Science.gov

Sample records for additional theoretical work

  1. M dwarfs: Theoretical work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, Dermott J.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical work on the atmospheres of M dwarfs has progressed along lines parallel to those followed in the study of other classes of stars. Such models have become increasingly sophisticated as improvements in opacities, in the equation of state, and in the treatment of convection were incorporated during the last 15 to 20 years. As a result, spectrophotometric data on M dwarfs can now be fitted rather well by current models. The various attempts at modeling M dwarf photospheres in purely thermal terms are summarized. Some extensions of these models to include the effects of microturbulence and magnetic inhomogeneities are presented.

  2. Theoretical and experimental investigation of additive drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibulkin, Merwin

    1954-01-01

    The significance of additive drag is discussed and equations for determining its approximate value are derived for annular and open-nose inlets. Charts are presented giving values of additive drag coefficient over a range of free-stream Mach numbers for open and for annular-nose inlets with conical flow at the inlet. The effects on additive drag of variable inlet-total-pressure recovery and static pressures on the centerbody are investigated and an analytical method of predicting the variation of pressure on the centerbody with mass-flow ratio is given. Experimental additive-drag values are presented for a series of 20 degree and 25 degree cone half-angle inlets and one open-nose inlet operating at free-stream Mach numbers of 1.8 and 1.6. A comparison with the theoretical values of additive drag shows excellent agreement for the open-nose inlet and moderately good agreement for the annular inlets. (author)

  3. Theoretical determination of cesiated work functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szejn, R. M.

    1972-01-01

    A computer program based on the theoretical work of Gyftopoulos, Steiner, and Levine on bimetallic systems and using a modified version of Wilkins' SIMCON subroutine SURFAS was written for the Univac 1108. This program, WFGSL, accepts the operating conditions and the physical parameters pertinent to the substrate and adsorbate, and outputs the field-free work function, electron current (Richardson equation), ion current (Saha equation), and fractional substrate coverage by the adsorbate. A brief description of the theory is presented together with a program description and listing. An application of the program to a bimetallic system of cesium (adsorbate) and rhenium (substrate) is also described.

  4. Historical and Theoretical Development of Culturally Competent Social Work Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohli, Hermeet K.; Huber, Ruth; Faul, Anna C.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a detailed review of the historical and theoretical context in which culturally competent practice has evolved in the social work profession and enables educators and practitioners to see holistic connections between the past and present. Historical review of the inclusion of diversity content is followed by definitions of…

  5. Theoretical study of addition reactions of carbene, silylene, and germylene to carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Ying-Ying; Su, Ming-Der

    2004-08-01

    A theoretical study of the mechanism of the reaction of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with carbene (H 2C), silylene (H 2Si), and germylene (H 2Ge) has been carried out using a two-layered ONIOM(B3LYP/6-311G ∗:PM3) approach. The main findings are as follows: (1) The computational results based on the method used in this work are in good agreement with recent theoretical findings [Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 41 (2002) 1853]. That is, SWCNTs with H 2C, H 2Si, and H 2Ge addends favor opened structures rather than three-membered rings. (2) The greater the atomic number of the carbene center, the larger the activation energy and the less exothermic (or the more endothermic) the cycloaddition reaction becomes. Therefore, addition to the C dbnd C bond of a SWCNT is more difficult the heavier the carbene center. (3) The theoretical observations suggest that the singlet-triplet splitting of a carbene can be used as a guide to its reactivity during the SWCNT cycloaddition process.

  6. [ORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT AND WORK ENGAGEMENT - THEORETICAL CONCEPTIONS AND TERMINOLOGICAL PROBLEMS].

    PubMed

    Łaguna, Mariola; Mielniczuk, Emilia; Żaliński, Adam; Wałachowska, Karolina

    2015-01-01

    Engagement in professional activities and positive attitudes towards an organization are of significant importance to functioning and health of employees. Studies analysing the phenomena of employees' engagement and their relations with an organization undergo a dynamic development in both international and Polish research. Two theoretical conceptions: organizational commitment (by Meyer and Allen) and work engagement (by Schaufeli and Bakker) have become prominent in the field. They capture 2 similar, albeit distinct constructs. In English-language journals academics concentrate on theoretical and empirical analyses of similarities and differences between the 2 concepts, while in Polish publications scholars also have to deal with the issue of the original term translation. The problem lies mostly in Polish nomenclature of the dimensions proposed in both of these conceptions. Lack of common translations for different studies may cause confusion in this area of research. In the paper authors present a review of Polish translations of terms used in the discussed conceptions and a linguistic analysis of terms, both in English and in Polish. Authors provide solutions which could help to clarify terminology in Polish-language publications concerning organizational commitment and work engagement. This allows for further development of research in this field. PMID:26294317

  7. The guanidine and maleic acid (1:1) complex. The additional theoretical and experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozd, Marek; Dudzic, Damian

    2012-04-01

    On the basis of experimental literature data the theoretical studies for guanidinium and maleic acid complex with using DFT method are performed. In these studies the experimental X-ray data for two different forms of investigated crystal were used. During the geometry optimization process one equilibrium structure was found, only. According to this result the infrared spectrum for one theoretical molecule was calculated. On the basis of potential energy distribution (PED) analysis the clear-cut assignments of observed bands were performed. For the calculated molecule with energy minimum the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) were obtained and graphically illustrated. The energy difference (GAP) between HOMO and LUMO was analyzed. Additionally, the nonlinear properties of this molecule were calculated. The α and β (first and second order) hyperpolarizability values are obtained. On the basis of these results the title crystal was classified as new second order NLO generator.

  8. Working with the Terminally Ill: An Integrated Theoretical Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, John R.

    This introduction and outline correspond to a presentation at the American Counseling Association (ACA) 1999 World Conference. The author recounts his psychotherapeutic work with young gay men diagnosed with AIDS and his increasing awareness of their movement toward psychological health and the development of a deeper spirituality. His quest…

  9. From dodo bird to mindfulness: the effect of theoretical orientation on work and self.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, Nathan T

    2014-08-01

    I discuss my transformation from a confused graduate student with a common factors theoretical orientation to a licensed psychologist focused on humanistic, cognitive, and mindfulness approaches. My theoretical journey was shaped by my work with clients and my own personal development and primarily motivated by a sense of uncertainty that accompanied the lack of a specific theoretical identity. This discussion of trying to find the "right" theoretical approach is set against the well-supported empirical findings that theoretical techniques (i.e., "specific factors") contribute relatively little to clinical outcome, and that no single theoretical approach has distinguished itself as superior to others in the literature. I discuss the effects of my theoretical orientations on my work with colleagues, my relationship with my spouse, and being a parent. PMID:24953554

  10. 46 CFR 78.36-25 - Additional requirements for hybrid work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. 78.36-25... OPERATIONS Work Vests § 78.36-25 Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. (a) In addition to the other... and any limitation(s) marked on them; and (2) Of the same or similar design and have the same...

  11. 46 CFR 35.03-25 - Additional requirements for hybrid work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. 35.03-25 Section 35.03-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Work Vests § 35.03-25 Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. (a) In addition to the other requirements in this subpart, commercial hybrid...

  12. 46 CFR 196.34-25 - Additional requirements for hybrid work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. 196.34-25... VESSELS OPERATIONS Work Vests § 196.34-25 Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. (a) In addition... the same method of operation as each other hybrid PFD carried on board....

  13. 46 CFR 97.34-25 - Additional requirements for hybrid work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. 97.34-25... VESSELS OPERATIONS Work Vests § 97.34-25 Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. (a) In addition to... the same method of operation as each other hybrid PFD carried on board....

  14. A Heated Debate: Theoretical Perspectives of Sexual Exploitation and Sex Work

    PubMed Central

    Gerassi, Lara

    2015-01-01

    The theoretical and often political framework of sexual exploitation and sex work among women is widely and enthusiastically debated among academic and legal scholars alike. The majority of theoretical literature in this area focuses on the macro perspective, while the micro-level perspective as to theory and causation remains sparse. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the philosophical, legal, and political perspectives pertaining to sexual exploitation of women and girls while addressing the subsequent controversies in the field. PMID:26834302

  15. 46 CFR 167.43-25 - Additional requirements for hybrid work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. 167.43-25... PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Work Vests § 167.43-25 Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. (a) In... the same method of operation as each other hybrid PFD carried on board....

  16. Theoretical Constructs in Student Personnel Work: The Nature and Types of Formulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stroup, Herbert

    1979-01-01

    Five types of theoretical constructs are presented as suggestions for theory reconstruction in student personnel work: (1) the community as ultimate source and validity; (2) ontological--the nature of things as justification; (3) mystic--intuitions and visions as basis; (4) anthropologic; and (5) historical. (Article originally published in 1945.)…

  17. 46 CFR 167.43-25 - Additional requirements for hybrid work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Work Vests § 167.43-25 Additional requirements for hybrid work vests. (a) In... maintained in accordance with the procedures set out in the manual required for these devices by §...

  18. Formation pathways of DMSO(2) in the addition channel of the OH-initiated DMS oxidation: A theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Anguita, Juan M; González-Lafont, Angels; Lluch, José M

    2009-07-15

    The production of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and dimethyl sulfone (DMSO(2)) in the dimethyl sulfide (DMS) degradation scheme initiated by the hydroxyl (OH) radical has been shown to be very sensitive to nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) levels. In the present work we have explored the potential energy surfaces corresponding to several reaction pathways which yield DMSO(2) from the CH(3)S(O)(OH)CH(3) adduct [including the formation of CH(3)S(O)(OH)CH(3) from the reaction of DMSO with OH] and the reaction channels that yield DMSO or/and DMSO(2) from the CH(3)S(O(2))(OH)CH(3) adduct are also studied. The formation of the CH(3)S(O(2))(OH)CH(3) adduct from CH(3)S(OH)CH(3) (DMS-OH) and O(2) was analyzed in our previous work. All these pathways due to the presence of NO(x) (NO and NO(2)) and also due to the reactions with O(2), OH and HO(2) are compared with the objective of inferring their kinetic relevance in the laboratory experiments that measure DMSO(2) (and DMSO) formation yields. In particular, our theoretical results clearly show the existence of NO(x)-dependent pathways leading to the formation of DMSO(2), which could explain some of these experimental results in comparison with experimental measurements carried out in NO(x)-free conditions. Our results indicate that the relative importance of the addition channel in the DMS oxidation process can be dependent on the NO(x) content of chamber experiments and of atmospheric conditions. PMID:19072765

  19. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  20. Theoretical foundations guiding culture change: The work of the Partnerships in Dementia Care Alliance

    PubMed Central

    Dupuis, Sherry; McAiney, Carrie A; Ploeg, Jenny; de Witt, Lorna

    2016-01-01

    Longstanding concerns about quality care provision, specifically in the area of long-term care, have prompted calls for changing the culture of care to reflect more client-driven and relationship-centred models. Despite an increase in culture change initiatives in both Canada and the United States, there is insufficient information about the theories and approaches that guide culture change. The purpose of this paper is to describe a culture change initiative currently underway in Canada, the Partnerships in Dementia Care Alliance, and the theoretical foundations informing our work. More specifically, we describe how the theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of the Alzheimer Disease and Related Dementias framework, the authentic partnership approach, participatory action research and Appreciative Inquiry have been integrated to guide a culture change process that encourages working collaboratively, thinking and doing differently and re-imagining new possibilities for changing the culture of dementia care. PMID:24419355

  1. Color and psychological functioning: a review of theoretical and empirical work

    PubMed Central

    Elliot, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade there has been increased interest in research on color and psychological functioning. Important advances have been made in theoretical work and empirical work, but there are also important weaknesses in both areas that must be addressed for the literature to continue to develop apace. In this article, I provide brief theoretical and empirical reviews of research in this area, in each instance beginning with a historical background and recent advancements, and proceeding to an evaluation focused on weaknesses that provide guidelines for future research. I conclude by reiterating that the literature on color and psychological functioning is at a nascent stage of development, and by recommending patience and prudence regarding conclusions about theory, findings, and real-world application. PMID:25883578

  2. Theoretical foundations guiding culture change: The work of the Partnerships in Dementia Care Alliance.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, Sherry; McAiney, Carrie A; Fortune, Darla; Ploeg, Jenny; Witt, Lorna de

    2016-01-01

    Longstanding concerns about quality care provision, specifically in the area of long-term care, have prompted calls for changing the culture of care to reflect more client-driven and relationship-centred models. Despite an increase in culture change initiatives in both Canada and the United States, there is insufficient information about the theories and approaches that guide culture change. The purpose of this paper is to describe a culture change initiative currently underway in Canada, the Partnerships in Dementia Care Alliance, and the theoretical foundations informing our work. More specifically, we describe how the theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of the Alzheimer Disease and Related Dementias framework, the authentic partnership approach, participatory action research and Appreciative Inquiry have been integrated to guide a culture change process that encourages working collaboratively, thinking and doing differently and re-imagining new possibilities for changing the culture of dementia care. PMID:24419355

  3. Generalized Constitutive-Based Theoretical and Empirical Models for Hot Working Behavior of Functionally Graded Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanini, Seyed Ali Sadough; Abolghasemzadeh, Mohammad; Assadi, Abbas

    2013-07-01

    Functionally graded steels with graded ferritic and austenitic regions including bainite and martensite intermediate layers produced by electroslag remelting have attracted much attention in recent years. In this article, an empirical model based on the Zener-Hollomon (Z-H) constitutive equation with generalized material constants is presented to investigate the effects of temperature and strain rate on the hot working behavior of functionally graded steels. Next, a theoretical model, generalized by strain compensation, is developed for the flow stress estimation of functionally graded steels under hot compression based on the phase mixture rule and boundary layer characteristics. The model is used for different strains and grading configurations. Specifically, the results for αβγMγ steels from empirical and theoretical models showed excellent agreement with those of experiments of other references within acceptable error.

  4. A theoretical study of wave dispersion and thermal conduction for HMX/additive interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yao; Chen, Jun

    2014-04-01

    The wave dispersion rule for non-uniform material is useful for ultrasonic inspection and engine life prediction, and also is key in achieving an understanding of the energy dissipation and thermal conduction properties of solid material. On the basis of linear response theory and molecular dynamics, we derive a set of formulas for calculating the wave dispersion rate of interface systems, and study four kinds of interfaces inside plastic bonded explosives: HMX/{HMX, TATB, F2312, F2313}. (HMX: octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine; TATB: 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene; F2312, F2313: fluoropolymers). The wave dispersion rate is obtained over a wide frequency range from kHz to PHz. We find that at low frequency, the rate is proportional to the square of the frequency, and at high frequency, the rate couples with the molecular vibration modes at the interface. By using the results, the thermal conductivities of HMX/additive interfaces are derived, and a physical model is built for describing the total thermal conductivity of mixture explosives, including HMX multi-particle systems and {TATB, F2312, F2313}-coated HMX.

  5. Theoretical and experimental investigation of design for multioptical-axis freeform progressive addition lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, HuaZhong; Chen, JiaBi; Zhu, TianFen; Wei, YeFei; Fu, DongXiang

    2015-11-01

    A freeform progressive addition lens (PAL) provides a good solution to correct presbyopia and prevent juvenile myopia by distributing pupils' optical powers of distance zone, near zone, and intermediate zone and is more widely adopted in the present optometric study. However, there is still a lack of a single-optical-axis system for the design of a PAL. This paper focuses on the research for an approach for designing a freeform PAL. A multioptical-axis system based on real viewing conditions using the eyes is employed for the representation of the freeform surface. We filled small pupils in the intermediate zone as a progressive corridor and the distance- and near-vision portions were defined as the standard spherical surfaces delimited by quadratic curves. Three freeform PALs with a spherical surface as the front side and a freeform surface as the backside were designed. We demonstrate the fabrication and measurement technologies for the PAL surface using computer numerical control machine tools from Schneider Smart and a Visionix VM-2000 Lens Power Mapper. Surface power and astigmatic values were obtained. Preliminary results showed that the approach for the design and fabrication is helpful to advance the design procedure optimization and mass production of PALs in optometry.

  6. Planning additional drilling campaign using two-space genetic algorithm: A game theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumral, Mustafa; Ozer, Umit

    2013-03-01

    Grade and tonnage are the most important technical uncertainties in mining ventures because of the use of estimations/simulations, which are mostly generated from drill data. Open pit mines are planned and designed on the basis of the blocks representing the entire orebody. Each block has different estimation/simulation variance reflecting uncertainty to some extent. The estimation/simulation realizations are submitted to mine production scheduling process. However, the use of a block model with varying estimation/simulation variances will lead to serious risk in the scheduling. In the medium of multiple simulations, the dispersion variances of blocks can be thought to regard technical uncertainties. However, the dispersion variance cannot handle uncertainty associated with varying estimation/simulation variances of blocks. This paper proposes an approach that generates the configuration of the best additional drilling campaign to generate more homogenous estimation/simulation variances of blocks. In other words, the objective is to find the best drilling configuration in such a way as to minimize grade uncertainty under budget constraint. Uncertainty measure of the optimization process in this paper is interpolation variance, which considers data locations and grades. The problem is expressed as a minmax problem, which focuses on finding the best worst-case performance i.e., minimizing interpolation variance of the block generating maximum interpolation variance. Since the optimization model requires computing the interpolation variances of blocks being simulated/estimated in each iteration, the problem cannot be solved by standard optimization tools. This motivates to use two-space genetic algorithm (GA) approach to solve the problem. The technique has two spaces: feasible drill hole configuration with minimization of interpolation variance and drill hole simulations with maximization of interpolation variance. Two-space interacts to find a minmax solution

  7. 48 CFR 1352.271-72 - Additional Item Requirements (AIR)-growth work

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Clauses 1352.271-72 Additional Item Requirements (AIR)—growth work As prescribed in 48 CFR 1371.103... fees represent the Government's best estimate for growth that may be required throughout the contract..., Painting, Boilermaking, Pipe Fitting, Engineering (Production), Sheetmetal Work, Staging/Scaffolding,...

  8. 48 CFR 1352.271-72 - Additional Item Requirements (AIR)-growth work

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Clauses 1352.271-72 Additional Item Requirements (AIR)—growth work As prescribed in 48 CFR 1371.103... fees represent the Government's best estimate for growth that may be required throughout the contract..., Painting, Boilermaking, Pipe Fitting, Engineering (Production), Sheetmetal Work, Staging/Scaffolding,...

  9. 77 FR 4654 - Senior Community Service Employment Program; Final Rule, Additional Indicator on Volunteer Work

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-31

    ... on September 1, 2010. 75 FR 53786. Previously, an interim final rule (IFR) on performance measures... an Additional Indicator for Volunteer Work, on November 23, 2010. 75 FR 71514. The additional... adult civic engagement, cited a report from the Corporation for National and Community...

  10. 48 CFR 1352.271-72 - Additional Item Requirements (AIR)-growth work

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional Item Requirements (AIR)-growth work 1352.271-72 Section 1352.271-72 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 1352.271-72 Additional Item...

  11. 48 CFR 1352.271-72 - Additional Item Requirements (AIR)-growth work

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional Item Requirements (AIR)-growth work 1352.271-72 Section 1352.271-72 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 1352.271-72 Additional Item...

  12. 48 CFR 1852.235-74 - Additional Reports of Work-Research and Development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Provisions and Clauses 1852.235-74 Additional Reports of Work—Research and Development. As prescribed in 1835... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional Reports of Work-Research and Development. 1852.235-74 Section 1852.235-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...

  13. 48 CFR 1852.235-74 - Additional Reports of Work-Research and Development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Provisions and Clauses 1852.235-74 Additional Reports of Work—Research and Development. As prescribed in 1835... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional Reports of Work-Research and Development. 1852.235-74 Section 1852.235-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...

  14. 48 CFR 1852.235-74 - Additional Reports of Work-Research and Development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Provisions and Clauses 1852.235-74 Additional Reports of Work—Research and Development. As prescribed in 1835... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional Reports of Work-Research and Development. 1852.235-74 Section 1852.235-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...

  15. Person-centered work environments, psychological safety, and positive affect in healthcare: a theoretical framework.

    PubMed

    Rathert, Cheryl; May, Douglas R

    2008-01-01

    We propose that in order to systematically improve healthcare quality, healthcare organizations (HCOs) need work environments that are person-centered: environments that support the careprovider as well as the patient. We further argue that HCOs have a moral imperative to provide a workplace where professional care standards can be achieved. We draw upon a large body of research from several disciplines to propose and articulate a theoretical framework that explains how the work environment should be related to the well-being of patients and careproviders, that is, the potential mediating mechanisms. Person-centered work environments include: 1. Climates for patient-centered care. 2. Climates for quality improvement. 3. Benevolent ethical climates. Such a work environment should support the provision of patient-centered care, and should lead to positive psychological states for careproviders, including psychological safety and positive affect. The model contributes to theory by specifying relationships between important organizational variables. The model can potentially contribute to practice by linking specific work environment attributes to outcomes for careproviders and patients. PMID:18839753

  16. How beauty works. Theoretical mechanisms and two empirical applications on students' evaluation of teaching.

    PubMed

    Wolbring, Tobias; Riordan, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    Plenty of studies show that the physical appearance of a person affects a variety of outcomes in everyday life. However, due to an incomplete theoretical explication and empirical problems in disentangling different beauty effects, it is unclear which mechanisms are at work. To clarify how beauty works we present explanations from evolutionary theory and expectation states theory and show where both perspectives differ and where interlinkage appears promising. Using students' evaluations of teaching we find observational and experimental evidence for the different causal pathways of physical attractiveness. First, independent raters strongly agree over the physical attractiveness of a person. Second, attractive instructors receive better student ratings. Third, students attend classes of attractive instructors more frequently - even after controlling for teaching quality. Fourth, we find no evidence that attractiveness effects become stronger if rater and ratee are of the opposite sex. Finally, the beauty premium turns into a penalty if an attractive instructor falls short of students' expectations. PMID:26973043

  17. Work of Adhesion in Al/SiC Composites with Alloying Element Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xin; Fan, Tongxiang; Zhang, Di

    2013-11-01

    In the current work, a general methodology was proposed to demonstrate how to calculate the work of adhesion in a reactive multicomponent alloy/ceramic system. Applying this methodology, the work of adhesion of Al alloy/SiC systems and the influence of different alloying elements were predicted. Based on the thermodynamics of interfacial reaction and calculation models for component activities, the equilibrium compositions of the melts in Al alloy/SiC systems were calculated. Combining the work of adhesion models for reactive metal/ceramic systems, the work of adhesion in Al alloy/SiC systems both before and after the reaction was calculated. The results showed that the addition of most alloying elements, such as Mg, Si, and Mn, could increase the initial work of adhesion, while Fe had a slightly decreasing effect. As for the equilibrium state, the additions of Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Ti, and La could increase the equilibrium work of adhesion, but the additions of Mg and Zn had an opposite effect. Si was emphasized due to its suppressing effect on the interfacial reaction.

  18. Theoretical investigation of the effect of hydrogen addition on the formation and properties of soliton in direct current argon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Saikia, P. Goswami, K. S.; Saikia, B. K.

    2014-03-15

    In this study the effect of hydrogen addition on the formation and properties of soliton in direct-current (DC) argon plasma is theoretically investigated. By coupling fluid equations with Poisons equation for such multi-component plasma, the Mach number and amplitude of the soliton are determined following pseudo potential method. Addition of hydrogen in argon discharge leads to the decrease of electron, Ar{sup +} ion density while a reverse trend was observed for ArH{sup +} and hydrogen like ions. It was found that presence of hydrogen like ions in argon plasma affects the formation of soliton with its amplitude significantly decreases as concentration of hydrogen increases. On the other hand, increase in ion to electron temperature ratios of the lighter ions in the discharge also has a significant influence on the amplitude and formation of soliton. The inverse relation between solitons width and amplitude is found to be consistent for the entire range of study.

  19. Theoretical investigation of the effect of hydrogen addition on the formation and properties of soliton in direct current argon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, P.; Goswami, K. S.; Saikia, B. K.

    2014-03-01

    In this study the effect of hydrogen addition on the formation and properties of soliton in direct-current (DC) argon plasma is theoretically investigated. By coupling fluid equations with Poisons equation for such multi-component plasma, the Mach number and amplitude of the soliton are determined following pseudo potential method. Addition of hydrogen in argon discharge leads to the decrease of electron, Ar+ ion density while a reverse trend was observed for ArH+ and hydrogen like ions. It was found that presence of hydrogen like ions in argon plasma affects the formation of soliton with its amplitude significantly decreases as concentration of hydrogen increases. On the other hand, increase in ion to electron temperature ratios of the lighter ions in the discharge also has a significant influence on the amplitude and formation of soliton. The inverse relation between solitons width and amplitude is found to be consistent for the entire range of study.

  20. Addition-fragmentation reaction of thionoesters compounds in free-radical polymerisation (methyl, cyanomethyl and styryl): a theoretical interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannachi, Douniazed; Ouddai, Nadia; Arotçaréna, Michel; Chermette, Henry

    2015-07-01

    A joint experimental and theoretical study has been carried out on reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerisation (RAFT). We have performed density functional theory calculations at the (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof) PBE/triple zeta plus polarisation level to analyse the RAFT mechanisms corresponding to these compounds. Global and local reactivity indices have been calculated to investigate the effect of the addition of methyl, cyanomethyl and styryl radicals on the double bond C=S of thionoester compounds producing an adduct radical. This mechanism is shown to be difficult when the cyanomethyl is used contrarily to the methyl and styryl radicals, in agreement with experimental results. The activation barrier of fragmentation of adduct radicals does not correlate well with the length of fragmented bond (O-Cα). The bond topological analysis of radical adduct predicts that the distance between the oxygen and a critical point (O-CP) in the fragment bond is a good parameter to estimate the activation energy of the fragmentation mechanism. It is shown that the nature of the free radicals is more selective than that of the thionoester compounds. With an overall large agreement with experiments, these theoretical results afford an explanation of the efficiency for the RAFT mechanism.

  1. 48 CFR 1352.271-72 - Additional Item Requirements (AIR)-growth work

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Clauses 1352.271-72 Additional Item Requirements (AIR)—growth work As prescribed in 48 CFR 1371.103... requested by the Contracting Officer, material quotes shall be provided. (3) Subcontractor estimates, individually broken out and priced along with the actual subcontractor quotes. The requirement to...

  2. Age and work environment characteristics in relation to sleep: Additive, interactive and curvilinear effects.

    PubMed

    Parkes, Katharine R

    2016-05-01

    Although additive combinations of age and work environment characteristics have been found to predict sleep impairment, possible age x work environment interactions have been largely disregarded. The present study examined linear and curvilinear interactions of age with work environment measures in relation to sleep quality and duration. Survey data were collected from offshore day-shift personnel (N = 901). Main effects and interactions of the age terms with work environment measures (job demand, control, and social support, physical environment and strenuous work) were evaluated. Sleep duration was predicted by a curvilinear interaction, age(2)x job demand (p < .005), and by the age x social support interaction (p < .002); sleep quality was predicted by age x job demand (p < .002). Job control and physical environment showed significant additive effects. At a time when older employees are encouraged to remain in the workforce, the findings serve to increase understanding of how ageing and work demands jointly contribute to sleep impairment. PMID:26851463

  3. Lifestyle of the Employees Working in Hamadan Public Sectors: Application of the Trans-Theoretical Model

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Jalal; Eftekhar, Hassan; Mahmoodi, Mahmood; Shojaeizade, Davod; Sadeghi, Roya

    2015-01-01

    Background: A healthy lifestyle is a valuable source to reduce the prevalence of health problems, and promoteehealth. Objectives: The current study aimed to evaluate the lifestyle and obesity status of Hamadan public employees and their status based on the trans-theoretical model (TTM). Patients and Methods: This analytical cross-sectional study was performed in 2014 on 1200 public employees in Hamadan city, Iran selected through proportional stratified random sampling. Data collection was performed using a three-section questionnaire including demographic characteristics, The FANTASTIC lifestyle questionnaire, and the five-part algorithm. Data were analyzed by SPSS-20 using linear regression, Chi-square, Fisher exact test, and ANOVA. Results: The mean age of the employees was 38.12 ± 8.04 years. Most of the employees (61.7%) had favorable lifestyle. About half of the employees were at the preparation stage of TTM. Most of the employees were in a poor condition regarding the physical activity and healthy eating habits. In most of the evaluated items, females got higher scores than males. The associations between lifestyle and age, gender, work experience, income satisfaction, and marital status were significant. Moreover, the associations between obesity and work experience, marital status, number of offspring, and gender were significant (P < 0. 05). Significant predicting variables of obesity were age and work experience; they explained 31.2% variance of obesity (adjusted R2 = 0.312, R2 change = 0.01). Conclusions: Planning health education interventions for employees through effective approaches seems necessary. PMID:25838939

  4. Theoretical investigation of the addition reaction of the aluminum chlorosilylenoid H2SiAlCl3 with ethylene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingxia; Li, Wenzuo; Liu, Zhenbo; Li, Qingzhong; Cheng, Jianbo

    2016-07-01

    The addition reaction of the aluminum chlorosilylenoid H2SiAlCl3 with ethylene was investigated using the M06-2X and QCISD methods for the first time. The calculated results demonstrate that the addition reaction proceeds via two pathways: path I involves just one transition state, while path II involves two transition states. Path I is more feasible dynamically, as it has a lower barrier height than path II. The effect of the solvent CH2Cl2 was taken into consideration using the PCM model. The results indicated that the addition reaction is less likely to occur in CH2Cl2 solvent than in vacuum. This work has therefore highlighted a new pathway for the synthesis of silicon heterocyclic compounds. Graphical Abstract Relative energies (in kJ·mol(-1)) of the stationary points along the potential energy surfaces of the addition reaction of H2SiAlCl3 with C2H4 (values in parentheses were calculated in CH2Cl2 solvent). PMID:27271163

  5. Personality, work characteristics, and employee well-being: a longitudinal analysis of additive and moderating effects.

    PubMed

    Houkes, Inge; Janssen, Peter P M; de Jonge, Jan; Bakker, Arnold B

    2003-01-01

    This study tested the longitudinal influence of personality (measured by the characteristics growth need strength, negative affectivity [NA], and upward striving) on 3 psychological outcomes (intrinsic work motivation, emotional exhaustion, and turnover intention), using a pattern of specific relationships between work characteristics and these outcomes as a framework. The study hypotheses were tested in a multioccupational sample consisting of bank employees and teachers, using a 2-wave panel design with a 1-year time interval and structural equation modeling. NA had a cross-lagged direct and additive relationship with emotional exhaustion and also moderated the relationship between Time 1 workload and Time 2 emotional exhaustion. The authors concluded that NA may have multiple effects on emotional exhaustion that persist over time. PMID:12553527

  6. Considerations about the theoretically expected crushing strength of tablets from binary powder mixtures: double layer tablets versus arithmetic additivity rule.

    PubMed

    Belda, Petra M; Mielck, Jobst B

    2006-11-01

    The theoretically expected breaking strength of tablets from powder mixtures is often calculated by the weighted arithmetic mean from the breaking strength of the single components, which corresponds to a linear interpolation. The validity of this additivity of fracture strength shall be evaluated by the underlying model of parallel couplings. It assumes the components linked in parallel with respect to the direction of loading during diametrical strength testing. Parallel couplings were experimentally realised by the preparation of double layer tablets from crystalline and spray-dried lactose on the one hand and from maltitol and metamizol-sodium on the other. Constant total true volumes of the single substances and of layered powders in varying ratios of true volume were compressed on an eccentric tabletting machine to constant geometric mean punch force. Simulated crushing profiles of parallel couplings were derived from force-displacement profiles measured during diametrical compression of the one-component tablets. At given finely graded deformation levels, the forces exerted by the components during loading were added in the proportion of the true volume fractions of the components in the coupling. The results from the experiments and from the simulations are in good accordance. They demonstrate that a linear change of the crushing strength in dependence on the true volume fraction of the components can only be assumed if the single components deform to the same extent up to the point of fracture. This behaviour was approximately found with the parallel lactose system. In all other cases it must be expected that the crushing strength of parallel systems will be lowered beneath the weighted arithmetic mean values or even below the crushing strength of the single components. The latter was observed with the maltitol-metamizol combinations. Thus, if tablets from binary powder mixtures exhibit a crushing strength depression, this is not necessarily an indication

  7. A theoretical study of the ozonolysis of C60: primary ozonide formation, dissociation, and multiple ozone additions.

    PubMed

    Chapleski, Robert C; Morris, John R; Troya, Diego

    2014-04-01

    We present an investigation of the reaction of ozone with C60 fullerene using electronic structure methods. Motivated by recent experiments of ozone exposure to a C60 film, we have characterized stationary points in the potential energy surface for the reactions of O3 with C60 that include both the formation of primary ozonide and subsequent dissociation reactions of this intermediate that lead to C-C bond cleavage. We have also investigated the addition of multiple O3 molecules to the C60 cage to explore potential reaction pathways under the high ozone flux conditions used in recent experiments. The lowest-energy product of the reaction of a single ozone molecule with C60 that results in C-C bond breakage corresponds to an open-cage C60O3 structure that contains ester and ketone moieties at the seam. This open-cage product is of much lower energy than the C60O + O2 products identified in prior work, and it is consistent with IR experimental spectra. Subsequent reaction of the open-cage C60O3 product with a second ozone molecule opens a low-energy reaction pathway that results in cage degradation via the loss of a CO2 molecule. Our calculations also reveal that, while full ozonation of all bonds between hexagons in C60 is unlikely even under high ozone concentration, the addition of a few ozone molecules to the C60 cage is favorable at room temperature. PMID:24549406

  8. Use of additive technologies for practical working with complex models for foundry technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olkhovik, E.; Butsanets, A. A.; Ageeva, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    The article presents the results of research of additive technology (3D printing) application for developing a geometrically complex model of castings parts. Investment casting is well known and widely used technology for the production of complex parts. The work proposes the use of a 3D printing technology for manufacturing models parts, which are removed by thermal destruction. Traditional methods of equipment production for investment casting involve the use of manual labor which has problems with dimensional accuracy, and CNC technology which is less used. Such scheme is low productive and demands considerable time. We have offered an alternative method which consists in printing the main knots using a 3D printer (PLA and ABS) with a subsequent production of castings models from them. In this article, the main technological methods are considered and their problems are discussed. The dimensional accuracy of models in comparison with investment casting technology is considered as the main aspect.

  9. Quality of Work Life: Theoretical and Methodological Problems, and Presentation of a New Model and Measuring Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martel, Jean-Pierre; Dupuis, Gilles

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Ever since the concept of Quality of Work Life (QWL) was first used over 30 years ago, a range of definitions and theoretical constructs have succeeded each other with the aim of mitigating the many problems facing the concept. A historical overview of the concept of QWL is presented here. Given the lack of consensus concerning the…

  10. Appraising the Qualities of Social Work Students' Theoretical Knowledge: A Qualitative Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Bommel, Marijke; Boshuizen, Henny P. A.; Kwakman, Kitty

    2012-01-01

    Higher professional education aims to prepare students for entering practice with an adequate theoretical body of knowledge. In constructivist programmes, authentic learning contexts and self-directed learning are assumed to support knowledge learning and the transition from education to practice. Through an in-depth exploration, this case study…

  11. Engaging Dialogue in Our Diverse Social Work Student Body: A Multilevel Theoretical Process Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozas, Lisa Werkmeister

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a theoretical process model for students engaging in dialogic learning about issues of race and anti-oppression. The model identifies conditions present in the dialogue process and demonstrates how these conditions, when coordinated with certain interventions and strategies, help to create particular outcomes for…

  12. Theoretical investigation on mechanism of asymmetric Michael addition of malononitrile to chalcones catalyzed by Cinchona alkaloid aluminium(III) complex.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhishan; Lee, Hai Whang; Kim, Chan Kyung

    2011-09-21

    The mechanism of Michael addition of malononitrile to chalcones catalyzed by Cinchona alkaloid aluminium(III) complex has been investigated by DFT and ONIOM methods. Calculations indicate that the reaction proceeds through a dual activation mechanism, in which Al(III) acts as a Lewis acid to activate the electrophile α,β-unsaturated carbonyl substrate while the tertiary amine in the Cinchona alkaloid works as a Lewis base to promote the activation of the malononitrile and deprotonation. A stepwise pathway involving C-C bond formation followed by proton transfer from the catalyst to the carbonyl substrate is adopted, and latter step is predicted to be the rate-determining-step in the reaction with an energy barrier of 12.4 kcal mol(-1). In the absence of the Al(III)-complex, a Cinchona alkaloid activates the carbonyl substrate by a hydrogen bonding of the hydroxyl group, involving a higher energy barrier of 30.4 kcal mol(-1). The steric repulsion between the phenyl group attached to the carbonyl group in the chalcone and isopropoxyl groups of the Al(III)-complex may play an important role in the control of stereoselectivity. The π-π stacking effect between the quinuclidine ring of the quinine and the phenyl group of the chalcones may also help the stabilization of the preferred molecular complex. These results are in agreement with experimental observations. PMID:21796318

  13. Suffering and Meaning in Counseling Service Work: Theoretical Foundations and Therapeutic Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eells, Gregory T.

    2012-01-01

    Working in a counseling service at a college or university often requires counselors to touch the deep foundation of suffering that underlies the human experience. This article will examine the philosophical underpinning of the ways in which our profession helps us respond to human suffering. I will first examine the roots of our daily work found…

  14. Working Memory and Science Education: Exploring the Compatibility of Theoretical Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Clair-Thompson, H. L.; Botton, C.

    2009-01-01

    Research in science education has referred to limitations in information processing resulting from both mental capacity and working memory capacity. Mental capacity is often conceptualised within the framework of the theory of constructive operators. However, the cognitive resources underlying working memory are not well specified within the…

  15. The Treatment of the Working Class in American Educational Historiography: Continuing Theoretical Constructs for Revisionist History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgart, Robert A.; Mihalik, Gregory

    A rationale is presented for a new direction in educational historiography which reevaluates the treatment of the working class as active creators of history. Presently the impact of the working class on the public school history curriculum is not fully assessed or explained in light of other social and economic circumstances in the twentieth…

  16. Theoretical studies of the work functions of Pd-based bimetallic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhao-Bin; Wu, Feng; Wang, Yue-Chao; Jiang, Hong

    2015-06-01

    Work functions of Pd-based bimetallic surfaces, including mainly M/Pd(111), Pd/M, and Pd/M/Pd(111) (M = 4d transition metals, Cu, Au, and Pt), are studied using density functional theory. We find that the work function of these bimetallic surfaces is significantly different from that of parent metals. Careful analysis based on Bader charges and electron density difference indicates that the variation of the work function in bimetallic surfaces can be mainly attributed to two factors: (1) charge transfer between the two different metals as a result of their different intrinsic electronegativity, and (2) the charge redistribution induced by chemical bonding between the top two layers. The first factor can be related to the contact potential, i.e., the work function difference between two metals in direct contact, and the second factor can be well characterized by the change in the charge spilling out into vacuum. We also find that the variation in the work functions of Pd/M/Pd(111) surfaces correlates very well with the variation of the d-band center of the surface Pd atom. The findings in this work can be used to provide general guidelines to design new bimetallic surfaces with desired electronic properties.

  17. Theoretical studies of the work functions of Pd-based bimetallic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Zhao-Bin; Wu, Feng; Wang, Yue-Chao; Jiang, Hong

    2015-06-07

    Work functions of Pd-based bimetallic surfaces, including mainly M/Pd(111), Pd/M, and Pd/M/Pd(111) (M = 4d transition metals, Cu, Au, and Pt), are studied using density functional theory. We find that the work function of these bimetallic surfaces is significantly different from that of parent metals. Careful analysis based on Bader charges and electron density difference indicates that the variation of the work function in bimetallic surfaces can be mainly attributed to two factors: (1) charge transfer between the two different metals as a result of their different intrinsic electronegativity, and (2) the charge redistribution induced by chemical bonding between the top two layers. The first factor can be related to the contact potential, i.e., the work function difference between two metals in direct contact, and the second factor can be well characterized by the change in the charge spilling out into vacuum. We also find that the variation in the work functions of Pd/M/Pd(111) surfaces correlates very well with the variation of the d-band center of the surface Pd atom. The findings in this work can be used to provide general guidelines to design new bimetallic surfaces with desired electronic properties.

  18. Theoretical studies of the work functions of Pd-based bimetallic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhao-Bin; Wu, Feng; Wang, Yue-Chao; Jiang, Hong

    2015-06-01

    Work functions of Pd-based bimetallic surfaces, including mainly M/Pd(111), Pd/M, and Pd/M/Pd(111) (M = 4d transition metals, Cu, Au, and Pt), are studied using density functional theory. We find that the work function of these bimetallic surfaces is significantly different from that of parent metals. Careful analysis based on Bader charges and electron density difference indicates that the variation of the work function in bimetallic surfaces can be mainly attributed to two factors: (1) charge transfer between the two different metals as a result of their different intrinsic electronegativity, and (2) the charge redistribution induced by chemical bonding between the top two layers. The first factor can be related to the contact potential, i.e., the work function difference between two metals in direct contact, and the second factor can be well characterized by the change in the charge spilling out into vacuum. We also find that the variation in the work functions of Pd/M/Pd(111) surfaces correlates very well with the variation of the d-band center of the surface Pd atom. The findings in this work can be used to provide general guidelines to design new bimetallic surfaces with desired electronic properties. PMID:26049515

  19. Work and Inter-subjectivity: a theoretical reflection on its dialectics in the field of health and nursing.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Brígida Gimenez; Peduzzi, Marina; Mandú, Edir Nei Teixeira; Ayres, José Ricardo de Carvalho Mesquita

    2012-01-01

    This theoretical reflection intends to show the inter-subjective relationship that takes place in health and nursing practices under the following theoretical perspectives: Institutional Analysis, Psychodynamics of Labor and the Theory of Communicative Action, with an emphasis on the latter. Linking these concepts to the Marxist approach to work in the field of health emerges from recognizing the need for its continuous reconstruction-in this case, with a view to understand the interaction and communication intrinsic to work in action. The theory of Communicative Action seeks to consider these two inextricable dimensions: work as productive action and as interaction. The first corresponds to instrumental action based on technical rules with a production-guided rationale. The second refers to the interaction that takes place as communicative action and seeks understanding among subjects. We assume that adopting this theoretical perspective in the analysis of health and nursing practices opens new possibilities for clarifying its social and historical process and inter-subjective connections. PMID:22481717

  20. Work while receiving disability insurance benefits: additional findings from the New Beneficiary Followup Survey.

    PubMed

    Schechter, E S

    1997-01-01

    From the foregoing analyses, the following picture emerges about persons who work after award of DI benefits: Almost one-quarter of the sample population attempted to reenter the labor force in the 10-year NBS-NBF period. The higher the level of education, the greater the proportion of persons who worked. Younger beneficiaries were more likely to work than older beneficiaries. About half of the beneficiaries who worked did so on a full-time (40-hour-or-more per week) basis. Most beneficiaries worked because of financial need. The profile of reasons for working did not vary across demographic groups and aspects of the first job held. Most beneficiaries began working without attributing this decision to an improvement in their health. Individuals pursued different methods of job search. No single approach emerged as the most successful. Job search modes did not vary for different groups and different jobs. Four activities were most likely to lead to job offers: persons checking where they had worked before, asking a friend, answering an ad, and following up a vocational rehabilitation lead. These findings were not conclusive because small numbers of persons engaged in these activities. Thirty percent of DI workers returned to their preentitlement employer. The beneficiaries' first postentitlement jobs had less exertion, fewer hours, and lower pay than did their job held prior to award. The likelihood of working was the same across a broad range of disabling health conditions. In terms of work return policy, formal work return programs aimed at young beneficiaries and those with higher levels of educational attainment would produce the greatest number of job placements. It appears that no targeting of programs is necessary along gender lines. The anomalous finding of an absence of the relationship between improvement in health and labor-force reentry requires further investigation. Any followup in this area of inquiry should plan to have the data collected close to

  1. Relating Theory and Practice in Laboratory Work: A Variation Theoretical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckerdal, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Computer programming education has practice-oriented as well as theory-oriented learning goals. Here, lab work plays an important role in students' learning. It is however widely reported that many students face great difficulties in learning theory as well as practice. This paper investigates the important but problematic relation between the…

  2. Theoretical and Empirical Underpinnings of the What Works Clearinghouse Attrition Standard for Randomized Controlled Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deke, John; Chiang, Hanley

    2014-01-01

    Meeting the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) attrition standard (or one of the attrition standards based on the WWC standard) is now an important consideration for researchers conducting studies that could potentially be reviewed by the WWC (or other evidence reviews). Understanding the basis of this standard is valuable for anyone seeking to meet…

  3. A Theoretical Model and New Test of Managerial Legitimacy in Work Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoon, Jeongkoo; Thye, Shane

    2011-01-01

    This study examines endorsement and authorization as two social mechanisms that can induce perceptions of legitimacy for individuals who manage work teams. "Endorsement" is the support of a manager by one's own team members, whereas "authorization" is the support of a team manager stemming from a higher bureaucratic level. Applying these…

  4. Life without Work: Understanding Social Class Changes and Unemployment through Theoretical Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Saba Rasheed; Fall, Kevin; Hoffman, Tina

    2013-01-01

    Unemployment is a stark reality in today's economic climate, and many Americans report a fear of loss or decrease in social status as a result of unexpected unemployment. Despite vocational psychology's emphasis on work as a domain of life, very little exploration on how social class shifts impact workers has been conducted. One way to rectify the…

  5. 48 CFR 1852.235-74 - Additional Reports of Work-Research and Development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-Research and Development. 1852.235-74 Section 1852.235-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL... Provisions and Clauses 1852.235-74 Additional Reports of Work—Research and Development. As prescribed in 1835.070(e), insert a clause substantially the same as the following: Additional Reports of...

  6. 48 CFR 1852.235-74 - Additional Reports of Work-Research and Development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-Research and Development. 1852.235-74 Section 1852.235-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL... Provisions and Clauses 1852.235-74 Additional Reports of Work—Research and Development. As prescribed in 1835.070(e), insert a clause substantially the same as the following: Additional Reports of...

  7. How does curcumin work with poor bioavailability? Clues from experimental and theoretical studies

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Liang; Liu, Cui-Cui; An, Chun-Yan; Ji, Hong-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin is a natural product with multiple biological activities and numerous potential therapeutic applications. However, its poor systemic bioavailability fails to explain the potent pharmacological effects and hinders its clinical application. Using experimental and theoretical approaches, we compared curcumin and its degradation products for its biological activities against Alzheimer’s disease (AD), including the superoxide anion radical (O2.–)-scavenging activity, Aβ fibrils (fAβ) formation-inhibiting activity, and enzymatic inhibition activity. We showed that compared to the parent compound curcumin, the degradation products mixture possessed higher O2.–-scavenging activity and stronger inhibition against fAβ formation. The docking simulations revealed that the bioactive degradation products should make important contribution to the experimentally observed enzymatic inhibition activities of curcumin. Given that curcumin is readily degraded under physiological condition, our findings strongly suggested that the degradation products should make important contribution to the diverse biological activities of curcumin. Our novel findings not only provide novel insights into the complex pharmacology of curcumin due to its poor bioavailability, but also open new avenues for developing therapeutic applications of this natural product. PMID:26887346

  8. Preparations and properties of anti-corrosion additives of water-soluble metal working fluids for aluminum alloy materials.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shoji

    2008-01-01

    This short review describes various types of anti-corrosion additives of water-soluble metal working fluids for aluminum alloy materials. It is concerned with synthetic additives classified according to their functional groups; silicone compounds, carboxylic acids and dibasic acids, esters, Diels-Alder adducts, various polymers, nitrogen compounds, phosphoric esters, phosphonic acids, and others. Testing methods for water-soluble metal working fluids for aluminum alloy materials are described for a practical application in a laboratory. PMID:18075217

  9. Theoretical study of the OH addition to the endocyclic and exocyclic double bonds of the d-limonene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Ramírez, Víctor M.; Nebot-Gil, Ignacio

    2005-06-01

    The initial step of the d-limonene + OH gas-phase reaction mechanism was investigated by means of ab initio calculations. We have considered eight different possibilities for the OH addition, corresponding to the two C-C double bonds, the two C atoms of each double bond, and the syn or anti orientation, with respect to the isopropenyl group (endocyclic attack) or the ring cycle (exocyclic attack). Activation energies calculated at the QCISD(T)/6-31G(d)//UMP2/6-31G(d) level, show that there are preferred orientations for the OH addition under atmospheric conditions of temperature and pressure.

  10. Working tools for theoretical chemistry: Polanyi, eyring, and debates over the "semiempirical method".

    PubMed

    Nye, Mary Jo

    2007-01-15

    Following along with the development of electron theory and quantum mechanics in the 1910s and 1920s, physical chemists began incorporating these new theories and approaches in their studies of activation energies, transition states, and chemical reactions for simple atomic and molecular systems. Among these chemists was Michael Polanyi, one of the founders of modern chemical dynamics, who collaborated with Henry Eyring in the development in the 1930s of a theory of the activated transition state and absolute reaction rates using potential energy surfaces and a semiempirical methodology. This paper examines the circumstances of their collaborative work, its reception, and its implications for further chemical research. PMID:17143868

  11. Laboratory and theoretical work in the service of planetary atmospheric research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coustenis, Athena

    2015-08-01

    A large quantity of observations is obtained by instruments onboard space missions exploring our solar system and by large ground-based telescopes observing the planets and also the exoplanets. Spectroscopy plays a major role in this type of investigation. To analyze and exploit these observations, planetary scientists need spectroscopic data covering wide ranges in wavelength but also in temperature, pressure, distance, etc.The outer regions of our solar system in particular, including the giant gaseous planets Jupiter and Saturn and their satellites, have recently been the target of space missions such as Cassini-Huygens and several investigations from the ground. Titan, the largest moon of Saturn, in particular, offers many similarities with our own planet, among which a dense atmosphere whose major component is dinitrogen at about 95%. Combining with methane (at a few percent) and hydrogen, gives rise to a complex organic chemistry with hydrocarbons and nitriles. Oxygen compounds also exist in Titan’s atmosphere. By studying Titan, we learn about our own planet and our Solar system Solar as a whole [1,2,3]. To properly interpret the Cassini-Huygens data and in anticipation of future missions like ESA’s JUICE to the Jupiter system, spectroscopic data are crucially needed. In the field of exoplanets (over 1000 discovered to date), it also becomes urgent to have adequate data of several molecules in order to analyze the observations returned to us every day by major observatories on Earth and in the space [4,5]. I will discuss recent applications from theoretical and experimental studies on the investigation of Titan and exoplanets, with emphasis on methane. I will also present some needs for future analyses.References: [1] Campargue, A., et al. 2012. Icarus 219, 110-128. [2] Coustenis, A., et al. 2013. Astrophys. J. 799, 177, 9p. [3] Hirtzig, et al., 2013. Icarus 226, 470-486 and corrigendum 1182-1182. [4] Tinetti, G., Encrenaz, Th., Coustenis, A., 2013

  12. Professional Competence Development of the Social Work Specialists in the Period of Study in the System of Additional Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davletkaliev, Denis Kuanyshevich; Zueva, Natalia Konstantinovna; Lebedeva, Natalya Vasilevna; Mkrtumova, Irina Vladimirovna; Timofeeva, Olga

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this work is the study of psychological-pedagogical approaches to the understanding of the idea of professional competence of social work specialists as well as the role of study in the system of additional educations in professional-personal development of the listeners. In the process of study of this problem we define main…

  13. Hypersensitivity to electricity: working definition and additional characterization of the syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hillert, L; Hedman, B K; Söderman, E; Arnetz, B B

    1999-11-01

    Those who believe that electric appliances trigger adverse symptoms have coined the label hypersensitivity to electricity. Scientific research has not been able to identify a direct link between electromagnetic fields and symptoms, and no diagnostic criteria exist. Groups with reported hypersensitivity are very heterogeneous. A need exists for an operational working definition and improved characterization of groups. We report an investigation of symptoms and risk indicators associated with reported hypersensitivity to electricity-based on a survey at a high-technology, multinational telecommunications corporation. Comparisons are also made with patients referred to a university department of occupational and environmental health. No association was found between specific psychosocial work characteristics nor personal traits and hypersensitivity to electricity. We present skin and neurovegetative symptom indices. Results indicate that skin, and not neurovegetative symptoms, characterize the syndrome, at least during the first years of illness. For characterization, we propose a set of dimensions, including triggering factors, behavior, and duration of symptoms. PMID:10624841

  14. Radionuclide release from spent fuel under geologic disposal conditions: An overview of experimental and theoretical work through 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, P.W.; Simonson, S.A.

    1988-04-01

    This report presents an overview of experimental and theoretical work on radionuclide release from spent fuel and uranium dioxide (UO/sub 2/) under geologic disposal conditions. The purpose of the report is to provide a source book of information that can be used to develop models that describe radionuclide release from spent fuel waste packages. Modeling activities of this nature will be conducted within the Waste Package Program (WPP) of the Department of Energy's Salt Repository Project (SRP). The topics discussed include experimental methods for investigating radionuclide release, how results have been reported from radionuclide release experiments, theoretical studies of UO/sub 2/ and actinide solubility, results of experimental studies of radionuclide release from spent fuel and UO/sub 2/ (i.e., the effects of different variables on radionuclide release), characteristics of spent fuel pertinent to radionuclide release, and status of modeling of radionuclide release from spent fuel. Appendix A presents tables of data from spent fuel radionuclide release experiments. These data have been digitized from graphs that appear in the literature. An annotated bibliography of literature on spent fuel characterization is provided in Appendix B.

  15. 41 CFR 102-5.25 - What additional guidance concerning home-to-work transportation should Federal agencies issue?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional guidance concerning home-to-work transportation should Federal agencies issue? 102-5.25 Section 102-5.25 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION GENERAL...

  16. Theoretical characterization of the minimum energy path for hydrogen atom addition to N2 - Implications for the unimolecular lifetime of HN2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Duchovic, Ronald J.; Rohlfing, Celeste Mcmichael

    1989-01-01

    Results are reported from CASSCF externally contracted CI ab initio computations of the minimum-energy path for the addition of H to N2. The theoretical basis and numerical implementation of the computations are outlined, and the results are presented in extensive tables and graphs and characterized in detail. The zero-point-corrected barrier for HN2 dissociation is estimated as 8.5 kcal/mol, and the lifetime of the lowest-lying quasi-bound vibrational state of HN2 is found to be between 88 psec and 5.8 nsec (making experimental observation of this species very difficult).

  17. Novel α- and β-type boron sheets: Theoretical insight into their structures, thermodynamic stability, and work functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bing; Yu, Hai-tao; Lian, Yong-fu; Xie, Ying

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we report the quantum-mechanical characterization of two novel α- and β-type 2D pure boron sheets, i.e., α6- and β14-sheets, constructed from the experimentally available B36 and B35 building blocks. Ten isomeric configurations were located. Using the calculated binding energies, the thermodynamic stability of these structures was considered in detail. Additionally, we calculated the work functions of α6- and β14-sheets. The results clearly demonstrate that their work functions (approximately 4.6 eV) are the highest among all of the reported mixed triangular-hexagonal type 2D boron sheets and are very similar to that of graphene.

  18. Methyl iodide oxidative addition to [Rh(acac)(CO)(PPh3)]: an experimental and theoretical study of the stereochemistry of the products and the reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Conradie, Marrigje M; Conradie, Jeanet

    2011-08-28

    Density functional theory was used to investigate the oxidative addition and subsequent carbonyl insertion and deinsertion steps of the reaction of methyl iodide to a rhodium(I) acetylacetonato complex of the formula [Rh(acac)(CO)(PPh(3))] (Hacac = acetylacetone). This process has been studied experimentally for many rhodium β-diketonato complexes, but, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first systematic computational study of the complete reaction sequence. Experimental (1)H techniques complement the theoretical results on the stereochemistry of the reaction intermediates and products. (1)H NMR also revealed the existence of a second rhodium(III)-acyl product, which has not been previously observed in this reaction. The calculated Gibbs free energy of activation of the oxidative addition reaction is 71 kJ mol(-1), which is in agreement with the experimental value of 82(1) kJ mol(-1). The DFT-calculated oxidative addition corresponds to an associative S(N)2 nucleophilic attack by the rhodium metal centre on the methyl iodide, which is in agreement with calculated and experimental (in brackets) activation parameters of the reaction, 27 (38.8) kJ mol(-1) for ΔH((≠)) and -147 (-146) J K(-1) mol(-1) for ΔS((≠)). PMID:21761056

  19. Collective Commitment and Collective Efficacy: A Theoretical Model for Understanding the Motivational Dynamics of Dilemma Resolution in Inter-Professional Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Jo; Norwich, Brahm

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new theoretical model which conceptualizes inter-professional and multi-agency collaborative working, at the level of the individual within a group. This arises from a review of the literature around joint working, and is based on social psychological theories which refer to shared goals. The model assumes that collective…

  20. The work of the European Union Reference Laboratory for Food Additives (EURL) and its support for the authorisation process of feed additives in the European Union: a review

    PubMed Central

    von Holst, Christoph; Robouch, Piotr; Bellorini, Stefano; de la Huebra, María José González; Ezerskis, Zigmas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This paper describes the operation of the European Union Reference Laboratory for Feed Additives (EURL) and its role in the authorisation procedure of feed additives in the European Union. Feed additives are authorised according to Regulation (EC) No. 1831/2003, which introduced a completely revised authorisation procedure and also established the EURL. The regulations authorising feed additives contain conditions of use such as legal limits of the feed additives, which require the availability of a suitable method of analysis for official control purposes under real world conditions. It is the task of the EURL to evaluate the suitability of analytical methods as proposed by the industry for this purpose. Moreover, the paper shows that one of the major challenges is the huge variety of the methodology applied in feed additive analysis, thus requiring expertise in quite different analytical areas. In order to cope with this challenge, the EURL is supported by a network of national reference laboratories (NRLs) and only the merged knowledge of all NRLs allows for a scientifically sound assessment of the analytical methods. PMID:26540604

  1. Experimental and Theoretical Analysis of Nanotransport in Oligophenylene Dithiol Junctions as a Function of Molecular Length and Contact Work Function.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zuoti; Bâldea, Ioan; Smith, Christopher E; Wu, Yanfei; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2015-08-25

    We report the results of an extensive investigation of metal-molecule-metal tunnel junctions based on oligophenylene dithiols (OPDs) bound to several types of electrodes (M1-S-(C6H4)n-S-M2, with 1 ≤ n ≤ 4 and M1,2 = Ag, Au, Pt) to examine the impact of molecular length (n) and metal work function (Φ) on junction properties. Our investigation includes (1) measurements by scanning Kelvin probe microscopy of electrode work function changes (ΔΦ = ΦSAM - Φ) caused by chemisorption of OPD self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), (2) measurements of junction current-voltage (I-V) characteristics by conducting probe atomic force microscopy in the linear and nonlinear bias ranges, and (3) direct quantitative analysis of the full I-V curves. Further, we employ transition voltage spectroscopy (TVS) to estimate the energetic alignment εh = EF - EHOMO of the dominant molecular orbital (HOMO) relative to the Fermi energy EF of the junction. Where photoelectron spectroscopy data are available, the εh values agree very well with those determined by TVS. Using a single-level model, which we justify via ab initio quantum chemical calculations at post-density functional theory level and additional UV-visible absorption measurements, we are able to quantitatively reproduce the I-V measurements in the whole bias range investigated (∼1.0-1.5 V) and to understand the behavior of εh and Γ (contact coupling strength) extracted from experiment. We find that Fermi level pinning induced by the strong dipole of the metal-S bond causes a significant shift of the HOMO energy of an adsorbed molecule, resulting in εh exhibiting a weak dependence with the work function Φ. Both of these parameters play a key role in determining the tunneling attenuation factor (β) and junction resistance (R). Correlation among Φ, ΔΦ, R, transition voltage (Vt), and εh and accurate simulation provide a remarkably complete picture of tunneling transport in these prototypical molecular junctions. PMID

  2. Experiences of Social Work Students with Learning Theoretical Knowledge in Constructivist Higher Vocational Education: A Qualitative Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Bommel, Marijke; Kwakman, Kitty; Boshuizen, Henny P. A.

    2012-01-01

    An important learning goal in higher vocational education concerns the professional domain's shared body of knowledge. Constructivist programmes use "authentic learning contexts" and "self-directed learning" to create a close connection throughout the learning process between theoretical knowledge and other forms of professional knowledge. Critics…

  3. Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Annette M.

    2003-01-01

    Draws upon Maria Montessori's writings to examine work as a universal human tendency throughout life. Discusses the work of adaptation of the infant, work of "psycho-muscular organism" for the preschooler, work of the imagination for the elementary child, community work of the adolescent, and work of the adult. Asserts that Montessorians' role is…

  4. Can Religious Expression and Sexual Orientation Affirmation Coexist in Social Work? A Critique of Hodge's Theoretical, Theological, and Conceptual Frameworks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessel, Adrienne; Bolen, Rebecca; Shepardson, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Social work strives to be inclusive of all cultural groups and religious identities. However, a tension exists in the profession between freedom of religious expression and full acceptance of lesbian, gay, and bisexual people. David Hodge and others claim social work is oppressive to evangelical Christians. This article critiques primarily Hodge's…

  5. An Approach to Life Skills Group Work with Youth in Transition to Independent Living: Theoretical, Practice, and Operational Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Terrence T.; Williams, Larry D.

    2012-01-01

    Group work is fundamental to working with youth learning about independent living and in making the tough and challenging transition to independence. The authors, seasoned and experienced group workers and researchers with youth leaving the child welfare system, will present a conceptual framework and set of practices for helping youth gain those…

  6. Photoinduced work function changes by isomerization of a densely packed azobenzene-based SAM on Au: a joint experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Crivillers, N; Liscio, A; Di Stasio, F; Van Dyck, C; Osella, S; Cornil, D; Mian, S; Lazzerini, G M; Fenwick, O; Orgiu, E; Reinders, F; Braun, S; Fahlman, M; Mayor, M; Cornil, J; Palermo, V; Cacialli, F; Samorì, P

    2011-08-28

    Responsive monolayers are key building blocks for future applications in organic and molecular electronics in particular because they hold potential for tuning the physico-chemical properties of interfaces, including their energetics. Here we study a photochromic SAM based on a conjugated azobenzene derivative and its influence on the gold work function (Φ(Au)) when chemisorbed on its surface. In particular we show that the Φ(Au) can be modulated with external stimuli by controlling the azobenzene trans/cis isomerization process. This phenomenon is characterized experimentally by four different techniques, kelvin probe, kelvin probe force microscopy, electroabsorption spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. The use of different techniques implies exposing the SAM to different measurement conditions and different preparation methods, which, remarkably, do not alter the observed work function change (Φ(trans)-Φ(cis)). Theoretical calculations provided a complementary insight crucial to attain a deeper knowledge on the origin of the work function photo-modulation. PMID:21695318

  7. Central additive effect of Ginkgo biloba and Rhodiola rosea on psychomotor vigilance task and short-term working memory accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Kuraishy, Hayder M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The present study investigates the effect of combined treatment with Ginkgo biloba and/or Rhodiola rosea on psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) and short-term working memory accuracy. Subjects and Methods: A total number of 112 volunteers were enrolled to study the effect of G. biloba and R. rosea on PVT and short-term working memory accuracy as compared to placebo effects, the central cognitive effect was assessed by critical flicker-fusion frequency, PVT, and computerized N-back test. Results: Placebo produced no significant effects on all neurocognitive tests measure P > 0.05 in normal healthy volunteers, G. biloba or R. rosea improve PVT and low to moderate working memory accuracy, The combined effect of R. rosea and G. biloba leading to more significant effect on PVT, all levels of short-term working memory accuracy and critical fusion versus flicker P < 0.01, more than of G. biloba or R. rosea when they used alone. Conclusion: The combined effect of R. rosea and G. biloba leading to a more significant effect on cognitive function than either G. biloba or R. rosea when they used alone. PMID:27069717

  8. Stimulus modality and working memory performance in Greek children with reading disabilities: additional evidence for the pictorial superiority hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Constantinidou, Fofi; Evripidou, Christiana

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of stimulus presentation modality on working memory performance in children with reading disabilities (RD) and in typically developing children (TDC), all native speakers of Greek. It was hypothesized that the visual presentation of common objects would result in improved learning and recall performance as compared to the auditory presentation of stimuli. Twenty children, ages 10-12, diagnosed with RD were matched to 20 TDC age peers. The experimental tasks implemented a multitrial verbal learning paradigm incorporating three modalities: auditory, visual, and auditory plus visual. Significant group differences were noted on language, verbal and nonverbal memory, and measures of executive abilities. A mixed-model MANOVA indicated that children with RD had a slower learning curve and recalled fewer words than TDC across experimental modalities. Both groups of participants benefited from the visual presentation of objects; however, children with RD showed the greatest gains during this condition. In conclusion, working memory for common verbal items is impaired in children with RD; however, performance can be facilitated, and learning efficiency maximized, when information is presented visually. The results provide further evidence for the pictorial superiority hypothesis and the theory that pictorial presentation of verbal stimuli is adequate for dual coding. PMID:21942734

  9. Efficacy of cognitive rehabilitation therapies for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in older adults: Working toward a theoretical model and evidence-based interventions

    PubMed Central

    Huckans, Marilyn; Hutson, Lee; Twamley, Elizabeth; Jak, Amy; Kaye, Jeffrey; Storzbach, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of cognitive rehabilitation therapies (CRTs) for mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Our review revealed a need for evidence-based treatments for MCI and a lack of a theoretical rehabilitation model to guide the development and evaluation of these interventions. We have thus proposed a theoretical rehabilitation model of MCI that yields key intervention targets - cognitive compromise, functional compromise, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and modifiable risk and protective factors known to be associated with MCI and dementia. Our model additionally defines specific cognitive rehabilitation approaches that may directly or indirectly target key outcomes - restorative cognitive training, compensatory cognitive training, lifestyle interventions, and psychotherapeutic techniques. Methods Fourteen randomized controlled trials met inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Results Studies markedly varied in terms of intervention approaches and selected outcome measures and were frequently hampered by design limitations. The bulk of the evidence suggested that CRTs can change targeted behaviors in individuals with MCI and that CRTs are associated with improvements in objective cognitive performance, but the pattern of effects on specific cognitive domains was inconsistent across studies. Other important outcomes (i.e., daily functioning, quality of life, neuropsychiatric symptom severity) were infrequently assessed across studies. Few studies evaluated long-term outcomes or the impact of CRTs on conversion rates from MCI to dementia or normal cognition. Conclusions Overall, results from trials are promising but inconclusive. Additional well-designed and adequately powered trials are warranted and required before CRTs for MCI can be considered evidence based. PMID:23471631

  10. Efficacy of cognitive rehabilitation therapies for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in older adults: working toward a theoretical model and evidence-based interventions.

    PubMed

    Huckans, Marilyn; Hutson, Lee; Twamley, Elizabeth; Jak, Amy; Kaye, Jeffrey; Storzbach, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of cognitive rehabilitation therapies (CRTs) for mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Our review revealed a need for evidence-based treatments for MCI and a lack of a theoretical rehabilitation model to guide the development and evaluation of these interventions. We have thus proposed a theoretical rehabilitation model of MCI that yields key intervention targets-cognitive compromise, functional compromise, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and modifiable risk and protective factors known to be associated with MCI and dementia. Our model additionally defines specific cognitive rehabilitation approaches that may directly or indirectly target key outcomes-restorative cognitive training, compensatory cognitive training, lifestyle interventions, and psychotherapeutic techniques. Fourteen randomized controlled trials met inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Studies markedly varied in terms of intervention approaches and selected outcome measures and were frequently hampered by design limitations. The bulk of the evidence suggested that CRTs can change targeted behaviors in individuals with MCI and that CRTs are associated with improvements in objective cognitive performance, but the pattern of effects on specific cognitive domains was inconsistent across studies. Other important outcomes (i.e., daily functioning, quality of life, neuropsychiatric symptom severity) were infrequently assessed across studies. Few studies evaluated long-term outcomes or the impact of CRTs on conversion rates from MCI to dementia or normal cognition. Overall, results from trials are promising but inconclusive. Additional well-designed and adequately powered trials are warranted and required before CRTs for MCI can be considered evidence-based. PMID:23471631

  11. The influence of Ag+Mg additions on the nucleation of strengthening precipitates in a non-cold-worked Al-Cu-Li alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Aluminum-copper-lithium alloys generally require cold work to attain their highest strengths in artificially aged tempers. These alloys are usually strengthened by a combination of the metastable delta prime (Al3Li) and theta prime (Al2Cu) phases and the equilibrium T sub 1 (Al2CuLi) phase, and where the T sub 1 phase is a more potent strengthener than the delta prime. Various investigators have shown that the high strengths obtained after artificial aging associated with cold work result from the heterogeneous precipitation of T sub 1 on matrix dislocations. The objective here is to elucidate the mechanism by which the Ag+Mg additions stimulate the precipitation of T sub 1 type precipitates without cold work. To accomplish this, the microstructure of an Al-6.3Cu-1.3Li-0.14Zr model alloy was evaluated in a T6 type temper with and without the Ag+Mg addition.

  12. Tuning of the Electronic Properties of Armchair Graphene Nanoribbons through Functionalization: Theoretical Study of (1)Δg O2 Border Addition.

    PubMed

    Ghigo, Giovanni; Maranzana, Andrea; Tonachini, Glauco

    2015-10-01

    We report the results of a DFT study of the border oxidation by (1) Δg O2 of molecular models of armchair graphene nanoribbons (a-GNRs). The aim of this work is to propose a new method, as an alternative or complementary method to the tuning of the size, to modify the electronic properties of a-GNRs. Here, we investigate modification of the HOMO and LUMO energies, which are some of the most important parameters to be controlled in the design of organic electronic devices. We study the oxidation reaction mechanism of medium-size polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, mimicking the stiffness and reactivity of a-GNRs. Thermodynamics and kinetics indicate that the reaction should bring about a decoration of the borders with vicinal dialdehyde groups. We also study the effect of this oxidation on the HOMO and LUMO energies of two series of molecular models of a-GNRs with increasing lengths. The results suggest that the oxidized a-GNRs should present LUMO energies lowered by 0.3-0.5 eV with respect to the original material, whereas the HOMO energies are barely lowered. PMID:26401974

  13. Theoretical and kinetic study of the reaction of ethyl methyl ketone with HO2 for T = 600-1600 K. Part II: addition reaction channels.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chong-Wen; Mendes, Jorge; Curran, Henry J

    2013-06-01

    The temperature and pressure dependence of the addition reaction of ethyl methyl ketone (EMK) with HO2 radical has been calculated using the master equation method employing conventional transition state theory estimates for the microcanonical rate coefficients in the temperature range of 600-1600 K. Geometries, frequencies, and hindrance potentials were obtained at the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level of theory. A modified G3(MP2,CC) method has been used to calculate accurate electronic energies for all of the species involved in the reactions. The rigid-rotor harmonic oscillator approximation has been used for all of the vibrations except for the torsional degrees of freedom which are being treated as 1D hindered rotors. Asymmetric Eckart barriers were used to model tunneling effect in a one-dimensional reaction coordinate through saddle points. Our calculated results show that the four reaction channels forming 1-buten-2-ol + HO2 radical (R5), 2-buten-2-ol + HO2 radical (R10), acetic acid + ethylene + OH radical (R13), and 2-methyl-2-oxetanol + OH radical (R15) are the dominant channels. When the temperature is below 1000 K, the reaction R15 forming the cyclic ether, 2-methyl-2-oxetanol, is dominant while the reaction R13 forming acetic acid + ethylene + OH radical becomes increasingly dominant at temperatures above 1000 K. The other two channels forming 1-buten-2-ol, 2-buten-2-ol, and HO2 radical are not dominant but are still important product channels over the whole temperature range investigated here. No pressure dependence has been found for the reaction channels forming 2-methyl-2-oxetanol + OH radical and acetic acid + ethylene + OH radical. A slightly negative pressure dependence has been found for the reaction channels producing the two butenols. Rate constants for the four important reaction channels at 1 atm (in cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1)) are k(R5) = 2.67 × 10(15) × T(-1.32)exp(-16637/T), k(R10) = 1.62 × 10(8) × T(0.57)exp(-13142/T), k(R13) = 2.29 × 10(17) × T

  14. A Proposed Theoretical Model Using the Work of Thomas Kuhn, David Ausubel, and Mauritz Johnson as a Basis for Curriculum and Instruction Decisions in Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Barbara Lynn

    This study presents a holistic framework which can be used as a basis for decision-making at various points in the curriculum-instruction development process as described by Johnson in a work published in 1967. The proposed framework has conceptual bases in the work of Thomas S. Kuhn and David P. Ausubel and utilizes the work of several perceptual…

  15. Development of a systems theoretical procedure for evaluation of the work organization of the cockpit crew of a civil transport airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fricke, M.; Vees, C.

    1983-01-01

    To achieve optimum design for the man machine interface with aircraft, a description of the interaction and work organization of the cockpit crew is needed. The development of system procedure to evaluate the work organization of pilots while structuring the work process is examined. Statistical data are needed to simulate sequences of pilot actions on the computer. Investigations of computer simulation and applicability for evaluation of crew concepts are discussed.

  16. [A need to implement new tools for diagnosing tobacco-addition syndrome and readiness/motivation to quit smoking in the working-age population in Poland].

    PubMed

    Broszkiewicz, Marzenna; Drygas, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    High rates of tobacco use is still observed in working-age population in Poland. The present level of the state tobacco control has been achieved through adopting legal regulations and population-based interventions. In Poland a sufficient contribution of health professionals to the diagnosis of the tobacco-addition syndrome (TAS) and the application of the 5A's (ask, advice, assess, assist, arrange follow-up) brief intervention, has not been confirmed by explicit research results. Systemic solutions of the health care system of the professional control, specialist health care, health professional trainings and reference centres have not as yet been elaborated. The tools for diagnosing tobacco dependence and motivation to quit smoking, developed over 30 years ago and recommended by experts to be used in clinical and research practice, have not met the current addiction criteria. In this paper other tools than those previously recommended - tests developed in the first decade of the 21st century (including Cigarette Dependence Scale and Nicotine Dependence Syndrome Scale), reflecting modern concepts of nicotine dependence are presented. In the literature on the readiness/motivation to change health behaviors, a new approach dominates. The motivational interviewing (MI) by Miller and Rollnick concentrates on a smoking person and his or her internal motivation. Motivational interviewing is recommended by the World Health Organization as a 5R's (relevance, risks, rewards, roadblocks, repetition) brief motivational advice, addressed to tobacco users who are unwilling to make a quit attempt. In Poland new research studies on the implementation of new diagnostic tools and updating of binding guidelines should be undertaken, to strengthen primary health care in treating tobacco dependence, and to incorporate MI and 5R's into trainings in TAS diagnosing and treating addressed to health professionals. PMID:27044722

  17. Capture-recapture and multiple-record systems estimation I: History and theoretical development. International Working Group for Disease Monitoring and Forecasting.

    PubMed

    1995-11-15

    This paper reviews the historical background and the theoretical development of models for the analysis of data from capture-recapture or multiple-record systems for estimating the size of closed populations. The models and methods were originally developed for use in fisheries and wildlife biology and were later adapted for use in connection with human populations. Application to epidemiology came much later. The simplest capture-recapture model involves two lists or samples and has four key assumptions: that the population is closed, that individuals can be matched from capture to recapture, that capture in the second sample is independent of capture in the first sample, and that the capture probabilities are homogeneous across all individuals in the population. Log-linear models provide a convenient representation for this basic capture-recapture model and its extensions to K lists. The paper provides an overview for these models and illustrates how they allow for dependency among the lists and heterogeneity in the population. The use of log-linear models for estimation in the presence of both dependence and heterogeneity is illustrated on a four-list example involving ascertainment of diabetes using data gathered in 1988 from residents of Casale Monferrato, Italy. The final section of the paper discusses techniques for model selection in the context of models for estimating the size of populations. PMID:7485050

  18. Feasibility and Satisfaction with a Tailored Web-based Audit Intervention for Recalibrating Radiologists’ Thresholds for Conducting Additional Work-up

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Patricia A.; Geller, Berta M.; Sickles, Edward A.; Miglioretti, Diana L.; Aiello Bowles, Erin J.; Abraham, Linn; Feig, Stephen A.; Brown, David; Cook, Andrea J.; Yankaskas, Bonnie C.; Elmore, Joann G.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To examine the feasibility of and satisfaction with a tailored web-based intervention designed to decrease radiologists' recommendation of inappropriate additional work-up following a screening mammogram. Methods We developed a web-based educational intervention designed to reduce inappropriate recall. Radiologists were randomly assigned to participate in an early intervention group or a late (control) intervention group, the latter of which served as a control for a nine-month follow-up period, after which they were invited to participate in the intervention. Intervention content was derived from our prior research and included three modules: 1) an introduction to audit statistics for mammography performance; 2) a review of data showing radiologists' inflated perceptions of medical malpractice risks related to breast imaging, and 3) a review of data on breast cancer risk among women seen in their practices. Embedded within the intervention were individualized audit data for each participating radiologists obtained from the national Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium. Results Seventy-four radiologists (37.8%; 74/196) consented to the intervention, which was completed by 67.5% (27/40) of those randomized to the early intervention group and 41.2% (14/34) of those randomized to the late (control) group. Thus, a total of 41 (55%) completed the intervention. On average, three log-ins were used to complete the program (range 1–14), which took approximately 1 hour. Ninety-five percent found the program moderately to very helpful in understanding how to calculate basic performance measures. Ninety-three percent found viewing their own performance measures moderately to very helpful, and 83% reported it being moderately to very important to learn that the breast cancer risk in their screening population program was lower than perceived. The percentage of radiologists who reported that the risk of medical malpractice influences their recall rates dropped from 36

  19. Theoretical Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2007-04-01

    The theoretical issues in the interpretation of the precision measurements of the nucleon-to-Delta transition by means of electromagnetic probes are highlighted. The results of these measurements are confronted with the state-of-the-art calculations based on chiral effective-field theories (EFT), lattice QCD, large-Nc relations, perturbative QCD, and QCD-inspired models. The link of the nucleon-to-Delta form factors to generalized parton distributions (GPDs) is also discussed.

  20. Theoretical geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikeš, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Theoretical geology Present day geology is mostly empirical of nature. I claim that geology is by nature complex and that the empirical approach is bound to fail. Let's consider the input to be the set of ambient conditions and the output to be the sedimentary rock record. I claim that the output can only be deduced from the input if the relation from input to output be known. The fundamental question is therefore the following: Can one predict the output from the input or can one predict the behaviour of a sedimentary system? If one can, than the empirical/deductive method has changes, if one can't than that method is bound to fail. The fundamental problem to solve is therefore the following: How to predict the behaviour of a sedimentary system? It is interesting to observe that this question is never asked and many a study is conducted by the empirical/deductive method; it seems that the empirical method has been accepted as being appropriate without question. It is, however, easy to argument that a sedimentary system is by nature complex and that several input parameters vary at the same time and that they can create similar output in the rock record. It follows trivially from these first principles that in such a case the deductive solution cannot be unique. At the same time several geological methods depart precisely from the assumption, that one particular variable is the dictator/driver and that the others are constant, even though the data do not support such an assumption. The method of "sequence stratigraphy" is a typical example of such a dogma. It can be easily argued that all the interpretation resulting from a method that is built on uncertain or wrong assumptions is erroneous. Still, this method has survived for many years, nonwithstanding all the critics it has received. This is just one example of the present day geological world and is not unique. Even the alternative methods criticising sequence stratigraphy actually depart from the same

  1. Theoretical Mathematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöltzner, Michael

    Answering to the double-faced influence of string theory on mathematical practice and rigour, the mathematical physicists Arthur Jaffe and Frank Quinn have contemplated the idea that there exists a `theoretical' mathematics (alongside `theoretical' physics) whose basic structures and results still require independent corroboration by mathematical proof. In this paper, I shall take the Jaffe-Quinn debate mainly as a problem of mathematical ontology and analyse it against the backdrop of two philosophical views that are appreciative towards informal mathematical development and conjectural results: Lakatos's methodology of proofs and refutations and John von Neumann's opportunistic reading of Hilbert's axiomatic method. The comparison of both approaches shows that mitigating Lakatos's falsificationism makes his insights about mathematical quasi-ontology more relevant to 20th century mathematics in which new structures are introduced by axiomatisation and not necessarily motivated by informal ancestors. The final section discusses the consequences of string theorists' claim to finality for the theory's mathematical make-up. I argue that ontological reductionism as advocated by particle physicists and the quest for mathematically deeper axioms do not necessarily lead to identical results.

  2. Review of ASME code criteria for control of primary loads on nuclear piping system branch connections and recommendations for additional development work

    SciTech Connect

    Rodabaugh, E.C.; Gwaltney, R.C.; Moore, S.E.

    1993-11-01

    This report collects and uses available data to reexamine the criteria for controlling primary loads in nuclear piping branch connections as expressed in Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. In particular, the primary load stress indices given in NB-3650 and NB-3683 are reexamined. The report concludes that the present usage of the stress indices in the criteria equations should be continued. However, the complex treatment of combined branch and run moments is not supported by available information. Therefore, it is recommended that this combined loading evaluation procedure be replaced for primary loads by the separate leg evaluation procedure specified in NC/ND-3653.3(c) and NC/ND-3653.3(d). No recommendation is made for fatigue or secondary load evaluations for Class 1 piping. Further work should be done on the development of better criteria for treatment of combined branch and run moment effects.

  3. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    Food additives are substances that become part of a food product when they are added during the processing or making of that food. "Direct" food additives are often added during processing to: Add nutrients ...

  4. Solving the Big Data (BD) Problem in Advanced Manufacturing (Subcategory for work done at Georgia Tech. Study Process and Design Factors for Additive Manufacturing Improvement)

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Brett W.; Diaz, Kimberly A.; Ochiobi, Chinaza Darlene; Paynabar, Kamran

    2015-09-01

    3D printing originally known as additive manufacturing is a process of making 3 dimensional solid objects from a CAD file. This ground breaking technology is widely used for industrial and biomedical purposes such as building objects, tools, body parts and cosmetics. An important benefit of 3D printing is the cost reduction and manufacturing flexibility; complex parts are built at the fraction of the price. However, layer by layer printing of complex shapes adds error due to the surface roughness. Any such error results in poor quality products with inaccurate dimensions. The main purpose of this research is to measure the amount of printing errors for parts with different geometric shapes and to analyze them for finding optimal printing settings to minimize the error. We use a Design of Experiments framework, and focus on studying parts with cone and ellipsoid shapes. We found that the orientation and the shape of geometric shapes have significant effect on the printing error. From our analysis, we also determined the optimal orientation that gives the least printing error.

  5. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  6. Theoretical Astrophysics at Fermilab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Theoretical Astrophysics Group works on a broad range of topics ranging from string theory to data analysis in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The group is motivated by the belief that a deep understanding of fundamental physics is necessary to explain a wide variety of phenomena in the universe. During the three years 2001-2003 of our previous NASA grant, over 120 papers were written; ten of our postdocs went on to faculty positions; and we hosted or organized many workshops and conferences. Kolb and collaborators focused on the early universe, in particular and models and ramifications of the theory of inflation. They also studied models with extra dimensions, new types of dark matter, and the second order effects of super-horizon perturbations. S tebbins, Frieman, Hui, and Dodelson worked on phenomenological cosmology, extracting cosmological constraints from surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. They also worked on theoretical topics such as weak lensing, reionization, and dark energy. This work has proved important to a number of experimental groups [including those at Fermilab] planning future observations. In general, the work of the Theoretical Astrophysics Group has served as a catalyst for experimental projects at Fennilab. An example of this is the Joint Dark Energy Mission. Fennilab is now a member of SNAP, and much of the work done here is by people formerly working on the accelerator. We have created an environment where many of these people made transition from physics to astronomy. We also worked on many other topics related to NASA s focus: cosmic rays, dark matter, the Sunyaev-Zel dovich effect, the galaxy distribution in the universe, and the Lyman alpha forest. The group organized and hosted a number of conferences and workshop over the years covered by the grant. Among them were:

  7. Theoretical geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Andrzej; Kosek, Wiesław

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents a summary of research activities concerning theoretical geodesy performed in Poland in the period of 2011-2014. It contains the results of research on new methods of the parameter estimation, a study on robustness properties of the M-estimation, control network and deformation analysis, and geodetic time series analysis. The main achievements in the geodetic parameter estimation involve a new model of the M-estimation with probabilistic models of geodetic observations, a new Shift-Msplit estimation, which allows to estimate a vector of parameter differences and the Shift-Msplit(+) that is a generalisation of Shift-Msplit estimation if the design matrix A of a functional model has not a full column rank. The new algorithms of the coordinates conversion between the Cartesian and geodetic coordinates, both on the rotational and triaxial ellipsoid can be mentioned as a highlights of the research of the last four years. New parameter estimation models developed have been adopted and successfully applied to the control network and deformation analysis. New algorithms based on the wavelet, Fourier and Hilbert transforms were applied to find time-frequency characteristics of geodetic and geophysical time series as well as time-frequency relations between them. Statistical properties of these time series are also presented using different statistical tests as well as 2nd, 3rd and 4th moments about the mean. The new forecasts methods are presented which enable prediction of the considered time series in different frequency bands.

  8. Theoretical effect of modifications to the upper surface of two NACA airfoils using smooth polynomial additional thickness distributions which emphasize leading edge profile and which vary linearly at the trailing edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hague, D. S.; Werz, A. W.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted on a CDC 7600 digital computer to determine the effects of additional thickness distributions to the upper surface of airfoils. The additional thickness distribution had the form of a continuous mathematical function which disappears at both the leading edge and the trailing edge. Results were obtained at a Mach number of 0.2 with an angle of attack of 6 deg. All calculations employed the full potential flow equations for two dimensional flow. The relaxation method of Jameson was used for solution of the potential flow equations. It is shown that increasing the thickness and variations in shape increases the lift and the adverse pitching moment coefficients.

  9. Rationale, design and methods of the Study of Work and Pain (SWAP): a cluster randomised controlled trial testing the addition of a vocational advice service to best current primary care for patients with musculoskeletal pain (ISRCTN 52269669)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal pain is a major contributor to short and long term work absence. Patients seek care from their general practitioner (GP) and yet GPs often feel ill-equipped to deal with work issues. Providing a vocational case management service in primary care, to support patients with musculoskeletal problems to remain at or return to work, is one potential solution but requires robust evaluation to test clinical and cost-effectiveness. Methods/Design This protocol describes a cluster randomised controlled trial, with linked qualitative interviews, to investigate the effect of introducing a vocational advice service into general practice, to provide a structured approach to managing work related issues in primary care patients with musculoskeletal pain who are absent from work or struggling to remain in work. General practices (n = 6) will be randomised to offer best current care or best current care plus a vocational advice service. Adults of working age who are absent from or struggling to remain in work due to a musculoskeletal pain problem will be invited to participate and 330 participants will be recruited. Data collection will be through patient completed questionnaires at baseline, 4 and 12 months. The primary outcome is self-reported work absence at 4 months. Incremental cost-utility analysis will be undertaken to calculate the cost per additional QALY gained and incremental net benefits. A linked interview study will explore the experiences of the vocational advice service from the perspectives of GPs, nurse practitioners (NPs), patients and vocational advisors. Discussion This paper presents the rationale, design, and methods of the Study of Work And Pain (SWAP) trial. The results of this trial will provide evidence to inform primary care practice and guide the development of services to provide support for musculoskeletal pain patients with work-related issues. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN52269669. PMID:25012813

  10. ALICE physics --- Theoretical overview

    SciTech Connect

    Alessandro, B.; Aurenche, P.; Baier, R.; Becattini, F.; Botje, M.; Csorgo, T.; de Cataldo, G.; Foka, Y.; Giovannini, A.; Giubellino, P.; Guillet, J.Ph.; Heinz, U.; Hencken, K.; Iancu, E.; Kaidalov, A.B.; Kajantie, K.; Karsch, F.; Koch, V.; Kopeliovich, B.Z.; Kurepin, A.B.; Laine, M.; Lednicky, R.; Mangano, M.; Monteno, M.; Paic, G.; Pilon, E.; Pshenichnov, I.A.; Redlich, K.; Revol, J.-P.; Riggi, F.; Safarik, K.; Salgado, C.A.; Schukraft, J.; Sinyukov, Y.; Tomasik, B.; Treleani, D.; Ugoccioni, R.; Venugopalan, R.; Vogt, R.; Wiedemann, U.A.

    2002-09-15

    ALICE is the dedicated heavy ion experiment at the LHC. This note summarizes theoretical developments in the field of hot and dense matter and their relevance for observables accessible to ALICE in nucleus-nucleus, proton-nucleus and proton-proton collisions. In addition, aspects of specific interest for proton-proton, proton-nucleus, ultraperipheral collisions and cosmic ray physics, which can be addressed by ALICE, are also discussed.

  11. Food additives.

    PubMed

    Berglund, F

    1978-01-01

    The use of additives to food fulfils many purposes, as shown by the index issued by the Codex Committee on Food Additives: Acids, bases and salts; Preservatives, Antioxidants and antioxidant synergists; Anticaking agents; Colours; Emulfifiers; Thickening agents; Flour-treatment agents; Extraction solvents; Carrier solvents; Flavours (synthetic); Flavour enhancers; Non-nutritive sweeteners; Processing aids; Enzyme preparations. Many additives occur naturally in foods, but this does not exclude toxicity at higher levels. Some food additives are nutrients, or even essential nutritents, e.g. NaCl. Examples are known of food additives causing toxicity in man even when used according to regulations, e.g. cobalt in beer. In other instances, poisoning has been due to carry-over, e.g. by nitrate in cheese whey - when used for artificial feed for infants. Poisonings also occur as the result of the permitted substance being added at too high levels, by accident or carelessness, e.g. nitrite in fish. Finally, there are examples of hypersensitivity to food additives, e.g. to tartrazine and other food colours. The toxicological evaluation, based on animal feeding studies, may be complicated by impurities, e.g. orthotoluene-sulfonamide in saccharin; by transformation or disappearance of the additive in food processing in storage, e.g. bisulfite in raisins; by reaction products with food constituents, e.g. formation of ethylurethane from diethyl pyrocarbonate; by metabolic transformation products, e.g. formation in the gut of cyclohexylamine from cyclamate. Metabolic end products may differ in experimental animals and in man: guanylic acid and inosinic acid are metabolized to allantoin in the rat but to uric acid in man. The magnitude of the safety margin in man of the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) is not identical to the "safety factor" used when calculating the ADI. The symptoms of Chinese Restaurant Syndrome, although not hazardous, furthermore illustrate that the whole ADI

  12. Theoretical effect of modifications to the upper surface of two NACA airfoils using smooth polynomial additional thickness distributions which emphasize leading edge profile and which vary quadratically at the trailing edge. [using flow equations and a CDC 7600 computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merz, A. W.; Hague, D. S.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted on a CDC 7600 digital computer to determine the effects of additional thickness distributions to the upper surface of the NACA 64-206 and 64 sub 1 - 212 airfoils. The additional thickness distribution had the form of a continuous mathematical function which disappears at both the leading edge and the trailing edge. The function behaves as a polynomial of order epsilon sub 1 at the leading edge, and a polynomial of order epsilon sub 2 at the trailing edge. Epsilon sub 2 is a constant and epsilon sub 1 is varied over a range of practical interest. The magnitude of the additional thickness, y, is a second input parameter, and the effect of varying epsilon sub 1 and y on the aerodynamic performance of the airfoil was investigated. Results were obtained at a Mach number of 0.2 with an angle-of-attack of 6 degrees on the basic airfoils, and all calculations employ the full potential flow equations for two dimensional flow. The relaxation method of Jameson was employed for solution of the potential flow equations.

  13. Reaction Mechanism of the Symmetry-Forbidden [2+2] Addition of Ethylene and Acetylene to Amido-Substituted Digermynes and Distannynes Ph2N-EE-NPh2, (E = Ge, Sn): A Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lili; Jones, Cameron; Frenking, Gernot

    2015-08-24

    Quantum chemical calculations of reaction mechanisms for the formal [2+2] addition of ethylene and acetylene to the amido-substituted digermyne and distannyne Ph2N-EE-NPh2 (E = Ge, Sn) have been carried out by using density functional theory at the BP86/def2-TZVPP level. The nature and bonding situations were studied with the NBO method and with the charge and energy decomposition analysis EDA-NOCV. The addition of ethylene to Ph2N-EE-NPh2 takes place through an initial [2+1] addition to one metal atom and consecutive rearrangement to four-membered cyclic species, which feature a weak E-E bond. Rotation about the C-C bond with concomitant rupture of the E-E bond leads to the 1,2-disubstituted ethanes, which have terminal E(NPh2) groups. The overall reaction Ph2N-EE-NPh2+C2H4→(Ph2N)E-C2H4-E(NPh2) has very low activation barriers and is slightly exergonic for E = Ge but slightly endergonic for E = Sn. The analysis of the electronic structure shows that there is charge donation of nearly one electron to the ethylene moiety already in the first part of the reaction. The energy partitioning analysis suggests that the HOMO(Ph2N-EE-NPh2)→LUMO(C2H4) interaction has a similar strength as the HOMO(C2H4)→LUMO(Ph2N-EE-NPh2) interaction. The [2+2] addition of acetylene to Ph2N-EE-NPh2 also takes place through an initial [2+1] approach, which eventually leads to 1,2-disubstituted olefins (Ph2N)E-C2H2-E(NPh2). The formation of the energetically lowest lying conformations of cis-(Ph2N)E-C2H2-E(NPh2), which occurs with very low activation barriers, is clearly exergonic for the germanium and the tin compound. The trans-coordinated isomers of (Ph2N)E-C2H2-E(NPh2) are slightly lower in energy than the cis form but they are separated by a substantial energy barrier for the rotation about the C-C bond. The energy decomposition analysis indicates that the initial reaction takes place under formation of electron-sharing bonds between triplet fragments rather than HOMO

  14. Noble reaction features of bromoborane in oxidative addition of B-Br σ-bond to [M(PMe3)2] (M=Pt or Pd): theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Guixiang; Sakaki, Shigeyoshi

    2011-06-01

    Through detailed calculations by density functional theory and second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) to fourth-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory including single, double, and quadruple excitations [MP4(SDQ)] methods, we investigated the oxidative addition of the B-Br bond of dibromo(trimethylsiloxy)borane [Br(2)B(OSiMe(3))] to Pt(0) and Pd(0) complexes [M(PMe(3))(2)] (M = Pt or Pd) directly yielding a trans bromoboryl complex trans-[MBr{BBr(OSiMe(3))}(PMe(3))(2)]. Two reaction pathways are found for this reaction: One is a nucleophilic attack pathway which directly leads to the trans product, and the other is a stepwise reaction pathway which occurs through successive cis oxidative addition of the B-Br bond to [M(PMe(3))(2)] and thermal cis-trans isomerization. In the Pt system, the former course occurs with a much smaller energy barrier (E(a) = 5.8 kcal/mol) than the latter one (E(a) = 20.7 kcal/mol), where the DFT-calculated E(a) value is presented hereafter. In the Pd system, only the latter course is found in which the rate-determining steps is the cis-trans isomerization with the E(a) of 15.1 kcal/mol. Interestingly, the thermal cis-trans isomerization occurs on the singlet potential energy surface against our expectation. This unexpected result is understood in terms of the strong donation ability of the boryl group. Detailed analyses of electronic processes in all these reaction steps as well as remarkable characteristic features of [Br(2)B(OSiMe(3))] are also provided. PMID:21557562

  15. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  16. Phosphazene additives

    SciTech Connect

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  17. Theoretical Developments in SUSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shifman, M.

    2009-01-01

    I am proud that I was personally acquainted with Julius Wess. We first met in 1999 when I was working on the Yuri Golfand Memorial Volume (The Many Faces of the Superworld, World Scientific, Singapore, 2000). I invited him to contribute, and he accepted this invitation with enthusiasm. After that, we met many times, mostly at various conferences in Germany and elsewhere. I was lucky to discuss with Julius questions of theoretical physics, and hear his recollections on how supersymmetry was born. In physics Julius was a visionary, who paved the way to generations of followers. In everyday life he was a kind and modest person, always ready to extend a helping hand to people who were in need of his help. I remember him telling me how concerned he was about the fate of theoretical physicists in Eastern Europe after the demise of communism. His ties with Israeli physicists bore a special character. I am honored by the opportunity to contribute an article to the Julius Wess Memorial Volume. I will review theoretical developments of the recent years in non-perturbative supersymmetry.

  18. Theoretical Particle Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Kamionkowski, Marc

    2013-08-07

    Abstract: Theoretical Particle Astrophysics The research carried out under this grant encompassed work on the early Universe, dark matter, and dark energy. We developed CMB probes for primordial baryon inhomogeneities, primordial non-Gaussianity, cosmic birefringence, gravitational lensing by density perturbations and gravitational waves, and departures from statistical isotropy. We studied the detectability of wiggles in the inflation potential in string-inspired inflation models. We studied novel dark-matter candidates and their phenomenology. This work helped advance the DoE's Cosmic Frontier (and also Energy and Intensity Frontiers) by finding synergies between a variety of different experimental efforts, by developing new searches, science targets, and analyses for existing/forthcoming experiments, and by generating ideas for new next-generation experiments.

  19. Amateurism and Professionalism in Work and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims to explore the concept of amateurism as a form of critique and addition to the concepts of professionalism, professional work and education. Design/methodology/approach: This is a theoretically driven article based upon a review of the historical and sociological literature on amateur-professional relations in various…

  20. Theoretical understanding of charm decays

    SciTech Connect

    Bigi, I.I.

    1986-08-01

    A detailed description of charm decays has emerged. The various concepts involved are sketched. Although this description is quite successful in reproducing the data the chapter on heavy flavour decays is far from closed. Relevant questions like on th real strength of weak annihilation, Penguin operators, etc. are still unanswered. Important directions in future work, both on the experimental and theoretical side are identified.

  1. Cognitive Achievement and Motivation in Hands-on and Teacher-Centred Science Classes: Does an additional hands-on consolidation phase (concept mapping) optimise cognitive learning at work stations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerstner, Sabine; Bogner, Franz X.

    2010-05-01

    Our study monitored the cognitive and motivational effects within different educational instruction schemes: On the one hand, teacher-centred versus hands-on instruction; on the other hand, hands-on instruction with and without a knowledge consolidation phase (concept mapping). All the instructions dealt with the same content. For all participants, the hands-on approach as well as the concept mapping adaptation were totally new. Our hands-on approach followed instruction based on "learning at work stations". A total of 397 high-achieving fifth graders participated in our study. We used a pre-test, post-test, retention test design both to detect students' short-term learning success and long-term learning success, and to document their decrease rates of newly acquired knowledge. Additionally, we monitored intrinsic motivation. Although the teacher-centred approach provided higher short-term learning success, hands-on instruction resulted in relatively lower decrease rates. However, after six weeks, all students reached similar levels of newly acquired knowledge. Nevertheless, concept mapping as a knowledge consolidation phase positively affected short-term increase in knowledge. Regularly placed in instruction, it might increase long-term retention rates. Scores of interest, perceived competence and perceived choice were very high in all the instructional schemes.

  2. Reconceptualising "Identity Slippage": Additional Language Learning and (L2) Identity Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armour, William

    2009-01-01

    This paper reconsiders the theoretical concept of "identity slippage" by considering a detailed exegesis of three model conversations taught to learners of Japanese as an additional language. To inform my analysis of these conversations and how they contribute to identity slippage, I have used the work of the systemic-functional linguist Jay Lemke…

  3. Theoretical perspectives on strange physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, J.

    1983-04-01

    Kaons are heavy enough to have an interesting range of decay modes available to them, and light enough to be produced in sufficient numbers to explore rate modes with satisfying statistics. Kaons and their decays have provided at least two major breakthroughs in fundamental physics: CP violation, and their lack of flavor-changing neutral interactions warned us to expect charm. In addition, K0-anti K0 mixing has provided one of the most elegant and sensitive laboratories for testing quantum mechanics. There is every reason to expect that future generations of kaon experiments with intense sources would add further to fundamental physics. This talk attempts to set future kaon experiments in a general theoretical context, and indicate how they bear upon fundamental theoretical issues. A survey of different experiments which would be done with an Intense Medium Energy Source of Strangeness, including rare K decays, probes of the nature of CP isolation, (SIGMA) decays, hyperon decays and neutrino physics is given.

  4. Study of electrochemically active carbon, Ga2O3 and Bi2O3 as negative additives for valve-regulated lead-acid batteries working under high-rate, partial-state-of-charge conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Li; Chen, Baishuang; Wu, Jinzhu; Wang, Dianlong

    2014-02-01

    Electrochemically active carbon (EAC), Gallium (III) oxide (Ga2O3) and Bismuth (III) oxide (Bi2O3) are used as the negative additives of valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries to prolong the cycle life of VRLA batteries under high-rate partial-state-of-charge (HRPSoC) conditions, and their effects on the cycle life of VRLA batteries are investigated. It is found that the addition of EAC in negative active material can restrain the sulfation of the negative plates and prolong the cycle performance of VRLA batteries under HRPSoC conditions. It is also observed that the addition of Ga2O3 or Bi2O3 in EAC can effectively increase the overpotential of hydrogen evolution on EAC electrodes, and decrease the evolution rate of hydrogen. An appropriate addition amount of Ga2O3 or Bi2O3 in the negative plates of VRLA batteries can decrease the cut-off charging voltage, increase the cut-off discharging voltage, and prolong the cycle life of VRLA batteries under HRPSoC conditions. The battery added with 0.5% EAC and 0.01% Ga2O3 in negative active material shows a lowest cut-off charging voltage and a highest cut-off discharging voltage under HRPSoC conditions, and its' cycle life reaches about 8100 cycles which is at least three times longer than that without Ga2O3.

  5. Theoretical Studies in Elementary Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, John C.; Roiban, Radu S

    2013-04-01

    This final report summarizes work at Penn State University from June 1, 1990 to April 30, 2012. The work was in theoretical elementary particle physics. Many new results in perturbative QCD, in string theory, and in related areas were obtained, with a substantial impact on the experimental program.

  6. Theoretical Chemistry At NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langhoff, Stephen

    1996-01-01

    The theoretical work being carried out in the Computational Chemistry Branch at NASA Ames will be overviewed. This overview will be followed by a more in-depth discussion of our theoretical work to determine molecular opacities for the TiO and water molecules and a discussion of our density function theory (DFT) calculations to determine the harmonic frequencies and intensities to the vibrational bands of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to assess their role as carriers to the unidentified infrared (UIR) bands. Finally, a more in-depth discussion of our work in the area of computational molecular nanotechnology will be presented.

  7. Working with Simple Machines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norbury, John W.

    2006-01-01

    A set of examples is provided that illustrate the use of work as applied to simple machines. The ramp, pulley, lever and hydraulic press are common experiences in the life of a student, and their theoretical analysis therefore makes the abstract concept of work more real. The mechanical advantage of each of these systems is also discussed so that…

  8. Theoretical methods for ultrafast spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, Roberto

    2013-05-10

    Time-resolved spectroscopy in the femtosecond and attosecond time domain is a tool to unravel the dynamics of nuclear and electronic motion in molecular systems. Theoretical insight into the underlying physical processes is ideally gained by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. In this work, methods currently used to solve this equation are reviewed in a compact presentation. These methods involve numerical representations of wavefunctions and operators, the calculation of time evolution operators, the setting up of the Hamiltonian operators and the types of coordinates to be used hereto. The advantages and disadvantages of some methods are discussed. PMID:23606322

  9. The Basic Theoretical Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeb, Abraham

    Cosmology is by now a mature experimental science. We are privileged to live at a time when the story of genesis (how the Universe started and developed) can be critically explored by direct observations. Looking deep into the Universe through powerful telescopes, we can see images of the Universe when it was younger because of the finite time it takes light to travel to us from distant sources. Existing data sets include an image of the Universe when it was 0.4 million years old (in the form of the cosmic microwave background), as well as images of individual galaxies when the Universe was older than a billion years. But there is a serious challenge: in between these two epochs was a period when the Universe was dark, stars had not yet formed, and the cosmic microwave background no longer traced the distribution of matter. And this is precisely the most interesting period, when the primordial soup evolved into the rich zoo of objects we now see. The observers are moving ahead along several fronts. The first involves the construction of large infrared telescopes on the ground and in space, that will provide us with new photos of the first galaxies. Current plans include ground-based telescopes which are 24-42 m in diameter, and NASA's successor to the Hubble Space Telescope, called the James Webb Space Telescope. In addition, several observational groups around the globe are constructing radio arrays that will be capable of mapping the three-dimensional distribution of cosmic hydrogen in the infant Universe. These arrays are aiming to detect the long-wavelength (redshifted 21-cm) radio emission from hydrogen atoms. The images from these antenna arrays will reveal how the non-uniform distribution of neutral hydrogen evolved with cosmic time and eventually was extinguished by the ultra-violet radiation from the first galaxies. Theoretical research has focused in recent years on predicting the expected signals for the above instruments and motivating these ambitious

  10. Information theoretic description of networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Thomas; Hollunder, Jens

    2007-11-01

    We present a new information theoretic approach for network characterizations. It is developed to describe the general type of networks with n nodes and L directed and weighted links, i.e., it also works for the simpler undirected and unweighted networks. The new information theoretic measures for network characterizations are based on a transmitter-receiver analogy of effluxes and influxes. Based on these measures, we classify networks as either complex or non-complex and as either democracy or dictatorship networks. Directed networks, in particular, are furthermore classified as either information spreading and information collecting networks. The complexity classification is based on the information theoretic network complexity measure medium articulation (MA). It is proven that special networks with a medium number of links ( L∼n1.5) show the theoretical maximum complexity MA=(log n)2/2. A network is complex if its MA is larger than the average MA of appropriately randomized networks: MA>MAr. A network is of the democracy type if its redundancy RH(B/A), it is an information collecting network, otherwise an information spreading network. Finally, different real networks (directed and undirected, weighted and unweighted) are classified according to our general scheme.

  11. Work Out at Work

    MedlinePlus

    ... exercise into your busy work day. Find 10-minute workout breaks throughout the day. There are a variety of strength, balance, and flexibility exercises you can do right at your desk. The Go4Life website has easy-to-follow directions for all of ...

  12. Theoretical Characterizaiton of Visual Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashinski, D. O.; Chase, G. M.; di Nallo, O. E.; Scales, A. N.; Vanderley, D. L.; Byrd, E. F. C.

    2015-05-01

    We are investigating the accuracy of theoretical models used to predict the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared spectra, as well as other properties, of product materials ejected from the muzzle of currently fielded systems. Recent advances in solid propellants has made the management of muzzle signature (flash) a principle issue in weapons development across the calibers. A priori prediction of the electromagnetic spectra of formulations will allow researchers to tailor blends that yield desired signatures and determine spectrographic detection ranges. Quantum chemistry methods at various levels of sophistication have been employed to optimize molecular geometries, compute unscaled vibrational frequencies, and determine the optical spectra of specific gas-phase species. Electronic excitations are being computed using Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT). A full statistical analysis and reliability assessment of computational results is currently underway. A comparison of theoretical results to experimental values found in the literature is used to assess any affects of functional choice and basis set on calculation accuracy. The status of this work will be presented at the conference. Work supported by the ARL, DoD HPCMP, and USMA.

  13. A Theoretical Trombone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    What follows is a description of a theoretical model designed to calculate the playing frequencies of the musical pitches produced by a trombone. The model is based on quantitative treatments that demonstrate the effects of the flaring bell and cup-shaped mouthpiece sections on these frequencies and can be used to calculate frequencies that…

  14. Studies in theoretical particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, D. B.

    1991-07-01

    This proposal focuses on research on three distinct areas of particle physics: (1) Nonperturbative QCD. I tend to continue work on analytic modelling of nonperturbative effects in the strong interactions. I have been investigating the theoretical connection between the nonrelativistic quark model and QCD. The primary motivation has been to understand the experimental observation of nonzero matrix elements involving current strange quarks in ordinary matter, which in the quark model has no strange quark component. This has led to my present work on understanding constituent (quark model) quarks as collective excitations of QCD degrees of freedom. (2) Weak Scale Baryogenesis. A continuation of work on baryogenesis in the early universe from weak interactions. In particular, an investigation of baryogenesis occurring during the weak phase transition through anomalous baryon violating processes in the standard model of weak interactions. (3) Flavor and Compositeness. Further investigation of a new mechanism that I recently discovered for dynamical mass generation for fermions, which naturally leads to a family hierarchy structure. A discussion of recent past work is found in the next section, followed by an outline of the proposed research. A recent publication from each of these three areas is attached to this proposal.

  15. Studies in theoretical particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.B.

    1991-07-01

    This proposal focuses on research on three distinct areas of particle physics: (1) Nonperturbative QCD. I tend to continue work on analytic modelling of nonperturbative effects in the strong interactions. I have been investigating the theoretical connection between the nonrelativistic quark model and QCD. The primary motivation has been to understand the experimental observation of nonzero matrix elements involving current strange quarks in ordinary matter -- which in the quark model has no strange quark component. This has led to my present work on understanding constituent (quark model) quarks as collective excitations of QCD degrees of freedom. (2) Weak Scale Baryogenesis. A continuation of work on baryogenesis in the early universe from weak interactions. In particular, an investigation of baryogenesis occurring during the weak phase transition through anomalous baryon violating processes in the standard model of weak interactions. (3) Flavor and Compositeness. Further investigation of a new mechanism that I recently discovered for dynamical mass generation for fermions, which naturally leads to a family hierarchy structure. A discussion of recent past work is found in the next section, followed by an outline of the proposed research. A recent publication from each of these three areas is attached to this proposal.

  16. Experimental and theoretical study of thermovibrational convection in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhkov, Ilya; Mialdun, Alexander; Melnikov, Denis; Shevtsova, Valentina

    Thermovibrational convection refers to the specific flows that appear when a non-uniformly heated fluid is subjected to external vibration. The relative motion results from different inertia of cold and hot parts of the fluid, which have different density. A pure thermovibrational convective mechanism can be observed only in the absence of other external forces. In terrestrial conditions, the static gravity provides an additional driving force for convection and may suppress the flows caused by vibration. There have been extensive theoretical studies of thermovibrational convection in weightlessness and ground conditions. However, the experiments addressing this phenomenon (especially in reduced gravity) are very limited. This work is focused on the experimental study of thermovibrational convection in microgravity and complementary theoretical analysis. The experiments were performed in parabolic flights during 46th Campaign organized by the European Space Agency. The study is aimed at observing thermo-vibrational flows in reduced gravity and verifying existing theoretical results. In the experiment, a cubic cell with differentially heated walls was filled with isopropanol and subjected to the harmonic oscillations produced by a linear motor. The flows were monitored by observing the evolution of temperature field with a help of optical digital interferometry. A comprehensive theoretical analysis has been performed in the course of experiment preparation. The strategy of choosing control parameters (such as the frequency, amplitude, applied temperature difference, etc.) for successful observation of thermovibrational phenomena was developed. In the experiment, it was shown that mean vibrational flows can cause strong heat transport in the fluid. This transport becomes more intensive with increasing the vibrational impact. The observed flow structures confirm previous theoretical results. Numerical simulations of thermovibrational convection in parabolic flight

  17. Maternal filicide theoretical framework.

    PubMed

    Mugavin, Marie

    2008-01-01

    The maternal filicide theoretical framework (MFTF) was developed to enrich the understanding of how traumatic experiences during formative years can affect a woman's relationship with her own child. Exposure to a known set of vulnerabilities can foster triggers that predispose a woman to respond impulsively and violently toward her child. Comprehensive assessment of vulnerable families is essential for the prevention of fatal and nonfatal abuse. The MFTF may be applied to both crimes. PMID:18522605

  18. A theoretical trombone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2014-09-01

    What follows is a description of a theoretical model designed to calculate the playing frequencies of the musical pitches produced by a trombone. The model is based on quantitative treatments that demonstrate the effects of the flaring bell and cup-shaped mouthpiece sections on these frequencies and can be used to calculate frequencies that compare well to both the desired frequencies of the musical pitches and those actually played on a real trombone.

  19. Theoretical Approaches to Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempa, Krzysztof

    Nanoparticles can be viewed as wave resonators. Involved waves are, for example, carrier waves, plasmon waves, polariton waves, etc. A few examples of successful theoretical treatments that follow this approach are given. In one, an effective medium theory of a nanoparticle composite is presented. In another, plasmon polaritonic solutions allow to extend concepts of radio technology, such as an antenna and a coaxial transmission line, to the visible frequency range.

  20. Panorama of theoretical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimouni, J.

    2012-06-01

    We shall start this panorama of theoretical physics by giving an overview of physics in general, this branch of knowledge that has been taken since the scientific revolution as the archetype of the scientific discipline. We shall then proceed in showing in what way theoretical physics from Newton to Maxwell, Einstein, Feynman and the like, in all modesty, could be considered as the ticking heart of physics. By its special mode of inquiry and its tantalizing successes, it has capturing the very spirit of the scientific method, and indeed it has been taken as a role model by other disciplines all the way from the "hard" ones to the social sciences. We shall then review how much we know today of the world of matter, both in term of its basic content and in the way it is structured. We will then present the dreams of today's theoretical physics as a way of penetrating into its psyche, discovering in this way its aspirations and longing in much the same way that a child's dreams tell us about his yearning and craving. Yet our understanding of matter has been going in the past decades through a crisis of sort. As a necessary antidote, we shall thus discuss the pitfalls of dreams pushed too far….

  1. [Theoretical contributions to an interpretation of urbanization in Latin America].

    PubMed

    Quintero Cedeno, M A

    1993-04-01

    This work analyzes two essays by Anibal Quijano and Paul Singer on urbanization, dependency, social change, and marginality in Latin America and suggests some elements for a theoretical interpretation of urbanization in Latin America. The work is divided into three major sections, each of which examines a specific question. The first section explores whether urban phenomena in Latin America are or are not attributable to a situation of dependency or whether they are derived from capitalism. The second section discusses whether changes in urban society and in the urban profile are also derived from dependency or from capitalism. The third section discusses factors leading to urban concentration and suggests some policies that have not yet been developed for urbanization and development, to be analyzed in later articles. Throughout this work, the theoretical approaches of Quijano and Singer are contrasted, and additional commentary on the author's own views is supplied. It is suggested that a policy to add subsidiary or complementary activities to zones that are currently exclusively agricultural would help to retain some part of rural population growth and would have other desirable effects. PMID:12346306

  2. Recent theoretical work on Cepheids and other types of variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    Some important problems in the theory of Cepheids and of other types of variables are pointed out. Three of these are: (1) large-amplitude mode behavior; (2) convection; and (3) Cepheid masses, which must essentially always be inferred indirectly. Of the several types of indirect mass which can be defined, the inferred masses of the 'beat (or double-mode) Cepheids,' seem to be smaller than one expects for this period range by factors of 2-3. For the nonbeat Cepheids, the indirect masses also appear to be low as compared with conventional stellar evolution theory, but by a smaller amount, say some 20-40 percent. Some conceivable ways of explaining these mass discrepancies are discussed. The question of whether the apparently predominantly radial pulsations of the beat Cepheids could be contaminated with a small admixture of nonradial pulsations, so that the use of purely radial pulsation theory may not be applicable to the beat Cepheids is addressed. Some other conjectures which may bear on ordinary or beat Cepheids are offered.

  3. Why Problem-Based Learning Works: Theoretical Foundations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marra, Rose M.; Jonassen, David H.; Palmer, Betsy; Luft, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is an instructional method where student learning occurs in the context of solving an authentic problem. PBL was initially developed out of an instructional need to help medical school students learn their basic sciences knowledge in a way that would be more lasting while helping to develop clinical skills…

  4. Job embeddedness: a multifoci theoretical extension.

    PubMed

    Kiazad, Kohyar; Holtom, Brooks C; Hom, Peter W; Newman, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    Integrating the expanding job embeddedness (JE) literature, in this article we advance a multifoci model of JE that is theoretically grounded in conservation of resources (COR) theory. From COR theory, we posit that employees' motivation to acquire and protect resources explains why they become embedded and how they behave once embedded. Our COR-based JE model highlights contextual antecedents that clarify how employees become embedded within different foci. Its multifoci theoretical lens also illustrates how different forms of work-focused embeddedness differentially affect work outcomes and how they interact with nonwork foci to influence those outcomes. Along with directions for further research, we further discuss theoretical and practical implications of our integrative formulation. PMID:25774569

  5. A Theoretical Study on Seasonality

    PubMed Central

    Schmal, Christoph; Myung, Jihwan; Herzel, Hanspeter; Bordyugov, Grigory

    2015-01-01

    In addition to being endogenous, a circadian system must be able to communicate with the outside world and align its rhythmicity to the environment. As a result of such alignment, external Zeitgebers can entrain the circadian system. Entrainment expresses itself in coinciding periods of the circadian oscillator and the Zeitgeber and a stationary phase difference between them. The range of period mismatches between the circadian system and the Zeitgeber that Zeitgeber can overcome to entrain the oscillator is called an entrainment range. The width of the entrainment range usually increases with increasing Zeitgeber strength, resulting in a wedge-like Arnold tongue. This classical view of entrainment does not account for the effects of photoperiod on entrainment. Zeitgebers with extremely small or large photoperiods are intuitively closer to constant environments than equinoctial Zeitgebers and hence are expected to produce a narrower entrainment range. In this paper, we present theoretical results on entrainment under different photoperiods. We find that in the photoperiod-detuning parameter plane, the entrainment zone is shaped in the form of a skewed onion. The bottom and upper points of the onion are given by the free-running periods in DD and LL, respectively. The widest entrainment range is found near photoperiods of 50%. Within the onion, we calculated the entrainment phase that varies over a range of 12 h. The results of our theoretical study explain the experimentally observed behavior of the entrainment phase in dependence on the photoperiod. PMID:25999912

  6. Theoretical investigation of linalool oxidation.

    PubMed

    Bäcktorp, Carina; Wass, J R Tobias Johnson; Panas, Itai; Sköld, Maria; Börje, Anna; Nyman, Gunnar

    2006-11-01

    This study concerns the autoxidation of one of the most used fragrances in daily life, linalool (3,7-dimethyl-1,6-octadien-3-ol). It reacts with O2 to form hydroperoxides, which are known to be important contact allergens. Pathways for hydroperoxide formation are investigated by means of quantum mechanical electronic structure calculations. Optimized molecular geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies are determined using density functional theory (DFT). Insight into how the addition of O2 to linalool occurs is obtained by establishing a theoretical framework and systematically investigating three smaller systems: propene, 2-methyl-2-butene, and 2-methyl-2-pentene. 2-Methyl-2-pentene was chosen as a model system and used to compare with linalool. This theoretical study characterizes the linalool-O2 biradical intermediate state, which constitutes a branching point for the further oxidation reactions pathways. Thus, the observed linalool oxidation product spectrum is discussed in terms of a direct reaction path, the ene-type mechanism, and the radical mechanism. The major hydroperoxide found in experiments is 7-hydroperoxy-3,7-dimethyl-octa-1,5-diene-3-ol, and the calculated results support this finding. PMID:17078616

  7. Theoretical perspectives on strange physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J.

    1983-04-01

    Kaons are heavy enough to have an interesting range of decay modes available to them, and light enough to be produced in sufficient numbers to explore rare modes with satisfying statistics. Kaons and their decays have provided at least two major breakthroughs in our knowledge of fundamental physics. They have revealed to us CP violation, and their lack of flavor-changing neutral interactions warned us to expect charm. In addition, K/sup 0/-anti K/sup 0/ mixing has provided us with one of our most elegant and sensitive laboratories for testing quantum mechanics. There is every reason to expect that future generations of kaon experiments with intense sources would add further to our knowledge of fundamental physics. This talk attempts to set future kaon experiments in a general theoretical context, and indicate how they may bear upon fundamental theoretical issues. A survey of different experiments which would be done with an Intense Medium Energy Source of Strangeness, including rare K decays, probes of the nature of CP isolation, ..mu.. decays, hyperon decays and neutrino physics is given. (WHK)

  8. Out of bounds additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Holshouser, Chris; Newell, Clint; Palas, Sid; Love, Lonnie J.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Lind, Randall F.; Lloyd, Peter D.; Rowe, John C.; Blue, Craig A.; Duty, Chad E.; Peter, William H.; Dehoff, Ryan R.

    2013-03-01

    Lockheed Martin and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working on an additive manufacturing system capable of manufacturing components measured not in terms of inches or feet, but multiple yards in all dimensions with the potential to manufacture parts that are completely unbounded in size.

  9. 'Impulsar': Experimental and Theoretical Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Apollonov, V. V.

    2008-04-28

    The Objective of the 'Impulsar' project is to accomplish a circle of experimental, engineering and technological works on creation of a high efficiency laser rocket engine. The project includes many organizations of the rocket industry and Academy of Sciences of Russia. High repetition rate pulse-periodic CO{sub 2} laser system project for launching will be presented. Optical system for 15 MW laser energy delivery and optical matrix of laser engine receiver will by discussed as well. Basic characteristics of the laser-based engine will be compared with theoretical predictions and important stages of further technology implementation (low frequency resonance). Relying on a wide cooperation of different branches of science and industry organizations it is very possible to use the accumulated potential for launching of nano-vehicles during the upcoming 4-5 years.

  10. Theoretical Models of Generalized Quasispecies.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Nathaniel; Atsmon-Raz, Yoav; Ashkenasy, Gonen

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical modeling of quasispecies has progressed in several directions. In this chapter, we review the works of Emmanuel Tannenbaum, who, together with Eugene Shakhnovich at Harvard University and later with colleagues and students at Ben-Gurion University in Beersheva, implemented one of the more useful approaches, by progressively setting up various formulations for the quasispecies model and solving them analytically. Our review will focus on these papers that have explored new models, assumed the relevant mathematical approximations, and proceeded to analytically solve for the steady-state solutions and run stochastic simulations . When applicable, these models were related to real-life problems and situations, including changing environments, presence of chemical mutagens, evolution of cancer and tumor cells , mutations in Escherichia coli, stem cells , chromosomal instability (CIN), propagation of antibiotic drug resistance , dynamics of bacteria with plasmids , DNA proofreading mechanisms, and more. PMID:26373410

  11. Theoretical Perspectives on Mathematics Teacher Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goos, Merrilyn; Geiger, Vince

    2010-01-01

    In this review essay we critically examine issues raised by authors whose work is published in the two Special Issues of "JMTE" (Part 1, 13.5 and Part 2, 13.6) on Mathematics Teacher and Mathematics Teacher Educator Change--Insight through Theoretical Perspectives. While the authors have drawn on a wide range of theories and approaches, we have…

  12. Theoretical models of helicopter rotor noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkings, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    For low speed rotors, it is shown that unsteady load models are only partially successful in predicting experimental levels. A theoretical model is presented which leads to the concept of unsteady thickness noise. This gives better agreement with test results. For high speed rotors, it is argued that present models are incomplete and that other mechanisms are at work. Some possibilities are briefly discussed.

  13. Institute for Theoretical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Giddings, S.B.; Ooguri, H.; Peet, A.W.; Schwarz, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    String theory is the only serious candidate for a unified description of all known fundamental particles and interactions, including gravity, in a single theoretical framework. Over the past two years, activity in this subject has grown rapidly, thanks to dramatic advances in understanding the dynamics of supersymmetric field theories and string theories. The cornerstone of these new developments is the discovery of duality which relates apparently different string theories and transforms difficult strongly coupled problems of one theory into weakly coupled problems of another theory.

  14. Working with simple machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norbury, John W.

    2006-11-01

    A set of examples is provided that illustrate the use of work as applied to simple machines. The ramp, pulley, lever and hydraulic press are common experiences in the life of a student, and their theoretical analysis therefore makes the abstract concept of work more real. The mechanical advantage of each of these systems is also discussed so that students can evaluate their usefulness as machines.

  15. Learning a Teachers Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maaranen, Katriina; Kynaslahti, Heikki; Krokfors, Leena

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to bridge the theoretical perspectives of workplace learning and teacher learning. Teacher learning takes place, for example, in the course of a teacher's work as well as in the institutional setting of a school. This article describes research conducted on such learning. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  16. Education and Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trostel, Philip; Walker, Ian

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between the incentives to work and to invest in human capital through education in a lifecycle optimizing model. These incentives are shown to be mutually reinforcing in a simple stylized model. This theoretical prediction is investigated empirically using three large micro datasets covering a broad range of…

  17. Dark matter: theoretical perspectives.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, M S

    1993-01-01

    I both review and make the case for the current theoretical prejudice: a flat Universe whose dominant constituent is nonbaryonic dark matter, emphasizing that this is still a prejudice and not yet fact. The theoretical motivation for nonbaryonic dark matter is discussed in the context of current elementary-particle theory, stressing that (i) there are no dark-matter candidates within the "standard model" of particle physics, (ii) there are several compelling candidates within attractive extensions of the standard model of particle physics, and (iii) the motivation for these compelling candidates comes first and foremost from particle physics. The dark-matter problem is now a pressing issue in both cosmology and particle physics, and the detection of particle dark matter would provide evidence for "new physics." The compelling candidates are a very light axion (10(-6)-10(-4) eV), a light neutrino (20-90 eV), and a heavy neutralino (10 GeV-2 TeV). The production of these particles in the early Universe and the prospects for their detection are also discussed. I briefly mention more exotic possibilities for the dark matter, including a nonzero cosmological constant, superheavy magnetic monopoles, and decaying neutrinos. PMID:11607395

  18. Dark matter: Theoretical perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S. . Enrico Fermi Inst. Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1993-01-01

    I both review and make the case for the current theoretical prejudice: a flat Universe whose dominant constituent is nonbaryonic dark matter, emphasizing that this is still a prejudice and not yet fact. The theoretical motivation for nonbaryonic dark matter is discussed in the context of current elementary-particle theory, stressing that: (1) there are no dark matter candidates within the standard model of particle physics; (2) there are several compelling candidates within attractive extensions of the standard model of particle physics; and (3) the motivation for these compelling candidates comes first and foremost from particle physics. The dark-matter problem is now a pressing issue in both cosmology and particle physics, and the detection of particle dark matter would provide evidence for new physics.'' The compelling candidates are: a very light axion ( 10[sup [minus]6] eV--10[sup [minus]4] eV); a light neutrino (20 eV--90 eV); and a heavy neutralino (10 GeV--2 TeV). The production of these particles in the early Universe and the prospects for their detection are also discussed. I briefly mention more exotic possibilities for the dark matter, including a nonzero cosmological constant, superheavy magnetic monopoles, and decaying neutrinos.

  19. Dark matter: Theoretical perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S. |

    1993-01-01

    I both review and make the case for the current theoretical prejudice: a flat Universe whose dominant constituent is nonbaryonic dark matter, emphasizing that this is still a prejudice and not yet fact. The theoretical motivation for nonbaryonic dark matter is discussed in the context of current elementary-particle theory, stressing that: (1) there are no dark matter candidates within the standard model of particle physics; (2) there are several compelling candidates within attractive extensions of the standard model of particle physics; and (3) the motivation for these compelling candidates comes first and foremost from particle physics. The dark-matter problem is now a pressing issue in both cosmology and particle physics, and the detection of particle dark matter would provide evidence for ``new physics.`` The compelling candidates are: a very light axion ( 10{sup {minus}6} eV--10{sup {minus}4} eV); a light neutrino (20 eV--90 eV); and a heavy neutralino (10 GeV--2 TeV). The production of these particles in the early Universe and the prospects for their detection are also discussed. I briefly mention more exotic possibilities for the dark matter, including a nonzero cosmological constant, superheavy magnetic monopoles, and decaying neutrinos.

  20. Theoretical ecology without species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonov, Mikhail

    The sequencing-driven revolution in microbial ecology demonstrated that discrete ``species'' are an inadequate description of the vast majority of life on our planet. Developing a novel theoretical language that, unlike classical ecology, would not require postulating the existence of species, is a challenge of tremendous medical and environmental significance, and an exciting direction for theoretical physics. Here, it is proposed that community dynamics can be described in a naturally hierarchical way in terms of population fluctuation eigenmodes. The approach is applied to a simple model of division of labor in a multi-species community. In one regime, effective species with a core and accessory genome are shown to naturally appear as emergent concepts. However, the same model allows a transition into a regime where the species formalism becomes inadequate, but the eigenmode description remains well-defined. Treating a community as a black box that expresses enzymes in response to resources reveals mathematically exact parallels between a community and a single coherent organism with its own fitness function. This coherence is a generic consequence of division of labor, requires no cooperative interactions, and can be expected to be widespread in microbial ecosystems. Harvard Center of Mathematical Sciences and Applications;John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

  1. Using SEQUEST with Theoretically Complete Sequence Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadygov, Rovshan G.

    2015-11-01

    SEQUEST has long been used to identify peptides/proteins from their tandem mass spectra and protein sequence databases. The algorithm has proven to be hugely successful for its sensitivity and specificity in identifying peptides/proteins, the sequences of which are present in the protein sequence databases. In this work, we report on work that attempts a new use for the algorithm by applying it to search a complete list of theoretically possible peptides, a de novo-like sequencing. We used freely available mass spectral data and determined a number of unique peptides as identified by SEQUEST. Using masses of these peptides and the mass accuracy of 0.001 Da, we have created a database of all theoretically possible peptide sequences corresponding to the precursor masses. We used our recently developed algorithm for determining all amino acid compositions corresponding to a mass interval, and used a lexicographic ordering to generate theoretical sequences from the compositions. The newly generated theoretical database was many-fold more complex than the original protein sequence database. We used SEQUEST to search and identify the best matches to the spectra from all theoretically possible peptide sequences. We found that SEQUEST cross-correlation score ranked the correct peptide match among the top sequence matches. The results testify to the high specificity of SEQUEST when combined with the high mass accuracy for intact peptides.

  2. Comparing geophysical measurements to theoretical estimates for soil mixtures at low pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Wildenschild, D; Berge, P A; Berryman, K G; Bonner, B P; Roberts, J J

    1999-01-15

    The authors obtained good estimates of measured velocities of sand-peat samples at low pressures by using a theoretical method, the self-consistent theory of Berryman (1980), using sand and porous peat to represent the microstructure of the mixture. They were unable to obtain useful estimates with several other theoretical approaches, because the properties of the quartz, air and peat components of the samples vary over several orders of magnitude. Methods that are useful for consolidated rock cannot be applied directly to unconsolidated materials. Instead, careful consideration of microstructure is necessary to adapt the methods successfully. Future work includes comparison of the measured velocity values to additional theoretical estimates, investigation of Vp/Vs ratios and wave amplitudes, as well as modeling of dry and saturated sand-clay mixtures (e.g., Bonner et al., 1997, 1998). The results suggest that field data can be interpreted by comparing laboratory measurements of soil velocities to theoretical estimates of velocities in order to establish a systematic method for predicting velocities for a full range of sand-organic material mixtures at various pressures. Once the theoretical relationship is obtained, it can be used to estimate the soil composition at various depths from field measurements of seismic velocities. Additional refining of the method for relating velocities to soil characteristics is useful for development inversion algorithms.

  3. Theoretical particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, S.A.; Hendry, A.W.; Kostelecky, V.A.; Lichtenberg, D.B.

    1992-04-01

    We have carried out research in lattice gauge theory, superstring theory, supersymmetry, the solar neutrino puzzle, QCD perturbation theory, and phenomenological models of hadrons. In this report, we summarize our work in each of these areas.

  4. PREFACE: Conference of Theoretical Physics and Nonlinear Phenomena (CTPNP) 2014: ''From Universe to String's Scale''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-10-01

    Theoretical physics is the first step for the development of science and technology. For more than 100 years it has delivered new and sophisticated discoveries which have changed human views of their surroundings and universe. Theoretical physics has also revealed that the governing law in our universe is not deterministic, and it is undoubtedly the foundation of our modern civilization. Contrary to its importance, research in theoretical physics is not well advanced in some developing countries such as Indonesia. This workshop provides the formal meeting in Indonesia devoted to the field of theoretical physics and is organized to cover all subjects of theoretical physics as well as nonlinear phenomena in order to create a gathering place for the theorists in Indonesia and surrounding countries, to motivate young physicists to keep doing active researches in the field and to encourage constructive communication among the community members. Following the success of the tenth previous meetings in this conference series, the eleventh conference was held in Sebelas Maret University (UNS), Surakarta, Indonesia on 15 February 2014. In addition, the conference was proceeded by School of Advance Physics at Gadjah Mada University (UGM), Yogyakarta, on 16-17 February 2014. The conference is expected to provide distinguished experts and students from various research fields of theoretical physics and nonlinear phenomena in Indonesia as well as from other continents the opportunities to present their works and to enhance contacts among them. The introduction to the conference is continued in the pdf.

  5. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects. PMID:24772784

  6. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. R.; St. Clair, T. L.; Burks, H. D.; Stoakley, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been found for enhancing the melt flow of thermoplastic polyimides during processing. A high molecular weight 422 copoly(amic acid) or copolyimide was fused with approximately 0.05 to 5 pct by weight of a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive, and this melt was studied by capillary rheometry. Excellent flow and improved composite properties on graphite resulted from the addition of a PMDA-aniline additive to LARC-TPI. Solution viscosity studies imply that amic acid additives temporarily lower molecular weight and, hence, enlarge the processing window. Thus, compositions containing the additive have a lower melt viscosity for a longer time than those unmodified.

  7. Leading Work with Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Roger, Ed.; Benjamin, Cathy, Ed.; Curran, Sheila, Ed.; Hunter, Rob, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Leading Work with Young People" provides a selection of writing from a complex and dynamic field of work. The editors bring together key readings and newly commissioned material to present a variety of theoretical and practical perspectives on leading and managing work with young people. The book will equip students with the knowledge, skills,…

  8. Theoretical Studies of Hydrogen Storage Alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Jonsson, Hannes

    2012-03-22

    Theoretical calculations were carried out to search for lightweight alloys that can be used to reversibly store hydrogen in mobile applications, such as automobiles. Our primary focus was on magnesium based alloys. While MgH{sub 2} is in many respects a promising hydrogen storage material, there are two serious problems which need to be solved in order to make it useful: (i) the binding energy of the hydrogen atoms in the hydride is too large, causing the release temperature to be too high, and (ii) the diffusion of hydrogen through the hydride is so slow that loading of hydrogen into the metal takes much too long. In the first year of the project, we found that the addition of ca. 15% of aluminum decreases the binding energy to the hydrogen to the target value of 0.25 eV which corresponds to release of 1 bar hydrogen gas at 100 degrees C. Also, the addition of ca. 15% of transition metal atoms, such as Ti or V, reduces the formation energy of interstitial H-atoms making the diffusion of H-atoms through the hydride more than ten orders of magnitude faster at room temperature. In the second year of the project, several calculations of alloys of magnesium with various other transition metals were carried out and systematic trends in stability, hydrogen binding energy and diffusivity established. Some calculations of ternary alloys and their hydrides were also carried out, for example of Mg{sub 6}AlTiH{sub 16}. It was found that the binding energy reduction due to the addition of aluminum and increased diffusivity due to the addition of a transition metal are both effective at the same time. This material would in principle work well for hydrogen storage but it is, unfortunately, unstable with respect to phase separation. A search was made for a ternary alloy of this type where both the alloy and the corresponding hydride are stable. Promising results were obtained by including Zn in the alloy.

  9. Additive usage levels.

    PubMed

    Langlais, R

    1996-01-01

    With the adoption of the European Parliament and Council Directives on sweeteners, colours and miscellaneous additives the Commission is now embarking on the project of coordinating the activities of the European Union Member States in the collection of the data that are to make up the report on food additive intake requested by the European Parliament. This presentation looks at the inventory of available sources on additive use levels and concludes that for the time being national legislation is still the best source of information considering that the directives have yet to be transposed into national legislation. Furthermore, this presentation covers the correlation of the food categories as found in the additives directives with those used by national consumption surveys and finds that in a number of instances this correlation still leaves a lot to be desired. The intake of additives via food ingestion and the intake of substances which are chemically identical to additives but which occur naturally in fruits and vegetables is found in a number of cases to be higher than the intake of additives added during the manufacture of foodstuffs. While the difficulties are recognized in contributing to the compilation of food additive intake data, industry as a whole, i.e. the food manufacturing and food additive manufacturing industries, are confident that in a concerted effort, use data on food additives by industry can be made available. Lastly, the paper points out that with the transportation of the additives directives into national legislation and the time by which the food industry will be able to make use of the new food legislative environment several years will still go by; food additives use data by the food industry will thus have to be reviewed at the beginning of the next century. PMID:8792135

  10. PREFACE International Conference on Theoretical Physics Dubna-Nano 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, Vladimir; Nesterenko, Valentin; Shukrinov, Yury

    2010-11-01

    The International Conference on Theoretical Physics 'Dubna-Nano2010' was held on 5-10 July 2010, at the Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow region, Russia. The previous conference of this series was at Dubna in 2008. The conference provided the opportunity for the presentation and discussion of theoretical and experimental advances in the rapidly growing area of nanophysics, with the accent on its theoretical aspects. The multidisciplinary character of the conference allowed an effective exchange of ideas between different areas of nanophysics. The following topics were covered: carbon nanosystems (graphene, nanotubes, fullerenes), quantum dots, quantum transport, spectroscopy and dynamics of atomic clusters, Josephson junctions, modelling, applications and perspectives. Approximately 120 scientists from 26 countries participated in the conference. The program included 63 oral talks and 70 posters. The 62 contributions are included in these proceedings. We would like to express our gratitude to all participants for their presentations and discussions, which made the conference indeed successful. We are deeply indebted to the members of the International Advisory Committee (Professors T Ando, J Fabian, F Guinea, P Hawrylak, K Kadowaki, T Koyama, Yu I Latushev, Yu E Lozovik, M Machida, B K Nikolic, N F Pedersen, P-G Reinhard, J M Rost, A Ya Vul') and the Local Organizing Committee for their fruitful work. The financial support of BLTP JINR, Russian Foundation for Basic Research, Heisenberg-Landau Program and Bogoliubov-Infeld Program was of a great importance. Additional information about 'Dubna-Nano2010' is available at the homepage http://theor.jinr.ru/~nano10. Vladimir Osipov, Valentin Nesterenko and Yury Shukrinov Editors

  11. An additional middle cuneiform?

    PubMed Central

    Brookes-Fazakerley, S.D.; Jackson, G.E.; Platt, S.R.

    2015-01-01

    Additional cuneiform bones of the foot have been described in reference to the medial bipartite cuneiform or as small accessory ossicles. An additional middle cuneiform has not been previously documented. We present the case of a patient with an additional ossicle that has the appearance and location of an additional middle cuneiform. Recognizing such an anatomical anomaly is essential for ruling out second metatarsal base or middle cuneiform fractures and for the preoperative planning of arthrodesis or open reduction and internal fixation procedures in this anatomical location. PMID:26224890

  12. Working Group 7 Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev S.; Berg J.

    2012-06-10

    The primary subject of working group 7 at the 2012 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop was muon accelerators for a muon collider or neutrino factory. Additionally, this working group included topics that did not fit well into other working groups. Two subjects were discussed by more than one speaker: lattices to create a perfectly integrable nonlinear lattice, and a Penning trap to create antihydrogen.

  13. Experimental and theoretical bases for mechanisms of antigen discrimination by T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kajita, Masashi K.; Yokota, Ryo; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Kobayashi, Tetsuya J.

    2015-01-01

    Interaction only within specific molecules is a requisite for accurate operations of a biochemical reaction in a cell where bulk of background molecules exist. While structural specificity is a well-established mechanism for specific interaction, biophysical and biochemical experiments indicate that the mechanism is not sufficient for accounting for the antigen discrimination by T cells. In addition, the antigen discrimination by T cells also accompanies three intriguing properties other than the specificity: sensitivity, speed, and concentration compensation. In this work, we review experimental and theoretical works on the antigen discrimination by focusing on these four properties and show future directions towards understanding of the fundamental principle for molecular discrimination. PMID:27493520

  14. Recovery after Work: The Role of Work Beliefs in the Unwinding Process

    PubMed Central

    Zoupanou, Zoe; Cropley, Mark; Rydstedt, Leif W.

    2013-01-01

    According to the Effort-Recovery model, mental or physical detachment from work is an important mechanism of work related recovery, as delayed recovery has been associated with range of negative health symptoms. In this paper, we examine whether recovery from work (in the form of mentally disengagement from work) is affected by the concept of ‘work ethic’, which refers to beliefs workers hold about their work and leisure and the effects of experiencing interruptions at work. Two indices of post-work recovery were utilized: problem solving pondering and psychological detachment. The study was conducted with 310 participants employed from diverse occupational sectors. Main effects of positive and negative appraisal of work interruption and beliefs were analysed using mediated and moderated regression analysis on problem-solving pondering and detachment. Weakened belief in wasted time as a partial mediator, reduced problem-solving pondering post work when interruptions were appraised as positive, and a high evaluation of leisure partially mediated problem-solving pondering when interruptions were appraised as positive. The results also showed that a high evaluation of centrality of work and leisure moderated the effect of negative appraisal of work interruption on elevated problem-solving pondering. Positive appraisal of work interruption was related to problem-solving pondering, and the strength of this association was further moderated by a strong belief in delay of gratification. In addition, employees' positive appraisal of work interruption was related to work detachment, and the strength of this association was further moderated by strong beliefs in hard work and self-reliance. These findings are discussed in terms of their theoretical and practical implications for employees who are strongly influenced by such work beliefs. PMID:24349060

  15. Fluoride Anion Recognition by a Multifunctional Urea Derivative: An Experimental and Theoretical Study

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Jana; Pérez-Ruiz, Raúl; Sampedro, Diego; Marqués-López, Eugenia; Herrera, Raquel P.; Díaz Díaz, David

    2016-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate the ability of a multifaceted N,N′-disubstituted urea to selectively recognize fluoride anion (F−) among other halides. This additional function is now added to its already reported organocatalytic and organogelator properties. The signaling mechanism relies on the formation of a charge-transfer (CT) complex between the urea-based sensor and F¯ in the ground state with a high association constant as demonstrated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The nature of the hydrogen bonding interaction between the sensor and F¯ was established by 1H-NMR studies and theoretical calculations. Moreover, the recovery of the sensor was achieved by addition of methanol. PMID:27171087

  16. Fluoride Anion Recognition by a Multifunctional Urea Derivative: An Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Jana; Pérez-Ruiz, Raúl; Sampedro, Diego; Marqués-López, Eugenia; Herrera, Raquel P; Díaz Díaz, David

    2016-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate the ability of a multifaceted N,N'-disubstituted urea to selectively recognize fluoride anion (F(-)) among other halides. This additional function is now added to its already reported organocatalytic and organogelator properties. The signaling mechanism relies on the formation of a charge-transfer (CT) complex between the urea-based sensor and F¯ in the ground state with a high association constant as demonstrated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The nature of the hydrogen bonding interaction between the sensor and F¯ was established by ¹H-NMR studies and theoretical calculations. Moreover, the recovery of the sensor was achieved by addition of methanol. PMID:27171087

  17. Carbamate deposit control additives

    SciTech Connect

    Honnen, L.R.; Lewis, R.A.

    1980-11-25

    Deposit control additives for internal combustion engines are provided which maintain cleanliness of intake systems without contributing to combustion chamber deposits. The additives are poly(oxyalkylene) carbamates comprising a hydrocarbyloxyterminated poly(Oxyalkylene) chain of 2-5 carbon oxyalkylene units bonded through an oxycarbonyl group to a nitrogen atom of ethylenediamine.

  18. Theoretical kinetics of O + C2H4

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Xiaohu; Jasper, Ahren W.; Zádor, Judit; Miller, James A.; Klippenstein, Stephen J.

    2016-06-01

    The reaction of atomic oxygen with ethylene is a fundamental oxidation step in combustion and is prototypical of reactions in which oxygen adds to double bonds. For 3O+C2H4 and for this class of reactions generally, decomposition of the initial adduct via spin-allowed reaction channels on the triplet surface competes with intersystem crossing (ISC) and a set of spin-forbidden reaction channels on the ground-state singlet surface. The two surfaces share some bimolecular products but feature different intermediates, pathways, and transition states. In addition, the overall product branching is therefore a sensitive function of the ISC rate. The 3O+C2H4 reaction has beenmore » extensively studied, but previous experimental work has not provided detailed branching information at elevated temperatures, while previous theoretical studies have employed empirical treatments of ISC. Here we predict the kinetics of 3O+C2H4 using an ab initio transition state theory based master equation (AITSTME) approach that includes an a priori description of ISC. Specifically, the ISC rate is calculated using Landau–Zener statistical theory, consideration of the four lowest-energy electronic states, and a direct classical trajectory study of the product branching immediately after ISC. The present theoretical results are largely in good agreement with existing low-temperature experimental kinetics and molecular beam studies. Good agreement is also found with past theoretical work, with the notable exception of the predicted product branching at elevated temperatures. Above ~1000 K, we predict CH2CHO+H and CH2+CH2O as the major products, which differs from the room temperature preference for CH3+HCO (which is assumed to remain at higher temperatures in some models) and from the prediction of a previous detailed master equation study.« less

  19. The NASTRAN theoretical manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Designed to accommodate additions and modifications, this commentary on NASTRAN describes the problem solving capabilities of the program in a narrative fashion and presents developments of the analytical and numerical procedures that underlie the program. Seventeen major sections and numerous subsections cover; the organizational aspects of the program, utility matrix routines, static structural analysis, heat transfer, dynamic structural analysis, computer graphics, special structural modeling techniques, error analysis, interaction between structures and fluids, and aeroelastic analysis.

  20. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  1. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  2. Cincinnati Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Duty, Chad E.; Love, Lonnie J.

    2015-03-04

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) worked with Cincinnati Incorporated (CI) to demonstrate Big Area Additive Manufacturing which increases the speed of the additive manufacturing (AM) process by over 1000X, increases the size of parts by over 10X and shows a cost reduction of over 100X. ORNL worked with CI to transition the Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) technology from a proof-of-principle (TRL 2-3) demonstration to a prototype product stage (TRL 7-8).

  3. Proof-Theoretic Semantics for a Natural Language Fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francez, Nissim; Dyckhoff, Roy

    We propose a Proof - Theoretic Semantics (PTS) for a (positive) fragment E+0 of Natural Language (NL) (English in this case). The semantics is intended [7] to be incorporated into actual grammars, within the framework of Type - Logical Grammar (TLG) [12]. Thereby, this semantics constitutes an alternative to the traditional model - theoretic semantics (MTS), originating in Montague's seminal work [11], used in TLG.

  4. Masculinities in Higher Education: Theoretical and Practical Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laker, Jason A., Ed.; Davis, Tracy, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Masculinities in Higher Education" provides empirical evidence, theoretical support, and developmental interventions for educators working with college men both in and out of the classroom. The critical philosophical perspective of the text challenges the status-quo and offers theoretically sound educational strategies to successfully promote…

  5. QTIPs: Questionable theoretical and interpretive practices in social psychology.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Mark J; Proulx, Travis

    2015-01-01

    One possible consequence of ideological homogeneity is the misinterpretation of data collected with otherwise solid methods. To help identify these issues outside of politically relevant research, we name and give broad descriptions to three questionable interpretive practices described by Duarte et al. and introduce three additional questionable theoretical practices that also reduce the theoretical power and paradigmatic scope of psychology. PMID:26785688

  6. Smog control fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lundby, W.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described of controlling, reducing or eliminating, ozone and related smog resulting from photochemical reactions between ozone and automotive or industrial gases comprising the addition of iodine or compounds of iodine to hydrocarbon-base fuels prior to or during combustion in an amount of about 1 part iodine per 240 to 10,000,000 parts fuel, by weight, to be accomplished by: (a) the addition of these inhibitors during or after the refining or manufacturing process of liquid fuels; (b) the production of these inhibitors for addition into fuel tanks, such as automotive or industrial tanks; or (c) the addition of these inhibitors into combustion chambers of equipment utilizing solid fuels for the purpose of reducing ozone.

  7. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wender, Ester H.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that food additives are causally associated with hyperkinesis and learning disabilities in children is reviewed, and available data are summarized. Available from: American Medical Association 535 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610. (JG)

  8. Additional Types of Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A Listen En Español Additional Types of Neuropathy Charcot's Joint Charcot's Joint, also called neuropathic arthropathy, ... can stop bone destruction and aid healing. Cranial Neuropathy Cranial neuropathy affects the 12 pairs of nerves ...

  9. The Effect of Additives on the Detonation Characteristics of a Liquid Explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haskins, Peter J.; Cook, Malcolm D.; Pilgrim, Alexandra J.; Briggs, Richard I.

    2001-06-01

    In this paper we report new experimental results on the detonation characteristics of nitromethane containing high percentages of essentially inert additives. The main body of the experimental work has concentrated on packed beds of both aluminium and glass beads, in a number of particle sizes. These have been saturated with nitromethane, and the detonation velocity and critical diameters determined. We provide a theoretical interpretation of our results and previous studies on liquid explosives containing both solid and liquid additives. In particular we discuss the propagation mechanism, and the requirements for thermal and mechanical equilibration, in such systems.

  10. Addition and subtraction operation of optical orbital angular momentum with dielectric metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Xunong; Li, Ying; Ling, Xiaohui; Liu, Yachao; Ke, Yougang; Fan, Dianyuan

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we propose a simple approach to realize addition and subtraction operation of optical orbital angular momentum (OAM) based on dielectric metasurfaces. The spin-orbit interaction of light in spatially inhomogeneous and anisotropic metasurfaces results in the spin-to-orbital angular momentum conversion. The subtraction system of OAM consists of two cascaded metasurfaces, while the addition system of OAM is constituted by inserting a half waveplate (HWP) between the two metasurfaces. Our experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical calculation. These results could be useful for OAM-carrying beams applied in optical communication, information processing, etc.

  11. Theoretical Equations of State for Porous/Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettger, Jonathan

    2013-06-01

    Although the equation of state (EOS) for a porous/granular material is identical to the EOS for the equivalent non-porous material, the requirement that the EOS must provide a realistic model of the material in its porous/granular state adds additional challenges for EOS modelers. These difficulties can be divided into two broad categories. First, dynamic processes often drive porous/granular materials through regions of thermodynamic phase space that are poorly described by standard wide-ranging tabular EOS. Second, for materials that are only available in a granular form, it can be difficult to accurately measure the material properties/parameters that are routinely used to constrain a theoretical EOS. This talk will attempt to describe in some detail the many challenges posed to EOS modelers by porous/granular materials. Work supported by the U.S. Dept. of Energy under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  12. Structural and Electronic Properties of Isolated Nanodiamonds: A Theoretical Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Raty, J; Galli, G

    2004-09-09

    Nanometer sized diamond has been found in meteorites, proto-planetary nebulae and interstellar dusts, as well as in residues of detonation and in diamond films. Remarkably, the size distribution of diamond nanoparticles appears to be peaked around 2-5 nm, and to be largely independent of preparation conditions. Using ab-initio calculations, we have shown that in this size range nanodiamond has a fullerene-like surface and, unlike silicon and germanium, exhibit very weak quantum confinement effects. We called these carbon nanoparticles bucky-diamonds: their atomic structure, predicted by simulations, is consistent with many experimental findings. In addition, we carried out calculations of the stability of nanodiamond which provided a unifying explanation of its size distribution in extra-terrestrial samples, and in ultra-crystalline diamond films. Here we present a summary of our theoretical results and we briefly outline work in progress on doping of nanodiamond with nitrogen.

  13. Information theoretic approaches to multidimensional neural computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, Jeffrey D.

    Many systems in nature process information by transforming inputs from their environments into observable output states. These systems are often difficult to study because they are performing computations on multidimensional inputs with many degrees of freedom using highly nonlinear functions. The work presented in this dissertation deals with some of the issues involved with characterizing real-world input/output systems and understanding the properties of idealized systems using information theoretic methods. Using the principle of maximum entropy, a family of models are created that are consistent with certain measurable correlations from an input/output dataset but are maximally unbiased in all other respects, thereby eliminating all unjustified assumptions about the computation. In certain cases, including spiking neurons, we show that these models also minimize the mutual information. This property gives one the advantage of being able to identify the relevant input/output statistics by calculating their information content. We argue that these maximum entropy models provide a much needed quantitative framework for characterizing and understanding sensory processing neurons that are selective for multiple stimulus features. To demonstrate their usefulness, these ideas are applied to neural recordings from macaque retina and thalamus. These neurons, which primarily respond to two stimulus features, are shown to be well described using only first and second order statistics, indicating that their firing rates encode information about stimulus correlations. In addition to modeling multi-feature computations in the relevant feature space, we also show that maximum entropy models are capable of discovering the relevant feature space themselves. This technique overcomes the disadvantages of two commonly used dimensionality reduction methods and is explored using several simulated neurons, as well as retinal and thalamic recordings. Finally, we ask how neurons in a

  14. Autonomy: an information theoretic perspective.

    PubMed

    Bertschinger, Nils; Olbrich, Eckehard; Ay, Nihat; Jost, Jürgen

    2008-02-01

    We present a tentative proposal for a quantitative measure of autonomy. This is something that, surprisingly, is rarely found in the literature, even though autonomy is considered to be a basic concept in many disciplines, including artificial life. We work in an information theoretic setting for which the distinction between system and environment is the starting point. As a first measure for autonomy, we propose the conditional mutual information between consecutive states of the system conditioned on the history of the environment. This works well when the system cannot influence the environment at all and the environment does not interact synergetically with the system. When, in contrast, the system has full control over its environment, we should instead neglect the environment history and simply take the mutual information between consecutive system states as a measure of autonomy. In the case of mutual interaction between system and environment there remains an ambiguity regarding whether system or environment has caused observed correlations. If the interaction structure of the system is known, we define a "causal" autonomy measure which allows this ambiguity to be resolved. Synergetic interactions still pose a problem since in this case causation cannot be attributed to the system or the environment alone. Moreover, our analysis reveals some subtle facets of the concept of autonomy, in particular with respect to the seemingly innocent system-environment distinction we took for granted, and raises the issue of the attribution of control, i.e. the responsibility for observed effects. To further explore these issues, we evaluate our autonomy measure for simple automata, an agent moving in space, gliders in the game of life, and the tessellation automaton for autopoiesis of Varela et al. [Varela, F.J., Maturana, H.R., Uribe, R., 1974. Autopoiesis: the organization of living systems, its characterization and a model. BioSystems 5, 187-196]. PMID:17897774

  15. Research in Theoretical Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, Hume A; Marfatia, Danny

    2014-09-24

    This document is the final report on activity supported under DOE Grant Number DE-FG02-13ER42024. The report covers the period July 15, 2013 – March 31, 2014. Faculty supported by the grant during the period were Danny Marfatia (1.0 FTE) and Hume Feldman (1% FTE). The grant partly supported University of Hawaii students, David Yaylali and Keita Fukushima, who are supervised by Jason Kumar. Both students are expected to graduate with Ph.D. degrees in 2014. Yaylali will be joining the University of Arizona theory group in Fall 2014 with a 3-year postdoctoral appointment under Keith Dienes. The group’s research covered topics subsumed under the Energy Frontier, the Intensity Frontier, and the Cosmic Frontier. Many theoretical results related to the Standard Model and models of new physics were published during the reporting period. The report contains brief project descriptions in Section 1. Sections 2 and 3 lists published and submitted work, respectively. Sections 4 and 5 summarize group activity including conferences, workshops and professional presentations.

  16. Theoretical model of ``fuzz'' growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasheninnikov, Sergei; Smirnov, Roman

    2012-10-01

    Recent more detailed experiments on tungsten irradiation with low energy helium plasma, relevant to the near-wall plasma conditions in magnetic fusion reactor like ITER, demonstrated (e.g. see Ref. 1) a very dramatic change in both surface morphology and near surface material structure of the samples. In particular, it was shown that a long (mm-scale) and thin (nm-scale) fiber-like structures filled with nano-bubbles, so-called ``fuzz,'' start to grow. In this work theoretical model of ``fuzz'' growth [2] describing the main features observed in experiments is presented. This model, based on the assumption of enhancement of creep of tungsten containing significant fraction of helium atoms and clusters. The results of the MD simulations [3] support this idea and demonstrate a strong reduction of the yield strength for all temperature range. They also show that the ``flow'' of tungsten strongly facilitates coagulation of helium clusters and the formation of nano-bubbles.[4pt] [1] M. J. Baldwin, et al., J. Nucl. Mater. 390-391 (2009) 885;[0pt] [2] S. I. Krasheninnikov, Physica Scripta T145 (2011) 014040;[0pt] [3] R. D. Smirnov and S. I. Krasheninnikov, submitted to J. Nucl. Materials.

  17. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  18. Rehabilitation Counselor Work Environment: Examining Congruence with Prototypic Work Personality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zanskas, Stephen; Strohmer, Douglas C.

    2010-01-01

    The profession of rehabilitation counseling has undergone extensive empirical study. Absent from this research has been a theoretical basis for describing and understanding the profession and its associated work environment. The focus of this study was to further our understanding of the nature of the rehabilitation counselor's work environment…

  19. Addition of one and two units of C{sub 2}H to styrene: A theoretical study of the C{sub 10}H{sub 9} and C{sub 12}H{sub 9} systems and implications toward growth of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Landera, Alexander; Mebel, Alexander M.; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2011-01-14

    Various mechanisms of the formation of naphthalene and its substituted derivatives have been investigated by ab initio G3(MP2,CC)/B3LYP/6-311G** calculations of potential energy surfaces for the reactions of one and two C{sub 2}H additions to styrene combined with RRKM calculations of product branching ratios under single-collision conditions. The results show that for the C{sub 2}H + styrene reaction, the dominant routes are H atom eliminations from the initial adducts; C{sub 2}H addition to the vinyl side chain of styrene is predicted to produce trans or cis conformations of phenylvinylacetylene (t- and c-PVA), whereas C{sub 2}H addition to the ortho carbon in the ring is expected to lead to the formation of o-ethynylstyrene. Although various reaction channels may lead to a second ring closure and the formation of naphthalene, they are not competitive with the direct H loss channels producing PVAs and ethynylstyrenes. However, c-PVA and o-ethynylstyrene may undergo a second addition of the ethynyl radical to ultimately produce substituted naphthalene derivatives. {alpha}- and {beta}-additions of C{sub 2}H to the side chain in c-PVA are calculated to form 2-ethynyl-naphthalene with branching ratios of about 30% and 96%, respectively; the major product in the case of {alpha}-addition would be cis-1-hexene-3,5-diynyl-benzene produced by an immediate H elimination from the initial adduct. C{sub 2}H addition to the ethynyl side chain in o-ethynylstyrene is predicted to lead to the formation of 1-ethynyl-naphthalene as the dominant product. The C{sub 2}H + styrene {yields}t-PVA+ H/c-PVA+ H/o-ethynylstyrene, C{sub 2}H +c-PVA{yields} 2-ethynyl-naphthalene + H, and C{sub 2}H +o-ethynylstyrene {yields} 1-ethynyl-naphthalene + H reactions are calculated to occur without a barrier and with high exothermicity, with all intermediates, transition states, and products lying significantly lower in energy than the initial reactants, and hence to be fast even at very low

  20. Intimate partner aggression and women's work outcomes.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Manon Mireille; Barling, Julian; Turner, Nick

    2014-10-01

    Using conservation of resources theory, we examined the relationship between intimate partner aggression enacted against heterosexual women and 3 types of work-related outcomes for these women: withdrawal while at work (i.e., cognitive distraction, work neglect), withdrawal from work (i.e., partial absenteeism, intentions to quit), and performance. In Study 1, we compared withdrawal both at and from work across 3 clinically categorized groups of women (n = 50), showing that experiencing physical aggression is related to higher work neglect. We replicated and extended these findings in Study 2 using a community sample of employed women (n = 249) by considering the incremental variance explained by both physical aggression and psychological aggression on these same outcomes. Results showed that physical aggression predicted higher levels of withdrawal both at and from work, with psychological aggression predicting additional variance in partial absenteeism over and above the effects of physical aggression. Study 3 extended the model to include academic performance as an outcome in a sample of female college students (n = 122) in dating relationships. Controlling for the women's conscientiousness, psychological aggression predicted lower academic performance after accounting for the effects of physical aggression. We discuss theoretical and practical implications of these results, as well as directions for future research. PMID:25068818

  1. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  2. Order Theoretical Semantic Recommendation

    SciTech Connect

    Joslyn, Cliff A.; Hogan, Emilie A.; Paulson, Patrick R.; Peterson, Elena S.; Stephan, Eric G.; Thomas, Dennis G.

    2013-07-23

    Mathematical concepts of order and ordering relations play multiple roles in semantic technologies. Discrete totally ordered data characterize both input streams and top-k rank-ordered recommendations and query output, while temporal attributes establish numerical total orders, either over time points or in the more complex case of startend temporal intervals. But also of note are the fully partially ordered data, including both lattices and non-lattices, which actually dominate the semantic strcuture of ontological systems. Scalar semantic similarities over partially-ordered semantic data are traditionally used to return rank-ordered recommendations, but these require complementation with true metrics available over partially ordered sets. In this paper we report on our work in the foundations of partial order measurement in ontologies, with application to top-k semantic recommendation in workflows.

  3. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Deanin, R D

    1975-01-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products. PMID:1175566

  4. Theoretical and experimental study on electron interactions with chlorobenzene: Shape resonances and differential cross sections.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Alessandra Souza; Varella, Márcio T do N; Sanchez, Sergio d'A; Ameixa, João; Blanco, Francisco; García, Gustavo; Limão-Vieira, Paulo; Ferreira da Silva, Filipe; Bettega, Márcio H F

    2016-08-28

    In this work, we report theoretical and experimental cross sections for elastic scattering of electrons by chlorobenzene (ClB). The theoretical integral and differential cross sections (DCSs) were obtained with the Schwinger multichannel method implemented with pseudopotentials (SMCPP) and the independent atom method with screening corrected additivity rule (IAM-SCAR). The calculations with the SMCPP method were done in the static-exchange (SE) approximation, for energies above 12 eV, and in the static-exchange plus polarization approximation, for energies up to 12 eV. The calculations with the IAM-SCAR method covered energies up to 500 eV. The experimental differential cross sections were obtained in the high resolution electron energy loss spectrometer VG-SEELS 400, in Lisbon, for electron energies from 8.0 eV to 50 eV and angular range from 7(∘) to 110(∘). From the present theoretical integral cross section (ICS) we discuss the low-energy shape-resonances present in chlorobenzene and compare our computed resonance spectra with available electron transmission spectroscopy data present in the literature. Since there is no other work in the literature reporting differential cross sections for this molecule, we compare our theoretical and experimental DCSs with experimental data available for the parent molecule benzene. PMID:27586926

  5. Good Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjorkquist, David C.

    1991-01-01

    The deterioration of the quality of work and the resulting impact on workers are of increasing concern. Those being prepared for entry into the workplace can also be prepared for the context and condition of work. (SK)

  6. Recent Additions for 1997

    EPA Science Inventory

    December 15, 1997
    Minutes of the Stakeholder Meetings on the Report of the JSA Shrimp Virus Work Group

    November 21, 1997
  7. Biobased lubricant additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fully biobased lubricants are those formulated using all biobased ingredients, i.e. biobased base oils and biobased additives. Such formulations provide the maximum environmental, safety, and economic benefits expected from a biobased product. Currently, there are a number of biobased base oils that...

  8. Multifunctional fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Baillargeon, D.J.; Cardis, A.B.; Heck, D.B.

    1991-03-26

    This paper discusses a composition comprising a major amount of a liquid hydrocarbyl fuel and a minor low-temperature flow properties improving amount of an additive product of the reaction of a suitable diol and product of a benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride and a long-chain hydrocarbyl aminoalcohol.

  9. Working Mothers

    MedlinePlus

    ... for their child when child care arrangements have broken down, or to take their child to necessary appointments. When to Return to Work A woman’s decision to return to work must take into account her own needs as well as those of her family. If you are considering returning to work, try ...

  10. Theoretical analysis of sheet metal formability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xinhai

    Sheet metal forming processes are among the most important metal-working operations. These processes account for a sizable proportion of manufactured goods made in industrialized countries each year. Furthermore, to reduce the cost and increase the performance of manufactured products, in addition to the environmental concern, more and more light weight and high strength materials have been used as a substitute to the conventional steel. These materials usually have limited formability, thus, a thorough understanding of the deformation processes and the factors limiting the forming of sound parts is important, not only from a scientific or engineering viewpoint, but also from an economic point of view. An extensive review of previous studies pertaining to theoretical analyses of Forming Limit Diagrams (FLDs) is contained in Chapter I. A numerical model to analyze the neck evolution process is outlined in Chapter II. With the use of strain gradient theory, the effect of initial defect profile on the necking process is analyzed. In the third chapter, the method proposed by Storen and Rice is adopted to analyze the initiation of localized neck and predict the corresponding FLDs. In view of the fact that the width of the localized neck is narrow, the deformation inside the neck region is constrained by the material in the neighboring homogeneous region. The relative rotation effect may then be assumed to be small and is thus neglected. In Chapter IV, Hill's 1948 yield criterion and strain gradient theory are employed to obtain FLDs, for planar anisotropic sheet materials by using bifurcation analysis. The effects of the strain gradient coefficient c and the material anisotropic parameters R's on the orientation of the neck and FLDs are analyzed in a systematic manner and compared with experiments. In Chapter V, Hill's 79 non-quadratic yield criterion with a deformation theory of plasticity is used along with bifurcation analyses to derive a general analytical

  11. Theoretical horizontal-branch evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweigart, Allen V.

    1987-01-01

    The general features of the theoretical evolution of canonical horizontal-branch (HB) stars are briefly reviewed with specific emphasis on the track morphology in the HR diagram and the determination of the globular cluster helium abundance. The observational evidence for the occurrence of semiconvection is discussed together with some remaining theoretical uncertainty.

  12. Boron addition to alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Coad, B. C.

    1985-08-20

    A process for addition of boron to an alloy which involves forming a melt of the alloy and a reactive metal, selected from the group consisting of aluminum, titanium, zirconium and mixtures thereof to the melt, maintaining the resulting reactive mixture in the molten state and reacting the boric oxide with the reactive metal to convert at least a portion of the boric oxide to boron which dissolves in the resulting melt, and to convert at least portion of the reactive metal to the reactive metal oxide, which oxide remains with the resulting melt, and pouring the resulting melt into a gas stream to form a first atomized powder which is subsequently remelted with further addition of boric oxide, re-atomized, and thus reprocessed to convert essentially all the reactive metal to metal oxide to produce a powdered alloy containing specified amounts of boron.

  13. Tackifier for addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. M.; St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    A modification to the addition polyimide, LaRC-160, was prepared to improve tack and drape and increase prepeg out-time. The essentially solventless, high viscosity laminating resin is synthesized from low cost liquid monomers. The modified version takes advantage of a reactive, liquid plasticizer which is used in place of solvent and helps solve a major problem of maintaining good prepeg tack and drape, or the ability of the prepeg to adhere to adjacent plies and conform to a desired shape during the lay up process. This alternate solventless approach allows both longer life of the polymer prepeg and the processing of low void laminates. This approach appears to be applicable to all addition polyimide systems.

  14. Vinyl capped addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D. (Inventor); Malarik, Diane C. (Inventor); Delvigs, Peter (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimide resins (PMR) are generally useful where high strength and temperature capabilities are required (at temperatures up to about 700 F). Polyimide resins are particularly useful in applications such as jet engine compressor components, for example, blades, vanes, air seals, air splitters, and engine casing parts. Aromatic vinyl capped addition polyimides are obtained by reacting a diamine, an ester of tetracarboxylic acid, and an aromatic vinyl compound. Low void materials with improved oxidative stability when exposed to 700 F air may be fabricated as fiber reinforced high molecular weight capped polyimide composites. The aromatic vinyl capped polyimides are provided with a more aromatic nature and are more thermally stable than highly aliphatic, norbornenyl-type end-capped polyimides employed in PMR resins. The substitution of aromatic vinyl end-caps for norbornenyl end-caps in addition polyimides results in polymers with improved oxidative stability.

  15. [Biologically active food additives].

    PubMed

    Velichko, M A; Shevchenko, V P

    1998-07-01

    More than half out of 40 projects for the medical science development by the year of 2000 have been connected with the bio-active edible additives that are called "the food of XXI century", non-pharmacological means for many diseases. Most of these additives--nutricevtics and parapharmacevtics--are intended for the enrichment of food rations for the sick or healthy people. The ecologicaly safest and most effective are combined domestic adaptogens with immuno-modulating and antioxidating action that give anabolic and stimulating effect,--"leveton", "phytoton" and "adapton". The MKTs-229 tablets are residue discharge means. For atherosclerosis and general adiposis they recommend "tsar tablets" and "aiconol (ikhtien)"--on the base of cod-liver oil or "splat" made out of seaweed (algae). All these preparations have been clinically tested and received hygiene certificates from the Institute of Dietology of the Russian Academy of Medical Science. PMID:9752776

  16. Electrophilic addition of astatine

    SciTech Connect

    Norseev, Yu.V.; Vasaros, L.; Nhan, D.D.; Huan, N.K.

    1988-03-01

    It has been shown for the first time that astatine is capable of undergoing addition reactions to unsaturated hydrocarbons. A new compound of astatine, viz., ethylene astatohydrin, has been obtained, and its retention numbers of squalane, Apiezon, and tricresyl phosphate have been found. The influence of various factors on the formation of ethylene astatohydrin has been studied. It has been concluded on the basis of the results obtained that the univalent cations of astatine in an acidic medium is protonated hypoastatous acid.

  17. Hydrocarbon fuel additive

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrogio, S.

    1989-02-28

    This patent describes the method of fuel storage or combustion, wherein the fuel supply contains small amounts of water, the step of adding to the fuel supply an additive comprising a blend of a hydrophilic agent chosen from the group of ethylene glycol, n-butyl alcohol, and cellosolve in the range of 22-37% by weight; ethoxylated nonylphenol in the range of 26-35% by weight; nonylphenol polyethylene glycol ether in the range of 32-43% by weight.

  18. Theoretical Study of a Spherical Plasma Focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ay, Yasar

    A theoretical model is developed for two concentric electrodes spherical plasma focus device in order to investigate the plasma sheath dynamics, radiative emission, and the ion properties. The work focuses on the model development of the plasma sheath dynamics and its validation, followed by studying of the radiation effects and the beam-ion properties in such unique geometry as a pulsed source for neutrons, soft and hard x-rays, and electron and ion beams. Chapter 1 is an introduction on fusion systems including plasma focus. Chapter 2 is an extensive literature survey on plasma focus modeling and experiments including the various radiations and their mechanism. Chapter 3 details modeling and validation of the plasma sheath dynamics model with comparison between hydrogen, deuterium, tritium and deuterium-tritium mixture for the production of pulsed neutrons. Chapter 4 is a study of the radiative phase, in which neutron yield is investigated, as well as the predicted beam-ion properties. Chapter 5 summarizes and discusses the results. Chapter 6 provides concluding remarks and proposed future works. The phases of the developed model are the rundown phase I, rundown phase II, the reflected phase and a radiative phase. The rundown phase I starts immediately after the completion of the gas breakdown and ends when the current sheath reaches the equator point of the spherical shape. Then immediately followed by rundown phase II to start and it ends when the shock front hits the axis, which is the beginning of the reflected shock phase. Reflected shock front moves towards the incoming current sheath and meets it which is both the end of the reflected shock phase and the beginning of the radiative phase. After the reflected shock front and the current sheath meet, the current sheath continues to move radially inward by compressing the produced plasma column until it reaches the axis. Since the discharge current contains important information about the plasma dynamic

  19. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online. PMID:24729671

  20. Work organization and the health of bank employees.

    PubMed

    Silva, Juliana Lemos; Navarro, Vera Lucia

    2012-01-01

    The Brazilian banking sector has undergone an intense restructuring process and taken a leading position in the incorporation of new technologies and organizational innovations. Computerization in the industry, in association with forms of work organization, has resulted in changes that reflect on the workers' health. Based on the theoretical and methodological frameworks of historical and dialectical materialism, this qualitative study investigates the work conditions of bank employees in order to identify the extent to which changes in work organization interfere with these workers' health. Data were collected through interviews held with 11 bank employees. In addition to physical sickening due to occupational diseases directly related to work intensification, the results also show an increased incidence of mental suffering and a feeling of loss of professional identity. Work-related frustration, instability and concerns related to psychological pressure resulting from the need to achieve goals predominated in the reports. PMID:22699722

  1. Theoretical Study on Standing Wave Thermoacoustic Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalra, S.; Desai, K. P.; Naik, H. B.; Atrey, M. D.

    Applications of thermoacoustic engines are not limited to driving pulse tube cryocoolers. The performance of a thermoacoustic engine is governed by various design parameters like type of resonator, stack geometry, frequency, type of working gas etc. and various operating parameters like heat input, charging pressure etc. It is very important to arrive at an optimum configuration of the engine for which a theoretical model is required. In the present work, a theoretical analysis, based on linear acoustic theory of a standing wave type half wavelength thermoacoustic engine is carried out using DeltaEC software. The system dimensions like length of resonator, stack, hot and cold heat exchangers are fixed with a helium-argon mixture as the working gas and a parallel plate type stack. Later on, two plate spacings, corresponding to helium-argon mixture and nitrogen gas, are used for carrying out analysis with helium, argon, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and helium-argon mixture as working gases of the system. The effect of charging pressure on the performance of the system is studied in terms of resonating frequency, onset temperature, pressure amplitude, acoustic power and efficiency. The conclusions derived from the analysis are reported in the paper.

  2. Siloxane containing addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maudgal, S.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Addition polyimide oligomers have been synthesized from bis(gamma-aminopropyl) tetramethyldisiloxane and 3, 3', 4, 4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride using a variety of latent crosslinking groups as endcappers. The prepolymers were isolated and characterized for solubility (in amide, chlorinated and ether solvents), melt flow and cure properties. The most promising systems, maleimide and acetylene terminated prepolymers, were selected for detailed study. Graphite cloth reinforced composites were prepared and properties compared with those of graphite/Kerimid 601, a commercially available bismaleimide. Mixtures of the maleimide terminated system with Kerimid 601, in varying proportions, were also studied.

  3. Oil additive process

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, H.

    1988-10-18

    This patent describes a method of making an additive comprising: (a) adding 2 parts by volume of 3% sodium hypochlorite to 45 parts by volume of diesel oil fuel to form a sulphur free fuel, (b) removing all water and foreign matter formed by the sodium hypochlorite, (c) blending 30 parts by volume of 24% lead naphthanate with 15 parts by volume of the sulphur free fuel, 15 parts by volume of light-weight material oil to form a blended mixture, and (d) heating the blended mixture slowly and uniformly to 152F.

  4. Theory of atomic additivity in molecular hyperpolizabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, James K.

    1987-01-01

    Hyperpolarizability is a function of frequency. This is called dispersion. Because of the Kramers-Kronig relations, researchers expect that a material that is dispersing light is also absorbing it. Where there is both dispersion and absorption, the molecular polarizabilities are complex functions of the frequency. This led researchers to consider atomic additivity in both the real and imaginary parts of the ordinary and hyperpolarizabilities. This effort is desirable not only from a theoretical point of view, but also because of the existence of a large body of complex refractive index data, which may be used to test the additivity principle with the complex valued ordinary dipole polarizability.

  5. Theoretical description of metabolism using queueing theory.

    PubMed

    Evstigneev, Vladyslav P; Holyavka, Marina G; Khrapatiy, Sergii V; Evstigneev, Maxim P

    2014-09-01

    A theoretical description of the process of metabolism has been developed on the basis of the Pachinko model (see Nicholson and Wilson in Nat Rev Drug Discov 2:668-676, 2003) and the queueing theory. The suggested approach relies on the probabilistic nature of the metabolic events and the Poisson distribution of the incoming flow of substrate molecules. The main focus of the work is an output flow of metabolites or the effectiveness of metabolism process. Two simplest models have been analyzed: short- and long-living complexes of the source molecules with a metabolizing point (Hole) without queuing. It has been concluded that the approach based on queueing theory enables a very broad range of metabolic events to be described theoretically from a single probabilistic point of view. PMID:25142745

  6. Theoretical Issues of Cluster Pattern Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barneva, Reneta P.; Brimkov, Valentin E.; Kanev, Kamen K.

    Since the 80s, when the computer mouse was first invented, point-and-click functionality became widely adopted, in particular, for work with images and GUIs. It would be useful to provide such functionality for printed materials, as well. A direct point-and-click functionality should not require tablet-like devices, but should rather use an embedded marking which defines a coordinate system within the image. An original approach and related technology for direct interface, known as Cluster Pattern Interface (CLUSPI), was proposed [12]. It is based on an unobtrusive layer of the image defining a coordinate system, a camera-based pointing device, and decoding software. CLUSPI technology was invented and patented by one of the authors of this paper. Here we present the theoretical (mathematical) foundations of the methods developed. We also describe some theoretical challenges and propose solutions to them.

  7. Working Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckett, David

    The resurgence of "lifelong learning" has renewed consideration of the nature of "working knowledge." Lifelong learning has many aspects, including construction and distribution of individuals' very self-hood, educational institutions' role in capturing informal experiences, and the juggling required between family and work-based responsibilities.…

  8. Projects Work!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Textor, Martin R.

    2005-01-01

    The great educational value of projects is emphasized by contrasting negative aspects of the life of today's children with the goals of project work. This is illustrated by a project "Shopping." It is shown what children are learning in such projects and what the advantages of project work are. Relevant topic areas, criteria for selecting a…

  9. Effort-reward imbalance at work and cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Siegrist, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Working conditions and employment arrangements make a significant contribution to the burden of cardiovascular disease, in particular in modern societies where mental and emotional demands and threats are becoming widespread. Occupational research has identified health-adverse features of modern work with the help of theoretical models. One such model, effort-reward imbalance, has been developed by this author and his group and has been widely tested in epidemiological and experimental studies. The model claims that stressful experience at work is elicited by a lack of reciprocity between efforts spent at work and rewards received in return, where rewards include money, promotion prospects, job security, and esteem. Results demonstrate elevated risks of coronary heart disease among employees exposed to effort-reward imbalance. Moreover, in ambulatory and experimental investigations, elevated heart rate and blood pressure and altered secretion of stress hormones were observed under these conditions. Although additional scientific evidence is needed, available findings call for practical measures towards improving quality of work, most importantly at the level of single companies and organisations. This conclusion is supported by first results from intervention studies that are guided by this theoretical approach. In view of the burden of cardiovascular disease attributable to unfavourable working conditions, such efforts are well justified and need to be extended in order to promote healthy work. PMID:20934954

  10. Performance Boosting Additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mainstream Engineering Corporation was awarded Phase I and Phase II contracts from Goddard Space Flight Center's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program in early 1990. With support from the SBIR program, Mainstream Engineering Corporation has developed a unique low cost additive, QwikBoost (TM), that increases the performance of air conditioners, heat pumps, refrigerators, and freezers. Because of the energy and environmental benefits of QwikBoost, Mainstream received the Tibbetts Award at a White House Ceremony on October 16, 1997. QwikBoost was introduced at the 1998 International Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Exposition. QwikBoost is packaged in a handy 3-ounce can (pressurized with R-134a) and will be available for automotive air conditioning systems in summer 1998.

  11. Sewage sludge additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Mueller, W. A.; Ingham, J. D. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The additive is for a raw sewage treatment process of the type where settling tanks are used for the purpose of permitting the suspended matter in the raw sewage to be settled as well as to permit adsorption of the dissolved contaminants in the water of the sewage. The sludge, which settles down to the bottom of the settling tank is extracted, pyrolyzed and activated to form activated carbon and ash which is mixed with the sewage prior to its introduction into the settling tank. The sludge does not provide all of the activated carbon and ash required for adequate treatment of the raw sewage. It is necessary to add carbon to the process and instead of expensive commercial carbon, coal is used to provide the carbon supplement.

  12. Perspectives on Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourell, David L.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has skyrocketed in visibility commercially and in the public sector. This article describes the development of this field from early layered manufacturing approaches of photosculpture, topography, and material deposition. Certain precursors to modern AM processes are also briefly described. The growth of the field over the last 30 years is presented. Included is the standard delineation of AM technologies into seven broad categories. The economics of AM part generation is considered, and the impacts of the economics on application sectors are described. On the basis of current trends, the future outlook will include a convergence of AM fabricators, mass-produced AM fabricators, enabling of topology optimization designs, and specialization in the AM legal arena. Long-term developments with huge impact are organ printing and volume-based printing.

  13. New addition curing polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frimer, Aryeh A.; Cavano, Paul

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to improve the thermal-oxidative stability (TOS) of PMR-type polymers, the use of 1,4-phenylenebis (phenylmaleic anhydride) PPMA, was evaluated. Two series of nadic end-capped addition curing polyimides were prepared by imidizing PPMA with either 4,4'-methylene dianiline or p-phenylenediamine. The first resulted in improved solubility and increased resin flow while the latter yielded a compression molded neat resin sample with a T(sub g) of 408 C, close to 70 C higher than PME-15. The performance of these materials in long term weight loss studies was below that of PMR-15, independent of post-cure conditions. These results can be rationalized in terms of the thermal lability of the pendant phenyl groups and the incomplete imidization of the sterically congested PPMA. The preparation of model compounds as well as future research directions are discussed.

  14. Theoretical Foundations of Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jessup-Anger, Jody E.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the historical and contemporary theoretical underpinnings of learning communities and argues that there is a need for more complex models in conceptualizing and assessing their effectiveness.

  15. 10 CFR 2.625 - Additional considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Work Authorizations Early Partial Decisions on Site Suitability-Combined License Under 10 Cfr Part 52 § 2.625 Additional considerations. (a) The Commission will not conduct more than one review of site... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional considerations. 2.625 Section 2.625...

  16. 10 CFR 2.625 - Additional considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Work Authorizations Early Partial Decisions on Site Suitability-Combined License Under 10 Cfr Part 52 § 2.625 Additional considerations. (a) The Commission will not conduct more than one review of site... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional considerations. 2.625 Section 2.625...

  17. Multi-heat addition turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franciscus, Leo C. (Inventor); Brabbs, Theodore A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A multi-heat addition turbine engine (MHATE) incorporates a plurality of heat addition devices to transfer energy to air and a plurality of turbines to extract energy from the air while converting it to work. The MHATE provides dry power and lower fuel consumption or lower combustor exit temperatures.

  18. 76 FR 5142 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ... Procurement List. Service Type/Location: Base Operations Support Service Directorate of Public Works (DPW... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed additions to the Procurement...

  19. The Higgs Working Group: Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    D. Cavalli et al.

    2004-03-18

    In this working group we have investigated the prospects for Higgs boson searches at the Tevatron and LHC and, in particular, the potential of these colliders to determine the Higgs properties once these particles have been found. The analyses were done in the framework of the Standard Model (SM) and its supersymmetric extensions as the minimal (MSSM) and next-to-minimal (NMSSM) supersymmetric extensions. The work for the discovery potential of the LHC mainly concentrated on the difficult regions of previous analyses as those which are plagued by invisible Higgs decays and Higgs decays into supersymmetric particles. Moreover, the additional signatures provided by the weak vector-boson fusion process (WBF) have been addressed and found to confirm the results of previous analyses. A major experimental effort has been put onto charged Higgs boson analyses. The final outcome was a significant improvement of the discovery potential at the Tevatron and LHC than previous analyses suggested. For an accurate determination of Higgs boson couplings, the theoretical predictions for the signal and background processes have to be improved. A lot of progress has been made during and after this workshop for the gluon-fusion gg {yields} H + (0, 1, 2jets) and the associated t{bar t}H production process. A thorough study of the present theoretical uncertainties of signal and background processes has been initialized, culminating in a list of open theoretical problems. A problem of major experimental interest is the proper treatment of processes involving bottom quark densities, which is crucial for some important signal and background processes. Further theoretical improvements have been achieved for the MSSM Higgs boson masses and Higgs bosons in the NMSSM. This report summarizes our work. The first part deals with theoretical developments for the signal and background processes. The second part gives an overview of the present status of Higgs boson searches at the Tevatron. The

  20. [Wet work].

    PubMed

    Kieć-Swierczyńska, Marta; Chomiczewska, Dorota; Krecisz, Beata

    2010-01-01

    Wet work is one of the most important risk factors of occupational skin diseases. Exposure of hands to the wet environment for more than 2 hours daily, wearing moisture-proof protective gloves for a corresponding period of time or necessity to wash hands frequently lead to the disruption of epidermal stratum corneum, damage to skin barrier function and induction of irritant contact dermatitis. It may also promote penetration of allergens into the skin and increase the risk of sensitization to occupational allergens. Exposure to wet work plays a significant role in occupations, such as hairdressers and barbers, nurses and other health care workers, cleaning staff, food handlers and metalworkers. It is more common among women because many occupations involving wet work are female-dominated. The incidence of wet-work-induced occupational skin diseases can be reduced by taking appropriate preventive measures. These include identification of high-risk groups, education of workers, organization of work enabling to minimize the exposure to wet work, use of personal protective equipment and skin care after work. PMID:20437890

  1. Working longer.

    PubMed

    2014-11-27

    New NHS pension scheme rules come into force in April, and one of the changes is a higher retirement age. To help staff plan for this, NHS Employers' Working Longer Group will publish a suite a resources to help employees understand and prepare for the implications of working into their late sixties. In the meantime, a factsheet with information for staff can be found at tinyurl.com/mjb4u5f and for employers at http://www.nhsemployers.org/your-workforce/need-to-know/working-longer-group. PMID:25428321

  2. Does Work Experience Actually Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, John

    2012-01-01

    As unemployment levels rise, so education and training move into the policy spotlight. For the government, this is a very uncomfortable place to be right now. A number of large companies have withdrawn from the flagship Work Programme--under which jobseekers are invited to take up unpaid work placements of between two and eight weeks--amid…

  3. Is New Work Good Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westwood, Andy

    Some new work is good work. Quality is ultimately defined by the individual. However, these perceptions are inevitably colored by the circumstances in which people find themselves, by the time, place, and wide range of motivations for having to do a particular job in the first place. One person's quality may be another's purgatory and vice versa.…

  4. Which Welfare Work Strategies Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, Nancy S.

    1986-01-01

    AFDC Welfare work strategies have been implemented to help AFDC (Aid to Families with Dependent Children) recipients secure unsubsidized employment. Reviews research on employment programs for AFDC clients and highlights the respective advantages of these programs. Suggests program changes to improve welfare work strategies. (Author/ABB)

  5. Does "Social Work Abstracts" Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Gary; Barker, Kathleen; Covert-Vail, Lucinda; Rosenberg, Gary; Cohen, Stephanie A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The current study seeks to provide estimates of the adequacy of journal coverage in the Social Work Abstracts (SWA) database. Method: A total of 23 journals listed in the Journal Citation Reports social work category during the 1997 to 2005 period were selected for study. Issue-level coverage estimates were obtained for SWA and…

  6. Working Parents

    MedlinePlus

    ... as the family's values, fathers may assume more responsibility for child care and housework than has traditionally ... and fatigue as they try to juggle their responsibilities at home and at work. If you are ...

  7. Role Resources and Work-Family Enrichment: The Role of Work Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siu, Oi-ling; Lu, Jia-fang; Brough, Paula; Lu, Chang-qin; Bakker, Arnold B.; Kalliath, Thomas; O'Driscoll, Michael; Phillips, David R.; Chen, Wei-qing; Lo, Danny; Sit, Cindy; Shi, Kan

    2010-01-01

    This article proposes a theoretical model of work-family enrichment and tests the mediating role of work engagement. The inclusion of work engagement extends prior research on work-family interface, and allows for examination of the effects of role resources (job resources, family support) on work-family enrichment. A two-wave survey was conducted…

  8. Theoretical molecular studies of astrophysical interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, George

    1991-01-01

    When work under this grant began in 1974 there was a great need for state-to-state collisional excitation rates for interstellar molecules observed by radio astronomers. These were required to interpret observed line intensities in terms of local temperatures and densities, but, owing to lack of experimental or theoretical values, estimates then being used for this purpose ranged over several orders of magnitude. A problem of particular interest was collisional excitation of formaldehyde; Townes and Cheung had suggested that the relative size of different state-to-state rates (propensity rules) was responsible for the anomalous absorption observed for this species. We believed that numerical molecular scattering techniques (in particular the close coupling or coupled channel method) could be used to obtain accurate results, and that these would be computationally feasible since only a few molecular rotational levels are populated at the low temperatures thought to prevail in the observed regions. Such calculations also require detailed knowledge of the intermolecular forces, but we thought that those could also be obtained with sufficient accuracy by theoretical (quantum chemical) techniques. Others, notably Roy Gordon at Harvard, had made progress in solving the molecular scattering equations, generally using semi-empirical intermolecular potentials. Work done under this grant generalized Gordon's scattering code, and introduced the use of theoretical interaction potentials obtained by solving the molecular Schroedinger equation. Earlier work had considered only the excitation of a diatomic molecule by collisions with an atom, and we extended the formalism to include excitation of more general molecular rotors (e.g., H2CO, NH2, and H2O) and also collisions of two rotors (e.g., H2-H2).

  9. Theoretical plurality and pluralism in psychoanalytic practice.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Juan Pablo

    2008-06-01

    The author begins by characterizing the present situation of psychoanalysis as one of increasing theoretical and practical diversity. The aim of this paper is to consider in depth the impact of theoretical plurality on clinical practice. After noting that the analyst has much more than evenly suspended attention in his(2)mind as he works with his patient in a session, the author reviews both older and more recent contributions on what the analyst has in his mind when working with a patient. He suggests that the subject has been addressed mainly from a single-person perspective. In this connection, and on the basis of clinical material, he attempts to show how, against the background of the 'implicit use of explicit theories', an ongoing process of decision-making that is co-determined by the patient's action and reaction takes place in the analyst's mind. In his analysis of a session, the author introduces the concepts of theoretical reason and practical reason, and contends that, whatever theories the analyst may have implicitly or explicitly in his mind, they ultimately yield to practical reasons. Pursuing the same line of thought, he describes validation in the clinical context as a single, wide-ranging, continuous process of social and linguistic co-construction of the intersubjective reality between patient and analyst. This process includes mutual aspects of observation and of communicative and pragmatic validation. In conclusion, he suggests that the figure of the craftsman is an appropriate description of the analyst in this conception of his work. PMID:18558957

  10. [Work addiction].

    PubMed

    Mentzel, G

    1979-01-01

    The symptomatology of workaholism (work addiction) was presented in the form of a questionnaire and compared with other forms of addiction, especially alcoholism. Then a case was used as example to illustrate the development of the illness and its psychodynamics. The therapy procedure was also briefly explained. Moreover the psychodynamics of workaholism (work addiction) are described, once again in comparison to other addictions. Finally the author gives general guidelines for therapy. PMID:452731

  11. Bundling in semiflexible polymers: A theoretical overview.

    PubMed

    Benetatos, Panayotis; Jho, YongSeok

    2016-06-01

    Supramolecular assemblies of polymers are key modules to sustain the structure of cells and their function. The main elements of these assemblies are charged semiflexible polymers (polyelectrolytes) generally interacting via a long(er)-range repulsion and a short(er)-range attraction. The most common supramolecular structure formed by these polymers is the bundle. In the present paper, we critically review some recent theoretical and computational advances on the problem of bundle formation, and point a few promising directions for future work. PMID:26813628

  12. [Experimental and theoretical high energy physics program

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, J.; Gaidos, J.A.; Loeffler, F.J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Palfrey, T.R.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.

    1993-04-01

    Experimental and theoretical high-energy physics research at Purdue is summarized in a number of reports. Subjects treated include the following: the CLEO experiment for the study of heavy flavor physics; gas microstrip detectors; particle astrophysics; affine Kac{endash}Moody algebra; nonperturbative mass bounds on scalar and fermion systems due to triviality and vacuum stability constraints; resonance neutrino oscillations; e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions at CERN; {bar p}{endash}p collisions at FNAL; accelerator physics at Fermilab; development work for the SDC detector at SSC; TOPAZ; D-zero physics; physics beyond the standard model; and the Collider Detector at Fermilab. (RWR)

  13. Recent Theoretical Studies On Excitation and Recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pradhan, Anil K.

    2000-01-01

    New advances in the theoretical treatment of atomic processes in plasmas are described. These enable not only an integrated, unified, and self-consistent treatment of important radiative and collisional processes, but also large-scale computation of atomic data with high accuracy. An extension of the R-matrix work, from excitation and photoionization to electron-ion recombination, includes a unified method that subsumes both the radiative and the di-electronic recombination processes in an ab initio manner. The extensive collisional calculations for iron and iron-peak elements under the Iron Project are also discussed.

  14. Design Of Theoretically Optimal Thermoacoustic Cooling Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisovský, Tomáš; Vít, Tomáš

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this article is to design theoretically optimal thermoacoustic cooling device. The opening chapter gives the reader brief introduction to thermoacoustic, specializing in the thermoacoustic principle in refrigerator regime. Subsequent part of the article aims to explain the principle on which thermoacoustic is simulated in DeltaEC. Numbers of executed numerical simulations are listed and the resulting thermoacoustic cooling device design is presented along with its main operation characteristics. In conclusion, recommendations for future experimental work are given and the results are discussed.

  15. A quantum theoretical study of polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Luke A.

    1987-01-01

    One of the most important contributions of theoretical chemistry is the correct prediction of properties of materials before any costly experimental work begins. This is especially true in the field of electrically conducting polymers. Development of the Valence Effective Hamiltonian (VEH) technique for the calculation of the band structure of polymers was initiated. The necessary VEH potentials were developed for the sulfur and oxygen atoms within the particular molecular environments and the explanation explored for the success of this approximate method in predicting the optical properties of conducting polymers.

  16. Theoretical photoabsorption spectra of Ar n+ clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doltsinis, Nikos L.; Knowles, Peter J.

    2000-08-01

    The photoabsorption spectra of selected Ar n+ clusters ( n=7, 8, 17, 19, 23) have been investigated theoretically using an extended Diatomics-in-Molecules approach including induced dipole - induced dipole and spin-orbit coupling interaction effects. Our calculations at 0 K confirm the experimentally observed spectral red-shift of the visible photoabsorption peak in the region 15< n<20 [Levinger et al., J. Chem. Phys. 89 (1988) 5654]. Furthermore, we have been able to reproduce the additional red-shift measured for 7⩽ n⩽9 [Haberland et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 67 (1991) 3290] by carrying out finite temperature Monte Carlo simulations.

  17. Exploring Job Satisfaction of Nursing Faculty: Theoretical Approaches.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingchen; Liesveld, Judy

    2015-01-01

    The Future of Nursing report identified the shortage of nursing faculty as 1 of the barriers to nursing education. In light of this, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the work-life of nursing faculty. The current research focused on job satisfaction of nursing faculty from 4 theoretical perspectives: human capital theory, which emphasizes the expected monetary and nonmonetary returns for any career choices; structural theory, which emphasizes the impact of institutional features on job satisfaction; positive extrinsic environment by self-determination theory, which asserts that a positive extrinsic environment promotes competency and effective outcomes at work; and psychological theory, which emphasizes the proposed relationship between job performance and satisfaction. In addition to the measures for human capital theory, institutional variables (from structural theory and self-determination theory), and productivity measures (from psychological theory), the authors also selected sets of variables for personal characteristics to investigate their effects on job satisfaction. The results indicated that variables related to human capital theory, especially salary, contributed the most to job satisfaction, followed by those related to institutional variables. Personal variables and productivity variables as a whole contributed as well. The only other variable with marginal significance was faculty's perception of institutional support for teaching. PMID:26653042

  18. Theoretical analysis of multispectral image segmentation criteria.

    PubMed

    Kerfoot, I B; Bresler, Y

    1999-01-01

    Markov random field (MRF) image segmentation algorithms have been extensively studied, and have gained wide acceptance. However, almost all of the work on them has been experimental. This provides a good understanding of the performance of existing algorithms, but not a unified explanation of the significance of each component. To address this issue, we present a theoretical analysis of several MRF image segmentation criteria. Standard methods of signal detection and estimation are used in the theoretical analysis, which quantitatively predicts the performance at realistic noise levels. The analysis is decoupled into the problems of false alarm rate, parameter selection (Neyman-Pearson and receiver operating characteristics), detection threshold, expected a priori boundary roughness, and supervision. Only the performance inherent to a criterion, with perfect global optimization, is considered. The analysis indicates that boundary and region penalties are very useful, while distinct-mean penalties are of questionable merit. Region penalties are far more important for multispectral segmentation than for greyscale. This observation also holds for Gauss-Markov random fields, and for many separable within-class PDFs. To validate the analysis, we present optimization algorithms for several criteria. Theoretical and experimental results agree fairly well. PMID:18267494

  19. Theoretical resources for a globalised bioethics.

    PubMed

    Verkerk, Marian A; Lindemann, Hilde

    2011-02-01

    In an age of global capitalism, pandemics, far-flung biobanks, multinational drug trials and telemedicine it is impossible for bioethicists to ignore the global dimensions of their field. However, if they are to do good work on the issues that globalisation requires of them, they need theoretical resources that are up to the task. This paper identifies four distinct understandings of 'globalised' in the bioethics literature: (1) a focus on global issues; (2) an attempt to develop a universal ethical theory that can transcend cultural differences; (3) an awareness of how bioethics itself has expanded, with new centres and journals emerging in nearly every corner of the globe; (4) a concern to avoid cultural imperialism in encounters with other societies. Each of these approaches to globalisation has some merit, as will be shown. The difficulty with them is that the standard theoretical tools on which they rely are not designed for cross-cultural ethical reflection. As a result, they leave important considerations hidden. A set of theoretical resources is proposed to deal with the moral puzzles of globalisation. Abandoning idealised moral theory, a normative framework is developed that is sensitive enough to account for differences without losing the broader context in which ethical issues arise. An empirically nourished, self-reflexive, socially inquisitive, politically critical and inclusive ethics allows bioethicists the flexibility they need to pick up on the morally relevant particulars of this situation here without losing sight of the broader cultural contexts in which it all takes place. PMID:21109698

  20. Hybrid rocket engine, theoretical model and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelaru, Teodor-Viorel; Mingireanu, Florin

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to build a theoretical model for the hybrid rocket engine/motor and to validate it using experimental results. The work approaches the main problems of the hybrid motor: the scalability, the stability/controllability of the operating parameters and the increasing of the solid fuel regression rate. At first, we focus on theoretical models for hybrid rocket motor and compare the results with already available experimental data from various research groups. A primary computation model is presented together with results from a numerical algorithm based on a computational model. We present theoretical predictions for several commercial hybrid rocket motors, having different scales and compare them with experimental measurements of those hybrid rocket motors. Next the paper focuses on tribrid rocket motor concept, which by supplementary liquid fuel injection can improve the thrust controllability. A complementary computation model is also presented to estimate regression rate increase of solid fuel doped with oxidizer. Finally, the stability of the hybrid rocket motor is investigated using Liapunov theory. Stability coefficients obtained are dependent on burning parameters while the stability and command matrixes are identified. The paper presents thoroughly the input data of the model, which ensures the reproducibility of the numerical results by independent researchers.

  1. Printability of alloys for additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mukherjee, T.; Zuback, J. S.; De, A.; DebRoy, T.

    2016-01-22

    Although additive manufacturing (AM), or three dimensional (3D) printing, provides significant advantages over existing manufacturing techniques, metallic parts produced by AM are susceptible to distortion, lack of fusion defects and compositional changes. Here we show that the printability, or the ability of an alloy to avoid these defects, can be examined by developing and testing appropriate theories. A theoretical scaling analysis is used to test vulnerability of various alloys to thermal distortion. A theoretical kinetic model is used to examine predisposition of different alloys to AM induced compositional changes. A well-tested numerical heat transfer and fluid flow model is usedmore » to compare susceptibilities of various alloys to lack of fusion defects. These results are tested and validated with independent experimental data. Here, the findings presented in this paper are aimed at achieving distortion free, compositionally sound and well bonded metallic parts.« less

  2. Printability of alloys for additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, T; Zuback, J S; De, A; DebRoy, T

    2016-01-01

    Although additive manufacturing (AM), or three dimensional (3D) printing, provides significant advantages over existing manufacturing techniques, metallic parts produced by AM are susceptible to distortion, lack of fusion defects and compositional changes. Here we show that the printability, or the ability of an alloy to avoid these defects, can be examined by developing and testing appropriate theories. A theoretical scaling analysis is used to test vulnerability of various alloys to thermal distortion. A theoretical kinetic model is used to examine predisposition of different alloys to AM induced compositional changes. A well-tested numerical heat transfer and fluid flow model is used to compare susceptibilities of various alloys to lack of fusion defects. These results are tested and validated with independent experimental data. The findings presented in this paper are aimed at achieving distortion free, compositionally sound and well bonded metallic parts. PMID:26796864

  3. Printability of alloys for additive manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, T.; Zuback, J. S.; De, A.; DebRoy, T.

    2016-01-01

    Although additive manufacturing (AM), or three dimensional (3D) printing, provides significant advantages over existing manufacturing techniques, metallic parts produced by AM are susceptible to distortion, lack of fusion defects and compositional changes. Here we show that the printability, or the ability of an alloy to avoid these defects, can be examined by developing and testing appropriate theories. A theoretical scaling analysis is used to test vulnerability of various alloys to thermal distortion. A theoretical kinetic model is used to examine predisposition of different alloys to AM induced compositional changes. A well-tested numerical heat transfer and fluid flow model is used to compare susceptibilities of various alloys to lack of fusion defects. These results are tested and validated with independent experimental data. The findings presented in this paper are aimed at achieving distortion free, compositionally sound and well bonded metallic parts. PMID:26796864

  4. Printability of alloys for additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, T.; Zuback, J. S.; de, A.; Debroy, T.

    2016-01-01

    Although additive manufacturing (AM), or three dimensional (3D) printing, provides significant advantages over existing manufacturing techniques, metallic parts produced by AM are susceptible to distortion, lack of fusion defects and compositional changes. Here we show that the printability, or the ability of an alloy to avoid these defects, can be examined by developing and testing appropriate theories. A theoretical scaling analysis is used to test vulnerability of various alloys to thermal distortion. A theoretical kinetic model is used to examine predisposition of different alloys to AM induced compositional changes. A well-tested numerical heat transfer and fluid flow model is used to compare susceptibilities of various alloys to lack of fusion defects. These results are tested and validated with independent experimental data. The findings presented in this paper are aimed at achieving distortion free, compositionally sound and well bonded metallic parts.

  5. A theoretical and experimental study of coplanar waveguide shunt stubs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dib, Nihad I.; Ponchak, George E.; Katehi, Linda P. B.

    1993-01-01

    A comprehensive theoretical and experimental study of straight and bent coplanar waveguide (CPW) shunt stubs is presented. In the theoretical analysis, the CPW is assumed to be inside a cavity while, the experiments are performed on open structures. For the analysis of CPW discontinuities with air-bridges, a hybrid technique was developed which was validated through extensive theoretical and experimental comparisons. The effect of the cavity resonances on the behavior of the stubs with and without air-bridges is investigated. In addition, the encountered radiation loss due to the discontinuities is evaluated experimentally.

  6. A career in theoretical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, P. W.

    -- 49. Chemical pseudopotentials -- 50. Spin glass Hamiltonians: a bridge between biology, statistical mechanics and computer science in Emerging Syntheses in Science -- 51. Measurement in quantum theory and the problem of complex systems in The Lessons of Quantum Theory -- 52. It's not over till the fat lady sings -- 53. Spin Glass I: a scaling law rescued. Spin glass II: is there a phase transition? Spin glass III: theory raises its head. Spin Glass IV: glimmerings of trouble. Spin glass V: real power brought to bear. Spin glass VI: spin glass as cornucopia. Spin glass VII: spin glass as paradigm -- 54. Epilogue in Valence Instabilities and Related Narrow-band Phenomena -- 55. Present status of theory: l/N approach n Proc. of 1983 NATO/CAP Inst. "Moment Formation in Solids" -- 56. The problem of fluctuating valence in f-electron metals in Windsurfing in the Fermi sea -- 57. Gutzwiller-Hubbard lattice-gas model with variable density: application to normal liquid [symbol]He (with D. Vollhardt and P. Wöffle) -- 58. Some ideas on the Aesthetics of Science lecture given at the 50th Anniversary seminar of the Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, Japan -- 59. Theoretical paradigms for the Sciences of Complexity Nishima Memorial Lecture, Department of Physics, Keio University -- 60. 50 years of the Mott phenomenon: insulators, magnets, solids, and superconductors as aspects of strong-repulsion theory in Frontiers and Borderlines in Many-Particle Physics -- 61. Theories of Fullerene T[symbol]'s which will not work -- 62. The Reverend Thomas Bayes, needles in haystacks, and the fifth force -- 63. The eightfold way to the theory of complexity: a prologue in Complexity -- 64. Magnetic field induced confinement in strongly correlated anisotropic materials (with S. P. Strong and D. G. Clarke) -- 65. Physics: the opening to complexity -- 66. Beyond chaos: singular distributions and power laws -- 67. Essay review - science: a 'dappled world' or a 'seamless web'? -- 68

  7. Compulsive Working, "Hyperprofessionality" and the Unseen Pleasures of Academic Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gornall, Lynne; Salisbury, Jane

    2012-01-01

    The paper applies Hoyle's notion of "extended" professionality to modern higher education working. It begins with some of the policy contexts and theoretical perspectives around the structural and professional change experienced by academic staff: changes that have been documented in systematic studies of university life from the 1970s onwards.…

  8. Theoretical design of lightning panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emetere, M. E.; Olawole, O. F.; Sanni, S. E.

    2016-02-01

    The light trapping device (LTD) was theoretically designed to suggests the best way of harvesting the energy derived from natural lightning. The Maxwell's equation was expanded using a virtual experimentation via a MATLAB environment. Several parameters like lightning flash and temperature distribution were consider to investigate the ability of the theoretical lightning panel to convert electricity efficiently. The results of the lighting strike angle on the surface of the LTD shows the maximum power expected per time. The results of the microscopic thermal distribution shows that if the LTD casing controls the transmission of the heat energy, then the thermal energy storage (TES) can be introduced to the lightning farm.

  9. Theoretical Consolidation of Acoustic Dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casiano, M. J.; Zoladz, T. F.

    2012-01-01

    In many engineering problems, the effects of dissipation can be extremely important. Dissipation can be represented by several parameters depending on the context and the models that are used. Some examples of dissipation-related parameters are damping ratio, viscosity, resistance, absorption coefficients, pressure drop, or damping rate. This Technical Memorandum (TM) describes the theoretical consolidation of the classic absorption coefficients with several other dissipation parameters including linearized resistance. The primary goal of this TM is to theoretically consolidate the linearized resistance with the absorption coefficient. As a secondary goal, other dissipation relationships are presented.

  10. Neutron Characterization for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Thomas; Bilheux, Hassina; An, Ke; Payzant, Andrew; DeHoff, Ryan; Duty, Chad; Peter, William; Blue, Craig; Brice, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is leveraging decades of experience in neutron characterization of advanced materials together with resources such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) shown in Fig. 1 to solve challenging problems in additive manufacturing (AM). Additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3-D) printing, is a rapidly maturing technology wherein components are built by selectively adding feedstock material at locations specified by a computer model. The majority of these technologies use thermally driven phase change mechanisms to convert the feedstock into functioning material. As the molten material cools and solidifies, the component is subjected to significant thermal gradients, generating significant internal stresses throughout the part (Fig. 2). As layers are added, inherent residual stresses cause warping and distortions that lead to geometrical differences between the final part and the original computer generated design. This effect also limits geometries that can be fabricated using AM, such as thin-walled, high-aspect- ratio, and overhanging structures. Distortion may be minimized by intelligent toolpath planning or strategic placement of support structures, but these approaches are not well understood and often "Edisonian" in nature. Residual stresses can also impact component performance during operation. For example, in a thermally cycled environment such as a high-pressure turbine engine, residual stresses can cause components to distort unpredictably. Different thermal treatments on as-fabricated AM components have been used to minimize residual stress, but components still retain a nonhomogeneous stress state and/or demonstrate a relaxation-derived geometric distortion. Industry, federal laboratory, and university collaboration is needed to address these challenges and enable the U.S. to compete in the global market. Work is currently being conducted on AM technologies at the ORNL

  11. Wetlands Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messina, Linda; Blanchard, Pamela Borne

    2004-01-01

    This article describes how a biology teacher's search for a cross-curricular project in science, math, history, and environmental science, that would help her students connect what they were learning in the classroom to their everyday life, resulted in an ongoing stewardship project. Working together with the Louisiana Sea Grant College Program…

  12. Work Simplification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Lynne

    1970-01-01

    Excerpts from a talk by Mrs. Ross at the 23rd annual convention of the American School Food Service Association in Detroit, August 5, 1969. A book on work simplification by Mrs. Ross will be available in June from the Iowa State University Press, Ames, Iowa. (Editor)

  13. Working Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Annemaree; Somerville, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to explore the contribution that an information literacy approach to the empirical study of workplace learning can make to how people understand and conceptualise workplace learning. Design/methodology/approach: Three cohorts of fire-fighters working in two regional locations in NSW, Australia were…

  14. Working Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Students need space to gather, share ideas, talk, develop common understanding and work to create greater knowledge. This focus on collaboration has put a strain on group study spaces. Students need to collaborate spontaneously, and scheduling time in a study room is not conducive to spur-of-the-moment collaboration. At many education…

  15. Working Corners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hochtritt, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    When people think of a person "working the corners," a G-rated image does not generally come to mind. Yet that is precisely what the author, posing as "June Cleavage," did in New York City one dreary morning: she facilitated a meeting of strangers through the creation of a character and an approachable situation. June, with her wacky outfit and…

  16. Biotechnology Works!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Libby G.; Spenciner, Loraine

    There have been few initiatives addressing the improvement of science education for students with disabilities. Funded by the National Science Foundation, Biotechnology Works is a summer institute in immunology and genetics for students with disabilities, high school science teachers, and high school counselors. During the 1998 summer session,…

  17. Information-theoretic limits of control

    PubMed

    Touchette; Lloyd

    2000-02-01

    Fundamental limits on the controllability of physical systems are discussed in the light of information theory. It is shown that the second law of thermodynamics, when generalized to include information, sets absolute limits to the minimum amount of dissipation required by open-loop control. In addition, an information-theoretic analysis of control systems shows feedback control to be a zero sum game: each bit of information gathered from a dynamical system by a control device can serve to decrease the entropy of that system by at most one bit additional to the reduction of entropy attainable without such information. Consequences for the control of discrete state systems and chaotic maps are discussed. PMID:11017467

  18. Unearthing the Theoretical Underpinnings of "Green Care" in Mental Health and Substance Misuse Care: Theoretical Underpinnings and Contemporary Clinical Examples.

    PubMed

    Cutcliffe, John R; Travale, Rodger

    2016-03-01

    The concept of "Green Care" can increasingly be found in mental health and addictions literature and some Psychiatric/Mental Health Nurses are practicing in facilities that base their approach on some or all of the underpinning theoretical elements of Green Care. However, Green Care is not yet widely considered to be part of mainstream psychiatry. Unearthing and articulating its theoretical underpinnings and clinical applications may further advance its legitimacy. Accordingly, this article identifies four principal theoretical elements of Green Care: Connectedness; Contact with Nature; Benefits of Exercise; and Occupation/Work as Therapeutic, each of which is explored and articulated by drawing on relevant literature. PMID:26979492

  19. Theoretical investigation on improving the ductility of Rh{sub 3}V by ternary addition

    SciTech Connect

    Manjula, M.; Sundareswari, M. Jayalakshmi, D. S.; Viswanathan, E.

    2015-06-24

    The band structure calculations are performed on the intermetallic compounds Rh{sub 3}V and Rh{sub 3}V{sub x}(Al){sub 1-x} by Full Potential Linearized Augmented Plane Wave(FP-LAPW) method. Total energies are calculated as a function of volume and fitted to Birch-Murnaughan equation of state to find the lattice parameter and the other ground state properties. The ductility of these compounds has been analyzed using Cauchy’s Pressure, Pugh Rule and Poisson’s ratio. From this study we observed that Rh{sub 3}V is brittle while its alloy Rh{sub 3}V{sub 0.875}Al{sub 0.125} is ductile. Electron density plots are illustrated and compared.

  20. Theoretical investigation on improving the ductility of Rh3V by ternary addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjula, M.; Sundareswari, M.; Jayalakshmi, D. S.; Viswanathan, E.

    2015-06-01

    The band structure calculations are performed on the intermetallic compounds Rh3V and Rh3Vx(Al)1-x by Full Potential Linearized Augmented Plane Wave(FP-LAPW) method. Total energies are calculated as a function of volume and fitted to Birch-Murnaughan equation of state to find the lattice parameter and the other ground state properties. The ductility of these compounds has been analyzed using Cauchy's Pressure, Pugh Rule and Poisson's ratio. From this study we observed that Rh3V is brittle while its alloy Rh3V0.875Al0.125 is ductile. Electron density plots are illustrated and compared.

  1. Subjectivity, Lifeworld, and Work Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leithaeuser, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The bases of the article are the results of an empirical study about traditional work places in industry. There were made group discussions and special qualitative interviews with workers and employees of a German factory. The article tries to interpret and to integrate these subjective concepts in the actual discussion of theoretical perspectives…

  2. Communication, Work Systems and HRD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pace, R. Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to show the foundational place that communication theory and its practice occupies in functioning work systems. Design/methodology/approach: This paper defines the word communication in terms of the creation and interpretation of displays, describes what it means to have a theoretical foundation for a…

  3. Children's Working Theories: Invoking Disequilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovatt, Daniel; Hedges, Helen

    2015-01-01

    One of the outcomes of the New Zealand early childhood curriculum, "Te Whariki", is "working theories". Prior research on this concept has primarily utilised sociocultural theoretical underpinnings and neglected Piagetian constructivist theories. This paper explores ways the Piagetian concepts of equilibrium and disequilibrium…

  4. Theoretical Principles of Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keegan, Desmond, Ed.

    This book contains the following papers examining the didactic, academic, analytic, philosophical, and technological underpinnings of distance education: "Introduction"; "Quality and Access in Distance Education: Theoretical Considerations" (D. Randy Garrison); "Theory of Transactional Distance" (Michael G. Moore); "Distance Education in a…

  5. Teaching Theoretical Criminology to Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, James L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Maintains that U.S. society's emphasis on individuality and pragmatism renders theoretical study of criminal deviance difficult for many students. Presents a structured approach to this problem that includes an emphasis on practical applications, comparative analysis, analytical skills, and the substantive content of theories. Describes teaching…

  6. Data, Methods, and Theoretical Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannagan, Rebecca J.; Schneider, Monica C.; Greenlee, Jill S.

    2012-01-01

    Within the subfields of political psychology and the study of gender, the introduction of new data collection efforts, methodologies, and theoretical approaches are transforming our understandings of these two fields and the places at which they intersect. In this article we present an overview of the research that was presented at a National…

  7. Tau decays: A theoretical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1992-11-01

    Theoretical predictions for various tau decay rates are reviewed. Effects of electroweak radiative corrections are described. Implications for precision tests of the standard model and ``new physics`` searches are discussed. A perspective on the tau decay puzzle and 1-prong problem is given.

  8. Tau decays: A theoretical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1992-11-01

    Theoretical predictions for various tau decay rates are reviewed. Effects of electroweak radiative corrections are described. Implications for precision tests of the standard model and new physics'' searches are discussed. A perspective on the tau decay puzzle and 1-prong problem is given.

  9. Lightning Talks 2015: Theoretical Division

    SciTech Connect

    Shlachter, Jack S.

    2015-11-25

    This document is a compilation of slides from a number of student presentations given to LANL Theoretical Division members. The subjects cover the range of activities of the Division, including plasma physics, environmental issues, materials research, bacterial resistance to antibiotics, and computational methods.

  10. Asking Research Questions: Theoretical Presuppositions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenenberg, Josh

    2014-01-01

    Asking significant research questions is a crucial aspect of building a research foundation in computer science (CS) education. In this article, I argue that the questions that we ask are shaped by internalized theoretical presuppositions about how the social and behavioral worlds operate. And although such presuppositions are essential in making…

  11. Theoretical predictions for exotic hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, T. |

    1996-12-31

    In this contribution the authors discuss current theoretical expectations for the properties of light meson exotica, which are meson resonances outside the q{anti q} quark model. Specifically they discuss expectations for gluonic hadrons (glueballs and hybrids) and multiquark systems (molecules). Experimental candidates for these states are summarized, and the relevance of a TCF to these studies is stressed.

  12. Theoretical Perspectives for Developmental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundell, Dana Britt, Ed.; Higbee, Jeanne L., Ed.

    This monograph from the University of Minnesota General College (GC) discusses theoretical perspectives on developmental education from both new and established standpoints. GC voluntarily eliminated its degree programs in order to focus on preparing under-prepared students for transfer to the university system. GC's curricular model includes a…

  13. Theoretical understanding of chromospheric inhomogeneities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delache, P.

    1973-01-01

    Detailed theoretical studies of chromospheric inhomogeneities consider dynamics as well as radiative transfer of mass flow as a consequence of energy deposition. It is shown that pressure is exerted by the heating waves, especially in inhomogeneous structures, where they can be defracted. A dynamical model is formulated that depicts the inhomogeneous structure of the chromosphere-corona transition region through mass flow regimes.

  14. Laboratory Practical Work as a Technological Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pich-Otero, Augusto; Molina-Ortiz, Sara; Delaplace, Laura; Castellani, Oscar; Hozbor, Daniela; Sorgentini, Delia; Lodeiro, Anibal

    1998-01-01

    Evaluates the traditional method of intercalating theoretical and seminar classes with laboratory practical work. Proposes a new schedule where students get problem-based learning of theoretical concepts during the first half of the course, and plan and execute a laboratory project during the second half. (Author/CCM)

  15. Working Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komorsky-Lovrić, Šebojka

    In electrochemistry an electrode is an electronic conductor in contact with an ionic conductor. The electronic conductor can be a metal, or a semiconductor, or a mixed electronic and ionic conductor. The ionic conductor is usually an electrolyte solution; however, solid electrolytes and ionic melts can be used as well. The term "electrode" is also used in a technical sense, meaning the electronic conductor only. If not specified otherwise, this meaning of the term "electrode" is the subject of the present chapter. In the simplest case the electrode is a metallic conductor immersed in an electrolyte solution. At the surface of the electrode, dissolved electroactive ions change their charges by exchanging one or more electrons with the conductor. In this electrochemical reaction both the reduced and oxidized ions remain in solution, while the conductor is chemically inert and serves only as a source and sink of electrons. The technical term "electrode" usually also includes all mechanical parts supporting the conductor (e.g., a rotating disk electrode or a static mercury drop electrode). Furthermore, it includes all chemical and physical modifications of the conductor, or its surface (e.g., a mercury film electrode, an enzyme electrode, and a carbon paste electrode). However, this term does not cover the electrolyte solution and the ionic part of a double layer at the electrode/solution interface. Ion-selective electrodes, which are used in potentiometry, will not be considered in this chapter. Theoretical and practical aspects of electrodes are covered in various books and reviews [1-9].

  16. Additional modes in a waveguide system of zero-index-metamaterials with defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yangyang; Xu, Yadong; Chen, Huanyang

    2014-09-01

    Zero-index-metamaterials (ZIM) have drawn much attention due to their intriguing properties and novel applications. Particularly, in a parallel plated ZIM waveguide system with defects, total reflection or transmission of wave can be achieved by adjusting the properties of defects. This effect has been explored extensively in different types of ZIM (e.g., epsilon-near-zero metamaterials, matched impedance ZIM, or anisotropic ZIM). Almost all previous literatures showed that only monopole modes are excited inside the defects if they are in circular cylinder shapes. However, the underlying physics for excited modes inside defects is wrongly ignored. In this work, we uncover that additional modes could be excited by theoretical analysis, which is important as it will correct the current common perception. For the case of matched impedance zero-index metamaterials (MIZIM), the additional dipole modes can be excited inside the defects when total transmission occurs. Moreover, we also observe the same results in Dirac-cone-like photonic crystals which have been demonstrated theoretically and experimentally to function as MIZIM. For another case of epsilon-near-zero metamaterials (ENZ), we find that additional higher order modes (e.g., tri-pole) can be excited inside the defects when total transmission happens. Numerical simulations are performed to verify our finding regarding the additional modes.

  17. School Social Work Worldwide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huxtable, Marion, Ed.; Blyth, Eric, Ed.

    This book, with sequentially arranged chapters, allow practitioners, educators, and students to follow the expansion of school social work practice around the world. Leaders in the field from 12 countries provide eye-opening perspectives and interventions, selected for their range and application. Additionally, the book looks ahead to policy and…

  18. Tough, High-Performance, Thermoplastic Addition Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H.; Proctor, K. Mason; Gleason, John; Morgan, Cassandra; Partos, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Series of addition-type thermoplastics (ATT's) exhibit useful properties. Because of their addition curing and linear structure, ATT polymers have toughness, like thermoplastics, and easily processed, like thermosets. Work undertaken to develop chemical reaction forming stable aromatic rings in backbone of ATT polymer, combining high-temperature performance and thermo-oxidative stability with toughness and easy processibility, and minimizing or eliminating necessity for tradeoffs among properties often observed in conventional polymer syntheses.

  19. Exploring scientists' working timetable: Do scientists often work overtime?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianwen; Xu, Shenmeng; Peng, Lian; Wang, Zhi; Wang, Chuanli; Zhang, Chunbo; Wang, Xianbing

    2012-10-01

    A novel method is proposed to monitor and record scientists' working timetable. We record the downloads information of scientific papers real-timely from Springer round the clock, and try to explore scientists' working habits. As our observation demonstrates, many scientists are still engaged in their research after working hours every day. Many of them work far into the night, even till next morning. In addition, research work also intrudes into their weekends. Different working time patterns are revealed. In the US, overnight work is more prevalent among scientists, while Chinese scientists mostly have busy weekends with their scientific research.

  20. A Field-Theoretic Approach to the Wiener Sausage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekovar, S.; Pruessner, G.

    2016-05-01

    The Wiener Sausage, the volume traced out by a sphere attached to a Brownian particle, is a classical problem in statistics and mathematical physics. Initially motivated by a range of field-theoretic, technical questions, we present a single loop renormalised perturbation theory of a stochastic process closely related to the Wiener Sausage, which, however, proves to be exact for the exponents and some amplitudes. The field-theoretic approach is particularly elegant and very enjoyable to see at work on such a classic problem. While we recover a number of known, classical results, the field-theoretic techniques deployed provide a particularly versatile framework, which allows easy calculation with different boundary conditions even of higher momenta and more complicated correlation functions. At the same time, we provide a highly instructive, non-trivial example for some of the technical particularities of the field-theoretic description of stochastic processes, such as excluded volume, lack of translational invariance and immobile particles. The aim of the present work is not to improve upon the well-established results for the Wiener Sausage, but to provide a field-theoretic approach to it, in order to gain a better understanding of the field-theoretic obstacles to overcome.

  1. Contaminant breakthrough: A theoretical study of charcoal sampling tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Y.H.; Nelson, J.H. )

    1990-06-01

    A previously developed theoretical model was applied to investigate contaminant breakthrough on charcoal sampling tubes. Associated with the model are two important theoretical parameters. These parameters are k' (a rate constant) and tau (the time required for 50% contaminant breakthrough). In this study, values of K' and tau were determined for n-heptane at five different concentration levels in air: 98, 117, 234, 330, and 988 ppm. These values were used along with pertinent theoretical considerations to calculate the entire (0-100%) breakthrough curve (plot of percent breakthrough versus time) regarding the adsorbance of n-heptane on charcoal sampling tubes. In addition, available experimental data for perchloroethylene, isobutyl acetate, ethyl acetate, and dichloromethane were used in conjunction with the theory to generate theoretical breakthrough curves over the entire range of 0 to 100%. In each case, calculated theoretical breakthrough curves are in remarkable agreement with corresponding experimental data. With the use of an additional theoretical parameter, a, the theory was extended to calculate the weight of contaminant collected on a single element (section) of a charcoal sampling tube at 10% breakthrough and at each of several different contaminant assault concentrations.

  2. Theoretical issues in Spheromak research

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R. H.; Hooper, E. B.; LoDestro, L. L.; Mattor, N.; Pearlstein, L. D.; Ryutov, D. D.

    1997-04-01

    This report summarizes the state of theoretical knowledge of several physics issues important to the spheromak. It was prepared as part of the preparation for the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX), which addresses these goals: energy confinement and the physics which determines it; the physics of transition from a short-pulsed experiment, in which the equilibrium and stability are determined by a conducting wall (``flux conserver``) to one in which the equilibrium is supported by external coils. Physics is examined in this report in four important areas. The status of present theoretical understanding is reviewed, physics which needs to be addressed more fully is identified, and tools which are available or require more development are described. Specifically, the topics include: MHD equilibrium and design, review of MHD stability, spheromak dynamo, and edge plasma in spheromaks.

  3. Theoretical Problems in Materials Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, J. S.; Glicksman, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Interactions between theoretical physics and material sciences to identify problems of common interest in which some of the powerful theoretical approaches developed for other branches of physics may be applied to problems in materials science are presented. A unique structure was identified in rapidly quenched Al-14% Mn. The material has long-range directed bonds with icosahedral symmetry which does not form a regular structure but instead forms an amorphous-like quasiperiodic structure. Finite volume fractions of second phase material is advanced and is coupled with nucleation theory to describe the formation and structure of precipitating phases in alloys. Application of the theory of pattern formation to the problem of dendrite formation is studied.

  4. Theoretical Foundation for Weld Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traugott, S.

    1986-01-01

    Differential equations describe physics of tungsten/inert-gas and plasma-arc welding in aluminum. Report collects and describes necessary theoretical foundation upon which numerical welding model is constructed for tungsten/inert gas or plasma-arc welding in aluminum without keyhole. Governing partial differential equations for flow of heat, metal, and current given, together with boundary conditions relevant to welding process. Numerical estimates for relative importance of various phenomena and required properties of 2219 aluminum included

  5. Game-theoretic Kalman Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colburn, Christopher; Bewley, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    The Kalman Filter (KF) is celebrated as the optimal estimator for systems with linear dynamics and gaussian uncertainty. Although most systems of interest do not have linear dynamics and are not forced by gaussian noise, the KF is used ubiquitously within industry. Thus, we present a novel estimation algorithm, the Game-theoretic Kalman Filter (GKF), which intelligently hedges between competing sequential filters and does not require the assumption of gaussian statistics to provide a "best" estimate.

  6. Consolidation of silicon nitride without additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sikora, P. F.; Yeh, H. C.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of producing a sound, dense Si3N4 body without additives was explored, using conventional gas hot isostatic pressing techniques and an uncommon hydraulic hot isostatic pressing technique. These two techniques produce much higher pressure 275-413 MN/m sq (40,000 - 60,000 psi) than hot-pressing techniques. Evaluation was based on density measurement, microscopic examination, both optical and electron, and X-ray diffraction analysis. The results are summarized as follows: (1) Si3N4 can be densified to high density, greater than 95% of theoretical, without additions. (2) The higher density Si3N4 specimens appear to be associated with a greater amount of alpha to beta transformation. (3) Under high pressure, the alpha to beta transformation can occur at a temperature as low as 1150 C. (4) Grain deformation and subsequent recrystallization and grain refinement result from hot isostatic pressing of Si3N4.

  7. Priming addition facts with semantic relations.

    PubMed

    Bassok, Miriam; Pedigo, Samuel F; Oskarsson, An T

    2008-03-01

    Results from 2 relational-priming experiments suggest the existence of an automatic analogical coordination between semantic and arithmetic relations. Word pairs denoting object sets served as primes in a task that elicits "obligatory" activation of addition facts (5 + 3 activates 8; J. LeFevre, J. Bisanz, & L. Mrkonjic, 1988). Semantic relations between the priming words were either aligned or misaligned with the structure of addition (M. Bassok, V. M. Chase, & S. A. Martin, 1998). Obligatory activation of addition facts occurred when the digits were primed by categorically related words (tulips-daisies), which are aligned with addition, but did not occur when the digits were primed by unrelated words (hens-radios, Experiment 1) or by functionally related words (records-songs, Experiment 2), which are misaligned with addition. These findings lend support to the viability of automatic analogical priming (B. A. Spellman, K. J. Holyoak, & R. G. Morrison, 2001) and highlight the relevance of arithmetic applications to theoretical accounts of mental arithmetic. PMID:18315410

  8. Additive Transforms Paint into Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Tech Traders Inc. sought assistance developing low-cost, highly effective coatings and paints that created useful thermal reflectance and were safe and non-toxic. In cooperation with a group of engineers at Kennedy Space Center., Tech Traders created Insuladd, a powder additive made up of microscopic, inert gas-filled, ceramic microspheres that can be mixed into ordinary interior or exterior paint, allowing the paint to act like a layer of insulation. When the paint dries, this forms a radiant heat barrier, turning the ordinary house paint into heat-reflecting thermal paint. According to Tech Traders, the product works with all types of paints and coatings and will not change the coverage rate, application, or adhesion of the paint. Other useful applications include feed storage silos to help prevent feed spoilage, poultry hatcheries to reduce the summer heat and winter cold effects, and on military vehicles and ships. Tech Traders has continued its connection to the aerospace community by recently providing Lockheed Martin Corporation with one of its thermal products for use on the F-22 Raptor.

  9. Cryptobiosis: a new theoretical perspective.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Yair

    2006-10-01

    The tardigrade is a microscopic creature that under environmental stress conditions undergoes cryptobiosis [Feofilova, E.P., 2003. Deceleration of vital activity as a universal biochemical mechanism ensuring adaptation of microorganisms to stress factors: A review. Appl. Biochem. Microbiol. 39, 1-18; Nelson, D.R., 2002. Current status of the tardigrada: Evolution and ecology. Integrative Comp. Biol. 42, 652-659]-a temporary metabolic depression-which is considered to be a third state between life and death [Clegg, J.S., 2001. Cryptobiosis-a peculiar state of biological organization. Comp. Biochem. Physiol. Part B 128, 613-624]. In contrast with death, cryptobiosis is a reversible state, and as soon as environmental conditions change, the tardigrade "returns to life." Cryptobiosis in general, and among the tardigrade in particular, is a phenomenon poorly understood [Guppy, M., 2004. The biochemistry of metabolic depression: a history of perceptions. Comp. Biochem. Physiol. Part B 139, 435-442; Schill, R.O., et al., 2004. Stress gene (hsp70) sequences and quantitative expression in Milensium tardigradum (Tardigrade) during active and cryptobiotic stages. J. Exp. Biol. 207, 1607-1613; Watanabe, M., et al., 2002. Mechanisn allowing an insect to survive complete dehydration and extreme temperatures. J. Exp. Biol. 205, 2799-2802; Wright, J.C., 2001. Cryptobiosis 300 years on from van Leuwenhoek: what have we learned about tardigrades? Zool. Anz. 240, 563-582]. Moreover, the ability of the tardigrade to bootstrap itself and to return to life seems paradoxical like the legendary Baron von Munchausen who pulled himself out of the swamp by grabbing his own hair. Two theoretical obstacles prevent us from advancing our knowledge of cryptobiosis. First, we lack appropriate theoretical understanding of reversible processes of biological computation in living systems. Second, we lack appropriate theoretical understanding of bootstrapping in living systems. In this short opinion

  10. A theoretical framework for negotiating the path of emergency management multi-agency coordination.

    PubMed

    Curnin, Steven; Owen, Christine; Paton, Douglas; Brooks, Benjamin

    2015-03-01

    Multi-agency coordination represents a significant challenge in emergency management. The need for liaison officers working in strategic level emergency operations centres to play organizational boundary spanning roles within multi-agency coordination arrangements that are enacted in complex and dynamic emergency response scenarios creates significant research and practical challenges. The aim of the paper is to address a gap in the literature regarding the concept of multi-agency coordination from a human-environment interaction perspective. We present a theoretical framework for facilitating multi-agency coordination in emergency management that is grounded in human factors and ergonomics using the methodology of core-task analysis. As a result we believe the framework will enable liaison officers to cope more efficiently within the work domain. In addition, we provide suggestions for extending the theory of core-task analysis to an alternate high reliability environment. PMID:25480001

  11. 77 FR 62220 - Procurement List; Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Additions On 7/20/2012 (77 FR 42701-42702), 7/27/2012 (77 FR 44220), and 8/ 17/2012 (77 FR 49784), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled published...), Department of Public Works (DPW), 453 Novosel Street, Fort Rucker, AL. NPA: PRIDE Industries, Roseville,...

  12. English as an Additional Language: Changing Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Constant, Ed.; Cable, Carrie, Ed.

    This volume highlights the language and learning needs of pupils with English as an additional language in the United Kingdom. It includes chapters by British teachers and researchers working in this field. The book addresses a number of issues of interest to practitioners, scholars, teacher educators, and policy makers. Each chapter is prefaced…

  13. Additive Manufacturing: From Rapid Prototyping to Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prater, Tracie

    2015-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) offers tremendous promise for the rocket propulsion community. Foundational work must be performed to ensure the safe performance of AM parts. Government, industry, and academia must collaborate in the characterization, design, modeling, and process control to accelerate the certification of AM parts for human-rated flight.

  14. THEORETICAL STUDIES OF NUCLEATION KINETICS AND NANODROPLET MICROSTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Wilemski, Gerald

    2009-01-31

    The goals of this project were to (1) explore ways of bridging the gap between fundamental molecular nucleation theories and phenomenological approaches based on thermodynamic reasoning, (2) test and improve binary nucleation theory, and (3) provide the theoretical underpinning for a powerful new experimental technique, small angle neutron scattering (SANS) from nanodroplet aerosols, that can probe the compositional structure of nanodroplets. This report summarizes the accomplishments of this project in realizing these goals. Publications supported by this project fall into three general categories: (1) theoretical work on nucleation theory (2) experiments and modeling of nucleation and condensation in supersonic nozzles, and (3) experimental and theoretical work on nanodroplet structure and neutron scattering. These publications are listed and briefly summarized in this report.

  15. Theoretical Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy of Peptides.

    PubMed

    Carr, Joshua K; Wang, Lu; Roy, Santanu; Skinner, James L

    2015-07-23

    Vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) has become a very promising technique for the study of proteins at interfaces, and it has been applied to important systems such as anti-microbial peptides, ion channel proteins, and human islet amyloid polypeptide. Moreover, so-called "chiral" SFG techniques, which rely on polarization combinations that generate strong signals primarily for chiral molecules, have proven to be particularly discriminatory of protein secondary structure. In this work, we present a theoretical strategy for calculating protein amide I SFG spectra by combining line-shape theory with molecular dynamics simulations. We then apply this method to three model peptides, demonstrating the existence of a significant chiral SFG signal for peptides with chiral centers, and providing a framework for interpreting the results on the basis of the dependence of the SFG signal on the peptide orientation. We also examine the importance of dynamical and coupling effects. Finally, we suggest a simple method for determining a chromophore's orientation relative to the surface using ratios of experimental heterodyne-detected signals with different polarizations, and test this method using theoretical spectra. PMID:25203677

  16. Theoretical Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy of Peptides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) has become a very promising technique for the study of proteins at interfaces, and it has been applied to important systems such as anti-microbial peptides, ion channel proteins, and human islet amyloid polypeptide. Moreover, so-called “chiral” SFG techniques, which rely on polarization combinations that generate strong signals primarily for chiral molecules, have proven to be particularly discriminatory of protein secondary structure. In this work, we present a theoretical strategy for calculating protein amide I SFG spectra by combining line-shape theory with molecular dynamics simulations. We then apply this method to three model peptides, demonstrating the existence of a significant chiral SFG signal for peptides with chiral centers, and providing a framework for interpreting the results on the basis of the dependence of the SFG signal on the peptide orientation. We also examine the importance of dynamical and coupling effects. Finally, we suggest a simple method for determining a chromophore’s orientation relative to the surface using ratios of experimental heterodyne-detected signals with different polarizations, and test this method using theoretical spectra. PMID:25203677

  17. A Theoretical Model of Water and Trade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Q.; Konar, M.; Reimer, J.; Di Baldassarre, G.; Lin, X.; Zeng, R.

    2015-12-01

    Water is an essential factor of agricultural production. Agriculture, in turn, is globalized through the trade of food commodities. In this paper, we develop a theoretical model of a small open economy that explicitly incorporates water resources. The model emphasizes three tradeoffs involving water decision-making that are important yet not always considered within the existing literature. One tradeoff focuses on competition for water among different sectors when there is a shock to one of the sectors only, such as trade liberalization and consequent higher demand for the product. A second tradeoff concerns the possibility that there may or may not be substitutes for water, such as increased use of sophisticated irrigation technology as a means to increase crop output in the absence of higher water availability. A third tradeoff explores the possibility that the rest of the world can be a source of supply or demand for a country's water-using products. A number of propositions are proven. For example, while trade liberalization tends to increase water use, increased pressure on water supplies can be moderated by way of a tax that is derivable with observable economic phenomena. Another example is that increased riskiness of water availability tends to cause water users to use less water than would be the case under profit maximization. These theoretical model results generate hypotheses that can be tested empirically in future work.

  18. Improper ferroelectricity: A theoretical and experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, J. R.; Ullman, F. G.

    1984-02-01

    A combined theoretical and experimental study has been made of the origins and properties of the improper ferroelectricity associated with structural modulations of non-zero wavelengths. Two classes of materials have been studied: rare earth molybdates (specifically, gadolinium molybdate: GMO), and potassium selenate and its isomorphs. In the former, the modulation is produced by a zone boundary phonon instability, and in the latter by the instability of a phonon of wave vector approximately two-thirds of the way to the zone-boundary. In the second case the initial result is a modulated structure whose repeat distance is not a rational multiple of the basic lattice repeat distance. This result is a modulated polarization which, when the basic modulation locks in to a rational multiple of the lattice spacing, becomes uniform, and improper ferroelectricity results. The origins of these effects have been elucidated by theoretical studies, initially semi-empirical, but subsequently from first-principles. These complemented the experimental work, which primarily used inelastic light scattering, uniaxial stress, and hydrostatic pressure, to probe the balance between the interionic forces through the effects on the phonons and dielectric properties.

  19. Theoretical studies of hadrons and nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    COTANCH, STEPHEN R

    2007-03-20

    This report details final research results obtained during the 9 year period from June 1, 1997 through July 15, 2006. The research project, entitled Theoretical Studies of Hadrons and Nuclei , was supported by grant DE-FG02-97ER41048 between North Carolina State University [NCSU] and the U. S. Department of Energy [DOE]. In compliance with grant requirements the Principal Investigator [PI], Professor Stephen R. Cotanch, conducted a theoretical research program investigating hadrons and nuclei and devoted to this program 50% of his time during the academic year and 100% of his time in the summer. Highlights of new, significant research results are briefly summarized in the following three sections corresponding to the respective sub-programs of this project (hadron structure, probing hadrons and hadron systems electromagnetically, and many-body studies). Recent progress is also discussed in a recent renewal/supplemental grant proposal submitted to DOE. Finally, full detailed descriptions of completed work can be found in the publications listed at the end of this report.

  20. A theoretical model of water and trade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Qian; Konar, Megan; Reimer, Jeffrey J.; Di Baldassarre, Giuliano; Lin, Xiaowen; Zeng, Ruijie

    2016-03-01

    Water is an essential input for agricultural production. Agriculture, in turn, is globalized through the trade of agricultural commodities. In this paper, we develop a theoretical model that emphasizes four tradeoffs involving water-use decision-making that are important yet not always considered in a consistent framework. One tradeoff focuses on competition for water among different economic sectors. A second tradeoff examines the possibility that certain types of agricultural investments can offset water use. A third tradeoff explores the possibility that the rest of the world can be a source of supply or demand for a country's water-using commodities. The fourth tradeoff concerns how variability in water supplies influences farmer decision-making. We show conditions under which trade liberalization affect water use. Two policy scenarios to reduce water use are evaluated. First, we derive a target tax that reduces water use without offsetting the gains from trade liberalization, although important tradeoffs exist between economic performance and resource use. Second, we show how subsidization of water-saving technologies can allow producers to use less water without reducing agricultural production, making such subsidization an indirect means of influencing water use decision-making. Finally, we outline conditions under which riskiness of water availability affects water use. These theoretical model results generate hypotheses that can be tested empirically in future work.

  1. Theoretical Formalism To Estimate the Positron Scattering Cross Section.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suvam; Dutta, Sangita; Naghma, Rahla; Antony, Bobby

    2016-07-21

    A theoretical formalism is introduced in this article to calculate the total cross sections for positron scattering. This method incorporates positron-target interaction in the spherical complex optical potential formalism. The study of positron collision has been quite subtle until now. However, recently, it has emerged as an interesting area due to its role in atomic and molecular structure physics, astrophysics, and medicine. With the present method, the total cross sections for simple atoms C, N, and O and their diatomic molecules C2, N2, and O2 are obtained and compared with existing data. The total cross section obtained in the present work gives a more consistent shape and magnitude than existing theories. The characteristic dip below 10 eV is identified due to the positronium formation. The deviation of the present cross section with measurements at energies below 10 eV is attributed to the neglect of forward angle-discrimination effects in experiments, the inefficiency of additivity rule for molecules, empirical treatment of positronium formation, and the neglect of annihilation reactions. In spite of these deficiencies, the present results show consistent behavior and reasonable agreement with previous data, wherever available. Besides, this is the first computational model to report positron scattering cross sections over the energy range from 1 to 5000 eV. PMID:27333337

  2. A theoretical framework for jamming in confluent biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, M. Lisa

    2015-03-01

    For important biological functions such as wound healing, embryonic development, and cancer tumorogenesis, cells must initially rearrange and move over relatively large distances, like a liquid. Subsequently, these same tissues must undergo buckling and support shear stresses, like a solid. Our work suggests that biological tissues can accommodate these disparate requirements because the tissues are close to glass or jamming transition. While recent self propelled particle models generically predict a glass/jamming transition that is driven by packing density φ and happens at some critical φc less than unity, many biological tissues that are confluent with no gaps between cells appear to undergo a jamming transition at a constant density (φ = 1). I will discuss a new theoretical framework for predicting energy barriers and rates of cell migration in 2D tissue monolayers, and show that this model predicts a novel type of rigidity transition, which takes place at constant φ = 1 and depends only on single cell properties such as cell-cell adhesion, cortical tension and cell elasticity. This model additionally predicts that an experimentally observable parameter, the ratio between a cell's perimeter and the square root of its cross-sectional area, attains a specific, critical value at the jamming transition. We show that this prediction is precisely realized in primary epithelial cultures from human patients, with implications for asthma pathology.

  3. Network-theoretic approach to model vortex interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Aditya; Taira, Kunihiko

    2014-11-01

    We present a network-theoretic approach to describe a system of point vortices in two-dimensional flow. By considering the point vortices as nodes, a complete graph is constructed with edges connecting each vortex to every other vortex. The interactions between the vortices are captured by the graph edge weights. We employ sparsification techniques on these graph representations based on spectral theory to construct sparsified models of the overall vortical interactions. The edge weights are redistributed through spectral sparsification of the graph such that the sum of the interactions associated with each vortex is maintained constant. In addition, sparse configurations maintain similar spectral properties as the original setup. Through the reduction in the number of interactions, key vortex interactions can be highlighted. Identification of vortex structures based on graph sparsification is demonstrated with an example of clusters of point vortices. We also evaluate the computational performance of sparsification for large collection of point vortices. Work supported by US Army Research Office (W911NF-14-1-0386) and US Air Force Office of Scientific Research (YIP: FA9550-13-1-0183).

  4. Investigations in Experimental and Theoretical High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Krennrich, Frank

    2013-07-29

    We report on the work done under DOE grant DE-FG02-01ER41155. The experimental tasks have ongoing efforts at CERN (ATLAS), the Whipple observatory (VERITAS) and R&D work on dual readout calorimetry and neutrino-less double beta decay. The theoretical task emphasizes the weak interaction and in particular CP violation and neutrino physics. The detailed descriptions of the final report on each project are given under the appropriate task section of this report.

  5. Theoretical and material studies on thin-film electroluminescent devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, C. J.; Goldman, J. A.; Brennan, K.

    1988-01-01

    During this report period work was performed on the modeling of High Field Electronic Transport in Bulk ZnS and ZnSe, and also on the surface cleaning of Si for MBE growth. Some MBE growth runs have also been performed in the Varian GEN II System. A brief outline of the experimental work is given. A complete summary will be done at the end of the next reporting period at the completion of the investigation. The theoretical studies are included.

  6. Theoretical modeling for the stereo mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Burlaga, L. F.; Kaiser, M. L.; Ng, C. K.; Reames, D. V.; Reiner, M. J.; Gombosi, T. I.; Lugaz, N.; Manchester, W.; Roussev, I. I.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Farrugia, C. J.; Galvin, A. B.; Lee, M. A.; Linker, J. A.; Mikić, Z.; Riley, P.; Alexander, D.; Sandman, A. W.; Cook, J. W.; Howard, R. A.; Odstrčil, D.; Pizzo, V. J.; Kóta, J.; Liewer, P. C.; Luhmann, J. G.; Inhester, B.; Schwenn, R. W.; Solanki, S. K.; Vasyliunas, V. M.; Wiegelmann, T.; Blush, L.; Bochsler, P.; Cairns, I. H.; Robinson, P. A.; Bothmer, V.; Kecskemety, K.; Llebaria, A.; Maksimovic, M.; Scholer, M.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2008-04-01

    We summarize the theory and modeling efforts for the STEREO mission, which will be used to interpret the data of both the remote-sensing (SECCHI, SWAVES) and in-situ instruments (IMPACT, PLASTIC). The modeling includes the coronal plasma, in both open and closed magnetic structures, and the solar wind and its expansion outwards from the Sun, which defines the heliosphere. Particular emphasis is given to modeling of dynamic phenomena associated with the initiation and propagation of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The modeling of the CME initiation includes magnetic shearing, kink instability, filament eruption, and magnetic reconnection in the flaring lower corona. The modeling of CME propagation entails interplanetary shocks, interplanetary particle beams, solar energetic particles (SEPs), geoeffective connections, and space weather. This review describes mostly existing models of groups that have committed their work to the STEREO mission, but is by no means exhaustive or comprehensive regarding alternative theoretical approaches.

  7. Threshold photodetachment of HOCO-: a theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyabe, S.; Haxton, D. J.; Lawler, K. V.; Lawler, A. E.; McCurdy, C. W.; Rescigno, T. N.

    2011-05-01

    The HOCO radical is an important intermediate in combustion. Information about its electronic structure has been obtained from studies of the photodetachment of HOCO-. We present the results of a theoretical study of HOCO- photodetachment, with a view toward understanding the origin of two peaks observed in the photoelectron kinetic energy spectrum very close to threshold. Fixed-nuclei variational electron-HOCO scattering calculations are used to compute photodetachment cross sections and laboratory-frame photoelectron angular distributions. We show that the observed peaks cannot, as previously assumed, be narrow shape resonances and argue that they can be attributed to vibrational Feshbach resonances of dipole-bound trans-HOCO-. LBNL, UC Davis. Work performed under auspices of US DOE and supported by OBES, Division of Chemical Sciences.

  8. Magnetic Reconnection: Theoretical and Observational Perspectives: Preface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, W. S.; Antiochos, S. K,; Drake, J. F.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental plasma-physical process by which energy stored in a magnetic field is converted, often explosively, into heat and the kinetic energy of the charged particles that constitute the plasma. It occurs in a variety of astrophysical settings, ranging from the solar corona to pulsar magnetospheres and winds, as well as in laboratory fusion experiments, where it is responsible for sawtooth crashes. First proposed by R.G. Giovanelli in the late I 940s as the mechanism responsible for solar flares, magnetic reconnection was invoked at the beginning of the space age to explain not just solar flares but also the transfer of energy, mass, and momentum from the solar wind to Earth's magnetosphere and the subsequent storage and release of the transferred energy in the magnetotai\\. During the half century or so that has followed the seminal theoretical works by J.W. Dungey, P.A. Sweet, E.N. Parker, and H.E. Petschek, in-situ measurements by Earth-orbiting satellites and remote-sensing observations of the solar corona have provided a growing body of evidence for the occurrence of reconnection at the Sun, in the solar wind, and in the near-Earth space environment. The last thirty years have also seen the development of laboratory reconnection experiments at a number of institutions. In parallel with the efforts of experimentalists in both space and laboratory plasma physics, theorists have investigated, analytically and with the help of increasingly powerful MHD, hybrid, and kinetic numerical simulations, the structure of the diffusion region, the factors controlling the rate, onset, and cessation of reconnection, and the detailed physics that enables the demagnetization of the ions and electrons and the topological reconfiguration of the magnetic field. Moreover, the scope of theoretical reconnection studies has been extended well beyond solar system and laboratory plasmas to include more exotic astrophysical plasma systems whose strong (10

  9. Propagation studies using a theoretical ionosphere model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M.

    1973-01-01

    The mid-latitude ionospheric and neutral atmospheric models are coupled with an advanced three dimensional ray tracing program to see what success would be obtained in predicting the wave propagation conditions and to study to what extent the use of theoretical ionospheric models is practical. The Penn State MK 1 ionospheric model, the Mitra-Rowe D region model, and the Groves' neutral atmospheric model are used throughout this work to represent the real electron densities and collision frequencies. The Faraday rotation and differential Doppler velocities from satellites, the propagation modes for long distance high frequency propagation, the group delays for each mode, the ionospheric absorption, and the spatial loss are all predicted.

  10. Reflection and Phenomenography: Towards Theoretical and Educational Development Possibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linder, C.; Marshall, D.

    2003-01-01

    Explores links between the characterization of learning stemming from the phenomenographic research orientation and D. Schon's reflection-in-action. Makes the case that parallels between these points of view open up new ways of viewing Shon's work that facilitate theoretical development for the phenomenographic view of learning. (SLD)

  11. A Sociocultural Perspective of Learning: Developing a New Theoretical Tenet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phan, Huy P.

    2012-01-01

    Explanation pertaining to individuals' cognitive development and learning approaches is a recurring theme in the areas of education and psychology. The work of Okagaki (e.g., Okagaki, 2001; Okagaki & Frensch, 1998), for example, has provided both theoretical and empirical insights into the structuring and situational positioning of individuals…

  12. A Theoretical Framework towards Understanding of Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulou, Maria S.

    2014-01-01

    Children's emotional and behavioural difficulties are the result of multiple individual, social and contextual factors working in concert. The current paper proposes a theoretical framework to interpret students' emotional and behavioural difficulties in schools, by taking into consideration teacher-student relationships, students'…

  13. Theoretical Evaluation Self-Test (Test): A Preliminary Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Over nearly 40 years, several scales have been developed to measure therapist theoretical orientation (Poznanski & McLennan, 1995). This study, unlike previous efforts, focuses on "community clinicians"--social workers and other mental health professionals (such as psychologists, counselors, psychiatrists, and psychiatric nurses) who work in…

  14. Theoretical Notes on the Sociological Analysis of School Reform Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladwig, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Nearly two decades ago, Ladwig outlined the theoretical and methodological implications of Bourdieu's concept of the social field for sociological analyses of educational policy and school reform. The current analysis extends this work to consider the sociological import of one of the most ubiquitous forms of educational reform found around…

  15. Principal Leadership: A Theoretical Framework for Research. Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Douglas

    A theoretical framework for leadership development is developed in this paper that links prior research findings to a cultural theory of principal influence on school performance. Four core dimensions of principal work--supervision, administration, management, and leadership--are analyzed in terms of their contributions to underlying cultural…

  16. Corporate Library Impact, Part I: A Theoretical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgar, William

    2004-01-01

    Drawing on library and information science, strategy, and organizational theory, this article presents a theoretical approach to the determination of corporate library contribution to its parent firm. This approach departs from previous work on this topic, which focused on corporate library contribution to corporate operations and standing,…

  17. Stellar and galactic jets - Theoretical issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konigl, A.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical issues pertaining to the modelling of jets in young stellar objects and in active galactic nuclei are reviewed. The strong morphological similarities between these two types of sources are emphasized, and observational constraints on the basic physical mechanisms that may be responsible for the jet phenomenon are outlined. Particular attention is given to the 'momentum-discharge problem' in molecular-cloud outflows and to its possible resolution in terms of a centrifugally driven magnetohydrodynamic wind from an accretion disk. In addition, various propagation effects are discussed, and the relevance to stellar jets of the de Laval collimation mechanism and of the accelerated-clump model for emission knots is assessed. The review concludes with a brief list of potentially useful observational tests.

  18. Theoretical Study of Negative Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, Jack

    2011-05-01

    Although this review provides references to tabulations of molecular electron affinities, primarily it focuses on explaining why theory plays an important role in understanding the behavior of anions, explaining the challenges that anions pose to theory, making connections between the theories used to compute electron affinities and the potentials (e.g., charge-dipole, charge-quadrupole, valence attraction and exchange repulsion, dispersion, and polarization) that govern the electron-molecule interaction, and discussing how species with negative electron affinities may possess metastable anion states and how such states should be treated. In addition to references to published literature, many links are given to websites of practicing theoretical chemists who study molecular anions; these links (which appear in boldface) offer the reader a broad avenue to access much more information about molecular anions than can be covered in a review or even through conventional literature sources.

  19. Theoretical and Experimental DNA Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amos, Martyn

    This book provides a broad overview of the entire field of DNA computation, tracing its history and development. It contains detailed descriptions of all major theoretical models and experimental results to date, which are lacking in existing texts, and discusses potential future developments. It also provides a useful reference source for researchers and students, and an accessible introduction for people new to the field. The field of DNA computation has flourished since the publication of Adleman's seminal article, in which he demonstrated for the first time how a computation may be performed at a molecular level by performing standard operations on a tube of DNA strands.

  20. Theoretical studies of molecular processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Qiang

    1997-09-01

    The current thesis concerns with theoretical studies of molecular processes and consists of two parts. The first part includes theoretical studies of dynamics of unimolecular and bimolecular reactions, in particular those involving non-adiabatic processes. In chapter 2 and 3, we have presented our studies of detailed mechanisms for the photodissociation of C2H2 and C2H, and the ion-molecule reactions of C2H2+ + CH4 or NH3, respectively. In chapter 4, we have presented our study that extends TST to non-adiabatic reactions, and an application of the theory of the spin-forbidden reaction of CH(2/Pi)+N2. In chapter 5, we have included our analyses on the photodissociation of triplet ketene, where an extensive seam has been found all along the reaction coordinate. Finally, in Chapter 6, we have presented our study on the photodissociation of O3/sp-, which includes qualitative electronic structure calculations and construction of global potential energy functions for coupled electronic states. The second part of the thesis deals with theoretical studies of organometallic reactions, metal clusters, and gas-surface interactions. With theoretical calculations, one can study the reactivities of transition metal compounds systematically, which allows one to understand the key parameters that control the reactivities of those compounds. In chapter 2, we have presented our implementation of analytical hessian for effective core potential, which makes normal mode analysis possible for large organometallic systems and has proven to be very useful in the study of systems containing transition metals. In chapter 3-5, we have included our studies on the detailed mechanisms of several interesting reactions including platinum/palladium(0) catalyzed diboration and thioboration reactions of acetylene and olefin, and H- H/C-H bond activation on small metal clusters Pt/Pdn(n = 1[-]3). For truly large systems such as surfaces or proteins, full quantum mechanical treatments are

  1. Theoretical approaches to metal chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Partridge, Harry; Halicioglu, Timur; Taylor, Peter R.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical calculations on metals ranging from very accurate ab initio studies of diatomic and triatomic systems to model studies of larger clusters are presented. Recent improvements in the representation of one-particle and n-particle spaces have made possible the prediction that Al2 has a 3Pi(u) ground state, even though the 3Sigma(-)g state lies within 200/cm. Results suggest that cluster geometry varies dramatically with cluster size, and that rather large clusters are required before the bulk structure becomes optimal. Al cluster studies show that three-body terms are needed for quantitative agreement with ab initio calculations.

  2. Theoretical underpinnings for women's health.

    PubMed

    McBride, A B; McBride, W L

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical framework for considerations of women's health is proposed, the central premise of which is that "women's health" at the core means taking women's lived experience as the starting point for all health efforts. Elaboration of this thesis involves: (1) surveying our philosophical roots for an understanding of what the lived experience means, (2) exploring the methodological consequences of a focus on the lived experience, and (3) applying these insights to the situations of woman as mother and of the overweight woman. PMID:7052984

  3. Theoretical studies of combustion dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, J.M.

    1993-12-01

    The basic objectives of this research program are to develop and apply theoretical techniques to fundamental dynamical processes of importance in gas-phase combustion. There are two major areas currently supported by this grant. One is reactive scattering of diatom-diatom systems, and the other is the dynamics of complex formation and decay based on L{sup 2} methods. In all of these studies, the authors focus on systems that are of interest experimentally, and for which potential energy surfaces based, at least in part, on ab initio calculations are available.

  4. Theoretical insights into interprofessional education.

    PubMed

    Hean, Sarah; Craddock, Deborah; Hammick, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    This article argues for the need for theory in the practice of interprofessional education. It highlights the range of theories available to interprofessional educators and promotes the practical application of these to interprofessional learning and teaching. It summarises the AMEE Guides in Medical Education publication entitled Theoretical Insights into Interprofessional Education: AMEE Guide No. 62, where the practical application of three theories, social capital, social constructivism and a sociological perspective of interprofessional education are discussed in-depth through the lens of a case study. The key conclusions of these discussions are presented in this article. PMID:22288995

  5. Theoretical Studies on Cluster Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhenyang

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The Thesis describes some theoretical studies on ligated and bare clusters. Chapter 1 gives a review of the two theoretical models, Tensor Surface Harmonic Theory (TSH) and Jellium Model, accounting for the electronic structures of ligated and bare clusters. The Polyhedral Skeletal Electron Pair Theory (PSEPT), which correlates the structures and electron counts (total number of valence electrons) of main group and transition metal ligated clusters, is briefly described. A structural jellium model is developed in Chapter 2 which accounts for the electronic structures of clusters using a crystal-field perturbation. The zero-order potential we derive is of central-field form, depends on the geometry of the cluster, and has a well-defined relationship to the full nuclear-electron potential. Qualitative arguments suggest that this potential produces different energy level orderings for clusters with a nucleus with large positive charge at the centre of the cluster. Analysis of the effects of the non-spherical perturbation on the spherical jellium shell structures leads to the conclusion that for a cluster with a closed shell electronic structure a high symmetry arrangement which is approximately or precisely close packed will be preferred. It also provides a basis for rationalising those structures of clusters with incomplete shell electronic configurations. In Chapter 3, the geometric conclusions derived in the structural jellium model are developed in more detail. The group theoretical consequences of the Tensor Surface Harmonic Theory are developed in Chapter 4 for (ML_2) _{rm n}, (ML_4) _{rm n} and (ML_5 ) _{rm n} clusters where either the xz and yz or x^2 -y^2 and xy components to L_sp{rm d}{pi } and L_sp{rm d} {delta} do not contribute equally to the bonding. The closed shell requirements for such clusters are defined and the orbital symmetry constraints pertaining to the

  6. Theoretical efficiency limits for thermoradiative energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Strandberg, Rune

    2015-02-07

    A new method to produce electricity from heat called thermoradiative energy conversion is analyzed. The method is based on sustaining a difference in the chemical potential for electron populations above and below an energy gap and let this difference drive a current through an electric circuit. The difference in chemical potential originates from an imbalance in the excitation and de-excitation of electrons across the energy gap. The method has similarities to thermophotovoltaics and conventional photovoltaics. While photovoltaic cells absorb thermal radiation from a body with higher temperature than the cell itself, thermoradiative cells are hot during operation and emit a net outflow of photons to colder surroundings. A thermoradiative cell with an energy gap of 0.25 eV at a temperature of 500 K in surroundings at 300 K is found to have a theoretical efficiency limit of 33.2%. For a high-temperature thermoradiative cell with an energy gap of 0.4 eV, a theoretical efficiency close to 50% is found while the cell produces 1000 W/m{sup 2} has a temperature of 1000 K and is placed in surroundings with a temperature of 300 K. Some aspects related to the practical implementation of the concept are discussed and some challenges are addressed. It is, for example, obvious that there is an upper boundary for the temperature under which solid state devices can work properly over time. No conclusions are drawn with regard to such practical boundaries, because the work is aimed at establishing upper limits for ideal thermoradiative devices.

  7. Quantitative Evaluation of Performance in Interventional Neuroradiology: An Integrated Curriculum Featuring Theoretical and Practical Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Marielle; Kriston, Levente; Romero, Javier M.; Frölich, Andreas M.; Jansen, Olav; Fiehler, Jens; Buhk, Jan-Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We sought to develop a standardized curriculum capable of assessing key competencies in Interventional Neuroradiology by the use of models and simulators in an objective, quantitative, and efficient way. In this evaluation we analyzed the associations between the practical experience, theoretical knowledge, and the skills lab performance of interventionalists. Materials and Methods We evaluated the endovascular skills of 26 participants of the Advanced Course in Endovascular Interventional Neuroradiology of the European Society of Neuroradiology with a set of three tasks (aneurysm coiling and thrombectomy in a virtual simulator and placement of an intra-aneurysmal flow disruptor in a flow model). Practical experience was assessed by a survey. Participants completed a written and oral examination to evaluate theoretical knowledge. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Results In multivariate analysis knowledge of materials and techniques in Interventional Neuroradiology was moderately associated with skills in aneurysm coiling and thrombectomy. Experience in mechanical thrombectomy was moderately associated with thrombectomy skills, while age was negatively associated with thrombectomy skills. We found no significant association between age, sex, or work experience and skills in aneurysm coiling. Conclusion Our study gives an example of how an integrated curriculum for reasonable and cost-effective assessment of key competences of an interventional neuroradiologist could look. In addition to traditional assessment of theoretical knowledge practical skills are measured by the use of endovascular simulators yielding objective, quantitative, and constructive data for the evaluation of the current performance status of participants as well as the evolution of their technical competency over time. PMID:26848840

  8. Incorporation of additives into polymers

    DOEpatents

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Yates, Matthew Z.

    2003-07-29

    There has been invented a method for incorporating additives into polymers comprising: (a) forming an aqueous or alcohol-based colloidal system of the polymer; (b) emulsifying the colloidal system with a compressed fluid; and (c) contacting the colloidal polymer with the additive in the presence of the compressed fluid. The colloidal polymer can be contacted with the additive by having the additive in the compressed fluid used for emulsification or by adding the additive to the colloidal system before or after emulsification with the compressed fluid. The invention process can be carried out either as a batch process or as a continuous on-line process.

  9. Deciphering the roles of multiple additives in organocatalyzed Michael additions.

    PubMed

    Günler, Z Inci; Companyó, Xavier; Alfonso, Ignacio; Burés, Jordi; Jimeno, Ciril; Pericàs, Miquel A

    2016-05-21

    The synergistic effects of multiple additives (water and acetic acid) on the asymmetric Michael addition of acetone to nitrostyrene catalyzed by primary amine-thioureas (PAT) were precisely determined. Acetic acid facilitates hydrolysis of the imine intermediates, thus leading to catalytic behavior, and minimizes the formation of the double addition side product. In contrast, water slows down the reaction but minimizes catalyst deactivation, eventually leading to higher final yields. PMID:27128165

  10. Revisiting Additivity Violation of Quantum Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Motohisa

    2014-12-01

    We prove additivity violation of minimum output entropy of quantum channels by straightforward application of -net argument and Lévy's lemma. The additivity conjecture was disproved initially by Hastings. Later, a proof via asymptotic geometric analysis was presented by Aubrun, Szarek and Werner, which uses Dudley's bound on Gaussian process (or Dvoretzky's theorem with Schechtman's improvement). In this paper, we develop another proof along Dvoretzky's theorem in Milman's view, showing additivity violation in broader regimes than the existing proofs. Importantly,Dvoretzky's theorem works well with norms to give strong statements, but these techniques can be extended to functions which have norm-like structures-positive homogeneity and triangle inequality. Then, a connection between Hastings' method and ours is also discussed. In addition, we make some comments on relations between regularized minimum output entropy and classical capacity of quantum channels.

  11. From "Work-Family" to "Work-Life": Broadening Our Conceptualization and Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeney, Jessica; Boyd, Elizabeth M.; Sinha, Ruchi; Westring, Alyssa F.; Ryan, Ann Marie

    2013-01-01

    Despite frequent reference to "work-life" issues in the organizational literature, little theoretical or empirical attention has been paid to nonwork areas beyond family. The purpose of the research described here is to move beyond work-family conflict to a broader conceptualization and measurement of work interference with life. A measure of work…

  12. Theoretical motions of hydrofoil systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imlay, Frederick H

    1948-01-01

    Results are presented of an investigation that has been undertaken to develop theoretical methods of treating the motions of hydrofoil systems and to determine some of the important parameters. Variations of parameters include three distributions of area between the hydrofoils, two rates of change of downwash angle with angle of attack, three depths of immersion, two dihedral angles, two rates of change of lift with immersion, three longitudinal hydrofoil spacings, two radii of gyration in pitching, and various horizontal and vertical locations of the center of gravity. Graphs are presented to show locations of the center of gravity for stable motion, values of the stability roots, and motions following the sudden application of a vertical force or a pitching moment to the hydrofoil system for numerous sets of values of the parameters.

  13. Research in Theoretical Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ralston, John P.

    2013-07-28

    This document is the final report on activity of the University of Kansas theory group supported under DOE Grant Number DE-FG02-04ER14308, ending April 30, 3013. The report covers the most recent three year period period May 1, 2010-April 30, 2013. Faculty supported by the grant during the period were Danny Marfatia (co-I), Douglas McKay (emeritus) and John Ralston (PI). The group's research topics and accomplishments covered numerous different topics subsumed under the {\\it the Energy Frontier, the Intensity Frontier}, and {\\it the Cosmic Frontier}. Many theoretical and experimental results related to the Standard Model and models of new physics were published during the reporting period. The group's research emphasis has been on challenging and confronting {\\it Anything that is Observable} about the physical Universe.

  14. Theoretical studies of molecular collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouri, Donald J.

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) total integral reactive cross sections and vibrationally resolved reaction probabilities for F + H2 = HF + H; (2) a theoretical study of inelastic O + N2 collisions; (3) body frame close coupling wave packet approach to gas phase atom-rigit rotor inelastic collisions; (4) wave packet study of gas phase atom-rigit motor scattering; (5) the application of optical potentials for reactive scattering; (6) time dependent, three dimensional body frame quantal wave packet treatment of the H + H2 exchange reaction; (7) a time dependent wave packet approach to atom-diatom reactive collision probabilities; (8) time dependent wave packet for the complete determination of s-matrix elements for reactive molecular collisions in three dimensions; (9) a comparison of three time dependent wave packet methods for calculating electron-atom elastic scattering cross sections; and (10) a numerically exact full wave packet approach to molecule-surface scattering.

  15. Theoretical Perspectives on Sibling Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Whiteman, Shawn D.; McHale, Susan M.; Soli, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Although siblings are a fixture of family life, research on sibling relationships lags behind that on other family relationships. To stimulate interest in sibling research and to serve as a guide for future investigations by family scholars, we review four theoretical psychologically oriented perspectives—(a) psychoanalytic-evolutionary, (b) social psychological, (c) social learning, and (d) family-ecological systems—that can inform research on sibling relationships, including perspectives on the nature and influences on developmental, individual, and group differences in sibling relationships. Given that most research on siblings has focused on childhood and adolescence, our review highlights these developmental periods, but we also incorporate the limited research on adult sibling relationships, including in formulating suggestions for future research on this fundamental family relationship. PMID:21731581

  16. Critical Arterial Stenosis: A Theoretical and Experimental Solution

    PubMed Central

    Berguer, R.; Hwang, N. H. C.

    1974-01-01

    The mechanics of critical stenosis of a blood vessel are studied by means of a comprehensive theoretical model in terms of energy changes and dissipation. These theoretical assumptions correlate well with experimental data obtained in vivo. Previous work in this field is analyzed. This new treatment of the phenomenon of blood vessel stenosis allows explanation of apparent contradictions in previous studies. When the velocity of flow in the unstenosed portion and the geometry of the stenosis are known, the drop in pressure at flow can be predicted. ImagesFig. 4.Fig. 5. PMID:4835958

  17. Theoretical analysis of ARC constriction

    SciTech Connect

    Stoenescu, M.L.; Brooks, A.W.; Smith, T.M.

    1980-12-01

    The physics of the thermionic converter is governed by strong electrode-plasma interactions (emissions surface scattering, charge exchange) and weak interactions (diffusion, radiation) at the maximum interelectrode plasma radius. The physical processes are thus mostly convective in thin sheaths in front of the electrodes and mostly diffusive and radiative in the plasma bulk. The physical boundaries are open boundaries to particle transfer (electrons emitted or absorbed by the electrodes, all particles diffusing through some maximum plasma radius) and to convective, conductive and radiative heat transfer. In a first approximation the thermionic converter may be described by a one-dimensional classical transport theory. The two-dimensional effects may be significant as a result of the sheath sensitivity to radial plasma variations and of the strong sheath-plasma coupling. The current-voltage characteristic of the converter is thus the result of an integrated current density over the collector area for which the boundary conditions at each r determine the regime (ignited/unignited) of the local current density. A current redistribution strongly weighted at small radii (arc constriction) limits the converter performance and opens questions on constriction reduction possibilities. The questions addressed are the followng: (1) what are the main contributors to the loss of current at high voltage in the thermionic converter; and (2) is arc constriction observable theoretically and what are the conditions of its occurrence. The resulting theoretical problem is formulated and results are given. The converter electrical current is estimated directly from the electron and ion particle fluxes based on the spatial distribution of the electron/ion density n, temperatures T/sub e/, T/sub i/, electrical voltage V and on the knowledge of the transport coefficients. (WHK)

  18. Theoretical elementary particle research at the University of Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Field, R.D.; Ramond, P.M.; Sikivie, P.; Thorn, C.B.

    1996-12-01

    This is the annual progress report of the theoretical particle theory group at the University of Florida under DoE Grant DE-FG05-86ER40272. At present the group consists of four Full Professors (Field, Ramond, Thorn, Sikivie), two Associate Professors (Qiu, Woodard), and one Assistant Professor (Kennedy). In addition, the group has four postdoctoral research associates and three graduate students. The research of the group covers a broad range of topics in theoretical high energy physics including both theory and phenomenology. Included in this report is a summary of the last several years and an outline of the current research program.

  19. Theoretical pluralism in psychoanalytic case studies

    PubMed Central

    Willemsen, Jochem; Cornelis, Shana; Geerardyn, Filip M.; Desmet, Mattias; Meganck, Reitske; Inslegers, Ruth; Cauwe, Joachim M. B. D.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide an overview of the scientific activity of different psychoanalytic schools of thought in terms of the content and production of case studies published on ISI Web of Knowledge. Between March 2013 and November 2013, we contacted all case study authors included in the online archive of psychoanalytic and psychodynamic case studies (www.singlecasearchive.com) to inquire about their psychoanalytic orientation during their work with the patient. The response rate for this study was 45%. It appears that the two oldest psychoanalytic schools, Object-relations psychoanalysis and Ego psychology or “Classical psychoanalysis” dominate the literature of published case studies. However, most authors stated that they feel attached to two or more psychoanalytic schools of thought. This confirms that the theoretical pluralism in psychoanalysis stretches to the field of single case studies. The single case studies of each psychoanalytic school are described separately in terms of methodology, patient, therapist, or treatment features. We conclude that published case studies features are fairly similar across different psychoanalytic schools. The results of this study are not representative of all psychoanalytic schools, as some do not publish their work in ISI ranked journals. PMID:26483725

  20. Theoretical Characterizaiton of Visual Signatures (Muzzle Flash)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashinski, D. O.; Scales, A. N.; Vanderley, D. L.; Chase, G. M.; di Nallo, O. E.; Byrd, E. F. C.

    2014-05-01

    We are investigating the accuracy of theoretical models used to predict the visible, ultraviolet and infrared spectra of product materials ejected from the muzzle of currently fielded systems. Recent advances in solid propellants has made the management of muzzle signature (flash) a principle issue in weapons development across the calibers. A priori prediction of the electromagnetic spectra of formulations will allow researchers to tailor blends that yield desired signatures and determine spectrographic detection ranges. We are currently employing quantum chemistry methods at various levels of sophistication to optimize molecular geometries, compute vibrational frequencies, and determine the optical spectra of specific gas-phase molecules and radicals of interest. Electronic excitations are being computed using Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT). A comparison of computational results to experimental values found in the literature is used to assess the affect of basis set and functional choice on calculation accuracy. The current status of this work will be presented at the conference. Work supported by the ARL, and USMA.

  1. Enantioselective Michael Addition of Water

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Resch, Verena; Otten, Linda G; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The enantioselective Michael addition using water as both nucleophile and solvent has to date proved beyond the ability of synthetic chemists. Herein, the direct, enantioselective Michael addition of water in water to prepare important β-hydroxy carbonyl compounds using whole cells of Rhodococcus strains is described. Good yields and excellent enantioselectivities were achieved with this method. Deuterium labeling studies demonstrate that a Michael hydratase catalyzes the water addition exclusively with anti-stereochemistry. PMID:25529526

  2. Gasoline additives, emissions, and performance

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The papers included in this publication deal with the influence of fuel, additive, and hardware changes on a variety of vehicle performance characteristics. Advanced techniques for measuring these performance parameters are also described. Contents include: Fleet test evaluation of gasoline additives for intake valve and combustion chamber deposit clean up; A technique for evaluating octane requirement additives in modern engines on dynamometer test stands; A fleet test of two additive technologies comparing their effects on tailpipe emissions; Investigation into the vehicle exhaust emissions of high percentage ethanol blends; Variability in hydrocarbon speciation measurements at low emission (ULEV) levels; and more.

  3. Cultural Framing: Foreign Correspondents and Their Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starck, Kenneth; Villanueva, Estela

    With the notion of cultural framing as a theoretical backdrop, a study examined the role of culture in the work of foreign correspondents. The aim was to explore cultural aspects of international news reporting that may suggest avenues for more systematic inquiry into the role of culture in the work of the foreign correspondent. Of 75 examined…

  4. Faculty at Work. Motivation, Expectation, Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, Robert T.; Lawrence, Janet H.

    This book draws together empirical evidence on college and university faculty work, develops and tests a theoretical framework of faculty motivation to engage in different teaching, research, and service activities, and suggests how administrative practices can be improved so that faculty work lives are enriched and institutions become more…

  5. Theoretical Foundations for Evidence-Based Health Informatics: Why? How?

    PubMed

    Scott, Philip J; Georgiou, Andrew; Hyppönen, Hannele; Craven, Catherine K; Rigby, Michael; Brender McNair, Jytte

    2016-01-01

    A scientific approach to health informatics requires sound theoretical foundations. Health informatics implementation would be more effective if evidence-based and guided by theories about what is likely to work in what circumstances. We report on a Medinfo 2015 workshop on this topic jointly organized by the EFMI Working Group on Assessment of Health Information Systems and the IMIA Working Group on Technology Assessment and Quality Development. We discuss the findings of the workshop and propose an approach to consolidate empirical knowledge into testable middle-range theories. PMID:27577457

  6. Mass Media and Socialization: Theoretic Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Thomas F.

    This paper examines the major theoretical approaches to the study of socialization, with an emphasis on media effects. The three major bodies of literature studied are the major theoretic approaches utilized in the general area of developmental psychology, the theoretical paradigms evident in studies dealing more specifically with child…

  7. Measure-theoretic sensitivity via finite partitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian

    2016-07-01

    For every positive integer n≥slant 2 , we introduce the concept of measure-theoretic n-sensitivity for measure-theoretic dynamical systems via finite measurable partitions, and show that an ergodic system is measure-theoretically n-sensitive but not (n  +  1)-sensitive if and only if its maximal pattern entropy is log n .

  8. Mathematical challenges from theoretical/computational chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The committee believes that this report has relevance and potentially valuable suggestions for a wide range of readers. Target audiences include: graduate departments in the mathematical and chemical sciences; federal and private agencies that fund research in the mathematical and chemical sciences; selected industrial and government research and development laboratories; developers of software and hardware for computational chemistry; and selected individual researchers. Chapter 2 of this report covers some history of computational chemistry for the nonspecialist, while Chapter 3 illustrates the fruits of some past successful cross-fertilization between mathematical scientists and computational/theoretical chemists. In Chapter 4 the committee has assembled a representative, but not exhaustive, survey of research opportunities. Most of these are descriptions of important open problems in computational/theoretical chemistry that could gain much from the efforts of innovative mathematical scientists, written so as to be accessible introductions to the nonspecialist. Chapter 5 is an assessment, necessarily subjective, of cultural differences that must be overcome if collaborative work is to be encouraged between the mathematical and the chemical communities. Finally, the report ends with a brief list of conclusions and recommendations that, if followed, could promote accelerated progress at this interface. Recognizing that bothersome language issues can inhibit prospects for collaborative research at the interface between distinctive disciplines, the committee has attempted throughout to maintain an accessible style, in part by using illustrative boxes, and has included at the end of the report a glossary of technical terms that may be familiar to only a subset of the target audiences listed above.

  9. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step…

  10. 75 FR 27313 - Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... FROM PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED PROCUREMENT LIST Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed additions to the... or Severely Disabled, Jefferson Plaza 2, Suite 10800, 1421 Jefferson Davis Highway,...

  11. Learning Information Systems: Theoretical Foundations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Terrance D.

    This paper uses the conceptual framework of cybernetics to understand why learning information systems such as the "Accelerated Reader" work so successfully, and to examine how this simple yet incisive concept can be used to accelerate learning at every level and in all disciplines. The first section, "Basic Concepts," discusses the cybernetic…

  12. Theoretical models on prediction of thermal property of nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalimba, Veikko; Skočilasová, Blanka

    2014-08-01

    This paper deals with theoretical models on prediction of thermo physical properties of iron nanoparticles in base fluid. A high performance of heat transfer fluid has a great influence on the size, weight and cost of heat transfer systems, therefore a high performance heat transfer fluid is very important in many industries. Over the last decades nanofluids have been developed. According to many researchers and publications on nanofluids it is evident that nanofluids are found to exhibit enhanced thermal properties i.e. thermal conductivity etc. Theoretical models for predicting enhanced thermal conductivity have been established. The underlying mechanisms for the enhancement are still debated and not fully understood. In this paper, theoretical analytical models on prediction of thermal conductivity of iron nano particle in base Jatropha oil are discussed. The work arises from the projects which were realized at UJEP, FPTM, department of Machines and Mechanics with cooperation with Polytechnic of Namibia, department of Mechanical Engineering.

  13. An integrated theoretical and practical approach for teaching hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonomi, Tullia; Fumagalli, Letizia; Cavallin, Angelo

    2013-04-01

    their limitations; C) by an evaluation process whose results contribute to the final examination, so that the students are evaluated on the basis of their ability to discuss theoretical subjects and/or projects and to resolving exercises and case studies either by hand calculations or by modelling. The applied hydrogeology examination is an example of the evaluation process. It involves development of a plan to resolve a real hydrogeological issue, such as the design of a hydraulic barrier for a landfill, the design of a well field to meet the supply requirements of a muncipality, or the control of possible seepage from a contaminated site close to to sensitive discharge features such as wells, springs, rivers. The students are allowed to work on computers for three consecutive mornings for a total 15 hours, and in the end are required to produce a technical report and a hydrogeological model. Obviously their solutions are neither unique nor completely optimized (just as in the real world), but the comparisons and debates among the students are important portals to learning and improvement. A second example: the groundwater pollution and remediation examination is based on the discussion of a remediation project elaborated in stages during the course, with the addition of increasing complex types of data and information. The students have one hour a week, during the course, to submit to the teacher their analysis of the problem and possible solutions. In ten years of experience all students have considered this method of examination a challenge, and found it engaging and helpful, even if unusual, at least in Italy. The University of Milano Bicocca has recently drilled a piezometric well both to monitor the flow of groundwater and to allow students to perform aquifer tests and to conduct standard groundwater sampling procedure, without any longer needing to rely on outside private donors for access to a field site. The overall approach, which includes, lectures

  14. High-throughput theoretical design of lithium battery materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi-Gang, Ling; Jian, Gao; Rui-Juan, Xiao; Li-Quan, Chen

    2016-01-01

    The rapid evolution of high-throughput theoretical design schemes to discover new lithium battery materials is reviewed, including high-capacity cathodes, low-strain cathodes, anodes, solid state electrolytes, and electrolyte additives. With the development of efficient theoretical methods and inexpensive computers, high-throughput theoretical calculations have played an increasingly important role in the discovery of new materials. With the help of automatic simulation flow, many types of materials can be screened, optimized and designed from a structural database according to specific search criteria. In advanced cell technology, new materials for next generation lithium batteries are of great significance to achieve performance, and some representative criteria are: higher energy density, better safety, and faster charge/discharge speed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11234013 and 51172274) and the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2015AA034201).

  15. Work organization, job stress, and work-related musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Carayon, P; Smith, M J; Haims, M C

    1999-12-01

    Recent studies indicate potential links among work organization, job stress, and work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMDs). In this paper we propose several pathways for a theoretical relationship between job stress and WRMDs. These pathways highlight the physiological, psychological, and behavioral reactions to stress that can affect WRMDs directly and indirectly. One model stipulates that psychosocial work factors (e.g., work pressure, lack of control), which can cause stress, might also influence or be related to ergonomic factors such as force, repetition, and posture that have been identified as risk factors for WRMDs. In order to fully understand the etiology of WRMDs, it is important to examine both physical ergonomic and psychosocial work factors simultaneously. Smith and Carayon-Sainfort (1989) have proposed a model of the work system for stress management that provides a useful framework for conceptualizing the work-related factors that contribute to WRMDs. Practical applications of this research include practitioners taking into account psychosocial work factors and job stress in their efforts to reduce and control WRMDs. PMID:10774134

  16. Theoretical tools for semiconductors devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hagan, P.; Cox, R.; Randall, E.; Reyna, L.

    1996-10-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Future generations of Very Large Scale Integrated (VLSI) circuits require semiconducting devices that are much faster and smaller than current devices. Three-dimensional and transient effects are critical to the performance of these devices. Yet using Monte Carlo (MC) codes to perform time-dependent, three-dimensional simulations will not be feasible in the foreseeable future. Here we re-analyze the physics of semiconductors; use singular perturbation techniques to derive the reduced-dimensionality equations that accurately describe the semiconductor in the regimes corresponding to ultra-small ultra-fast devices; and validate the resulting theoretical models against MC simulations and experimental data. The objective of this project was to gain the capability of accurately simulating ultra-small ultra-fast devices in three spatial dimensions with the ultimate goal of transforming the design of advanced devices.

  17. Rethinking Theoretical Approaches to Stigma

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jack K; Lang, Annie; Olafsdottir, Sigrun

    2008-01-01

    A resurgence of research and policy efforts on stigma both facilitates and forces a reconsideration of the levels and types of factors that shape reactions to persons with conditions that engender prejudice and discrimination. Focusing on the case of mental illness but drawing from theories and studies of stigma across the social sciences, we propose a framework that brings together theoretical insights from micro, meso and macro level research: Framework Integrating Normative Influences on Stigma (FINIS) starts with Goffman’s notion that understanding stigma requires a language of social relationships, but acknowledges that individuals do not come to social interaction devoid of affect and motivation. Further, all social interactions take place in a context in which organizations, media and larger cultures structure normative expectations which create the possibility of marking “difference”. Labelling theory, social network theory, the limited capacity model of media influence, the social psychology of prejudice and discrimination, and theories of the welfare state all contribute to an understanding of the complex web of expectations shaping stigma. FINIS offers the potential to build a broad-based scientific foundation based on understanding the effects of stigma on the lives of persons with mental illness, the resources devoted to the organizations and families who care for them, and policies and programs designed to combat stigma. We end by discussing the clear implications this framework holds for stigma reduction, even in the face of conflicting results. PMID:18436358

  18. Theoretical investigations of plasma processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, H. E.; Hong, S. H.

    1976-01-01

    System analyses are presented for electrically sustained, collision dominated plasma centrifuges, in which the plasma rotates under the influence of the Lorentz forces resulting from the interaction of the current density fields with an external magnetic field. It is shown that gas discharge centrifuges are technically feasible in which the plasma rotates at speeds up to 1 million cm/sec. The associated centrifugal forces produce a significant spatial isotope separation, which is somewhat perturbed in the viscous boundary layers at the centrifuge walls. The isotope separation effect is the more pronounced. The induced magnetic fields have negligible influence on the plasma rotation if the Hall coefficient is small. In the technical realization of collision dominated plasma centrifuges, a trade-off has to be made between power density and speeds of rotation. The diffusion of sputtered atoms to system surfaces of ion propulsion systems and the deposition of the atoms are treated theoretically by means of a simple model which permits an analytical solution. The problem leads to an inhomogeneous integral equation.

  19. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-10-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step in understanding mathematical representations of RGB color. Finally, color addition and subtraction are presented for the X11 colors from web design to illustrate yet another real-life application of color mixing.

  20. Theoretical analysis of single molecule spectroscopy lineshapes of conjugated polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Murali

    satisfactory fitting, it is shown that the inclusion of an additional energetic disorder is essential, representing the effect of quasi-static disorder accumulated during the SMES of each polymer. Various technical details, ambiguous issues, and implication of the present work are discussed.

  1. Work values system development during adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Porfeli, Erik J.

    2006-01-01

    Work values stability, change, and development can be appreciably reduced to a living system model (Ford, 1994). This theoretical model includes discrepancy-reducing and cohesion-amplifying mechanisms that interact to govern the change in standard- and goal-oriented work values over time (Boldero & Francis, 2002). Employing longitudinal data from a sample of adolescents (n = 1010) spanning the 9th through the 12th grades, the results demonstrate that the value system develops in a theoretically predictable fashion during the adolescent period. Discrepancy reduction and cohesion mechanisms interact to either maintain or increase the integrity of and harmony between standard-oriented values associated with high school part-time work experiences and goal-oriented work values related to anticipated career-oriented work during adulthood. Exploratory analyses suggest that adolescents’ educational expectations influence the relative salience of standard- and goal-oriented work values and the discrepancy reduction process linking the two over time. PMID:17387373

  2. About the dark and bright sides of self-efficacy: workaholism and work engagement.

    PubMed

    Del Líbano, Mario; Llorens, Susana; Salanoval, Marisa; Schaufeli, Wilmar B

    2012-07-01

    Taking the Resources-Experiences-Demands Model (RED Model) by Salanova and colleagues as our starting point, we tested how work self-efficacy relates positively to negative (i.e., work overload and work-family conflict) and positive outcomes (i.e., job satisfaction and organizational commitment), through the mediating role of workaholism (health impairment process) and work engagement (motivational process). In a sample of 386 administrative staff from a Spanish University (65% women), Structural Equation Modeling provided full evidence for the research model. In addition, Multivariate Analyses of Variance showed that self-efficacy was only related positively to one of the two dimensions of workaholism, namely, working excessively. Finally, we discuss the theoretical and practical contributions in terms of the RED Model. PMID:22774443

  3. Pargament's Theory of Religious Coping: Implications for Spiritually Sensitive Social Work Practice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianbin

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes that Pargament's theory of religious coping can be a theoretical beacon to spiritually sensitive social work practice. It begins with a discussion of the raison d'être of spiritually sensitive social work, which is examined as being able to cast a holistic and positive glow on social work. Then it provides an overview and a critique of Pargament's theory, emphasising that the theory offers a fuller and more impartial picture of religious coping. In addition, it explores the implications of Pargament's theory for spiritually sensitive social work practice with religious clients in terms of engagement, assessment and intervention. This article concludes by discussing how social work practitioners can avoid the pitfalls and limitations of Pargament's theory. PMID:27559234

  4. Theoretical aspects of the biological catch bond.

    PubMed

    Prezhdo, Oleg V; Pereverzev, Yuriy V

    2009-06-16

    The biological catch bond is fascinating and counterintuitive. When an external force is applied to a catch bond, either in vivo or in vitro, the bond resists breaking and becomes stronger instead. In contrast, ordinary slip bonds, which represent the vast majority of biological and chemical bonds, dissociate faster when subjected to a force. Catch-bond behavior was first predicted theoretically 20 years ago and has recently been experimentally observed in a number of protein receptor-ligand complexes. In this Account, we review the simplest physical-chemical models that lead to analytic expressions for bond lifetime, the concise universal representations of experimental data, and the explicit requirements for catch binding. The phenomenon has many manifestations: increased lifetime with growing constant force is its defining characteristic. If force increases with time, as in jump-ramp experiments, catch binding creates an additional maximum in the probability density of bond rupture force. The new maximum occurs at smaller forces than the slip-binding maximum, merging with the latter at a certain ramp rate in a process resembling a phase transition. If force is applied periodically, as in blood flows, catch-bond properties strongly depend on force frequency. Catch binding results from a complex landscape of receptor-ligand interactions. Bond lifetime can increase if force (i) prevents dissociation through the native pathway and drives the system over a higher energy barrier or (ii) alters protein conformations in a way that strengthens receptor-ligand binding. The bond deformations can be associated with allostery; force-induced conformational changes at one end of the protein propagate to the binding site at the other end. Surrounding water creates further exciting effects. Protein-water tension provides an additional barrier that can be responsible for significant drops in bond lifetimes observed at low forces relative to zero force. This strong dependence of

  5. Decent Work: A Psychological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Blustein, David L.; Olle, Chad; Connors-Kellgren, Alice; Diamonti, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    This contribution, which serves as the lead article for the Research Topic entitled “From Meaning of Working to Meaningful Lives: The Challenges of Expanding Decent Work,” explores current challenges in the development and operationalization of decent work. Based on an initiative from the International Labor Organization [ILO] (1999) decent work represents an aspirational statement about the quality of work that should be available to all people who seek to work around the globe. Within recent years, several critiques have been raised about decent work from various disciplines, highlighting concerns about a retreat from the social justice ethos that had initially defined the concept. In addition, other scholars have observed that decent work has not included a focus on the role of meaning and purpose at work. To address these concerns, we propose that a psychological perspective can help to revitalize the decent work agenda by infusing a more specific focus on individual experiences and by reconnecting decent work to its social justice origins. As an illustration of the advantages of a psychological perspective, we explore the rise of precarious work and also connect the decent work agenda to the Psychology-of-Working Framework and Theory (Blustein, 2006; Duffy et al., 2016). PMID:27047430

  6. Work and Sleep—A Prospective Study of Psychosocial Work Factors, Physical Work Factors, and Work Scheduling

    PubMed Central

    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn; Garefelt, Johanna; Richter, Anne; Westerlund, Hugo; Magnusson Hanson, Linda L.; Sverke, Magnus; Kecklund, Göran

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: There is limited knowledge about the prospective relationship between major work characteristics (psychosocial, physical, scheduling) and disturbed sleep. The current study sought to provide such knowledge. Design: Prospective cohort, with measurements on two occasions (T1 and T2) separated by two years. Setting: Naturalistic study, Sweden. Participants: There were 4,827 participants forming a representative sample of the working population. Measurements and Results: Questionnaire data on work factors obtained on two occasions were analyzed with structural equation modeling. Competing models were compared in order to investigate temporal relationships. A reciprocal model was found to fit the data best. Sleep disturbances at T2 were predicted by higher work demands at T1 and by lower perceived stress at T1. In addition, sleep disturbances at T1 predicted subsequent higher perception of stress, higher work demands, lower degree of control, and less social support at work at T2. A cross-sectional mediation analysis showed that (higher) perceived stress mediated the relationship between (higher) work demands and sleep disturbances; however, no such association was found longitudinally. Conclusions: Higher work demands predicted disturbed sleep, whereas physical work characteristics, shift work, and overtime did not. In addition, disturbed sleep predicted subsequent higher work demands, perceived stress, less social support, and lower degree of control. The results suggest that remedial interventions against sleep disturbances should focus on psychosocial factors, and that such remedial interventions may improve the psychosocial work situation in the long run. Citation: Åkerstedt T, Garefelt J, Richter A, Westerlund H, Magnusson LL, Sverke M, Kecklund G. Work and sleep—a prospective study of psychosocial work factors, physical work factors, and work scheduling. SLEEP 2015;38(7):1129–1136. PMID:26118559

  7. A theoretical approach to artificial intelligence systems in medicine.

    PubMed

    Spyropoulos, B; Papagounos, G

    1995-10-01

    The various theoretical models of disease, the nosology which is accepted by the medical community and the prevalent logic of diagnosis determine both the medical approach as well as the development of the relevant technology including the structure and function of the A.I. systems involved. A.I. systems in medicine, in addition to the specific parameters which enable them to reach a diagnostic and/or therapeutic proposal, entail implicitly theoretical assumptions and socio-cultural attitudes which prejudice the orientation and the final outcome of the procedure. The various models -causal, probabilistic, case-based etc. -are critically examined and their ethical and methodological limitations are brought to light. The lack of a self-consistent theoretical framework in medicine, the multi-faceted character of the human organism as well as the non-explicit nature of the theoretical assumptions involved in A.I. systems restrict them to the role of decision supporting "instruments" rather than regarding them as decision making "devices". This supporting role and, especially, the important function which A.I. systems should have in the structure, the methods and the content of medical education underscore the need of further research in the theoretical aspects and the actual development of such systems. PMID:8547968

  8. 48 CFR 1836.213-370 - Additive and deductive items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Additive and deductive... Special Aspects of Contracting for Construction 1836.213-370 Additive and deductive items. When it appears... the work generally as specified and one or more additive or deductive bid items progressively...

  9. 48 CFR 1436.571 - Additive and deductive items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additive and deductive... Additive and deductive items. If it appears that funds available for a construction project may be... the work as specified and for one or more additive or deductive bid items which add or omit...

  10. 48 CFR 1836.213-370 - Additive and deductive items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additive and deductive... Special Aspects of Contracting for Construction 1836.213-370 Additive and deductive items. When it appears... the work generally as specified and one or more additive or deductive bid items progressively...

  11. 48 CFR 1436.571 - Additive and deductive items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additive and deductive... Additive and deductive items. If it appears that funds available for a construction project may be... the work as specified and for one or more additive or deductive bid items which add or omit...

  12. Calculators and Computers: Graphical Addition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spero, Samuel W.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program is presented that generates problem sets involving sketching graphs of trigonometric functions using graphical addition. The students use calculators to sketch the graphs and a computer solution is used to check it. (MP)

  13. Theoretical study of thermoelectric properties of n-type doped Mg2Si0.4Sn0.6 solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceyda Yelgel, Övgü

    2016-02-01

    In this work, a systematic theoretical investigation of thermoelectric properties of n-type doped ? solid solutions with ? is presented in the temperature range ? K. Electronic transport properties (?, S, and ?) are calculated using the nearly-free-electron approximation and the Fermi-Dirac statistics. Thermal transport properties including contributions from carriers (?), electron-hole pairs (?) and phonons (?) computed using the Wiedemann-Franz law, Price's theory and Srivastava's scheme, respectively. In a very good agreement with available experimental measurements, among with ? samples, the highest value for thermoelectric figure of merit ZT is found to be 1.41 at 800 K for ? sample owing to its highest electrical conductivity and the lowest lattice thermal conductivity values. Additionally, by theoretically considering the doping levels as ?, we suggest that at 800 K ZT goes up by 30% for ? sample with the value of ? compared to ? sample due to increment in the electrical conductivity and additional mass defect effects to the phonon thermal conductivity.

  14. Polyolefins as additives in plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Deanin, R.D.

    1993-12-31

    Polyolefins are not only major commodity plastics - they are also very useful as additives, both in other polyolefins and also in other types of plastics. This review covers ethylene, propylene, butylene and isobutylene polymers, in blends with each other, and as additives to natural rubber, styrene/butadiene rubber, polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride, polymethyl methacrylate, polyphenylene oxide, polycarbonate, thermoplastic polyesters, polyurethanes, polyamides, and mixed automotive plastics recycling.

  15. Electromechanical properties of smart aggregate: theoretical modeling and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianjun; Kong, Qingzhao; Shi, Zhifei; Song, Gangbing

    2016-09-01

    Smart aggregate (SA), as a piezoceramic-based multi-functional device, is formed by sandwiching two lead zirconate titanate (PZT) patches with copper shielding between a pair of solid-machined cylindrical marble blocks with epoxy. Previous researches have successfully demonstrated the capability and reliability of versatile SAs to monitor the structural health of concrete structures. However, the previous works concentrated mainly on the applications of SAs in structural health monitoring; no reasonable theoretical model of SAs was proposed. In this paper, electromechanical properties of SAs were investigated using a proposed theoretical model. Based on one dimensional linear theory of piezo-elasticity, the dynamic solutions of a SA subjected to an external harmonic voltage were solved. Further, the electric impedance of the SA was computed, and the resonance and anti-resonance frequencies were calculated based on derived equations. Numerical analysis was conducted to discuss the effects of the thickness of epoxy layer and the dimension of PZT patch on the fundamental resonance and anti-resonance frequencies as well as the corresponding electromechanical coupling factor. The dynamic solutions based on the proposed theoretical model were further experimentally verified with two SA samples. The fundamental resonance and anti-resonance frequencies of SAs show good agreements in both theoretical and experimental results. The presented analysis and results contribute to the overall understanding of SA properties and help to optimize the working frequencies of SAs in structural health monitoring of civil structures.

  16. Theoretical and experimental studies of the stability of drug-drug interact.

    PubMed

    Soares, Monica F R; Alves, Lariza D S; Nadvorny, Daniela; Soares-Sobrinho, José L; Rolim-Neto, Pedro J

    2016-11-01

    Several factors can intervene in the molecular properties and consequently in the stability of drugs. The molecular complexes formation often occur due to favor the formation of hydrogen bonds, leading the system to configuration more energy stable. This work we aim to investigate through theoretical and experimental methods the relation between stability and properties of molecular complexes the molecular complex formed between the drugs, efavirenz (EFV), lamivudine (3TC) and zidovudine (AZT). With this study was possible determining the most stable complex formed between the compounds evaluated. In addition the energy and structural properties of the complex formed in relation to its individual components allowed us to evaluate the stability of the same. PMID:27267283

  17. Theoretical and Experimental Study of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) Signals Using an Analytical Transport Model

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez Villa, A.; Delgado Atencio, J. A.; Vazquez y Montiel, S.; Cunill Rodriguez, M.; Martinez Rodriguez, A. E.; Ramos, J. Castro; Villanueva, A.

    2010-12-07

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive low coherent interferometric technique that provides cross-sectional images of turbid media. OCT is based on the classical Michelson interferometer where the mirror of the reference arm is oscillating and the signal arm contains a biological sample. In this work, we analyzed theoretically the heterodyne optical signal adopting the so called extended Huygens-Fresnel principle (EHFP). We use simulated OCT images with known optical properties to test an algorithm developed by ourselves to recover the scattering coefficient and we recovered the scattering coefficient with a relative error less than 5% for noisy signals. In addition, we applied this algorithm to OCT images from phantoms of known optical properties; in this case curves were indistinguishable. A revision of the validity of the analytical model applied to our system should be done.

  18. Regulation of ATP supply during muscle contraction: theoretical studies.

    PubMed Central

    Korzeniewski, B

    1998-01-01

    The dynamic computer model of oxidative phosphorylation developed previously and successfully tested for large-scale changes in fluxes and metabolite concentrations was used to study the question of how the rate of ATP production by oxidative phosphorylation is adjusted to meet the energy demand during muscle contraction, which causes a great increase in ATP consumption in relation to the resting state. The changes in the respiration rate and ATP/ADP ratio after the onset of maximal work measured experimentally were compared with simulated changes in the respiration rate and ATP/ADP in several different cases, assuming direct activation of different steps by an external effector. On the basis of the computer simulations performed, it was possible to conclude which enzymes/metabolic blocks should be directly activated to cause the experimentally observable changes in fluxes and metabolite concentrations. The theoretical results obtained suggest that the parallel direct activation of actinomyosin-ATP-ase and oxidative phosphorylation by an external effector (for example calcium ions) is the main mechanism responsible for fitting of ATP production to ATP consumption, while the negative feedback via an increase in ADP concentration (decrease in ATP/ADP), which indirectly activates the ATP supply, plays only a minor role. Additionally, the conclusion is drawn that most of the oxidative phosphorylation steps should be directly activated in order to explain the observed changes in the respiration rate and ATP/ADP ratio (and also in other parameters) during muscle contraction. It is suggested that there should exist a universal external activator/regulatory mechanism which causes a parallel stimulation of different enzymes/processes. A possible nature of such an activator is shortly discussed. PMID:9494084

  19. ADDITIVITY ASSESSMENT OF TRIHALOMETHANE MIXTURES BY PROPORTIONAL RESPONSE ADDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    If additivity is known or assumed, the toxicity of a chemical mixture may be predicted from the dose response curves of the individual chemicals comprising the mixture. As single chemical data are abundant and mixture data sparse, mixture risk methods that utilize single chemical...

  20. Violence against women: theoretical reflections.

    PubMed

    Casique, Leticia Casique; Furegato, Antonia Regina Ferreira

    2006-01-01

    Violence appears in different forms and circumstances and involves distinct kinds of violent acts against children, women, elderly and other defenseless persons. This serious problem, which degrades women's integrity, is denoted by terms like domestic violence, gender violence and violence against women. Gender violence can appear as physical, psychological, sexual, economic violence, as well as violence at work. Violence against women committed by their intimate partners can be analyzed through the Ecological Model, which explains the close relation between individuals and their environment. Factors influencing people's behavior towards this violence should be analyzed with a view to establishing help programs. PMID:17294031

  1. Theoretical Explanations in Mathematical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivadulla, Andrés

    Many physicists wonder at the usefulness of mathematics in physics. According Madrid to Einstein mathematics is admirably appropriate to the objects of reality. Wigner asserts that mathematics plays an unreasonable important role in physics. James Jeans affirms that God is a mathematician, and that the first aim of physics is to discover the laws of nature, which are written in mathematical language. Dirac suggests that God may have used very advanced mathematics in constructing the universe. And Barrow adheres himself to Wigner's claim about the unreasonable effectiveness of mathematics for the workings of the physical world.

  2. Theoretical & Experimental Studies of Elementary Particles

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, Kevin

    2012-10-04

    Abstract High energy physics has been one of the signature research programs at the University of Rochester for over 60 years. The group has made leading contributions to experimental discoveries at accelerators and in cosmic rays and has played major roles in developing the theoretical framework that gives us our ``standard model'' of fundamental interactions today. This award from the Department of Energy funded a major portion of that research for more than 20 years. During this time, highlights of the supported work included the discovery of the top quark at the Fermilab Tevatron, the completion of a broad program of physics measurements that verified the electroweak unified theory, the measurement of three generations of neutrino flavor oscillations, and the first observation of a ``Higgs like'' boson at the Large Hadron Collider. The work has resulted in more than 2000 publications over the period of the grant. The principal investigators supported on this grant have been recognized as leaders in the field of elementary particle physics by their peers through numerous awards and leadership positions. Most notable among them is the APS W.K.H. Panofsky Prize awarded to Arie Bodek in 2004, the J.J. Sakurai Prizes awarded to Susumu Okubo and C. Richard Hagen in 2005 and 2010, respectively, the Wigner medal awarded to Susumu Okubo in 2006, and five principal investigators (Das, Demina, McFarland, Orr, Tipton) who received Department of Energy Outstanding Junior Investigator awards during the period of this grant. The University of Rochester Department of Physics and Astronomy, which houses the research group, provides primary salary support for the faculty and has waived most tuition costs for graduate students during the period of this grant. The group also benefits significantly from technical support and infrastructure available at the University which supports the work. The research work of the group has provided educational opportunities for graduate students

  3. [INVITED] Lasers in additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkerton, Andrew J.

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing is a topic of considerable ongoing interest, with forecasts predicting it to have major impact on industry in the future. This paper focusses on the current status and potential future development of the technology, with particular reference to the role of lasers within it. It begins by making clear the types and roles of lasers in the different categories of additive manufacturing. This is followed by concise reviews of the economic benefits and disadvantages of the technology, current state of the market and use of additive manufacturing in different industries. Details of these fields are referenced rather than expanded in detail. The paper continues, focusing on current indicators to the future of additive manufacturing. Barriers to its development, trends and opportunities in major industrial sectors, and wider opportunities for its development are covered. Evidence indicates that additive manufacturing may not become the dominant manufacturing technology in all industries, but represents an excellent opportunity for lasers to increase their influence in manufacturing as a whole.

  4. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, and to prepare specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives, including flavouring agents. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for eight food additives (Benzoe tonkinensis; carrageenan; citric and fatty acid esters of glycerol; gardenia yellow; lutein esters from Tagetes erecta; octenyl succinic acid-modified gum arabic; octenyl succinic acid-modified starch; paprika extract; and pectin) and eight groups of flavouring agents (aliphatic and alicyclic hydrocarbons; aliphatic and aromatic ethers; ionones and structurally related substances; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; monocyclic and bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; phenol and phenol derivatives; phenyl-substituted aliphatic alcohols and related aldehydes and esters; and sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: citric acid; gellan gum; polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monostearate; potassium aluminium silicate; and Quillaia extract (Type 2). Annexed to the report are tables summarizing the Committee's recommendations for dietary exposures to and toxicological evaluations of all of the food additives and flavouring agents considered at this meeting. PMID:26118220

  5. Identifiability of Additive, Time-Varying Actuator and Sensor Faults by State Augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Jason M.; Gonzalez, Oscar R.; Joshi, Suresh M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent work has provided a set of necessary and sucient conditions for identifiability of additive step faults (e.g., lock-in-place actuator faults, constant bias in the sensors) using state augmentation. This paper extends these results to an important class of faults which may affect linear, time-invariant systems. In particular, the faults under consideration are those which vary with time and affect the system dynamics additively. Such faults may manifest themselves in aircraft as, for example, control surface oscillations, control surface runaway, and sensor drift. The set of necessary and sucient conditions presented in this paper are general, and apply when a class of time-varying faults affects arbitrary combinations of actuators and sensors. The results in the main theorems are illustrated by two case studies, which provide some insight into how the conditions may be used to check the theoretical identifiability of fault configurations of interest for a given system. It is shown that while state augmentation can be used to identify certain fault configurations, other fault configurations are theoretically impossible to identify using state augmentation, giving practitioners valuable insight into such situations. That is, the limitations of state augmentation for a given system and configuration of faults are made explicit. Another limitation of model-based methods is that there can be large numbers of fault configurations, thus making identification of all possible configurations impractical. However, the theoretical identifiability of known, credible fault configurations can be tested using the theorems presented in this paper, which can then assist the efforts of fault identification practitioners.

  6. Intelligence: new findings and theoretical developments.

    PubMed

    Nisbett, Richard E; Aronson, Joshua; Blair, Clancy; Dickens, William; Flynn, James; Halpern, Diane F; Turkheimer, Eric

    2012-01-01

    We review new findings and new theoretical developments in the field of intelligence. New findings include the following: (a) Heritability of IQ varies significantly by social class. (b) Almost no genetic polymorphisms have been discovered that are consistently associated with variation in IQ in the normal range. (c) Much has been learned about the biological underpinnings of intelligence. (d) "Crystallized" and "fluid" IQ are quite different aspects of intelligence at both the behavioral and biological levels. (e) The importance of the environment for IQ is established by the 12-point to 18-point increase in IQ when children are adopted from working-class to middle-class homes. (f) Even when improvements in IQ produced by the most effective early childhood interventions fail to persist, there can be very marked effects on academic achievement and life outcomes. (g) In most developed countries studied, gains on IQ tests have continued, and they are beginning in the developing world. (h) Sex differences in aspects of intelligence are due partly to identifiable biological factors and partly to socialization factors. (i) The IQ gap between Blacks and Whites has been reduced by 0.33 SD in recent years. We report theorizing concerning (a) the relationship between working memory and intelligence, (b) the apparent contradiction between strong heritability effects on IQ and strong secular effects on IQ, (c) whether a general intelligence factor could arise from initially largely independent cognitive skills, (d) the relation between self-regulation and cognitive skills, and (e) the effects of stress on intelligence. PMID:22233090

  7. Neural complexity: A graph theoretic interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, L.; Buckley, C. L.; Bullock, S.

    2011-04-01

    One of the central challenges facing modern neuroscience is to explain the ability of the nervous system to coherently integrate information across distinct functional modules in the absence of a central executive. To this end, Tononi [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA.PNASA60027-842410.1073/pnas.91.11.5033 91, 5033 (1994)] proposed a measure of neural complexity that purports to capture this property based on mutual information between complementary subsets of a system. Neural complexity, so defined, is one of a family of information theoretic metrics developed to measure the balance between the segregation and integration of a system’s dynamics. One key question arising for such measures involves understanding how they are influenced by network topology. Sporns [Cereb. Cortex53OPAV1047-321110.1093/cercor/10.2.127 10, 127 (2000)] employed numerical models in order to determine the dependence of neural complexity on the topological features of a network. However, a complete picture has yet to be established. While De Lucia [Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.71.016114 71, 016114 (2005)] made the first attempts at an analytical account of this relationship, their work utilized a formulation of neural complexity that, we argue, did not reflect the intuitions of the original work. In this paper we start by describing weighted connection matrices formed by applying a random continuous weight distribution to binary adjacency matrices. This allows us to derive an approximation for neural complexity in terms of the moments of the weight distribution and elementary graph motifs. In particular, we explicitly establish a dependency of neural complexity on cyclic graph motifs.

  8. A theoretical analysis of vertical flow equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Yortsos, Y.C.

    1992-01-01

    The assumption of Vertical Flow Equilibrium (VFE) and of parallel flow conditions, in general, is often applied to the modeling of flow and displacement in natural porous media. However, the methodology for the development of the various models is rather intuitive, and no rigorous method is currently available. In this paper, we develop an asymptotic theory using as parameter the variable R{sub L} = (L/H){radical}(k{sub V})/(k{sub H}). It is rigorously shown that present models represent the leading order term of an asymptotic expansion with respect to 1/R{sub L}{sup 2}. Although this was numerically suspected, it is the first time that is is theoretically proved. Based on the general formulation, a series of models are subsequently obtained. In the absence of strong gravity effects, they generalize previous works by Zapata and Lake (1981), Yokoyama and Lake (1981) and Lake and Hirasaki (1981), on immiscible and miscible displacements. In the limit of gravity-segregated flow, we prove conditions for the fluids to be segregated and derive the Dupuit and Dietz (1953) approximations. Finally, we also discuss effects of capillarity and transverse dispersion.

  9. Theoretical study of Δ-3-(+)-carene oxidation.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Leonardo; Fernandes Francisco, Lilian; Dias, Jacques Fernandes; da Silva, Edilson Clemente; Ferreira dos Santos, Claudio Vinicius; Gil de Mendonça, Felipe Simões; Arbilla, Graciela

    2014-09-28

    In this work, the rate-limiting steps of Δ(3)-carene oxidation by ozone and OH radicals were studied. The thermochemical and kinetic parameters were evaluated using the B3LYP, PBE1PBE and BHandHLYP functionals, coupled cluster methods and the 6-311G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. The attack on the double bond may occur in different orientations, leading to different oxidation products. The rate coefficients of each step of the reactions were evaluated using conventional canonical transition-state theory and variational canonical transition-state theory whenever necessary. The theoretical rate coefficient for the ozonolysis mechanism, evaluated at the CCSD(T)/6-31G(d,p)//PBE1PBE/6-311++G(d,p) level, was 2.08 × 10(-17) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). The coefficient for the oxidation initialised by the OH radical, calculated at the BHandHLYP/6-311++G(d,p) level, was 5.06 × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). These values are in reasonable agreement with the experimental results. The importance of these reactions in atmospheric chemistry is discussed. PMID:25102281

  10. Theoretical considerations and measurements for phoropters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiyan; Liu, Wenli; Sun, Jie

    2008-10-01

    A phoropter is one of the most popular ophthalmic instruments used in current optometry practice. The quality and verification of the instrument are of the utmost importance. In 1997, International Organization for Standardization published the first ISO standard for requirements of phoropters. However, in China, few standard and test method are suggested for phoropters. Research work on test method for phoropters was carried out early in 2004 by China National Institute of Metrology. In this paper, first, structure of phoropters is described. Then, theoretical considerations for its optical design are analyzed. Next, a newly developed instrument is introduced and measurements are taken. By calibration, the indication error of the instrument is not over 0.05m-1. Finally, measurement results show that the quality situation of phoropters is not as good as expected because of production and assembly error. Optical design shall be improved especially for combinations of both spherical and cylindrical lenses with higher power. Besides, optical requirements specified in ISO standard are found to be a little strict and hard to meet. A proposal for revision of this international standard is drafted and discussed on ISO meeting of 2007 held in Tokyo.

  11. Family group conferencing: a theoretical underpinning.

    PubMed

    Metze, Rosalie N; Abma, Tineke A; Kwekkeboom, Rick H

    2015-06-01

    In the last decade, Family Group Conferences (FGCs) have increasingly been used to help people and their networks deal with their problems. The FGC fits well with the call for equal rights and self-management coming from clients and client movements, as well as the economy-driven pressure towards more informal and less professional care coming from governments. However, there is a lack of knowledge about the underlying theory to explain how the FGC works. In this article, we aim to provide such a theoretical basis by examining how the concept of empowerment can be linked with the basic assumptions underlying the FGC. Can making a plan of their own indeed help to empower people and if so, how does the process of empowerment proceed? Empowerment is often mentioned as a goal of the FGC, but authors are not unanimous when it comes to the operationalisation of empowerment, especially on the relational level of the person in his or her social context. In the article, we use the concepts of relational autonomy and resilience to conceptualize empowerment on the relational and individual level. PMID:23996065

  12. The renal concentrating mechanism: fundamental theoretical concepts.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, J L

    1983-05-15

    Five theoretical principles that follow from qualitative consideration of renal architecture and tubular permeabilities are proposed to explain the concentration of urine in the mammalian kidney. These are: 1) The medullary loop of the doubly folded S-shaped configuration of the nephron permits solute supplied by ascending Henle's limb (AHL) to extract water from descending Henle's limb (DHL) and collecting duct (CD). 2) The cortical loop allows the diluted AHL fluid to return to isotonicity with cortical plasma before returning to the medulla. 3) The folded vasa recta and surrounding interstitium (the central core) provide an expansion chamber for the performance of osmotic work and a mixing chamber for salt and urea. This mixing induces passive salt transport out of AHL. 4) Overall, the system acts as a solute cycling multiplier from the AHL to vascular core and the osmotically equilibrated DHL and CD. 5) The short-looped nephrons provide urea to drive salt transport out of AHL of long nephrons in the inner medulla. PMID:6840288

  13. Theoretical knock-outs on biological networks.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Pedro J; de S Pinto, Sandro E; Baptista, Murilo S; La Guardia, Giuliano G

    2016-08-21

    In this work we redefine the concept of biological importance and how to compute it, based on a model of complex networks and random walk. We call this new procedure, theoretical knock-out (KO). The proposed method generalizes the procedure presented in a recent study about Oral Tolerance. To devise this method, we make two approaches: algebraically and algorithmically. In both cases we compute a vector on an asymptotic state, called flux vector. The flux is given by a random walk on a directed graph that represents a biological phenomenon. This vector gives us the information about the relative flux of walkers on a vertex which represents a biological agent. With two vector of this kind, we can calculate the relative mean error between them by averaging over its coefficients. This quantity allows us to assess the degree of importance of each vertex of a complex network that evolves in time and has experimental background. We find out that this procedure can be applied in any sort of biological phenomena in which we can know the role and interrelationships of its agents. These results also provide experimental biologists to predict the order of importance of biological agents on a mounted complex network. PMID:27188251

  14. Theoretical Investigations of Plasma-Based Accelerators and Other Advanced Accelerator Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Shuets, G.

    2004-05-21

    Theoretical investigations of plasma-based accelerators and other advanced accelerator concepts. The focus of the work was on the development of plasma based and structure based accelerating concepts, including laser-plasma, plasma channel, and microwave driven plasma accelerators.

  15. Theoretical Assessment of Norfloxacin Redox and Photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa, Klefah A. K.; Eriksson, Leif A.

    2009-09-01

    Norfloxacin, 1-ethyl-6-fluoro-1,4-dihydo-4-oxo-7-(1-piperazinyl)-3-quinolinecarboxylic acid, NOR, is an antibiotic drug from the fluoroquinoline family. The different protonation states of this drug formed throughout the pH range is studied by means of density functional theory (DFT) and the spectra of the NOR species computed using time-dependent DFT. Details about their photochemistry are obtained from investigating the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals. The predominant species under physiological pH, the zwitterion, is the most photoliable one, capable of producing singlet oxygen or/and superoxide radical anions from its triplet state. In addition, the main photodegradation step, defluorination, occurs more easily from this species compared with the other forms. The defluorination from the excited triplet state requires passing a barrier of 16.3 kcal/mol in the case of the zwitterion. The neutral and cationic forms display higher transition barriers, whereas the reaction path of defluorination is completely endothermic for the anionic species. The theoretical results obtained herein are in line with previous experimental data.

  16. Conjoined twins: theoretical embryologic basis.

    PubMed

    Spencer, R

    1992-06-01

    A theoretical basis for the embryology of conjoined twins was formulated from clinical experience with ten cases and extensive review of pertinent embryologic and clinical literature, including over 500 cases. Regarding the age old question of fusion or fission, it is concluded that there is no known embryologic process by which conjoined twins can be formed by fission but firm evidence to support fusion in all cases. Whether the fusion occurs between embryos on one embryonic disc or on two is of no consequence since they are all monovular. Intact ectoderm will not fuse to intact ectoderm, and all seven types of conjoined twins are explained by seven possible sites of union in the early embryo. One new term is proposed: parapagus, from the Greek para, meaning "side," combined with pagus, meaning "fixed"; this is the group formerly called dicephalus or diprosopos. These anterolaterally united parapagus twins must result from two nearly parallel notochords in close proximity; craniopagi and pygopagi from fusion at the cranial and caudal neuropores, respectively; cephalopagi and ischiopagi from union at the pharyngeal and cloacal membranes, respectively; thoracopagi from merging of the cardiac anlage; and omphalopagi from fusion of the umbilicus or of the edges of two embryonic discs in any area not including the above sites. Parasitic twins result from embryonic death of one twin, leaving various portions of the body vascularized by the surviving autosite. The rarity of cases (2) not easily explained by the above theories, and the nearly 6% of twins with two umbilical cords arising from the placenta would seem to support these conclusions. Should one wish to learn the methods of a conjurer, he might vainly watch the latter's customary repertoire, and, so long as everything went smoothly, might never obtain a clue to the mysterious performance, baffled by the precision of the manipulations and the complexity of the apparatus; if, however, a single error were made in

  17. Additive manufacturing in production: challenges and opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Bhrigu; Karg, Michael; Schmidt, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Additive manufacturing, characterized by its inherent layer by layer fabrication methodology has been coined by many as the latest revolution in the manufacturing industry. Due to its diversification of Materials, processes, system technology and applications, Additive Manufacturing has been synonymized with terminology such as Rapid prototyping, 3D printing, free-form fabrication, Additive Layer Manufacturing, etc. A huge media and public interest in the technology has led to an innovative attempt of exploring the technology for applications beyond the scope of the traditional engineering industry. Nevertheless, it is believed that a critical factor for the long-term success of Additive Manufacturing would be its ability to fulfill the requirements defined by the traditional manufacturing industry. A parallel development in market trends and product requirements has also lead to a wider scope of opportunities for Additive Manufacturing. The presented paper discusses some of the key challenges which are critical to ensure that Additive Manufacturing is truly accepted as a mainstream production technology in the industry. These challenges would highlight on various aspects of production such as product requirements, process management, data management, intellectual property, work flow management, quality assurance, resource planning, etc. In Addition, changing market trends such as product life cycle, mass customization, sustainability, environmental impact and localized production will form the foundation for the follow up discussion on the current limitations and the corresponding research opportunities. A discussion on ongoing research to address these challenges would include topics like process monitoring, design complexity, process standardization, multi-material and hybrid fabrication, new material development, etc.

  18. Manipulating crystallization with molecular additives.

    PubMed

    Shtukenberg, Alexander G; Lee, Stephanie S; Kahr, Bart; Ward, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Given the importance of organic crystals in a wide range of industrial applications, the chemistry, biology, materials science, and chemical engineering communities have focused considerable attention on developing methods to control crystal structure, size, shape, and orientation. Tailored additives have been used to control crystallization to great effect, presumably by selectively binding to particular crystallographic surfaces and sites. However, substantial knowledge gaps still exist in the fundamental mechanisms that govern the formation and growth of organic crystals in both the absence and presence of additives. In this review, we highlight research discoveries that reveal the role of additives, either introduced by design or present adventitiously, on various stages of formation and growth of organic crystals, including nucleation, dislocation spiral growth mechanisms, growth inhibition, and nonclassical crystal morphologies. The insights from these investigations and others of their kind are likely to guide the development of innovative methods to manipulate crystallization for a wide range of materials and applications. PMID:24579880

  19. Additive Manufacturing of Hybrid Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; Clem, Paul G.; Keicher, David; Hirschfeld, Deidre; Hall, Aaron C.; Bell, Nelson S.

    2016-07-01

    There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming hybrid circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer hybrid circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects. Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (AD), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. Finally, we show examples of hybrid circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or AD processes and conventional, established processes.

  20. Defining Disability for Women and the Problem of Unpaid Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reisine, Susan T.; Fifield, Judith

    1988-01-01

    Discusses political, theoretical, and methodological issues in defining and measuring paid and unpaid work disability. Presents results of study analyzing disability in paid work and unpaid family work among 206 women with rheumatoid arthritis, demonstrating feasibility of measuring disability in family work and showing that women experience…

  1. Tougher Addition Polyimides Containing Siloxane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, T. L.; Maudgal, S.

    1986-01-01

    Laminates show increased impact resistances and other desirable mechanical properties. Bismaleamic acid extended by reaction of diaminosiloxane with maleic anhydride in 1:1 molar ratio, followed by reaction with half this molar ratio of aromatic dianhydride. Bismaleamic acid also extended by reaction of diaminosiloxane with maleic anhydride in 1:2 molar ratio, followed by reaction with half this molar ratio of aromatic diamine (Michael-addition reaction). Impact resistances improved over those of unmodified bismaleimide, showing significant increase in toughness. Aromatic addition polyimides developed as both matrix and adhesive resins for applications on future aircraft and spacecraft.

  2. Additive manufacturing of glass for optical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Junjie; Gilbert, Luke J.; Bristow, Douglas A.; Landers, Robert G.; Goldstein, Jonathan T.; Urbas, Augustine M.; Kinzel, Edward C.

    2016-04-01

    Glasses including fused quartz have significant scientific and engineering applications including optics, communications, electronics, and hermetic seals. This paper investigates a filament fed process for Additive Manufacturing (AM) of fused quartz. Additive manufacturing has several potential benefits including increased design freedom, faster prototyping, and lower processing costs for small production volumes. However, current research in AM of glasses is limited and has focused on non-optical applications. Fused quartz is studied here because of its desirability for high-quality optics due to its high transmissivity and thermal stability. Fused quartz also has a higher working temperature than soda lime glass which poses a challenge for AM. In this work, fused quartz filaments are fed into a CO2 laser generated melt pool, smoothly depositing material onto the work piece. Single tracks are printed to explore the effects that different process parameters have on the morphology of printed fused quartz. A spectrometer is used to measure the thermal radiation incandescently emitted from the melt pool. Thin-walls are printed to study the effects of layer-to-layer height. Finally, a 3D fused quartz cube is printed using the newly acquired layer height and polished on each surface. The transmittance and index homogeneity of the polished cube are both measured. These results show that the filament fed process has the potential to print fused quartz with optical transparency and of index of refraction uniformity approaching bulk processed glass.

  3. Comparison of experimental with theoretical total-pressure loss in parallel-walled turbojet combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittrich, Ralph T

    1957-01-01

    An experimental investigation of combustor total-pressure loss was undertaken to confirm previous theoretical analyses of effects of geometric and flow variables and of heat addition. The results indicate that a reasonable estimate of cold-flow total-pressure-loss coefficient may be obtained from the theoretical analyses. Calculated total-pressure loss due to heat addition agreed with experimental data only when there was no flame ejection from the liner at the upstream air-entry holes.

  4. Social Stressors at Work, Sleep, and Recovery.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Diana; Gross, Sven; Elfering, Achim

    2016-03-01

    Many employees in service work are required to work on Saturdays, recovering during work-free Sundays and working again Mondays. We examined the effects of social stressors at work on recovery status at Sunday noon and Monday noon, and investigated if sleep quality mediates the negative effects of social stressors at work on recovery. From Saturday until Monday morning, 41 participants wore actigraphs to measure sleep duration and sleep fragmentation. Social stressors at work were assessed by self-reported questionnaires administered on Saturday. Recovery status was reported Sunday noon and Monday noon. Hierarchical regression analysis revealed that social stressors at work were negatively related to recovery status on Sunday and on Monday. Supporting our assumptions, more social stressors at work predicted higher sleep fragmentation in the night to Monday. A mediation effect of sleep quality, however, was not found. Theoretical and practical implications of these results are discussed. PMID:26386866

  5. Theoretical Modeling of Interstellar Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven

    2009-01-01

    The chemistry of complex interstellar organic molecules will be described. Gas phase processes that may build large carbon-chain species in cold molecular clouds will be summarized. Catalytic reactions on grain surfaces can lead to a large variety of organic species, and models of molecule formation by atom additions to multiply-bonded molecules will be presented. The subsequent desorption of these mixed molecular ices can initiate a distinctive organic chemistry in hot molecular cores. The general ion-molecule pathways leading to even larger organics will be outlined. The predictions of this theory will be compared with observations to show how possible organic formation pathways in the interstellar medium may be constrained. In particular, the success of the theory in explaining trends in the known interstellar organics, in predicting recently-detected interstellar molecules, and, just as importantly, non-detections, will be discussed.

  6. Theoretical Modeling of Mechanical-Electrical Coupling of Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jun-Qiang; Jiang, Hanqiang

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been studied extensively due to their unique properties, ranging from electrical, mechanical, optical, to thermal properties. The coupling between the electrical and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes has emerged as a new field, which raises both interesting fundamental problems and huge application potentials. In this article, we will review our recently work on the theoretical modeling on mechanical-electrical coupling of carbon nanotubes subject to various loading conditions, including tension/compression, torsion, and squashing. Some related work by other groups will be also mentioned.

  7. Promoting Additive Acculturation in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Margaret A.

    1995-01-01

    A study focusing on 113 ninth graders of Mexican descent indicates that most students and their parents adhere to a strategy of additive acculturation (incorporating skills of the new culture and language), but that the school curriculum and general school climate devalue Mexican culture. (SLD)

  8. Individualized Additional Instruction for Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takata, Ken

    2010-01-01

    College students enrolling in the calculus sequence have a wide variance in their preparation and abilities, yet they are usually taught from the same lecture. We describe another pedagogical model of Individualized Additional Instruction (IAI) that assesses each student frequently and prescribes further instruction and homework based on the…

  9. The Additive Property of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaoussis, Dimitris S.

    1995-01-01

    Presents exercises that analyze the additive property of energy. Concludes that if a body has more than one component of energy depending on the same physical quantity, the body's total energy will be the algebraic sum of the components if a linear relationship exists between the energy components and that physical quantity. (JRH)

  10. Tinkertoy Color-Addition Device.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Joe L.

    1995-01-01

    Describes construction and use of a simple home-built device, using an overhead projector, for use in demonstrations of the addition of various combinations of red, green, and blue light. Useful in connection with discussions of color, color vision, or color television. (JRH)

  11. Silage Additives and Management Issues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inoculants are the most common silage additives in the United States. These products contain lactic acid bacteria to supplement the lactic acid bacteria naturally on the crop and help insure a consistent fermentation in the silo. There are three types of inoculants: homofermentative lactic acid bact...

  12. Tetrasulfide extreme pressure lubricant additives

    SciTech Connect

    Gast, L.E.; Kenney, H.E.; Schwab, A.W.

    1980-08-19

    A novel class of compounds has been prepared comprising the tetrasulfides of /sup 18/C hydrocarbons, /sup 18/C fatty acids, and /sup 18/C fatty and alkyl and triglyceride esters. These tetrasulfides are useful as extreme pressure lubricant additives and show potential as replacements for sulfurized sperm whale oil.

  13. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, with a view to concluding as to safety concerns and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives, including flavouring agents. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for five food additives (magnesium dihydrogen diphosphate; mineral oil (medium and low viscosity) classes II and III; 3-phytase from Aspergillus niger expressed in Aspergillus niger; serine protease (chymotrypsin) from Nocardiopsis prasina expressed in Bacillus licheniformis; and serine protease (trypsin) from Fusarium oxysporum expressed in Fusarium venenatum) and 16 groups of flavouring agents (aliphatic and aromatic amines and amides; aliphatic and aromatic ethers; aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and related esters, sulfides, disulfides and ethers containing furan substitution; aliphatic linear alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, acids and related alcohols, acetals and esters; amino acids and related substances; epoxides; furfuryl alcohol and related substances; linear and branched-chain aliphatic, unsaturated, unconjugated alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; phenol and phenol derivatives; pyrazine derivatives; pyridine, pyrrole and quinoline derivatives; saturated aliphatic acyclic branched-chain primary alcohols, aldehydes and acids; simple aliphatic and aromatic sulfides and thiols; sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds; and sulfur-substituted furan derivatives). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: ethyl cellulose, mineral oil (medium viscosity), modified starches and titanium

  14. Relativistic Navigation: A Theoretical Foundation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turyshev, Slava G.

    1996-01-01

    We present a theoretical foundation for relativistic astronomical measurements in curved space-time. In particular, we discuss a new iterative approach for describing the dynamics of an isolated astronomical N-body system in metric theories of gravity. To do this, we generalize the Fock-Chandrasekhar method of the weak-field and slow-motion approximation (WFSMA) and develop a theory of relativistic reference frames (RF's) for a gravitationally bounded many-extended-body problem. In any proper RF constructed in the immediate vicinity of an arbitrary body, the N-body solutions of the gravitational field equations are formally presented as a sum of the Riemann-flat inertial space-time, the gravitational field generated by the body itself, the unperturbed solutions for each body in the system transformed to the coordinates of this proper RF, and the gravitational interaction term. We develop the basic concept of a general WFSMA theory of the celestial RF's applicable to a wide class of metric theories of gravity and an arbitrary model of matter distribution. We apply the proposed method to general relativity. Celestial bodies are described using a perfect fluid model; as such, they possess any number of internal mass and current multipole moments that explicitly characterize their internal structures. The obtained relativistic corrections to the geodetic equations of motion arise because of a coupling of the bodies' multiple moments to the surrounding gravitational field. The resulting relativistic transformations between the different RF's extend the Poincare group to the motion of deformable self-gravitating bodies. Within the present accuracy of astronomical measurements we discuss the properties of the Fermi-normal-like proper RF that is defined in the immediate vicinity of the extended compact bodies. We further generalize the proposed approximation method and include two Eddington parameters (gamma, Beta). This generalized approach was used to derive the

  15. Understanding bimolecular machines: Theoretical and experimental approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goler, Adam Scott

    This dissertation concerns the study of two classes of molecular machines from a physical perspective: enzymes and membrane proteins. Though the functions of these classes of proteins are different, they each represent important test-beds from which new understanding can be developed by the application of different techniques. HIV1 Reverse Transcriptase is an enzyme that performs multiple functions, including reverse transcription of RNA into an RNA/DNA duplex, RNA degradation by the RNaseH domain, and synthesis of dsDNA. These functions allow for the incorporation of the retroviral genes into the host genome. Its catalytic cycle requires repeated large-scale conformational changes fundamental to its mechanism. Motivated by experimental work, these motions were studied theoretically by the application of normal mode analysis. It was observed that the lowest order modes correlate with largest amplitude (low-frequency) motion, which are most likely to be catalytically relevant. Comparisons between normal modes obtained via an elastic network model to those calculated from the essential dynamics of a series of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations show the self-consistency between these calculations. That similar conformational motions are seen between independent theoretical methods reinforces the importance of large-scale subdomain motion for the biochemical action of DNA polymerases in general. Moreover, it was observed that the major subunits of HIV1 Reverse Transcriptase interact quasi-harmonically. The 5HT3A Serotonin receptor and P2X1 receptor, by contrast, are trans-membrane proteins that function as ligand gated ion channels. Such proteins feature a central pore, which allows for the transit of ions necessary for cellular function across a membrane. The pore is opened by the ligation of binding sites on the extracellular portion of different protein subunits. In an attempt to resolve the individual subunits of these membrane proteins beyond the diffraction

  16. Facilities removal working group

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    This working group`s first objective is to identify major economic, technical, and regulatory constraints on operator practices and decisions relevant to offshore facilities removal. Then, the group will try to make recommendations as to regulatory and policy adjustments, additional research, or process improvements and/or technological advances, that may be needed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the removal process. The working group will focus primarily on issues dealing with Gulf of Mexico platform abandonments. In order to make the working group sessions as productive as possible, the Facilities Removal Working Group will focus on three topics that address a majority of the concerns and/or constraints relevant to facilities removal. The three areas are: (1) Explosive Severing and its Impact on Marine Life, (2) Pile and Conductor Severing, and (3) Deep Water Abandonments This paper will outline the current state of practice in the offshore industry, identifying current regulations and specific issues encountered when addressing each of the three main topics above. The intent of the paper is to highlight potential issues for panel discussion, not to provide a detailed review of all data relevant to the topic. Before each panel discussion, key speakers will review data and information to facilitate development and discussion of the main issues of each topic. Please refer to the attached agenda for the workshop format, key speakers, presentation topics, and panel participants. The goal of the panel discussions is to identify key issues for each of the three topics above. The working group will also make recommendations on how to proceed on these key issues.

  17. Exposure to chemical additives from polyvinyl chloride polymer extrusion processing

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, C.S.

    1989-12-01

    The report presents a model to predict worker inhalation exposure due to off-gassing of additives during polyvinyl chloride (PVC) extrusion processing. Data on off-gassing of additives were reviewed in the literature, the off-gassing at normal PVC processing temperatures was studied in the laboratory, process variables were estimated from an equipment manufacturer survey, and worker-activities and possible exposure sources were observed in an industrial survey. The purpose of the study was to develop a theoretical model to predict worker inhalation exposure to additives used during PVC extrusion processing. A model to estimate the generation rate of the additive from the polymer extrudate was derived from the mass transport equations governing diffusion. The mass flow rate, initial additive volatile weight fraction, off-gassing time, diffusivity, and slab thickness are required to determine the generation rate from the model.

  18. 46 CFR 169.556 - Work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Work vests. 169.556 Section 169.556 Shipping COAST GUARD... Firefighting Equipment Additional Lifesaving Equipment § 169.556 Work vests. (a) Buoyant work vests carried.... (b) Approved buoyant work vests are items of safety apparel and may be carried aboard vessels to...

  19. 46 CFR 169.556 - Work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Work vests. 169.556 Section 169.556 Shipping COAST GUARD... Firefighting Equipment Additional Lifesaving Equipment § 169.556 Work vests. (a) Buoyant work vests carried.... (b) Approved buoyant work vests are items of safety apparel and may be carried aboard vessels to...

  20. 46 CFR 169.556 - Work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Work vests. 169.556 Section 169.556 Shipping COAST GUARD... Firefighting Equipment Additional Lifesaving Equipment § 169.556 Work vests. (a) Buoyant work vests carried.... (b) Approved buoyant work vests are items of safety apparel and may be carried aboard vessels to...

  1. 46 CFR 169.556 - Work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Work vests. 169.556 Section 169.556 Shipping COAST GUARD... Firefighting Equipment Additional Lifesaving Equipment § 169.556 Work vests. (a) Buoyant work vests carried.... (b) Approved buoyant work vests are items of safety apparel and may be carried aboard vessels to...

  2. 46 CFR 169.556 - Work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Work vests. 169.556 Section 169.556 Shipping COAST GUARD... Firefighting Equipment Additional Lifesaving Equipment § 169.556 Work vests. (a) Buoyant work vests carried.... (b) Approved buoyant work vests are items of safety apparel and may be carried aboard vessels to...

  3. Metrology Needs for Metal Additive Manufacturing Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotwinski, John A.; Garboczi, Edward J.

    2015-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) processes can produce highly complex and customized parts without the need for dedicated tooling and can produce parts directly from the part design information. These types of processes are poised to revolutionize the manufacturing industry, yet several challenges are currently preventing more widespread adoption of AM technologies. Among these challenges are metrology issues associated with the measurement and characterization of the metal powders used for AM systems. This article will describe the technical challenges and needs for characterizing metal AM powders, recent research efforts to address those needs, and current work to standardize characterization methods in ASTM and ISO, such as the recently released ASTM F3049, Standard Guide for Characterizing Properties of Metal Powders Used for Additive Manufacturing Processes.

  4. The addition of disilanes to cumulenes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.

    1997-10-08

    The syntheses of silicon-containing compounds and the studies of their rearrangements have been active research areas in the Barton research group. Previously, the addition of disilanes to acetylenes was studied in the group and an intramolecular 2S + 2A mechanism has been proposed. In this thesis, the work is focused on the addition of disilanes to cumulenes. The syntheses of the precursors are discussed and the possible mechanisms for their thermal, photochemical and catalytic rearrangements are proposed. Conjugated organic polymers have been studied in the group since 1985 because of their potential for exhibiting high electroconductivity, photoconductivity, strong non-linear optical response and intense fluorescence. In the second section of this dissertation, the synthesis and property studies of poly(phenylene vinylene) analogues are discussed.

  5. Polymer-additive extraction via pressurized fluids and organic solvents of variously cross-linked poly(methylmethacrylates).

    PubMed

    Nazem, N; Taylor, L T

    2002-04-01

    Variously cross-linked poly(methylmethacrylates) (PMMAs) are synthesized with three additives incorporated at theoretically 1000 microg of the additive per gram of prepared polymer. The additives are Irganox 1010, Irganox 1076, and Irgafos 168. The in-house" synthesized polyacrylates are then subjected to supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) to determine if additive recovery is a function of percent cross-linking. Although considerable work in this regard has been performed with non-cross-linked polyolefins, the literature is lacking regarding polyacrylates. Some additive degradation apparently occurs during the synthesis, as judged by the increased complexity of the extract high-performance liquid chromatographic trace and the low percent recoveries observed especially for the Irganoxes. For low polymer cross-linking (1%), it appears that both PMMA synthetic reproducibility and readily observed polymer swelling during SFE are serious issues that adversely affect additive percent recovery and precision of results. Higher percent cross-linking yields more consistent analytical data than low percent cross-linking, even though the amount of additive extracted in all PMMA samples (regardless of cross-linking percentage) is essentially the same whether the extraction is via SFE or liquid-solid extraction with methylene chloride. Results for comparably cross-linked poly(ethylmethacrylate) and poly(butylmethacrylate) are similar to PMMA. PMID:12004935

  6. Characteristics of asphalt mixes with FT additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štefunková, S.

    2012-03-01

    This article is focused on low-temperature asphalt mixture technologies using FT additive and RAP. The modern production and use of asphalt mixture technologies with reduced temperatures has many advantages. These advantages mainly help to save energy and the environment. Lower temperatures enable a reduction in energy consumption, a more acceptable working environment for workers, a reduction in negative environmental effects, such as greenhouse gas emissions, and an improvement in the workability of mixtures and a prolongation of their duration. This technology is currently becoming popular in many countries.

  7. Decontamination formulation with sorbent additive

    DOEpatents

    Tucker; Mark D. , Comstock; Robert H.

    2007-10-16

    A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a bleaching activator, a sorbent additive, and water. The highly adsorbent, water-soluble sorbent additive (e.g., sorbitol or mannitol) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients, such as the liquid bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate) and convert the activator into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

  8. Theoretical studies of non-Newtonian and Newtonian fluid flow through porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu-Shu.

    1990-02-01

    A comprehensive theoretical study has been carried out on the flow behavior of both single and multiple phase non-Newtonian fluids in porous media. This work is divided into three parts: development of numerical and analytical solutions; theoretical studies of transient flow of non-Newtonian fluids in porous media; and applications of well test analysis and displacement efficiency evaluation to field problems. A fully implicit, integral finite difference model has been developed for simulation of non-Newtonian and Newtonian fluid flow through porous media. Several commonly-used rheological models of power-law and Bingham plastic non-Newtonian fluids have been incorporated in the simulator. A Buckley-Leverett type analytical solution for one-dimensional, immiscible displacement involving non-Newtonian fluids in porous media has been developed. An integral method is also presented for the study of transient flow of Bingham fluids in porous media. In addition, two well test analysis methods have been developed for analyzing pressure transient tests of power-law and Bingham fluids, respectively. Applications are included to demonstrate this new technology. The physical mechanisms involved in immiscible displacement with non-Newtonian fluids in porous media have been studied using the Buckley-Leverett type analytical solution. In another study, an idealized fracture model has been used to obtain some insights into the flow of a power-law fluid in a double-porosity medium. Transient flow of a general pseudoplastic fluid has been studied numerically. 125 refs., 91 figs., 12 tabs.

  9. The Alkaline Hydrolysis of Sulfonate Esters: Challenges in Interpreting Experimental and Theoretical Data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Sulfonate ester hydrolysis has been the subject of recent debate, with experimental evidence interpreted in terms of both stepwise and concerted mechanisms. In particular, a recent study of the alkaline hydrolysis of a series of benzene arylsulfonates (Babtie et al., Org. Biomol. Chem.10, 2012, 8095) presented a nonlinear Brønsted plot, which was explained in terms of a change from a stepwise mechanism involving a pentavalent intermediate for poorer leaving groups to a fully concerted mechanism for good leaving groups and supported by a theoretical study. In the present work, we have performed a detailed computational study of the hydrolysis of these compounds and find no computational evidence for a thermodynamically stable intermediate for any of these compounds. Additionally, we have extended the experimental data to include pyridine-3-yl benzene sulfonate and its N-oxide and N-methylpyridinium derivatives. Inclusion of these compounds converts the Brønsted plot to a moderately scattered but linear correlation and gives a very good Hammett correlation. These data suggest a concerted pathway for this reaction that proceeds via an early transition state with little bond cleavage to the leaving group, highlighting the care that needs to be taken with the interpretation of experimental and especially theoretical data. PMID:24279349

  10. LipidHome: a database of theoretical lipids optimized for high throughput mass spectrometry lipidomics.

    PubMed

    Foster, Joseph M; Moreno, Pablo; Fabregat, Antonio; Hermjakob, Henning; Steinbeck, Christoph; Apweiler, Rolf; Wakelam, Michael J O; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Protein sequence databases are the pillar upon which modern proteomics is supported, representing a stable reference space of predicted and validated proteins. One example of such resources is UniProt, enriched with both expertly curated and automatic annotations. Taken largely for granted, similar mature resources such as UniProt are not available yet in some other "omics" fields, lipidomics being one of them. While having a seasoned community of wet lab scientists, lipidomics lies significantly behind proteomics in the adoption of data standards and other core bioinformatics concepts. This work aims to reduce the gap by developing an equivalent resource to UniProt called 'LipidHome', providing theoretically generated lipid molecules and useful metadata. Using the 'FASTLipid' Java library, a database was populated with theoretical lipids, generated from a set of community agreed upon chemical bounds. In parallel, a web application was developed to present the information and provide computational access via a web service. Designed specifically to accommodate high throughput mass spectrometry based approaches, lipids are organised into a hierarchy that reflects the variety in the structural resolution of lipid identifications. Additionally, cross-references to other lipid related resources and papers that cite specific lipids were used to annotate lipid records. The web application encompasses a browser for viewing lipid records and a 'tools' section where an MS1 search engine is currently implemented. LipidHome can be accessed at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/apweiler-srv/lipidhome. PMID:23667450

  11. A Comprehensive Theoretical Investigation of the Molecular Properties of Methyl Bromide (CH3Br)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ang-Yang; Efil, Kürşat; Yang, Rui; Hu, Qing-Miao

    2015-12-01

    The properties of the ground and the lowest excited state of methyl bromide (CH3Br) have been studied with and without inclusion of the solvent effects in this work. The geometric parameters, energies, and frequencies of the ground state and the triplet state are calculated by using the MP2(full)/6-311++G** level of theory. The vertical excitation for the singlet state is also investigated. It is found that the theoretical results performed by the TDDFT/B3P86/6-311++G** method are in the best agreement with the experimental results. In addition, the dissociation energy of CH3Br molecule is computed at MP2(full)/6-311++G** level of theory for the gas phase and in water. The ionisation potential (IP), electron affinity (EA), electronegativity (χ), electrophilicity index (ω), hardness (η), softness (S), and chemical potential (μ) values are calculated from HOMO-LUMO energies both in the gas phase and in solvent (water). These theoretical results could serve as a guide for future experimental investigations.

  12. Theoretical nuclear physics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    As the three-year period FY93-FY96 ended, there were six senior investigators on the grant full-time: Bulgac, Henley, Miller, Savage, van Kolck and Wilets. This represents an increase of two members from the previous three-year period, achieved with only a two percent increase over the budget for FY90-FY93. In addition, the permanent staff of the Institute for Nuclear Theory (George Bertsch, Wick Haxton, and David Kaplan) continued to be intimately associated with our physics research efforts. Aurel Bulgac joined the Group in September, 1993 as an assistant professor, with promotion requested by the Department and College of Arts and Sciences by September, 1997. Martin Savage, who was at Carnegie-Mellon University, jointed the Physics Department in September, 1996. U. van Kolck continued as research assistant professor, and we were supporting one postdoctoral research associate, Vesteinn Thorssen, who joined us in September, 1995. Seven graduate students were being supported by the Grant (Chuan-Tsung Chan, Michael Fosmire, William Hazelton, Jon Karakowski, Jeffrey Thompson, James Walden and Mitchell Watrous).

  13. Robust stability under additive perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhaya, A.; Desoer, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    A MIMO linear time-invariant feedback system 1S(P,C) is considered which is assumed to be U-stable. The plant P is subjected to an additive perturbation Delta P which is proper but not necessarily stable. It is proved that the perturbed system is U-stable if and only if Delta P(I + Q x Delta P) exp -1 is U-stable.

  14. Beauty baryon decays: a theoretical overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Ming

    2014-11-01

    I overview the theoretical status and recent progress on the calculations of beauty baryon decays focusing on the QCD aspects of the exclusive semi-leptonic Λb → plμ decay at large recoil and theoretical challenges of radiative and electro-weak penguin decays Λb → Λγ,Λl+l-.

  15. On the Worthwhileness of Theoretical Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hand, Michael

    2009-01-01

    R.S. Peters' arguments for the worthwhileness of theoretical activities are intended to justify education per se, on the assumption that education is necessarily a matter of initiating people into theoretical activities. If we give up this assumption, we can ask whether Peters' arguments might serve instead to justify the academic curriculum over…

  16. Additive manufacturing of hybrid circuits

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bell, Nelson S.; Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; Clem, Paul G.; Keicher, David M.; Hirschfeld, Deidre; Hall, Aaron Christopher

    2016-03-26

    There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming hybrid circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer hybrid circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects.more » Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (AD), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. As a result, we show examples of hybrid circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or AD processes and conventional, established processes.« less

  17. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, with a view to recommending acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation and assessment of intake of food additives (in particular, flavouring agents). A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and intake data for certain food additives (asparaginase from Aspergillus niger expressed in A. niger, calcium lignosulfonate (40-65), ethyl lauroyl arginate, paprika extract, phospholipase C expressed in Pichia pastoris, phytosterols, phytostanols and their esters, polydimethylsiloxane, steviol glycosides and sulfites [assessment of dietary exposure]) and 10 groups of related flavouring agents (aliphatic branched-chain saturated and unsaturated alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters; aliphatic linear alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, acids and related alcohols, acetals and esters; aliphatic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; alkoxy-substituted allylbenzenes present in foods and essential oils and used as flavouring agents; esters of aliphatic acyclic primary alcohols with aliphatic linear saturated carboxylic acids; furan-substituted aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and related esters, sulfides, disulfides and ethers; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; monocyclic and bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; hydroxy- and alkoxy-substituted benzyl derivatives; and substances structurally related to menthol). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: canthaxanthin; carob bean gum and carob bean gum (clarified); chlorophyllin copper complexes, sodium and potassium salts; Fast Green FCF; guar gum and guar gum (clarified

  18. Fire-Retardant Polymeric Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K.; Smith, Trent M.

    2011-01-01

    Polyhydroxyamide (PHA) and polymethoxyamide (PMeOA) are fire-retardant (FR) thermoplastic polymers and have been found to be useful as an additive for imparting fire retardant properties to other compatible, thermoplastic polymers (including some elastomers). Examples of compatible flammable polymers include nylons, polyesters, and acrylics. Unlike most prior additives, PHA and PMeOA do not appreciably degrade the mechanical properties of the matrix polymer; indeed, in some cases, mechanical properties are enhanced. Also, unlike some prior additives, PHA and PMeOA do not decompose into large amounts of corrosive or toxic compounds during combustion and can be processed at elevated temperatures. PMeOA derivative formulations were synthesized and used as an FR additive in the fabrication of polyamide (PA) and polystyrene (PS) composites with notable reduction (>30 percent for PS) in peak heat release rates compared to the neat polymer as measured by a Cone Calorimeter (ASTM E1354). Synergistic effects were noted with nanosilica composites. These nanosilica composites had more than 50-percent reduction in peak heat release rates. In a typical application, a flammable thermoplastic, thermoplastic blend, or elastomer that one seeks to render flame-retardant is first dry-mixed with PHA or PMeOA or derivative thereof. The proportion of PHA or PMeOA or derivative in the mixture is typically chosen to lie between 1 and 20 weight percent. The dry blend can then be melt-extruded. The extruded polymer blend can further be extruded and/or molded into fibers, pipes, or any other of a variety of objects that may be required to be fire-retardant. The physical and chemical mechanisms which impart flame retardancy of the additive include inhibiting free-radical oxidation in the vapor phase, preventing vaporization of fuel (the polymer), and cooling through the formation of chemical bonds in either the vapor or the condensed phase. Under thermal stress, the cyclic hydroxyl/ methoxy

  19. A practical and theoretical definition of very small field size for radiotherapy output factor measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, P. H. Crowe, S. B.; Langton, C. M.; Trapp, J. V.; Cranmer-Sargison, G.; Thwaites, D. I.; Kairn, T.; Knight, R. T.; Kenny, J.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: This work introduces the concept of very small field size. Output factor (OPF) measurements at these field sizes require extremely careful experimental methodology including the measurement of dosimetric field size at the same time as each OPF measurement. Two quantifiable scientific definitions of the threshold of very small field size are presented. Methods: A practical definition was established by quantifying the effect that a 1 mm error in field size or detector position had on OPFs and setting acceptable uncertainties on OPF at 1%. Alternatively, for a theoretical definition of very small field size, the OPFs were separated into additional factors to investigate the specific effects of lateral electronic disequilibrium, photon scatter in the phantom, and source occlusion. The dominant effect was established and formed the basis of a theoretical definition of very small fields. Each factor was obtained using Monte Carlo simulations of a Varian iX linear accelerator for various square field sizes of side length from 4 to 100 mm, using a nominal photon energy of 6 MV. Results: According to the practical definition established in this project, field sizes ≤15 mm were considered to be very small for 6 MV beams for maximal field size uncertainties of 1 mm. If the acceptable uncertainty in the OPF was increased from 1.0% to 2.0%, or field size uncertainties are 0.5 mm, field sizes ≤12 mm were considered to be very small. Lateral electronic disequilibrium in the phantom was the dominant cause of change in OPF at very small field sizes. Thus the theoretical definition of very small field size coincided to the field size at which lateral electronic disequilibrium clearly caused a greater change in OPF than any other effects. This was found to occur at field sizes ≤12 mm. Source occlusion also caused a large change in OPF for field sizes ≤8 mm. Based on the results of this study, field sizes ≤12 mm were considered to be theoretically very small for 6

  20. Working group 1: Coronal streamers

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, R.A.

    1994-04-01

    The working group on colonel streamers convened on the first day of the 2nd SOHO Workshop, which took place in Marciana Marina, Isola d`Elba, 27 September--1 October 1993. Recent progress in streamer observational techniques and theoretical modeling was reported. The contribution of streamers to the mass and energy supply for the solar wind was discussed. Moreover, the importance of thin electric current sheets for determining both the gross dynamical properties of streamers and the fine-scale filamentary structure within streamers, was strongly emphasized. Potential advances to our understanding of these areas of colonel physics that could be made by the contingent of instruments aboard SOHO were pointed out.

  1. A mechanistic study of the addition of alcohol to a five-membered ring silene via a photochemical reaction.

    PubMed

    Su, Ming-Der

    2016-03-21

    The mechanism for the photochemical rearrangement of a cyclic divinyldisilane (1-Si) in its first excited state ((1)π → (1)π*) is determined using the CAS/6-311G(d) and MP2-CAS/6-311++G(3df,3pd) levels of theory. The photoproduct, a cyclic silene, reacts with various alcohols to yield a mixture of cis- and trans- adducts. The two reaction pathways are denoted as the cis- addition path (path A) and the trans-addition path (path B). These model studies demonstrate that conical intersections play a crucial role in the photo-rearrangements of cyclic divinyldisilanes. The theoretical evidence also demonstrates that the addition of alcohol to a cyclic divinyldisilane follows the reaction path: cyclic divinyldisilane → Franck-Condon region → conical intersection → photoproduct (cyclic silene) → local intermediate (with alcohol) → transition state → cis- or trans-adduct. The theoretical studies demonstrate that the steric effects as well as the concentrations of CH3OH must have a dominant role in determining the yields of the final adducts by stereochemistry. The same mechanism for the carbon derivative (1-C) is also considered in this work. However, the theoretical results indicate that 1-C does not undergo a methanol addition reaction via the photochemical reaction pathway, since its energy of conical intersection (S1/S0-CI-C) is more than that of its FC (FC-C). The reason for these phenomena could be that the atomic radius of carbon is much smaller than that of silicon (77 and 117 pm, respectively). As a result, the conformation for 1-C is more sterically congested than that for 1-Si, along the 1,3-silyl-migration pathway. PMID:26928893

  2. Theoretical integration and the psychology of sport injury prevention.

    PubMed

    Chan, Derwin King-Chung; Hagger, Martin S

    2012-09-01

    Integrating different theories of motivation to facilitate or predict behaviour change has received an increasing amount of attention within the health, sport and exercise science literature. A recent review article in Sports Medicine, by Keats, Emery and Finch presented an integrated model using two prominent theories in social psychology, self-determination theory (SDT) and the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), aimed at explaining and enhancing athletes' adherence to sport injury prevention. While echoing their optimistic views about the utility of these two theories to explain adherence in this area and the virtues of theoretical integration, we would like to seize this opportunity to clarify several conceptual principles arising from the authors' integration of the theories. Clarifying the theoretical assumptions and explaining precisely how theoretical integration works is crucial not only for improving the comprehensiveness of the integrated framework for predicting injury prevention behaviour, but also to aid the design of effective intervention strategies targeting behavioural adherence. In this article, we use the integration of SDT and TPB as an example to demonstrate how theoretical integration can advance the understanding of injury prevention behaviour in sport. PMID:22909184

  3. Density functional reactivity theory study of SN2 reactions from the information-theoretic perspective.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zemin; Rong, Chunying; Lu, Tian; Ayers, Paul W; Liu, Shubin

    2015-10-28

    As a continuation of our recent efforts to quantify chemical reactivity with quantities from the information-theoretic approach within the framework of density functional reactivity theory, the effectiveness of applying these quantities to quantify electrophilicity for the bimolecular nucleophilic substitution (SN2) reactions in both gas phase and aqueous solvent is presented in this work. We examined a total of 21 self-exchange SN2 reactions for the compound with the general chemical formula of R1R2R3C-F, where R1, R2, and R3 represent substituting alkyl groups such as -H, -CH3, -C2H5, -C3H7, and -C4H9 in both gas and solvent phases. Our findings confirm that scaling properties for information-theoretic quantities found elsewhere are still valid. It has also been verified that the barrier height has the strongest correlation with the electrostatic interaction, but the contributions from the exchange-correlation and steric effects, though less significant, are indispensable. We additionally unveiled that the barrier height of these SN2 reactions can reliably be predicted not only by the Hirshfeld charge and information gain at the regioselective carbon atom, as previously reported by us for other systems, but also by other information-theoretic descriptors such as Shannon entropy, Fisher information, and Ghosh-Berkowitz-Parr entropy on the same atom. These new findings provide further insights for the better understanding of the factors impacting the chemical reactivity of this vastly important category of chemical transformations. PMID:26412416

  4. The Role of Working Memory in Multimedia Instruction: Is Working Memory Working during Learning from Text and Pictures?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuler, Anne; Scheiter, Katharina; van Genuchten, Erlijn

    2011-01-01

    A lot of research has focused on the beneficial effects of using multimedia, that is, text and pictures, for learning. Theories of multimedia learning are based on Baddeley's working memory model (Baddeley 1999). Despite this theoretical foundation, there is only little research that aims at empirically testing whether and more importantly how…

  5. Theoretical span loading and moments of tapered wings produced by aileron deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, H A

    1937-01-01

    The effect of tapered ailerons on linearly tapered wings is theoretically determined. Four different aileron spans are considered for each of three wing aspect ratios and each of four wing taper ratios. The change in lift on one half of the wing, the rolling moment, the additional induced drag, and the yawing moment, due to aileron deflection, are represented by non dimensional coefficients. Similar coefficients are given for the damping and yawing moments, the additional drag, and the change in lift, due to rolling. It was found possible to effect a fairly close agreement between the theoretical and experimental rolling moments by introducing into the theoretical expression for the rolling moment an effective change in angle of attack obtained from an analysis of flap data. The theoretical curves show that the highly tapered wing with long ailerons has a lower ratio of yawing to rolling moment and a lower additional induced drag than wings with less taper.

  6. Additional evidence of Mercurian volcanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trask, N.J.; Strom, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Evidence concerned with (1) the character and distribution of terrain surrounding fresh basins, (2) albedo, color and temporal differences between a basin rim and smooth plains on its floor, and (3) the stratigraphic relations and local distribution of smooth plains in the hilly and lineated terrain are cited as additional evidence for an internal origin of much of the Mercurian smooth plains. Altough the question of Mercurian volcanism should be kept open, this evidence together with that presented in an earlier paper suggests that volcanism occurred on Mercury early in its history. ?? 1976.

  7. Individualized additional instruction for calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, Ken

    2010-10-01

    College students enrolling in the calculus sequence have a wide variance in their preparation and abilities, yet they are usually taught from the same lecture. We describe another pedagogical model of Individualized Additional Instruction (IAI) that assesses each student frequently and prescribes further instruction and homework based on the student's performance. Our study compares two calculus classes, one taught with mandatory remedial IAI and the other without. The class with mandatory remedial IAI did significantly better on comprehensive multiple-choice exams, participated more frequently in classroom discussion and showed greater interest in theorem-proving and other advanced topics.

  8. Water based drilling mud additive

    SciTech Connect

    McCrary, J.L.

    1983-12-13

    A water based fluid additive useful in drilling mud used during drilling of an oil or gas well is disclosed, produced by reacting water at temperatures between 210/sup 0/-280/sup 0/ F. with a mixture comprising in percent by weight: gilsonite 25-30%, tannin 7-15%, lignite 25-35%, sulfonating compound 15-25%, water soluble base compound 5-15%, methylene-yielding compound 1-5%, and then removing substantially all of the remaining water to produce a dried product.

  9. Metal Additive Manufacturing: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, William E.

    2014-06-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of an important, rapidly emerging, manufacturing technology that is alternatively called additive manufacturing (AM), direct digital manufacturing, free form fabrication, or 3D printing, etc. A broad contextual overview of metallic AM is provided. AM has the potential to revolutionize the global parts manufacturing and logistics landscape. It enables distributed manufacturing and the productions of parts-on-demand while offering the potential to reduce cost, energy consumption, and carbon footprint. This paper explores the material science, processes, and business consideration associated with achieving these performance gains. It is concluded that a paradigm shift is required in order to fully exploit AM potential.

  10. Photolytic properties of cobalamins: a theoretical perspective.

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, Pawel M; Garabato, Brady D; Lodowski, Piotr; Jaworska, Maria

    2016-03-21

    This Perspective Article highlights recent theoretical developments, and summarizes the current understanding of the photolytic properties of cobalamins from a computational point of view. The primary focus is on two alkyl cobalamins, methylcobalamin (MeCbl) and adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl), as well as two non-alkyl cobalamins, cyanocobalamin (CNCbl) and hydroxocobalamin (HOCbl). Photolysis of alkyl cobalamins involves low-lying singlet excited states where photodissociation of the Co-C bond leads to formation of singlet-born alkyl/cob(ii)alamin radical pairs (RPs). Potential energy surfaces (PESs) associated with cobalamin low-lying excited states as functions of both axial bonds, provide the most reliable tool for initial analysis of their photochemical and photophysical properties. Due to the complexity, and size limitations associated with the cobalamins, the primary method for calculating ground state properties is density functional theory (DFT), while time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) is used for electronically excited states. For alkyl cobalamins, energy pathways on the lowest singlet surface, connecting metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) and ligand field (LF) minima, can be associated with photo-homolysis of the Co-C bond observed experimentally. Additionally, energy pathways between minima and seams associated with crossing of S1/S0 surfaces, are the most efficient for internal conversion (IC) to the ground state. Depending on the specific cobalamin, such IC may involve simultaneous elongation of both axial bonds (CNCbl), or detachment of axial base followed by corrin ring distortion (MeCbl). The possibility of intersystem crossing, and the formation of triplet RPs is also discussed based on Landau-Zener theory. PMID:26865262

  11. Observational and theoretical advances in cosmological foreground emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Matthew A.

    Observational and theoretical work towards the separation of foreground emission from the cosmic microwave background is described. The bulk of this work is in the design, construction, and commissioning of the C-Band All-Sky Survey (C-BASS), an experiment to produce a template of the Milky Way Galaxy's polarized synchrotron emission. Theoretical work is the derivation of an analytical approximation to the emission spectrum of spinning dust grains. The performance of the C-BASS experiment is demonstrated through a preliminary, deep survey of the North Celestial Pole region. A comparison to multiwavelength data is performed, and the thermal and systematic noise properties of the experiment are explored. The systematic noise has been minimized through careful data processing algorithms, implemented both in the experiment's Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) based digital backend and in the data analysis pipeline. Detailed descriptions of these algorithms are presented. The analytical function of spinning dust emission is derived through the application of careful approximations, with each step tested against numerical calculations. This work is intended for use in the parameterized separation of cosmological foreground components and as a framework for interpreting and comparing the variety of anomalous microwave emission observations.

  12. Additive manufacturing of RF absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Matthew S.

    The ability of additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate integrated electromagnetic absorbers tuned for specific radio frequency bands within structural composites allows for unique combinations of mechanical and electromagnetic properties. These composites and films can be used for RF shielding of sensitive electromagnetic components through in-plane and out-of-plane RF absorption. Structural composites are a common building block of many commercial platforms. These platforms may be placed in situations in which there is a need for embedded RF absorbing properties along with structural properties. Instead of adding radar absorbing treatments to the external surface of existing structures, which adds increased size, weight and cost; it could prove to be advantageous to integrate the microwave absorbing properties directly into the composite during the fabrication process. In this thesis, a method based on additive manufacturing techniques of composites structures with prescribed electromagnetic loss, within the frequency range 1 to 26GHz, is presented. This method utilizes screen printing and nScrypt micro dispensing to pattern a carbon based ink onto low loss substrates. The materials chosen for this study will be presented, and the fabrication technique that these materials went through to create RF absorbing structures will be described. The calibration methods used, the modeling of the RF structures, and the applications in which this technology can be utilized will also be presented.

  13. High Flow Addition Curing Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Vannucci, Raymond D.; Ansari, Irfan; Cerny, Lawrence L.; Scheiman, Daniel A.

    1994-01-01

    A new series of high flow PMR-type addition curing polyimides was developed, which employed the substitution of 2,2'-bis (trifluoromethyl) -4,4'-diaminobiphenyl (BTDB) for p-phenylenediamine (p -PDA) in a PMR-IL formulation. These thermoset polyimides, designated as 12F resins, were prepared from BTDB and the dimethyl ester of 4,4'- (hexafluo- roisopropylidene) -diphthalic acid (HFDE) with either nadic ester (NE) or p-aminostyrene (PAS) as the endcaps for addition curing. The 12F prepolymers displayed lower melting temperatures in DSC analysis, and higher melt flow in rheological studies than the cor- responding PMR-11 polyimides. Long-term isothermal aging studies showed that BTDB- based 12F resins exhibited comparable thermo-oxidative stability to P-PDA based PMR-11 polyimides. The noncoplanar 2- and 2'-disubstituted biphenyldiamine (BTDB) not only lowered the melt viscosities of 12F prepolymers, but also retained reasonable thermal sta- bility of the cured resins. The 12F polyimide resin with p-aminostyrene endcaps showed the best promise for long-term, high-temperature application at 343 C (650 F).

  14. Surety theoretics: The forest or the trees?

    SciTech Connect

    Senglaub, M.

    1997-10-30

    Periodically one needs to re-examine the objectives and the efforts associated with a field of study. In the case of surety which comprises, safety, security and reliability one needs to be sure that theoretical efforts support the needs of systems and design engineers in satisfying stakeholder requirements. The current focus in the surety areas does not appear to address the theoretical foundations needed by the systems engineer. Examination of papers and abstracts demonstrate significant effort along the lines of thermal hydraulics, chemistry, structural response, control theory, etc. which are analytical disciplines which provide support for a surety theoretic but do not constitute a theoretic. The representations currently employed, fault trees etc., define static representations of a system, not the dynamic representation characteristic of response in abnormal, hostile or under degrading conditions. Current methodologies would require a semi-infinite set of scenarios to be examined before a system could be certified as satisfying a surety requirement. The elements that are required of a surety theoretic must include: (1) a dynamic representation of the system; (2) the ability to automatically identify terminal states of the system; and (3) determine the probabilities of specified terminal states under dynamic conditions. This paper examines the requirements of a surety theoretic that will support the efforts of the design and development engineer. Speculations then follow on technologies that might provide the theoretical and support foundations needed by the systems engineering community to form a robust surety analysis and design environment.

  15. Work Values System Development during Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porfeli, Erik J.

    2007-01-01

    Work values stability, change, and development can be appreciably reduced to a living system model [Ford, D. H. (1994). "Humans as self-constructing living systems: A developmental perspective on behavior and personality" (2nd ed.). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates]. This theoretical model includes discrepancy-reducing and…

  16. Grief and Loss: A Social Work Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Jennifer E.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the wealth of research that exists in the area of death, grief, and loss, the scarcity of literature examining the impact upon social work practitioners is troubling. This article initially draws upon a case study to explore this impact through the theoretical framework of disenfranchised grief. Further comment is made regarding the…

  17. Job Design for Learning in Work Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lantz, Annika; Brav, Agneta

    2007-01-01

    Purpose--What is required of job design and production planning, if they are to result in a work group taking a self-starting approach and going beyond what is formally required of it? This paper aims to contribute to group research by testing a theoretical model of relations between job design on the one hand (captured as completeness, demand on…

  18. Reconceptualizing Working Memory in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenesi, Barbara; Sana, Faria; Kim, Joseph A.; Shore, David I.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, research from cognitive science has provided a solid theoretical framework to develop evidence-based interventions in education. In particular, research into reading, writing, language, mathematics and multimedia learning has been guided by the application of Baddeley's multicomponent model of working memory. However, an…

  19. Researching in Classrooms: Getting beyond "What Works"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley-Marling, Curt

    2011-01-01

    The dominant approach to research in learning disabilities utilizes experimental and quasi-experimental designs to identify the most effective instructional strategies for students with learning disabilities. Research is always undertaken from a point of view, yet the discourse on "what works?" is generally silent on how theoretical frameworks…

  20. People Interview: Continuing Einstein's great work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-09-01

    INTERVIEW Continuing Einstein's great work Dr Michio Kaku is a theoretical physicist, bestselling author and popularizer of science. He is the co-founder of string field theory (a branch of string theory) and continues Einstein's search to unite the four fundamental forces of nature into one unified theory. David Smith speaks to him about inspiration and education.

  1. Working Papers in Art Education, 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurmuehlen, Marilyn, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    This publication presents manuscripts and research reports by graduate students. Accompanying papers from their mentors establish a context for the student papers. In this volume the works are organized by sponsoring university. Student papers presented are: (1) "Interpreting Museums as Cultural Metaphors" (Michael Sikes); (2) "Key Theoretical,…

  2. Additives in fibers and fabrics.

    PubMed

    Barker, R H

    1975-06-01

    The additives and contaminants which occur in textile fibers vary widely, depending on the type of fiber and the pretreatment which it has received. Synthetic fibers such as nylon and polyester contain trace amounts of contaminants such as catalysts and catalyst deactivators which remain after the synthesis of the basic polymers. In addition, there are frequently a number of materials which are added to perform specific functions in almost all man-made fibers. Examples of these would include traces of metals or metal salts used as tracers for identification of specific lots of fiber, TiO2 or similar materials added as delustrants, and a host of organic species added for such special purposes as antistatic agents or flame retardants. There may also be considerable quantities of residual monomer or small oligomers dissolved in the polymer matrix. The situation becomes even more complex after the fibers are converted into fabric form. Numerous materials are applied at various stages of fabric preparation to act as lubricants, sizing agents, antistats, bleaches, and wetting agents to facilitate the processing, but these are normally removed before the fabric reaches the cutters of the ultimate consumers and therefore usually do not constitute potential hazards. However, there are many other chemical agents which are frequently added during the later stages of fabric preparation and which are not designed to be removed. Aside from dyes and printing pigments, the most common additive for apparel fabrics is a durable press treatment. This generally involves the use of materials capable of crosslinking cellulosics by reacting through such functions as N-methylolated amides or related compounds such as ureas and carbamates. These materials pose some potential hazards due to both the nitrogenous bases and the formaldehyde which they usually release. There is usually also some residual catalyst in fabrics which have received such treatments. Other types of chemical treatments

  3. Additives in fibers and fabrics.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, R H

    1975-01-01

    The additives and contaminants which occur in textile fibers vary widely, depending on the type of fiber and the pretreatment which it has received. Synthetic fibers such as nylon and polyester contain trace amounts of contaminants such as catalysts and catalyst deactivators which remain after the synthesis of the basic polymers. In addition, there are frequently a number of materials which are added to perform specific functions in almost all man-made fibers. Examples of these would include traces of metals or metal salts used as tracers for identification of specific lots of fiber, TiO2 or similar materials added as delustrants, and a host of organic species added for such special purposes as antistatic agents or flame retardants. There may also be considerable quantities of residual monomer or small oligomers dissolved in the polymer matrix. The situation becomes even more complex after the fibers are converted into fabric form. Numerous materials are applied at various stages of fabric preparation to act as lubricants, sizing agents, antistats, bleaches, and wetting agents to facilitate the processing, but these are normally removed before the fabric reaches the cutters of the ultimate consumers and therefore usually do not constitute potential hazards. However, there are many other chemical agents which are frequently added during the later stages of fabric preparation and which are not designed to be removed. Aside from dyes and printing pigments, the most common additive for apparel fabrics is a durable press treatment. This generally involves the use of materials capable of crosslinking cellulosics by reacting through such functions as N-methylolated amides or related compounds such as ureas and carbamates. These materials pose some potential hazards due to both the nitrogenous bases and the formaldehyde which they usually release. There is usually also some residual catalyst in fabrics which have received such treatments. Other types of chemical treatments

  4. Work Cultures and Work/Family Balance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Sue Campbell

    2001-01-01

    For 179 workers with family responsibilities, flexibility of work was associated with job satisfaction and family well-being, flexible work schedules were not. Supportive supervision was associated only with increased employee citizenship and did not increase work-family balance of those at risk. Family-friendly culture did not appear to benefit…

  5. Principle of minimal work fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Gaoyang; Gong, Jiangbin

    2015-08-01

    Understanding and manipulating work fluctuations in microscale and nanoscale systems are of both fundamental and practical interest. For example, in considering the Jarzynski equality 〈e-βW〉=e-βΔF, a change in the fluctuations of e-βW may impact how rapidly the statistical average of e-βW converges towards the theoretical value e-βΔF, where W is the work, β is the inverse temperature, and ΔF is the free energy difference between two equilibrium states. Motivated by our previous study aiming at the suppression of work fluctuations, here we obtain a principle of minimal work fluctuations. In brief, adiabatic processes as treated in quantum and classical adiabatic theorems yield the minimal fluctuations in e-βW. In the quantum domain, if a system initially prepared at thermal equilibrium is subjected to a work protocol but isolated from a bath during the time evolution, then a quantum adiabatic process without energy level crossing (or an assisted adiabatic process reaching the same final states as in a conventional adiabatic process) yields the minimal fluctuations in e-βW, where W is the quantum work defined by two energy measurements at the beginning and at the end of the process. In the classical domain where the classical work protocol is realizable by an adiabatic process, then the classical adiabatic process also yields the minimal fluctuations in e-βW. Numerical experiments based on a Landau-Zener process confirm our theory in the quantum domain, and our theory in the classical domain explains our previous numerical findings regarding the suppression of classical work fluctuations [G. Y. Xiao and J. B. Gong, Phys. Rev. E 90, 052132 (2014)]. PMID:26382367

  6. Principle of minimal work fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Gaoyang; Gong, Jiangbin

    2015-08-01

    Understanding and manipulating work fluctuations in microscale and nanoscale systems are of both fundamental and practical interest. For example, in considering the Jarzynski equality =e-β Δ F , a change in the fluctuations of e-β W may impact how rapidly the statistical average of e-β W converges towards the theoretical value e-β Δ F, where W is the work, β is the inverse temperature, and Δ F is the free energy difference between two equilibrium states. Motivated by our previous study aiming at the suppression of work fluctuations, here we obtain a principle of minimal work fluctuations. In brief, adiabatic processes as treated in quantum and classical adiabatic theorems yield the minimal fluctuations in e-β W. In the quantum domain, if a system initially prepared at thermal equilibrium is subjected to a work protocol but isolated from a bath during the time evolution, then a quantum adiabatic process without energy level crossing (or an assisted adiabatic process reaching the same final states as in a conventional adiabatic process) yields the minimal fluctuations in e-β W, where W is the quantum work defined by two energy measurements at the beginning and at the end of the process. In the classical domain where the classical work protocol is realizable by an adiabatic process, then the classical adiabatic process also yields the minimal fluctuations in e-β W. Numerical experiments based on a Landau-Zener process confirm our theory in the quantum domain, and our theory in the classical domain explains our previous numerical findings regarding the suppression of classical work fluctuations [G. Y. Xiao and J. B. Gong, Phys. Rev. E 90, 052132 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.90.052132].

  7. Working Group Report: Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Artuso, M.; et al.,

    2013-10-18

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  8. A Generalized Information Theoretical Model for Quantum Secret Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Chen-Ming; Li, Zhi-Hui; Xu, Ting-Ting; Li, Yong-Ming

    2016-07-01

    An information theoretical model for quantum secret sharing was introduced by H. Imai et al. (Quantum Inf. Comput. 5(1), 69-80 2005), which was analyzed by quantum information theory. In this paper, we analyze this information theoretical model using the properties of the quantum access structure. By the analysis we propose a generalized model definition for the quantum secret sharing schemes. In our model, there are more quantum access structures which can be realized by our generalized quantum secret sharing schemes than those of the previous one. In addition, we also analyse two kinds of important quantum access structures to illustrate the existence and rationality for the generalized quantum secret sharing schemes and consider the security of the scheme by simple examples.

  9. Decision-theoretic reflections on processing a fingermark.

    PubMed

    Gittelson, S; Bozza, S; Biedermann, A; Taroni, F

    2013-03-10

    A recent publication in this journal [1] presented the results of a field study that revealed the data provided by the fingermarks not processed in a forensic science laboratory. In their study, the authors were interested in the usefulness of this additional data in order to determine whether such fingermarks would have been worth submitting to the fingermark processing workflow. Taking these ideas as a starting point, this communication here places the fingermark in its context of a case brought before a court, and examines the question of processing or not processing a fingermark from a decision-theoretic point of view. The decision-theoretic framework presented provides an answer to this question in the form of a quantified expression of the expected value of information (EVOI) associated with the processed fingermark, which can then be compared with the cost of processing the mark. PMID:23428350

  10. A novel addition polyimide adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.; Progar, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    An addition polyimide adhesive, LARC 13, was developed which shows promise for bonding both titanium and composites for applications which require service temperatures in excess of 533 K. The LARC 13 is based on an oligomeric bis nadimide containing a meta linked aromatic diamine. The adhesive melts prior to polymerization due to its oligomeric nature, thereby allowing it to be processed at 344 kPa or less. Therefore, LARC 13 is ideal for the bonding of honeycomb sandwich structures. After melting, the resin thermosets during the cure of the nadic endcaps to a highly crosslinked system. Few volatiles are evolved, thus allowing large enclosed structures to be bonded. Preparation of the adhesive as well as bonding, aging, and testing of lap shear and honeycomb samples are discussed.

  11. Optics of progressive addition lenses.

    PubMed

    Sheedy, J E; Buri, M; Bailey, I L; Azus, J; Borish, I M

    1987-02-01

    The optical characteristics of the major progressive addition lenses were measured using an automated lensometer with a specially designed lens holder to simulate eye rotation. Measurements were made every 3 degrees (about 1.5 mm) and graphs of isospherical equivalent lines and isocylinder lines were developed. Generally the near zone of these lenses is narrower and lower than in bifocal or trifocal lenses. Distinct differences exist between the various progressive lenses. The width of the near zone, rate of power progression, amount of unwanted cylinder (level with the distance center), and clarity of the distance zone are compared for the various lenses. The optical measurements demonstrate an apparent trade-off between the size of the cylinder-free area of the lens and the amount of the cylinder. PMID:3826294

  12. Addition polyimide end cap study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    The characterization of addition polyimides with various end caps for adhesive applications at 120-250 C environments is discussed. Oligometric polyimides were prepared from 3,3',4,4'-benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,3'-methylenedianiline which were end-capped with functionally reactive moities which cause crosslinking when the oligomers are heated to 200-400 C. The syntheses of the oligomers are outlined. The thermolysis of the oligomers was studied by differential scanning calorimetry and the resulting polymers were characterized by differential thermal analysis and adhesive performance. The adhesive data include lap shear strengths on titanium 6-4 adherends both before and after aging for 1000 hours at 121 C and/or 232 C.

  13. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact

    PubMed Central

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system. PMID:26601039

  14. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact.

    PubMed

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system. PMID:26601039

  15. SIPSEY WILDERNESS AND ADDITIONS, ALABAMA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schweinfurth, Stanley P.; Mory, Peter C.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of geologic, geochemical, and mineral surveys the Sipsey Wilderness and additions are deemed to have little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources. Although limestone, shale, and sandstone resources that occur in the area are physically suitable for a variety of uses, similar materials are available outside the area closer to transportation routes and potential markets. A small amount of coal has been identified in the area, occurring as nonpersistent beds less than 28 in. thick. Oil and (or) natural gas resources may be present if suitable structural traps exist in the subsurface. Therefore, the area has a probable oil and gas potential. Small amounts of asphaltic sandstone and limestone, commonly referred to as tar sands, may also occur in the subsurface. 5 refs.

  16. Adverse reactions to food additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1986-01-01

    There are thousands of agents that are intentionally added to the food that we consume. These include preservatives, stabilizers, conditioners, thickeners, colorings, flavorings, sweeteners, antioxidants, etc. etc. Yet only a surprisingly small number have been associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Amongst all the additives, FD&C dyes have been most frequently associated with adverse reactions. Tartrazine is the most notorious of them all; however, critical review of the medical literature and current Scripps Clinic studies would indicate that tartrazine has been confirmed to be at best only occasionally associated with flares of urticaria or asthma. There is no convincing evidence in the literature of reactivity to the other azo or nonazo dyes. This can also be said of BHA/BHT, nitrites/nitrates and sorbates. Parabens have been shown to elicit IgE mediated hypersensitivity reactions when used as pharmaceutical preservatives; however, as with the other additives noted above, ingested parabens have only occasionally been associated with adverse reactions. MSG, the cause of the 'Chinese restaurant syndrome' has only been linked to asthma in one report. Sulfiting agents used primarily as food fresheners and to control microbial growth in fermented beverages have been established as the cause of any where from mild to severe and even fatal reactions in at least 5% of the asthmatic population. Other reactions reported to follow sulfite ingestion include anaphylaxis, gastro intestinal complaints and dermatological eruptions. The prevalence of these non asthmatic reactions is unknown. The mechanism of sulfite sensitive asthma is also unknown but most likely involves hyperreactivity to inhale SO2 in the great majority of cases; however, there are reports of IgE mediated reactions and other sulfite sensitive asthmatics have been found with low levels of sulfite oxidase; necessary to oxidize endogenous sulfite to sulfate. PMID:3302664

  17. Anomaly Detection In Additively Manufactured Parts Using Laser Doppler Vibrometery

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, Carlos A.

    2015-09-29

    Additively manufactured parts are susceptible to non-uniform structure caused by the unique manufacturing process. This can lead to structural weakness or catastrophic failure. Using laser Doppler vibrometry and frequency response analysis, non-contact detection of anomalies in additively manufactured parts may be possible. Preliminary tests show promise for small scale detection, but more future work is necessary.

  18. Quality of Working Life: An Antecedent to Employee Turnover Intention

    PubMed Central

    Mosadeghrad, Ali Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to measure the level of quality of work life (QWL) among hospital employees in Iran. Additionally, it aimed to identify the factors that are critical to employees’ QWL. It also aimed to test a theoretical model of the relationship between employees’ QWL and their intention to leave the organization. Methods: A survey study was conducted based on a sample of 608 hospital employees using a validated questionnaire. Face, content and construct validity were conducted on the survey instrument. Results: Hospital employees reported low QWL. Employees were least satisfied with pay, benefits, job promotion, and management support. The most important predictor of QWL was management support, followed by job proud, job security and job stress. An inverse relationship was found between employees QWL and their turnover intention. Conclusion: This study empirically examined the relationships between employees’ QWL and their turnover intention. Managers can take appropriate actions to improve employees’ QWL and subsequently reduce employees’ turnover. PMID:24596835

  19. Beyond pluralism: psychoanalysis and the workings of mind.

    PubMed

    Pine, Fred

    2011-10-01

    Subjects that Freud excluded or incompletely explored have been sites of theoretical expansion in over a century of observation: the role of the other, the self, the preoedipal period, action, the countertransference, limits to neutrality/anonymity/abstinence, the loci of the analytic drama, effects beyond interpretation, agency, and basic needs (versus wishes). These developments have led to conflicting theories and sect-like groupings within the field. Group psychological processes underlying this are discussed; and a broad and inclusive view of psychoanalysis is proposed under the heading of the study of the workings of mind. Additionally, substantial integrative proposals are offered with respect to the central tasks of individual development, theories of mind, the relational turn, and aspects of technique. PMID:22034677

  20. A theoretical approach to measuring pilot workload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantowitz, B. H.

    1984-01-01

    Theoretical assumptions used by researchers in the area of attention, with emphasis upon errors and inconsistent assumptions used by some researchers were studied. Two GAT experiments, two laboratory studies and one field experiment were conducted.