2O/nm(2)) involving direct water binding to hematite surface sites, and of a "condensation regime" (up to 34 H2O/nm(2)) involving water binding to hematite-bound water nanoclusters. Vibration spectroscopy identified the predominant hematite surface hydroxo groups (-OH, μ-OH, μ3-OH) through which first layer water molecules formed hydrogen bonds, as well as surface iron sites directly coordinating water molecules (i.e., as geminal η-(OH2)2 sites). Chemometric analyses of the vibration spectra also revealed a strong correspondence in the response of hematite surface hydroxo groups to DVA-derived water loadings. These findings point to a near-saturation of the hydrogen-bonding environment of surface hydroxo groups at a partial water vapor pressure of ∼8 Torr (∼40% relative humidity). Classical molecular dynamics (MD) resolved the interfacial water structures and hydrogen bonding populations at five representative crystallographic faces expressed in these nanoparticles. Simulations of single oriented slabs underscored the individual roles of all (hydro)oxo groups in donating and accepting hydrogen bonds with first layer water in the "adsorption regime". These analyses pointed to the preponderance of hydrogen bond-donating -OH groups in the stabilization of thin water films. Contributions of μ-OH and μ3-OH groups are secondary, yet remain essential in the stabilization of thin water films. MD simulations also helped resolve crystallographic

  16. LANDSCAPE INDICATORS OF SURFACE WATER CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This task comprises three inter-related projects: 1) impervious surface mapping and evaluation of its impact ; 2) detection of BMPs and estimation of their ability to reduce nutrient input into streams, and; 3) detection of isolated wetlands. Each substask addresses critical is...

  17. Interactions between ground water and surface water in the Suwannee River basin, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katz, B.G.; DeHan, R.S.; Hirten, J.J.; Catches, J.S.

    1997-01-01

    Ground water and surface water constitute a single dynamic system in roost parts of the Suwannee River basin due to the presence of karat features that facilitate the interaction between the surface and subsurface. Low radon-222 concentrations (below background levels) and enriched amounts of oxygen-18 and deuterium in ground water indicate mixing with surface water in parts of the basin. Comparison of surface water and regional ground water flow patterns indicate that boundaries for ground water basins typically do not coincide with surface water drainage subbasins. There are several areas in the basin where ground water flow that originates outside of the Suwannee River basin crosses surface water basin boundaries during both low-flow and high-flow conditions. In a study area adjacent to the Suwannee River that consists predominantly of agricultural land use, 18 wells tapping the Upper Floridan aquifer and 7 springs were sampled three times during 1990 through 1994 for major dissolved inorganic constituents, trace elements, and nutrients. During a period of above normal rainfall that resulted in high river stage and high ground water levels in 1991, the combination of increased amounts of dissolved organic carbon and decreased levels of dissolved oxygen in ground water created conditions favorable for the natural reduction of nitrate by denitrification reactions in the aquifer. As a result, less nitrate was discharged by ground water to the Suwannee River.

  18. Selenium concentration, speciation and behavior in surface waters of the Canadian prairies.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoxi; Wang, Feiyue; Hanson, Mark L

    2009-11-01

    Similar to the San Joaquin Valley of California, the Canadian prairies are underlain with seleniferous shale and have recently witnessed a significant expansion in irrigated agriculture. The irrigated acreage in the prairies is expected to further increase due to global warming and changes in human use patterns. This raises concerns over potential selenium (Se) contamination in prairie surface waters and risk of adverse biological effects. To test the potential for elevated Se in the prairies, Se concentrations and speciation were examined in surface water, sediments, and sediment porewater in three water bodies in southern Manitoba, Canada, along a north-south transect with a gradient of irrigation and agricultural activities. A selenite addition experiment was also performed in mesocosms in a prairie wetland to assess the risk of increasing Se loading to the prairie waters. Overall, our results indicate that Se concentrations in the prairie waters of southern Manitoba are presently low except during the snowmelt season, that Se speciation is dominated by selenate which is of lower toxicity than selenite, and that if additional selenite is discharged into the prairie waters, it will be quickly removed from the surface water to the sediment. The low Se risk in the Canadian prairies is attributed to high soil drainability and relatively small scale of irrigation at present. The Se problem as being experienced in central California is thus unlikely to occur in surface waters of the Canadian prairies, although Se contamination in ground water is possible should the irrigated acreage continue to increase. PMID:19732939

  19. Safety assessment of greenhouse hydroponic tomatoes irrigated with reclaimed and surface water.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Galvez, Francisco; Allende, Ana; Pedrero-Salcedo, Francisco; Alarcon, Juan Jose; Gil, Maria Isabel

    2014-11-17

    The impact of reclaimed and surface water on the microbiological safety of hydroponic tomatoes was assessed. Greenhouse tomatoes were irrigated with reclaimed and surface water and grown on two hydroponic substrates (coconut fiber and rock wool). Water samples (n=208) were taken from irrigation water, with and without the addition of fertilizers and drainage water, and hydroponic tomatoes (n=72). Samples were analyzed for indicator microorganisms, generic Escherichia coli and Listeria spp., and pathogenic bacteria such as Salmonella spp. and Shiga-toxigenic E. coli (STEC), using multiplex real-time PCR (RT-PCR) after enrichment. The correlation between climatological parameters such as temperature and the levels of microorganisms in water samples was also determined. In irrigation water, generic E. coli counts were higher in reclaimed than in surface water whereas Listeria spp. numbers increased after adding the fertilizers in both water sources. In drainage water, no clear differences in E. coli and Listeria numbers were observed between reclaimed and surface water. No positive samples for STEC were found in irrigation water. Presumptive positives for Salmonella spp. were found in 7.7% of the water samples and 62.5% of these samples were reclaimed water. Salmonella-positive samples by RT-PCR could not be confirmed by conventional methods. Higher concentrations of E. coli were associated with Salmonella-presumptive positive samples. Climatological parameters, such as temperature, were not correlated with the E. coli and Listeria spp. counts. Tomato samples were negative for bacterial pathogens, while generic E. coli and Listeria spp. counts were below the detection limit. The prevalence of presumptive Salmonella spp. found in irrigation water (reclaimed and surface water) was high, which might present a risk of contamination. The absence of pathogens on greenhouse hydroponic tomatoes indicates that good agricultural practices (GAP) were in place, avoiding the

  20. Third Stokes parameter emission from a periodic water surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. T.; Kong, J. A.; Shin, R. T.; Staelin, D. H.; Oneill, K.; Lohanick, A.

    1991-01-01

    An experiment in which the third Stokes parameter thermal emission from a periodic water surface was measured is documented. This parameter is shown to be related to the direction of periodicity of the periodic surface and to approach brightnesses of up to 30 K at X band for the surface used in the experiment. The surface actually analyzed was a 'two-layer' periodic surface; the theory of thermal emission from such a surface is derived and the theoretical results are found to be in good agreement with the experimental measurements. These results further the idea of using the third Stokes parameter emission as an indicator of wind direction over the ocean.

  1. Assessment of information on ground-water/surface-water interactions in the northern midcontinent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strobel, Michael L.

    1995-01-01

    Ground-water/surface-water interactions are important to the hydrology of shallow aquifers, streams, lakes, and wetlands. Information on ground-water/surface-water interactions in the northern midcontinent was assessed. The ground-water/surface-water interactions in physiographic and climatic areas that contain many wetlands differed from the interactions in areas that consisted predominantly of alluvial aquifers along large streams. In both types of areas, however, the interactions are complex. The distribution of shallow ground-water observation wells in the northern midcontinent and the frequency of measurement were evaluated. Most shallow wells are located adjacent to major streams, especially in areas where wetlands are not a dominant surface-water feature. The frequency of measurement was inconsistent between states.

  2. Multivariate qualitative analysis of banned additives in food safety using surface enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shixuan; Xie, Wanyi; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Liqun; Wang, Yunxia; Liu, Xiaoling; Liu, Yulong; Du, Chunlei

    2015-02-01

    A novel strategy which combines iteratively cubic spline fitting baseline correction method with discriminant partial least squares qualitative analysis is employed to analyze the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy of banned food additives, such as Sudan I dye and Rhodamine B in food, Malachite green residues in aquaculture fish. Multivariate qualitative analysis methods, using the combination of spectra preprocessing iteratively cubic spline fitting (ICSF) baseline correction with principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminant partial least squares (DPLS) classification respectively, are applied to investigate the effectiveness of SERS spectroscopy for predicting the class assignments of unknown banned food additives. PCA cannot be used to predict the class assignments of unknown samples. However, the DPLS classification can discriminate the class assignment of unknown banned additives using the information of differences in relative intensities. The results demonstrate that SERS spectroscopy combined with ICSF baseline correction method and exploratory analysis methodology DPLS classification can be potentially used for distinguishing the banned food additives in field of food safety.

  3. Multivariate qualitative analysis of banned additives in food safety using surface enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    He, Shixuan; Xie, Wanyi; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Liqun; Wang, Yunxia; Liu, Xiaoling; Liu, Yulong; Du, Chunlei

    2015-02-25

    A novel strategy which combines iteratively cubic spline fitting baseline correction method with discriminant partial least squares qualitative analysis is employed to analyze the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy of banned food additives, such as Sudan I dye and Rhodamine B in food, Malachite green residues in aquaculture fish. Multivariate qualitative analysis methods, using the combination of spectra preprocessing iteratively cubic spline fitting (ICSF) baseline correction with principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminant partial least squares (DPLS) classification respectively, are applied to investigate the effectiveness of SERS spectroscopy for predicting the class assignments of unknown banned food additives. PCA cannot be used to predict the class assignments of unknown samples. However, the DPLS classification can discriminate the class assignment of unknown banned additives using the information of differences in relative intensities. The results demonstrate that SERS spectroscopy combined with ICSF baseline correction method and exploratory analysis methodology DPLS classification can be potentially used for distinguishing the banned food additives in field of food safety. PMID:25300041

  4. Coherent structures in liquid water close to hydrophilic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Giudice, Emilio; Tedeschi, Alberto; Vitiello, Giuseppe; Voeikov, Vladimir

    2013-06-01

    Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) predicts the occurrence of a number of coherent dynamical phenomena in liquid water. In the present paper we focus our attention on the joint coherent oscillation of the almost free electrons produced by the coherent oscillation of the electron clouds of water molecules, which has been described in previous publications, and of the negative electric charges lying on the solid surfaces wet by water. This joint coherent oscillation gives rise to a number of phenomenological consequences which are found to exist in the physical reality and coincide with the layers of Exclusion Zone (EZ) water experimentally observed close to hydrophilic surfaces.

  5. Groundwater and surface-water utilisation using a bank infiltration technique in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsuddin, Mohd Khairul Nizar; Sulaiman, Wan Nor Azmin; Suratman, Saim; Zakaria, Mohamad Pauzi; Samuding, Kamarudin

    2014-05-01

    Bank infiltration (BI) is one of the solutions to providing raw water for public supply in tropical countries. This study in Malaysia explores the use of BI to supplement a polluted surface-water resource with groundwater. Three major factors were investigated: (1) contribution of surface water through BI to the resulting abstraction, (2) input of local groundwater, and (3) water-quality characteristics of the resulting water supply. A geophysical method was employed to define the subsurface geology and hydrogeology, and isotope techniques were performed to identify the source of groundwater recharge and the interaction between surface water and groundwater. The physicochemical and microbiological parameters of the local surface-water bodies and groundwater were analyzed before and during water abstraction. Extracted water revealed a 5-98 % decrease in turbidity, as well as reductions in HCO3 -, Cl-, SO4 2-, NO3 -, Ca2+, Al3+ and As concentrations compared with those of Langat River water. In addition, amounts of E. coli, total coliform and Giardia were significantly reduced (99.9 %). However, water samples from test wells during pumping showed high concentrations of Fe2+ and Mn2+. Pumping test results indicate that the two wells used in the study were able to sustain yields.

  6. Phosphorus removal with membrane filtration for surface water treatment.

    PubMed

    Dietze, A; Gnirss, R; Wiesmann, U

    2002-01-01

    Surface waters are often burdened with inflows of low quality water, so that drinking-water production, swimming or ground water charging must be restricted. To ensure the long-term use of such surface water it is necessary to treat the influents or the water used for ground water charging. The current treatment process for phosphorus and turbidity removal is a process combination called floc filtration. By using this conventional method it is possible to reduce the dissolved ortho-phosphate and the turbidity (particulate phosphorus) as well as the amounts of algae and pathogenic organisms to very low concentrations. The high degree of reduction is only achieved by a relatively high dosage of chemicals. A comparison will be made between this process, which represents the state-of-the-art, and the combination of precipitation/coagulation with micro-/ultrafiltration in dead-end filtration mode. PMID:12361018

  7. Summary of I-129 measurements in ground and surface waters

    SciTech Connect

    Kantelo, M.V.

    1987-11-17

    The iodine-129 content of groundwater and surface water at on-plant (Savannah River Plant) and off-plant locations has been determined at irregular intervals since 1970 using neutron activation analysis. I-129 was detected in groundwater near the Burial Ground and near the seepage basins of the Separations areas. For reference, I-129 concentrations in the groundwater can be compared to the EPA drinking water standard. At a few locations the concentrations exceeded both the existing and pending EPA drinking water standard. In surface water, Four Mile Creek was the only SRP stream found to transport significant I-129 to the Savannah River. Dilution by C-Reactor discharge and the Savannah River reduced the off-plant I-129 concentrations in river water to less than 1% of the existing EPA drinking water standard and less than 0.01% of the pending EPA drinking water standard.

  8. The Use of Additional GPS Frequencies to Independently Determine Tropospheric Water Vapor Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, B.M.; Feng, D.; Flittner, D. E.; Kursinski, E. R.

    2000-01-01

    It is well known that the currently employed L1 and L2 GPS/MET frequencies (1.2 - 1.6) Ghz) do not allow for the separation of water vapor and density (or temperature) from active microwave occultation measurements in regions of the troposphere warmer than 240 K Therefore, additional information must be used, from other types of measurements and weather analyses, to recover water vapor (and temperature) profiles. Thus in data sparse regions, these inferred profiles can be subject to larger errors than would result in data rich regions. The use of properly selected additional GPS frequencies enables a direct, independent measurement of the absorption associated with the water vapor profile, which may then be used in the standard GPS/MET retrievals to obtain a more accurate determination of atmospheric temperature throughout the water vapor layer. This study looks at the use of microwave crosslinks in the region of the 22 Ghz water vapor absorption line for this purpose. An added advantage of using 22 Ghz frequencies is that they are only negligibly affected by the ionosphere in contrast to the large effect at the GPS frequencies. The retrieval algorithm uses both amplitude and phase measurements to obtain profiles of atmospheric pressure, temperature and water water vapor pressure with a vertical resolution of 1 km or better. This technique also provides the cloud liquid water content along the ray path, which is in itself an important element in climate monitoring. Advantages of this method include the ability to make measurements in the presence of clouds and the use of techniques and technology proven through the GPS/MET experiment and several of NASA's planetary exploration missions. Simulations demonstrating this method will be presented for both clear and cloudy sky conditions.

  9. Two-dimensional percolation at the free water surface and its relation with the surface tension anomaly of water.

    PubMed

    Sega, Marcello; Horvai, George; Jedlovszky, Pál

    2014-08-01

    The percolation temperature of the lateral hydrogen bonding network of the molecules at the free water surface is determined by means of molecular dynamics computer simulation and identification of the truly interfacial molecules analysis for six different water models, including three, four, and five site ones. The results reveal that the lateral percolation temperature coincides with the point where the temperature derivative of the surface tension has a minimum. Hence, the anomalous temperature dependence of the water surface tension is explained by this percolation transition. It is also found that the hydrogen bonding structure of the water surface is largely model-independent at the percolation threshold; the molecules have, on average, 1.90 ± 0.07 hydrogen bonded surface neighbors. The distribution of the molecules according to the number of their hydrogen bonded neighbors at the percolation threshold also agrees very well for all the water models considered. Hydrogen bonding at the water surface can be well described in terms of the random bond percolation model, namely, by the assumptions that (i) every surface water molecule can form up to 3 hydrogen bonds with its lateral neighbors and (ii) the formation of these hydrogen bonds occurs independently from each other. PMID:25106600

  10. Water diffusion on TiO2 anatase surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosta, L.; Gala, F.; Zollo, G.

    2015-06-01

    Compatibility between biological molecules and inorganic materials, such as crystalline metal oxides, is strongly dependent on the selectivity properties and the adhesion processes at the interface between the two systems. Among the many different aspects that affect the adsorption processes of peptides or proteins onto inorganic surfaces, such as the charge state of the amino acids, the peptide 3D structure, the surface roughness, the presence of vacancies or defects on and below the surface, a key role is certainly played by the water solvent whose molecules mediate the interaction. Then the surface hydration pattern may strongly affect the adsorption behavior of biological molecules. For the particular case of (101) anatase TiO2 surface that has a fundamental importance in the interaction of biocompatible nano-devices with biological environment, it was shown, both theoretically and experimentally, that various hydration patterns are close in energy and that the water molecules are mobile at as low temperature values as 190 K. Then it is important to understand the dynamical behavior of first hydration layer of the (101) anatase surface. As a first approach to this problem, density functional calculations are used to investigate water diffusion on the (101) anatase TiO2 surface by sampling the potential energy surface of water molecules of the first hydration layer thus calculating the water molecule migration energy along some relevant diffusion paths on the (101) surface. The measured activation energy of water migration seems in contrast with the observed surface mobility of the water molecules that, as a consequence could be explained invoking a strong role of the entropic term in the context of the transition state theory.

  11. Boundary slip of superoleophilic, oleophobic, and superoleophobic surfaces immersed in deionized water, hexadecane, and ethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Jing, Dalei; Bhushan, Bharat

    2013-11-26

    The boundary slip condition is an important property, and its existence can reduce fluid drag in micro/nanofluidic systems. The boundary slip on various surfaces immersed in water and various electrolytes has been widely studied. For the surfaces immersed in oil, the boundary slip on superoleophilic and oleophilic surfaces has been studied, but there is no data on oleophobic and superoleophobic surfaces. In this paper, experiments are carried out to study electrostatic force and boundary slip on superoleophilic, oleophobic, and superoleophobic surfaces immersed in deionized (DI) water, hexadecane, and ethylene glycol. In addition, the surface charge density of the samples immersed in DI water is quantified. Results show that the electrostatic force and the absolute value of the surface charge density of an octadecyltrichlorosilane surface are larger than that of a polystyrene surface, and the electrostatic force and the absolute value of surface charge density of a superoleophilic surface are larger than that of oleophobic and superoleophobic surfaces. For the same liquid, the larger contact angle leads to a larger slip length at the solid-liquid interface. For the same surface, the larger liquid viscosity leads to a larger slip length. The relevant mechanisms are discussed in this paper. PMID:24168076

  12. Identifying and Mapping Seasonal Surface Water Frost with MGS TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bapst, J.; Bandfield, J. L.; Wood, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    The Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) visible/near-infrared and thermal infrared bolometers measured surface broadband albedo and temperature for more than three Mars years. As seasons progress on Mars, surface temperatures may fall below the frost point of volatiles in the atmosphere (namely, carbon dioxide and water). Systematic mapping of the spatial and temporal occurrence of these volatiles in the martian atmosphere, on the surface, and in the subsurface has shown their importance in understanding the climate of Mars. However, few studies have investigated seasonal surface water frost and its role in the global water cycle. We examine zonally-averaged TES daytime albedo, temperature, and water vapor abundance data [after Smith, 2004] to map the presence of surface water frost on Mars. Surface water frost occurs in the polar and mid latitudes, in regions with surface temperatures less than 220 K and above 150 K, and can significantly increase albedo relative to the bare surface. In the northern hemisphere water frost is most apparent in late fall/early winter, before the onset of carbon dioxide frost. Dust storms occurring near northern winter solstice affect albedo data and prevent us from putting a latitudinal lower limit on the water frost in the northern hemisphere. Regardless, seasonal water frost occurs at least as low as 48°N in Utopia Planitia, beginning at Ls=~230°, as observed by Viking Lander 2 [Svitek and Murray, 1990]. Daytime surface water frost was also observed at the Phoenix Lander site (68°N) beginning at Ls=~160° [Cull et al., 2010]. The timing of albedo variations observed by TES agree relatively well with lander observations of seasonal frost. Seasonal water frost is not detected during fall in the southern hemisphere. A potential explanation for this discrepancy, compared with frost detections in the north, is the disparity in atmospheric water vapor abundance between the two hemispheres. The frost point temperatures for water vapor

  13. Formation of Water on a Warm Amorphous Silicate Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidali, Gianfranco; He, Jiao

    2014-06-01

    It is well established that reactions on interstellar dust grain surfaces are indispensable for water formation in space. Among all the intermediate products that lead to water formation, the OH radical is especially important because is a product of all the three main water formation surface routes, i.e., the hydrogenation of O, O2, and O3, and it also connects these three routes. The desorption energy of OH from dust grain surfaces, along with dust grain temperature, determines the availability OH for grain surface versus gas-phase reactions. We experimentally investigated water formation on the surface of a warm amorphous silicate via H+O3→OH+O2. The surface temperature was kept at 50 K so as to exclude the interference of O2. It is found that OH has a significant residence time at 50 K. The OH desorption energy from amorphous silicate surface is calculated to be at least 1680 K, and possibly as high as 4760 K. Water is formed efficiently via OH+H and OH+H2, and the product H2O stays on the surface upon formation. Deuterium has also been used in place of hydrogen to check isotopic effects. This work is supported by NSF, Astronomy & Astrophysics Division (Grants No. 0908108 and 1311958) and NASA (Grant No. NNX12AF38G). We thank Dr. J.Brucato of the Astrophysical Observatory of Arcetri for providing the samples used in these experiments.

  14. Surface Propensities of the Self-Ions of Water

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The surface charge of water, which is important in a wide range of chemical, biological, material, and environmental contexts, has been a subject of lengthy and heated debate. Recently, it has been shown that the highly efficient LEWIS force field, in which semiclassical, independently mobile valence electron pairs capture the amphiproticity, polarizability and H-bonding of water, provides an excellent description of the solvation and dynamics of hydroxide and hydronium in bulk water. Here we turn our attention to slabs, cylinders, and droplets. In extended simulations with 1000 molecules, we find that hydroxide consistently prefers the surface, hydronium consistently avoids the surface, and the two together form an electrical double layer until neutralization occurs. The behavior of hydroxide can largely be accounted for by the observation that hydroxide moving to the surface loses fewer hydrogen bonds than are gained by the water molecule that it displaces from the surface. At the same time, since the orientation of the hydroxide increases the ratio of dangling hydrogens to dangling lone pairs, the proton activity of the exposed surface may be increased, rather than decreased. Hydroxide also moves more rapidly in the surface than in the bulk, likely because the proton donating propensity of neighboring water molecules is focused on the one hydrogen that is not dangling from the surface. PMID:27163053

  15. Surface Propensities of the Self-Ions of Water.

    PubMed

    Bai, Chen; Herzfeld, Judith

    2016-04-27

    The surface charge of water, which is important in a wide range of chemical, biological, material, and environmental contexts, has been a subject of lengthy and heated debate. Recently, it has been shown that the highly efficient LEWIS force field, in which semiclassical, independently mobile valence electron pairs capture the amphiproticity, polarizability and H-bonding of water, provides an excellent description of the solvation and dynamics of hydroxide and hydronium in bulk water. Here we turn our attention to slabs, cylinders, and droplets. In extended simulations with 1000 molecules, we find that hydroxide consistently prefers the surface, hydronium consistently avoids the surface, and the two together form an electrical double layer until neutralization occurs. The behavior of hydroxide can largely be accounted for by the observation that hydroxide moving to the surface loses fewer hydrogen bonds than are gained by the water molecule that it displaces from the surface. At the same time, since the orientation of the hydroxide increases the ratio of dangling hydrogens to dangling lone pairs, the proton activity of the exposed surface may be increased, rather than decreased. Hydroxide also moves more rapidly in the surface than in the bulk, likely because the proton donating propensity of neighboring water molecules is focused on the one hydrogen that is not dangling from the surface. PMID:27163053

  16. Influence of surface roughness on water- and oil-repellent surfaces coated with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Chien-Te; Chen, Jin-Ming; Kuo, Rong-Rong; Lin, Ta-Sen; Wu, Chu-Fu

    2005-02-01

    Various rough surfaces coated with titanium oxide nanoparticles and perfluoroalkyl methacrylic copolymer were conducted to explore the influence of surface roughness on the performance of water- and oil-repellence. Surface characteristics determined from nitrogen physisorption at -196 °C showed that the surface area and pore volume increased significantly with the extent of nanoparticle ratio, indicating an increase of surface roughness. Due to the surface nano-coating, the maximum contact angles of water and ethylene glycol (EG) droplets increased up to 56 and 48%, respectively, e.g. from 105° to 164° for water droplets and from 96° to 144° for EG droplets. The excellent water- and oil-repellence of the prepared surfaces was ascribed to this increase of surface roughness and fluorinated-contained surface. Compared with Wenzel model, the Cassie model yielded a fairly good fit to the simulation of contact angle with surface roughness. However, a derivation of 3°-10° at higher roughness still existed. This phenomenon was very likely due to the surface heterogeneity with different pore size distributions of the fractal surfaces. In this case, it was unfavorable for super repellency from rough surface with larger mesopore fraction because of its capillary condensation, reflecting that micropore provided more air resistance against wettability.

  17. Bioavailability of veterinary antibiotics in surface water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Veterinary antibiotics are commonly used as feed additives in livestock production for growth promotion and disease prevention. These pharmaceuticals are often excreted by the livestock in urine and feces, and enter the environment via manure application. Little is known about the fate of veterinary...

  18. Micro-Plasma Transferred Arc Additive Manufacturing for Die and Mold Surface Remanufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhavar, Suyog; Paul, Christ Prakash; Jain, Neelesh Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Micro-plasma transferred arc ( µPTA) additive manufacturing is one of the newest options for remanufacturing of dies and molds surfaces in the near-millimeter range leading to extended usage of the same. We deployed an automatic micro-plasma deposition setup to deposit a wire of 300 µm of AISI P20 tool steel on the substrate of same material for the potential application in remanufacturing of the die and mold surface. Our present research effort is to establish µPTA additive manufacturing as a viable economical and cleaner methodology for potential industrial applications. We undertook the optimization of single weld bead geometry as the first step in our present study. Bead-on-plate trials were conducted to deposit single bead geometry at various processing parameters. The bead geometry (shape and size) and dilution were measured and the parametric dependence was derived. A set of parameters leading to reproducible regular and smooth single bead geometry were identified and used to prepare a thin wall for mechanical testing. The deposits were subjected to material characterization such as microscopic studies, micro-hardness measurements and tensile testing. The process was compared qualitatively with other deposition processes involving high-energy density beams and was found to be advantageous in terms of low initial and running costs with comparable properties. The outcome of the study confirmed the process capability of µPTA deposition leading to deployment of cost-effective and environmentally friendlier technology for die and mold remanufacturing.

  19. Micro-Plasma Transferred Arc Additive Manufacturing for Die and Mold Surface Remanufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhavar, Suyog; Paul, Christ Prakash; Jain, Neelesh Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Micro-plasma transferred arc (µPTA) additive manufacturing is one of the newest options for remanufacturing of dies and molds surfaces in the near-millimeter range leading to extended usage of the same. We deployed an automatic micro-plasma deposition setup to deposit a wire of 300 µm of AISI P20 tool steel on the substrate of same material for the potential application in remanufacturing of the die and mold surface. Our present research effort is to establish µPTA additive manufacturing as a viable economical and cleaner methodology for potential industrial applications. We undertook the optimization of single weld bead geometry as the first step in our present study. Bead-on-plate trials were conducted to deposit single bead geometry at various processing parameters. The bead geometry (shape and size) and dilution were measured and the parametric dependence was derived. A set of parameters leading to reproducible regular and smooth single bead geometry were identified and used to prepare a thin wall for mechanical testing. The deposits were subjected to material characterization such as microscopic studies, micro-hardness measurements and tensile testing. The process was compared qualitatively with other deposition processes involving high-energy density beams and was found to be advantageous in terms of low initial and running costs with comparable properties. The outcome of the study confirmed the process capability of µPTA deposition leading to deployment of cost-effective and environmentally friendlier technology for die and mold remanufacturing.

  20. A siphon gage for monitoring surface-water levels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCobb, T.D.; LeBlanc, D.R.; Socolow, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    A device that uses a siphon tube to establish a hydraulic connection between the bottom of an onshore standpipe and a point at the bottom of a water body was designed and tested for monitoring surface-water levels. Water is added to the standpipe to a level sufficient to drive a complete slug of water through the siphoning tube and to flush all air out of the system. The water levels in the standpipe and the water body equilibrate and provide a measurable static water surface in the standpipe. The siphon gage was designed to allow quick and accurate year-round measurements with minimal maintenance. Currently available devices for monitoring surface-water levels commonly involve time-consuming and costly installation and surveying, and the movement of reference points and the presence of ice cover in cold regions cause discontinuity and inaccuracy in the data collected. Installation and field testing of a siphon gage using 0.75-in-diameter polyethylene tubing at Ashumet Pond in Falmouth, Massachusetts, demonstrated that the siphon gage can provide long-term data with a field effort and accuracy equivalent to measurement of ground-water levels at an observation well.A device that uses a siphon tube to establish a hydraulic connection between the bottom of an onshore standpipe and a point at the bottom of a water body was designed and tested for monitoring surface-water levels. Water is added to the standpipe to a level sufficient to drive a complete slug of water through the siphoning tube and to flush all air out of the system. The water levels in the standpipe and the water body equilibrate and provide a measurable static water surface in the standpipe. The siphon gage was designed to allow quick and accurate year-round measurements with minimal maintenance. Currently available devices for monitoring surface-water levels commonly involve time-consuming and costly installation and surveying, and the movement of reference points and the presence of ice cover in cold

  1. The potential application of red mud and soil mixture as additive to the surface layer of a landfill cover system.

    PubMed

    Ujaczki, Éva; Feigl, Viktória; Molnár, Mónika; Vaszita, Emese; Uzinger, Nikolett; Erdélyi, Attila; Gruiz, Katalin

    2016-06-01

    Red mud, the by-product of aluminum production, has been regarded as a problematic residue all over the world. Its storage involves risks as evidenced by the Ajka red mud spill, an accident in Hungary where the slurry broke free, flooding the surrounding areas. As an immediate remediation measure more than 5cm thick red mud layer was removed from the flooded soil surface. The removed red mud and soil mixture (RMSM) was transferred into the reservoirs for storage. In this paper the application of RMSM is evaluated in a field study aiming at re-utilizing waste, decreasing cost of waste disposal and providing a value-added product. The purpose was to investigate the applicability of RMSM as surface layer component of landfill cover systems. The field study was carried out in two steps: in lysimeters and in field plots. The RMSM was mixed at ratios ranging between 0 and 50% w/w with low quality subsoil (LQS) originally used as surface layer of an interim landfill cover. The characteristics of the LQS+RMSM mixtures compared to the subsoil (LQS) and the RMSM were determined by physical-chemical, biological and ecotoxicological methods. The addition of RMSM to the subsoil (LQS) at up to 20% did not result any ecotoxic effect, but it increased the water holding capacity. In addition, the microbial substrate utilization became about triple of subsoil (LQS) after 10months. According to our results the RMSM mixed into subsoil (LQS) at 20% w/w dose may be applied as surface layer of landfill cover systems. PMID:27266315

  2. ICESat-derived inland water surface spot heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Loughlin, Fiachra E.; Neal, Jeffrey; Yamazaki, Dai; Bates, Paul D.

    2016-04-01

    Accurate measurement of water surface height is key to many fields in hydrology and limnology. Satellite radar and laser altimetry have been shown to be useful means of obtaining such data where no ground gauging stations exist, and the accuracy of different satellite instruments is now reasonably well understood. Past validation studies have shown water surface height data from the ICESat instrument to have the highest vertical accuracy (mean absolute errors of ˜10 cm for ICESat, compared, for example, with ˜28 cm from Envisat), yet no freely available source of processed ICESat data currently exists for inland water bodies. Here we present a database of processed and quality checked ICESat-derived inland water surface heights (IWSH) for water bodies greater than 3 arc sec (˜92 m at the equator) in width. Four automated methods for removing spurious observations or outliers were investigated, along with the impact of using different water masks. We find that the best performing method ensures that observations used are completely surrounded by water in the SRTM Water Body data. Using this method for removing spurious observations, we estimate transect-averaged water surface heights at 587,292 unique locations from 2003 to 2009, with the number of locations proportional to the size of the river.

  3. Direct Addition Mechanism during the Catalytic Hydrogenation of Olefins over Platinum Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yujung; Ebrahimi, Maryam; Tillekaratne, Aashani; Zaera, Francisco

    2016-07-01

    The mechanism of the hydrogenation of olefins catalyzed by metal surfaces was probed by using isotope labeling in conjunction with a high-flux effusive molecular beam setup capable of sustaining steady-state conversion under well-controlled ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). The unique conditions afforded by this instrument, namely, a single collision regime and impinging frequencies equivalent to pressures in the mTorr range, led to the clear identification of two competing pathways: a multiple H-D isotope exchange channel explained by the well-known Horiuti-Polanyi mechanism but with an unusually high probability for β-hydride elimination from the alkyl surface intermediate (versus its reductive elimination to the alkane), and a direct addition route that produces dideuterated alkanes selectively. The latter may follow an Eley-Rideal mechanism involving an adsorbate (either the olefin or the hydrogen/deuterium atoms resulting from dissociative adsorption of H2/D2) and a gas-phase molecule (the other reactant), or, alternatively, it could reflect the limited diffusion of the hydrogen atoms on the surface under catalytic conditions because of site blocking by the islands of strongly bonded carbonaceous (alkylidyne) layers present during catalysis. Regardless, our data clearly show that the distribution of alkane isotopologues obtained from the conversion of olefins with deuterium can deviate significantly from statistical expectations. PMID:27309969

  4. Antibacterial Behavior of Additively Manufactured Porous Titanium with Nanotubular Surfaces Releasing Silver Ions.

    PubMed

    Amin Yavari, S; Loozen, L; Paganelli, F L; Bakhshandeh, S; Lietaert, K; Groot, J A; Fluit, A C; Boel, C H E; Alblas, J; Vogely, H C; Weinans, H; Zadpoor, A A

    2016-07-13

    Additive manufacturing (3D printing) has enabled fabrication of geometrically complex and fully interconnected porous biomaterials with huge surface areas that could be used for biofunctionalization to achieve multifunctional biomaterials. Covering the huge surface area of such porous titanium with nanotubes has been already shown to result in improved bone regeneration performance and implant fixation. In this study, we loaded TiO2 nanotubes with silver antimicrobial agents to equip them with an additional biofunctionality, i.e., antimicrobial behavior. An optimized anodizing protocol was used to create nanotubes on the entire surface area of direct metal printed porous titanium scaffolds. The nanotubes were then loaded by soaking them in three different concentrations (i.e., 0.02, 0.1, and 0.5 M) of AgNO3 solution. The antimicrobial behavior and cell viability of the developed biomaterials were assessed. As far as the early time points (i.e., up to 1 day) are concerned, the biomaterials were found to be extremely effective in preventing biofilm formation and decreasing the number of planktonic bacteria particularly for the middle and high concentrations of silver ions. Interestingly, nanotubes not loaded with antimicrobial agents also showed significantly smaller numbers of adherent bacteria at day 1, which may be attributed to the bactericidal effect of high aspect ratio nanotopographies. The specimens with the highest concentrations of antimicrobial agents adversely affected cell viability at day 1, but this effect is expected to decrease or disappear in the following days as the rate of release of silver ions was observed to markedly decrease within the next few days. The antimicrobial effects of the biomaterials, particularly the ones with the middle and high concentrations of antimicrobial agents, continued until 2 weeks. The potency of the developed biomaterials in decreasing the number of planktonic bacteria and hindering the formation of biofilms make

  5. Wave-Generated Flows on the Water Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shats, Michael; Punzmann, Horst; Francois, Nicolas; Xia, Hua

    2016-06-01

    Predicting trajectories of fluid parcels on the water surface perturbed by waves is a difficult mathematical and theoretical problem. It is even harder to model flows generated on the water surface due to complex three-dimensional wave fields, which commonly result from the modulation instability of planar waves. We have recently shown that quasi-standing, or Faraday, waves are capable of generating horizontal fluid motions on the water surface whose statistical properties are very close to those in two-dimensional turbulence. This occurs due to the generation of horizontal vortices. Here we show that progressing waves generated by a localized source are also capable of creating horizontal vortices. The interaction between such vortices can be controlled and used to create stationary surface flows of desired topology. These results offer new methods of surface flow generation, which allow engineering inward and outward surface jets, large-scale vortices and other complex flows. The new principles can be also be used to manipulate floaters on the water surface and to form well-controlled Lagrangian coherent structures on the surface. The resulting flows are localized in a narrow layer near the surface, whose thickness is less than one wavelength.

  6. The biological impact of landfill leachate on nearby surface water

    SciTech Connect

    Geis, S.W.

    1994-12-31

    Five landfill sites were evaluated for their potential to adversely impact the biotic community of surface waters. Acute and chronic aquatic toxicity tests were used to determine the toxicity of water samples collected from landfill monitoring wells and the nearest surface water. Four of the five landfill sites exhibited acute or chronic toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia, Daphnia magna, or Pimephales promelas. Toxicity identification procedures performed on water samples revealed toxic responses to metals and one toxic response to organic compounds. Surface water toxicity at an industrial landfill is most likely due to zinc from a tire production facility. Iron and a surfactant were determined to be the probable causes for toxicity at two municipal solid waste landfills.

  7. Protocol for quantitative tracing of surface water with synthetic DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foppen, J. W.; Bogaard, T. A.

    2012-04-01

    Based on experiments we carried out in 2010 with various synthetic single stranded DNA markers with a size of 80 nucleotides (ssDNA; Foppen et al., 2011), we concluded that ssDNA can be used to carry out spatially distributed multi-tracer experiments in the environment. Main advantages are in principle unlimited amount of tracers, environmental friendly and tracer recovery at very high dilution rates (detection limit is very low). However, when ssDNA was injected in headwater streams, we found that at selected downstream locations, the total mass recovery was less than 100%. The exact reason for low mass recovery was unknown. In order to start identifying the cause of the loss of mass in these surface waters, and to increase our knowledge of the behaviour of synthetic ssDNA in the environment, we examined the effect of laboratory and field protocols working with artificial DNA by performing numerous batch experiments. Then, we carried out several field tests in different headwater streams in the Netherlands and in Luxembourg. The laboratory experiments consisted of a batch of water in a vessel with in the order of 10^10 ssDNA molecules injected into the batch. The total duration of each experiment was 10 hour, and, at regular time intervals, 100 µl samples were collected in a 1.5 ml Eppendorf vial for qPCR analyses. The waters we used ranged from milliQ water to river water with an Electrical Conductivity of around 400 μS/cm. The batch experiments were performed in different vessel types: polyethylene bottles, polypropylene copolymer bottles , and glass bottles. In addition, two filter types were tested: 1 µm pore size glass fibre filters and 0.2 µm pore size cellulose acetate filters. Lastly, stream bed sediment was added to the batch experiments to quantify interaction of the DNA with sediment. For each field experiment around 10^15 ssDNA molecules were injected, and water samples were collected 100 - 600 m downstream of the point of injection. Additionally

  8. Intermolecular Casimir-Polder forces in water and near surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiyam, Priyadarshini; Persson, Clas; Sernelius, Bo E.; Parsons, Drew F.; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders; Boström, Mathias

    2014-09-01

    The Casimir-Polder force is an important long-range interaction involved in adsorption and desorption of molecules in fluids. We explore Casimir-Polder interactions between methane molecules in water, and between a molecule in water near SiO2 and hexane surfaces. Inclusion of the finite molecular size in the expression for the Casimir-Polder energy leads to estimates of the dispersion contribution to the binding energies between molecules and between one molecule and a planar surface.

  9. Lithium Bromide/Water as Additives in Dearomatizing Samarium-Ketyl (Hetero)Arene Cyclizations.

    PubMed

    Rao, Chintada Nageswara; Bentz, Christoph; Reissig, Hans-Ulrich

    2015-11-01

    New conditions for dearomatizing samarium-ketyl (hetero)arene cyclizations are reported. In many examples of these samarium diiodide-mediated reactions, lithium bromide and water can be used as additives instead of the carcinogenic and mutagenic hexamethylphosphoramide (HMPA). The best results were obtained for the cyclizations of N-acylated indole derivatives delivering the expected indolines in good yields and excellent diastereoselectivities. A new type of cyclization delivering indolyl-substituted allene derivatives is also described. The scope and limitations of the lithium bromide/water system are discussed. PMID:26368916

  10. Documentation of potential for surface faulting related to ground-water withdrawal in Las Vegas Valley, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, Thomas L.

    1978-01-01

    Leveling data collected in Las Vegas Valley are compatible with the interpretation that ongoing land-surface displacements related to ground-water withdrawal may be precursory to fault offset of the land surface. Zones of potential faulting intersect regions of intense urban development. The degree of risk and the potential economic consequences from possible surface faulting cannot be assessed adequately without additional data and analysis of the relation between surface faulting and ground-water withdrawal.

  11. Reassigning the most stable surface of hydroxyapatite to the water resistant hydroxyl terminated (010) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeglinski, Jacek; Nolan, Michael; Thompson, Damien; Tofail, Syed A. M.

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the surface stability and crystal growth morphology of hydroxyapatite is important to comprehend bone growth and repair processes and to engineer protein adsorption, cellular adhesion and biomineralization on calcium phosphate based bone grafts and implant coatings. It has generally been assumed from electronic structure calculations that the most stable hydroxyapatite surface is the (001) surface, terminated just above hydroxyl ions perpendicular to the {001} crystal plane. However, this is inconsistent with the known preferential growth direction of hydroxyapatite crystals and previous experimental work which indicates that, contrary to currently accepted theoretical predictions, it is actually the (010) surface that is preferentially exposed. The surface structure of the (010) face is still debated and needs reconciliation. In this work, we use a large set of density functional theory calculations to model the interaction of water with hydroxyapatite surfaces and probe the surface stability and resistance to hydrolytic remodeling of a range of surface faces including the (001) surface and the phosphate-exposed, calcium-exposed, and hydroxyl-exposed terminations of the (010) surface. For the (001) surface and the phosphate-exposed (010) surface, dissociative water adsorption is favorable. In contrast, the hydroxyl-terminated (010) surface will not split water and only molecular adsorption of water is possible. Our calculations show, overall, that the hydroxyl-terminated (010) surface is the most stable and thus should be the predominant form of the hydroxyapatite surface exposed in experiments. This finding reconciles discrepancies between the currently proposed surface terminations of hydroxyapatite and the experimentally observed crystal growth direction and surface stability, which may aid efforts to accelerate biomineralization and better control bone-repair processes on hydroxyapatite surfaces.

  12. Repetition priming in simple addition depends on surface form and typicality.

    PubMed

    Sciama, S C; Semenza, C; Butterworth, B

    1999-01-01

    Repetition priming and recognition memory for numbers were measured in four experiments using single-digit addition. Results of the first two experiments indicate that when numbers were presented as number words and dot configurations, preexposure of the same problem in the same notation produced greater reaction-time benefit than did preexposure of the same problem in Arabic-digit notation. In contrast, when numbers were presented as Arabic digits, preexposure of the same problem in Arabic digit, number word, and dot notation produced the same amount of priming. In the third experiment, priming was shown to be greatest, for all three notations, when the task performed on preexposure trials (addition or multiplication) matched the task performed on repetition trials (addition). Results of the fourth experiment, measuring recognition memory, were comparable to the priming results in the sense that memory was superior when notation matched across repetitions if the test involved number words and dot configurations but not Arabic digits. These data are interpreted in terms of models of numerical cognition, and they support the hypothesis that the influence of surface form on repetition priming depends on the typicality of the input for the task. PMID:10087861

  13. Water chemistry of surface waters affected by the Fourmile Canyon wildfire, Colorado, 2010-2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCleskey, R. Blaine; Writer, Jeffrey H.; Murphy, Sheila F.

    2012-01-01

    In September 2010, the Fourmile Canyon fire burned about 23 percent of the Fourmile Creek watershed in Boulder County, Colo. Water-quality sampling of Fourmile Creek began within a month after the wildfire to assess its effects on surface-water chemistry. Water samples were collected from five sites along Fourmile Creek (above, within, and below the burned area) monthly during base flow, twice weekly during snowmelt runoff, and at higher frequencies during storm events. Stream discharge was also monitored. Water-quality samples were collected less frequently from an additional 6 sites on Fourmile Creek, from 11 tributaries or other inputs, and from 3 sites along Boulder Creek. The pH, electrical conductivity, temperature, specific ultraviolet absorbance, total suspended solids, and concentrations (dissolved and total) of major cations (calcium, magnesium, sodium, and potassium), anions (chloride, sulfate, alkalinity, fluoride, and bromide), nutrients (nitrate, ammonium, and phosphorus), trace metals (aluminum, arsenic, boron, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, iron, mercury, lithium, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead, rubidium, antimony, selenium, strontium, vanadium, and zinc), and dissolved organic carbon are here reported for 436 samples collected during 2010 and 2011.

  14. Formation and transport of deethylatrazine and deisopropylatrazine in surface water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Meyer, M.T.; Mills, M.S.; Zimmerman, L.R.; Perry, C.A.; Goolsby, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    Field disappearance studies and a regional study of nine rivers in the Midwest Corn Belt show that deethylatrazine (DEA; 2-amino-4-chloro-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) and deisopropylatrazine (DIA; 2-amino-4-chloro-6-ethylaminos-triazine) occur frequently in surface water that has received runoff from two parent triazine herbicides, atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) and cyanazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-methylpropionitrileamino-s-triazine). The concentration of DEA and DIA in surface water varies with the hydrologic conditions of the basin and the timing of runoff, with maximum concentrations reaching 5 ??g/L (DEA + DIA). Early rainfall followed by a dry summer will result in an early peak concentration of metabolites in surface water. A wet summer will delay the maximum concentrations of metabolites and increase their runoff into surface water, occasionally resulting in a slight separation of the parent atrazine maximum concentrations from the metabolite maximum concentrations, giving a "second flush?? of triazine metabolites to surface water. Replicated field dissipation studies of atrazine and cyanazine indicate that DIA/DEA ratios will vary from 0.4 ?? 0.1 when atrazine is the major triazine present to 0.6 ?? 0.1 when significant amounts of cyanazine are present. A comparison of transport time of DEA and DIA from field plots to their appearance in surface water indicates that storage and dilution are occurring in the alluvial aquifers of the basin.

  15. Occurrence of deeethylatrazine and deisopropylatrazine in surface and ground water

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman, E.M.; Goolsby, D.A.

    1996-10-01

    Field-disappearance studies and a regional study of nine rivers in the Midwest show that deethylatrazine (DEA) and deisopropylatrazine (DIA) occur frequently in surface water that has received runoff from two parent triazine herbicides, atrazine and cyanazine. The concentration of DEA and DIA in surface water varies with the hydrologic conditions of the basin and the timing of runoff, with maximum concentrations reaching 5 mg/L (DEA + DIA). Early rainfall followed by a dry summer will result in an early peak concentration of metabolites in surface water. A wet summer will delay the maximum concentrations of metabolites and increase their runoff into surface water, occasionally resulting in a slight separation of the parent atrazine maximum concentrations from the metabolite maximum concentrations giving a {open_quotes}second flush{close_quotes} of triazine metabolites to surface water. Replicated field dissipation studies of atrazine and cyanazine indicate that DIA/DEA ratios will vary from 0.4{plus_minus}0.1 when atrazine is the major triazine present to 0.6{plus_minus}0.1 when significant amounts of cyanazine are present. A comparison of transport time of DEA and DIA from field plots to their appearance in surface water indicates that storage and dilution are occurring in the alluvial aquifers of the basin.

  16. Landfill disposal of unused medicines reduces surface water releases.

    PubMed

    Tischler, Lial; Buzby, Mary; Finan, Douglas S; Cunningham, Virginia L

    2013-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is conducting research to evaluate the pathways and fate of active pharmaceutical ingredients from the consumer to surface waters. One potential pathway identified by the researchers is the disposal of unused pharmaceutical products that are discarded by consumers in household trash and disposed of in municipal solid waste landfills. This study was designed to evaluate relative amounts of surface water exposures through the landfill disposal pathway compared to patient use and flushing of unused medicine pathways. The estimated releases to surface water of 24 example active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) in landfill leachate were calculated for 3 assumed disposal scenarios: 5%, 10%, and 15% of the total annual quantity of API sold is discarded and unused. The estimated releases from landfills to surface waters, after treatment of the leachate, were compared to the total amount of each example API that would be released to surface waters from publicly owned treatment works, generated by patient use and excretion. This study indicates that the disposal of unused medications in municipal solid waste landfills effectively eliminates the unused medicine contribution of APIs to surface waters; greater than 99.9% of APIs disposed of in a landfill are permanently retained. PMID:22556107

  17. Surface solvation for an ion in a water cluster.

    PubMed

    Herce, David H; Perera, Lalith; Darden, Thomas A; Sagui, Celeste

    2005-01-01

    We have used molecular dynamics simulations to study the structural, dynamical, and thermodynamical properties of ions in water clusters. Careful evaluations of the free energy, internal energy, and entropy are used to address controversial or unresolved issues, related to the underlying physical cause of surface solvation, and the basic assumptions that go with it. Our main conclusions are the following. (i) The main cause of surface solvation of a single ion in a water cluster is both water and ion polarization, coupled to the charge and size of the ion. Interestingly, the total energy of the ion increases near the cluster surface, while the total energy of water decreases. Also, our analysis clearly shows that the cause of surface solvation is not the size of the total water dipole (unless this is too small). (ii) The entropic contribution is the same order of magnitude as the energetic contribution, and therefore cannot be neglected for quantitative results. (iii) A pure energetic analysis can give a qualitative description of the ion position at room temperature. (iv) We have observed surface solvation of a large positive iodinelike ion in a polarizable water cluster, but not in a nonpolarizable water cluster. PMID:15638604

  18. The spatio-temporal variations of surface water quality in China during the "Eleventh Five-Year Plan".

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingbo; Chen, Yi; Zhang, Zhao; Wang, Pin; Song, Xiao; Wei, Xing; Feng, Boyan

    2015-03-01

    Surface water pollution has become a hot issue in recent years in that deterioration of surface water quality has hampered the sustainable development of China's economy. Previous studies have analyzed regional changes of water pollutants, but very few have studied at a national scale. By analyzing 9 water quality parameters recorded at 422 sampling stations nationwide, this studies summarized the spatial and temporal variations of surface water quality in China in "11th Five-Year Plan" period. Research showed that China's surface water quality is improving. But, further deterioration in several areas cannot be ignored. Human activities including over-urbanization and farming exerted a negative impact on surface water quality. Though the water quality in the upstream of major rivers located in northwest China was relatively better than that of other areas, deterioration of surface water quality has begun to emerge in the area. Additionally, the surface water quality in southern China was better than that of northern China. But some studies indicated that surface water quality was likely to worsen at a high speed. It was also found that different water quality parameters are characterized by spatial and temporal variations. These studies pointed out, the government should pay more attention to in the areas where the water quality parameters significantly exceeded the national standards. These studies provides theoretical basis for the decision-making and implementation of macro-scale water quality control policies. PMID:25647793

  19. High resolution remote sensing of water surface patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodget, A.; Visser, F.; Maddock, I.; Carbonneau, P.

    2012-12-01

    The assessment of in-stream habitat availability within fluvial environments in the UK traditionally includes the mapping of patterns which appear on the surface of the water, known as 'surface flow types' (SFTs). The UK's River Habitat Survey identifies ten key SFTs, including categories such as rippled flow, upwelling, broken standing waves and smooth flow. SFTs result from the interaction between the underlying channel morphology, water depth and velocity and reflect the local flow hydraulics. It has been shown that SFTs can be both biologically and hydraulically distinct. SFT mapping is usually conducted from the river banks where estimates of spatial coverage are made by eye. This approach is affected by user subjectivity and inaccuracies in the spatial extent of mapped units. Remote sensing and specifically the recent developments in unmanned aerial systems (UAS) may now offer an alternative approach for SFT mapping, with the capability for rapid and repeatable collection of very high resolution imagery from low altitudes, under bespoke flight conditions. This PhD research is aimed at investigating the mapping of SFTs using high resolution optical imagery (less than 10cm) collected from a helicopter-based UAS flown at low altitudes (less than 100m). This paper presents the initial findings from a series of structured experiments on the River Arrow, a small lowland river in Warwickshire, UK. These experiments investigate the potential for mapping SFTs from still and video imagery of different spatial resolutions collected at different flying altitudes and from different viewing angles (i.e. vertical and oblique). Imagery is processed using 3D mosaicking software to create orthophotos and digital elevation models (DEM). The types of image analysis which are tested include a simple, manual visual assessment undertaken in a GIS environment, based on the high resolution optical imagery. In addition, an object-based image analysis approach which makes use of the

  20. CHARACTERIZING SURFACE WATERS THAT MAY NOT REQUIRE FILTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field data from various utilities were studied with the object of identifying a set of characteristics of a surface water that might allow it to be successfully treated by disinfection alone, thus avoiding the need to filter. It was found possible to define water quality standard...

  1. SURFACE WATER QUALITY PARAMETERS FOR MONITORING OIL SHALE DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report develops and recommends prioritized listings of chemical, physical, and biological parameters which can be used to assess the environmental impact of oil shale development on surface water resources. Each of the potential water-related problems is addressed in the con...

  2. Dark solitons on the surface of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabchoub, Amin

    2014-05-01

    The nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS) models the evolution dynamics in time and space of weakly nonlinear water wave trains in finite or infinite depth. In the defocusing regime (finite depth), the NLS admits a family of soliton solutions, which describe the strong depression of wave envelopes. These solitons are referred to dark solitons and have been already observed in optics and in Bose-Einstein condensates. We present experimental results on gray and black solitons, propagating in a wave flume. Furthermore, we analyze the data and discuss the discrepancies observed with respect to theoretical predictions. The results prove that in the case of weak-nonlinearity of the waves, the NLS describes well the dynamics of nonlinear wave packets in finite depth.

  3. Dynamics of ice nucleation on water repellent surfaces.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Azar; Yamada, Masako; Li, Ri; Shang, Wen; Otta, Shourya; Zhong, Sheng; Ge, Liehui; Dhinojwala, Ali; Conway, Ken R; Bahadur, Vaibhav; Vinciquerra, A Joseph; Stephens, Brian; Blohm, Margaret L

    2012-02-14

    Prevention of ice accretion and adhesion on surfaces is relevant to many applications, leading to improved operation safety, increased energy efficiency, and cost reduction. Development of passive nonicing coatings is highly desirable, since current antiicing strategies are energy and cost intensive. Superhydrophobicity has been proposed as a lead passive nonicing strategy, yet the exact mechanism of delayed icing on these surfaces is not clearly understood. In this work, we present an in-depth analysis of ice formation dynamics upon water droplet impact on surfaces with different wettabilities. We experimentally demonstrate that ice nucleation under low-humidity conditions can be delayed through control of surface chemistry and texture. Combining infrared (IR) thermometry and high-speed photography, we observe that the reduction of water-surface contact area on superhydrophobic surfaces plays a dual role in delaying nucleation: first by reducing heat transfer and second by reducing the probability of heterogeneous nucleation at the water-substrate interface. This work also includes an analysis (based on classical nucleation theory) to estimate various homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation rates in icing situations. The key finding is that ice nucleation delay on superhydrophobic surfaces is more prominent at moderate degrees of supercooling, while closer to the homogeneous nucleation temperature, bulk and air-water interface nucleation effects become equally important. The study presented here offers a comprehensive perspective on the efficacy of textured surfaces for nonicing applications. PMID:22235939

  4. Variation of Local Surface Properties of an Air Bubble in Water Caused by Its Interaction with Another Surface.

    PubMed

    Del Castillo, Lorena A; Ohnishi, Satomi; Carnie, Steven L; Horn, Roger G

    2016-08-01

    Surface and hydrodynamic forces acting between an air bubble and a flat mica surface in surfactant-free water and in 1 mM KCl solution have been investigated by observing film drainage using a modified surface force apparatus (SFA). The bubble shapes observed with the SFA are compared to theoretical profiles computed from a model that considers hydrodynamic interactions, surface curvature, and disjoining pressure arising from electrical double layer and van der Waals interactions. It is shown that the bubble experiences double-layer forces, and a final equilibrium wetting film between the bubble and mica surfaces is formed by van der Waals repulsion. However, comparison with the theoretical model reveals that the double-layer forces are not simply a function of surface separation. Rather, they appear to be changed by one of more of the following: the bubble's dynamic deformation, its proximity to another surface, and/or hydrodynamic flow in the aqueous film that separate them. The same comments apply to the hydrodynamic mobility or immobility of the air-water interface. Together the results show that the bubble's surface is "soft" in two senses: in addition to its well-known deformability, its local properties are affected by weak external forces, in this case the electrical double-layer interactions with a nearby surface and hydrodynamic flow in the neighboring aqueous phase. PMID:27391417

  5. An Ontology Design Pattern for Surface Water Features

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Gaurav; Mark, David; Kolas, Dave; Varanka, Dalia; Romero, Boleslo E; Feng, Chen-Chieh; Usery, Lynn; Liebermann, Joshua; Sorokine, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Surface water is a primary concept of human experience but concepts are captured in cultures and languages in many different ways. Still, many commonalities can be found due to the physical basis of many of the properties and categories. An abstract ontology of surface water features based only on those physical properties of landscape features has the best potential for serving as a foundational domain ontology. It can then be used to systematically incor-porate concepts that are specific to a culture, language, or scientific domain. The Surface Water ontology design pattern was developed both for domain knowledge distillation and to serve as a conceptual building-block for more complex surface water ontologies. A fundamental distinction is made in this on-tology between landscape features that act as containers (e.g., stream channels, basins) and the bodies of water (e.g., rivers, lakes) that occupy those containers. Concave (container) landforms semantics are specified in a Dry module and the semantics of contained bodies of water in a Wet module. The pattern is imple-mented in OWL, but Description Logic axioms and a detailed explanation is provided. The OWL ontology will be an important contribution to Semantic Web vocabulary for annotating surface water feature datasets. A discussion about why there is a need to complement the pattern with other ontologies, es-pecially the previously developed Surface Network pattern is also provided. Fi-nally, the practical value of the pattern in semantic querying of surface water datasets is illustrated through a few queries and annotated geospatial datasets.

  6. Additional capabilities and benchmarking with the SPERT transients for heavy water application of the PARET code

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, W.L.

    1989-01-01

    The capabilities of the PARET code have been expanded to include the ability to compute steady-state and transient results for heavy water reactors. A comparison is provided between PARET and the SPERT II series of transients. Another significant improvement in the code is the addition of a restart capability. The current capabilities of the code are summarized. 7 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Concentration data for anthropogenic organic compounds in groundwater, surface water, and finished water of selected community water systems in the United States, 2002-10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, Janet M.; Kingsbury, James A.; Hopple, Jessica A.; Delzer, Gregory C.

    2010-01-01

    The National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the U.S. Geological Survey began implementing Source Water-Quality Assessments (SWQAs) in 2001 that focus on characterizing the quality of source water and finished water of aquifers and major rivers used by some of the larger community water systems in the United States. As used in SWQA studies, source water is the raw (ambient) water collected at the supply well before water treatment (for groundwater) or the raw (ambient) water collected from the river near the intake (for surface water), and finished water is the water that has been treated and is ready to be delivered to consumers. Finished-water samples are collected before the water enters the distribution system. The primary objective of SWQAs is to determine the occurrence of more than 250 anthropogenic organic compounds in source water used by community water systems, many of which currently are unregulated in drinking water by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. A secondary objective is to understand recurrence patterns in source water and determine if these patterns also occur in finished water before distribution. SWQA studies were conducted in two phases for most studies completed by 2005, and in one phase for most studies completed since 2005. Analytical results are reported for a total of 295 different anthropogenic organic compounds monitored in source-water and finished-water samples collected during 2002-10. The 295 compounds were classified according to the following 13 primary use or source groups: (1) disinfection by-products; (2) fumigant-related compounds; (3) fungicides; (4) gasoline hydrocarbons, oxygenates, and oxygenate degradates; (5) herbicides and herbicide degradates; (6) insecticides and insecticide degradates; (7) manufacturing additives; (8) organic synthesis compounds; (9) pavement- and combustion-derived compounds; (10) personal-care and domestic-use products; (11) plant- or animal-derived biochemicals; (12) refrigerants and

  8. [Clinical evaluation of an oxygen concentrator and humidifier that does not require additional reservoir water].

    PubMed

    Burioka, Naoto; Nakamoto, Sachiko; Fukuoka, Yasushi; Shimizu, Eiji

    2011-02-01

    A conventional humidifier with a reservoir of water for humidification can produce micro-aerosols contaminated with bacteria. The present study was undertaken to determine the clinical efficiency of a membrane humidifier that does not require additional reservoir water. We analyzed relative room air humidity and oxygen levels obtained from 2 pressure-swing adsorption (PSA)-type oxygen concentrators with membrane humidifiers. A significant correlation was found between relative room air humidity and that of oxygen moistened by a membrane humidifier. Several patients with chronic respiratory failure experienced improvements in subjectively reported nasal dryness using an oxygen concentrator with a membrane humidifier. This device avoids the need to change reservoir water, and may improve patient quality of life in the home. PMID:21400902

  9. Nano-porous pottery using calcined waste sediment from tap water production as an additive.

    PubMed

    Sangsuk, Supin; Khunthon, Srichalai; Nilpairach, Siriphan

    2010-10-01

    A suspension of sediment from a lagoon in a tap water production plant was collected for this experiment. The suspension was spray dried and calcined at 700 °C for 1 h. After calcining, 30 wt.% of the sediment were mixed with pottery clay. Samples with and without calcined sediment were sintered at 900, 1000 and 1100 °C. The results show that calcined sediment can be used as an additive in pottery clay. The samples with calcined sediment show higher porosity, water absorption and flexural strength, especially for 900 and 1000 °C. At 900 °C, samples with calcined sediment show a porosity of 50% with an average pore size of 68 nm, water absorption of 31% and flexural strength of 12.61 MPa. PMID:19942644

  10. A Model of Surface Energy Budget over Water, Snow and Ice Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Bras, R. L.

    2012-12-01

    The recently developed maximum entropy production (MEP) model of turbulent and conductive heat fluxes over land surfaces is generalized to water/snow/ice surfaces. Analogous to the case of land surfaces, an analytical solution of latent, sensible and surface water/snow/ice heat flux is derived as a function of surface temperature (e.g. sea surface temperature) and surface net short- and long wave radiation. Compared to the classical bulk transfer equations based models, the MEP model does not need wind speed, near-surface air temperature and roughness lengths as input. The model is parameter parsimonious. A test of the MEP model against observations from several field experiments has suggested its usefulness and potential for predicting conductive and turbulent fluxes over water/snow/ice surfaces. The model is a suitable tool for remote sensing of the surface energy balance over oceans, snow covered Antarctica and sea ice. The model can also be incorporated into regional and global atmospheric models as an alternative algorithm for surface energy/water balance.

  11. Probing the water on chemically heterogeneous surface: interfacial-structural analysis for surface charge distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sucheol; Willard, Adam

    We introduce the novel method for predicting the charge distribution of chemically heterogeneous surface, but reconstructed from the perspective of the interfacial water molecules. Our approach is to analyze the response of water to a disordered surface and infer from that response the heterogeneous distribution of surface charge. We accomplish this using a framework that is based on a probabilistic description of water's interfacial molecular structure and maximum likelihood estimation. This framework allows to deduce the apparent charge that is most congruently represented by the set of water configurations over the particular region of a surface. We demonstrate that the estimated charge distribution is consistent to the actual distribution for a static model substrate and hence that our method can be applied to investigate a dynamic fluctuating substrate such as the surface of a hydrated protein. This novel technique provides the useful information that can reflect the influence of fluctuations in the structure of biomolecule.

  12. Integrated Water Flow Model (IWFM), A Tool For Numerically Simulating Linked Groundwater, Surface Water And Land-Surface Hydrologic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogrul, E. C.; Brush, C. F.; Kadir, T. N.

    2006-12-01

    The Integrated Water Flow Model (IWFM) is a comprehensive input-driven application for simulating groundwater flow, surface water flow and land-surface hydrologic processes, and interactions between these processes, developed by the California Department of Water Resources (DWR). IWFM couples a 3-D finite element groundwater flow process and 1-D land surface, lake, stream flow and vertical unsaturated-zone flow processes which are solved simultaneously at each time step. The groundwater flow system is simulated as a multilayer aquifer system with a mixture of confined and unconfined aquifers separated by semiconfining layers. The groundwater flow process can simulate changing aquifer conditions (confined to unconfined and vice versa), subsidence, tile drains, injection wells and pumping wells. The land surface process calculates elemental water budgets for agricultural, urban, riparian and native vegetation classes. Crop water demands are dynamically calculated using distributed soil properties, land use and crop data, and precipitation and evapotranspiration rates. The crop mix can also be automatically modified as a function of pumping lift using logit functions. Surface water diversions and groundwater pumping can each be specified, or can be automatically adjusted at run time to balance water supply with water demand. The land-surface process also routes runoff to streams and deep percolation to the unsaturated zone. Surface water networks are specified as a series of stream nodes (coincident with groundwater nodes) with specified bed elevation, conductance and stage-flow relationships. Stream nodes are linked to form stream reaches. Stream inflows at the model boundary, surface water diversion locations, and one or more surface water deliveries per location are specified. IWFM routes stream flows through the network, calculating groundwater-surface water interactions, accumulating inflows from runoff, and allocating available stream flows to meet specified or

  13. A GIS water balance approach to support surface water flood risk management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Nieto, J.

    Concern has arisen as to whether the lack of appropriate consideration to surface water in urban spatial planning is reducing our capacity to manage surface water flood risk. Appropriate tools are required that allow spatial planners to explore opportunities and solutions for surface after flooding at large spatial scales. An urban surface water balance model has been developed that screens large urban areas to identify flooded areas and which allows solutions to be explored. The model hypothesis is that key hydrological characteristics; storage volume and location, flow paths and surface water generation capture the key processes responsible for surface water flooding> The model uses a LiDAR DEM (Light Detection and Ranging Digital Elevation Model) as the basis for determining surface water accumulation in a catchment and has been developed so that it requires minimal inputs and computational resources. The urban surface water balance approach is applied to Keighley in West Yorkshire where several instances of surface water flooding have been reported. This research used a postal questionnaire, followed up with site visits to collect data on surface water flooding locations in Keighley. A qualitative analysis based on field visits revealed that the degree of interaction with the sewer network varies spatially, and as the importance of the interaction of the sewer system increase, the accuracy of the model results are lowered. It also highlighted that local detail not present in the DEM, the presence of urban drainage assets and the performance of the sewer system which are not be represented in the model, can determine the accuracy of model results. Model results were used as a basis to develop solutions to surface water flooding. A least cost path methodology was developed to identify managed flood routes as a solution. These were translated into model inputs in the form a modified DEM.

  14. Profile of the Interface between a Hydrophobic Surface and Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Salas, Ursula; Stalgren, Johan; Majkrzak, Charles; Heinrich, Frank; Toney, Michael; Vanderah, David

    2008-03-01

    Aqueous interfaces are ubiquitous and play a fundamental role in biology, chemistry, and geology. The structure of water near interfaces is of the utmost importance, including chemical reactivity and macromolecular function. Theoretical work by Chandler et al. on polar-apolar interfaces predicts that a water depletion layer exists between a hydrophobic surface and bulk water for hydrophobes larger than ˜20nm2 (a ˜4A in radius apolar molecule). Until now, what the interface really looks like remains in dispute since recent experiments give conflicting results: from complete wetting (no water depletion layer) to a water depletion layer. Those experiments that have found a water depletion layer report 40-70% water in the depletion zone: 40 -70% and a width of ˜3A. However, an alternative interpretation to the profiles exists where no depletion layer is required. By studying hydrophobic SAM surfaces against several water mixtures we obtained the hydrophobic/water profile by phase sensitive neutron reflectivity. With this model independent technique we observe a 2 times wider and drier depletion water layer: 6A thick and 0-25% water. Given the level of disagreement, I will review the topic of immiscible interfaces and show how phase sensitive reflectometry is unique in obtaining nm resolution profiles without fitting bias.

  15. Occurrence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium spp. in surface water supplies.

    PubMed Central

    LeChevallier, M W; Norton, W D; Lee, R G

    1991-01-01

    Giardia and Cryptosporidium levels were determined by using a combined immunofluorescence test for source waters of 66 surface water treatment plants in 14 states and 1 Canadian province. The results showed that cysts and oocysts were widely dispersed in the aquatic environment. Giardia spp. were detected in 81% of the raw water samples. Cryptosporidium spp. were found in 87% of the raw water locations. Overall, Giardia or Cryptosporidium spp. were detected in 97% of the raw water samples. Higher cyst and oocyst densities were associated with source waters receiving industrial or sewage effluents. Significant correlations were found between Giardia and Cryptosporidium densities and raw water quality parameters such as turbidity and total and fecal coliform levels. Statistical modeling suggests that cyst and oocyst densities could be predicted on the basis of watershed and water quality characteristics. The occurrence of high levels of Giardia cysts in raw water samples may require water utilities to apply treatment beyond that outlined in the Surface Water Treatment Rule of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. PMID:1822675

  16. Percent recoveries of anthropogenic organic compounds with and without the addition of ascorbic acid to preserve finished-water samples containing free chlorine, 2004-10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Valder, Joshua F.; Delzer, Gregory C.; Bender, David A.; Price, Curtis V.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents finished-water matrix-spike recoveries of 270 anthropogenic organic compounds with and without the addition of ascorbic acid to preserve water samples containing free chlorine. Percent recoveries were calculated using analytical results from a study conducted during 2004-10 for the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The study was intended to characterize the effect of quenching on finished-water matrix-spike recoveries and to better understand the potential oxidation and transformation of 270 anthropogenic organic compounds. The anthropogenic organic compounds studied include those on analytical schedules 1433, 2003, 2033, 2060, 2020, and 4024 of the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory. Three types of samples were collected from 34 NAWQA locations across the Nation: (1) quenched finished-water samples (not spiked), (2) quenched finished-water matrix-spike samples, and (3) nonquenched finished-water matrix-spike samples. Percent recoveries of anthropogenic organic compounds in quenched and nonquenched finished-water matrix-spike samples are presented. Comparisons of percent recoveries between quenched and nonquenched spiked samples can be used to show how quenching affects finished-water samples. A maximum of 18 surface-water and 34 groundwater quenched finished-water matrix-spike samples paired with nonquenched finished-water matrix-spike samples were analyzed. Percent recoveries for the study are presented in two ways: (1) finished-water matrix-spike samples supplied by surface-water or groundwater, and (2) by use (or source) group category for surface-water and groundwater supplies. Graphical representations of percent recoveries for the quenched and nonquenched finished-water matrix-spike samples also are presented.

  17. Growth control of nonionic reverse micelles by surfactant and solvent molecular architecture and water addition.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Lok Kumar; Shrestha, Rekha Goswami; Aramaki, Kenji

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes a facile route to the shape, size, and structure control of reversed micelles by surfactant and solvent molecular architecture and water addition. Nonionic reverse micellar size is found to increase with increase in hydrophilic headgroup size of surfactant, whose scheme is understood in terms of decrease in the critical packing parameter (cpp). On the other hand, an opposite trend is observed with increase in lipophilicity of the surfactant. This is caused by the repulsive excluded volume interactions, which increases with the volume of lipophilic moiety of surfactant; as a result, the micelle interface tends to become more curved and micelles shrink. Solvent molecular structure has played a crucial role; increasing hydrocarbon chain length of alkanes favored one dimensional micellar growth. We note that long chain oil has a poor penetration tendency to lipophilic tail of surfactant and decreases the cpp. Solvent polarity is also crucial; globular micelles are formed in short chain oil cyclohexane. We note that decreasing chain length of oil mimic the decrease in the headgroup size of surfactant; rod-to-sphere type transition in the micellar structure. Addition of trace water favors micellar growth; maximum dimension and micellar cross section increases with increase in water concentration. The sizes of the water incorporated reverse micelles (or w/o microemulsion) are much bigger than the empty micelles. Micellar structure was confirmed by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and supported by rheology. PMID:21770115

  18. Evaporation model for beam based additive manufacturing using free surface lattice Boltzmann methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, Alexander; Scharowsky, Thorsten; Körner, Carolin

    2014-07-01

    Evaporation plays an important role in many technical applications including beam-based additive manufacturing processes, such as selective electron beam or selective laser melting (SEBM/SLM). In this paper, we describe an evaporation model which we employ within the framework of a two-dimensional free surface lattice Boltzmann method. With this method, we solve the hydrodynamics as well as thermodynamics of the molten material taking into account the mass and energy losses due to evaporation and the recoil pressure acting on the melt pool. Validation of the numerical model is performed by measuring maximum melt depths and evaporative losses in samples of pure titanium and Ti-6Al-4V molten by an electron beam. Finally, the model is applied to create processing maps for an SEBM process. The results predict that the penetration depth of the electron beam, which is a function of the acceleration voltage, has a significant influence on evaporation effects.

  19. Influence of metal surface and sulfur addition on coke deposition in the thermal cracking of hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Reyniers, M.F.S.G.; Froment, G.F.

    1995-03-01

    Coke formation in the thermal cracking of hydrocarbons was studied in a pilot plant unit and in a microreactor with complete mixing of the gas phase, containing a hollow cylinder suspended at the arm of an electrobalance. The morphology of the coke was studied by SEM, while EDX was used to determine the concentration of metals in the coke layer. The influence of the metal surface composition, of it pretreatment, and of the addition of various sulfur compounds on the coking rate and CO production was investigated for condition typical for those in the cracking coil. The CO yield is not a measure of the coking rate. Sulfur compounds are very efficient in reducing the CO yield but promote coke formation.

  20. 10 CFR 60.132 - Additional design criteria for surface facilities in the geologic repository operations area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional design criteria for surface facilities in the...) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Technical Criteria Design Criteria for the Geologic Repository Operations Area § 60.132 Additional design criteria for surface facilities...

  1. Nitrification in lake sediment with addition of drinking water treatment residuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhui; Liu, Juanfeng; Wang, Zhixin; Pei, Yuansheng

    2014-06-01

    Drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs), non-hazardous by-products generated during potable water production, can effectively reduce the lake internal phosphorus (P) loading and improve water quality in lakes. It stands to reason that special attention regarding the beneficial reuse of WTRs should be given not only to the effectiveness of P pollution control, but also to the effects on the migration and transformation of other nutrients (e.g., nitrogen (N)). In this work, based on laboratory enrichment tests, the effects of WTRs addition on nitrification in lake sediment were investigated using batch tests, fluorescence in situ hybridization, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and phylogenetic analysis techniques. The results indicated that WTRs addition had minor effects on the morphologies of AOB and NOB; however, the addition slightly enhanced the sediment nitrification potential from 12.8 to 13.2 μg-N g(-1)-dry sample h(-1) and also increased the ammonia oxidation bacteria (AOB) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) abundances, particularly the AOB abundances (P < 0.05), which increased from 1.11 × 10(8) to 1.31 × 10(8) copies g(-1)-dry sample. Moreover, WTRs addition was beneficial to the enrichment of Nitrosomonas and Nitrosospira multiformis and promoted the emergence of a new Nitrospira cluster, causing the increase in AOB and NOB diversities. Further analysis showed that the variations of nitrification in lake sediment after WTRs addition were primarily due to the decrease of bioavailable P, the introduction of new nitrifiers and the increase of favorable carriers for microorganism attachment in sediments. Overall, these results suggested that WTRs reuse for the control of lake internal P loading would also lead to conditions that are beneficial to nitrification. PMID:24681379

  2. Nucleate boiling of water from plain and structured surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Das, A.K.; Das, P.K.; Saha, P.

    2007-08-15

    Heat transfer from plain surface and from surfaces with distinct nucleation sites has been investigated under saturated pool boiling condition. Surfaces have been prepared with regular array of discrete nucleation sites formed by micro-drilling. Distilled water has been used as the boiling liquid. Out of various available correlations, Rohsenow correlation [W.M. Rohsenow, A method of correlating heat transfer data for surface boiling of liquids, Trans. ASME 74 (1952) 969-976] gives best agreement with the experimental data from plain surface at low degree of superheat. A mechanistic model also provides a good trend matching with the same experimental data. With the introduction of artificial nucleation sites substantial augmentation in heat transfer for distilled water compared to the plane surface has been noted. Continuous increase in nucleation site density increases the rate of heat transfer with a diminishing trend of enhancement. A correlation similar to that of Yamagata et al. [K. Yamagata, F. Hirano, K. Nishiwaka, H. Matsouka, Nucleate boiling of water on the horizontal heating surface, Mem. Fac. Eng. Kyushu 15 (1955) 98] has been developed to fit the experimental data of plane surface. Modification of the same correlation to take care of the nucleation site density has been developed and used to predict the experimental data from augmented surfaces. (author)

  3. Investigation of water washes suitable for very small meat plants to reduce pathogens on beef surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Sally Flowers; Henning, William R; Mills, Edward W; Doores, Stephanie; Ostiguy, Nancy; Cutter, Catherine N

    2010-05-01

    Water washing with a handheld hose was performed on beef surfaces to ascertain the most effective combination of methods needed to remove potentially harmful microorganisms. For these experiments, beef brisket surfaces were experimentally inoculated with a fecal slurry containing Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, Campylobacter coli, and Campylobacter jejuni. In a pilot study, surfaces were washed with cold water (15 degrees C) at various water pressures, spray distances, application times, and drip times, and remaining bacterial populations were determined following the enumeration and isolation of pathogens and naturally occurring hygiene indicators (mesophilic aerobic bacteria, coliforms, and E. coli). The most efficacious combinations of these washing conditions were applied subsequently to artificially contaminated beef brisket surfaces in conjunction with hot (77 degrees C), warm (54 degrees C), and additional cold (15 degrees C) water washes. In the cold water washing pilot study, combinations of physical washing conditions significantly reduced all bacterial populations (P < 0.05). Further studies clearly indicated the superior bactericidal effectiveness of hot water washing; E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium were reduced by 3.8 and 4.1 log CFU/cm(2), respectively. Overall, higher water temperature, longer application times, and shorter spray distances more effectively removed pathogens from inoculated beef surfaces. These findings will be used to formulate water washing recommendations for very small meat processing establishments. PMID:20501042

  4. Asphaltene surface activity at oil/water interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sheu, E.Y.; Shields, M.B.

    1995-11-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) dynamic surface tension (DST), dynamic interfacial tension (DIFT), and zero shear viscosity were used to study the surface activity of Ratawi asphaltenes in organic solvents, in the asphaltene/water/toluene emulsions and at the toluene/aqueous solution interfaces. In organic solvents, the kinetic process of micellization and the micellar structure are characterized. Their dependence on asphaltene concentration was investigated. The emulsion droplet structure and their capability in water uptake was tested. Also, the enhancement of surface activity of asphaltenes and its potential applications are briefly discussed.

  5. Water transport mechanism through open capillaries analyzed by direct surface modifications on biological surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Daisuke; Horiguchi, Hiroko; Hirai, Yuji; Yabu, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Yasutaka; Ijiro, Kuniharu; Tsujii, Kaoru; Shimozawa, Tateo; Hariyama, Takahiko; Shimomura, Masatsugu

    2013-01-01

    Some small animals only use water transport mechanisms passively driven by surface energies. However, little is known about passive water transport mechanisms because it is difficult to measure the wettability of microstructures in small areas and determine the chemistry of biological surfaces. Herein, we developed to directly analyse the structural effects of wettability of chemically modified biological surfaces by using a nanoliter volume water droplet and a hi-speed video system. The wharf roach Ligia exotica transports water only by using open capillaries in its legs containing hair- and paddle-like microstructures. The structural effects of legs chemically modified with a self-assembled monolayer were analysed, so that the wharf roach has a smart water transport system passively driven by differences of wettability between the microstructures. We anticipate that this passive water transport mechanism may inspire novel biomimetic fluid manipulations with or without a gravitational field. PMID:24149467

  6. Rupture and dewetting of water films on solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mulji, Neil; Chandra, Sanjeev

    2010-12-01

    An experimental study was conducted to observe rupture and dewetting of water films, 0.5-2mm thick, on solid surfaces. The effects of surface roughness, wettability, protrusions on surfaces, and air entrapment between films and surfaces were studied. Film thickness measurements were made and film rupture and surface dewetting photographed. Experiments showed that liquid films ruptured first along the highest edges of test surfaces. Placing a protrusion on the surface had no effect-the liquid film continued to rupture along the edges. A thermodynamic model was developed to show that protrusions lower the surface energy of the system and promote wetting. Increasing surface roughness therefore increases film stability by resisting rupture and dewetting. Water films could be punctured by introducing an air bubble that burst and created a hole. The hole would close if the film was thick and the solid-liquid contact angle was either small or large; the hole would grow larger if the film was thin and the contact angle was in the mid-range (∼80°). An analytical model that calculates the difference between the surface energies of the two states can be used to predict whether a hole would lead to surface dewetting or not. PMID:20817200

  7. Non-additivity of molecule-surface van der Waals potentials from force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Christian; Fournier, Norman; Ruiz, Victor G.; Li, Chen; Müllen, Klaus; Rohlfing, Michael; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Temirov, Ruslan; Tautz, F. Stefan

    2014-11-01

    Van der Waals (vdW) forces act ubiquitously in condensed matter. Despite being weak on an atomic level, they substantially influence molecular and biological systems due to their long range and system-size scaling. The difficulty to isolate and measure vdW forces on a single-molecule level causes our present understanding to be strongly theory based. Here we show measurements of the attractive potential between differently sized organic molecules and a metal surface using an atomic force microscope. Our choice of molecules and the large molecule-surface separation cause this attraction to be purely of vdW type. The experiment allows testing the asymptotic vdW force law and its validity range. We find a superlinear growth of the vdW attraction with molecular size, originating from the increased deconfinement of electrons in the molecules. Because such non-additive vdW contributions are not accounted for in most first-principles or empirical calculations, we suggest further development in that direction.

  8. Non-additivity of molecule-surface van der Waals potentials from force measurements

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Christian; Fournier, Norman; Ruiz, Victor G.; Li, Chen; Müllen, Klaus; Rohlfing, Michael; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Temirov, Ruslan; Tautz, F. Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Van der Waals (vdW) forces act ubiquitously in condensed matter. Despite being weak on an atomic level, they substantially influence molecular and biological systems due to their long range and system-size scaling. The difficulty to isolate and measure vdW forces on a single-molecule level causes our present understanding to be strongly theory based. Here we show measurements of the attractive potential between differently sized organic molecules and a metal surface using an atomic force microscope. Our choice of molecules and the large molecule-surface separation cause this attraction to be purely of vdW type. The experiment allows testing the asymptotic vdW force law and its validity range. We find a superlinear growth of the vdW attraction with molecular size, originating from the increased deconfinement of electrons in the molecules. Because such non-additive vdW contributions are not accounted for in most first-principles or empirical calculations, we suggest further development in that direction. PMID:25424490

  9. A Black Phosphate Conversion Coating on Steel Surface Using Antimony(III)-Tartrate as an Additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Wang, Guiping

    2016-05-01

    A novel black phosphate conversion coating was formed on steel surface through a Zn-Mn phosphating bath containing mainly ZnO, H3PO4, Mn(H2PO4)2, and Ca(NO3)2, where antimony(III)-tartrate was used as the blackening agent of phosphatization. The surface morphology and composition of the coating were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersion spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Corrosion resistance of the coating was studied by potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The pH value of the solution had significant influence on the formation and corrosion resistance of the coating. The experimental results indicated that the Sb plays a vital role in the blackening of phosphate conversion coating. The optimal concentration of antimony(III)-tartrate in the phosphating bath used in this experiment was 1.0 g L-1, as higher values reduced the corrosion resistance of the coating. In addition, by saponification and oil seals, the corrosion duration of the black phosphate coating in a copper sulfate spot test can be as long as 20 min.

  10. Molecular Imprinting of Silica Nanoparticle Surfaces via Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Polymerization for Optical Biosensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oluz, Zehra; Nayab, Sana; Kursun, Talya Tugana; Caykara, Tuncer; Yameen, Basit; Duran, Hatice

    Azo initiator modified surface of silica nanoparticles were coated via reversible addition-fragmentation polymerization (RAFT) of methacrylic acid and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate using 2-phenylprop 2-yl dithobenzoate as chain transfer agent. Using L-phenylalanine anilide as template during polymerization led molecularly imprinted nanoparticles. RAFT polymerization offers an efficient control of grafting process, while molecularly imprinted polymers shows enhanced capacity as sensor. L-phenylalanine anilide imprinted silica particles were characterized by X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM). Performances of the particles were followed by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR) after coating the final product on gold deposited glass substrate against four different analogous of analyte molecules: D-henylalanine anilide, L-tyrosine, L-tryptophan and L-phenylalanine. Characterizations indicated that silica particles coated with polymer layer do contain binding sites for L-phenylalanine anilide, and are highly selective for the molecule of interest. This project was supported by TUBITAK (Project No:112M804).

  11. Tensile testing of ultra-thin films on water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Han; Nizami, Adeel; Hwangbo, Yun; Jang, Bongkyun; Lee, Hak-Joo; Woo, Chang-Su; Hyun, Seungmin; Kim, Taek-Soo

    2013-10-01

    The surface of water provides an excellent environment for gliding movement, in both nature and modern technology, from surface living animals such as the water strider, to Langmuir-Blodgett films. The high surface tension of water keeps the contacting objects afloat, and its low viscosity enables almost frictionless sliding on the surface. Here we utilize the water surface as a nearly ideal underlying support for free-standing ultra-thin films and develop a novel tensile testing method for the precise measurement of mechanical properties of the films. In this method, namely, the pseudo free-standing tensile test, all specimen preparation and testing procedures are performed on the water surface, resulting in easy handling and almost frictionless sliding without specimen damage or substrate effects. We further utilize van der Waals adhesion for the damage-free gripping of an ultra-thin film specimen. Our approach can potentially be used to explore the mechanical properties of emerging two-dimensional materials.

  12. Surface energy and stiffness discrete gradients in additive manufactured scaffolds for osteochondral regeneration.

    PubMed

    Di Luca, Andrea; Longoni, Alessia; Criscenti, Giuseppe; Lorenzo-Moldero, Ivan; Klein-Gunnewiek, Michel; Vancso, Julius; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Mota, Carlos; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2016-03-01

    Swift progress in biofabrication technologies has enabled unprecedented advances in the application of developmental biology design criteria in three-dimensional scaffolds for regenerative medicine. Considering that tissues and organs in the human body develop following specific physico-chemical gradients, in this study, we hypothesized that additive manufacturing (AM) technologies would significantly aid in the construction of 3D scaffolds encompassing such gradients. Specifically, we considered surface energy and stiffness gradients and analyzed their effect on adult bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into skeletal lineages. Discrete step-wise macroscopic gradients were obtained by sequentially depositing different biodegradable biomaterials in the AM process, namely poly(lactic acid) (PLA), polycaprolactone (PCL), and poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)/poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEOT/PBT) copolymers. At the bulk level, PEOT/PBT homogeneous scaffolds supported a higher alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity compared to PCL, PLA, and gradient scaffolds, respectively. All homogeneous biomaterial scaffolds supported also a significantly higher amount of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) production compared to discrete gradient scaffolds. Interestingly, the analysis of the different material compartments revealed a specific contribution of PCL, PLA, and PEOT/PBT to surface energy gradients. Whereas PEOT/PBT regions were associated to significantly higher ALP activity, PLA regions correlated with significantly higher GAG production. These results show that cell activity could be influenced by the specific spatial distribution of different biomaterial chemistries in a 3D scaffold and that engineering surface energy discrete gradients could be considered as an appealing criterion to design scaffolds for osteochondral regeneration. PMID:26924824

  13. The Proposed Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng; Alsdorf, Douglas; Rodriguez, Ernesto; Morrow, Rosemary; Mognard, Nelly; Vaze, Parag; Lafon, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    A new space mission concept called Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) is being developed jointly by a collaborative effort of the international oceanographic and hydrological communities for making high-resolution measurement of the water elevation of both the ocean and land surface water to answer the questions about the oceanic submesoscale processes and the storage and discharge of land surface water. The key instrument payload would be a Ka-band radar interferometer capable of making high-resolution wide-swath altimetry measurement. This paper describes the proposed science objectives and requirements as well as the measurement approach of SWOT, which is baselined to be launched in 2019. SWOT would demonstrate this new approach to advancing both oceanography and land hydrology and set a standard for future altimetry missions.

  14. Surface nanobubble nucleation dynamics during water-ethanol exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chon U.; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2015-11-01

    Water-ethanol exchange has been a promising nucleation method for surface attached nanobubbles since their discovery. In this process, water and ethanol displace each other sequentially on a substrate. As the gas solubility is 36 times higher in ethanol than water, it was suggested that the exchange process leads to transient supersaturation and is responsible for the nanobubble nucleation. In this work, we visualize the nucleation dynamics by controllably mixing water and ethanol. It depicts the temporal evolution of the conventional exchange in a single field of view, detailing the conditions for surface nanobubble nucleation and the flow field that influences their spatial organization. This technique can also pattern surface nanobubbles with variable size distribution.

  15. Circumnutation on the water surface: female flowers of Vallisneria.

    PubMed

    Kosuge, Keiko; Iida, Satoko; Katou, Kiyoshi; Mimura, Tetsuro

    2013-01-01

    Circumnutation, the helical movement of growing organ tips, is ubiquitous in land plants. The mechanisms underlying circumnutation have been debated since Darwin's time. Experiments in space and mutant analyses have revealed that internal oscillatory (tropism-independent) movement and gravitropic response are involved in circumnutation. Female flower buds of tape grass (Vallisneria asiatica var. biwaensis) circumnutate on the water surface. Our observations and experiments with an artificial model indicated that gravitropism is barely involved in circumnutation. Instead, we show that helical intercalary growth at the base of peduncle plays the primary role in all movements in Vallisneria. This growth pattern produces torsional bud rotation, and gravity and buoyancy forces have a physical effect on the direction of peduncle elongation, resulting in bud circumnutation on the water surface. In contrast to other water-pollinated hydrophilous plants, circumnutation in Vallisneria enables female flowers to actively collect male flowers from a larger surface area of water. PMID:23355948

  16. [Current status of surface water acidification in Northeast China].

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang-yi; Kang, Rong-hua; Luo, Yao; Duan, Lei

    2013-05-01

    In order to evaluate the status of surface water acidification in Northeast China, chemical composition of 33 small streams was investigated in August, 2011. It was found that only a few waters located in Changbai Mountain had pH of lower than 6.0, and all waters had acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) of higher than 0.2 meq x L(-1). This indicated that surface water acidification was not a regional environmental issue in Northeast China. HCO3- was the major anion, with SO4(2-) concentration mostly below 150 microeq x L(-1) and even much lower NO3- concentration. Low concentration of SO4(2-) and NO3- means no serious acid deposition in this area. However, the distribution of acidic forest soils, with low base cation weathering rate, could only provide limited buffering capacity for surface water to acidification in Northeast China, and the potential risk of water acidification still existed. Currently, acid deposition in Northeast Asia could hardly cause severe acidification of surface water. The neighboring countries should therefore not amplify the environmental impact by transboundary air pollutants from China. PMID:23914517

  17. High Conductivity Water Treatment Using Water Surface Discharge with Nonmetallic Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Xingwang; Lei, Lecheng

    2013-06-01

    Although electrohydraulic discharge is effective for wastewater treatment, its application is restricted by water conductivity and limited to the treatment of low conductivity water. For high conductivity water treatment, water-surface discharge is the preferred choice. However, the metallic electrodes are easily corroded because of the high temperature and strong oxidative environment caused by gas phase discharge and the electrochemical reaction in water. As a result, the efficiency of the water treatment might be affected and the service life of the reactor might be shortened. In order to avoid the corrosion problem, nonmetallic electrode water-surface discharge is introduced into high conductivity water treatment in the present study. Carbon-felt and water were used as the high voltage electrode and ground electrode, respectively. A comparison of the electrical and chemical characteristics showed that nonmetallic electrode discharge maintained the discharge characteristics and enhanced the energy efficiency, and furthermore, the corrosion of metal electrodes was avoided.

  18. Suppression of methane/air explosion by ultrafine water mist containing sodium chloride additive.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xingyan; Ren, Jingjie; Zhou, Yihui; Wang, Qiuju; Gao, Xuliang; Bi, Mingshu

    2015-03-21

    The suppression effect of ultrafine mists on methane/air explosions with methane concentrations of 6.5%, 8%, 9.5%, 11%, and 13.5% were experimentally studied in a closed visual vessel. Ultrafine water/NaCl solution mist as well as pure water mist was adopted and the droplet sizes of mists were measured by phase doppler particle analyzer (PDPA). A high speed camera was used to record the flame evolution processes. In contrast to pure water mist, the flame propagation speed, the maximum explosion overpressure (ΔP(max)), and the maximum pressure rising rate ((dP/dt)max) decreased significantly, with the "tulip" flame disappearing and the flame getting brighter. The results show that the suppressing effect on methane explosion by ultrafine water/NaCl solution mist is influenced by the mist amount and methane concentration. With the increase of the mist amount, the pressure, and the flame speed both descended significantly. And when the mist amount reached 74.08 g/m(3) and 37.04 g/m(3), the flames of 6.5% and 13.5% methane explosions can be absolutely suppressed, respectively. All of results indicate that addition of NaCl can improve the suppression effect of ultrafine pure water mist on the methane explosions, and the suppression effect is considered due to the combination effect of physical and chemical inhibitions. PMID:25528229

  19. Autotrophic nitrogen removal from black water: calcium addition as a requirement for settleability.

    PubMed

    de Graaff, M S; Temmink, H; Zeeman, G; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Buisman, C J N

    2011-01-01

    Black (toilet) water contains half of the organic load in the domestic wastewater, as well as the major fraction of the nutrients nitrogen and phosphorus. When collected with vacuum toilets, the black water is 25 times more concentrated than the total domestic wastewater stream, i.e. including grey water produced by laundry, showers etc. A two-stage nitritation-anammox process was successfully employed and removed 85%-89% of total nitrogen in anaerobically treated black water. The (free) calcium concentration in black water was too low (42 mg/L) to obtain sufficient granulation of anammox biomass. The granulation and retention of the biomass was improved considerably by the addition of 39 mg/L of extra calcium. This resulted in a volumetric nitrogen removal rate of 0.5 gN/L/d, irrespective of the two temperatures of 35 °C and 25 °C at which the anammox reactors were operated. Nitrous oxide, a very strong global warming gas, was produced in situations of an incomplete anammox conversion accompanied by elevated levels of nitrite. PMID:20822793

  20. Numerical study of the effect of water addition on gas explosion.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuntao; Zeng, Wen

    2010-02-15

    Through amending the SENKIN code of CHEMKIN III chemical kinetics package, a computational model of gas explosion in a constant volume bomb was built, and the detailed reaction mechanism (GRI-Mech 3.0) was adopted. The mole fraction profiles of reactants, some selected free radicals and catastrophic gases in the process of gas explosion were analyzed by this model. Furthermore, through the sensitivity analysis of the reaction mechanism of gas explosion, the dominant reactions that affect gas explosion and the formation of catastrophic gases were found out. At the same time, the inhibition mechanisms of water on gas explosion and the formation of catastrophic gases were analyzed. The results show that the induced explosion time is prolonged, and the mole fractions of reactant species such as CH(4), O(2) and catastrophic gases such as CO, CO(2) and NO are decreased as water is added to the mixed gas. With the water fraction in the mixed gas increasing, the sensitivities of the dominant reactions contributing to CH(4), CO(2) are decreased and the sensitivity coefficients of CH(4), CO and NO mole fractions are also decreased. The inhibition of gas explosion with water addition can be ascribed to the significant decrease of H, O and OH in the process of gas explosion due to the water presence. PMID:19811873

  1. Role of Carbon-Addition and Hydrogen-Migration Reactions in Soot Surface Growth.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Bo; Hou, Dingyu; Law, Chung K; You, Xiaoqing

    2016-02-11

    Using density functional theory and master equation modeling, we have studied the kinetics of small unsaturated aliphatic molecules reacting with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules having a diradical character. We have found that these reactions follow the mechanism of carbon addition and hydrogen migration (CAHM) on both spin-triplet and open-shell singlet potential energy surfaces at a rate that is about ten times those of the hydrogen-abstraction-carbon-addition (HACA) reactions at 1500 K in the fuel-rich postflame region. The results also show that the most active reaction sites are in the center of the zigzag edges of the PAHs. Furthermore, the reaction products are more likely to form straight rather than branched aliphatic side chains in the case of reacting with diacetylene. The computed rate constants are also found to be independent of pressure at conditions of interest in soot formation, and the activation barriers of the CAHM reactions are linearly correlated with the diradical characters. PMID:26799641

  2. Additive Effects on Si3n4 Oxidation/Volatilization in Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Robinson, R. Craig; Fox, Dennis S.; Wenglarz, Richard A.; Ferber, Mattison K.

    2002-01-01

    Two commercially available additive-containing silicon nitride materials were exposed in four environments which range in severity from dry oxygen at 1 atm pressure, and low gas velocity to an actual turbine engine. Oxidation and volatilization kinetics were monitored at temperatures ranging from 1066 to 1400 C. The main purpose of this paper is to examine the surface oxide morphology resulting from the exposures. It was found that the material surface was enriched in rare earth silicate phases in combustion environments when compared to the oxides formed on materials exposed in dry oxygen. However, the in situ formation of rare earth disilicate phases offered little additional protection from the volatilization of silica observed in combustion environments. It was concluded that externally applied environmental barrier coatings are needed to protect additive-containing silicon nitride materials from volatilization reactions in combustion environments. Introduction Si3N4 is proposed for use as components, such as vanes, in turbine applications. Tens of thousands of hours of life are needed for both land-based turbines and aeropropulsion applications. Additive-containing SisN4 materials are

  3. Ground Water and Surface Water in the Haiku Area, East Maui, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gingerich, Stephen B.

    1999-01-01

    The Haiku study area lies on the gently sloping eastern flank of the East Maui Volcano (Haleakala) between the drainage basins of Maliko Gulch to the west and Kakipi Gulch to the east. The study area lies on the northwest rift zone of East Maui Volcano, a geologic feature 3 to 5 miles wide marked by surface expressions such as cinder, spatter, and pumice cones. The study area contains two geologic units, the main shield-building stage Honomanu Basalt and the Kula Volcanics. The hydraulic conductivity of the Honomanu Basalt was estimated to be between 1,000 and 3,600 feet per day on the basis of aquifer tests and 3,300 feet per day on the basis of the regional recharge rate and observed ground-water heads. The hydraulic conductivity of the Kula Volcanics is expected to be several orders of magnitude lower. An estimated 191 million gallons per day of rainfall and 22 million gallons per day of fog drip reach the study area and about 98 million gallons per day enters the ground-water system as recharge. Nearly all of the ground water currently withdrawn in the study area is from well 5520-01 in Maliko Gulch, where historic withdrawal rates have averaged about 2.8 million gallons per day. An additional 18 million gallons per day of ground-water withdrawal is proposed. Flow in Waiohiwi Gulch, a tributary to Maliko Gulch, is perennial between about 2,000 ft and 4,000 ft altitude. At lower altitudes in Maliko Gulch, flow is perennial at only a few spots downstream of springs and near the coast. The Kuiaha and Kaupakulua Gulch systems are usually dry from sea level to an altitude of 350 feet and gain water from about 350 feet to about 900 feet altitude. The two main branches of the Kaupakulua Gulch system alternately gain and lose water as high as 2,400 feet altitude. Kakipi Gulch has perennial flow over much of its length but is often dry near the coast below 400 feet altitude. Fresh ground water occurs in two main forms: (1) as perched high-level water held up by

  4. Movement of agricultural chemicals between surface water and ground water, lower Cedar River basin, Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Squillace, Paul J.; Caldwell, J.P.; Schulmeyer, P.M.; Harvey, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    Bank storage is probably an important source of agricultural chemicals discharged from the alluvial aquifer but becomes depleted with time after surface runoff. Herbicides discharged from the alluvial aquifer during periods of extended base flow entered the alluvial aquifer with ground-water recharge at some distance from the river. The movement of nitrate between surface water and ground water is minor, when compared to the herbicides, even though nitrite was detected in the Cedar River during runoff.

  5. SURFACE WATER AND GROUND WATER QUALITY MONITORING FOR RESTORATION OF URBAN LAKES IN GREATER HYDERABAD, INDIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, A. K.

    2009-12-01

    SURFACE WATER AND GROUND WATER QUALITY MONITORING FOR RESTORATION OF URBAN LAKES IN GREATER HYDERABAD, INDIA A.K. Mohanty, K. Mahesh Kumar, B. A. Prakash and V.V.S. Gurunadha Rao Ecology and Environment Group National Geophysical Research Institute, (CSIR) Hyderabad - 500 606, India E-mail:atulyakumarmohanty@yahoo.com Abstract: Hyderabad Metropolitan Development Authority has taken up restoration of urban lakes around Hyderabad city under Green Hyderabad Environment Program. Restoration of Mir Alam Tank, Durgamcheruvu, Patel cheruvu, Pedda Cheruvu and Nallacheruvu lakes have been taken up under the second phase. There are of six lakes viz., RKPuramcheruvu, Nadimicheruvu (Safilguda), Bandacheruvu Patelcheruvu, Peddacheruvu, Nallacheruvu, in North East Musi Basin covering 38 sq km. Bimonthly monitoring of lake water quality for BOD, COD, Total Nitrogen, Total phosphorous has been carried out for two hydrological cycles during October 2002- October 2004 in all the five lakes at inlet channels and outlets. The sediments in the lake have been also assessed for nutrient status. The nutrient parameters have been used to assess eutrophic condition through computation of Trophic Status Index, which has indicated that all the above lakes under study are under hyper-eutrophic condition. The hydrogeological, geophysical, water quality and groundwater data base collected in two watersheds covering 4 lakes has been used to construct groundwater flow and mass transport models. The interaction of lake-water with groundwater has been computed for assessing the lake water budget combining with inflow and outflow measurements on streams entering and leaving the lakes. Individual lake water budget has been used for design of appropriate capacity of Sewage Treatment Plants (STPs) on the inlet channels of the lakes for maintaining Full Tank Level (FTL) in each lake. STPs are designed for tertiary treatment i.e. removal of nutrient load viz., Phosphates and Nitrates. Phosphates are

  6. A water soluble additive to suppress respirable dust from concrete-cutting chainsaws: a case study.

    PubMed

    Summers, Michael P; Parmigiani, John P

    2015-01-01

    Respirable dust is of particular concern in the construction industry because it contains crystalline silica. Respirable forms of silica are a severe health threat because they heighten the risk of numerous respirable diseases. Concrete cutting, a common work practice in the construction industry, is a major contributor to dust generation. No studies have been found that focus on the dust suppression of concrete-cutting chainsaws, presumably because, during normal operation water is supplied continuously and copiously to the dust generation points. However, there is a desire to better understand dust creation at low water flow rates. In this case study, a water-soluble surfactant additive was used in the chainsaw's water supply. Cutting was performed on a free-standing concrete wall in a covered outdoor lab with a hand-held, gas-powered, concrete-cutting chainsaw. Air was sampled at the operator's lapel, and around the concrete wall to simulate nearby personnel. Two additive concentrations were tested (2.0% and 0.2%), across a range of fluid flow rates (0.38-3.8 Lpm [0.1-1.0 gpm] at 0.38 Lpm [0.1 gpm] increments). Results indicate that when a lower concentration of additive is used exposure levels increase. However, all exposure levels, once adjusted for 3 hours of continuous cutting in an 8-hour work shift, are below the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) permissible exposure limit (PEL) of 5 mg/m(3). Estimates were made using trend lines to predict the fluid flow rates that would cause respirable dust exposure to exceed both the OSHA PEL and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH®) threshold limit value (TLV). PMID:25714034

  7. 77 FR 12227 - Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule: Uncovered Finished Water Reservoirs; Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 141 and 142 Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule: Uncovered Finished Water Reservoirs; Public Meeting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of public..., concerning information that may inform the regulatory review of the uncovered finished water...

  8. Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 1996 water year. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Shaull, D.A.; Alexander, M.R.; Reynolds, R.P.; McLean, C.T.

    1996-11-01

    The principle investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 17 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory. The data show less runoff than do data for the 1995 water year. Water chemistry data from larger storm events occurring at some stations are also published here.

  9. DETECTION OF A GROUND-WATER/SURFACE-WATER INTERFACE WITH DIRECT-PUSH EQUIPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A ground-water/surface-water interface (GSI) was documented at the Thermo Chem CERCLA Site in Muskegon, MI via direct-push (DP) sampling. At that time, contaminated ground water flowed from the upland area of the site into the Black Creek floodplain. DP rods equipped with a 1.5...

  10. MONITORING OXIDATION-REDUCTION PROCESS DURING GROUND WATER-SURFACE WATER INTERACTIONS AT THE CHICKASAW NRA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mineralized ground waters at the Chickasaw National Recreational Area contain hydrogen sulfide, i.e., sulfur in the -2 valence state. As these mineralized ground waters discharge at the surface and mix with oxygen-rich waters a series of abiotic and biotic reactions occur that c...

  11. Structural and dynamical properties of water on chemically modified surfaces: The role of the instantaneous surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekele, Selemon; Tsige, Mesfin

    Surfaces of polymers such as atactic polystyrene (aPS) represent very good model systems for amorphous material surfaces. Such polymer surfaces are usually modified either chemically or physically for a wide range of applications that include friction, lubrication and adhesion. It is thus quite important to understand the structural and dynamical properties of liquids that come in contact with them to achieve the desired functional properties. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we investigate the structural and dynamical properties of water molecules in a slab of water in contact with atactic polystyrene surfaces of varying polarity. We find that the density of water molecules and the number distribution of hydrogen bonds as a function of distance relative to an instantaneous surface exhibit a structure indicative of a layering of water molecules near the water/PS interface. For the dynamics, we use time correlation functions of hydrogen bonds and the incoherent structure function for the water molecules. Our results indicate that the polarity of the surface dramatically affects the dynamics of the interfacial water molecules with the dynamics slowing down with increasing polarity. This work was supported by NSF Grant DMR1410290.

  12. Experimental Values of the Surface Tension of Supercooled Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacker, P. T.

    1951-01-01

    The results of surface-tension measurements for supercooled water are presented. A total of 702 individual measurements of surface tension of triple-distilled water were made in the temperature range, 27 to -22.2 C, with 404 of these measurements at temperatures below 0 C. The increase in magnitude of surface tension with decreasing temperature, as indicated by measurements above 0 C, continues to -22.2 C. The inflection point in the surface-tension - temperature relation in the vicinity of 0 C, as indicated by the International Critical Table values for temperatures down to -8 C, is substantiated by the measurements in the temperature range, 0 to -22.2 C. The surface tension increases at approximately a linear rate from a value of 76.96+/-0.06 dynes per centimeter at -8 C to 79.67+/-0.06 dynes per centimeter at -22.2 C.

  13. Influence of surface structure and chemistry on water droplet splashing.

    PubMed

    Koch, Kerstin; Grichnik, Roland

    2016-08-01

    Water droplet splashing and aerosolization play a role in human hygiene and health systems as well as in crop culturing. Prevention or reduction of splashing can prevent transmission of diseases between animals and plants and keep technical systems such as pipe or bottling systems free of contamination. This study demonstrates to what extent the surface chemistry and structures influence the water droplet splashing behaviour. Smooth surfaces and structured replicas of Calathea zebrina (Sims) Lindl. leaves were produced. Modification of their wettability was done by coating with hydrophobizing and hydrophilizing agents. Their wetting was characterized by contact angle measurement and splashing behaviour was observed with a high-speed video camera. Hydrophobic and superhydrophilic surfaces generally showed fewer tendencies to splash than hydrophobic ones. Structuring amplified the underlying behaviour of the surface chemistries, increasing hydrophobic surfaces' tendency to splash and decreasing splash on hydrophilic surfaces by quickly transporting water off the impact point by capillary forces. The non-porous surface structures found in C. zebrina could easily be applied to technical products such as plastic foils or mats and coated with hydrophilizing agents to suppress splash in areas of increased hygiene requirements or wherever pooling of liquids is not desirable.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bioinspired hierarchically structured surfaces for green science'. PMID:27354737

  14. Vulnerability of Drinking-Water Wells in La Crosse, Wisconsin, to Enteric-Virus Contamination from Surface Water Contributions

    PubMed Central

    Borchardt, Mark A.; Haas, Nathaniel L.; Hunt, Randall J.

    2004-01-01

    Human enteric viruses can contaminate municipal drinking-water wells, but few studies have examined the routes by which viruses enter these wells. In the present study, the objective was to monitor the municipal wells of La Crosse, Wisconsin, for enteric viruses and determine whether the amount of Mississippi River water infiltrating the wells was related to the frequency of virus detection. From March 2001 to February 2002, one river water site and four wells predicted by hydrogeological modeling to have variable degrees of surface water contributions were sampled monthly for enteric viruses, microbial indicators of sanitary quality, and oxygen and hydrogen isotopes. 18O/16O and 2H/1H ratios were used to determine the level of surface water contributions. All samples were collected prior to chlorination at the wellhead. By reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), 24 of 48 municipal well water samples (50%) were positive for enteric viruses, including enteroviruses, rotavirus, hepatitis A virus (HAV), and noroviruses. Of 12 river water samples, 10 (83%) were virus positive by RT-PCR. Viable enteroviruses were not detected by cell culture in the well samples, although three well samples were positive for culturable HAV. Enteroviruses detected in the wells by RT-PCR were identified as several serotypes of echoviruses and group A and group B coxsackieviruses. None of the well water samples was positive for indicators of sanitary quality, namely male-specific and somatic coliphages, total coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli, and fecal enterococci. Contrary to expectations, viruses were found in all wells regardless of the level of surface water contributions. This result suggests that there were other unidentified sources, in addition to surface water, responsible for the contamination. PMID:15466536

  15. Water balance model for mean annual hydrogen and oxygen isotope distributions in surface waters of the contiguous United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, Gabriel J.; Kennedy, Casey D.; Liu, Zhongfang; Stalker, Jeremy

    2011-12-01

    The stable H and O isotope composition of river and stream water records information on runoff sources and land-atmosphere water fluxes within the catchment and is a potentially powerful tool for network-based monitoring of ecohydrological systems. Process-based hydrological models, however, have thus far shown limited power to replicate observed large-scale variation in U.S. surface water isotope ratios. Here we develop a geographic information system-based model to predict long-term annual average surface water isotope ratios across the contiguous United States. We use elevation-explicit, gridded precipitation isotope maps as model input and data from a U.S. Geological Survey monitoring program for validation. We find that models incorporating monthly variation in precipitation-evapotranspiration (P-E) amounts account for the majority (>89%) of isotopic variation and have reduced regional bias relative to models that do not consider intra-annual P-E effects on catchment water balance. Residuals from the water balance model exhibit strong spatial patterning and correlations that suggest model residuals isolate additional hydrological signal. We use interpolated model residuals to generate optimized prediction maps for U.S. surface water δ2H and δ18O values. We show that the modeled surface water values represent a relatively accurate and unbiased proxy for drinking water isotope ratios across the United States, making these data products useful in ecological and criminal forensics applications that require estimates of the local environmental water isotope variation across large geographic regions.

  16. Ground- and Surface-Water Chemistry of Handcart Gulch, Park County, Colorado, 2003-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verplanck, Philip L.; Manning, Andrew H.; Kimball, Briant A.; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Runkel, Robert L.; Caine, Jonathan Saul; Adams, Monique; Gemery-Hill, Pamela A.; Fey, David L.

    2008-01-01

    As part of a multidisciplinary project to determine the processes that control ground-water chemistry and flow in mineralized alpine environments, ground- and surface-water samples from Handcart Gulch, Colorado were collected for analysis of inorganic solutes and water and dissolved sulfate stable isotopes in selected samples. The primary aim of this study was to document variations in ground-water chemistry in Handcart Gulch and to identify changes in water chemistry along the receiving stream of Handcart Gulch. Water analyses are reported for ground-water samples collected from 12 wells in Handcart Gulch, Colorado. Samples were collected between August 2003 and October 2005. Water analyses for surface-water samples are reported for 50 samples collected from Handcart Gulch and its inflows during a low-flow tracer injection on August 6, 2003. In addition, water analyses are reported for three other Handcart Gulch stream samples collected in September 2005 and March 2006. Reported analyses include field parameters (pH, specific conductance, temperature, dissolved oxygen, and Eh), major and trace constituents, oxygen and hydrogen isotopic composition of water and oxygen and sulfur isotopic composition of dissolved sulfate. Ground-water samples from this study are Ca-SO4 type and range in pH from 2.5 to 6.8. Most of the samples (75 percent) have pH values between 3.3 and 4.3. Surface water samples are also Ca-SO4 type and have a narrower range in pH (2.7?4.0). Ground- and surface-water samples vary from relatively dilute (specific conductance of 68 ?S/cm) to concentrated (specific conductance of 2,000 ?S/cm).

  17. Foulant Characteristics Comparison in Recycling Cooling Water System Makeup by Municipal Reclaimed Water and Surface Water in Power Plant

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Xu; Jing, Wang; Yajun, Zhang; Jie, Wang; Shuai, Si

    2015-01-01

    Due to water shortage, municipal reclaimed water rather than surface water was replenished into recycling cooling water system in power plants in some cities in China. In order to understand the effects of the measure on carbon steel corrosion, characteristics of two kinds of foulant produced in different systems were studied in the paper. Differences between municipal reclaimed water and surface water were analyzed firstly. Then, the weight and the morphology of two kinds of foulant were compared. Moreover, other characteristics including the total number of bacteria, sulfate reducing bacteria, iron bacteria, extracellular polymeric substance (EPS), protein (PN), and polysaccharide (PS) in foulant were analyzed. Based on results, it could be concluded that microbial and corrosive risk would be increased when the system replenished by municipal reclaimed water instead of surface water. PMID:25893132

  18. Foulant characteristics comparison in recycling cooling water system makeup by municipal reclaimed water and surface water in power plant.

    PubMed

    Ping, Xu; Jing, Wang; Yajun, Zhang; Jie, Wang; Shuai, Si

    2015-01-01

    Due to water shortage, municipal reclaimed water rather than surface water was replenished into recycling cooling water system in power plants in some cities in China. In order to understand the effects of the measure on carbon steel corrosion, characteristics of two kinds of foulant produced in different systems were studied in the paper. Differences between municipal reclaimed water and surface water were analyzed firstly. Then, the weight and the morphology of two kinds of foulant were compared. Moreover, other characteristics including the total number of bacteria, sulfate reducing bacteria, iron bacteria, extracellular polymeric substance (EPS), protein (PN), and polysaccharide (PS) in foulant were analyzed. Based on results, it could be concluded that microbial and corrosive risk would be increased when the system replenished by municipal reclaimed water instead of surface water. PMID:25893132

  19. [Distribution of arsenic in surface water in Tibet].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-Guo; Li, She-Hong; Wang, Hui; Xiao, Tang-Fu; Zheng, Bao-Shan

    2012-10-01

    This research was aimed on studying the arsenic distribution of water in Yarlung Zangbo and Singe Zangbo basins in Tibet. Results showed that arsenic concentrations were different in different types of the water. The sequence of arsenic concentration from high to low was hot spring water (4920 microg x L(-1) +/- 1520 microg x L(-1), n =2), salt lake water (2180 microg x L(-1) +/- 3840 microg x L(-1), n =7), well water (194 microg x L(-1), n = 1), freshwater lake water (163 microg x L(-1) +/- 202 microg x L(-1), n =2) and stream water (35.5 microg x L(-1) +/- 57.0 microg x L(-1), n=74). The high arsenic concentration in surface water in Singe Zangbo and the upstream of Yarlung Zangbo were found. The average concentration of arsenic in water from Singe Zangbo (58.4 microg x L(-1) +/- 69.9 microg x L(-1), n = 39) was significantly higher than that from Yarlung Zangbo (10.8 microg x L(-1) +/- 16.9 microg x L(-1), n = 30). Arsenic concentration in 43.2% of stream water samples and all of the hot springs, saline lakes and well water were higher than 10 microg x L(-1). Yarlung Zangbo and Singe Zangbo are important sources of drinking water for the local people. There is a high risk for the local people who may suffer from chronic arsenic poisoning. PMID:23233967

  20. Land use/land cover water quality nexus: quantifying anthropogenic influences on surface water quality.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Cyril O

    2015-07-01

    Anthropogenic forces widely influence the composition, configuration, and trend of land use and land cover (LULC) changes with potential implications for surface water quality. These changes have the likelihood of generating non-point source pollution with additional environmental implications for terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Monitoring the scope and trajectory of LULC change is pivotal for region-wide planning, tracking the sustainability of natural resources, and meeting the information needs of policy makers. A good comprehension of the dynamics of anthropogenic drivers (proximate and underlying) that influence such changes in LULC is important because any potential adverse change in LULC that may be inimical to sustainable water quality might be addressed at the anthropogenic driver level rather than the LULC change stage. Using a dense time stack of Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper images, a hydrologic water quality and socio-geospatial modeling framework, this study quantifies the role of anthropogenic drivers of LULC change on total suspended solids and total phosphorus concentrations in the Lower Chippewa River Watershed, Wisconsin, at three time steps-1990, 2000, and 2010. Results of the study demonstrated that proximate drivers of LULC change accounted for between 32 and 59% of the concentration and spatial distribution of total suspended solids, while the extent of phosphorus impairment attributed to the proximate drivers ranged between 31 and 42%. PMID:26065891

  1. A Mechanism for Near-Surface Water Ice on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travis, B. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Maurice, S.

    2009-12-01

    Recent findings (e.g., Byrne et al, 2009) indicate that water ice lies very close to the surface at mid-latitudes on Mars. Re-interpretation of neutron and gamma-ray data is consistent with water ice buried less than a meter or two below the surface. Hydrothermal convection of brines provides a mechanism for delivering water to the near-surface. Previous numerical and experimental studies with pure water have indicated that hydrothermal circulation of pore water should be possible, given reasonable estimates of geothermal heat flux and regolith permeability. For pure water convection, the upper limit of the liquid zone would lie at some depth, but in the case of salt solutions, the boundary between liquid and frozen pore water could reach virtually to the surface. The principal drivers for hydrothermal circulation are regolith permeability, geothermal heat flux, surface temperature and salt composition. Both the Clifford and the Hanna-Phillips models of Martian regolith permeability predict sufficiently high permeabilities to sustain hydrothermal convection. Salts in solution will concentrate in upwelling plumes as the cold surface is approached. As water ice is excluded upon freezing, the remaining solution becomes a more concentrated brine, reaching its eutectic concentration before freezing. Numerical simulations considering several salts (NaCl, CaCl2, MgSO4), and a range of heat fluxes (20 - 100 mW/m2) covering the range of estimated present day heat flux (20 to 40 mW/m2) to moderately elevated conditions (60 to 100 mW/m2) such as might exist in the vicinity of volcanoes and craters, all indicate the same qualitative behavior. A completely liquid, convective regime occurs at depth, overlain by a partially frozen "mushy" layer (but still convecting despite the increased viscosity), overlain by a thin frozen layer at the surface. The thicknesses of these layers depend on the heat flux, surface temperature and the salt. As heat flux increases, the mushy region

  2. Enhancement of nitrate removal at the sediment-water interface by carbon addition plus vertical mixing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuechu; He, Shengbing; Zhang, Yueping; Huang, Xiaobo; Huang, Yingying; Chen, Danyue; Huang, Xiaochen; Tang, Jianwu

    2015-10-01

    Wetlands and ponds are frequently used to remove nitrate from effluents or runoffs. However, the efficiency of this approach is limited. Based on the assumption that introducing vertical mixing to water column plus carbon addition would benefit the diffusion across the sediment-water interface, we conducted simulation experiments to identify a method for enhancing nitrate removal. The results suggested that the sediment-water interface has a great potential for nitrate removal, and the potential can be activated after several days of acclimation. Adding additional carbon plus mixing significantly increases the nitrate removal capacity, and the removal of total nitrogen (TN) and nitrate-nitrogen (NO3(-)-N) is well fitted to a first-order reaction model. Adding Hydrilla verticillata debris as a carbon source increased nitrate removal, whereas adding Eichhornia crassipe decreased it. Adding ethanol plus mixing greatly improved the removal performance, with the removal rate of NO3(-)-N and TN reaching 15.0-16.5 g m(-2) d(-1). The feasibility of this enhancement method was further confirmed with a wetland microcosm, and the NO3(-)-N removal rate maintained at 10.0-12.0 g m(-2) d(-1) at a hydraulic loading rate of 0.5 m d(-1). PMID:25556005

  3. Model for outgassing of water from metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Minxu; Dylla, Fred

    1993-06-01

    Numerous measurements of outgassing from metal surfaces show that the outgassing obeys a power law of the form Q=Q{sub 10}t{sup -alpha}, where alpha is typically near unity. For unbaked systems, outgassing is dominated by water. This work demonstrates that alpha is a function of the water vapor exposure during venting of the system, and the physical properties of the passivation oxide layer on the surface. An analytic expression for the outgassing rate is derived based on the assumption that the rate of water diffusing through the passivation oxide layer to the surface governs the rate of its release into the vacuum. The source distribution function for the desorbing water is assumed to be a combination of a Gaussian distribution centered at the interior surface driven by atmospheric exposure, and a uniform concentration throughout the bulk. We have measured the outgassing rate from a clean stainless-steel (type 304) chamber as a function of water exposure to the chamber surface from <1 to 600 monolayers. The measured outgassing rate data show that alpha tends to 0.5 for low H{sub 2}O exposures and tends to 1.5 for high H{sub 2}O exposures as predicted by the model.

  4. Integrated Land Surface Water State Indicators for Climate Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, B. T.; McDonald, K. C.; Steiner, N.; Azarderakhsh, M.; Schroeder, R.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate characterization of seasonal freeze/thaw transition timing coupled with accompanying characterization of snowpack water content, surface inundation, and radiation balance give the potential for an unambiguous indication of climate change. Earth remote sensing data sources have demonstrated utility for determining these surface and radiation balance state variables. NASA's Climate Indicators Team seeks to develop and test potential climate indicators that employ NASA capabilities to support the National Climate Assessemnt and are useful to decision makers. We present development of a set of climate indicators built upon remote sensing measures of surface water state variables: Landscape freeze/thaw (FT), Snow Water Equivalent (SWE), Surface inundation fraction (Fw), and radiative flux. Indicators based on and derived from these parameters may be assembled from integrated remote sensing datasets and provide key information in assessment of climate state. Combined, these state variables provide unique insight into linkages and feedbacks in terrestrial energy, water and carbon cycles and allow examination to the response of the integrated system to climate drivers. Assembled from existing remote sensing datasets, these deliverables will represent the first broad-scale observationally-based, comprehensive measures of surface water state and distribution coupled to atmospheric radiation for use in climate change assessment.

  5. Molecular dynamics study of oil detachment from an amorphous silica surface in water medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiaxuan; Si, Hao; Chen, Wenyang

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the mechanism of oil detachment from optical glass in water medium is studied by using molecular dynamics simulation. At the beginning, some undecane molecules are adsorbed on the amorphous silica surface to get contaminated glass. Upon addition of 6000 water molecules, most of the undecane molecules on the substrate surface can be detached from an amorphous silica surface through three stages. The formation of different directions of water channels is vital for oil detachment. The electrostatic interaction of water substrate contributes to disturbing the aggregates of undecane molecules and the H-bonding interaction between the water molecules is helpful for the oil puddle away from the substrate. However, there is still some oil molecules residue on the substrate surface after water cleaning. The simulation results showed that the specific ring potential well of amorphous silica surface will hinder the detachment of oil molecules. We also find that the formation of the specific ring potential well is related to the number of atoms and the average radius in silica atomic rings. Increasing the upward lift force, which acts on the hydrocarbon tail of oil molecules, will be benefit to clear the oil pollution residues from the glass surface.

  6. Impact of Water Recovery from Wastes on the Lunar Surface Mission Water Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, John W.; Hogan, John Andrew; Wignarajah, Kanapathipi; Pace, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    Future extended lunar surface missions will require extensive recovery of resources to reduce mission costs and enable self-sufficiency. Water is of particular importance due to its potential use for human consumption and hygiene, general cleaning, clothes washing, radiation shielding, cooling for extravehicular activity suits, and oxygen and hydrogen production. Various water sources are inherently present or are generated in lunar surface missions, and subject to recovery. They include: initial water stores, water contained in food, human and other solid wastes, wastewaters and associated brines, ISRU water, and scavenging from residual propellant in landers. This paper presents the results of an analysis of the contribution of water recovery from life support wastes on the overall water balance for lunar surface missions. Water in human wastes, metabolic activity and survival needs are well characterized and dependable figures are available. A detailed life support waste model was developed that summarizes the composition of life support wastes and their water content. Waste processing technologies were reviewed for their potential to recover that water. The recoverable water in waste is a significant contribution to the overall water balance. The value of this contribution is discussed in the context of the other major sources and loses of water. Combined with other analyses these results provide guidance for research and technology development and down-selection.

  7. Surface water pesticide modelling for decision support in drinking water production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmet, Nele; Dams, Jef; Bronders, Jan; Peleman, Gisèle; Verdickt, Liesbeth

    2015-04-01

    The occurrence of pesticides and other contaminants in river systems may compromise the use of surface water for drinking water production. To reduce the cost of removal of pesticides from the raw water, drinking water companies can: search for other raw water sources, invest in water storage capacity to overcome periods with high pesticide concentrations (often related to the application period), or impose measures to reduce the emission of pesticides to surface water (i.e. sustainable application strategies or use restrictions). To select the most appropriate water management options, the costs and effects of the aforementioned actions need to be evaluated. This evaluation requires knowledge on the concentrations and loads of pesticides at the point of drinking water abstraction, as well as insight in the contribution and the temporal variability of different sources or subbasins. In such a case, a modelling approach can assist in generating measurement-based datasets and to compare different scenarios for water management. We illustrate how a modelling approach can provide decision support for water management related to drinking water abstraction from surface water in a catchment that suffers from elevated pesticide concentrations. The study area is a water production center (WPC) located in northwestern Belgium. The WPC abstracts raw water from the river IJzer or from a natural pond and its connected streams. The available quantities as well as the quality of the water vary throughout the year. The WPC uses a reservoir of 3 million m³ to capture and store raw water to overcome periods with limited water availability and/or poor water quality. However, the pressure on water increases and in the future this buffering capacity might be no longer sufficient to fulfill the drinking water production demand. A surface water quality model for the area is set up using InfoWorks RS. The model is applied to obtain insight in the concentrations and loads at the different

  8. Effect of Grain Size on Uranium(VI) Surface Complexation Kinetics and Adsorption Additivity

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.

    2011-07-27

    Laboratory experiments were performed to investigate the contribution of variable grain sizes to uranium adsorption/desorption in a sediment collected from the US DOE Hanford site. The sediment was wet-sieved into four size fractions: coarse sand (1-2 mm), medium sand (0.2-1 mm), fine sand (0.05-0.2 mm), and clay/silt fraction (< 0.05mm). For each size fraction and their composite (sediment), batch experiments were performed to determine uranium adsorption isotherms, and stirred flow-cell experiments were conducted to derive kinetic data of uranium adsorption and subsequent desorption. The results showed that uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics were size-specific, reflecting the effects of size-specific adsorption site concentration and kinetic rate constants. The larger-size fraction had a larger mass percentage in the sediment, but with a smaller adsorption site concentration and generally a slower uranium adsorption/desorption rate. The same equilibrium surface complexation reaction and reaction constant could describe uranium adsorption isotherms for all size fractions and the composite after accounting for the effect of adsorption site concentration. Mass-weighted, linear additivity was observed for both uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics in the composite. Our analysis also showed that uranium adsorption site concentration estimated from the adsorption isotherms was 3 orders of magnitude less than a site concentration estimated from sediment surface area and generic site density. One important implication of this study is that grain size distribution may be used to estimate uranium adsorption site, and adsorption/desorption kinetic rates in heterogeneous sediments from a common location.

  9. Temperature Dependence of Cryogenic Ammonia-Water Ice Mixtures and Implications for Icy Satellite Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, J. B., III; Curchin, J. M.; Clark, R. N.

    2001-01-01

    Infrared spectra of ammonia-water ice mixtures reveal temperature-dependent absorption bands due to ammonia. These features, at 1.04, 2.0, and 2.25 microns, may shed light on the surface compositions of the Galilean and Saturnian satellites. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. Hydrologic Science and Satellite Measurements of Surface Water (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsdorf, D. E.; Mognard, N. M.; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2010-12-01

    While significant advances continue to be made for satellite measurements of surface waters, important science and application opportunities remain. Examples include the following: (1) Our current methods of measuring floodwater dynamics are either sparsely distributed or temporally inadequate. As an example, flood depths are measured by using high water marks, which capture only the peak of the flood wave, not its temporal variability. (2) Discharge is well measured at individual points along stream networks using in-situ gauges, but these do not capture within-reach hydraulic variability such as the water surface slope changes on the rising and falling limbs of flood waves. (3) Just a 1.0 mm/day error in ET over the Congo Basin translates to a 35,000 m3/s discharge error. Knowing the discharge of the Congo River and its many tributaries should significantly improve our understanding of the water balance throughout the basin. The Congo is exemplary of many other basins around the globe. (4) Arctic hydrology is punctuated by millions of unmeasured lakes. Globally, there might be as many as 30 million lakes larger than a hectare. Storage changes in these lakes are nearly unknown, but in the Arctic such changes are likely an indication of global warming. (5) Well over 100 rivers cross international boundaries, yet the sharing of water data is poor. Overcoming this helps to better manage the entire river basin while also providing a better assessment of potential water related disasters. The Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT, http://swot.jpl.nasa.gov/) mission is designed to meet these needs by providing global measurements of surface water hydrodynamics. SWOT will allow estimates of discharge in rivers wider than 100m (50m goal) and storage changes in water bodies larger than 250m by 250m (and likely as small as one hectare).

  11. THE USE OF DI WATER TO MITIGATE DUSTING FOR ADDITION OF DWPF FRIT TO THE SLURRY MIX EVAPORATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, E.

    2010-07-21

    objective of this task is to perform bench scale testing on various frits that have been used at DWPF or in test programs at SRNL to determine the quantity of de-ionized (DI) water required to mitigate dusting per mass basis of frit. The quantity of DI water required was determined visually by observing the effluent port of the mixer, and DI water addition was made to the point where no visible dust was observed leaving the effluent port. A total of eight different frits were selected for testing. Secondary objectives in this task include the following: (1) Video taping of the de-dusting procedure, (2) Particle size distribution analyses of the dry and wetted frits at the weight fraction of water required for de-dusting, (3) Plate flow tests to determine angle of flow and quantity of material remaining on plate at 90 degrees, (4) Microscopy of dry and wetted frit, and (5) Effect of excess water for selected frits on plate flow. The above analyses were performed within one hour of water addition, to minimize the effect of evaporative water losses. To better understand the size of dust particles, perform settling tests on selected frits and capture the fines. Analyze the fines for particle size distribution. Finally, it is expected that the surface area of frit is an important parameter in the quantity of water required for dust mitigation. An analysis of particle size distribution (PSD) data of as-received frit analyzed by SRNL over the past two to three years will be performed to determine the variation in the distribution of as-received frit. The following objectives were stated in the Technical Task Request4 as objectives that given adequate time would provide insight in helping DWPF in assessing equipment or processes for de-dusting and processing of dry frit. Due to time constraints, commercial methods for dedusting are provided. These results are detailed in section 3.7. Obtain design information from Hanford with respective to equipment used for dedusting. Suggestions

  12. Additive Pressures of Elevated Sea Surface Temperatures and Herbicides on Symbiont-Bearing Foraminifera

    PubMed Central

    van Dam, Joost W.; Negri, Andrew P.; Mueller, Jochen F.; Altenburger, Rolf; Uthicke, Sven

    2012-01-01

    Elevated ocean temperatures and agrochemical pollution individually threaten inshore coral reefs, but these pressures are likely to occur simultaneously. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the combined effects of elevated temperature and the photosystem II (PSII) inhibiting herbicide diuron on several types of symbiotic algae (diatom, dinoflagellate or rhodophyte) of benthic foraminifera in hospite. Diuron was shown to evoke a direct effect on photosynthetic efficiency (reduced effective PSII quantum yield ΔF/F′m), while elevated temperatures (>30°C, only 2°C above current average summer temperatures) were observed to impact photosynthesis more indirectly by causing reductions in maximum PSII quantum yield (Fv/Fm), interpreted as photodamage. Additionally, elevated temperatures were shown to cause bleaching through loss of chlorophyll a in foraminifera hosting either diatoms or dinoflagellates. A significant linear correlation was found between reduced Fv/Fm and loss of chlorophyll a. In most cases, symbionts within foraminifera proved more sensitive to thermal stress in the presence of diuron (≥1 µg L−1). The mixture toxicity model of Independent Action (IA) described the combined effects of temperature and diuron on the photosystem of species hosting diatoms or dinoflagellates convincingly and in agreement with probabilistic statistics, so a response additive joint action can be assumed. We thus demonstrate that improving water quality can improve resilience of symbiotic phototrophs to projected increases in ocean temperatures. As IA described the observed combined effects from elevated temperature and diuron stress it may therefore be employed for prediction of untested mixtures and for assessing the efficacy of management measures. PMID:22439012

  13. Hydroeconomic optimization of integrated water management and transfers under stochastic surface water supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Tingju; Marques, Guilherme Fernandes; Lund, Jay R.

    2015-05-01

    Efficient reallocation and conjunctive operation of existing water supplies is gaining importance as demands grow, competitions among users intensify, and new supplies become more costly. This paper analyzes the roles and benefits of conjunctive use of surface water and groundwater and market-based water transfers in an integrated regional water system where agricultural and urban water users coordinate supply and demand management based on supply reliability and economic values of water. Agricultural users optimize land and water use for annual and perennial crops to maximize farm income, while urban users choose short-term and long-term water conservation actions to maintain reliability and minimize costs. The temporal order of these decisions is represented in a two-stage optimization that maximizes the net expected benefits of crop production, urban conservation and water management including conjunctive use and water transfers. Long-term decisions are in the first stage and short-term decisions are in a second stage based on probabilities of water availability events. Analytical and numerical analyses are made. Results show that conjunctive use and water transfers can substantially stabilize farmer's income and reduce system costs by reducing expensive urban water conservation or construction. Water transfers can equalize marginal values of water across users, while conjunctive use minimizes water marginal value differences in time. Model results are useful for exploring the integration of different water demands and supplies through water transfers, conjunctive use, and conservation, providing valuable insights for improving system management.

  14. Spatial development of the wind-driven water surface flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemin, Rémi; Caulliez, Guillemette

    2015-04-01

    The water velocity field induced by wind and waves beneath an air-water interface is investigated experimentally versus fetch in the large Marseille-Luminy wind wave tank. Measurements of the vertical velocity profiles inside the subsurface shear layer were performed by a three-component Nortek acoustic Doppler velocimeter. The surface drift current was also derived from visualizations of small floating drifters recorded by a video camera looking vertically from above the water surface. Surface wave height and slopes were determined simultaneously by means of capacitance gauges and a single-point laser slope system located in the immediate vicinity of the profiler. Observations were made at steady low to moderate wind speeds and various fetches ranging between 1 and 15 meters. This study first corroborates that the thin subsurface water boundary layer forced by wind at the leading edge of the water sheet is laminar. The surface drift current velocity indeed increases gradually with fetch, following a 1/3 power law characteristic of an accelerated flat-plate laminar boundary layer. The laminar-turbulent transition manifests itself by a sudden decrease in the water surface flow velocity and a rapid deepening of the boundary layer due to the development of large-scale longitudinal vortices. Further downstream, when characteristic capillary-gravity wind waves develop at the surface, the water flow velocity increases again rapidly within a sublayer of typically 4 mm depth. This phenomenon is explained by the occurrence of an intense momentum flux from waves to the mean flow due to the dissipation of parasitic capillaries generated ahead of the dominant wave crests. This phenomenon also sustains significant small-scale turbulent motions within the whole boundary layer. However, when gravity-capillary waves of length longer than 10 cm then grow at the water surface, the mean flow velocity field decreases drastically over the whole boundary layer thickness. At the same

  15. Influence of building resolution on surface water inundation outputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Daniel; Yu, Dapeng; Pattison, Ian

    2016-04-01

    Surface water (pluvial) flooding occurs when intense precipitation events overwhelm the drainage capacity of an area and excess water is unable to infiltrate into the ground or drain via natural or artificial drainage channels. In the UK, over 3 million properties are at risk from surface water flooding alone, accounting for approximately one third of all UK flood risk. This risk is predicted to increase due to future climatic changes resulting in an increasing magnitude and frequency of intense precipitation events. Numerical modelling is a well-established method of investigating surface water flood risk, allowing the researcher to gain an understanding of the depth, extent and severity of actual or hypothetical flood scenarios. Although numerical models allow the simulation of surface water inundation in a particular region, the model parameters (e.g. roughness, hydraulic conductivity) and resolution of topographic data have been shown to exert a profound influence on the inundation outputs which often leads to an over- or under-estimation of flood depths and extent without the use of external validation data to calibrate model outputs. Although previous research has demonstrated that model outputs are highly sensitive to Digital Elevation Model (DEM) mesh resolution, with flood inundation over large and complex topographies often requiring mesh resolutions coarser than the structural features (e.g. buildings) present within the study catchment, the specific influence of building resolution on surface flowpaths and connectivity during a surface water flood event has not been investigated. In this study, a LiDAR-derived DEM and OS MasterMap buildings layer of the Loughborough University campus, UK, were rasterized into separate 1m, 5m and 10m resolution layers. These layers were combined to create a series of Digital Surface Models (DSM) with varying, mismatching building and DEM resolutions (e.g. 1m DEM resolution, 10m building resolution, etc.) to understand

  16. The impact of groundwater depletions on groundwater surface water interactions and streamflow across the contiguous US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condon, L. E.; Maxwell, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past 50 years, connections between climate change and streamflow trends have been observed in many regions of the Western US. However, much of the work to detect climate change signals in historical hydrologic records has focused on surface water changes in relatively undeveloped basins. While this is necessary to isolate any climate change signal from uncertain water management operations, it also excludes interactions with the concurrent human development that has occurred over the last 100 years. In highly utilized groundwater systems, such as the High Plains Aquifer, groundwater mining has already been linked to streamflow depletions at local to regional scales; but no prior studies have evaluated the role of groundwater declines in historical changes of groundwater surface water interactions at the continental scale. Here we isolate the influence of groundwater depletions from water management operations (e.g. irrigation and surface water diversions) to systematically evaluate how subsurface storage losses alter large-scale hydrologic interactions. Using a fully integrated groundwater surface water model of the contiguous US we simulate dynamic equilibrium conditions of a predevelopment system and a system with groundwater depletions equivalent to all of the groundwater development of the 20th century. Results illustrate the effect of persistent drawdown on streamflows, recharge and groundwater surface water exchanges across many spatial scales. In addition, we run transient simulations to evaluate the effect of these shifts on seasonal surface water variability. Simulations demonstrate the widespread trends in groundwater surface water interactions that have already resulted from ubiquitous groundwater mining in the United States and the potential for such changes to influence future response to climate variability.

  17. Infiltration of pesticides in surface water into nearby drinking water supply wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaguerra, F.; Albrechtsen, H.; Binning, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    Drinking water wells are often placed near streams because streams often overly permeable sediments and the water table is near the surface in valleys, and so pumping costs are reduced. The lowering of the water table by pumping wells can reverse the natural flow from the groundwater to the stream, inducing infiltration of surface water to groundwater and consequently to the drinking water well. Many attenuation processes can take place in the riparian zone, mainly due to mixing, biodegradation and sorption. However, if the water travel time from the surface water to the pumping well is too short, or if the compounds are poorly degradable, contaminants can reach the drinking water well at high concentrations, jeopardizing drinking water quality. Here we developed a reactive transport model to evaluate the risk of contamination of drinking water wells by surface water pollution. The model was validated using data of a tracer experiment in a riparian zone. Three compounds were considered: an older pesticide MCPP (Mecoprop) which is mobile and persistent, glyphosate (Roundup), a new biodegradable and strongly sorbed pesticide, and its degradation product AMPA. Global sensitivity analysis using the method of Morris was employed to identify the dominant model parameters. Results showed that the presence of an aquitard and its characteristics (degree of fracturing and thickness), pollutant properties and well depth are the crucial factors affecting the risk of drinking water well contamination from surface water. Global sensitivity analysis results were compared with rank correlation statistics between pesticide concentrations and geological parameters derived from a comprehensive database of Danish drinking water wells. Aquitard thickness and well depth are the most critical parameters in both the model and observed data.

  18. Modeling studies of geothermal systems with a free water surface

    SciTech Connect

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.

    1983-12-01

    A numerical simulator was developed for the modeling of air-steam-water systems. The simulator was applied to various problems involving injection into or production from a geothermal reservoir in hydraulic communication with a shallow free-surface aquifer. First, a one-dimensional column problem is considered and the water level movement during exploitation is studied using different capillary pressure functions. Second, a two-dimensional radial model is used to study and compare reservoir depletion for cases with and without a free-surface aquifer. Finally, the contamination of a shallow free-surface aquifer due to cold water injection is investigated. The primary aim of these studies is to obtain an understanding of the response of a reservoir in hydraulic communication with a unconfined aquifer during exploitation or injection and to determine under which circumstances conventional modeling techniques (fully saturated systems) can be applied to such systems.

  19. Occurrence of illicit drugs in surface waters in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Kaiyang; Du, Peng; Xu, Zeqiong; Gao, Tingting; Li, Xiqing

    2016-06-01

    Illicit drugs have been recognized as a group of emerging contaminants. In this work, occurrence of common illicit drugs and their metabolites in Chinese surface waters was examined by collecting samples from 49 lakes and 4 major rivers across the country. Among the drugs examined, methamphetamine and ketamine were detected with highest frequencies and concentration levels, consistent with the fact that these are primary drugs of abuse in China. Detection frequencies and concentrations of other drugs were much lower than in European lakes and rivers reported in the literature. In most Chinese surface waters methamphetamine and ketamine were detected at concentrations of several ng L(-1) or less, but in some southern lakes and rivers, these two drugs were detected at much higher concentrations (up to several tens ng L(-1)). Greater occurrence of methamphetamine and ketamine in southern surface waters was attributed to greater abuse and more clandestine production of the two drugs in southern China. PMID:26942687

  20. Improving the performance of ammonia-water absorption cycles using salt additives and membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, O.M.; Barnett, S.M.; Balamuru, V.G.

    1997-12-31

    This paper proposes a new design of an ammonia-water absorption refrigeration cycle for low-temperature heat sources such as solar energy and waste heat. The proposed cycle uses a salt additive to shift the chemical equilibrium toward more effective separation of ammonia molecules from aqueous solution (i.e., salting out). Since salt additives can affect all aspects of the absorption cycle, membranes have been chosen to control the flow of ions in the cycle and limit their effects to the generation side. This paper describes an absorption cycle that uses membrane separation processes, such as reverse osmosis, dialysis, and electrodialysis. To optimize the performance of the cycle, however, the membranes and salts must be carefully chosen.

  1. Isotopic Tracers for Delineating Non-Point Source Pollutants in Surface Water

    SciTech Connect

    Davisson, M L

    2001-03-01

    This study tested whether isotope measurements of surface water and dissolved constituents in surface water could be used as tracers of non-point source pollution. Oxygen-18 was used as a water tracer, while carbon-14, carbon-13, and deuterium were tested as tracers of DOC. Carbon-14 and carbon-13 were also used as tracers of dissolved inorganic carbon, and chlorine-36 and uranium isotopes were tested as tracers of other dissolved salts. In addition, large databases of water quality measurements were assembled for the Missouri River at St. Louis and the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta in California to enhance interpretive results of the isotope measurements. Much of the water quality data has been under-interpreted and provides a valuable resource to investigative research, for which this report exploits and integrates with the isotope measurements.

  2. Apple Snail: a Bio Cleaner of the Water Free Surface.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassiri, Golnaz

    2005-11-01

    Oil spills from tankers represent a threat for shorelines and marine life. Despite continuing research, there has been little change in the fundamental technology for dealing with oil spills. An experimental investigation of the feeding strategy of Apple snails from the water free surface, called surface film feeding, is being studied motivated by the need to develop new techniques to recover oil spills. To feed on floating food (usually a thin layer of microorganisms), the apple snail forms a funnel with its foot and pulls the free surface toward the funnel. High speed imaging and particle image velocimetry were used in the present investigation to measure the free surface motion and to investigate the mechanism used by the apple snails to pull the free surface. The results suggest that the snail pulls the free surface via the wavy motion of the muscles in its funnel.

  3. Radar image sequence analysis of inhomogeneous water surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seemann, Joerg; Senet, Christian M.; Dankert, Heiko; Hatten, Helge; Ziemer, Friedwart

    1999-10-01

    The radar backscatter from the ocean surface, called sea clutter, is modulated by the surface wave field. A method was developed to estimate the near-surface current, the water depth and calibrated surface wave spectra from nautical radar image sequences. The algorithm is based on the three- dimensional Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) of the spatio- temporal sea clutter pattern in the wavenumber-frequency domain. The dispersion relation is used to define a filter to separate the spectral signal of the imaged waves from the background noise component caused by speckle noise. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) contains information about the significant wave height. The method has been proved to be reliable for the analysis of homogeneous water surfaces in offshore installations. Radar images are inhomogeneous because of the dependency of the image transfer function (ITF) on the azimuth angle between the wave propagation and the antenna viewing direction. The inhomogeneity of radar imaging is analyzed using image sequences of a homogeneous deep-water surface sampled by a ship-borne radar. Changing water depths in shallow-water regions induce horizontal gradients of the tidal current. Wave refraction occurs due to the spatial variability of the current and water depth. These areas cannot be investigated with the standard method. A new method, based on local wavenumber estimation with the multiple-signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm, is outlined. The MUSIC algorithm provides superior wavenumber resolution on local spatial scales. First results, retrieved from a radar image sequence taken from an installation at a coastal site, are presented.

  4. The effect of surface water and wetting on gecko adhesion.

    PubMed

    Stark, Alyssa Y; Sullivan, Timothy W; Niewiarowski, Peter H

    2012-09-01

    Despite profound interest in the mechanics and performance of the gecko adhesive system, relatively few studies have focused on performance under conditions that are ecologically relevant to the natural habitats of geckos. Because geckos are likely to encounter surfaces that are wet, we used shear force adhesion measurements to examine the effect of surface water and toe pad wetting on the whole-animal performance of a tropical-dwelling gecko (Gekko gecko). To test the effect of surface wetting, we measured the shear adhesive force of geckos on three substrate conditions: dry glass, glass misted with water droplets and glass fully submerged in water. We also investigated the effect of wetting on the adhesive toe pad by soaking the toe pads prior to testing. Finally, we tested for repeatability of the adhesive system in each wetting condition by measuring shear adhesion after each step a gecko made under treatment conditions. Wetted toe pads had significantly lower shear adhesive force in all treatments (0.86 ± 0.09 N) than the control (17.96 ± 3.42 N), as did full immersion in water (0.44 ± 0.03 N). Treatments with droplets of water distributed across the surface were more variable and did not differ from treatments where the surface was dry (4.72 ± 1.59 N misted glass; 9.76 ± 2.81 N dry glass), except after the gecko took multiple steps. These findings suggest that surface water and the wetting of a gecko's adhesive toe pads may have significant consequences for the ecology and behavior of geckos living in tropical environments. PMID:22875772

  5. Improved simulation of groundwater - surface water interaction in catchment models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    teklesadik, aklilu; van Griensven, Ann; Anibas, Christian; Huysmans, Marijke

    2016-04-01

    Groundwater storage can have a significant contribution to stream flow, therefore a thorough understanding of the groundwater surface water interaction is of prime important when doing catchment modeling. The aim of this study is to improve the simulation of groundwater - surface water interaction in a catchment model of the upper Zenne River basin located in Belgium. To achieve this objective we used the "Groundwater-Surface water Flow" (GSFLOW) modeling software, which is an integration of the surface water modeling tool "Precipitation and Runoff Modeling system" (PRMS) and the groundwater modeling tool MODFLOW. For this case study, the PRMS model and MODFLOW model were built and calibrated independently. The PRMS upper Zenne River basin model is divided into 84 hydrological response units (HRUs) and is calibrated with flow data at the Tubize gauging station. The spatial discretization of the MODFLOW upper Zenne groundwater flow model consists of 100m grids. Natural groundwater divides and the Brussels-Charleroi canal are used as boundary conditions for the MODFLOW model. The model is calibrated using piezometric data. The GSFLOW results were evaluated against a SWAT model application and field observations of groundwater-surface water interactions along a cross section of the Zenne River and riparian zone. The field observations confirm that there is no exchange of groundwater beyond the Brussel-Charleroi canal and that the interaction at the river bed is relatively low. The results show that there is a significant difference in the groundwater simulations when using GSFLOW versus SWAT. This indicates that the groundwater component representation in the SWAT model could be improved and that a more realistic implementation of the interactions between groundwater and surface water is advisable. This could be achieved by integrating SWAT and MODFLOW.

  6. Salmonellae as an Index of Pollution of Surface Waters

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, William B.; Hanks, John B.; Thomason, Berenice M.; Murlin, Alma M.; Biddle, James W.; Croom, John M.

    1972-01-01

    Screening enrichments of surface water specimens by means of a polyvalent fluorescent antibody reagent for the salmonellae yielded approximately 60% more positive specimens than was obtained by cultural procedures. It is not known what fraction of the excess of fluorescent antibody-positive over culturally positive specimens represents staining of non-salmonellae or non-arizonae as opposed to the staining of non-cultivatable organisms of these two genera. Cotton gauze and rayon-polypropylene fiber swabs were equally sensitive for collecting salmonellae from the streams examined. Tetrathionate enrichment incubated at 41.5 C appeared to be superior to selenite-cystine for isolation of salmonellae from surface waters. Twenty-eight serotypes of Salmonella and two serotypes of Arizona were identified in the 121 positive specimens. In water rated moderately polluted, 65% of all specimens tested were positive; in minimally polluted waters, 38% were positive; and in unpolluted streams, 44% were positive. PMID:4562473

  7. Effect of grain size on uranium(VI) surface complexation kinetics and adsorption additivity.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M

    2011-07-15

    The contribution of variable grain sizes to uranium adsorption/desorption was studied using a sediment from the US DOE Hanford site. The sediment was wet sieved into four size fractions: coarse sand (1-2 mm), medium sand (0.2-1 mm), fine sand (0.053-0.2 mm), and clay/silt fraction (<0.053 mm). For each size fraction and their composite (sediment), batch and flow-cell experiments were performed to determine uranium adsorption isotherms and kinetic uranium adsorption and subsequent desorption. The results showed that uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics were size specific, reflecting the effects of size-specific adsorption site concentration and kinetic rate constants. The larger-size fraction had a larger mass percentage in the sediment but with a smaller adsorption site concentration and generally a slower uranium adsorption/desorption rate. The same equilibrium surface complexation reaction and reaction constant could describe uranium adsorption isotherms for all size fractions and the composite after accounting for the effect of adsorption site concentration. Mass-weighted, linear additivity was observed for both uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics in the composite. One important implication of this study is that grain-size distribution may be used to estimate uranium adsorption site and adsorption/desorption kinetic rates in heterogeneous sediments from a common location. PMID:21648458

  8. Non-additivity of molecule-surface van der Waals potentials from force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tautz, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    Van der Waals (vdW) forces act ubiquitously in condensed matter. Their description as an inherently quantum mechanical phenomenon was developed for single atoms and homogeneous macroscopic bodies by London, Casimir, and Lifshitz. For intermediate-sized objects like organic molecules an atomistic description is required, but explicit first principles calculations are very difficult since correlations between many interacting electrons have to be considered. Hence, semi-empirical correction schemes are often used that simplify the vdW interaction to a sum over atom-pair potentials. A similar gap exists between successful measurements of vdW and Casimir forces for single atoms on the one hand and macroscopic bodies on the other, as comparable experiments for molecules are absent. I will present experiments in which long-range vdW potentials between a series of related molecules and a metal surface have been determined experimentally. The experiments rely on the extremely sensitive force detection of an atomic force microscope in combination with its molecular manipulation capabilities. The results allow us to confirm the asymptotic force law and to quantify the non-additive part of the vdW interaction which is particularly challenging for theory. In the present case, cooperative effects account for 10% of the total interaction. This effect is of general validity in molecules and thus relevant at the intersection of chemistry, physics, biology, and materials science.

  9. Study Design and Percent Recoveries of Anthropogenic Organic Compounds With and Without the Addition of Ascorbic Acid to Preserve Water Samples Containing Free Chlorine, 2004-06

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Valder, Joshua F.; Delzer, Gregory C.; Price, Curtis V.; Sandstrom, Mark W.

    2008-01-01

    The National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began implementing Source Water-Quality Assessments (SWQAs) in 2002 that focus on characterizing the quality of source water and finished water of aquifers and major rivers used by some of the larger community water systems in the United States. As used for SWQA studies, source water is the raw (ambient) water collected at the supply well prior to water treatment (for ground water) or the raw (ambient) water collected from the river near the intake (for surface water). Finished water is the water that is treated, which typically involves, in part, the addition of chlorine or other disinfection chemicals to remove pathogens, and is ready to be delivered to consumers. Finished water is collected before the water enters the distribution system. This report describes the study design and percent recoveries of anthropogenic organic compounds (AOCs) with and without the addition of ascorbic acid to preserve water samples containing free chlorine. The percent recoveries were determined by using analytical results from a laboratory study conducted in 2004 by the USGS's National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) and from data collected during 2004-06 for a field study currently (2008) being conducted by the USGS's NAWQA Program. The laboratory study was designed to determine if preserving samples with ascorbic acid (quenching samples) adversely affects analytical performance under controlled conditions. During the laboratory study, eight samples of reagent water were spiked for each of five analytical schedules evaluated. Percent recoveries from these samples were then compared in two ways: (1) four quenched reagent spiked samples analyzed on day 0 were compared with four quenched reagent spiked samples analyzed on day 7 or 14, and (2) the combined eight quenched reagent spiked samples analyzed on day 0, 7, or 14 were compared with eight laboratory reagent spikes (LRSs). Percent

  10. Molecular dynamics studies of water deposition on hematite surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvamme, Bjørn; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Haynes, Martin

    2012-12-01

    The interest in carbon dioxide for enhanced oil recovery is increasing proportional to the decrease in naturally driven oil production and also due to the increasing demand for reduced emission of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Transport of carbon dioxide in offshore pipelines involves high pressure and low temperatures which may lead to the formation of hydrate between residual water dissolved in carbon dioxide. The critical question is whether the water at some condition of temperature and pressure will drop out as liquid droplets or as water adsorbed on the surfaces of the pipeline and then subsequently form hydrates heterogeneously. In this work we have used the 6-311G basis set with B3LYP to estimate the charge distribution of different sizes of hematite crystals. The obtained surface charge distribution were kept unchanged while the inner charge distribution where scaled so as to result in an overall neutral crystal. These rust particles were embedded in water and chemical potential for adsorbed water molecules were estimated through thermodynamic integration and compared to similar estimates for same size water cluster. Estimated values of water chemical potentials indicate that it is thermodynamically favorable for water to adsorb on hematite, and that evaluation of potential carbon dioxide hydrate formation conditions and kinetics should be based this sequence of processes.

  11. Zirconium fluoride glass - Surface crystals formed by reaction with water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, R. H.; Bansal, N. P.; Bradner, T.; Murphy, D.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrated surfaces of a zirconium barium fluoride glass, which has potential for application in optical fibers and other optical elements, were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Crystalline zirconium fluoride was identified by analysis of X-ray diffraction patterns of the surface crystals and found to be the main constituent of the surface material. It was also found that hydrated zirconium fluorides form only in highly acidic fluoride solutions. It is possible that the zirconium fluoride crystals form directly on the glass surface as a result of its depletion of other ions. The solubility of zirconium fluoride is suggested to be probably much lower than that of barium fluoride (0.16 g/100 cu cm at 18 C). Dissolution was determined to be the predominant process in the initial stages of the reaction of the glass with water. Penetration of water into the glass has little effect.

  12. Nanostructuring of metal surfaces by corrosion for efficient water splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jooyoung; Lim, Guh-Hwan; Lim, Byungkwon

    2016-01-01

    We show that simply by corroding Ni foam in an aqueous solution, it is possible to produce nanostructured surfaces. When Ni foam was corroded in water or an aqueous solution containing NaCl, a dense array of Ni(OH)2 nanosheets was produced on the surface of the foam. When corroded in the presence of RuCl3, the nanostructured surface composed of Ni(OH)2 nanosheets decorated with ultrasmall RuO2 nanoparticles was obtained. At an applied voltage of 1.7 V, the combination of these two nanostructured surfaces yielded a water-splitting current density more than three times that obtained on the commercial Pt wire electrodes.

  13. Constraints for Using Radon-in-Water Concentrations as an Indicator for Groundwater Discharge into Surface Water Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petermann, Eric; Schubert, Michael

    2015-04-01

    since these time-series are usually observed at varying tidal stages. The normalization of the radon signal was performed by applying a regression model derived from a sensitivity analysis. For this purpose, the sensitivity of radon-in-water concentration for water level changes was analysed for a radon time-series measurement at a fixed location over two tidal cycles. Third, additional sources for radon release into the surface water body e.g., discharge of a radon bearing river, also need to be considered when evaluating radon-in-water concentrations. To sum up, radon-in-water concentrations act as a precise indicator for groundwater discharge localization if the effects of the instruments response delay, the tidal influence and the presence of additional radon sources are removed from the recorded radon signal.

  14. The use of radar imagery for surface water investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, M. L.

    1981-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the interpretation of hydrologic features using L-band (HH) imagery collected by aircraft and Seasat systems. Areas of research needed to more precisely define the accuracy and repeatability of measurements related to the conditions of surfaces and boundaries of fresh water bodies are identified. These include: the definition of shoreline, the nature of variations in surface roughness across a water body and along streams and lake shores, and the separation of ambiguous conditions which appear similar to lakes.

  15. Heterogeneous Nucleation of Naphthalene Vapor on Water Surface

    PubMed

    Smolík; Schwarz

    1997-01-15

    The evaporation of a water drop into a ternary gaseous mixture of air, steam, and naphthalene vapor was investigated. The experimental results were compared with a theoretical prediction based on a numerical solution of coupled boundary layer equations for heat and mass transfer from a drop moving in ternary gas. In the experiments the naphthalene vapor condensed on the water drop as a supercooled liquid even at temperatures far below the melting point of naphthalene. The condensation on drop surface is discussed in terms of classical theory of heterogeneous nucleation on smooth surfaces. PMID:9028892

  16. [Simultaneous Analysis of 18 Glucocorticoids in Surface Water].

    PubMed

    Guo, Wen-jing; Chang, Hong; Sun, De-zhi; Wu, Feng-chang; Yang, Hao

    2015-07-01

    A method of ultra-performance liquid chomatography tandam mass spectrometry(UPLC-MS/MS) combined with solid-phase extraction (SPE) has been developed for simultaneous analysis of 18 glucocorticoids in surface water. The analytes were first enriched and purified through a HLB cartridge, and eluted with acetonitrile/ethyl acetate (1:1, V/V), then detected by UPLC-MS/MS. The detection used gradient elution process with methanol and 0. 1% formic acid/water (V/V) as the mobile phase to achieve baseline separations of these 18 analytes. The linear range was 1. 0-1 000 µg.L-1. The method detection limits (MDLs) were 0. 10-1. 0 ng.L-1 except for cortisone acetate and cortisol acetate(10 ng.L-1) with overall mean recoveries of 65% - 108% in surface water. Application of this method for 5 surface waters from Beijing area showed that 8 glucocorticoids were detected with the concentration range of 0. 20-476 ng.L-1. Triamcinolone, triamcinolone acetonide, cortisol acetate and clobetasol propionate were detected for the first time in surface water samples, suggesting that this method is efficient for real sample analysis. PMID:26489346

  17. Aluminum in acidic surface waters: chemistry, transport, and effects.

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, C T

    1985-01-01

    Ecologically significant concentrations of Al have been reported in surface waters draining "acid-sensitive" watersheds that are receiving elevated inputs of acidic deposition. It has been hypothesized that mineral acids from atmospheric deposition have remobilized Al previously precipitated within the soil during soil development. This Al is then thought to be transported to adjacent surface waters. Dissolved mononuclear Al occurs as aquo Al, as well as OH-, F-, SO4(2-), and organic complexes. Although past investigations have often ignored non-hydroxide complexes of Al, it appears that organic and F complexes are the predominant forms of Al in dilute (low ionic strength) acidic surface waters. The concentration of inorganic forms of Al increases exponentially with decreases in solution pH. This response is similar to the theoretical pH dependent solubility of Al mineral phases. The concentration of organic forms of Al, however, is strongly correlated with variations in organic carbon concentration of surface waters rather than pH. Elevated concentrations of Al in dilute acidic waters are of interest because: Al is an important pH buffer; Al may influence the cycling of important elements like P, organic carbon, and trace metals; and Al is potentially toxic to aquatic organisms. An understanding of the aqueous speciation of Al is essential for an evaluation of these processes. PMID:3935428

  18. Insight into water molecules bonding on 4d metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, Javier; Michaelides, Angelos; Scheffler, Matthias

    2008-03-01

    Water-metal interactions are of capital importance to a wide variety of phenomena in materials science, catalysis, corrosion, electrochemistry, etc. Here we address the nature of the bond between water molecules and metal surfaces through a careful systematic study. Specifically, the bonding of isolated water molecules to a series of close-packed transition metal surfaces - Ru(0001), Rh(111), Pd(111) and Ag(111) - has been examined in detail with density functional theory (DFT). Aiming to understand the origin behind energetic and structural trends along the 4d series we employ a range of analysis tools, such as decomposition of the density of states, electron density differences, electronic reactivity function and inspection of individual Kohn-Sham orbitals. The results obtained allow us to rationalize the bonding between water and transition metal surfaces as a balance of covalent and electrostatic interactions. A frontier orbital scheme based on so-called two-center four-electron interactions between molecular orbitals of water and d band states of the surface proves incisive in understanding these systems.

  19. Energy Landscape of Water and Ethanol on Silica Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Di; Guo, Xiaofeng; Sun, Hui; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-06-26

    Fundamental understanding of small molecule–silica surface interactions at their interfaces is essential for the scientific, technological, and medical communities. We report direct enthalpy of adsorption (Δhads) measurements for ethanol and water vapor on porous silica glass (CPG-10), in both hydroxylated and dehydroxylated (hydrophobic) forms. Results suggest a spectrum of energetics as a function of coverage, stepwise for ethanol but continuous for water. The zero-coverage enthalpy of adsorption for hydroxylated silica shows the most exothermic enthalpies for both water (-72.7 ± 3.1 kJ/mol water) and ethanol (-78.0 ± 1.9 kJ/mol ethanol). The water adsorption enthalpy becomes less exothermic gradually until reaching its only plateau (-20.7 ± 2.2 kJ/mol water) reflecting water clustering on a largely hydrophobic surface, while the enthalpy of ethanol adsorption profile presents two well separated plateaus, corresponding to strong chemisorption of ethanol on adsorbate-free silica surface (-66.4 ± 4.8 kJ/mol ethanol), and weak physisorption of ethanol on ethanol covered silica (-4.0 ± 1.6 kJ/mol ethanol). On the other hand, dehydroxylation leads to missing water–silica interactions, whereas the number of ethanol binding sites is not impacted. The isotherms and partial molar properties of adsorption suggest that water may only bind strongly onto the silanols (which are a minor species on silica glass), whereas ethanol can interact strongly with both silanols and the hydrophobic areas of the silica surface.

  20. Energy Landscape of Water and Ethanol on Silica Surfaces

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wu, Di; Guo, Xiaofeng; Sun, Hui; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-06-26

    Fundamental understanding of small molecule–silica surface interactions at their interfaces is essential for the scientific, technological, and medical communities. We report direct enthalpy of adsorption (Δhads) measurements for ethanol and water vapor on porous silica glass (CPG-10), in both hydroxylated and dehydroxylated (hydrophobic) forms. Results suggest a spectrum of energetics as a function of coverage, stepwise for ethanol but continuous for water. The zero-coverage enthalpy of adsorption for hydroxylated silica shows the most exothermic enthalpies for both water (-72.7 ± 3.1 kJ/mol water) and ethanol (-78.0 ± 1.9 kJ/mol ethanol). The water adsorption enthalpy becomes less exothermic gradually until reachingmore » its only plateau (-20.7 ± 2.2 kJ/mol water) reflecting water clustering on a largely hydrophobic surface, while the enthalpy of ethanol adsorption profile presents two well separated plateaus, corresponding to strong chemisorption of ethanol on adsorbate-free silica surface (-66.4 ± 4.8 kJ/mol ethanol), and weak physisorption of ethanol on ethanol covered silica (-4.0 ± 1.6 kJ/mol ethanol). On the other hand, dehydroxylation leads to missing water–silica interactions, whereas the number of ethanol binding sites is not impacted. The isotherms and partial molar properties of adsorption suggest that water may only bind strongly onto the silanols (which are a minor species on silica glass), whereas ethanol can interact strongly with both silanols and the hydrophobic areas of the silica surface.« less

  1. A Global Scale 30m Water Surface Detection Optimized and Validated for Landsat 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekel, J. F.; Cottam, A.; Clerici, M.; Belward, A.; Dubois, G.; Bartholome, E.; Gorelick, N.

    2014-12-01

    Life on Earth as we know it is impossible without water. Its importance to biological diversity, human well-being and the very functioning of the Earth-system cannot be overstressed, but we have remarkably little detailed knowledge concerning the spatial and temporal distribution of this vital resource. Earth observing satellites operating with high temporal revisits yet moderate spatial resolution have provided global datasets documenting spatial and temporal changes to water bodies on the Earth's surface. Landsat 8 has a data acquisition strategy such that global coverage of all land surfaces now occurs more frequently than from any preceding Landsat mission and provides 30 m resolution data. Whilst not the last word in temporal sampling this presents a basis for mapping and monitoring changes to global surface water resources at unprecedented levels of spatial detail. In this paper we provide a first 30 m resolution global synthesis of surface water occurrence, we document permanent water surfaces, seasonal water surfaces and always-dry surfaces. These products have been derived by optimizing a methodology previously developed for use with moderate resolution MODIS imagery for use with Landsat 8. The approach is based on a transformation of RGB color space into HSV combined with a sequence of cloud, topographic and temperature masks. Analysis at the global scale used the Google Earth Engine platform applied to all Landsat 8 acquisitions between June 2013 and June 2014. Systematic validation is done and demonstrated our ability to map surface water. Our method can be applied to other Landsat missions offering the potential to document changes in surface water over three decades; our study shows examples illustrating the capacity to map new water surfaces and ephemeral water surfaces in addition to the three previous classes. Thanks to an optimized data acquisition strategy, a full-free and open data policy and the processing capacity of the GEE global land

  2. Surface-Heating Algorithm for Water at Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Y D, Sumith; Maroo, Shalabh C

    2015-09-17

    A novel surface-heating algorithm for water is developed for molecular dynamics simulations. The validated algorithm can simulate the transient behavior of the evaporation of water when heated from a surface, which has been lacking in the literature. In this work, the algorithm is used to study the evaporation of water droplets on a platinum surface at different temperatures. The resulting contact angles of the droplets are compared to existing theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies. The evaporation profile along the droplet's radius and height is deduced along with the temperature gradient within the drop, and the evaporation behavior conforms to the Kelvin-Clapeyron theory. The algorithm captures the realistic differential thermal gradient in water heated at the surface and is promising for studying various heating/cooling problems, such as thin film evaporation, Leidenfrost effect, and so forth. The simplicity of the algorithm allows it to be easily extended to other surfaces and integrated into various molecular simulation software and user codes. PMID:26722754

  3. Estimation of water surface elevations for the Everglades, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaseanu, Monica; Pearlstine, Leonard

    2008-07-01

    The Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN) is an integrated network of real-time water-level monitoring gages and modeling methods that provides scientists and managers with current (2000-present) online water surface and water depth information for the freshwater domain of the Greater Everglades. This integrated system presents data on a 400-m square grid to assist in (1) large-scale field operations; (2) integration of hydrologic and ecologic responses; (3) supporting biological and ecological assessment of the implementation of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP); and (4) assessing trophic-level responses to hydrodynamic changes in the Everglades. This paper investigates the radial basis function multiquadric method of interpolation to obtain a continuous freshwater surface across the entire Everglades using radio-transmitted data from a network of water-level gages managed by the US Geological Survey (USGS), the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD), and the Everglades National Park (ENP). Since the hydrological connection is interrupted by canals and levees across the study area, boundary conditions were simulated by linearly interpolating along those features and integrating the results together with the data from marsh stations to obtain a continuous water surface through multiquadric interpolation. The absolute cross-validation errors greater than 5 cm correlate well with the local outliers and the minimum distance between the closest stations within 2000-m radius, but seem to be independent of vegetation or season.

  4. Surface-water and climatological data, Salt Lake County, Utah, water year 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pyper, G.E.; Christensen, R.C.; Stephens, D.W.; McCormack, H.F.; Conroy, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    This report presents streamflow, water-quality, precipitation, and storm-runoff data collected in Salt Lake County, Utah, during the 1980 water year and certain water-quality data for the 1979 water year which were included for comparative purposes. Surface-water data consist of daily mean values of flow at 33 sites on natural streams, canals, and conduits. Water-quality data consist of chemical, biologic, and sediment analyses at 30 sites. Precipitation data consist of daily and monthly total at nine sites. Storm-runoff data consist of 5 and 15-minute interval discharge data for storms of July 1-2, August 19, and August 25, 1980, for most surface-water sites. (USGS)

  5. BIOMECHANICS. Jumping on water: Surface tension-dominated jumping of water striders and robotic insects.

    PubMed

    Koh, Je-Sung; Yang, Eunjin; Jung, Gwang-Pil; Jung, Sun-Pill; Son, Jae Hak; Lee, Sang-Im; Jablonski, Piotr G; Wood, Robert J; Kim, Ho-Young; Cho, Kyu-Jin

    2015-07-31

    Jumping on water is a unique locomotion mode found in semi-aquatic arthropods, such as water striders. To reproduce this feat in a surface tension-dominant jumping robot, we elucidated the hydrodynamics involved and applied them to develop a bio-inspired impulsive mechanism that maximizes momentum transfer to water. We found that water striders rotate the curved tips of their legs inward at a relatively low descending velocity with a force just below that required to break the water surface (144 millinewtons/meter). We built a 68-milligram at-scale jumping robotic insect and verified that it jumps on water with maximum momentum transfer. The results suggest an understanding of the hydrodynamic phenomena used by semi-aquatic arthropods during water jumping and prescribe a method for reproducing these capabilities in artificial systems. PMID:26228144

  6. Improving SNMR data sensitivity to infiltrating water in the presence of large bodies of surface water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falzone, S.; Keating, K.; Grunewald, E. D.; Walsh, D. O.

    2014-12-01

    Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (SNMR) is a geophysical method used to image water content with depth. Recently SNMR has been used to monitor infiltration events in the vadose zone; however, this application can be complicated by the presence of large signals associated with the ponded surface water. In this study, we develop algorithms to reduce this surface water signal for improved sensitivity to the infiltrated groundwater. Using synthetic models, we examine the accuracy of these algorithms. We then assess our approach using a field dataset collected from a five-week SNMR survey conducted during an infiltration event at the South Aura Valley Storage and Recovery Project (SAVSARP) site in Tucson, AZ. Three different algorithms were developed to remove the surface water from the SNMR data: (1) late time mono-exponential subtraction, in which signal from late in the measurement is used to model surface water signal; (2) model subtraction, in which the Earth's magnetic field subsurface conductive structure, and water layer thickness are used to model the surface water signal; and (3) late time inversion correction, in which model parameters in the relaxation time distributions corresponding to slower relaxation times are zeroed. We used two readily available SNMR inversion codes to verify the three approaches: the GMR Inversion software and the MRS Matlab toolkit. Synthetic models were recovered using both inversion codes by applying the late time mono-exponential subtraction and the model subtraction algorithms, while the late time inversion correction algorithm produced poorly resolved relaxation time distribution models. The corrected dataset from the start of the SAVSARP survey contained features in the relaxation time distribution and water content versus depth models that were consistent with observed features present in other datasets from the survey. We conclude that either the late time mono-exponential subtraction or the model subtraction algorithm are

  7. Effects of atmospheric precipitation additions on phytoplankton photosynthesis in Lake Michigan water samples

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.I.; Tisue, G.T.; Kennedy, C.W.; Seils, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of incremental additions (0.1 to 50% v/v) of atmospheric precipitation on phytoplankton photosynthesis (/sup 14/C uptake) were tested in Lake Michigan water samples. Wet deposition was used in experiments I, III, and IV, and a melted snow core was used in experiment II. Additions of precipitation significantly reduced photosynthesis in the first three experiments, starting at about the 5 to 15% treatment level. No significant difference occurred in experiment IV, but photosynthesis was greater than in the control samples and this precipitation sample appeared to stimulate primary productivity. Soluble reactive phosphate, nitrate, and ammonia levels in the precipitation samples exceeded the lake water averages by factors of 10, 2, and 50, respectively. Silicon levels in precipitation reduced pH very little and no consistent relationship was observed with reduced photosynthesis. Alkalinity was greatly reduced in the treated samples and special precautions were required in ce, Ti, Be, Co, Cu, Mo, Ni, P,f the Pd crystals of about 30 A. Possible mechanisms are discussed for isotope exchange in CO molecules in these catalysts and for the promoting effect of Pd on the activity of CuO.

  8. Effect of PAC addition on immersed ultrafiltration for the treatment of algal-rich water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Tian, Jiayu; Nan, Jun; Gao, ShanShan; Liang, Heng; Wang, Meilian; Li, Guibai

    2011-02-28

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of powdered activated carbon (PAC) addition on the treatment of algal-rich water by immersed ultrafiltration (UF), in terms of permeate quality and membrane fouling. Experiments were performed with a hollow-fiber polyvinyl chloride ultrafiltration membrane at a laboratory scale, 20-25°C and 10 L/(m(2) h) constant permeate flux. UF could achieve an absolute removal of Microcystis aeruginosa cells, but a poor removal of algogenic organic matter (AOM) released into water, contaminants responsible for severe membrane fouling. The addition of 4 g/L PAC to the immersed UF reactor significantly alleviated the development of trans-membrane pressure and enhanced the removal of dissovled organic carbon (by 10.9±1.7%), UV(254) (by 27.1±1.7%), and microcystins (expressed as MC-LR(eq), by 40.8±4.2%). However, PAC had little effect on the rejection of hydrophilic high molecular weight AOM such as carbohydrates and proteins. It was also identified that PAC reduced the concentrations of carbohydrates and proteins in the reactor due to decreased light intensity, as well as the MC-LR(eq) concentration by PAC adsorption. PMID:21216530

  9. Water Surface Ripples Generated by the Turbulent Boundary Layer of a Surface-Piercing Moving Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washuta, N.; Masnadi, N.; Duncan, J. H.

    2014-11-01

    Free surface ripples created by subsurface turbulence along a surface-piercing moving wall are studied experimentally. In this experiment, a meter-wide stainless steel belt travels horizontally in a loop around two rollers with vertically oriented axes, which are separated by 7.5 meters. One of the two 7.5-m-long belt sections between the rollers is in contact with the water in a large open-surface water tank and the water level is adjusted so that the top of the belt pierces the water free surface. The belt is launched from rest with a 3 g acceleration in order to quickly reach a steady state velocity. This belt motion creates a temporally evolving boundary layer analogous to the spatially evolving boundary layer created along the side of a ship hull moving at the belt velocity, with a length equivalent to the length of belt that has passed the measurement region. The water surface ripples generated by the subsurface turbulence are measured in a plane normal to the belt using a cinematic LIF technique. It is found that the overall RMS surface fluctuations increase linearly with belt speed and that the spatial distributions of the fluctuations show a sharp increase near the wall. The support of the Office of Naval Research is gratefully acknowledged.

  10. Direct numerical simulation of a turbulent stably stratified air flow above a wavy water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzhinin, O. A.; Troitskaya, Yu. I.; Zilitinkevich, S. S.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the roughness of the underlaying water surface on turbulence is studied in a stably stratified boundary layer (SSBL). Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is conducted at various Reynolds (Re) and Richardson (Ri) numbers and the wave steepness ka. It is shown that, at constant Re, the stationary turbulent regime is set in at Ri below the threshold value Ri c depending on Re. At Ri > Ri c , in the absence of turbulent fluctuations near the wave water surface, three-dimensional quasiperiodical structures are identified and their threshold of origin depends on the steepness of the surface wave on the water surface. This regime is called a wave pumping regime. The formation of three-dimensional structures is explained by the development of parametric instability of the disturbances induced by the surface water in the air flow. The DNS results are quite consistent with prediction of the theoretical model of the SSBL flow, in which solutions for the disturbances of the fields of velocity and temperature in the wave pumping regime are found to be a solution of a two-dimensional linearized system with the heterogeneous boundary condition, which is caused by the presence of the surface wave. In addition to the turbulent fluctuations, the three-dimensional structures in the wave pumping regime provide for the transfer of impulse and heat, i.e., the increase in the roughness of the water-air boundary caused by the presence of waves intensifies the exchange in the SSBL.

  11. Surface Modified Particles By Multi-Step Michael-Type Addition And Process For The Preparation Thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Ronald Lee; Elliott, Brian John; Luebben, Silvia DeVito; Myers, Andrew William; Smith, Bryan Matthew

    2005-05-03

    A new class of surface modified particles and a multi-step Michael-type addition surface modification process for the preparation of the same is provided. The multi-step Michael-type addition surface modification process involves two or more reactions to compatibilize particles with various host systems and/or to provide the particles with particular chemical reactivities. The initial step comprises the attachment of a small organic compound to the surface of the inorganic particle. The subsequent steps attach additional compounds to the previously attached organic compounds through reactive organic linking groups. Specifically, these reactive groups are activated carbon—carbon pi bonds and carbon and non-carbon nucleophiles that react via Michael or Michael-type additions.

  12. Groundwater - surface water interactions in the Ayeyarwady river delta, Myanmar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyaoka, K.; Haruyama, S.; Kuzuha, Y.; Kay, T.

    2012-12-01

    Groundwater is widely used as a water resource in the Ayeyarwady River delta. But, Groundwater has some chemical problem in part of the area. To use safety groundwater for health, it is important to make clear the actual conditions of physical and chemical characteristics of groundwater in this delta. Besides, Ayeyarwady River delta has remarkable wet and dry season. Surface water - groundwater interaction is also different in each season, and it is concerned that physical and chemical characteristics of groundwater is affected by the flood and high waves through cyclone or monsoon. So, it is necessary to research a good aquifer distribution for sustainable groundwater resource supply. The purposes of this study are evaluate to seasonal change of groundwater - surface water interactions, and to investigate the more safety aquifer to reduce the healthy risk. Water samples are collected at 49 measurement points of river and groundwater, and are analyzed dissolved major ions and oxygen and hydro-stable isotope compositions. There are some groundwater flow systems and these water qualities are different in each depth. These showed that physical and chemical characteristics of groundwater are closely related to climatological, geomorphogical, geological and land use conditions. At the upper Alluvium, groundwater quality changes to lower concentration in wet season, so Ayeyarwady River water is main recharge water at this layer in the wet season. Besides, in the dry season, water quality is high concentration by artificial activities. Shallower groundwater is affected by land surface conditions such as the river water and land use in this layer. At lower Alluvium, Arakan and Pegu mountains are main recharge area of good water quality aquifers. Oxygen18 value showed a little affected by river water infiltration in the wet season, but keep stable good water quality through the both seasons. In the wet season, the same groundwater exists and water quality changes through

  13. Covalent Functionalization of Fluorinated Graphene and Subsequent Application as Water-based Lubricant Additive.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiangyuan; Ma, Limin; Yang, Zhigang; Wang, Jinqing; Wang, Honggang; Yang, Shengrong

    2016-03-23

    Although the fluorinated graphene (FG) possesses numerous excellent properties, it can not be really applied in aqueous environments due to its high hydrophobicity. Therefore, how to achieve hydrophilic FG is a challenge. Here, a method of solvent-free urea melt synthesis is developed to prepare the hydrophilic urea-modified FG (UFG). Some characterizations via transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transfer infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) demonstrate that the urea molecules can covalently functionalize the FG and the hydrophilic UFG can be prepared. According to the tribological tests run on an optimal-SRV-I reciprocation friction tester, it can be found that the antiwear ability of water can be largely improved by adding the appropriate UFG. When the concentration of UFG aqueous dispersion is 1 mg/mL, the sample of UFG-1 has the best antiwear ability with a 64.4% decrease of wear rate compared with that of the pure water (UFG-0), demonstrating the prepared UFG can be used as a novel and effective water-based lubricant additive. PMID:26923174

  14. Diesel engine experiments with oxygen enrichment, water addition and lower-grade fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Sekar, R.R.; Marr, W.W.; Cole, R.L.; Marciniak, T.J. ); Schaus, J.E. )

    1990-01-01

    The concept of oxygen enriched air applied to reciprocating engines is getting renewed attention in the context of the progress made in the enrichment methods and the tougher emissions regulations imposed on diesel and gasoline engines. An experimental project was completed in which a direct injection diesel engine was tested with intake oxygen levels of 21% -- 35%. Since an earlier study indicated that it is necessary to use a cheaper fuel to make the concept economically attractive, a less refined fuel was included in the test series. Since a major objection to the use of oxygen enriched combustion air had been the increase in NO{sub x} emissions, a method must be found to reduce NO{sub x}. Introduction of water into the engine combustion process was included in the tests for this purpose. Fuel emulsification with water was the means used here even though other methods could also be used. The teat data indicated a large increase in engine power density, slight improvement in thermal efficiency, significant reductions in smoke and particulate emissions and NO{sub x} emissions controllable with the addition of water. 15 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Radiolysis Concerns for Water Shielding in Fission Surface Power Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenfeld, Michael P.; Anghaie, Samim

    2008-01-21

    This paper presents an overview of radiolysis concerns with regard to water shields for fission surface power. A review of the radiolysis process is presented and key parameters and trends are identified. From this understanding of the radiolytic decomposition of water, shield pressurization and corrosion are identified as the primary concerns. Existing experimental and modeling data addressing concerns are summarized. It was found that radiolysis of pure water in a closed volume results in minimal, if any net decomposition, and therefore reduces the potential for shield pressurization and corrosion.

  16. Enhanced Water Splitting Efficiency Through Selective Surface State Removal.

    PubMed

    Zandi, Omid; Hamann, Thomas W

    2014-05-01

    Hematite (α-Fe2O3) thin film electrodes prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) were employed to photocatalytically oxidize water under 1 sun illumination. It was shown that annealing at 800 °C substantially improves the water oxidation efficiency of the ultrathin film hematite electrodes. The effect of high temperature treatment is shown to remove one of two surface states identified, which reduces recombination and Fermi level pinning. Further modification with Co-Pi water oxidation catalyst resulted in unprecedented photocurrent onset potential of ∼0.6 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE; slightly positive of the flat band potential). PMID:26270090

  17. Distribution of tritium in precipitation and surface water in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harms, Patrick A.; Visser, Ate; Moran, Jean E.; Esser, Brad K.

    2016-03-01

    The tritium concentration in the surface hydrosphere throughout California was characterized to examine the reasons for spatial variability and to enhance the applicability of tritium in hydrological investigations. Eighteen precipitation samples were analyzed and 148 samples were collected from surface waters across California in the Summer and Fall of 2013, with repeat samples from some locations collected in Winter and Spring of 2014 to examine seasonal variation. The concentration of tritium in present day precipitation varied from 4.0 pCi/L near the California coast to 17.8 pCi/L in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Concentrations in precipitation increase in spring due to the 'Spring Leak' phenomenon. The average coastal concentration (6.3 ± 1.2 pCi/L) in precipitation matches estimated pre-nuclear levels. Surface water samples show a trend of increasing tritium with inland distance. Superimposed on that trend, elevated tritium concentrations are found in the San Francisco Bay area compared to other coastal areas, resulting from municipal water imported from inland mountain sources and local anthropogenic sources. Tritium concentrations in most surface waters decreased between Summer/Fall 2013 and Winter/Spring 2014 likely due to an increased groundwater signal as a result of drought conditions in 2014. A relationship between tritium and electrical conductivity in surface water was found to be indicative of water provenance and anthropogenic influences such as agricultural runoff. Despite low initial concentrations in precipitation, tritium continues to be a valuable tracer in a post nuclear bomb pulse world.

  18. DISTRIBUTION OF ORGANIC WASTEWATER CONTAMINANTS BETWEEN WATER AND SEDIMENT IN SURFACE WATERS OF THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trace concentrations of pharmaceuticals and other organic wastewater contaminants have been determined in the surface waters of Europe and the United States. A preliminary report of substantially higher concentrations of pharmaceuticals in sediment suggests that bottom sediment ...

  19. Microcystins (cyanobacterial toxins) in surface waters of rural Bangladesh: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Welker, Martin; Khan, Saleha; Haque, Md Mahfuzul; Islam, Sirajul; Khan, Nurul Huda; Chorus, Ingrid; Fastner, Jutta

    2005-12-01

    In Bangladesh the exposure of millions of inhabitants to water from (shallow) tube wells contaminated with high geogenic loads of arsenic is a major concern. As an alternative to the costly drilling of deep wells, the return to the use of surface water as a source of drinking water is considered. In addition to the well-known hazards of water borne infectious diseases associated with the use of surface water, recently the potential public health implications of toxic cyanobacteria have been recognized. As a first step towards a risk assessment for cyanotoxins in Bangladesh surface waters, seston samples of 79 ponds were analysed in late summer 2002 for the presence of cyanobacteria and microcystins (MCYST), the most frequently detected cyanobacterial toxins worldwide. Microcystins could be detected in 39 ponds, mostly together with varying abundance of potentially microcystin-producing genera such as Microcystis, Planktothrix and Anabaena. Total microcystin concentrations ranged between <0.1 and > 1,000 microg l(-1), and more than half of the positive samples contained high concentrations of more than 10 microg l(-1). The results clearly show that concentrations of microcystins well above the provisional WHO guideline value of 1 microg l(-1) MCYST-LR can be frequently detected in Bangladesh ponds. Thus, an increasing use of surface water for human consumption introduces a risk of replacing one health hazard by another and therefore needs to be accompanied by cyanotoxin hazard assessments. PMID:16459839

  20. Theoretical Study of Sodium-Water Surface Reaction Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Shin; Kurihara, Akikazu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kenro

    Computational study of the sodium-water reaction at the gas (water) - liquid (sodium) interface has been carried out using the ab initio (first-principle) method. A possible reaction channel has been identified for the stepwise OH bond dissociations of a single water molecule. The energetics including the binding energy of a water molecule on the sodium surface, the activation energies of the bond cleavages, and the reaction energies, have been evaluated, and the rate constants of the first and second OH bond-breakings have been compared. It was found that the estimated rate constant of the former was much larger than the latter. The results are the basis for constructing the chemical reaction model used in a multi-dimensional sodium-water reaction code, SERAPHIM, being developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) toward the safety assessment of the steam generator (SG) in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR).

  1. Bulk and Surface Interactions of Hydrophilic Polyacrylates with Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wan-Lin; Shull, Kenneth R.

    1998-03-01

    The adsorption of water by a series of hydrophilic acrylic coatings has been investigated in controlled humidity environments using a quartz crystal microbalance. The amounts of water adsorption are strongly dependent on the lengths of the polyethylene glycol (PEG) side chains of the acrylic polymers. We have also studied the properties of block copolymers which have a PEG-acrylate block coupled to hydrophobic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) or polystyrene (PS) blocks. The dynamic wetting behavior of water on these polymeric surfaces has been monitored by video microscopy during spreading of water drops on polymer thin films. The swelling and spreading rate data provide a useful characterization of the interactions of these materials with water.

  2. The Apollo lunar surface water vapor event revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, J. W., Jr.; Hills, H. K.

    1991-01-01

    On March 7, 1971, the first sunrise following the Apollo 14 mission, the Suprathermal Ion Detector Experiment (SIDE) deployed at the Apollo 14 site reported an intense flux of ions whose mass per charge was consistent with water vapor. The amount of water is examined, and the various acceleration processes, responsible for accelerating ions into the SIDE, are discussed. It is concluded that during most of the event the observed water vapor ions were accelerated by the negative lunar surface electric potential and, secondly, that this event was probably the result of mission associated water vapor, either from the LM ascent and descent stage rockets or from residual water in the descent stage tanks.

  3. Behavior of Ru surfaces after ozonated water treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Dongwan; Park, Chanhyoung; Jung, Juneui; Yoon, Mihyun; Lee, Dongwook; Kim, Chang Yeol; Lim, Sangwoo

    2011-10-01

    In order for the development of cleaning technology of extreme ultra violet lithography photomask, the behavior of Ru surfaces after treatment with ozonated deionized water (DIO 3) solution was studied using Ru and ruthenium oxide particles and 2 nm-thick Ru capping layers. No significant changes in crystalline structures or chemical states of the Ru surfaces, nor any similarities with the structures or states of ruthenium oxide, were observed after DIO 3 treatment. Oxidation of ruthenium to form RuO 2 or RuO 3 was not observed. Adsorption of H 2O molecules on the Ru layer increased the surface roughness, but the desorption of H 2O molecules recovered it. Local chemisorption of H 2O molecules on the Ru surface may be the reason why rougher Ru surfaces were observed after DIO 3 cleaning.

  4. Heat transfer characteristics for some coolant additives used for water cooled engines

    SciTech Connect

    Abou-Ziyan, H.Z.; Helali, A.H.B.

    1996-12-31

    Engine coolants contain certain additives to prevent engine overheating or coolant freezing in cold environments. Coolants, also, contain corrosion and rust inhibitors, among other additives. As most engines are using engine cooling solutions, it is of interest to evaluate the effect of engine coolants on the boiling heat transfer coefficient. This has its direct impact on radiator size and environment. This paper describes the apparatus and the measurement techniques. Also, it presents the obtained boiling heat transfer results at different parameters. Three types of engine coolants and their mixtures in distilled water are evaluated, under sub-cooled and saturated boiling conditions. A profound effect of the presence of additives in the coolant, on heat transfer, was clear since changes of heat transfer for different coolants were likely to occur. The results showed that up to 180% improvement of boiling heat transfer coefficient is experienced with some types of coolants. However, at certain concentrations other coolants provide deterioration or not enhancement in the boiling heat transfer characteristics. This investigation proved that there are limitations, which are to be taken into consideration, for the composition of engine coolants in different environments. In warm climates, ethylene glycol should be kept at the minimum concentration required for dissolving other components, whereas borax is beneficial to the enhancement of the heat transfer characteristics.

  5. Geochemical characterization of surface water and spring water in SE Kashmir Valley, western Himalaya: Implications to water-rock interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeelani, Gh; Bhat, Nadeem A.; Shivanna, K.; Bhat, M. Y.

    2011-10-01

    Water samples from precipitation, glacier melt, snow melt, glacial lake, streams and karst springs were collected across SE of Kashmir Valley, to understand the hydrogeochemical processes governing the evolution of the water in a natural and non-industrial area of western Himalayas. The time series data on solute chemistry suggest that the hydrochemical processes controlling the chemistry of spring waters is more complex than the surface water. This is attributed to more time available for infiltrating water to interact with the diverse host lithology. Total dissolved solids (TDS), in general, increases with decrease in altitude. However, high TDS of some streams at higher altitudes and low TDS of some springs at lower altitudes indicated contribution of high TDS waters from glacial lakes and low TDS waters from streams, respectively. The results show that some karst springs are recharged by surface water; Achabalnag by the Bringi stream and Andernag and Martandnag by the Liddar stream. Calcite dissolution, dedolomitization and silicate weathering were found to be the main processes controlling the chemistry of the spring waters and calcite dissolution as the dominant process in controlling the chemistry of the surface waters. The spring waters were undersaturated with respect to calcite and dolomite in most of the seasons except in November, which is attributed to the replenishment of the CO2 by recharging waters during most of the seasons.

  6. Radiological monitoring plan for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant: Surface water

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-25

    National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit TN0002968, issued April 28, 1995, requires that the Y-12 Plant Radiological Monitoring Plan for surface water be modified (Part 111-H). These modifications shall consist of expanding the plan to include storm water monitoring and an assessment of alpha, beta, and gamma emitters. In addition, a meeting was held with personnel from the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) on May 4, 1995. In this meeting, TDEC personnel provided guidance to Y-12 Plant personnel in regard to the contents of the modified plan. This report contains a revised plan incorporating the permit requirements and guidance provided by TDEC personnel. In addition, modifications were made to address future requirements of the new regulation for radiation protection of the public and the environment in regards to surface water monitoring.

  7. CONTROLLING STORM WATER RUNOFF WITH TRADABLE CREDITS FOR IMPERVIOUS SURFACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Storm water flow off impervious surface in a watershed can lead to stream degradation, habitat alteration, low base flows and toxic leading. We show that a properly designed tradable runoff credit (TRC) system creates economic incentives for landowners to employ best management p...

  8. Zearalenone occurrence in surface waters in central Illinois, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zearalenone (ZEN) is an estrogenic secondary metabolite produced by certain fungi that commonly infest important cereal crops, such as corn and wheat. The ability of ZEN to move from contaminated crops to surface waters has been demonstrated previously. This article reports the development of a meth...

  9. Shale gas development impacts on surface water quality in Pennsylvania

    PubMed Central

    Olmstead, Sheila M.; Muehlenbachs, Lucija A.; Shih, Jhih-Shyang; Chu, Ziyan; Krupnick, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    Concern has been raised in the scientific literature about the environmental implications of extracting natural gas from deep shale formations, and published studies suggest that shale gas development may affect local groundwater quality. The potential for surface water quality degradation has been discussed in prior work, although no empirical analysis of this issue has been published. The potential for large-scale surface water quality degradation has affected regulatory approaches to shale gas development in some US states, despite the dearth of evidence. This paper conducts a large-scale examination of the extent to which shale gas development activities affect surface water quality. Focusing on the Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania, we estimate the effect of shale gas wells and the release of treated shale gas waste by permitted treatment facilities on observed downstream concentrations of chloride (Cl−) and total suspended solids (TSS), controlling for other factors. Results suggest that (i) the treatment of shale gas waste by treatment plants in a watershed raises downstream Cl− concentrations but not TSS concentrations, and (ii) the presence of shale gas wells in a watershed raises downstream TSS concentrations but not Cl− concentrations. These results can inform future voluntary measures taken by shale gas operators and policy approaches taken by regulators to protect surface water quality as the scale of this economically important activity increases. PMID:23479604

  10. Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

    1981-04-01

    The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters, comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium concentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms.

  11. Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

    1981-04-01

    The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium concentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms.

  12. Biphilic Surfaces for Enhanced Water Collection from Humid Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkoski, Jason; Gerasopoulos, Konstantinos; Luedeman, William

    Surface wettability plays an important role in water recovery, distillation, dehumidification, and heat transfer. The efficiency of each process depends on the rate of droplet nucleation, droplet growth, and mass transfer. Unfortunately, hydrophilic surfaces are good at nucleation but poor at shedding. Hydrophobic surfaces are the reverse. Many plants and animals overcome this tradeoff through biphilic surfaces with patterned wettability. For example, the Stenocara beetle uses hydrophilic patches on a superhydrophobic background to collect fog from air. Cribellate spiders similarly collect fog on their webs through periodic spindle-knot structures. In this study, we investigate the effects of wettability patterns on the rate of water collection from humid air. The steady state rate of water collection per unit area is measured as a function of undercooling, angle of inclination, water contact angle, hydrophilic patch size, patch spacing, area fraction, and patch height relative to the hydrophobic background. We then model each pattern by comparing the potential and kinetic energy of a droplet as it rolls downwards at a fixed angle. The results indicate that the design rules for collecting fog differ from those for condensation from humid air. The authors gratefully acknowledge the Office of Naval Research for financial support through Grant Number N00014-15-1-2107.

  13. Simulating the fate and transport of nanomaterials in surface waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    The unique properties of nanomaterials have resulted in their increased production. However, it is unclear how nanomaterials will move and react once released to the environment One approach for addressing possible exposure of nanomaterials in surface waters is by using numerical...

  14. Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

    1981-04-01

    The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium conentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms.

  15. PARTITION COEFFICIENTS FOR METALS IN SURFACE WATER, SOIL, AND WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents metal partition coefficients for the surface water pathway and for the source model used in the Multimedia, Multi-pathway, Multi-receptor Exposure and Risk Assessment (3MRA) technology under development by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Partition ...

  16. CHARACTERIZING SURFACE WATERS THAT MAY NOT REQUIRE FILTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A relatively clean raw surface water can be determined that is amenable to disinfection as the only controlling treatment process. The essential criteria and associated standards are: ecal coliform, 20 organisms/100 mL; Turbidity, 1.0 NTU; Color, 15 ACU; Chlorine Demand, 2 mg/L. ...

  17. AIRBONE LASER FLUOROSENSING OF SURFACE WATER CHLOROPHYLL 'A'

    EPA Science Inventory

    A prototype airborne laser fluorosensor for monitoring surface water chlorophyll 'a' has been tested over Lake Mead, Nevada. Trends in the remotely sensed data are in close correspondence with ground truth data. It is suggested that system performance can be improved by concurren...

  18. REMOTE MONITORING OF ORGANIC CARBON IN SURFACE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study shows that the intensity of the Raman normalized fluorescence emission induced in surface waters by ultraviolet radiation can be used to provide a unique remote sensing capability for airborne monitoring the concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Trace concen...

  19. Long-term trends in precipitation and surface water chemistry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter shows long-term data and trends in precipitation and surface water chemistry for each site. It contains a brief introduction to the topic, and methods of measurements, selection of variables, and their data source. It consists primarily of a large number of figures showing long-term da...

  20. Surface barrier heights and changes induced by ferrocene group addition on Ge and Si surfaces cleaved in electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinckley, S.; Haneman, D.

    1980-12-01

    Ge and Si single crystals were cleaved inside electrolytes of ferrocene in tetrabutyl ammonium perchlorate and ethanol. and the stable surface barrier heights measured from photocurrent-potential plots. When hydroxymethylferrocene (HMF) was added, the Ge barrier height reduced from 0.19 to 0.14eV, but Si was unchanged at 0.68 eV. The results are interpreted as due to inability of HMF to dislodge ferrocene from the Si surfaces, but ability to replace it on Ge surfaces; the packing density of the molecules is concluded to be lower than for ferrocene.

  1. Diagnosing coupled watershed processes using a fully-coupled groundwater, land-surface, surface water and mesoscale atmospheric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, R. M.; Kollet, S. J.; Chow, F. K.

    2007-12-01

    A variably-saturated groundwater flow model with an integrated overland flow component, a land-surface model and a mesoscale atmospheric model is used to examine the interplay between coupled water and energy processes. These processes are influenced by land-surface topography and subsurface heterogeneity. This parallel, integrated model simulates spatial variations in land-surface forcing driven by three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric and subsurface components. Spatial statistics are used to demonstrate spatial and temporal correlations between surface and lower atmospheric variables and water table depth. These correlations are particularly strong during times when the land surface temperatures trigger shifts in wind behavior, such as during early morning surface heating. Additionally, spectral transforms of subsurface arrival times are computed using a transient Lagrangian transport simulation. Macrodispersion is used to mimic the effects of subsurface heterogeneity for a range of Peclet numbers. The slopes of these transforms indicate fractal scaling of this system over a range of timescales. All of these techniques point to importance of realistically representing coupled processes and the need to understand and diagnose these processes in nature. This work was conducted under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under contract W-7405-Eng-48. This project was funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at LLNL

  2. Roles of surface water areas for water and solute cycle in Hanoi city, Viet Nam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Takeshi; Kuroda, Keisuke; Do Thuan, An; Tran Thi Viet, Nga; Takizawa, Satoshi

    2013-04-01

    Hanoi city, the capital of Viet Nam, has developed beside the Red river. Recent rapid urbanization of this city has reduced a large number of natural water areas such as lakes, ponds and canals not only in the central area but the suburban area. Contrary, the urbanization has increased artificial water areas such as pond for fish cultivation and landscaping. On the other hand, the urbanization has induced the inflow of waste water from households and various kinds of factories to these water areas because of delay of sewerage system development. Inflow of the waste water has induced eutrophication and pollution of these water areas. Also, there is a possibility of groundwater pollution by infiltration of polluted surface water. However, the role of these water areas for water cycle and solute transport is not clarified. Therefore, this study focuses on the interaction between surface water areas and groundwater in Hanoi city to evaluate appropriate land development and groundwater resource management. We are carrying out three approaches: a) understanding of geochemical characteristics of surface water and groundwater, b) monitoring of water levels of pond and groundwater, c) sampling of soil and pond sediment. Correlation between d18O and dD of precipitation (after GNIP), the Red River (after GNIR) and the water samples of this study showed that the groundwater is composed of precipitation, the Red River and surface water that has evaporation process. Contribution of the surface water with evaporation process was widely found in the study area. As for groundwater monitoring, the Holocene aquifers at two sites were in unconfined condition in dry season and the groundwater levels in the aquifer continued to increase through rainy season. The results of isotopic analysis and groundwater level monitoring showed that the surface water areas are one of the major groundwater sources. On the other hand, concentrations of dissolved Arsenic (filtered by 0.45um) in the pore

  3. Surface water-groundwater connectivity in deltaic distributary channel networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, Audrey H.; Edmonds, Douglas A.; Knights, Deon

    2015-12-01

    Delta distributary channel networks increase river water contact with sediments and provide the final opportunity to process nutrients and other solutes before river water discharges to the ocean. In order to understand surface water-groundwater interactions at the scale of the distributary channel network, we created three numerical deltas that ranged in composition from silt to sand using Delft3D, a morphodynamic flow and sediment transport model. We then linked models of mean annual river discharge to steady groundwater flow in MODFLOW. Under mean annual discharge, exchange rates through the numerical deltas are enhanced relative to a single-threaded river. We calculate that exchange rates across a <10 km2 network are equivalent to exchange through ~10-100 km of single-threaded river channel. Exchange rates are greatest in the coarse-grained delta due to its permeability and morphology. Groundwater residence times range from hours to centuries and have fractal tails. Deltas are vanishing due to relative sea level rise. River diversion projects aimed at creating new deltaic land should also aim to restore surface water-groundwater connectivity, which is critical for biogeochemical processing in wetlands. We recommend designing diversions to capture more sand and thus maximize surface water-groundwater connectivity.

  4. An evaluation of free water surface wetlands as tertiary sewage water treatment of micro-pollutants.

    PubMed

    Breitholtz, Magnus; Näslund, Maria; Stråe, Daniel; Borg, Hans; Grabic, Roman; Fick, Jerker

    2012-04-01

    Increased attention is currently directed towards potential negative effects of pharmaceuticals and other micro-pollutants discharged into the aquatic environment via municipal sewage water. A number of additional treatment technologies, such as ozonation, have therefore been suggested as promising tools for improving the removal efficiency of pharmaceuticals in existing Sewage Treatment Plants (STPs). Constructed wetlands are also capable of removing a variety of micro-pollutants, including some pharmaceuticals, and could hence be a resource efficient complement to more advanced treatment technologies. The purpose of the present study was therefore to increase the knowledge base concerning the potential use of constructed wetlands as a treatment step to reduce emissions of organic micro-pollutants from municipal sewage effluents. Under cold winter conditions, incoming and outgoing waters from four Swedish free water surface wetlands, operated as final treatment steps of sewage effluent from municipal STPs, were sampled and analyzed for levels of a set of 92 pharmaceuticals and 22 inorganic components as well as assessed using subchronic ecotoxicity tests with a macro-alga and a crustacean. Sixty-five pharmaceuticals were detected in the range from 1 ng L(-1) to 7.6 μg L(-1) in incoming and outgoing waters from the four investigated wetlands. Although the sampling design used in the present study lacks the robustness of volume proportional to 24h composite samples, the average estimated removal rates ranged from 42% to 52%, which correlates to previous published values. The effects observed in the ecotoxicity tests with the macro-alga (EC(50)s in the range of 7.5-46%) and the crustacean (LOECs in the range of 11.25-90%) could not be assigned to either pharmaceutical residues or metals, but in general showed that these treatment facilities release water with a relatively low toxic potential, comparable to water that has been treated with advanced tertiary

  5. Effect of River Restoration on Ground Water Recharge: Investigation of Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions with Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, A.-M.; Schirmer, M.

    2012-04-01

    Following the EU Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC (1) Switzerland passed the Water Protection Act 814.20 (2), obligating the cantons to restoring their surface water bodies to a near-natural state within the next 100 years. In case of rivers and streams this comprises the provision of extensive areas to allow for meandering, sufficient discharge to prevent drying-out of the river, as might be caused by hydropower production, and adequate water quality, e.g. by limiting waste water discharge. Hereby, the main aim lies in improving the ecological status of the surface water bodies, as well as flood protection and mitigation (2). However, apart from the enhancement of the water quality, river restoration has the potential to increase groundwater recharge due to improved connectivity between the surface water bodies and the underlying aquifers. A new method for the estimation of groundwater recharge in rivers is currently developed at Eawag in Switzerland, and will be employed to investigate if river restoration enhances groundwater recharge. This method comprises the use of distributed temperature sensing (DTS), as well as heatable glass-fibre optics cables. DTS is a fibre-optical method for temperature determination over long distances with high accuracy and precision (3), largely depending on the instrument settings and calibration, as well as the fibre-optics cables employed in the measurements (4). Temperature data will be used to distinguish between ground- and surface water, due to their different temperature signatures (5). By heating the glass-fibre optics cable the additional information on the cooling behaviour of the cable may be used to (i) distinguish between up- and downwelling water and to (ii) estimate the volume of water exchanged locally in the river bed. In order to separate the signal of horizontal flow from vertical flow over the cable, it will be buried 30-40 cm deep in the river bed; a control cable will be installed in 10-20 cm depth right

  6. Water-Mediated Proton Hopping on an Iron Oxide Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Merte, L. R.; Peng, Guowen; Bechstein, Ralf; Rieboldt, Felix; Farberow, Carrie A.; Grabow, Lars C.; Kudernatsch, Wilhelmine; Wendt, Stefen; Laegsgaard, E.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Besenbacher, Fleming

    2012-05-18

    The diffusion of hydrogen atoms across solid oxide surfaces is often assumed to be accelerated by the presence of water molecules. Here we present a high-resolution, high-speed scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) study of the diffusion of H atoms on an FeO thin film. STM movies directly reveal a water-mediated hydrogen diffusion mechanism on the oxide surface at temperatures between 100 and 300 kelvin. Density functional theory calculations and isotope-exchange experiments confirm the STM observations, and a proton-transfer mechanism that proceeds via an H3O+-like transition state is revealed. This mechanism differs from that observed previously for rutile TiO2(110), where water dissociation is a key step in proton diffusion.

  7. Visual tracking system for water surface moving targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lin; Beetz, Michael; Gedikli, Suat

    2007-11-01

    Water surface moving targets tracking is a challenging problem in the field of computer vision. Because moving targets are in a cluttered environment and are occluded randomly by splashed water, it is difficult to accurately extract and track them. In this paper, by analyzing water surface's color and motion statistical characteristics, a two-step segmentation algorithm is proposed to extract these targets. Then a multi-view tracking systme is established to estimate the 3D trajectory of moving targets' center. We employ this system to canoe competition, and to compare our result with the standard 3D trajectories, which can be calculated by using the markers on the canoes. THe experiments show that the root median square error between our trajectories and the standard ones is very low.

  8. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 2002 Water Year

    SciTech Connect

    D.A. Shaull; D. Ortiz; M.R. Alexander; R.P. Romero

    2003-03-03

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 34 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs--two that flow into Canon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon--and peak flow data from 16 stations.

  9. Survey of the Mutagenicity of Surface Water, Sediments, and Drinking Water from the Penobscot Indian Nation.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Survey of the Mutagenicity of Surface Water, Sediments, andDrinking Water from the Penobscot Indian NationSarah H. Warren, Larry D. Claxton,1, Thomas J. Hughes,*, Adam Swank,Janet Diliberto, Valerie Marshall, Daniel H. Kusnierz, Robert Hillger, David M. DeMariniNational Health a...

  10. Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory 2006 Water Year

    SciTech Connect

    R.P. Romero, D. Ortiz, G. Kuyumjian

    2007-08-01

    The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 44 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs--two that flow into Canon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon--and peak flow data for 44 stations.

  11. Field Evaluation Of Arsenic Speciation In Sediments At The Ground Water/Surface Water Interface

    EPA Science Inventory

    The speciation and mineralogy of sediments contaminated with arsenic at the ground water/surface water interface of the Ft. Devens Super Fund Site in Ft. Devens, MA were determined using X-ray absorption fine structure and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy. Speciation and mineralog...

  12. Biological indicators of ground water-surface water interaction: An update

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    This document discusses recent research about the use of biological indicators as a tool to evaluate the interaction of ground water and surface water. Topics covered include: hyporheic zone organism sample collection and study methods, study settings and contaminants, and general effectiveness of this research. An extensive bibliography appears at the end of this document.

  13. Surface Chemistry and Water Dispersability of Carbon Black Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Baker, Frederick S; Burchell, Timothy D

    2006-01-01

    Formulation of water-stable carbon black dispersions is a double-sided task, which requires selection of a proper dispersing agents and matching it with the properties of a specific carbon black. Among other properties that affect water dispersability of carbon blacks (particle size, surface area, and aggregate structure), surface chemistry plays a prime-order role. We have characterized physical and chemical properties of several carbon black materials, and correlated them with the stability of dispersions formed with ionic and non-ionic surfactants. In particular, chemical characterization of surface functional groups on carbon blacks based on potentiometric titration measurements (pKa spectra) provided a comprehensive picture of pH effects on dispersion stability. The results obtained were complemented by information from physical characterization methods, such as XPS and FTIR. The selection of a suitable dispersing agent able to withstand large pH variations will be discussed.

  14. Primary acoustic signal structure during free falling drop collision with a water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashechkin, Yu. D.; Prokhorov, V. E.

    2016-04-01

    Consistent optical and acoustic techniques have been used to study the structure of hydrodynamic disturbances and acoustic signals generated as a free falling drop penetrates water. The relationship between the structures of hydrodynamic and acoustic perturbations arising as a result of a falling drop contacting with the water surface and subsequent immersion into water is traced. The primary acoustic signal is characterized, in addition to stably reproduced features (steep leading edge followed by long decay with local pressure maxima), by irregular high-frequency packets, which are studied for the first time. Reproducible experimental data are used to recognize constant and variable components of the primary acoustic signal.

  15. Potentiometric surface of the Floridan aquifer in the Northwest Florida Water Management District, May 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenau, J.C.; Milner, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    A May 1980 potentiometric surface map of the Northwest Florida Water Management District depicts water levels in wells tapping the Floridan aquifer prior to summer pumpage. Compared to earlier potentiometric maps of the area, there are no significant differences in the 1980 map that are the result of hydrologic conditions. The addition of numerous new monitor wells in Jackson, Calhoun, Gadsden, and Liberty Counties, however, permitted refinement or better delineation of contours and a separation of water-bearing zones of the Floridan aquifer in the latter two counties. (USGS)

  16. Cholesterol enhances surface water diffusion of phospholipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Kausik, Ravinath; Han, Songi; Olijve, Luuk L. C.

    2014-12-14

    Elucidating the physical effect of cholesterol (Chol) on biological membranes is necessary towards rationalizing their structural and functional role in cell membranes. One of the debated questions is the role of hydration water in Chol-embedding lipid membranes, for which only little direct experimental data are available. Here, we study the hydration dynamics in a series of Chol-rich and depleted bilayer systems using an approach termed {sup 1}H Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP) NMR relaxometry that enables the sensitive and selective determination of water diffusion within 5–10 Å of a nitroxide-based spin label, positioned off the surface of the polar headgroups or within the nonpolar core of lipid membranes. The Chol-rich membrane systems were prepared from mixtures of Chol, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine and/or dioctadecyl phosphatidylcholine lipid that are known to form liquid-ordered, raft-like, domains. Our data reveal that the translational diffusion of local water on the surface and within the hydrocarbon volume of the bilayer is significantly altered, but in opposite directions: accelerated on the membrane surface and dramatically slowed in the bilayer interior with increasing Chol content. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) lineshape analysis shows looser packing of lipid headgroups and concurrently tighter packing in the bilayer core with increasing Chol content, with the effects peaking at lipid compositions reported to form lipid rafts. The complementary capability of ODNP and EPR to site-specifically probe the hydration dynamics and lipid ordering in lipid membrane systems extends the current understanding of how Chol may regulate biological processes. One possible role of Chol is the facilitation of interactions between biological constituents and the lipid membrane through the weakening or disruption of strong hydrogen-bond networks of the surface hydration layers that otherwise exert stronger repulsive forces, as reflected in

  17. Cholesterol enhances surface water diffusion of phospholipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Olijve, Luuk L. C.; Kausik, Ravinath; Han, Songi

    2014-12-01

    Elucidating the physical effect of cholesterol (Chol) on biological membranes is necessary towards rationalizing their structural and functional role in cell membranes. One of the debated questions is the role of hydration water in Chol-embedding lipid membranes, for which only little direct experimental data are available. Here, we study the hydration dynamics in a series of Chol-rich and depleted bilayer systems using an approach termed 1H Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP) NMR relaxometry that enables the sensitive and selective determination of water diffusion within 5-10 Å of a nitroxide-based spin label, positioned off the surface of the polar headgroups or within the nonpolar core of lipid membranes. The Chol-rich membrane systems were prepared from mixtures of Chol, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine and/or dioctadecyl phosphatidylcholine lipid that are known to form liquid-ordered, raft-like, domains. Our data reveal that the translational diffusion of local water on the surface and within the hydrocarbon volume of the bilayer is significantly altered, but in opposite directions: accelerated on the membrane surface and dramatically slowed in the bilayer interior with increasing Chol content. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) lineshape analysis shows looser packing of lipid headgroups and concurrently tighter packing in the bilayer core with increasing Chol content, with the effects peaking at lipid compositions reported to form lipid rafts. The complementary capability of ODNP and EPR to site-specifically probe the hydration dynamics and lipid ordering in lipid membrane systems extends the current understanding of how Chol may regulate biological processes. One possible role of Chol is the facilitation of interactions between biological constituents and the lipid membrane through the weakening or disruption of strong hydrogen-bond networks of the surface hydration layers that otherwise exert stronger repulsive forces, as reflected in faster

  18. Evaluation of ATP measurements to detect microbial ingress by wastewater and surface water in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Vang, Óluva K; Corfitzen, Charlotte B; Smith, Christian; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2014-11-01

    Fast and reliable methods are required for monitoring of microbial drinking water quality in order to protect public health. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was investigated as a potential real-time parameter for detecting microbial ingress in drinking water contaminated with wastewater or surface water. To investigate the ability of the ATP assay in detecting different contamination types, the contaminant was diluted with non-chlorinated drinking water. Wastewater, diluted at 10(4) in drinking water, was detected with the ATP assay, as well as 10(2) to 10(3) times diluted surface water. To improve the performance of the ATP assay in detecting microbial ingress in drinking water, different approaches were investigated, i.e. quantifying microbial ATP or applying reagents of different sensitivities to reduce measurement variations; however, none of these approaches contributed significantly in this respect. Compared to traditional microbiological methods, the ATP assay could detect wastewater and surface water in drinking water to a higher degree than total direct counts (TDCs), while both heterotrophic plate counts (HPC 22 °C and HPC 37 °C) and Colilert-18 (Escherichia coli and coliforms) were more sensitive than the ATP measurements, though with much longer response times. Continuous sampling combined with ATP measurements displays definite monitoring potential for microbial drinking water quality, since microbial ingress in drinking water can be detected in real-time with ATP measurements. The ability of the ATP assay to detect microbial ingress is influenced by both the ATP load from the contaminant itself and the ATP concentration in the specific drinking water. Consequently, a low ATP concentration of the specific drinking water facilitates a better detection of a potential contamination of the water supply with the ATP assay. PMID:25086698

  19. Diminished Mercury Emission From Water Surfaces by Duckweed (Lemna minor)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollenberg, J. L.; Peters, S. C.

    2007-12-01

    Aquatic plants of the family Lemnaceae (generally referred to as duckweeds) are a widely distributed type of floating vegetation in freshwater systems. Under suitable conditions, duckweeds form a dense vegetative mat on the water surface, which reduces light penetration into the water column and decreases the amount of exposed water surface. These two factors would be expected to reduce mercury emission by limiting a) direct photoreduction of Hg(II), b) indirect reduction via coupled DOC photooxidation-Hg(II) reduction, and c) gas diffusion across the water-air interface. Conversely, previous studies have demonstrated transpiration of Hg(0) by plants, so it is therefore possible that the floating vegetative mat would enhance emission via transpiration of mercury vapor. The purpose of this experiment was to determine whether duckweed limits mercury flux to the atmosphere by shading and the formation of a physical barrier to diffusion, or whether it enhances emission from aquatic systems via transpiration of Hg(0). Deionized water was amended with mercury to achieve a final concentration of approximately 35 ng/L and allowed to equilibrate prior to the experiment. Experiments were conducted in rectangular polystyrene flux chambers with measured UV-B transmittance greater than 60% (spectral cutoff approximately 290 nm). Light was able to penetrate the flux chamber from the sides as well as the top throughout the experiment, limiting the effect of shading by duckweed on the water surface. Flux chambers contained 8L of water with varying percent duckweed cover, and perforated plastic sheeting was used as an abiotic control. Exposures were conducted outside on days with little to no cloud cover. Real time mercury flux was measured using atomic absorption (Mercury Instruments UT-3000). Total solar and ultraviolet radiation, as well as a suite of meteorological parameters, were also measured. Results indicate that duckweed diminishes mercury emission from the water surface

  20. Hydraulic exchange between a coral reef and surface sea water

    SciTech Connect

    Tribble, G.W.; Sansone, F.J.; Li, Yuan-Hui

    1992-10-01

    Hydraulic exchange between overlying sea water and the internal structure of a patch reef in Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, Hawaii, was studied with an array of wells, 1, 2, and 4 m deep. Two natural chemical tracers, radon, and salinity, were used to calculate the exchange rate between surface sea water and reef interstitial waters. Dissolved radon concentrations are substantially higher in interstitial waters than is surface water. The degree of radon enrichment is quantitatively related to the time elapsed since interstitial water had equilibrated with the atmosphere. Residence time estimates are 1-40 days, with deeper wells having slower exchange. The average residence time for 1-m-deep wells was 2.1 days. A rainstorm-induced dilution of the salinity of Kaneohe Bay provides the second tracer. Samples of surface and reef interstitial waters following this salinity perturbation are used to calculate an average residence time of 2.6 days at a depth of 1 m and 42 days at a depth of 2 m. Three types of physical forces thought to cause exchange between surface and interstitial water are considered by measurement of the forcing functions and reef permeability. Hydraulic conductivities are about 50 m/d, with lower values near the seaward side of the reef. Most exchange seems to be caused by high-frequency, wave-driven oscillatory pumping and by unidirectional hydraulic head gradients (of uncertain origin) that are stable for at least 3-4 days. Wave-driven mixing is probably more important shallower in the reef, whereas head-driven flow may dominate deeper in the reef. Tidal pumping does not seem to contribute to exchange. All methods indicate that exchange in the upper part of Checker Reef is primarily through vertical exchange. The best estimate for the residence time of water at a depth of 1 m is 2 days. Water at depths of 204 m probably has a residence time of weeks to months. 49 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Sea, ice and surface water circulation, Alaskan Continental Shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, F. F. (Principal Investigator); Sharma, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Two cruises were conducted in Cook Inlet to obtain ground truth. Forty-seven stations during 22-23 August and 68 stations during 25-29 September 1972 were occupied and temperature, salinity, percent light transmission, and suspended load of surface waters obtained. Similar data at various depths was also obtained at selected stations. Cook Inlet is an estuary with complex mixing of river discharges and ocean water. The Upper Cook Inlet shows a gradual and systematic decrease in salinity, however, west of Kenai the mixing of waters is complex. The sediments in suspension originating at the head of the inlet generally settle out east of Kenai and Drift River. Sediment load in suspension decreased gradually from 1700 mg/1 near Anchorage to about 50 mg/1 in the Narrows. In the Lower Cook Inlet the suspended load varied between 1-10 mg/1. Surface waters with sediments in suspension and ocean water with relatively lower sediment concentration are clearly discernible in ERTS-1 images obtained during September 18, 1972 pass over Cook Inlet. The movement and mixing of these waters can also be delineated in the images.

  2. Optimizing Nanopore Surface Properties for High-Efficiency Water Desalination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen-Tanugi, David; Grossman, Jeffrey

    2011-03-01

    As water resources worldwide become rapidly scarcer, it is becoming increasingly important to devise new techniques to obtain clean water from seawater. At present, water purification technologies are limited by costly energy requirements relative to the theoretical thermodynamic limit and by insufficient understanding of the physical processes underlying ion filtration and fluid transport at the molecular scale. New advances in computational materials science offer a promising way to deepen our understanding of these physical phenomena. In this presentation, we describe a new approach for high-efficiency water desalination based on surface-engineered porous materials. This approach is especially relevant for promising technologies such as nanofiltration and membrane distillation, which offers promising advantages over traditional desalination technologies using mesoporous membranes that are only permeable to pure water vapor. More accurate molecular modeling of mesoporous and nanoporous materials represents a key step towards efficient large-scale treatment of seawater. Results regarding the effect of pore properties (surface texture, morphology, density, tortuosity) on desired performance characteristics such as ion selectivity, maximal water flux and energy requirements will be presented.

  3. Surface water and groundwater interactions in coastal wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ling; Xin, Pei; Shen, Chengji

    2014-05-01

    Salt marshes are an important wetland system in the upper intertidal zone, interfacing the land and coastal water. Dominated by salt-tolerant plants, these wetlands provide essential eco-environmental services for maintaining coastal biodiversity. They also act as sediment traps and help stabilize the coastline. While they play an active role in moderating greenhouse gas emissions, these wetlands have become increasingly vulnerable to the impact of global climate change. Salt marshes are a complex hydrological system characterized by strong, dynamic interactions between surface water and groundwater, which underpin the wetland's eco-functionality. Bordered with coastal water, the marsh system undergoes cycles of inundation and exposure driven by the tide. This leads to dynamic, complex pore-water flow and solute transport in the marsh soil. Pore-water circulations occur at different spatial and temporal scales with strong link to the marsh topography. These circulations control solute transport between the marsh soil and the tidal creek, and ultimately affect the overall nutrient exchange between the marsh and coastal water. The pore-water flows also dictate the soil aeration conditions, which in turn affect marsh plant growth. This talk presents results and findings from recent numerical and experimental studies, focusing on the pore-water flow behaviour in the marsh soil under the influence of tides and density-gradients.

  4. Surface Water and Ground Water Interactions in an Irrigated Valley in Northern New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, C.; Fernald, A.; Guldan, S.; Tidwell, V.; King, P.; Cevik, Y.; Cusack, C.

    2008-12-01

    Interactions between surface water and ground water can provide many benefits like terrestrial and aquatic species habitat, aquifer recharge, and shallow ground water return flow. In northern New Mexico, the use of traditional irrigation systems has effectively expanded riparian functions to encompass full irrigated valley width. The objective of this study was to characterize the surface water and ground water interactions occurring in an irrigated valley along the Rio Grande in northern New Mexico. We used a combination of field measurements and modeling for determining different components of the water budget. Our results show that on average ditch flow is 0.9 cms, ditch seepage is 10%, irrigated field deep percolation is 30%, and ground water level rise is 0.4 m over the entire valley after the irrigation season started. We calculated that on average, 50% of the water diverted into the main irrigation ditch returns back to the river as surface return flow and about 10% of the total ditch inflow returns as groundwater flow. Results from this study show that a significant amount of water being diverted into the valley returns back to the river after completing its task of supporting important production and ecological functions in this expanded riverine valley.

  5. Surface Tension Studies of Alkyl Esters and Epoxidized Alkyl Esters Relevant to Oleochemically Based Fuel Additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the surface tension of several epoxidized oleochemicals and their comparable fatty esters at temperatures between 25 and 60 deg C. Surface tensions of the olefins measured at 40 deg C range from 25.9 mN m-1, for isobutyl oleate, to 28.4 mN m-1 for methyl linoleate. The epoxy versions of ...

  6. Observation of dynamic water microadsorption on Au surface

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaokang Gupta, Gaurav; Gao, Weixiang; Tran, Van; Nguyen, Bang; McCormick, Eric; Cui, Yongjie; Yang, Yinbao; Hall, Craig; Isom, Harold

    2014-05-15

    Experimental and theoretical research on water wettability, adsorption, and condensation on solid surfaces has been ongoing for many decades because of the availability of new materials, new detection and measurement techniques, novel applications, and different scales of dimensions. Au is a metal of special interest because it is chemically inert, has a high surface energy, is highly conductive, and has a relatively high melting point. It has wide applications in semiconductor integrated circuitry, microelectromechanical systems, microfluidics, biochips, jewelry, coinage, and even dental restoration. Therefore, its surface condition, wettability, wear resistance, lubrication, and friction attract a lot of attention from both scientists and engineers. In this paper, the authors experimentally investigated Au{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth, wettability, roughness, and adsorption utilizing atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, reflectance spectrometry, and contact angle measurement. Samples were made using a GaAs substrate. Utilizing a super-hydrophilic Au surface and the proper surface conditions of the surrounding GaAs, dynamic microadsorption of water on the Au surface was observed in a clean room environment. The Au surface area can be as small as 12 μm{sup 2}. The adsorbed water was collected by the GaAs groove structure and then redistributed around the structure. A model was developed to qualitatively describe the dynamic microadsorption process. The effective adsorption rate was estimated by modeling and experimental data. Devices for moisture collection and a liquid channel can be made by properly arranging the wettabilities or contact angles of different materials. These novel devices will be very useful in microfluid applications or biochips.

  7. Imbalanced land surface water budgets in a numerical weather prediction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffeldt, Anna; Halldin, Sven; Pappenberger, Florian; Wetterhall, Fredrik; Xu, Chong-Yu; Cloke, Hannah L.

    2015-06-01

    There has been a significant increase in the skill and resolution of numerical weather prediction models (NWPs) in recent decades, extending the time scales of useful weather predictions. The land surface models (LSMs) of NWPs are often employed in hydrological applications, which raises the question of how hydrologically representative LSMs really are. In this paper, precipitation (P), evaporation (E), and runoff (R) from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts global models were evaluated against observational products. The forecasts differ substantially from observed data for key hydrological variables. In addition, imbalanced surface water budgets, mostly caused by data assimilation, were found on both global (P-E) and basin scales (P-E-R), with the latter being more important. Modeled surface fluxes should be used with care in hydrological applications, and further improvement in LSMs in terms of process descriptions, resolution, and estimation of uncertainties is needed to accurately describe the land surface water budgets.

  8. UHF RiverSonde observations of water surface velocity at Threemile Slough, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teague, C.C.; Barrick, D.E.; Lilleboe, P.M.; Cheng, R.T.; Ruhl, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    A UHF RiverSonde system, operating near 350 MHz, has been in operation at Threemile Slough in central California, USA since September 2004. The water in the slough is dominated by tidal effects, with flow reversals four times a day and a peak velocity of about 0.8 m/s in each direction. Water level and water velocity are continually measured by the U. S. Geological Survey at the experiment site. The velocity is measured every 15 minutes by an ultrasonic velocity meter (UVM) which determines the water velocity from two-way acoustic propagation time-difference measurements made across the channel. The RiverSonde also measures surface velocity every 15 minutes using radar resonant backscatter techniques. Velocity and water level data are retrieved through a radio data link and a wideband internet connection. Over a period of several months, the radar-derived mean surface velocity has been very highly correlated with the UVM index velocity several meters below the surface, with a coefficient of determination R2 of 0.976 and an RMS difference of less than 10 cm/s. The wind has a small but measurable effect on the velocities measured by both instruments. In addition to the mean surface velocity across the channel, the RiverSonde system provides an estimate of the cross-channel variation of the surface velocity. ?? 2005 IEEE.

  9. Coupled community cohesion and surface water hydrology determinants of groundwater use sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernald, A.

    2013-12-01

    Water table elevations are dropping in irrigated locations of the western U.S. and the world where use exceeds recharge. Along the Rio Grande, community irrigation systems have been developed that are particularly suited to high interannual precipitation variability. These same systems that efficiently and equitable allocate surface irrigation water seem to also generate feedback loops that balance groundwater recharge with use. To identify drivers of groundwater sustainability, we studied the coupled human and natural system components of surface water - groundwater interactions at distinctive sites along the Rio Grande: vibrant community irrigation systems of northern New Mexico; separately controlled surface and groundwater irrigation systems of southern New Mexico; and groundwater irrigation systems that had entirely lost their historic community surface irrigation systems in northern Chihuahua, Mexico. At the northern New Mexico site we found both the hydrology and the community irrigation system generate positive feedback loops for sustainable groundwater and for return flow to the river that benefits downstream users. In southern New Mexico, positive feedbacks of reduced irrigation district surface deliveries lead to more groundwater pumping that in turn causes less efficient surface delivery, additional pumping and stressed groundwater systems. At the sites in Mexico, lack of community cohesion coupled with decades of groundwater pumping has led to negative feedbacks where additional pumping causes drops in groundwater levels that increase pumping costs and reduce the rate of groundwater declines. In ongoing work, we are using socio-cultural and hydrological data to inform a system dynamics model that will identify groundwater sustainability tipping points in terms of community cohesion and the balance between irrigation water use and groundwater recharge in surface water connected systems.

  10. Experimental Study of Water Droplet Vaporization on Nanostructured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Jorge, Jr.

    This dissertation summarizes results of an experimental exploration of heat transfer during vaporization of a water droplet deposited on a nanostructured surface at a temperature approaching and exceeding the Leidenfrost point for the surface and at lower surface temperatures 10-40 degrees C above the saturated temperature of the water droplet at approximately 101 kPa. The results of these experiments were compared to those performed on bare smooth copper and aluminum surfaces in this and other studies. The nanostructured surfaces were composed of a vast array of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals grown by hydrothermal synthesis on a smooth copper substrate having an average surface roughness of approximately 0.06 micrometer. Various nanostructured surface array geometries were produced on the copper substrate by performing the hydrothermal synthesis for 4, 10 and 24 hours. The individual nanostructures were randomly-oriented and, depending on hydrothermal synthesis time, had a mean diameter of about 500-700 nm, a mean length of 1.7-3.3 micrometers,and porosities of approximately 0.04-0.58. Surface</