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Sample records for additional therapeutic options

  1. [Hepatocellular Carcinoma: therapeutic options 2015].

    PubMed

    Schultheiß, Michael; Bettinger, Dominik; Neeff, Hannes P; Brunner, Thomas B; Thimme, Robert

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a common neoplasm, is rising and the prognosis is poor. Many factors have to be taken into account when deciding on the best mode of therapy, like tumor size and number, liver function, sequelae of portal hypertension or other comorbidities. These factors are reflected in the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) classification. Resection, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and liver transplantation can be seen as curative therapies for the early and localized HCC. For the intermediate state of the HCC, there are other therapeutic modalities in therapy available: transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT, rarer occasions), off label: stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). At the moment, Sorafenib is the only option in treating advanced stages of HCC. Alternative treatment strategies, like e.g. immunological therapies, are being investigated. PMID:26182255

  2. [Therapeutic options for pressure ulcers].

    PubMed

    Damert, H-G; Meyer, F; Altmann, S

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this overview is based on remarks on the pathogenesis of and therapy for pressure ulcers and selected but representative cases to demonstrate current options of plastic coverage. As a consequence of the demographic developments, in particular, with regard to the increasing proportion of older patients as well as the advances in modern medicine, the number of multimorbid, geriatric and bedridden patients and of those with prolonged sickbed periods has been steadily growing. Therefore, partly severe manifestations of pressure ulcers at various exposed body regions can be observed in spite of the best preventive intention of care. While in the early stages rather conservative treatment is adequate, surgical intervention might become important and indispensable for a sufficient treatment in advanced stages. To facilitate basic care and to appropriately treat the infectious focus, the methods and procedures of plastic surgery can become relevant. Although there are several options and approaches existing to sanitise and cover defects of pressure ulcers, which are described within the article based on representative cases, preventive measures can still be considered the best approach.

  3. [Nystagmus. Clinical characteristics and therapeutic options].

    PubMed

    Käsmann-Kellner, B

    2016-03-01

    This article presents an overview of the pathophysiology of nystagmus and the differential diagnostics of congenital and acquired nystagmus. In addition, the principles of conservative, surgical and pharmacotherapy treatment options are described. The pathophysiological basis of nystagmus deepens the understanding of the etiology of the individual forms of nystagmus. The therapeutic approach to calming of nystagmus aims at an extension of the foveation time, which has the most significant impact on visual acuity. In congenital nystagmus this can be carried out by optimization of the retinal image, prisms or by bilateral surgical muscle repositioning to use the phenomenon of a null or neutral zone. In acquired nystagmus the off-label use of centrally acting medications can sometimes be helpful to calm the nystagmus and the associated oscillopsia. PMID:26936363

  4. [Giant infantile hepatic hemangioma: which therapeutic options?].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Cristina; Lobo, Luisa; Anjos, Rui; Salgueiro, Carlos; Lopes, Ana Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Infantile hepatic hemangioma is the third most frequent liver tumor in children and the most common below 6 months of age. Therapeutic options depend on clinical manifestations and should be tailored on an individual patient basis. We present the case of a 4 year old boy with neonatal diagnosis of large vascularized liver tumor with imagiological criteria of infantile hepatic hemangioma. We highlight the occurrence of heart failure and Kasabach-Merrit syndrome (thrombocytopenia, anemia) that have spontaneously regressed. During follow up, sequential imaging (ultrasound with Doppler, magnetic resonance imaging, dynamic contrast enhancement computed tomography) confirmed the hypothesis of IHH, allowing vascular mapping of the lesion. From the first year on, we observed a favorable course with progressive tumor regression. In the present case, a conservative approach has been maintained, but the best therapeutic option remains unclear. We highlight the specific features of this case, discussing the most cost-effective approach.

  5. [Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. New therapeutical options].

    PubMed

    Seculini Patiño, Carina E; Tabares, Aldo H

    2016-01-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is an immune-mediated adverse reaction due to antibodies to a multimolecular complex of heparin and platelet factor 4 (PF4) characterized by moderate thrombocytopenia and paradoxical arterial or venous thrombosis. It is a relatively infrequent complication related to the administration of any type of heparin. In patients undergoing percutaneous coronary revascularization or coronary artery by-pass graft the prevalence of HIT is higher than in other clinical settings. Recognizing clinical and laboratory features of HIT allow immediate discontinuation of heparin and the use of alternative anticoagulants to avoid serious thrombotic complications. In this review, we summarize different therapeutic options for the treatment of HIT with special emphasis on direct oral anticoagulants (DOACS) such as dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban. DOACS might represent a therapeutic alternative for HIT treatment. PMID:27576282

  6. [Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. New therapeutical options].

    PubMed

    Seculini Patiño, Carina E; Tabares, Aldo H

    2016-01-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is an immune-mediated adverse reaction due to antibodies to a multimolecular complex of heparin and platelet factor 4 (PF4) characterized by moderate thrombocytopenia and paradoxical arterial or venous thrombosis. It is a relatively infrequent complication related to the administration of any type of heparin. In patients undergoing percutaneous coronary revascularization or coronary artery by-pass graft the prevalence of HIT is higher than in other clinical settings. Recognizing clinical and laboratory features of HIT allow immediate discontinuation of heparin and the use of alternative anticoagulants to avoid serious thrombotic complications. In this review, we summarize different therapeutic options for the treatment of HIT with special emphasis on direct oral anticoagulants (DOACS) such as dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban. DOACS might represent a therapeutic alternative for HIT treatment.

  7. [Sialendoscopy: diagnostic possibilities and therapeutic options].

    PubMed

    Boehm, A; Faure, F; Dietz, A

    2008-05-01

    With the improved availability of sialendoscopy (SE) during the last decade the therapeutical concept for sialoliths has remarkably changed. Due to the introduction of SE the diagnostic opportunities could be extended. Before introduction of SE, the diagnostic was focused only on the existence and size of sialoliths. Now, questions like consistence of sialoliths and their mobility in the duct system, stenoses with sialolithiasis-like symptoms as well as the evaluation of the remaining secretory capacity of the involved gland became relevant for the therapeutic decision. Furthermore there are an increasing number of therapeutic opportunities available. For some of these techniques long term experiences are missing so far. On the basis of the review of the current literature and a retrospective analysis of 256 own patients the different techniques and their indication are described. The combination of different therapeutical options of the SE and the still established extracorporal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) results in an important reduction of glandular resection in patients with sialolithiasis. Thus, the rate of glandular resection for the glandular submandibular can be decreased to 5 % and for the glandular parotis to 1 %. In summary, the most effective way is a stepwise approach based on the diagnostic tools of SE and including the laser-lithotripsy and ESWL in the treatment of sialolithiasis.

  8. Therapeutic options for management of endometrial hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial hyperplasia (EH) comprises a spectrum of changes in the endometrium ranging from a slightly disordered pattern that exaggerates the alterations seen in the late proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle to irregular, hyperchromatic lesions that are similar to endometrioid adenocarcinoma. Generally, EH is caused by continuous exposure of estrogen unopposed by progesterone, polycystic ovary syndrome, tamoxifen, or hormone replacement therapy. Since it can progress, or often occur coincidentally with endometrial carcinoma, EH is of clinical importance, and the reversion of hyperplasia to normal endometrium represents the key conservative treatment for prevention of the development of adenocarcinoma. Presently, cyclic progestin or hysterectomy constitutes the major treatment option for EH without or with atypia, respectively. However, clinical trials of hormonal therapies and definitive standard treatments remain to be established for the management of EH. Moreover, therapeutic options for EH patients who wish to preserve fertility are challenging and require nonsurgical management. Therefore, future studies should focus on evaluation of new treatment strategies and novel compounds that could simultaneously target pathways involved in the pathogenesis of estradiol-induced EH. Novel therapeutic agents precisely targeting the inhibition of estrogen receptor, growth factor receptors, and signal transduction pathways are likely to constitute an optimal approach for treatment of EH. PMID:26463434

  9. Therapeutic options for peritoneal metastasis arising from colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Glockzin, Gabriel; Schlitt, Hans J; Piso, Pompiliu

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal metastasis is a common sign of advanced tumor stage, tumor progression or tumor recurrence in patients with colorectal cancer. Due to the improvement of systemic chemotherapy, the development of targeted therapy and the introduction of additive treatment options such as cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC), the therapeutic approach to peritoneal metastatic colorectal cancer (pmCRC) has changed over recent decades, and patient survival has improved. Moreover, in contrast to palliative systemic chemotherapy or best supportive care, the inclusion of CRS and HIPEC as inherent components of a multidisciplinary treatment regimen provides a therapeutic approach with curative intent. Although CRS and HIPEC are increasingly accepted as the standard of care for selected patients and have become part of numerous national and international guidelines, the individual role, optimal timing and ideal sequence of the different systemic, local and surgical treatment options remains a matter of debate. Ongoing and future randomized controlled clinical trials may help clarify the impact of the different components, allow for further improvement of patient selection and support the standardization of oncologic treatment regimens for pmCRC. The addition of further therapeutic options such as neoadjuvant intraperitoneal chemotherapy or pressurized intraperitoneal aerosol chemotherapy, should be investigated to optimize therapeutic regimens and further improve the oncological outcome.

  10. Therapeutic options for peritoneal metastasis arising from colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Glockzin, Gabriel; Schlitt, Hans J; Piso, Pompiliu

    2016-08-01

    Peritoneal metastasis is a common sign of advanced tumor stage, tumor progression or tumor recurrence in patients with colorectal cancer. Due to the improvement of systemic chemotherapy, the development of targeted therapy and the introduction of additive treatment options such as cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC), the therapeutic approach to peritoneal metastatic colorectal cancer (pmCRC) has changed over recent decades, and patient survival has improved. Moreover, in contrast to palliative systemic chemotherapy or best supportive care, the inclusion of CRS and HIPEC as inherent components of a multidisciplinary treatment regimen provides a therapeutic approach with curative intent. Although CRS and HIPEC are increasingly accepted as the standard of care for selected patients and have become part of numerous national and international guidelines, the individual role, optimal timing and ideal sequence of the different systemic, local and surgical treatment options remains a matter of debate. Ongoing and future randomized controlled clinical trials may help clarify the impact of the different components, allow for further improvement of patient selection and support the standardization of oncologic treatment regimens for pmCRC. The addition of further therapeutic options such as neoadjuvant intraperitoneal chemotherapy or pressurized intraperitoneal aerosol chemotherapy, should be investigated to optimize therapeutic regimens and further improve the oncological outcome. PMID:27602235

  11. Therapeutic options for peritoneal metastasis arising from colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Glockzin, Gabriel; Schlitt, Hans J; Piso, Pompiliu

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal metastasis is a common sign of advanced tumor stage, tumor progression or tumor recurrence in patients with colorectal cancer. Due to the improvement of systemic chemotherapy, the development of targeted therapy and the introduction of additive treatment options such as cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC), the therapeutic approach to peritoneal metastatic colorectal cancer (pmCRC) has changed over recent decades, and patient survival has improved. Moreover, in contrast to palliative systemic chemotherapy or best supportive care, the inclusion of CRS and HIPEC as inherent components of a multidisciplinary treatment regimen provides a therapeutic approach with curative intent. Although CRS and HIPEC are increasingly accepted as the standard of care for selected patients and have become part of numerous national and international guidelines, the individual role, optimal timing and ideal sequence of the different systemic, local and surgical treatment options remains a matter of debate. Ongoing and future randomized controlled clinical trials may help clarify the impact of the different components, allow for further improvement of patient selection and support the standardization of oncologic treatment regimens for pmCRC. The addition of further therapeutic options such as neoadjuvant intraperitoneal chemotherapy or pressurized intraperitoneal aerosol chemotherapy, should be investigated to optimize therapeutic regimens and further improve the oncological outcome. PMID:27602235

  12. [The option of neuroprotective therapeutics for glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Shuyu; Xu, Xun

    2014-08-01

    Glaucoma is the second common cause of irreversible blindness worldwide associated with a progressive neurodegenerative disease of retinal ganglion cells (RGC). The major hypothetical mechanisms of the apoptosis of RGCs includes deprivation of neurotrophic factors, excitotoxicity mediated by the interaction of glutamate with NMDAR. This article reviewed current development of three kinds of neuroprotective drugs for glaucoma management such as small-molecule therapeutics, recombinant therapeutic proteins and small-molecule bioactive peptides. Particularly, small peptides, which show high target specificity, high potency and low toxicity compared with small molecules, possession of the advantages of low immunogenicity and high cost-effectiveness over recombinant therapeutics, may become most important choice for neuroprotection against glaucoma of next generation.

  13. Graves' disease. Manifestations and therapeutic options

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, K.F.; Saleeby, G.

    1988-03-01

    Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. Clinical features include thyroid enlargement, eye signs, tachycardia, heat intolerance, emotional lability, weight loss, and hyperkinesis. Three modes of therapy are available. The preferences of the patient and physician are usually prime considerations in devising the therapeutic plan. Radioactive iodine is the most frequently used and safest method of treatment for adults. Antithyroid drugs are preferred for children and pregnant women. Surgery is usually reserved for patients in whom the other forms of treatment are not acceptable. Considerable patient education during the decision-making process enhances the success of the therapeutic plan.

  14. Update on therapeutic options for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    McCoyd, Matthew

    2013-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the most common neurologic disorders that affects young people. The disorder has long been associated with clinical relapses and a disabling course. However, there has been a rapid expansion in the available treatment options for MS, and new insights into existing therapies, as decades of research has begun to produce tangible treatment results leading to newly approved an emerging therapies. PMID:23896508

  15. Secukinumab: a promising therapeutic option in spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Maldonado-Ficco, Hernan; Perez-Alamino, Rodolfo; Maldonado-Cocco, José A

    2016-09-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is the second most common chronic inflammatory joint disease. Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is another less common but equally chronic and disabling spondyloarthritis (SpA). Therapeutic agents for the treatment of these diseases have been somewhat lacking as compared with those available for rheumatoid arthritis, which represents a significant challenge for both the treating physician and the pharmaceutical industry. A promising development for our understanding of the physiopathology of PsA and AS involves new targets to interrupt IL-17 and IL-12/IL-23 pathways. Up to 30-40 % of SpA patients have inadequate or poor response, or are intolerant to anti-TNF therapies. Therefore, there has been a clear unmet medical need in an important group of these patients. As a result, new therapeutic targets have emerged for the treatment of both axial and peripheral SpA. Interleukin 17 (IL-17) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that is increased in psoriatic lesions as well as in the synovial fluid of patients with PsA and in sites of enthesitis in SpA. IL-23 has been shown to play an important role in the polarization of CD4+ T-cells to become IL-17 producers. Based on these evidences, blockade of the cytokine IL-17 or its receptors was considered to have therapeutic implications for the treatment of psoriasis, as well as PsA and AS.This article presents a thorough review of an IL-17 A blocking agent, its mechanism of action, its clinical efficacy and its therapeutic safety. PMID:27437696

  16. Therapeutic options in the polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bhathena, R K

    2007-02-01

    The polycystic ovary syndrome is the most common endocrine disorder affecting women. It is a heterogeneous familial condition of uncertain aetiology. The diagnosis is made by the detection of polycystic ovaries on ultrasound examination and the occurrence of single or multiple clinical features such as menstrual cycle disturbances, obesity, acne, hirsutism, alopecia and biochemical abnormalities such as hypersecretion of luteinising hormone and testosterone. In a significant number of women with this condition there is impaired insulin metabolism. Women with the polycystic ovary syndrome are at an increased risk of developing diabetes and possibly cardiovascular disease in later life. The management should be symptom-orientated. Menstrual cycle regulation may be attained with the combined oral contraceptive pill or cyclical progestogen therapy. In obese women, with the loss of weight, the symptoms and endocrine profile are generally improved. Short-term treatment with metformin may be useful in women with insulin resistance. Hyperandrogenism may be treated with the contraceptive pill containing cyproterone acetate or with short-term low-dose anti-androgen therapy, together with effective contraception. Ovulation may be induced with clomiphene citrate with careful monitoring, failing which low-dose gonadotrophin therapy or laparoscopic ovarian diathermy are effective options.

  17. Phytotherapy: emerging therapeutic option in urologic disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Phytotherapy belongs to the area of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and the definition of phytotherapy is the use of plants or plant extracts for medicinal uses. Interest in phytotherapy is growing in both Asian and western countries for its use in the prevention and management of disease, improvement of general health and anti-aging. And also, there are several studies about the efficacy of phytotherapy in urologic diseases like benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), erectile dysfunction (ED), late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) and infertility in males. Phytotherapy for BPH including saw palmetto, pygeum, and nettles, is under vigorous research for the therapeutic effect. No solid evidence showing better effective treatment modality for ED than placebo has been found yet for phytotherapy. Recently, a potent NO donor, L-arginine is under research with promising results. Phytotherapy is used by a number of patients with urological disease, and urologists need to have accurate knowledge about phytotherapy as well as keep a cautious approach. The possible effects and side effects should be defined and related to urologic patients by urologists. PMID:26816707

  18. Phytotherapy: emerging therapeutic option in urologic disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sae Woong

    2012-09-01

    Phytotherapy belongs to the area of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and the definition of phytotherapy is the use of plants or plant extracts for medicinal uses. Interest in phytotherapy is growing in both Asian and western countries for its use in the prevention and management of disease, improvement of general health and anti-aging. And also, there are several studies about the efficacy of phytotherapy in urologic diseases like benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), erectile dysfunction (ED), late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) and infertility in males. Phytotherapy for BPH including saw palmetto, pygeum, and nettles, is under vigorous research for the therapeutic effect. No solid evidence showing better effective treatment modality for ED than placebo has been found yet for phytotherapy. Recently, a potent NO donor, L-arginine is under research with promising results. Phytotherapy is used by a number of patients with urological disease, and urologists need to have accurate knowledge about phytotherapy as well as keep a cautious approach. The possible effects and side effects should be defined and related to urologic patients by urologists.

  19. Targeting α-synuclein: Therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Dehay, Benjamin; Decressac, Mickael; Bourdenx, Mathieu; Guadagnino, Irene; Fernagut, Pierre-Olivier; Tamburrino, Anna; Bassil, Fares; Meissner, Wassilios G; Bezard, Erwan

    2016-06-01

    The discovery of the central role of α-synuclein (αSyn) in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) has powered, in the last decade, the emergence of novel relevant models of this condition based on viral vector-mediated expression of the disease-causing protein or inoculation of toxic species of αSyn. Although the development of these powerful tools and models has provided considerable insights into the mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in PD, it has also been translated into the expansion of the landscape of preclinical therapeutic strategies. Much attention is now brought to the proteotoxic mechanisms induced by αSyn and how to block them using strategies inspired by intrinsic cellular pathways such as the enhancement of cellular clearance by the lysosomal-autophagic system, through proteasome-mediated degradation or through immunization. The important effort undertaken by several laboratories and consortia to tackle these issues and identify novel targets warrants great promise for the discovery not only of neuroprotective approaches but also of restorative strategies for PD and other synucleinopathies. In this viewpoint, we summarize the latest advances in this new area of PD research and will discuss promising approaches and ongoing challenges. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:26926119

  20. Therapeutic options for the management of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Maria L; Rehman, Azeem A; Gondi, Christopher S

    2014-01-01

    Since its initial characterization, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma has remained one of the most devastating and difficult cancers to treat. Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States, resulting in an estimated 38460 deaths annually. With few screening tools available to detect this disease at an early stage, 94% of patients will die within five years of diagnosis. Despite decades of research that have led to a better understanding of the molecular and cellular signaling pathways in pancreatic cancer cells, few effective therapies have been developed to target these pathways. Other treatment options have included more sophisticated pancreatic cancer surgeries and combination therapies. While outcomes have improved modestly for these patients, more effective treatments are desperately needed. One of the greatest challenges in the future of treating this malignancy will be to develop therapies that target the tumor microenvironment and surrounding pancreatic cancer stem cells in addition to pancreatic cancer cells. Recent advances in targeting pancreatic stellate cells and the stroma have encouraged researchers to shift their focus to the role of desmoplasia in pancreatic cancer pathobiology in the hopes of developing newer-generation therapies. By combining novel agents with current cytotoxic chemotherapies and radiation therapy and personalizing them to each patient based on specific biomarkers, the goal of prolonging a patient’s life could be achieved. Here we review the most effective therapies that have been used for the treatment of pancreatic cancer and discuss the future potential of therapeutic options. PMID:25170201

  1. Therapeutic options in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Jaspreet S

    2009-01-01

    Current theraputic options for the treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) are reviewed. Therapeutic options for mild lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), as defined by the American Urological Association, are generally treated medically. Moderate to severe LUTS can be treated medically or with surgical therapy. Current medical and surgical treatments for LUTS secondary to BPH are reviewed and evolving treatments are explored. PMID:19936164

  2. Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis: Therapeutic Options and Surveillance Management

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Aditi; Wheatley, Daniel; Puttanna, Amar

    2016-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis is a chronic immune-mediated liver disease. Though rare, it poses several clinical concerns for the managing physician. There are currently limited therapeutic options in the management of the condition and weak evidence base behind them. Endoscopic intervention is limited to those patients with obstructing stricture-related disease, and even liver transplantation has a risk of disease recurrence. Surveillance for inflammatory bowel disorders, metabolic bone disease, and malignancy is paramount when managing such patients. This article provides an overview of the condition with further focus on current therapeutic options and guidance on surveillance management. PMID:27330336

  3. Stem cells as promising therapeutic options for neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jongman; Kim, Han-Soo; Hwang, Dong-Youn

    2013-04-01

    Due to the limitations of pharmacological and other current therapeutic strategies, stem cell therapies have emerged as promising options for treating many incurable neurologic diseases. A variety of stem cells including pluripotent stem cells (i.e., embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells) and multipotent adult stem cells (i.e., fetal brain tissue, neural stem cells, and mesenchymal stem cells from various sources) have been explored as therapeutic options for treating many neurologic diseases, and it is becoming obvious that each type of stem cell has pros and cons as a source for cell therapy. Wise selection of stem cells with regard to the nature and status of neurologic dysfunctions is required to achieve optimal therapeutic efficacy. To this aim, the stem cell-mediated therapeutic efforts on four major neurological diseases, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and stroke, will be introduced, and current problems and future directions will be discussed.

  4. Therapeutic options in idiopathic burning mouth syndrome: literature review.

    PubMed

    Miziara, Ivan; Chagury, Azis; Vargas, Camila; Freitas, Ludmila; Mahmoud, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is characterized by a burning sensation in the tongue, palate, lips, or gums of no well-defined etiology. The diagnosis and treatment for primary BMS are controversial. No specific laboratory tests or diagnostic criteria are well established, and the diagnosis is made by excluding all other possible disorders. Objective To review the literature on the main treatment options in idiopathic BMS and compare the best results of the main studies in 15 years. Data Synthesis We conducted a literature review on PubMed/MEDLINE, SciELO, and Cochrane-BIREME of work in the past 15 years, and only selected studies comparing different therapeutic options in idiopathic BMS, with preference for randomized and double-blind controlled studies. Final Comments Topical clonazepam showed good short-term results for the relief of pain, although this was not presented as a definitive cure. Similarly, α-lipoic acid showed good results, but there are few randomized controlled studies that showed the long-term results and complete remission of symptoms. On the other hand, cognitive therapy is reported as a good and lasting therapeutic option with the advantage of not having side effects, and it can be combined with pharmacologic therapy. PMID:25992157

  5. Therapeutic Options in Idiopathic Burning Mouth Syndrome: Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Miziara, Ivan; Chagury, Azis; Vargas, Camila; Freitas, Ludmila; Mahmoud, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is characterized by a burning sensation in the tongue, palate, lips, or gums of no well-defined etiology. The diagnosis and treatment for primary BMS are controversial. No specific laboratory tests or diagnostic criteria are well established, and the diagnosis is made by excluding all other possible disorders. Objective To review the literature on the main treatment options in idiopathic BMS and compare the best results of the main studies in 15 years. Data Synthesis We conducted a literature review on PubMed/MEDLINE, SciELO, and Cochrane-BIREME of work in the past 15 years, and only selected studies comparing different therapeutic options in idiopathic BMS, with preference for randomized and double-blind controlled studies. Final Comments Topical clonazepam showed good short-term results for the relief of pain, although this was not presented as a definitive cure. Similarly, α-lipoic acid showed good results, but there are few randomized controlled studies that showed the long-term results and complete remission of symptoms. On the other hand, cognitive therapy is reported as a good and lasting therapeutic option with the advantage of not having side effects, and it can be combined with pharmacologic therapy. PMID:25992157

  6. Fetal cardiac interventions: an update of therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2014-01-01

    Objective This article aims to present updated therapeutic options for fetal congenital heart diseases. Methods Data source for the present study was based on comprehensive literature retrieval on fetal cardiac interventions in terms of indications, technical approaches and clinical outcomes. Results About 5% of fetal congenital heart diseases are critical and timely intrauterine intervention may alleviate heart function. Candidates for fetal cardiac interventions are limited. These candidates may include critical aortic valve stenosis with evolving hypoplastic left heart syndrome, pulmonary atresia with an intact ventricular septum and evolving hypoplastic right heart syndrome, and hypoplastic left heart syndrome with an intact or highly restrictive atrial septum as well as fetal heart block. The advocated option are prenatal aortic valvuloplasty, pulmonary valvuloplasty, creation of atrial communication and fetal cardiac pacing. Conclusion Fetal cardiac interventions are feasible at midgestation with gradually improved technical success and fetal/postnatal survival due mainly to a well-trained multidisciplinary team, sophisticated equipment and better postnatal care. PMID:25372914

  7. [Monoclonal antibodies, overview and outlook of a promising therapeutic option].

    PubMed

    Herschel, Tom; El-Armouche, Ali; Weber, Silvio

    2016-09-01

    Rising numbers of approved monoclonal antibodies for cancer, autoimmune and cardiovascular disease treatment underline the growing importance of this therapeutic option which has been discovered in the late 19th century. However, clinical trials and commercial use started in the late 20th century. The specific mode of action and clinical advantages over standard strategies signify a big step forward not only in terms of treating cancer but various other diseases like psoriasis and multiple sclerosis. New developments in the field of biologicals raise hope for an even broader scope of applications and options for currently untreatable diseases. The following article summarizes the historical development, the status-quo of clinical approvement and current development of monoclonal antibody therapy. PMID:27642741

  8. New therapeutic options for actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sligh, James E

    2014-06-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK) is a common premalignant skin lesion that is frequently treated by cryosurgery. Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignancy of man, and early-stage lesions are usually cured via surgery. Advanced basal cell carcinoma may require more extensive surgery resulting in deformity, and many advanced lesions cannot be treated surgically. Several recent developments have improved therapeutic options for both conditions. Cryosurgery is still a mainstay of treatment for AK, but the introduction of effective topical agents, imiquimod cream and ingenol mebutate, has provided alternatives to cryosurgery. For advanced basal cell carcinoma, the small-molecule inhibitor vismodegib has proven to be an effective therapy for lesions that are not amenable to surgery and has demonstrated ability to achieve dramatic improvement in advanced, potentially disfiguring cancer. PMID:25268601

  9. [Acute coronary syndrome and cancer: which therapeutic option first?].

    PubMed

    Vicinelli, Paolo; Martinoni, Alessandro; Villani, Camillo; Zuccari, Marco; Morra, Sergio; Di Credico, Germano; D'Urbano, Maurizio

    2015-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease and cancer are the leading causes of mortality worldwide. We report our experience in a cancer patient with acute coronary syndrome successfully treated by hybrid revascularization, i.e. off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting, followed by surgical removal of the tumor and percutaneous coronary intervention. The concomitant presence of cancer and acute coronary syndrome is not rare, ranging from 1.9% to 4.2%. Usually, the most life-threatening disease should be treated first, more frequently coronary artery disease. There are several therapeutic approaches to patients with cancer and coronary artery disease and cancer, including percutaneous coronary intervention, surgical treatment of cancer, or coronary artery bypass grafting. Each of these options should consider the severity of cardiac disease, the stage of malignancy and the clinical conditions of the patient.

  10. Inner ear symptoms and disease: Pathophysiological understanding and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Ciuman, Raphael R.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, huge advances have taken place in understanding of inner ear pathophysiology causing sensorineural hearing loss, tinnitus, and vertigo. Advances in understanding comprise biochemical and physiological research of stimulus perception and conduction, inner ear homeostasis, and hereditary diseases with underlying genetics. This review describes and tabulates the various causes of inner ear disease and defines inner ear and non-inner ear causes of hearing loss, tinnitus, and vertigo. The aim of this review was to comprehensively breakdown this field of otorhinolaryngology for specialists and non-specialists and to discuss current therapeutic options in distinct diseases and promising research for future therapies, especially pharmaceutic, genetic, or stem cell therapy. PMID:24362017

  11. Current Therapeutic Options in Sturge-Weber Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Comi, Anne

    2015-12-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome is a vascular malformation syndrome consisting of a facial port-wine birthmark associated with malformed leptomeningeal blood vessels and a choroid "angioma" of the eye. It is a rare neurocutaneous disorder that occurs sporadically, is not inherited, and is caused by a somatic mosaic mutation in GNAQ. In patients with Sturge-Weber syndrome, brain involvement typically presents in infancy with seizures, strokes, and stroke-like episodes, and a range of neurologic impairments. Standard treatment includes laser therapy for the birthmark, control of glaucoma through eyedrops or surgery, and the use of anticonvulsants. Increasingly low-dose aspirin is offered. Treatment with propranolol has been tried generally without the dramatic results seen in hemangiomas. Treatment with an anticonvulsant or low-dose aspirin or both before the onset of seizures is an option. Surgical resection may be offered to those whose seizures are medically refractory. Endocrine, medical rehabilitation and cognitive comorbidities are important to manage. In the future, new therapeutic options are likely to be offered stemming from preclinical studies and small pilot clinical trials currently ongoing. Discovery of the causative somatic mosaic mutation suggests new insights into the pathophysiology of this vascular malformation disorder, and potential novel treatment strategies for future study. The mutation results in constitutive overactivation of the Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK and the HIPPO-YAP pathways and inhibitors of these pathways may in the future prove useful in the treatment of Sturge-Weber syndrome. PMID:26706016

  12. Current Therapeutic Options in Sturge-Weber Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Comi, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome is a vascular malformation syndrome consisting of a facial port-wine birthmark associated with malformed leptomeningeal blood vessels and a choroid “angioma” of the eye. It is a rare neurocutaneous disorder that occurs sporadically, is not inherited, and is caused by a somatic mosaic mutation in GNAQ. In patients with Sturge-Weber syndrome, brain involvement typically presents in infancy with seizures, strokes, and stroke-like episodes, and a range of neurologic impairments. Standard treatment includes laser therapy for the birthmark, control of glaucoma through eyedrops or surgery, and the use of anticonvulsants. Increasingly low-dose aspirin is offered. Treatment with propranolol has been tried generally without the dramatic results seen in hemangiomas. Treatment with an anticonvulsant or low-dose aspirin or both before the onset of seizures is an option. Surgical resection may be offered to those whose seizures are medically refractory. Endocrine, medical rehabilitation and cognitive comorbidities are important to manage. In the future, new therapeutic options are likely to be offered stemming from preclinical studies and small pilot clinical trials currently ongoing. Discovery of the causative somatic mosaic mutation suggests new insights into the pathophysiology of this vascular malformation disorder, and potential novel treatment strategies for future study. The mutation results in constitutive overactivation of the Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK and the HIPPO-YAP pathways and inhibitors of these pathways may in the future prove useful in the treatment of Sturge-Weber syndrome. PMID:26706016

  13. Hepatitis C virus: molecular biology & current therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suresh D

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a small (approximately 55 to 65 nm), spherical, enveloped, hepatotropic RNA virus that causes acute and chronic hepatitis in humans. Persistent virus infection with HCV often leads to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). At present there is neither a selective antiviral therapy nor a preventive vaccine. The only available treatment option is a long-acting pegylated-interferon-alpha, given in combination with nucleoside analog ribavirin, which is not very effective. Molecular studies of HCV began with the successful cloning of its genome in 1989. For many years, research to develop therapeutics was stalled by the inability to grow virus in tissue culture. A major milestone was achieved with the recent development of a robust cell culture system for HCV propagation. HCV proteins assemble and form replication complexes on modified host membranes, called as membranous webs. Even though HCV is detected and targeted by host immune mechanisms, it establishes and maintains a life-long persistent infection. HCV has evolved multiple strategies to survive and persist in hostile cellular environments; and the viral population is known to rapidly change during the course of a natural infection thereby escaping immune surveillance. Rapid mutations also help virus to survive by selecting for the variants which are resistant to antiviral drugs. Although precise mechanisms regulating HCV entry into hepatic cells via receptors remain unknown, HCV also has the capability of direct cell-to-cell transmission. The extremely complex and incompletely understood nature of the HCV lifecycle has complicated the discovery of new therapies. A complete understanding of the functional roles played by the HCV proteins during HCV lifecycle is vital for developing a successful cure. This review deals with current status of efforts in addressing these daunting tasks and challenges in developing therapeutics against chronic and rapidly changing hepatitis C virus

  14. Polycystic ovary syndrome and metabolic comorbidities: therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    De Leo, V; Musacchio, M C; Palermo, V; Di Sabatino, A; Morgante, G; Petraglia, F

    2009-10-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinopathy in women and the most common cause of anovulatory infertility, affecting 5-10% of the population. Approximately 60-70% of PCOS patients are obese. Although it is well known that obesity is associated with insulin resistance, most studies have shown that impaired insulin sensitivity is present without obesity. Hyper-insulinemia associated with insulin resistance has been causally linked to all features of the syndrome, such as hyperandrogenism, reproductive disorders, acne, hirsutism and metabolic disturbances. PCOS patients often have an atherogenic lipid profile and increased incidence of cardiovascular risk factors and type 2 diabetes. It has been demonstrated that by reducing hyper-insulinemia, insulin-lowering agents might improve endocrine and reproductive abnormalities in PCOS patients, and have numerous beneficial effects on multiple cardiovascular risk factors in PCOS. Metformin is currently the preferred insulin-sensitizing drug for chronic treatment of PCOS and has been shown to improve the metabolic profile, menstrual cyclicity and fertility in women with PCOS, and is associated with weight loss. In this review the metabolic comorbidities of PCOS and their therapeutic options are discussed.

  15. Transcriptome Sequencing of Tumor Subpopulations Reveals a Spectrum of Therapeutic Options for Squamous Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Christian L.; Schwab, Richard B.; Jung, HyunChul; Crain, Brian; Goff, Daniel J.; Jamieson, Catriona H. M.; Thistlethwaite, Patricia A.; Harismendy, Olivier; Carson, Dennis A.; Frazer, Kelly A.

    2013-01-01

    Background The only therapeutic options that exist for squamous cell lung carcinoma (SCC) are standard radiation and cytotoxic chemotherapy. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are hypothesized to account for therapeutic resistance, suggesting that CSCs must be specifically targeted. Here, we analyze the transcriptome of CSC and non-CSC subpopulations by RNA-seq to identify new potential therapeutic strategies for SCC. Methods We sorted a SCC into CD133− and CD133+ subpopulations and then examined both by copy number analysis (CNA) and whole genome and transcriptome sequencing. We analyzed The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) transcriptome data of 221 SCCs to determine the generality of our observations. Results Both subpopulations highly expressed numerous mRNA isoforms whose protein products are active drug targets for other cancers; 31 (25%) correspond to 18 genes under active investigation as mAb targets and an additional 4 (3%) are of therapeutic interest. Moreover, we found evidence that both subpopulations were proliferatively driven by very high levels of c-Myc and the TRAIL long isoform (TRAILL) and that normal apoptotic responses to high expression of these genes was prevented through high levels of Mcl-1L and Bcl-xL and c-FlipL—isoforms for which drugs are now in clinical development. SCC RNA-seq data (n = 221) from TCGA supported our findings. Our analysis is inconsistent with the CSC concept that most cells in a cancer have lost their proliferative potential. Furthermore, our study suggests how to target both the CSC and non-CSC subpopulations with one treatment strategy. Conclusions Our study is relevant to SCC in particular for it presents numerous potential options to standard therapy that target the entire tumor. In so doing, it demonstrates how transcriptome sequencing provides insights into the molecular underpinnings of cancer propagating cells that, importantly, can be leveraged to identify new potential therapeutic options for cancers beyond what is

  16. Management of hepatitis delta: Need for novel therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Zaigham; Abbas, Minaam

    2015-08-28

    Hepatitis D virus (HDV) is the smallest single stranded RNA virus infecting humans. The hepatitis B surface antigen envelope protein protects the HDV nucleocapsid antigen and provides a means for the virus to enter and exit the hepatocyte. Hepatitis B and D viruses exploit the human sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP), a receptor, for their entry into hepatocytes. Prenylation of the large delta antigen is a critical determinant of HDV particle assembly. Treatment with pegylated interferon results in sustained virological response six months post-treatment in one fourth of the patients. Nucleos(t)ide analogs (NAs) have been widely tested in hepatitis delta, but they appear to be ineffective. Combination treatment of NAs with interferon also proved to be disappointing so there is a need for novel therapeutic options. The receptor function of NTCP is blocked by Myrcludex B, a synthetic N-acylated preS1 lipopeptide that competes with infectious virions for receptor binding. There are already some approved drugs available, including irbesartan, ezetimibe, and ritonavir and cyclosporin A, with documented inhibitory effects on NTCP's metabolic function. These drugs may have a role in HDV treatment. Interference with host-mediated post-translational changes of proteins that are crucial to the HDV life cycle, such as prenylation may become an important tool to control HDV infection and prevent replication. Lonafarnib, a prenylation inhibitor significantly reduces virus levels in hepatitis delta patients. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides which are complementary to genomic HDV ribozyme self-cleavage site and stem I regions can inhibit genomic HDV ribozyme activity.

  17. 45 CFR 1306.36 - Additional Head Start program option variations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional Head Start program option variations..., YOUTH AND FAMILIES, HEAD START PROGRAM HEAD START STAFFING REQUIREMENTS AND PROGRAM OPTIONS Head Start Program Options § 1306.36 Additional Head Start program option variations. In addition to the...

  18. 45 CFR 1306.36 - Additional Head Start program option variations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional Head Start program option variations..., YOUTH AND FAMILIES, HEAD START PROGRAM HEAD START STAFFING REQUIREMENTS AND PROGRAM OPTIONS Head Start Program Options § 1306.36 Additional Head Start program option variations. In addition to the...

  19. 45 CFR 1306.36 - Additional Head Start program option variations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional Head Start program option variations..., YOUTH AND FAMILIES, HEAD START PROGRAM HEAD START STAFFING REQUIREMENTS AND PROGRAM OPTIONS Head Start Program Options § 1306.36 Additional Head Start program option variations. In addition to the...

  20. 45 CFR 1306.36 - Additional Head Start program option variations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional Head Start program option variations..., YOUTH AND FAMILIES, HEAD START PROGRAM HEAD START STAFFING REQUIREMENTS AND PROGRAM OPTIONS Head Start Program Options § 1306.36 Additional Head Start program option variations. In addition to the...

  1. Attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder: a therapeutic option

    PubMed Central

    Topczewski, Abram

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the use of a therapeutic regimen to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder patients. Methods A total of 140 patients initially underwent physical, neurological and laboratory evaluation. Thereafter, treatment was initiated with a compounding product consisting of a tricyclic antidepressant and an anxiolytic. Results The response was positive in 71.43% of patients in controlling hyperactivity and improving dispersion and attention deficit. Conclusion The therapeutic regimen utilized proved to be an effective therapeutic alternative, especially for patients who do not adapt to psychostimulant drugs. PMID:25295451

  2. Emerging therapeutic options for sporadic inclusion body myositis

    PubMed Central

    Alfano, Lindsay N; Lowes, Linda P

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic inclusion body myositis is the most common inflammatory muscle disorder preferentially affecting males over the age of 40 years. Progressive muscle weakness of the finger flexors and quadriceps muscles results in loss of independence with activities of daily living and eventual wheelchair dependence. Initial signs of disease are often overlooked and can lead to mis- or delayed diagnosis. The underlying cause of disease is unknown, and disease progression appears refractory to available treatment options. This review discusses the clinical presentation of inclusion body myositis and the current efforts in diagnosis, and focuses on the current state of research for both nonpharmacological and pharmacological treatment options for this patient group. PMID:26445546

  3. Therapeutic options in coronary artery disease: Focusing on the guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Leonard

    2009-01-01

    There are three options for the treatment of patients with coronary artery disease: coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and optimal medical treatment alone. While there has been an active interface between CABG and PCI, medical treatment has not been as vociferously advocated. However, it performs well in randomized trials and is still a treatment arm in studies such as the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) trial. The present review compares these options in acute and chronic coronary syndromes, including the indications for each as summarized by recent American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association guidelines. While the landscape in Canada is changing for CABG and PCI, with an increase in the latter procedure for patients with multivessel disease, optimal medical treatment alone is very effective. There are few subsets, particularly in chronic syndromes, in which revascularization is indicated for prognosis alone. PMID:19148338

  4. Lactic acid bacteria as mucosal delivery vehicles: a realistic therapeutic option.

    PubMed

    Wang, Miao; Gao, Zeqian; Zhang, Yongguang; Pan, Li

    2016-07-01

    Recombinant lactic acid bacteria (LAB), in particular lactococci and lactobacilli, have gained increasing interest as mucosal delivery vehicles in recent years. With the development of mucosal vaccines, studies on LAB expression systems have been mainly focused on the generation of genetic tools for antigen expression in different locations. Recombinant LAB show advantages in a wide range of aspects over other mucosal delivery systems and represent an attractive candidate for the delivery of therapeutic and prophylactic molecules in different applications. Here, we review the recent data on the use of recombinant LAB as mucosal delivery vectors and the associated health benefits, including the prevention and treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), autoimmune disorders, and infections by pathogenic microorganisms from mucosal surfaces. In addition, we discuss the use of LAB as vehicles to deliver DNA directly to eukaryotic cells. Researches from the last 5 years demonstrate that LAB as vectors for mucosal delivery of therapeutic molecules seem to be a realistic therapeutic option both in human and animal diseases.

  5. Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita: From Pathophysiology to Novel Therapeutic Options.

    PubMed

    Kasperkiewicz, Michael; Sadik, Christian D; Bieber, Katja; Ibrahim, Saleh M; Manz, Rudolf A; Schmidt, Enno; Zillikens, Detlef; Ludwig, Ralf J

    2016-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is a prototypic organ-specific autoimmune disease induced by autoantibodies to type VII collagen causing mucocutaneous blisters. In the inflammatory (bullous pemphigoid-like) EBA variant, autoantibody binding is followed by a lesional inflammatory cell infiltration, and the overall clinical picture may be indistinguishable from that of bullous pemphigoid, the latter being the most common autoimmune bullous disease. The last decade witnessed the development of several mouse models of inflammatory EBA that facilitated the elucidation of the pathogenesis of autoantibody-induced, cell-mediated subepidermal blistering diseases and identified new therapeutic targets for these and possibly other autoantibody-driven disorders. PMID:26763420

  6. Molecular Targets and Emerging Therapeutic Options for Uterine Leiomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Heather; Ike, Chiemeka; Parma, Jennifer; Masand, Ramya P.; Mach, Claire M.

    2016-01-01

    Uterine leiomyosarcoma (uLMS) is an aggressive malignancy characterized by its early metastasis, high rates of recurrence, and poor prognosis. Multiple obstacles complicate the clinical management of uLMS. These include the fact that most uLMS are typically identified only after a woman has undergone hysterectomy or myomectomy, the limited efficacy of adjuvant therapy for early stage disease, and the poor response of metastatic disease to current treatments. Here, we discuss recent insights into the molecular basis of uLMS and discuss emerging options for its clinical management. Particular attention is given to the biologic basis of these strategies with the goal of understanding the rationale motivating their use. PMID:27721667

  7. Current and Novel Therapeutic Options for Irritable Bowel Syndrome Management

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael; Andresen, Viola

    2009-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder affecting up to 3-15% of the general population in western countries. It is characterized by unexplained abdominal pain, discomfort, and bloating in association with altered bowel habits. The pathophysiology of IBS is multifactorial involving disturbances of the brain-gut-axis. The pathophysiology provides the rationale for pharmacotherapy: abnormal gastrointestinal motor functions, visceral hypersensitivity, psychosocial factors, autonomic dysfunction, and mucosal immune activation. Understanding the mechanisms, and their mediators or modulators including neurotransmitters and receptors have led to several therapeutic approaches including agents acting on the serotonin receptor or serotonin transporter system, antidepressants, novel selective anticholinergics, α-adrenergic agonists, opioid agents, cholecystokinin-antagonists, neurokinin-antagonists, somatostatin receptor agonists, corticotropin releasing factor antagonists, chloride-channel activators, guanylate-cyclase-c agonists, melatonin, atypical benzodiazepines, antibiotics, immune modulators and probiotics. The mechanisms and current evidence regarding efficacy of these agents are reviewed. PMID:19665953

  8. Treating seborrheic dermatitis: review of mechanisms and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Neal

    2013-07-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is one of those conditions that dermatologists and patients alike tend to find a routine for, and in many cases those routines are hard to break. And, unlike the new treatment paradigms for eczema, acne, and even actinic keratoses, combination therapies for addressing the disease process typically have not been a part of the approach to treating seborrheic dermatitis. However, with the advent of new therapies and vehicles as well as a better understanding of how neutrophils and free oxygen radicals impact inflammation,1 there are new options to maintain and control the disease process of seborrheic dermatitis to minimize flares. Although the needs of the scalp, face and chest are different, as are the variations in skin types, the fundamental mechanisms of the inflammatory process are often the same. If it is understood that seborrheic dermatitis is histologically classified as a papulosquamous disorder with paucineutrophilic and lymphocytic infiltrates, and if the trigger and etiologic agent most likely is Malassezia furfur, then the ideal mechanisms of action of therapies should be directed as such

  9. The potential for emerging therapeutic options for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Harsh; Rea, Mary C; Cotter, Paul D; Ross, R Paul; Hill, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is mainly a nosocomial pathogen and is a significant cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. It is also implicated in the majority of cases of pseudomembranous colitis. Recently, advancements in next generation sequencing technology (NGS) have highlighted the extent of damage to the gut microbiota caused by broad-spectrum antibiotics, often resulting in C. difficile infection (CDI). Currently the treatment of choice for CDI involves the use of metronidazole and vancomycin. However, recurrence and relapse of CDI, even after rounds of metronidazole/vancomycin administration is a problem that must be addressed. The efficacy of alternative antibiotics such as fidaxomicin, rifaximin, nitazoxanide, ramoplanin and tigecycline, as well as faecal microbiota transplantation has been assessed and some have yielded positive outcomes against C. difficile. Some bacteriocins have also shown promising effects against C. difficile in recent years. In light of this, the potential for emerging treatment options and efficacy of anti-C. difficile vaccines are discussed in this review. PMID:25564777

  10. The potential for emerging therapeutic options for Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Harsh; Rea, Mary C; Cotter, Paul D; Ross, R Paul; Hill, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is mainly a nosocomial pathogen and is a significant cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. It is also implicated in the majority of cases of pseudomembranous colitis. Recently, advancements in next generation sequencing technology (NGS) have highlighted the extent of damage to the gut microbiota caused by broad-spectrum antibiotics, often resulting in C. difficile infection (CDI). Currently the treatment of choice for CDI involves the use of metronidazole and vancomycin. However, recurrence and relapse of CDI, even after rounds of metronidazole/vancomycin administration is a problem that must be addressed. The efficacy of alternative antibiotics such as fidaxomicin, rifaximin, nitazoxanide, ramoplanin and tigecycline, as well as faecal microbiota transplantation has been assessed and some have yielded positive outcomes against C. difficile. Some bacteriocins have also shown promising effects against C. difficile in recent years. In light of this, the potential for emerging treatment options and efficacy of anti-C. difficile vaccines are discussed in this review. PMID:25564777

  11. Newer therapeutic options for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kuitwaard, Krista; van Doorn, Pieter A

    2009-05-29

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an immune-mediated disorder with variable symptoms and severity that can be difficult to diagnose. Intravenous immunoglobulin, plasma exchange and corticosteroids have all been proven to be beneficial in randomized controlled trials, although the proof for corticosteroids is less clear. Although these treatments are likely to be similar in efficacy, they differ in terms of their cost, availability and adverse effects. These characteristics should be taken into account when deciding which treatment to offer a patient. If there is no response to the first treatment option, one of the other treatments should be tried. Patients with a pure motor CIDP may deteriorate after corticosteroid treatment. Some patients do not respond or become refractory or intolerant to these conventional treatments. Those who become unresponsive to therapy should be checked again for the appearance of a monoclonal protein or other signs of malignancy. Over the years, small non-randomized studies have reported possible beneficial effects of various immunosuppressive agents. A Cochrane review concluded that currently there is insufficient evidence to decide whether these immunosuppressive drugs are beneficial in CIDP. When giving immunosuppressive drugs, one should be aware that some might even cause demyelinating disease. It is difficult to prove beneficial effects of these newer treatments since they have only been used in small groups of patients, who are refractory to other treatments, and often in combination with other treatments. CIDP patients can deteriorate during or after infections or improve spontaneously, making it more difficult to judge treatment efficacy. Various treatments for CIDP are described such as azathioprine, ciclosporin, cyclophosphamide, interferons, methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil, rituximab and etanercept. An overview of these newer treatments, their mode of action, adverse effects and

  12. Sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease: many causes, few therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Diederich, Nico J; McIntyre, Deborah J

    2012-03-15

    Sleep symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) are frequent and have multifactorial and multilayered causes. Primary involvement of sleep/wake regulating centers in the brainstem, sleep problems caused by the nocturnal manifestation of motor and dysautonomic signs and medication-induced sleep problems are often impossible to disentangle in the individual patient. Two syndromes, hypersomnia and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD), are increasingly recognized as harbingers of the core PD motor syndrome. RBD, associated with a panoply of other nonmotor symptoms, may predispose to a specific PD phenotype. Long-acting dopaminergic stimulation, when abating nocturnal akinesia, also improves subjective sleep quantity. While this strategy is backed up by several randomized controlled trials (RCT), other treatment recommendations are mostly based on case series or expert opinion. Thus we identified only two other RCT, one treating insomnia with eszopiclone, the other nocturnal behavioral abnormalities in demented PD patients with memantine. While the causal complexity of sleep problems in PD certainly hampers the design of therapeutic studies, multiple general treatment strategies against sleep disorders can however be applied efficiently in PD patients as well.

  13. Therapeutic Options for Controlling Fluids in the Visual System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Kristina M.; Wotring, Virginia E.

    2014-01-01

    Visual Impairment/Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) is a newly recognized risk at NASA. The VIIP project examines the effect of long-term exposure to microgravity on vision of crewmembers before and after they return to Earth. Diamox (acetazolamide) is a medication which is used to decrease intraocular pressure; however, it carries a 3% risk of kidney stones. Astronauts are at a higher risk of kidney stones during spaceflight and the use Diamox would only increase the risk; therefore alternative therapies were investigated. Histamine 2 (H2) antagonist acid blockers such as cimetidine, ranitidine, famotidine and nizatidine are typically used to relieve the symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). H2 receptors have been found in the human visual system, which has led to research on the use of H2 antagonist blockers to control fluid production in the human eye. Another potential therapeutic strategy is targeted at aquaporins, which are water channels that help maintain fluid homeostasis. Aquaporin antagonists are also known to affect intracranial pressure which can in turn alter intraocular pressure. Studies on aquaporin antagonists suggest high potential for effective treatment. The primary objective of this investigation is to review existing research on alternate medications or therapy to significantly reduce intracranial and intraocular pressure. A literature review was conducted. Even though we do not have all the answers quite yet, a considerable amount of information was discovered, and findings were narrowed, which should allow for more conclusive answers to be found in the near future.

  14. Endovascular Therapeutic Options for Isolated Iliac Aneurysms with a Working Classification

    SciTech Connect

    Fahrni, Markus; Lachat, Mario M; Wildermuth, Simon; Pfammatter, Thomas

    2003-09-15

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a variety of stent-grafting and embolization techniques and describe a new classification for endovascular treatment of isolated iliac artery aneurysms. A total of 19 patients were treated for isolated iliac aneurysms. Depending on the proximal iliac neck and the uni-/bilaterality of common iliac artery aneurysms (CIAA's) the patient may be treated by a tube (Type Ia) or a bifurcated stent-graft (Type Ib) in addition to internal iliac artery embolization. Neck anatomy is also critical in determining therapeutical options for internal iliac artery aneurysms (IIAA's). These are tube stent-grafting plus internal iliac branch embolization (Type IIa), coiling of afferent and efferent internal iliac vessels (Type IIb) and IIAA packing (Type IIc). The average length of stay for these procedures was 3.8 days. During the mean follow-up of 20.9 months, aneurysm size remained unchanged in all but 4 patients. Reinterventions were necessary in option Type Ib (3/8 pat.) and Type Ia (1/7 pat.) due to extender stent-graft migration (n = 2) or reperfusion leaks (n 2). We conclude that Iliac artery aneurysms may be successfully and safely treated by a tailored approach using embolization or a combination of embolization and stent-grafting. Long-term CT imaging follow-up is necessary, particularly in patients treated with bifurcated stent-grafts (Type Ib)

  15. [Adult Refsum disease. A retinal dystrophy with therapeutic options].

    PubMed

    Rüther, K

    2005-08-01

    Adult Refsum disease is one of the few forms of tapetoretinal degenerations accessible for therapy. The disease is characterized by an elevated plasma phytanic acid level and high concentrations of phytanic acid in a variety tissues. Beside tapetoretinal degeneration, additional symptoms are chronic polyneuropathy, cerebellar ataxia, sensorineural hearing loss, anosmia, ichthyosis, skeletal malformations, and cardiac abnormalities. A diet low in phytanic acid leads to an amelioration of polyneuropathy and ataxia and slows or even stops the other manifestations. This beneficial effect of dietary precautions requires the need to get hold of as much patients as possible but better all of them. The ophthalmologist plays a crucial role to this end because of the early manifestation of the tapetoretinal degeneration. A delay of 11 years between the appearance of first symptoms and the diagnosis of Refsum disease, as reported in the literature, is not acceptable.

  16. Obesity and Asthma in Children: Current and Future Therapeutic Options

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    With the childhood prevalence of obesity and asthma increasing, it is important for pediatric professionals to appreciate that obesity modifies the diagnosis and management of asthma. These disease modifications present challenges to clinical management, including decreased responsiveness to controller therapy and decreased quality-of-life compared to normal weight asthmatic children. While consensus guidelines do not currently suggest specific changes in asthma management for obese patients, management of some patients may be improved with consideration of the latest evidence. This Current Opinion article briefly summarizes what is known regarding the complex relationship between obesity and asthma in children, and discusses practical issues associated with the diagnosis and effective clinical management of asthma in obese children. On average, obese patients with asthma do not respond as well to inhaled corticosteroid therapy. Management approaches including weight loss and routine exercise are safe, and may improve important asthma outcomes. Asthma providers should learn to facilitate weight loss for their obese patients. In addition, pharmacologic interventions for weight loss in obese asthma, though not currently recommended, may soon be considered. PMID:24604125

  17. Esophageal GIST: case report of surgical enucleation and update on current diagnostic and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Portale, Giuseppe; Zaninotto, Giovanni; Costantini, Mario; Rugge, Massimo; Pennelli, Gian Maria; Rampado, Sabrina; Bocus, Paolo; Ancona, Ermanno

    2007-10-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, but they have been rarely reported in the esophagus. The authors present the case of an esophageal GIST and discuss the diagnostic course and therapeutic options, as currently reported in the literature.

  18. Transcatheter device closure of pseudoaneurysms of the left ventricular wall: An emerging therapeutic option.

    PubMed

    Madan, Tarun; Juneja, Manish; Raval, Abhishek; Thakkar, Bhavesh

    2016-02-01

    Left ventricular pseudoaneurysm is a rare but serious complication of acute myocardial infarction and cardiac surgery. While surgical intervention is the conventional therapeutic option, transcatheter closure can be considered in selected patients with suitable morphology of the pseudoaneurysm. We report a case of successful transcatheter closure of a left ventricular pseudoaneurysm orifice and isolation of the sac using an Amplatzer septal occluder.

  19. [Inner Ear Hearing Loss Part II: Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss, Therapeutic Options].

    PubMed

    Hesse, Gerhard

    2016-07-01

    The great majority of hearing disorders generates from pathologies in the inner ear, mainly the outer hair cells, as mentioned in the first part of this review. Very often, however, hearing loss appears suddenly and even without external causes like noise exposure. This sudden hearing loss is mostly unilateral, recovers very often spontaneously and should be treated, if persisting. Only in this acute stage there are therapeutic options available. If the inner ear hearing loss is chronic there is no curative therapy, an effective management of the hearing disorder is only possible through rehabilitation. This is due to the fact, that hair cells of all mammals, incl. humans, have no regenerative capacity and neither pharmaceutic agents nor other means can induce regeneration and recovery of hair cells. Even a gen-therapy is not available yet. In the second part of this review the main focus lies in sudden hearing loss and general therapeutic options for inner ear hearing loss. PMID:27392187

  20. [Inner Ear Hearing Loss Part II: Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss, Therapeutic Options].

    PubMed

    Hesse, Gerhard

    2016-07-01

    The great majority of hearing disorders generates from pathologies in the inner ear, mainly the outer hair cells, as mentioned in the first part of this review. Very often, however, hearing loss appears suddenly and even without external causes like noise exposure. This sudden hearing loss is mostly unilateral, recovers very often spontaneously and should be treated, if persisting. Only in this acute stage there are therapeutic options available. If the inner ear hearing loss is chronic there is no curative therapy, an effective management of the hearing disorder is only possible through rehabilitation. This is due to the fact, that hair cells of all mammals, incl. humans, have no regenerative capacity and neither pharmaceutic agents nor other means can induce regeneration and recovery of hair cells. Even a gen-therapy is not available yet. In the second part of this review the main focus lies in sudden hearing loss and general therapeutic options for inner ear hearing loss.

  1. Sarcopenia, cachexia and aging: diagnosis, mechanisms and therapeutic options - a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sumbul; Garcia, Jose M

    2014-01-01

    By the year 2050, individuals over the age of 65 years will comprise 20% of the US population. Loss of muscle mass and strength is common in this age group and it is associated with increased dependence, frailty and mortality. Sarcopenia, defined as the loss of muscle mass and function associated with aging, and cachexia, defined as weight loss due to an underlying illness, are muscle wasting disorders of particular relevance in the aging population, but they go largely unrecognized. In this review we highlight the common pathophysiological mechanisms underlying muscle loss in sarcopenia and cachexia, the factors unique to each condition and means of diagnosing and differentiating them clinically. Therapeutic options including exercise, nutritional therapy, androgens and growth hormone as well as their practical limitations are discussed. We also shed light on newer agents being developed as potential therapeutic options for wasting diseases. PMID:24731978

  2. Herbal Medicine Offered as an Initiative Therapeutic Option for the Management of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shao-Ru; Qiu, Hong-Cong; Hu, Yang; Wang, Ying; Wang, Yi-Tao

    2016-06-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common malignant cancer and is the third leading cause of death worldwide. Effective treatment of this disease is limited by the complicated molecular mechanism underlying HCC pathogenesis. Thus, therapeutic options for HCC management are urgently needed. Targeting the Wnt/β-catenin, Hedgehog, Notch, and Hippo-YAP signaling pathways in cancer stem cell development has been extensively investigated as an alternative treatment. Herbal medicine has emerged as an initiative therapeutic option for HCC management because of its multi-level, multi-target, and coordinated intervention effects. In this article, we summarized the recent progress and clinical benefits of targeting the above mentioned signaling pathways and using natural products such as herbal medicine formulas to treat HCC. Proving the clinical success of herbal medicine is expected to deepen the knowledge on herbal medicine efficiency and hasten the adoption of new therapies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Herbal Medicine Offered as an Initiative Therapeutic Option for the Management of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shao-Ru; Qiu, Hong-Cong; Hu, Yang; Wang, Ying; Wang, Yi-Tao

    2016-06-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common malignant cancer and is the third leading cause of death worldwide. Effective treatment of this disease is limited by the complicated molecular mechanism underlying HCC pathogenesis. Thus, therapeutic options for HCC management are urgently needed. Targeting the Wnt/β-catenin, Hedgehog, Notch, and Hippo-YAP signaling pathways in cancer stem cell development has been extensively investigated as an alternative treatment. Herbal medicine has emerged as an initiative therapeutic option for HCC management because of its multi-level, multi-target, and coordinated intervention effects. In this article, we summarized the recent progress and clinical benefits of targeting the above mentioned signaling pathways and using natural products such as herbal medicine formulas to treat HCC. Proving the clinical success of herbal medicine is expected to deepen the knowledge on herbal medicine efficiency and hasten the adoption of new therapies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26879574

  4. Therapeutic options in pediatric non alcoholic fatty liver disease: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Vajro, Pietro; Lenta, Selvaggia; Pignata, Claudio; Salerno, Mariacarolina; D'Aniello, Roberta; De Micco, Ida; Paolella, Giulia; Parenti, Giancarlo

    2012-10-17

    The epidemics of overweight and obesity has resulted in a significant increase of non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a potentially progressive condition. Currently, obesity related hepatopathy represents therefore the main cause of pediatric chronic liver disease. The first choice treatment at all ages is weight loss and/or lifestyle changes, however compliance is very poor and a pharmacological approach has become necessary. In the present article we present a systematic literature review focusing on established pediatric NALFD drugs (ursodeoxycholic acid, insulin sensitizers, and antioxidants) and on innovative therapeutic options as well.Regarding the former ones, a pediatric pilot study highlighted that ursodeoxycholic acid is not efficient on transaminases levels and bright liver. Similarly, a recent large scale, multicenter randomized clinical trial (TONIC study) showed that also insulin sensitizers and antioxidant vitamin E have scarce effects on serum transaminase levels. Among a large series of novel therapeutic approaches acting on recently proposed different pathomechanisms, probiotics seem hitherto the most interesting and reasonable option for their safety and tolerability. Toll-like receptors modifiers, Pentoxifylline, and Farnesoid X receptors agonists have been still poorly investigated, and will need further studies before becoming possible promising innovative therapeutic strategies.

  5. Ocular Manifestations and Therapeutic Options in Patients with Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Martins, A. C.; Rosa, A. M.; Costa, E.; Tavares, C.; Quadrado, M. J.; Murta, J. N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. This paper aims to review the morphological and functional characteristics of patients affected by familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP), with greater focus on type I and its progression after liver transplantation. We also analyse therapeutic options for the ophthalmic manifestations. Methods. The literature from 2002 through 2015 was reviewed, with a total of 45 articles studied, using the key terms related to amyloidosis and its therapeutic approaches. Information was collated, evaluated, critically assessed, and then summarised in its present form. Pathophysiology and Treatment. FAP results from mutation of the transthyretin gene, with Val30Met being the most frequent substitution. The symptoms are those typical of a sensorimotor autonomic neuropathy and can be halted with liver transplantation. Nowadays there are new medical therapies that delay the progression of the systemic neuropathy. However, there are still no options to avoid ocular disease. Conclusion. The main ocular manifestations in patients with FAP type I are amyloid deposition in the vitreous, dry eye, and secondary glaucoma. Despite liver transplantation, eye synthesis of amyloid persists and is associated with progressive ocular manifestations, which require continued ophthalmologic follow-up. New therapeutic strategies are therefore needed, particularly to target the ocular synthesis of the abnormal protein. PMID:26558262

  6. Addition of flexible body option to the TOLA computer program, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, J. W.; Benda, B. J.

    1975-01-01

    This report describes a flexible body option that was developed and added to the Takeoff and Landing Analysis (TOLA) computer program. The addition of the flexible body option to TOLA allows it to be used to study essentially any conventional type airplane in the ground operating environment. It provides the capability to predict the total motion of selected points on the analytical methods incorporated in the program and operating instructions for the option are described. A program listing is included along with several example problems to aid in interpretation of the operating instructions and to illustrate program usage.

  7. Current and emerging therapeutic options for the treatment of chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Muratore, Claudio A; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Chagas’ disease is an endemic disease in Latin America caused by a unicellular parasite (Trypanosoma cruzi) that affects almost 18 million people. This condition involves the heart, causing heart failure, arrhythmias, heart block, thromboembolism, stroke, and sudden death. In this article, we review the current and emerging treatment of Chagas’ cardiomyopathy focusing mostly on management of heart failure and arrhythmias. Heart failure therapeutical options including drugs, stem cells and heart transplantation are revised. Antiarrhythmic drugs, catheter ablation, and intracardiac devices are discussed as well. Finally, the evidence for a potential role of specific antiparasitic treatment for the prevention of cardiovascular disease is reviewed. PMID:20730015

  8. Conclusions of the expert panel: importance of erlotinib as a second-line therapeutic option

    PubMed Central

    Castagnari, Aldo

    2008-01-01

    During the Experts Meeting on Lung Cancer, participants emphasized the usefulness of erlotinib as second-line therapy for lung cancer. They noted that, although there are no comparative studies, erlotinib could be as effective as docetaxel and pemetrexed in second-line therapy. Regarding the toxicity profile of each of these drugs – one of the key issues considered in the meeting – specialists pointed out how important it is to clearly identify existing differences in this issue. Each drug has different degrees of toxicity, and this information is crucial at the time of choosing the therapeutic regimen. Erlotinib treatment could be an effective option for second-line therapy. PMID:18831720

  9. Novel therapeutic options for second-line therapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    VON KLOT, CHRISTOPH-A. J.; MERSEBURGER, AXEL S.; KUCZYK, MARKUS A.

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) has gained a variety of therapeutic options since the introduction of targeted therapy, starting in 2007. The basic molecular mechanisms included predominantly the targeting of vascular endothelial growth factor or the inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin. Recently, results from two randomized controlled trials, the CheckMate-25 and the METEOR trial, regarding therapy for RCC in the second-line setting have been published. In the present review, the current status of second-line therapy in mRCC is discussed, together with results from the two newly introduced substances, nivolumab and cabozantinib. PMID:27313856

  10. 24 CFR 982.629 - Homeownership option: Additional PHA requirements for family search and purchase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Homeownership option: Additional PHA requirements for family search and purchase. 982.629 Section 982.629 Housing and Urban Development...: Additional PHA requirements for family search and purchase. (a) The PHA may establish the maximum time for...

  11. 24 CFR 982.629 - Homeownership option: Additional PHA requirements for family search and purchase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Homeownership option: Additional PHA requirements for family search and purchase. 982.629 Section 982.629 Housing and Urban Development...: Additional PHA requirements for family search and purchase. (a) The PHA may establish the maximum time for...

  12. 24 CFR 982.629 - Homeownership option: Additional PHA requirements for family search and purchase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Homeownership option: Additional PHA requirements for family search and purchase. 982.629 Section 982.629 Housing and Urban Development...: Additional PHA requirements for family search and purchase. (a) The PHA may establish the maximum time for...

  13. 24 CFR 982.629 - Homeownership option: Additional PHA requirements for family search and purchase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Homeownership option: Additional PHA requirements for family search and purchase. 982.629 Section 982.629 Housing and Urban Development...: Additional PHA requirements for family search and purchase. (a) The PHA may establish the maximum time for...

  14. 24 CFR 982.629 - Homeownership option: Additional PHA requirements for family search and purchase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Homeownership option: Additional PHA requirements for family search and purchase. 982.629 Section 982.629 Housing and Urban Development...: Additional PHA requirements for family search and purchase. (a) The PHA may establish the maximum time for...

  15. New therapeutic option for irritable bowel syndrome: Serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Good, Larry; Rosario, Roxanne; Panas, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Oral prescription medical foods have long been used in hospital settings but are also appropriate therapies for gastrointestinal disorders in outpatient medical practice. Oral serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate (SBI) has been shown in clinical studies to reduce loose stools and improve stool consistency as well as other symptoms (i.e., abdominal pain, bloating, and urgency) in patients with irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) and human immunodeficiency virus-associated enteropathy. This case series reports the outcomes of 14 IBS patients who received SBI as an addition to standard of care at an individual physician’s clinical practice. The patients: 2 IBS with constipation (IBS-C), 7 IBS-D, 2 mixed diarrhea and constipation IBS (IBS-M) and 3 undefined IBS (IBS-U; also described by some physicians as IBS-Bloating), ranged in age from 22-87 years. SBI (5 g or 10 g daily dose) was added to the patient’s current standard care and followed for several weeks to determine if symptoms were improved with the addition of SBI. Overall, 12 of the 14 patients indicated some level of improvement through direct questioning of the patients regarding changes from the prior visit. One IBS-Bloating patient had a resolution of symptoms and two patients (1 IBS-Bloating and 1 IBS-C) discontinued therapy because of insufficient relief. The 12 patients who continued on therapy reported an overall improvement in symptoms with better stool consistency, decreased frequency as well as reductions in abdominal pain, bloating, distention, and incontinence. In most cases, therapeutic effects of SBI were seen within the first four weeks of therapy with continued improvements at subsequent visits. SBI has a multifaceted mechanism of action and may help to manage IBS by providing a distinct protein source required to normalize bowel function, gastrointestinal microbiota, and nutritionally enhance tight junction protein expression between intestinal epithelial cells

  16. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive (HER2+) metastatic breast cancer: how the latest results are improving therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hanfang; Rugo, Hope S.

    2015-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive (HER2+) metastatic breast cancer (MBC) remains an incurable disease, and approximately 25% of patients with HER2+ early breast cancer still relapse after adjuvant trastuzumab-based treatment. HER2 is a validated therapeutic target that remains relevant throughout the disease process. Recently, a number of novel HER2 targeted agents have become available, including lapatinib (a small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor of both HER2 and the epidermal growth factor receptor), pertuzumab (a new anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody) and ado-trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1, a novel antibody–drug conjugate), which provide additional treatment options for patients with HER2+ MBC. The latest clinical trials have demonstrated improved outcome with treatment including pertuzumab or T-DM1 compared with standard HER2 targeted therapy. Here we review the clinical development of approved and investigational targeted agents for the treatment of HER2+ MBC, summarize the latest results of important clinical trials supporting use of these agents in the treatment of HER2+ MBC, and discuss how these results impact therapeutic options in clinical practice. PMID:26557900

  17. Endometriosis: Survey of Current Diagnostic and Therapeutic Options and Latest Research Work

    PubMed Central

    Juhasz-Böss, I.; Laschke, M. W.; Müller, F.; Rosenbaum, P.; Baum, S.; Solomayer, E. F.; Ulrich, U.

    2014-01-01

    Endometriosis is one of the most frequent benign diseases in women of child-bearing age. The main symptoms are chronic upper abdominal pain and infertility. However, the aetiology and pathogenesis of endometriosis are as yet insufficiently clarified. Thus, therapy is mainly symptomatic with laparoscopic surgery being the gold standard. The aim of drug therapy is to achieve a hypo-oestrogenic condition. In cases of severe endometriosis and a desire to have children there is often an indication for assisted reproduction. The present article illustrates almost all current aspects on the diagnosis of and therapy of endometriosis. From the clinical viewpoint, emphasis is placed on the rare cases of deeply infiltrating endometriosis that are, however, accompanied with a high morbidity. Current therapeutic options in cases of infertility are also presented in more detail. Furthermore, special attention is paid to the latest research results from both clinical and basic research fields in order to demonstrate our current knowledge on the pathogenesis and, where possible, potentially related therapeutic options. PMID:25221341

  18. Coronary Sinus Reducer system™: A new therapeutic option in refractory angina patients unsuitable for revascularization.

    PubMed

    Ielasi, Alfonso; Todaro, Maria Chiara; Grigis, Giulietta; Tespili, Maurizio

    2016-04-15

    A challenge of modern cardiovascular medicine is to find new, effective treatments for patients with refractory angina pectoris (RAP), a clinical condition characterized by severe angina despite optimal medical therapy and "no option" for a surgical or percutaneous revascularization. Although the relevant advance of both pharmaceutical and interventional treatments for patients affected by symptomatic coronary artery disease has greatly contributed to prolong survival, the increasing number of patients experimenting persistent and invalidating angina symptoms, highlights that quality of life of these patients has not been equally improved. Clinical limitations of the efficiency of conventional and relatively new approaches justify the search for new therapeutic options. In this review, we will focus on the epidemiology of RAP, and we will provide a brief update on the different options actually available to these patients with particular interest to an innovative device that narrow the coronary sinus: the Reducer system (Neovasc Inc., Richmond B.C., Canada). The efforts of present and future clinical studies will ultimately answer the question of whether this intriguing therapy is a suitable strategy for treatment of patients with RAP. PMID:26889595

  19. Technical options for processing additional light tight oil volumes within the United States

    EIA Publications

    2015-01-01

    This report examines technical options for processing additional LTO volumes within the United States. Domestic processing of additional LTO would enable an increase in petroleum product exports from the United States, already the world’s largest net exporter of petroleum products. Unlike crude oil, products are not subject to export limitations or licensing requirements. While this is one possible approach to absorbing higher domestic LTO production in the absence of a relaxation of current limitations on crude exports, domestic LTO would have to be priced at a level required to encourage additional LTO runs at existing refinery units, debottlenecking, or possible additions of processing capacity.

  20. A new therapeutic option for postoperative pain management with oxycodone HCI injection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Fentanyl is the most commonly used opioid analgesic in intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA) in Korea. IV oxycodone was approved for postoperative IV PCA by the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety of Korea in 2013. The approved dosage regimen for postoperative pain relief with IV oxycodone is IV bolus loading of 2 mg followed by PCA composed of demand boluses of 1 mg and no background infusion with an oxycodone concentration of 1 mg/ml. However, a simulation study indicated that the minimum effective analgesic concentration (MEAC, as indicated by relief of pain by administering rescue analgesics) of oxycodone was reached most quickly with a higher loading dose of 0.1 mg/kg and IV PCA with background infusion. Oxycodone is a therapeutic option as an analgesic for postoperative pain management. It is necessary to reduce the analgesic dose of oxycodone in elderly patients because metabolic clearance decreases with age. PMID:27274364

  1. Antihypertensive therapy versus alternative therapeutic options for prehypertension: an evidence-based approach.

    PubMed

    Gaddam, Krishna K; Ventura, Hector; Lavie, Carl J

    2012-01-01

    The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC-7) defines hypertension as systolic blood pressure (BP) ≥140 mmHg or diastolic BP ≥90 mmHg. The JNC-7 defines 'prehypertension' to include systolic BP values between 120 and 139 mmHg and diastolic BP values between 80 and 89 mmHg. Individuals with blood pressure in the prehypertension range are clearly at increased risk of developing hypertension in the future and have an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, compared with those with normal BP. However, there is paucity of evidence to intervene in these patients. In this article we discuss an evidence-based approach to therapeutic options in patients with prehypertension. PMID:22185450

  2. Cladophialophora bantiana: a rare cause of fungal brain abscess. Clinical aspects and new therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Garzoni, Christian; Markham, Lydia; Bijlenga, Philippe; Garbino, Jorge

    2008-08-01

    Black molds or dematiaceous fungi are rare etiologic agents of intracerebral abscesses and such infections carry a high mortality of up to 70% despite combined surgical and antifungal therapy. While the growing use of immunosuppressive therapies and organ transplantation have caused an increase in the incidence of rare fungal cerebral infections, occurrence in immunocompetent hosts is also possible. We describe a 60-year-old female patient with a cerebral abscess caused by Cladophialophora bantiana. The case illustrates the clinical and radiological similarities between glioblastomas and brain abscesses and emphasizes the need to perform histological and microbiological studies prior to the initiation of any form of therapy. Long-term survival from cerebral black mold abscesses has been reported only when complete surgical resection was possible. The recommended antifungal treatment involves the use of amphotericin B combined with a triazole and, if possible, flucytosine. Highly-active new generation triazole antifungal compounds (voriconazole or posaconazole) are likely to offer improved survival rates for patients with rare mold infections. In particular, posaconazole could be a new therapeutic option given its better tolerance, lower toxicity and fewer drug-drug interactions. We discuss clinical, microbiological and practical pharmacological aspects and review current and evolving treatment options.

  3. Studies on nonsense mediated decay reveal novel therapeutic options for genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Bashyam, Murali D

    2009-01-01

    Scientific breakthroughs have often led to commercially viable patents mainly in the field of engineering. Commercialization in the field of medicine has been restricted mostly to machinery and engineering on the one hand and therapeutic drugs for common chronic ailments such as cough, cold, headache, etc, on the other. Sequencing of the human genome has attracted the attention of pharmaceutical companies and now biotechnology has become a goldmine for commercialization of products and processes. Recent advances in our understanding of basic biological processes have resulted in the opening of new avenues for treatment of human genetic diseases, especially single gene disorders. A significant proportion of human genetic disorders have been shown to be caused due to degradation of transcripts for specific genes through a process called nonsense mediated decay (NMD). The modulation of NMD provides a viable therapeutic option for treatment of several genetic disorders and therefore has been a good prospect for patenting and commercialization. In this review the molecular basis for NMD and attempts to treat genetic diseases which result from NMD are discussed.

  4. Harnessing the immunological properties of stem cells as a therapeutic option for diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    D'Addio, Francesca; Trevisani, Alessio; Ben Nasr, Moufida; Bassi, Roberto; El Essawy, Basset; Abdi, Reza; Secchi, Antonio; Fiorina, Paolo

    2014-12-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading and possibly the most devastating complication of diabetes, with a prevalence ranging from 25 to 40 % in diabetic individuals, and as such represents an important challenge for public health worldwide. As a major cause of end-stage renal disease, diabetic nephropathy also accounts for a large proportion of deaths in diabetic individuals. To date, therapeutic options for overt diabetic nephropathy include medical interventions to reduce blood glucose levels and to control blood pressure and proteinuria. Recent evidence suggests a strong role for inflammation in the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Various immune cells, cytokines and chemokines have been implicated in the onset of diabetic nephropathy, while immune-related transcription factors and adhesion molecules have been correlated with the establishment of a renal proinflammatory microenvironment. Both inflammation and immune activation may promote severe distress in the kidney, with subsequent increased local fibrosis, ultimately leading to the development of end-stage renal disease. Stem cells are undifferentiated cells capable of regenerating virtually any organ or tissue and bearing important immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. Due to the aforementioned considerations, significant interest has been ignited with regard to the use of stem cells as novel therapeutics for diabetic nephropathy. Here, we will be examining in detail how anti-inflammatory properties of different populations of stem cells may offer novel therapy for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  5. Influenza virus pathogenicity regulated by host cellular proteases, cytokines and metabolites, and its therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    KIDO, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) causes significant morbidity and mortality. The knowledge gained within the last decade on the pandemic IAV(H1N1)2009 improved our understanding not only of the viral pathogenicity but also the host cellular factors involved in the pathogenicity of multiorgan failure (MOF), such as cellular trypsin-type hemagglutinin (HA0) processing proteases for viral multiplication, cytokine storm, metabolic disorders and energy crisis. The HA processing proteases in the airway and organs for all IAV known to date have been identified. Recently, a new concept on the pathogenicity of MOF, the “influenza virus–cytokine–trypsin” cycle, has been proposed involving up-regulation of trypsin through pro-inflammatory cytokines, and potentiation of viral multiplication in various organs. Furthermore, the relationship between causative factors has been summarized as the “influenza virus–cytokine–trypsin” cycle interconnected with the “metabolic disorders–cytokine” cycle. These cycles provide new treatment concepts for ATP crisis and MOF. This review discusses IAV pathogenicity on cellular proteases, cytokines, metabolites and therapeutic options. PMID:26460316

  6. Cerebral Melanoma Metastases: A Critical Review on Diagnostic Methods and Therapeutic Options

    PubMed Central

    Goulart, Carlos R.; Mattei, Tobias Alecio; Ramina, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Malignant melanoma represents the third most common cause for cerebral metastases after breast and lung cancer. Central nervous system (CNS) metastases occur in 10 to 40% of patients with melanoma. Most of the symptoms of CNS melanoma metastases are unspecific and depend on localization of the lesion. All patients with new neurological signs and a previous primary melanoma lesion must be investigated. Although primary diagnosis may rely on computed tomography scan, magnetic resonance images are usually used in order to study more precisely the characteristics of the lesions in and to embase the surgical plan. Other possible complementary exams are: positron emission tomography, iofetamine cintilography, immunohistochemistry of liquor, monoclonal antibody immunocytology, optical coherence tomography, and transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Treatment procedures are indicated based on patient clinical status, presence of unique or multiple lesions, and family agreement. Often surgery, radiosurgery, whole brain radiotherapy, and chemotherapy are combined in order to obtain longer remissions and optimal symptom relieve. Corticoids may be also useful in those cases that present with remarkable peritumoral edema and important mass effect. Despite of the advance in therapeutic options, prognosis for patients with melanoma brain metastases remains poor with a median survival time of six months after diagnosis. PMID:22084751

  7. Addressing Therapeutic Options for Ebola Virus Infection in Current and Future Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Hober, Didier; Blondiaux, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus can cause severe hemorrhagic disease with high fatality rates. Currently, no specific therapeutic agent or vaccine has been approved for treatment and prevention of Ebola virus infection of humans. Although the number of Ebola cases has fallen in the last few weeks, multiple outbreaks of Ebola virus infection and the likelihood of future exposure highlight the need for development and rapid evaluation of pre- and postexposure treatments. Here, we briefly review the existing and future options for anti-Ebola therapy, based on the data coming from rare clinical reports, studies on animals, and results from in vitro models. We also project the mechanistic hypotheses of several potential drugs against Ebola virus, including small-molecule-based drugs, which are under development and being tested in animal models or in vitro using various cell types. Our paper discusses strategies toward identifying and testing anti-Ebola virus properties of known and medically approved drugs, especially those that can limit the pathological inflammatory response in Ebola patients and thereby provide protection from mortality. We underline the importance of developing combinational therapy for better treatment outcomes for Ebola patients. PMID:26248374

  8. Novel therapeutic options in anaplastic large cell lymphoma: molecular targets and immunological tools.

    PubMed

    Merkel, Olaf; Hamacher, Frank; Sifft, Eveline; Kenner, Lukas; Greil, Richard

    2011-07-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a CD30-positive, aggressive T-cell lymphoma, and about half of the patients with this disease harbor the t(2;5)(p21;q35) translocation. This chromosomal aberration leads to fusion of the NPM gene with the ALK tyrosine kinase, leading to its constitutive activation. To date, treatment options include polychemotherapy (e.g., cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone), which is sometimes combined with radiation in the case of bulky disease, leading to remission rates of ∼80%. However, the remaining patients do not respond to therapy, and some patients experience chemo-resistant relapses, making the identification of new and better treatments imperative. The recent discovery of deregulated ALK in common cancers such as non-small cell lung cancer and neuroblastoma has reinvigorated industry interest in the development of ALK inhibitors. Moreover, it has been shown that the ALK protein is an ideal antigen for vaccination strategies due to its low expression in normal tissue. The characterization of microRNAs that are deregulated in ALCL will yield new insights into the biology of ALCL and open new avenues for therapeutic approaches in the future. Also, CD30 antibodies that have been tested in ALCL for quite a while will probably find a place in forthcoming treatment strategies.

  9. High-throughput screening for the identification of new therapeutic options for metastatic pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma.

    PubMed

    Giubellino, Alessio; Shankavaram, Uma; Bullova, Petra; Schovanek, Jan; Zhang, Yaqin; Shen, Min; Patel, Nikita; Elkahloun, Abdel; Lee, Min-Jung; Trepel, Jane; Ferrer, Marc; Pacak, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Drug repurposing or repositioning is an important part of drug discovery that has been growing in the last few years for the development of therapeutic options in oncology. We applied this paradigm in a screening of a library of about 3,800 compounds (including FDA-approved drugs and pharmacologically active compounds) employing a model of metastatic pheochromocytoma, the most common tumor of the adrenal medulla in children and adults. The collection of approved drugs was screened in quantitative mode, testing the compounds in compound-titration series (dose-response curves). Analysis of the dose-response screening data facilitated the selection of 50 molecules with potential bioactivity in pheochromocytoma cells. These drugs were classified based on molecular/cellular targets and signaling pathways affected, and selected drugs were further validated in a proliferation assay and by flow cytometric cell death analysis. Using meta-analysis information from molecular targets of the top drugs identified by our screening with gene expression data from human and murine microarrays, we identified potential drugs to be used as single drugs or in combination. An example of a combination with a synergistic effect is presented. Our study exemplifies a promising model to identify potential drugs from a group of clinically approved compounds that can more rapidly be implemented into clinical trials in patients with metastatic pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma.

  10. [Treatment of arterial hypertension in children and adolescents--Update of therapeutic options].

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Nadine; Hage, Alfred

    2015-04-01

    Changing living conditions, which lead to physical inactivity and obesity, are probably the main reason for the establishment of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in children and adolescents. In the past those risk factors were typically seen only in the elderly. On long-term, the elevated body-mass-index is a very important risk factor for primary arterial hypertension in children and adolescents, because it is responsible for both structural and functional changes in the cardiovascular system. Regular screening for these target organ damages is necessary. However, the role of newer methods has still to be proven in current research. The primary therapeutical options for this group are life style interventions like body weight control and physical activity. Children and adolescents with arterial hypertension persisting despite life style interventions should receive medication early, in order to prevent persistent target organ damage. Drug therapy should start as mono therapy--depending on patient profile--with one ACE inhibitor, angiotensin II receptor antagonist, calcium channel blocker or beta-blocker. If blood pressure cannot be reduced into the target area by mono therapy, combination therapy with different mechanisms should be started. Forms of secondary arterial hypertension have to be treated according to the primary disease.

  11. Addressing Therapeutic Options for Ebola Virus Infection in Current and Future Outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Haque, Azizul; Hober, Didier; Blondiaux, Joel

    2015-10-01

    Ebola virus can cause severe hemorrhagic disease with high fatality rates. Currently, no specific therapeutic agent or vaccine has been approved for treatment and prevention of Ebola virus infection of humans. Although the number of Ebola cases has fallen in the last few weeks, multiple outbreaks of Ebola virus infection and the likelihood of future exposure highlight the need for development and rapid evaluation of pre- and postexposure treatments. Here, we briefly review the existing and future options for anti-Ebola therapy, based on the data coming from rare clinical reports, studies on animals, and results from in vitro models. We also project the mechanistic hypotheses of several potential drugs against Ebola virus, including small-molecule-based drugs, which are under development and being tested in animal models or in vitro using various cell types. Our paper discusses strategies toward identifying and testing anti-Ebola virus properties of known and medically approved drugs, especially those that can limit the pathological inflammatory response in Ebola patients and thereby provide protection from mortality. We underline the importance of developing combinational therapy for better treatment outcomes for Ebola patients.

  12. The practicing physician's current perspective on therapeutic options in coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Drenth, D.J.; Zijlstra, F.; Boonstra, P.W.

    2005-01-01

    Over the past decades the management of patients with stable as well as unstable manifestations of coronary artery disease has evolved in every aspect of routine clinical practice. Modern diagnostic modalities allow reliable and objective assessment of both the anatomical and functional consequences of the early as well as advanced stages of this disease, which remains one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Pharmacological therapy now includes several classes of drugs with mortality benefits documented by randomised controlled trials. Surgical and percutaneous revascularisation techniques have shown rapid technical improvements and are now applicable in a wide range of clinical conditions. In this paper we will attempt to place the current status of the three therapeutic options for patients with coronary artery disease into perspective. It is important to realise that it is impossible to write a complete overview, a Pubmed search: 'PCI or drug therapy or surgery for coronary artery disease' results in 1,152,117 hits. Therefore, we have chosen the viewpoint of the practicing physician to synthesise this abundance of information in the context of modern clinical practice in a high volume cardiothoracic and cardiological practice. PMID:25696508

  13. [Treatment of arterial hypertension in children and adolescents--Update of therapeutic options].

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Nadine; Hage, Alfred

    2015-04-01

    Changing living conditions, which lead to physical inactivity and obesity, are probably the main reason for the establishment of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in children and adolescents. In the past those risk factors were typically seen only in the elderly. On long-term, the elevated body-mass-index is a very important risk factor for primary arterial hypertension in children and adolescents, because it is responsible for both structural and functional changes in the cardiovascular system. Regular screening for these target organ damages is necessary. However, the role of newer methods has still to be proven in current research. The primary therapeutical options for this group are life style interventions like body weight control and physical activity. Children and adolescents with arterial hypertension persisting despite life style interventions should receive medication early, in order to prevent persistent target organ damage. Drug therapy should start as mono therapy--depending on patient profile--with one ACE inhibitor, angiotensin II receptor antagonist, calcium channel blocker or beta-blocker. If blood pressure cannot be reduced into the target area by mono therapy, combination therapy with different mechanisms should be started. Forms of secondary arterial hypertension have to be treated according to the primary disease. PMID:26364380

  14. Rectal cancer and Fournier’s gangrene - current knowledge and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Bruketa, Tomislav; Majerovic, Matea; Augustin, Goran

    2015-01-01

    Fournier’s gangrene (FG) is a rapid progressive bacterial infection that involves the subcutaneous fascia and part of the deep fascia but spares the muscle in the scrotal, perianal and perineal region. The incidence has increased dramatically, while the reported incidence of rectal cancer-induced FG is unknown but is extremely low. Pathophysiology and clinical presentation of rectal cancer-induced FG per se does not differ from the other causes. Only rectal cancer-specific symptoms before presentation can lead to the diagnosis. The diagnosis of rectal cancer-induced FG should be excluded in every patient with blood on digital rectal examination, when urogenital and dermatological causes are excluded and when fever or sepsis of unknown origin is present with perianal symptomatology. Therapeutic options are more complex than for other forms of FG. First, the causative rectal tumor should be removed. The survival of patients with rectal cancer resection is reported as 100%, while with colostomy it is 80%. The preferred method of rectal resection has not been defined. Second, oncological treatment should be administered but the timing should be adjusted to the resolution of the FG and sometimes for the healing of plastic reconstructive procedures that are commonly needed for the reconstruction of large perineal, scrotal and lower abdominal wall defects. PMID:26290629

  15. Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome: Perspectives for immunogenetics, multimodal imaging, and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Silpa-Archa, Sukhum; Silpa-Archa, Narumol; Preble, Janine M; Foster, C Stephen

    2016-08-01

    Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome (VKH) is a bilateral, diffuse granulomatous uveitis associated with neurological, audiovestibular, and dermatological systems. The primary pathogenesis is T-cell-mediated autoimmune response directed towards melanocyte or melanocyte-associated antigens causing inflammation of the choroidal layer. This phenomenon usually leads to diffuse inflammatory conditions throughout most parts of eye before ocular complications ensue. The diagnosis is achieved mainly by clinical features according to the revised diagnostic criteria of VKH published in 2001, without confirmatory serologic tests as a requirement. However, ancillary tests, especially multimodal imaging, can reliably provide supportive evidence for the diagnosis of early cases, atypical presentations, and evaluation of management. Prompt treatment with systemic corticosteroids and early non-steroidal immunosuppressive drug therapy can lessen visually threatening ocular complications and bring about good visual recovery. Close monitoring warrants visual stabilization from disease recurrence and ocular complications. This article review aims not only to update comprehensive knowledge regarding VKH but also to emphasize three major perspectives of VKH: immunogenetics as the major pathogenesis of the disease, multimodal imaging, and therapeutic options. The role of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy and drug-induced VKH is also provided.

  16. Improving Response to Hormone Therapy in Breast Cancer: New Targets, New Therapeutic Options.

    PubMed

    Rugo, Hope S; Vidula, Neelima; Ma, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    The majority of breast cancer expresses the estrogen and or progesterone receptors (ER and PR). In tumors without concomitant HER2 amplification, hormone therapy is a major treatment option for all disease stages. Resistance to hormonal therapy is associated with disease recurrence and progression. Recent studies have identified a number of resistance mechanisms leading to estrogen-independent growth of hormone receptor-positive (HR+) breast cancer as a result of genetic and epigenetic alterations, which could be exploited as novel therapeutic targets. These include acquired mutations in ER-alpha (ESR1) in response to endocrine deprivation; constitutive activation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) 4 and 6; cross talk between ER and growth factor receptor signaling such as HER family members, fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) pathways, intracellular growth, and survival signals PI3K/Akt/mTOR; and epigenetic modifications by histone deacetylase (HDAC) as well as interactions with tumor microenvironment and host immune response. Inhibitors of these pathways are being developed to improve efficacy of hormonal therapy for treatment of both metastatic and early-stage disease. Two agents are currently approved in the United States for the treatment of metastatic HR+ breast cancer, including the mTOR inhibitor everolimus and the CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib. Management of toxicity is a critical aspect of treatment; the primary toxicity of everolimus is stomatitis (treated with topical steroids) and of palbociclib is neutropenia (treated with dose reduction/delay). Many agents are in clinical trials, primarily in combination with hormone therapy; novel combinations are under active investigation. PMID:27249746

  17. Adhesion molecules in peritoneal dissemination: function, prognostic relevance and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Sluiter, Nina; de Cuba, Erienne; Kwakman, Riom; Kazemier, Geert; Meijer, Gerrit; Te Velde, Elisabeth Atie

    2016-06-01

    Peritoneal dissemination is diagnosed in 10-25 % of colorectal cancer patients. Selected patients are treated with cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy. For these patients, earlier diagnosis, optimised selection criteria and a personalised approach are warranted. Biomarkers could play a crucial role here. However, little is known about possible candidates. Considering tumour cell adhesion as a key step in peritoneal dissemination, we aim to provide an overview of the functional importance of adhesion molecules in peritoneal dissemination and discuss the prognostic, diagnostic and therapeutic options of these candidate biomarkers. A systematic literature search was conducted according to the PRISMA guidelines. In 132 in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo studies published between 1995 and 2013, we identified twelve possibly relevant adhesion molecules in various cancers that disseminate peritoneally. The most studied molecules in tumour cell adhesion are integrin α2β1, CD44 s and MUC16. Furthermore, L1CAM, EpCAM, MUC1, sLe(x) and Le(x), chemokine receptors, Betaig-H3 and uPAR might be of clinical importance. ICAM1 was found to be less relevant in tumour cell adhesion in the context of peritoneal metastases. Based on currently available data, sLe(a) and MUC16 are the most promising prognostic biomarkers for colorectal peritoneal metastases that may help improve patient selection. Different adhesion molecules appear expressed in haematogenous and transcoelomic spread, indicating two different attachment processes. However, our extensive assessment of available literature reveals that knowledge on metastasis-specific genes and their possible candidates is far from complete. PMID:27074785

  18. A New Horizon: Oxytocin as a Novel Therapeutic Option for Obesity and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Dongsheng; Purkayastha, Sudarshana

    2013-01-01

    The story of oxytocin (OXT) began long ago in evolutionary terms with its recognition as a classical neurohypophyseal hormone important for lactation and uterine contraction. With the recent discovery of its local actions in the brain, its previously-unappreciated diverse functions in regulating social behaviors and metabolic physiology are emerging. In light of metabolic control, OXT has been shown to induce feeding restriction and body weight lowering through acting on brain regulatory regions, in particular the hypothalamus. Studies from pharmacologic interventions and genetic manipulations demonstrated that OXT can play significant roles in affecting glucose metabolism as well as insulin secretion and lipolysis, many of those functions being regulated both centrally and peripherally. Also excitingly, recent therapeutic success was obtained in clinical endeavor showing that OXT nasal spray effectively induced weight loss and metabolic improvement in human patients with obesity, thus further indicating OXT as a tangible drug target for treating obesity and metabolic complications. In addition to the native form, OXT-derived analogues have been found effective in inducing body weight control and glucose balance. Altogether, all recent advances in studying OXT and metabolic regulation has promoted a promising foundation for the therapeutic strategy of developing innovative OXT peptidyl drugs for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic diseases. PMID:24159336

  19. Contemporary management of lymph node metastases from an unknown primary to the neck: II. a review of therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Strojan, Primož; Ferlito, Alfio; Langendijk, Johannes A; Corry, June; Woolgar, Julia A; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Silver, Carl E; Paleri, Vinidh; Fagan, Johannes J; Pellitteri, Phillip K; Haigentz, Missak; Suárez, Carlos; Robbins, K Thomas; Rodrigo, Juan P; Olsen, Kerry D; Hinni, Michael L; Werner, Jochen A; Mondin, Vanni; Kowalski, Luiz P; Devaney, Kenneth O; de Bree, Remco; Takes, Robert P; Wolf, Gregory T; Shaha, Ashok R; Genden, Eric M; Barnes, Leon

    2013-02-01

    Although uncommon, cancer of an unknown primary (CUP) metastatic to cervical lymph nodes poses a range of dilemmas relating to optimal treatment. The ideal resolution would be a properly designed prospective randomized trial, but it is unlikely that this will ever be conducted in this group of patients. Accordingly, knowledge gained from retrospective studies and experience from treating patients with known head and neck primary tumors form the basis of therapeutic strategies in CUP. This review provides a critical appraisal of various treatment approaches described in the literature. Emerging treatment options for CUP with metastases to cervical lymph nodes are discussed in view of recent innovations in the field of head and neck oncology and suitable therapeutic strategies for particular clinical scenarios are presented. For pN1 or cN1 disease without extracapsular extension (ECE), selective neck dissection or radiotherapy offer high rates of regional control. For more advanced neck disease, intensive combined treatment is required, either a combination of neck dissection and radiotherapy, or initial (chemo)radiotherapy followed by neck dissection if a complete response is not recorded on imaging. Each of these approaches seems to be equally effective. Use of extensive bilateral neck/mucosal irradiation must be weighed against toxicity, availability of close follow-up with elective neck imaging and guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) when appropriate, the human papillomavirus (HPV) status of the tumor, and particularly against the distribution pattern (oropharynx in the majority of cases) and the emergence rate of hidden primary lesions (<10% after comprehensive workup). The addition of systemic agents is expected to yield similar improvement in outcome as has been observed for known head and neck primary tumors. PMID:22034062

  20. Biologics and other novel approaches as new therapeutic options in myasthenia gravis: a view to the future.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2012-12-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is caused by complement-fixing antibodies against the acetylcholine receptors (AChR). Regulatory T cells (T(reg) cells), Th17 cells, and recognition of AChR epitopes by CD4(+) T cells are fundamental. Novel biological agents now in the offing, offer the potential for specific treatment options in MG by targeting the following: (1) T cell intracellular signaling pathways, costimulation, and transduction molecules; (2) B cells, against CD20 molecules, or the B cell trophic factors BAFF and APRIL; (3) complement, against C5 that intercepts the formation of MAC; (4) cytokines and cytokine receptors targeting interleukin (IL)-6, IL-17, and the Janus tyrosine kinases (JAK)1 and JAK3; and (5) cellular adhesion and T cell migration molecules. Reengineering of pathogenic antibodies (i.e., molecular decoys) by constructing recombinant antibodies that block the complement binding of the pathogenic AChR antibodies is an additional approach. The promising therapeutic profile of these agents should be weighted against excessive cost and rare complications necessitating the need for controlled trials to secure efficacy and balance benefit against risks. PMID:23252891

  1. Biologics and other novel approaches as new therapeutic options in myasthenia gravis: a view to the future.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2012-12-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is caused by complement-fixing antibodies against the acetylcholine receptors (AChR). Regulatory T cells (T(reg) cells), Th17 cells, and recognition of AChR epitopes by CD4(+) T cells are fundamental. Novel biological agents now in the offing, offer the potential for specific treatment options in MG by targeting the following: (1) T cell intracellular signaling pathways, costimulation, and transduction molecules; (2) B cells, against CD20 molecules, or the B cell trophic factors BAFF and APRIL; (3) complement, against C5 that intercepts the formation of MAC; (4) cytokines and cytokine receptors targeting interleukin (IL)-6, IL-17, and the Janus tyrosine kinases (JAK)1 and JAK3; and (5) cellular adhesion and T cell migration molecules. Reengineering of pathogenic antibodies (i.e., molecular decoys) by constructing recombinant antibodies that block the complement binding of the pathogenic AChR antibodies is an additional approach. The promising therapeutic profile of these agents should be weighted against excessive cost and rare complications necessitating the need for controlled trials to secure efficacy and balance benefit against risks.

  2. [Treatment of hypertension in diabetes: threshold of intervention and therapeutic options].

    PubMed

    Plouin, P F; Lebrun, P; Azizi, M; Day, M

    1992-01-01

    Early screening for hypertension in diabetic patients and for glycoregulation abnormalities in hypertensives is justified by the additive cardiovascular risks when hypertension and diabetes co-exist and by the accelerated development of diabetic nephropathy and retinopathy if hypertension co-exists. In insulin-dependent diabetes, hypertension is generally preceded by microalbuminuria, known to be reduced by angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. The requirement for nephropathy prevention and the hemodynamic and/or tissular effects of this therapeutic class could justify their use at a blood pressure level less than that conventionally considered hypertensive. This strategy must be confirmed by prospective trials, already underway, evaluating the nephroprotective efficacy of this therapy. In non-insulin-dependent diabetes, hypertension is often present before the diabetes is diagnosed and antihypertensive therapy, especially thiazide diuretics, could play a demasking or favorizing role. The optimal blood pressure level to which these patients at high renal and coronary risk should be lowered still has to be determined. A prospective study, comparing the effects of strict (treated diastolic blood pressure less than 80 mmHg) and less strict (treated diastolic blood pressure between 90 and 100 mmHg) hypertensive control on coronary event prevention in essential hypertension, is in progress and will have important implications for hypertension treatment in diabetics. Appropriate treatment of other risk factors, such as hyperlipidaemia and smoking, contributes to coronary and renal prevention in all diabetic hypertensives. PMID:1639206

  3. Therapeutic options to minimize allogeneic blood transfusions and their adverse effects in cardiac surgery: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Antônio Alceu; da Silva, José Pedro; da Silva, Luciana da Fonseca; de Sousa, Alexandre Gonçalves; Piotto, Raquel Ferrari; Baumgratz, José Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Introdution Allogeneic blood is an exhaustible therapeutic resource. New evidence indicates that blood consumption is excessive and that donations have decreased, resulting in reduced blood supplies worldwide. Blood transfusions are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, as well as higher hospital costs. This makes it necessary to seek out new treatment options. Such options exist but are still virtually unknown and are rarely utilized. Objective To gather and describe in a systematic, objective, and practical way all clinical and surgical strategies as effective therapeutic options to minimize or avoid allogeneic blood transfusions and their adverse effects in surgical cardiac patients. Methods A bibliographic search was conducted using the MeSH term “Blood Transfusion” and the terms “Cardiac Surgery” and “Blood Management.” Studies with titles not directly related to this research or that did not contain information related to it in their abstracts as well as older studies reporting on the same strategies were not included. Results Treating anemia and thrombocytopenia, suspending anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, reducing routine phlebotomies, utilizing less traumatic surgical techniques with moderate hypothermia and hypotension, meticulous hemostasis, use of topical and systemic hemostatic agents, acute normovolemic hemodilution, cell salvage, anemia tolerance (supplementary oxygen and normothermia), as well as various other therapeutic options have proved to be effective strategies for reducing allogeneic blood transfusions. Conclusion There are a number of clinical and surgical strategies that can be used to optimize erythrocyte mass and coagulation status, minimize blood loss, and improve anemia tolerance. In order to decrease the consumption of blood components, diminish morbidity and mortality, and reduce hospital costs, these treatment strategies should be incorporated into medical practice worldwide. PMID:25714216

  4. [Nasal Highflow (NHF): A New Therapeutic Option for the Treatment of Respiratory Failure].

    PubMed

    Bräunlich, J; Nilius, G

    2016-01-01

    The therapy of choice in hypoxemic respiratory failure (type 1) is the application of supplemental oxygen at flow rates of 1 to 15 l/min via nasal prongs or mask. Non-invasive or invasive positive pressure ventilation will be initiated when the oxygen therapy effects are not sufficient or if hypercapnic respiratory failure (type 2) is the underlying problem. Recently, an alternative therapy option is available, from the pathophysiology it can be classified between oxygen therapy and positive pressure ventilation. The therapy called Nasal High Flow (NHF) is based on the nasal application of a heated and humidified air oxygen mixture with a flow range of up to 60 l/min. The precise pathophysiological principles of NHF are only partly understood, yet various aspects are well studied already: it is possible to deliver high oxygen concentrations, airway dryness can be avoided, dead space ventilation reduced and clearance of nasal dead space is achieved. Additionally, an end expiratory positive pressure is built up, which helps to prevent airway collapse, thus resulting in an improvement of respiratory efficiency and reduction of breathing work. Current studies demonstrate improvement in gas exchange and reduction of reintubation rate when applying the NHF treatment in acute respiratory failure. Thus the NHF therapy attracts attention in intensive care medicine. The application in other fields like chronic respiratory insufficiency is less well clarified. The objectives of this review are to present the pathophysiological effects and mechanisms of NHF, as far as understood, and to give an overview over the current state of relevant studies. PMID:26789432

  5. Addition of flexible body option to the TOLA computer program. Part 2: User and programmer documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, J. W.; Benda, B. J.

    1975-01-01

    User and programmer oriented documentation for the flexible body option of the Takeoff and Landing Analysis (TOLA) computer program are provided. The user information provides sufficient knowledge of the development and use of the option to enable the engineering user to successfully operate the modified program and understand the results. The programmer's information describes the option structure and logic enabling a programmer to make major revisions to this part of the TOLA computer program.

  6. Oxidative Stress and Neurodegenerative Diseases: A Review of Upstream and Downstream Antioxidant Therapeutic Options

    PubMed Central

    Uttara, Bayani; Singh, Ajay V.; Zamboni, Paolo; Mahajan, R.T

    2009-01-01

    Free radicals are common outcome of normal aerobic cellular metabolism. In-built antioxidant system of body plays its decisive role in prevention of any loss due to free radicals. However, imbalanced defense mechanism of antioxidants, overproduction or incorporation of free radicals from environment to living system leads to serious penalty leading to neuro-degeneration. Neural cells suffer functional or sensory loss in neurodegenerative diseases. Apart from several other environmental or genetic factors, oxidative stress (OS) leading to free radical attack on neural cells contributes calamitous role to neuro-degeneration. Though, oxygen is imperative for life, imbalanced metabolism and excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation end into a range of disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, aging and many other neural disorders. Toxicity of free radicals contributes to proteins and DNA injury, inflammation, tissue damage and subsequent cellular apoptosis. Antioxidants are now being looked upon as persuasive therapeutic against solemn neuronal loss, as they have capability to combat by neutralizing free radicals. Diet is major source of antioxidants, as well as medicinal herbs are catching attention to be commercial source of antioxidants at present. Recognition of upstream and downstream antioxidant therapy to oxidative stress has been proved an effective tool in alteration of any neuronal damage as well as free radical scavenging. Antioxidants have a wide scope to sequester metal ions involved in neuronal plaque formation to prevent oxidative stress. In addition, antioxidant therapy is vital in scavenging free radicals and ROS preventing neuronal degeneration in post-oxidative stress scenario. PMID:19721819

  7. Endovascular Therapeutic Occlusion of the Posterior Cerebral Artery: An Option for Ruptured Giant Aneurysm in a Child.

    PubMed

    Demartini, Zeferino; Matos, Luiz Afonso Dias; Dos Santos, Marcio Luis Tostes; Cardoso-Demartini, Adriane de Andre

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of intracranial aneurysms in the pediatric population is low, and surgical clipping remains a good long-term treatment option. However, posterior circulation aneurysms are even more complex to manage in children than in adults. We report a case of a giant aneurysm of the posterior cerebral artery in a 10-year-old boy presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Endovascular treatment with platinum coils was performed with total occlusion of the aneurysm and the affected arterial segment without complications. The patient achieved good recovery, and a late control angiogram confirmed exclusion of the aneurysm. Occurrence of special features of cerebral aneurysm in children, in comparison to adults, is also described. Parent artery sacrifice is an effective therapeutic option, but long-term follow-up is necessary to avoid recurrence and rebleeding.

  8. Endovascular Therapeutic Occlusion of the Posterior Cerebral Artery: An Option for Ruptured Giant Aneurysm in a Child.

    PubMed

    Demartini, Zeferino; Matos, Luiz Afonso Dias; Dos Santos, Marcio Luis Tostes; Cardoso-Demartini, Adriane de Andre

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of intracranial aneurysms in the pediatric population is low, and surgical clipping remains a good long-term treatment option. However, posterior circulation aneurysms are even more complex to manage in children than in adults. We report a case of a giant aneurysm of the posterior cerebral artery in a 10-year-old boy presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Endovascular treatment with platinum coils was performed with total occlusion of the aneurysm and the affected arterial segment without complications. The patient achieved good recovery, and a late control angiogram confirmed exclusion of the aneurysm. Occurrence of special features of cerebral aneurysm in children, in comparison to adults, is also described. Parent artery sacrifice is an effective therapeutic option, but long-term follow-up is necessary to avoid recurrence and rebleeding. PMID:26974558

  9. Rivaroxaban - a safe therapeutic option in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome? Our experience in 23 cases.

    PubMed

    Haładyj, Ewa; Olesińska, Marzena

    2016-01-01

    In the therapeutic approach to patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) with thrombotic manifestations, oral vitamin K antagonists (VKA) remain the standard of care. However, the use of VKA is very often associated with inability to achieve a therapeutic dose even in patients maintaining nutritional and therapeutic restrictions. The non-vitamin-K oral anticoagulants (NOAC) have a lot of advantages, but their efficacy and safety in APS have not been proven. We present 23 patients with APS treated with rivaroxaban in our department. Recurrence of thrombosis was observed only in 1 patient. No major or minor bleeding occurred. It proves the efficacy of treatment with rivaroxaban, but our observations require further prospective, randomized studies. PMID:27504026

  10. Rivaroxaban – a safe therapeutic option in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome? Our experience in 23 cases

    PubMed Central

    Olesińska, Marzena

    2016-01-01

    In the therapeutic approach to patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) with thrombotic manifestations, oral vitamin K antagonists (VKA) remain the standard of care. However, the use of VKA is very often associated with inability to achieve a therapeutic dose even in patients maintaining nutritional and therapeutic restrictions. The non-vitamin-K oral anticoagulants (NOAC) have a lot of advantages, but their efficacy and safety in APS have not been proven. We present 23 patients with APS treated with rivaroxaban in our department. Recurrence of thrombosis was observed only in 1 patient. No major or minor bleeding occurred. It proves the efficacy of treatment with rivaroxaban, but our observations require further prospective, randomized studies. PMID:27504026

  11. Is the medical use of cannabis a therapeutic option for children?

    PubMed

    Rieder, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis is a psychoactive compound with a long history of recreational and therapeutic use. Current considerations regarding cannabis use for medical purposes in children have been stimulated by recent case reports describing its beneficial effect with refractory epilepsy. Overall, there are insufficient data to support either the efficacy or safety of cannabis use for any indications in children, and an increasing body of data suggests possible harm, most importantly in specific conditions. The potential for cannabis as a therapeutic agent must be evaluated carefully for both efficacy and safety in treating specific paediatric health conditions. Smoking is not an acceptable mode of drug delivery for children. The use of cannabis for medical purposes in specific cases should not be construed as a justification for recreational cannabis use by adolescents. Recommendations for therapeutic use in exceptional paediatric cases are offered, always providing that this treatment course is carefully evaluated in individuals and in ongoing, well-designed research studies to determine safety and efficacy.

  12. Gastric carcinoids and therapeutic options. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Dobru, Daniela; Boeriu, Alina; Mocan, Simona; Pascarenco, Ofelia; Boeriu, Cristian; Molnar, Calin

    2013-03-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (carcinoids) are tumors originating from neuroendocrine cells. The distinction between different types of gastric carcinoids is important for their management. We present the case of a 38-year old woman with type 1 gastric neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) associated with autoimmune atrophic gastritis. The management of these tumors has not been yet codified and different therapeutic strategies have been suggested. A proper evaluation before therapy is indicated in order to rule out both the malignant transformation as well as the presence of synchronous lesions, such as dysplasia or gastric adenocarcinoma. We describe our diagnostic and therapeutic strategies with references to previously published reports. PMID:23539397

  13. Passive solar addition to therapeutic pre-school. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    This project consisted of designing and constructing a passive solar system on a new classroom addition to the Peanut Butter and Jelly Therapeutic Pre-School in Albuquerque, NM. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the applicability of solar space heating systems to large institutional buildings, and to demonstrate the energy and cost savings available through the use of such systems. Preliminary estimates indicated that the passive solar systems will provide about 90 percent of the heating and cooling needs for the new classroom addition to the school.

  14. Regulation of kallikrein-related peptidases in the skin - from physiology to diseases to therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Fischer, J; Meyer-Hoffert, U

    2013-09-01

    Kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) constitute a family of 15 highly conserved serine proteases, which show a tissue-specific expression profile. This made them valuable tumour expression markers. It became evident that KLKs are involved in many physiological processes like semen liquefaction and skin desquamation. More recently, we have learnt that they are involved in many pathophysiological conditions and diseases making them promising target of therapeutic intervention. Therefore, regulation of KLKs raised the interest of numerous reports. Herein, we summarise the current knowledge on KLKs regulation with an emphasis on skin-relevant KLKs regulation processes. Regulation of KLKs takes place on the level of transcription, on protease activation and on protease inactivation. A variety of protease inhibitors has been described to interact with KLKs including the irreversible serine protease inhibitors (SERPINs) and the reversible serine protease inhibitors of Kazal-type (SPINKs). In an attempt to integrate current knowledge, we propose that KLK regulation has credentials as targets for therapeutic intervention.

  15. Treatment of hyperuricemia in gout: current therapeutic options, latest developments and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Sattui, Sebastian E.; Gaffo, Angelo L.

    2016-01-01

    Despite being the most common type of inflammatory arthritis, gout is often poorly managed. Except for febuxostat and pegloticase, research in new therapeutic agents for the management of hyperuricemia in gout remained insufficient for several decades. With emerging evidence of possible roles of hyperuricemia in cardiometabolic comorbidities, as well as more convincing evidence regarding poor outcomes (e.g. disability, recurrent hospital admissions) in patients with uncontrolled gout, several agents are current under development. Increasing knowledge regarding renal urate transporters has resulted in the development of new generation uricosurics such as lesinurad and arhalofenate. This review aims at discussing current therapeutic strategies for gout, as well as their limitations and the possible role of emerging agents in the chronic management of hyperuricemia in gout. Drugs in phases I and II of development will be discussed, along with new agents and therapeutic classes, such as purine nucleoside phosphorylase inhibitors and dual-action drugs. These new developments are encouraging, and will hopefully contribute to a more adequate management of hyperuricemia in gout. PMID:27493693

  16. Is the medical use of cannabis a therapeutic option for children?

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis is a psychoactive compound with a long history of recreational and therapeutic use. Current considerations regarding cannabis use for medical purposes in children have been stimulated by recent case reports describing its beneficial effect with refractory epilepsy. Overall, there are insufficient data to support either the efficacy or safety of cannabis use for any indications in children, and an increasing body of data suggests possible harm, most importantly in specific conditions. The potential for cannabis as a therapeutic agent must be evaluated carefully for both efficacy and safety in treating specific paediatric health conditions. Smoking is not an acceptable mode of drug delivery for children. The use of cannabis for medical purposes in specific cases should not be construed as a justification for recreational cannabis use by adolescents. Recommendations for therapeutic use in exceptional paediatric cases are offered, always providing that this treatment course is carefully evaluated in individuals and in ongoing, well-designed research studies to determine safety and efficacy. PMID:26941559

  17. Treatment of hyperuricemia in gout: current therapeutic options, latest developments and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Sattui, Sebastian E; Gaffo, Angelo L

    2016-08-01

    Despite being the most common type of inflammatory arthritis, gout is often poorly managed. Except for febuxostat and pegloticase, research in new therapeutic agents for the management of hyperuricemia in gout remained insufficient for several decades. With emerging evidence of possible roles of hyperuricemia in cardiometabolic comorbidities, as well as more convincing evidence regarding poor outcomes (e.g. disability, recurrent hospital admissions) in patients with uncontrolled gout, several agents are current under development. Increasing knowledge regarding renal urate transporters has resulted in the development of new generation uricosurics such as lesinurad and arhalofenate. This review aims at discussing current therapeutic strategies for gout, as well as their limitations and the possible role of emerging agents in the chronic management of hyperuricemia in gout. Drugs in phases I and II of development will be discussed, along with new agents and therapeutic classes, such as purine nucleoside phosphorylase inhibitors and dual-action drugs. These new developments are encouraging, and will hopefully contribute to a more adequate management of hyperuricemia in gout. PMID:27493693

  18. [Ocular Hypotension: How the Retina Surgeon Sees the Causes and Therapeutic Options].

    PubMed

    Joussen, A M; Strauß, O; Winterhalter, S; Klamann, M; Dietrich-Ntoukas, T; Müller, B

    2016-09-01

    Ocular hypotension is a result of a lack of production or a loss of intraocular fluid. Intraocular inflammation, drugs, or proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) with overgrowth of the ciliary body can result in reduced secretion of intraocular fluid. Loss of intraocular fluid can result from external loss, such as in fistulating surgery or trauma, or internally, e.g. from cyclodialysis clefts or retinal detachment. In this review, we discuss the causal therapy of ocular hypotension: fixation of the ciliary body, removal of ciliary body membranes, surgery for PVR, choice of tamponade, possibilities and limitations of an iris diaphragm, and pharmacological options. PMID:27617647

  19. Tacrolimus combined with low-dose corticosteroids is an effective and safe therapeutic option for refractory IgA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Qi-Jun; Hu, Hao-Fei; He, Yong-Cheng; Luan, Shao-Dong; Chen, Hong-Tao; Li, Tong; Xu, Yi; Xu, Hui-Li; Liao, Ying

    2016-01-01

    -dose corticosteroids may be an effective and safe therapeutic option for the treatment of refractory IgAN. However, given the small number of patients in this study, further prospective randomized controlled trials are required with a larger sample of participants and longer follow-up period. PMID:27602099

  20. New direct oral anticoagulants--current therapeutic options and treatment recommendations for bleeding complications.

    PubMed

    Miesbach, Wolfgang; Seifried, Erhard

    2012-10-01

    To date, clinical studies show that the incidence of spontaneous bleeding with new direct oral anticoagulants (DOAs) is comparable to that of established anticoagulants. However, unlike vitamin K antagonists, there are currently no clinically available antidotes or approved reversal agents for new DOAs. Restoring normal coagulation is important in many cases, such as emergency surgeries, serious bleedings, or anticoagulant overdosing. Attempts have been made to restore normal coagulation after treatment with new DOAs using compounds such as recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa), prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC), or FEIBA (factor eight inhibitor bypassing activity). Limited pre-clinical data and even less clinical evidence are available on the usefulness of these methods in restoring normal coagulation for the emergency management of critical bleeding episodes. Evaluating the utility of DOAs is further complicated by the fact that it is unknown how predictive established test systems are of the bleeding risks. Clinical practice requires further evaluation of the emergency management options for the new DOAs to define the agents and the doses that are most useful. Furthermore, patients receiving long-term treatment with a DOA are likely to undergo elective surgery at some point, and there is lack of evidence regarding perioperative treatment regimens under such conditions. This review summarises potential bleeding management options and available data on the new DOAs. PMID:22782297

  1. 45 CFR 1306.36 - Additional Head Start program option variations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., home-based, combination programs, and family child care options defined in this part, the Director of the Office of Head Start retains the right to fund alternative program variations to meet the unique needs of communities or to demonstrate or test alternative approaches for providing Head Start services....

  2. Current state of evidence on 'off-label' therapeutic options for systemic lupus erythematosus, including biological immunosuppressive agents, in Germany, Austria and Switzerland--a consensus report.

    PubMed

    Aringer, M; Burkhardt, H; Burmester, G R; Fischer-Betz, R; Fleck, M; Graninger, W; Hiepe, F; Jacobi, A M; Kötter, I; Lakomek, H J; Lorenz, H M; Manger, B; Schett, G; Schmidt, R E; Schneider, M; Schulze-Koops, H; Smolen, J S; Specker, C; Stoll, T; Strangfeld, A; Tony, H P; Villiger, P M; Voll, R; Witte, T; Dörner, T

    2012-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can be a severe and potentially life-threatening disease that often represents a therapeutic challenge because of its heterogeneous organ manifestations. Only glucocorticoids, chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, azathioprine, cyclophosphamide and very recently belimumab have been approved for SLE therapy in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. Dependence on glucocorticoids and resistance to the approved therapeutic agents, as well as substantial toxicity, are frequent. Therefore, treatment considerations will include 'off-label' use of medication approved for other indications. In this consensus approach, an effort has been undertaken to delineate the limits of the current evidence on therapeutic options for SLE organ disease, and to agree on common practice. This has been based on the best available evidence obtained by a rigorous literature review and the authors' own experience with available drugs derived under very similar health care conditions. Preparation of this consensus document included an initial meeting to agree upon the core agenda, a systematic literature review with subsequent formulation of a consensus and determination of the evidence level followed by collecting the level of agreement from the panel members. In addition to overarching principles, the panel have focused on the treatment of major SLE organ manifestations (lupus nephritis, arthritis, lung disease, neuropsychiatric and haematological manifestations, antiphospholipid syndrome and serositis). This consensus report is intended to support clinicians involved in the care of patients with difficult courses of SLE not responding to standard therapies by providing up-to-date information on the best available evidence.

  3. Therapeutic options for patients with polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia refractory/resistant to hydroxyurea

    PubMed Central

    Sever, Matjaz; Newberry, Kate J.; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyurea (HU) has traditionally been the first-line treatment for patients with PV or ET at high-risk for vascular complications. However, approximately 20-25% of patients develop resistance or intolerance to HU and must be treated with second-line therapies. Resistance is associated with disease transformation and reduced survival. However, given the dearth of large-scale controlled clinical trials in this patient population, there is no clear consensus on how to best treat patients who develop resistance or intolerance to HU. Herein, we review current literature on treatment options for patients with HU-refractory/resistant PV or ET and provide recommendations for treating these patients. PMID:24524340

  4. Genome Integrity in Aging: Human Syndromes, Mouse Models, and Therapeutic Options.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, Wilbert P; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Pothof, Joris

    2016-01-01

    Human syndromes and mouse mutants that exhibit accelerated but bona fide aging in multiple organs and tissues have been invaluable for the identification of nine denominators of aging: telomere attrition, genome instability, epigenetic alterations, mitochondrial dysfunction, deregulated nutrient sensing, altered intercellular communication, loss of proteostasis, cellular senescence and adult stem cell exhaustion. However, whether and how these instigators of aging interrelate or whether they have one root cause is currently largely unknown. Rare human progeroid syndromes and corresponding mouse mutants with resolved genetic defects highlight the dominant importance of genome maintenance for aging. A second class of aging-related disorders reveals a cross connection with metabolism. As genome maintenance and metabolism are closely interconnected, they may constitute the main underlying biology of aging. This review focuses on the role of genome stability in aging, its crosstalk with metabolism, and options for nutritional and/or pharmaceutical interventions that delay age-related pathology.

  5. Genome Integrity in Aging: Human Syndromes, Mouse Models, and Therapeutic Options.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, Wilbert P; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Pothof, Joris

    2016-01-01

    Human syndromes and mouse mutants that exhibit accelerated but bona fide aging in multiple organs and tissues have been invaluable for the identification of nine denominators of aging: telomere attrition, genome instability, epigenetic alterations, mitochondrial dysfunction, deregulated nutrient sensing, altered intercellular communication, loss of proteostasis, cellular senescence and adult stem cell exhaustion. However, whether and how these instigators of aging interrelate or whether they have one root cause is currently largely unknown. Rare human progeroid syndromes and corresponding mouse mutants with resolved genetic defects highlight the dominant importance of genome maintenance for aging. A second class of aging-related disorders reveals a cross connection with metabolism. As genome maintenance and metabolism are closely interconnected, they may constitute the main underlying biology of aging. This review focuses on the role of genome stability in aging, its crosstalk with metabolism, and options for nutritional and/or pharmaceutical interventions that delay age-related pathology. PMID:26514200

  6. Therapeutic options for chronic myeloid leukemia: focus on imatinib (Glivec®, Gleevec™)

    PubMed Central

    Henkes, Martin; van der Kuip, Heiko; Aulitzky, Walter E

    2008-01-01

    Treatment options for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) have changed dramatically during the last decades. Interferon-α treatment and stem cell transplantation (SCT) clearly improved survival over conventional chemotherapy and offered the possibility of complete and durable responses. With the advent of the small molecule inhibitor imatinib mesylate (Glivec®, Gleevec™) targeting the causative Bcr-Abl oncoprotein, the era of molecular cancer therapy began with remarkable success especially in chronic phase patients. Today, imatinib is the first-line treatment for CML. However, imatinib does not appear to be capable to eliminate all leukemia cells in the patients and pre-existing as well as acquired resistance to the drug has been increasingly recognized. To overcome these problems, several strategies involving dose escalation, combinations with other agents, and novel Bcr-Abl inhibitors have been developed. PMID:18728706

  7. Predictive Biomarkers in Colorectal Cancer: From the Single Therapeutic Target to a Plethora of Options.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Daniela; Longatto-Filho, Adhemar; Martins, Sandra F

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most frequent cancers and is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Treatments used for CRC may include some combination of surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy. The current standard drugs used in chemotherapy are 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin in combination with irinotecan and/or oxaliplatin. Most recently, biologic agents have been proven to have therapeutic benefits in metastatic CRC alone or in association with standard chemotherapy. However, patients present different treatment responses, in terms of efficacy and toxicity; therefore, it is important to identify biological markers that can predict the response to therapy and help select patients that would benefit from specific regimens. In this paper, authors review CRC genetic markers that could be useful in predicting the sensitivity/resistance to chemotherapy. PMID:27563673

  8. Therapeutic options for acute cough due to upper respiratory infections in children.

    PubMed

    Paul, Ian M

    2012-02-01

    Cough due to upper respiratory tract infections (URIs) is one of the most frequent complaints encountered by pediatric health-care providers, and one of the most disruptive symptoms for children and families. Despite the frequency of URIs, there is limited evidence to support the few therapeutic agents currently available in the United States (US) to treat acute cough due to URI. Published, well-designed, contemporary research supporting the efficacy of narcotics (codeine, hydrocodone) and US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved over-the-counter (OTC) oral antitussives and expectorants (dextromethorphan, diphenhydramine, chlophedianol, and guaifenesin) is absent for URI-associated pediatric cough. Alternatively, honey and topically applied vapor rubs may be effective antitussives. PMID:21892785

  9. Predictive Biomarkers in Colorectal Cancer: From the Single Therapeutic Target to a Plethora of Options

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Daniela; Longatto-Filho, Adhemar

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most frequent cancers and is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Treatments used for CRC may include some combination of surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy. The current standard drugs used in chemotherapy are 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin in combination with irinotecan and/or oxaliplatin. Most recently, biologic agents have been proven to have therapeutic benefits in metastatic CRC alone or in association with standard chemotherapy. However, patients present different treatment responses, in terms of efficacy and toxicity; therefore, it is important to identify biological markers that can predict the response to therapy and help select patients that would benefit from specific regimens. In this paper, authors review CRC genetic markers that could be useful in predicting the sensitivity/resistance to chemotherapy. PMID:27563673

  10. Therapeutic Options for the Treatment of Hypertension in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Mary M.; Fox, Beth A.; Maxwell, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Primary hypertension in children is increasing in prevalence with many cases likely going undiagnosed. The prevalence is currently estimated at between 3%–5% in the United States and may be higher in certain ethnic groups. Primary hypertension, once felt to be rare in children, is now considered to be about five times more common than secondary hypertension. This review provides information to guide physicians through an organized approach to: 1) screening children and adolescents for hypertension during routine visits; 2) using normative percentile data for diagnosis and classification; 3) performing a clinical evaluation to identify the presence of co-morbidities; 4) initiating a plan of care including subsequent follow-up blood pressure measurements, therapeutic lifestyle changes and pharmacologic therapies. PMID:22408373

  11. Therapeutic options for acute cough due to upper respiratory infections in children.

    PubMed

    Paul, Ian M

    2012-02-01

    Cough due to upper respiratory tract infections (URIs) is one of the most frequent complaints encountered by pediatric health-care providers, and one of the most disruptive symptoms for children and families. Despite the frequency of URIs, there is limited evidence to support the few therapeutic agents currently available in the United States (US) to treat acute cough due to URI. Published, well-designed, contemporary research supporting the efficacy of narcotics (codeine, hydrocodone) and US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved over-the-counter (OTC) oral antitussives and expectorants (dextromethorphan, diphenhydramine, chlophedianol, and guaifenesin) is absent for URI-associated pediatric cough. Alternatively, honey and topically applied vapor rubs may be effective antitussives.

  12. Evolving Therapeutic Options for Polycythemia Vera: Perspectives of the Canadian Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Group.

    PubMed

    Sirhan, Shireen; Busque, Lambert; Foltz, Lynda; Grewal, Kuljit; Hamm, Caroline; Laferriere, Nicole; Laneuville, Pierre; Leber, Brian; Liew, Elena; Olney, Harold J; Prchal, Jaroslav; Porwit, Anna; Gupta, Vikas

    2015-12-01

    Polycythemia vera (PV) is a clonal stem cell disorder characterized by erythrocytosis and associated with burdensome symptoms, reduced quality of life, risk of thrombohemorrhagic complications, and risk of transformation to myelofibrosis and acute myeloid leukemia. The discovery of the JAK2 V617 mutation marked a significant milestone in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease and subsequently the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. The current diagnostic criteria for PV are based on hemoglobin level and presence of the JAK2 V617 mutation. The treatment is geared toward prevention of thrombotic events, normalization of blood counts, control of disease-related symptoms, and potential prolongation of survival. Cytoreductive therapy is indicated in patients at increased risk of thrombosis. Hydroxyurea (HU) remains the most commonly used first-line cytoreductive therapy and is superior to phlebotomy in reducing risk of arterial and venous thrombosis. Interferon (IFN) is used either at failure of HU or in selected patients as first-line therapy. The results of pegylated IFN in phase 2 studies appear encouraging, with molecular responses occurring in some patients. Ongoing phase 3 studies of HU versus pegylated IFN will define the optimal first-line cytoreductive therapy for PV. A recent phase 3 trial has shown the superiority of the JAK1/2 inhibitor ruxolitinib in comparison to best available treatment in HU-intolerant or -resistant patients. The therapeutic landscape of PV is likely to change in the near future. In this report, we assess the potential impact of the changing landscape of PV management on daily practice. PMID:26433906

  13. Evolution in the treatment of gastroenteropancreatic-neuroendocrine neoplasms, focus on systemic therapeutic options: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pusceddu, Sara; De Braud, Filippo; Festinese, Fabrizio; Bregant, Cristina; Lorenzoni, Alice; Maccauro, Marco; Milione, Massimo; Concas, Laura; Formisano, Barbara; Leuzzi, Livia; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Buzzoni, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) are a group of heterogeneous tumors. The present review discusses current therapeutic strategies for the treatment of gastro-entero-pancreatic NEN. Several systemic options are currently available, including medical systemic chemotherapy, biological drugs, somatostatin analogs and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy. The carcinoid syndrome can be adequately controlled with somatostatin analogs; chemotherapy has shown positive outcomes in poor prognosis patients, and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy is a promising treatment based on the use of radioisotopes for advanced disease expressing somatostatin receptors. Targeted therapies, such as multikinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies are also recommended or under evaluation for the treatment of advanced NENs, but some critical issues in clinical practice remain unresolved. Depending upon the development of the disease, a multimodal approach is recommended. The treatment strategy for metastatic patients should be planned by a multidisciplinary team in order to define the optimal sequence of treatments.

  14. [Vitamin D and Alzheimer's disease: from an intriguing idea to a therapeutic option].

    PubMed

    Annweiler, Cédric

    2014-01-01

    Beyond the classically described regulation of calcium and bone metabolism, vitamin D is a neurosteroid hormone essential to neurophysiological function (regulation of neurotransmitters and neurotrophins) with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant neuroprotective action. In contrast, hypovitaminosis D, which is extremely frequent in the elderly, may result in neurological dysfunction and may explain part of the cognitive disorders in this population. Epidemiology is consistent with this notion and has repeatedly shown an association between hypovitaminosis D and cognitive decline, either in the general population or in Alzheimer's patients. Preliminary intervention trials confirm the causal relationship and quantify the cognitive effect of vitamin D supplementation in the elderly. This raises prospects for primary/secondary prevention of cognitive decline by exogenous supplies of vitamin D. In particular, although current anti-dementia drugs are only symptomatic, future treatment options could rely on drug combinations preventing several neurodegenerative mechanisms at once. As such, vitamin D enhances the efficacy of memantine in terms of neuronal protection and prevention of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Extended Ultrastructural Characterization of Chordoma Cells: The Link to New Therapeutic Options

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, Dagmar; Pritz, Elisabeth; Steinecker-Frohnwieser, Bibiane; Lohberger, Birgit; Deutsch, Alexander; Kroneis, Thomas; El-Heliebi, Amin; Dohr, Gottfried; Meditz, Katharina; Wagner, Karin; Koefeler, Harald; Leitinger, Gerd; Leithner, Andreas; Liegl-Atzwanger, Bernadette; Zweytick, Dagmar; Rinner, Beate

    2014-01-01

    Chordomas are rare bone tumors, developed from the notochord and largely resistant to chemotherapy. A special feature of this tumor is the heterogeneity of its cells. By combining high pressure freezing (HPF) with electron tomography we were able to illustrate the connections within the cells, the cell-cell interface, and the mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membrane complex that appears to play a special role among the characteristics of chordoma. These lipid raft-like regions are responsible for lipid syntheses and for calcium signaling. Compared to other tumor cells, chordoma cells show a close connection of rough endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, which may influence the sphingolipid metabolism and calcium release. We quantified levels of ceramide and glycosylceramide species by the methyl tert-butyl ether extraction method and we assessed the intracellular calcium concentration with the ratiometric fluorescent dye Fura-2AM. Measurements of the changes in the intracellular calcium concentration revealed an increase in calcium due to the application of acetylcholine. With regard to lipid synthesis, glucosylceramide levels in the chordoma cell line were significantly higher than those in normal healthy cells. The accumulation of glycosylceramide in drug resistant cancer cells has been confirmed in many types of cancer and may also account for drug resistance in chordoma. This study aimed to provide a deep morphological description of chordoma cells, it demonstrated that HPF analysis is useful in elucidating detailed structural information. Furthermore we demonstrate how an accumulation of glycosylceramide in chordoma provides links to drug resistance and opens up the field for new research options. PMID:25479055

  16. [Lower urinary tract obstruction (LUTO)--clinical picture, prenatal diagnostics and therapeutic options].

    PubMed

    Bildau, J; Enzensberger, C; Degenhardt, J; Kawecki, A; Tenzer, A; Kohl, T; Stressig, R; Ritgen, J; Utsch, B; Axt-Fliedner, R

    2014-02-01

    The aetiology of urinary tract obstructions (LUTO) is heterogeneous. The most common entities are isolated posterior urethral valves or urethral atresia in male foetuses. In female foetuses LUTO is frequently a part of complex malformations. The natural history of LUTO is characterised by high morbidity and mortality due to the development of severe pulmonary hypoplasia caused by oligo- or anhydramnios affecting the cannalicular phase (16-24 weeks of gestation) of pulmonary development. The degree of renal damage is variable and ranges from mild renal impairment in infancy to end-stage renal insufficiency, necessitating dialysis and transplantation. Foetal interventions in order to bypass the obstruction are biologically plausible and technically feasible. Vesico-amniotic shunting as well as (currently less frequent) foetoscopic cystoscopy and laser ablation of posterior urethral valves are minimally invasive treatment options. Previous reports indicate that prenatal therapy is suitable to reduce perinatal mortality but does not improve postnatal renal function. Selection of foetuses who may profit from prenatal intervention is aggravated by the lack of reliable prognostic criteria for the prediction of postnatal renal function in both ultrasound and foetal urine analysis. Furthermore, there is no randomised trial available at the time of writing. Because of a relevant complication rate and still no clear evidence for foetal benefit, interventions should be performed in specialised centres. Further studies are necessary to improve case selection of affected foetuses and to evaluate the impact of interventions in earlier gestational weeks. The data from the PLUTO trial (percutaneous shunting in lower urinary tract obstruction) conducted by the University of Birmingham may help to answer these questions. In the meantime selection of foetuses for prenatal intervention puts high requirements on interdisciplinary counselling in every case. A general treatment algorithm

  17. Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells: A New Therapeutic Option for Tooth Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuanwei; Yu, Yongchun; Chen, Lin; Ye, Lanfeng; Cui, Junhui; Sun, Quan; Li, Kaide; Li, Zhiyong; Liu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Tooth regeneration is considered to be an optimistic approach to replace current treatments for tooth loss. It is important to determine the most suitable seed cells for tooth regeneration. Recently, human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) have been regarded as a promising candidate for tissue regeneration. However, it has not been reported whether hUCMSCs can be employed in tooth regeneration. Here, we report that hUCMSCs can be induced into odontoblast-like cells in vitro and in vivo. Induced hUCMSCs expressed dentin-related proteins including dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1), and their gene expression levels were similar to those in native pulp tissue cells. Moreover, DSP- and DMP-1-positive calcifications were observed after implantation of hUCMSCs in vivo. These findings reveal that hUCMSCs have an odontogenic differentiation potency to differentiate to odontoblast-like cells with characteristic deposition of dentin-like matrix in vivo. This study clearly demonstrates hUCMSCs as an alternative therapeutic cell source for tooth regeneration.

  18. [Advanced luminal breast cancer (hormone receptor-positive, HER2 negative): New therapeutic options in 2015].

    PubMed

    Vanacker, Hélène; Bally, Olivia; Kassem, Loay; Tredan, Olivier; Heudel, Pierre; Bachelot, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Despite improvements in early detection, surgery and systemic therapy, metastatic breast cancer remains a major cause of death. Luminal type breast cancers expressing hormone estrogen receptor (ER) or progesterone (PR) and without HER2 overexpression are generally sensitive to endocrine therapy, but raise the issue of the occurrence of resistance to treatment, particularly at metastatic stage. A better understanding of hormone resistance may guide the development of new therapeutics. New strategies aim at enhancing and prolonging of endocrine sensitivity, by optimizing existing schemes, or by combining an endocrine therapy with a targeted therapies specific to hormone resistance pathways: ER signaling, PI3K/AKT/mTOR and Cyclin Dependent Kinase (CDK). Key corners of 2014 include confirmation of benefit of high dose fulvestrant, and commercialization of everolimus as the first mTOR inhibitor in this indication. Other strategies are being tested dealing with new endocrine therapies or new molecular targets such as PI3K inhibitors, insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-R) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. Coming years may be fruitful and might radically change our way to treat these patients.

  19. Can Plazomicin Alone or in Combination Be a Therapeutic Option against Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii?

    PubMed Central

    García-Salguero, Cristina; Rodríguez-Avial, Iciar; Picazo, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    Nosocomial pathogens can be associated with a variety of infections, particularly in intensive care units (ICUs) and in immunocompromised patients. Usually these pathogens are resistant to multiple drugs and pose therapeutic challenges. Among these organisms, Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the most frequent being encountered in the clinical setting. Carbapenems are very useful to treat infections caused by these drug-resistant Gram-negative bacilli, but carbapenem resistance is increasing globally. Combination therapy is frequently given empirically for hospital-acquired infections in critically ill patients and is usually composed of an adequate beta-lactam and an aminoglycoside. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the in vitro activity of plazomicin against carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Amikacin was used as a comparator. The activity of plazomicin in combination with several different antibiotics was tested by disk diffusion, the checkerboard method, and time-kill studies. Synergy was consistently observed with carbapenems (meropenem and/or imipenem) along with plazomicin or amikacin. When the aminoglycosides were combined with other classes of antibiotics, synergy was observed in some cases, depending on the strain and the antibiotic combination; importantly, there was no antagonism observed in any case. These findings indicate the potential utility of plazomicin in combination with other antibiotics (mainly carbapenems) for the treatment of A. baumannii infections, including those caused by carbapenem-resistant isolates. PMID:26169398

  20. [Advanced luminal breast cancer (hormone receptor-positive, HER2 negative): New therapeutic options in 2015].

    PubMed

    Vanacker, Hélène; Bally, Olivia; Kassem, Loay; Tredan, Olivier; Heudel, Pierre; Bachelot, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Despite improvements in early detection, surgery and systemic therapy, metastatic breast cancer remains a major cause of death. Luminal type breast cancers expressing hormone estrogen receptor (ER) or progesterone (PR) and without HER2 overexpression are generally sensitive to endocrine therapy, but raise the issue of the occurrence of resistance to treatment, particularly at metastatic stage. A better understanding of hormone resistance may guide the development of new therapeutics. New strategies aim at enhancing and prolonging of endocrine sensitivity, by optimizing existing schemes, or by combining an endocrine therapy with a targeted therapies specific to hormone resistance pathways: ER signaling, PI3K/AKT/mTOR and Cyclin Dependent Kinase (CDK). Key corners of 2014 include confirmation of benefit of high dose fulvestrant, and commercialization of everolimus as the first mTOR inhibitor in this indication. Other strategies are being tested dealing with new endocrine therapies or new molecular targets such as PI3K inhibitors, insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-R) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. Coming years may be fruitful and might radically change our way to treat these patients. PMID:26118876

  1. The challenge of Clostridium difficile infection: Overview of clinical manifestations, diagnostic tools and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Postma, Nynke; Kiers, Dorien; Pickkers, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The most important infectious cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and colitis is Clostridium difficile, which is a Gram-positive, anaerobic, spore-forming, toxin-producing bacillus. In this overview we will discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic management of patients presenting with suspected or proven C. difficile infection (CDI). The clinical spectrum varies from asymptomatic C. difficile carriers to fulminant colitis with multi-organ failure. The onset of symptoms is usually within 2 weeks after initiation of antibiotic treatment. Diagnosis is based on the combination of clinical symptoms and either a positive stool test for C. difficile toxins or endoscopic or histological findings of pseudomembranous colitis. There is no indication for treatment of asymptomatic carriers, but patients with proven CDI should be treated. Treatment consists of cessation of the provoking antibiotic treatment, secondary prevention by infection control strategies, and treatment with metronidazole or vancomycin. Treatment of recurring CDI, severe infection, the need for surgery, and novel alternative potential treatment strategies will be discussed. The concurrent increase in multiresistant colonisation and increasing numbers of asymptomatic carriers of C. difficile will lead to an increase of the situation in which patients with severe infections, treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics, will develop concurrent severe CDI. We will discuss possible therapy strategies for these patients.

  2. Can Plazomicin Alone or in Combination Be a Therapeutic Option against Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii?

    PubMed

    García-Salguero, Cristina; Rodríguez-Avial, Iciar; Picazo, Juan J; Culebras, Esther

    2015-10-01

    Nosocomial pathogens can be associated with a variety of infections, particularly in intensive care units (ICUs) and in immunocompromised patients. Usually these pathogens are resistant to multiple drugs and pose therapeutic challenges. Among these organisms, Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the most frequent being encountered in the clinical setting. Carbapenems are very useful to treat infections caused by these drug-resistant Gram-negative bacilli, but carbapenem resistance is increasing globally. Combination therapy is frequently given empirically for hospital-acquired infections in critically ill patients and is usually composed of an adequate beta-lactam and an aminoglycoside. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the in vitro activity of plazomicin against carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Amikacin was used as a comparator. The activity of plazomicin in combination with several different antibiotics was tested by disk diffusion, the checkerboard method, and time-kill studies. Synergy was consistently observed with carbapenems (meropenem and/or imipenem) along with plazomicin or amikacin. When the aminoglycosides were combined with other classes of antibiotics, synergy was observed in some cases, depending on the strain and the antibiotic combination; importantly, there was no antagonism observed in any case. These findings indicate the potential utility of plazomicin in combination with other antibiotics (mainly carbapenems) for the treatment of A. baumannii infections, including those caused by carbapenem-resistant isolates. PMID:26169398

  3. Allele-specific suppression of mutant huntingtin using antisense oligonucleotides: providing a therapeutic option for all Huntington disease patients.

    PubMed

    Skotte, Niels H; Southwell, Amber L; Østergaard, Michael E; Carroll, Jeffrey B; Warby, Simon C; Doty, Crystal N; Petoukhov, Eugenia; Vaid, Kuljeet; Kordasiewicz, Holly; Watt, Andrew T; Freier, Susan M; Hung, Gene; Seth, Punit P; Bennett, C Frank; Swayze, Eric E; Hayden, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited, fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. The mutant protein causes neuronal dysfunction and degeneration resulting in motor dysfunction, cognitive decline, and psychiatric disturbances. Currently, there is no disease altering treatment, and symptomatic therapy has limited benefit. The pathogenesis of HD is complicated and multiple pathways are compromised. Addressing the problem at its genetic root by suppressing mutant huntingtin expression is a promising therapeutic strategy for HD. We have developed and evaluated antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeting single nucleotide polymorphisms that are significantly enriched on HD alleles (HD-SNPs). We describe our structure-activity relationship studies for ASO design and find that adjusting the SNP position within the gap, chemical modifications of the wings, and shortening the unmodified gap are critical for potent, specific, and well tolerated silencing of mutant huntingtin. Finally, we show that using two distinct ASO drugs targeting the two allelic variants of an HD-SNP could provide a therapeutic option for all persons with HD; allele-specifically for roughly half, and non-specifically for the remainder.

  4. Allele-Specific Suppression of Mutant Huntingtin Using Antisense Oligonucleotides: Providing a Therapeutic Option for All Huntington Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Skotte, Niels H.; Southwell, Amber L.; Østergaard, Michael E.; Carroll, Jeffrey B.; Warby, Simon C.; Doty, Crystal N.; Petoukhov, Eugenia; Vaid, Kuljeet; Kordasiewicz, Holly; Watt, Andrew T.; Freier, Susan M.; Hung, Gene; Seth, Punit P.; Bennett, C. Frank; Swayze, Eric E.; Hayden, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited, fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. The mutant protein causes neuronal dysfunction and degeneration resulting in motor dysfunction, cognitive decline, and psychiatric disturbances. Currently, there is no disease altering treatment, and symptomatic therapy has limited benefit. The pathogenesis of HD is complicated and multiple pathways are compromised. Addressing the problem at its genetic root by suppressing mutant huntingtin expression is a promising therapeutic strategy for HD. We have developed and evaluated antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeting single nucleotide polymorphisms that are significantly enriched on HD alleles (HD-SNPs). We describe our structure-activity relationship studies for ASO design and find that adjusting the SNP position within the gap, chemical modifications of the wings, and shortening the unmodified gap are critical for potent, specific, and well tolerated silencing of mutant huntingtin. Finally, we show that using two distinct ASO drugs targeting the two allelic variants of an HD-SNP could provide a therapeutic option for all persons with HD; allele-specifically for roughly half, and non-specifically for the remainder. PMID:25207939

  5. Allele-specific suppression of mutant huntingtin using antisense oligonucleotides: providing a therapeutic option for all Huntington disease patients.

    PubMed

    Skotte, Niels H; Southwell, Amber L; Østergaard, Michael E; Carroll, Jeffrey B; Warby, Simon C; Doty, Crystal N; Petoukhov, Eugenia; Vaid, Kuljeet; Kordasiewicz, Holly; Watt, Andrew T; Freier, Susan M; Hung, Gene; Seth, Punit P; Bennett, C Frank; Swayze, Eric E; Hayden, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited, fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. The mutant protein causes neuronal dysfunction and degeneration resulting in motor dysfunction, cognitive decline, and psychiatric disturbances. Currently, there is no disease altering treatment, and symptomatic therapy has limited benefit. The pathogenesis of HD is complicated and multiple pathways are compromised. Addressing the problem at its genetic root by suppressing mutant huntingtin expression is a promising therapeutic strategy for HD. We have developed and evaluated antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeting single nucleotide polymorphisms that are significantly enriched on HD alleles (HD-SNPs). We describe our structure-activity relationship studies for ASO design and find that adjusting the SNP position within the gap, chemical modifications of the wings, and shortening the unmodified gap are critical for potent, specific, and well tolerated silencing of mutant huntingtin. Finally, we show that using two distinct ASO drugs targeting the two allelic variants of an HD-SNP could provide a therapeutic option for all persons with HD; allele-specifically for roughly half, and non-specifically for the remainder. PMID:25207939

  6. [Cell-based therapies - an innovative therapeutic option in ophthalmology: Treating corneal diseases with stem cells].

    PubMed

    Bakker, Ann-Christin; Langer, Barbara

    2015-11-01

    Pathological changes and disorders of the cornea are a major cause of severe visual impairment and blindness. Replacement of a pathologically altered cornea with healthy corneal tissue from the eye of a suitable donor is among the most common and successful transplantation procedures in medicine. In Germany, approximately 5000-6000 corneal transplantations are performed each year, but the total demand per year is estimated to be twice as high. With a success rate of 90%, the outcome of cornea transplantation is very favourable. However, long-term maintenance and regeneration of a healthy new cornea requires tissue-specific corneal stem cells residing at the basal layer of the limbus, which is the annular transition zone between the cornea and sclera. When this important limbal stem cell population is destroyed or dysfunctional, a pathological condition known as limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) manifests. Limbal stem cell deficiency describes conditions associated with impaired corneal wound healing and regeneration. In this situation, transplantation of healthy limbal stem cells is the only curative treatment approach for restoration of an intact and functional ocular surface. To date, treatment of LSCD presents a great challenge for ophthalmologists. However, innovative, cell-therapeutic approaches may open new, promising treatment perspectives. In February 2015, the European Commission granted marketing authorization to the first stem cell-based treatment in the European Union. The product named Holoclar® is an advanced therapy medicinal product (ATMP) for the treatment of moderate to severe LSCD due to physical and chemical burns in adults. Further cell-based treatment approaches are in clinical development.

  7. Mycoplasma genitalium infection: current treatment options, therapeutic failure, and resistance-associated mutations

    PubMed Central

    Couldwell, Deborah L; Lewis, David A

    2015-01-01

    determine the optimal therapeutic dosing schedules for both agents to effect clinical cure and minimize the risk of emergent antimicrobial resistance. Continual inappropriate M. genitalium treatments will likely lead to untreatable infections in the future. PMID:26060411

  8. [Cell-based therapies - an innovative therapeutic option in ophthalmology: Treating corneal diseases with stem cells].

    PubMed

    Bakker, Ann-Christin; Langer, Barbara

    2015-11-01

    Pathological changes and disorders of the cornea are a major cause of severe visual impairment and blindness. Replacement of a pathologically altered cornea with healthy corneal tissue from the eye of a suitable donor is among the most common and successful transplantation procedures in medicine. In Germany, approximately 5000-6000 corneal transplantations are performed each year, but the total demand per year is estimated to be twice as high. With a success rate of 90%, the outcome of cornea transplantation is very favourable. However, long-term maintenance and regeneration of a healthy new cornea requires tissue-specific corneal stem cells residing at the basal layer of the limbus, which is the annular transition zone between the cornea and sclera. When this important limbal stem cell population is destroyed or dysfunctional, a pathological condition known as limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) manifests. Limbal stem cell deficiency describes conditions associated with impaired corneal wound healing and regeneration. In this situation, transplantation of healthy limbal stem cells is the only curative treatment approach for restoration of an intact and functional ocular surface. To date, treatment of LSCD presents a great challenge for ophthalmologists. However, innovative, cell-therapeutic approaches may open new, promising treatment perspectives. In February 2015, the European Commission granted marketing authorization to the first stem cell-based treatment in the European Union. The product named Holoclar® is an advanced therapy medicinal product (ATMP) for the treatment of moderate to severe LSCD due to physical and chemical burns in adults. Further cell-based treatment approaches are in clinical development. PMID:26459569

  9. New and emerging therapeutic options for malignant pleural mesothelioma: review of early clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Kotova, Svetlana; Wong, Raymond M; Cameron, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare tumor that is challenging to control. Despite some benefit from using the multimodality-approach (surgery, combination chemotherapy and radiation), survival remains poor. However, current research produced a list of potential therapies. Here, we summarize significant new preclinical and early clinical developments in treatment of MPM, which include mesothelin specific antibody and toxin therapies, interleukin-4 (IL-4) receptor toxins, dendritic cell vaccines, immune checkpoint inhibitors, and gene-based therapies. In addition, several local modalities such as photodynamic therapy, postoperative lavage using betadine, and cryotherapy for local recurrence, have also shown to be effective for local control of disease. PMID:25670913

  10. ADI, autophagy and apoptosis: Metabolic stress as a therapeutic option for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Randie H.; Bold, Richard J.; Kung, Hsing-Jien

    2009-01-01

    Prostate cancer, the leading incidence of cancer in American males, is a disease in which treatment of nonlocalized tumors remains largely unsuccessful. These cancers lose expression of an arginine synthesis enzyme, argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS), and are susceptible to arginine deprivation by arginine deiminase (ADI). We show CWR22Rv1 prostate cancer cells are susceptible to ADI in a caspase-independent manner in vitro and in a xenograft model in vivo. We demonstrate that single amino acid deprivation by ADI is able to trigger autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy by chloroquine and siRNA enhances and accelerates ADI-induced cell death, suggesting that autophagy is a protective response to ADI, at least in the early phases. In addition, the co-administration of docetaxel, a caspase-dependent chemotherapy, with ADI inhibits tumor growth in vivo. Thus, targeting multiple cell death pathways, either through autophagy modulation or non-canonical apoptosis, may find expanded use as adjuvant chemotherapies, providing additional avenues for cancer treatment. PMID:19276647

  11. ADI, autophagy and apoptosis: metabolic stress as a therapeutic option for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Randie H; Bold, Richard J; Kung, Hsing-Jien

    2009-05-01

    Prostate cancer, the leading incidence of cancer in American males, is a disease in which treatment of nonlocalized tumors remains largely unsuccessful. These cancers lose expression of an arginine synthesis enzyme, argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS), and are susceptible to arginine deprivation by arginine deiminase (ADI). We show CWR22Rv1 prostate cancer cells are susceptible to ADI in a caspase-independent manner in vitro and in a xenograft model in vivo. We demonstrate that single amino acid deprivation by ADI is able to trigger autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy by chloroquine and siRNA enhances and accelerates ADI-induced cell death, suggesting that autophagy is a protective response to ADI, at least in the early phases. In addition, the co-administration of docetaxel, a caspase-dependent chemotherapy, with ADI inhibits tumor growth in vivo. Thus, targeting multiple cell death pathways, either through autophagy modulation or non-canonical apoptosis, may find expanded use as adjuvant chemotherapies, providing additional avenues for cancer treatment.

  12. Inflammatory Acne Treatment: Review of Current and New Topical Therapeutic Options.

    PubMed

    Zeichner, Joshua A

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris (AV) is an inflammatory skin disease characterized by the presence of comedones, papules, pustules, and nodules. Consensus guidelines recommend the use of combination therapy using different drugs with complementary mechanisms of action to best address as many acne pathogenic factors as possible at the same time. Topical acne medications exist as individual agents that may be combined in physician-recommended regimens or as pre-formulated fixed-dose combination products. In addition, there are several new and promising topical therapies currently being developed that work by different mechanisms of action from traditionally used acne therapies. The following review will cover commonly used drugs, newcomers to the market, and what the future holds for the topical treatment of AV. PMID:26741391

  13. Cell therapeutic options in liver diseases: cell types, medical devices and regulatory issues.

    PubMed

    Nussler, Andreas K; Zeilinger, Katrin; Schyschka, Lilianna; Ehnert, Sabrina; Gerlach, Jörg C; Yan, Xueying; Lee, Serene M L; Ilowski, Maren; Thasler, Wolfgang E; Weiss, Thomas S

    2011-05-01

    Although significant progress has been made in the field of orthotopic liver transplantation, cell-based therapies seem to be a promising alternative to whole-organ transplantation. The reasons are manifold but organ shortage is the main cause for this approach. However, many problems such as the question which cell type should be used or which application site is best for transplantation have been raised. In addition, some clinicians have had success by cultivating liver cells in bioreactors for temporary life support. Besides answering the question which cell type, which injection site or even which culture form should be used for liver support recent international harmonization of legal requirements is needed to be addressed by clinicians, scientists and companies dealing with cellular therapies. We here briefly summarize the possible cell types used to partially or temporarily correct liver diseases, the most recent development of bioreactor technology and important regulatory issues.

  14. Inflammatory Acne Treatment: Review of Current and New Topical Therapeutic Options.

    PubMed

    Zeichner, Joshua A

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris (AV) is an inflammatory skin disease characterized by the presence of comedones, papules, pustules, and nodules. Consensus guidelines recommend the use of combination therapy using different drugs with complementary mechanisms of action to best address as many acne pathogenic factors as possible at the same time. Topical acne medications exist as individual agents that may be combined in physician-recommended regimens or as pre-formulated fixed-dose combination products. In addition, there are several new and promising topical therapies currently being developed that work by different mechanisms of action from traditionally used acne therapies. The following review will cover commonly used drugs, newcomers to the market, and what the future holds for the topical treatment of AV.

  15. The role of platelets in coagulation dysfunction in xenotransplantation, and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Hayato; Ezzelarab, Mohamed B; Ekser, Burcin; Cooper, David K C

    2014-01-01

    Xenotransplantation could resolve the increasing discrepancy between the availability of deceased human donor organs and the demand for transplantation. Most advances in this field have resulted from the introduction of genetically engineered pigs, e.g., α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene-knockout (GTKO) pigs transgenic for one or more human complement-regulatory proteins (e.g., CD55, CD46, CD59). Failure of these grafts has not been associated with the classical features of acute humoral xenograft rejection, but with the development of thrombotic microangiopathy in the graft and/or consumptive coagulopathy in the recipient. Although the precise mechanisms of coagulation dysregulation remain unclear, molecular incompatibilities between primate coagulation factors and pig natural anticoagulants exacerbate the thrombotic state within the xenograft vasculature. Platelets play a crucial role in thrombosis and contribute to the coagulation disorder in xenotransplantation. They are therefore important targets if this barrier is to be overcome. Further genetic manipulation of the organ-source pigs, such as pigs that express one or more coagulation-regulatory genes (e.g., thrombomodulin, endothelial protein C receptor, tissue factor pathway inhibitor, CD39), is anticipated to inhibit platelet activation and the generation of thrombus. In addition, adjunctive pharmacologic anti-platelet therapy may be required. The genetic manipulations that are currently being tested are reviewed, as are the potential pharmacologic agents that may prove beneficial.

  16. Endothelin receptor antagonists: a new therapeutic option for improving the outcome after solid organ transplantation?

    PubMed

    Göttmann, Uwe; van der Woude, Fokko J; Braun, Claude

    2003-10-01

    Initially described as the most potent vasoconstrictor peptide, endothelin (ET) has also been shown to possess extraordinary immunomodulatory and proinflammatory properties. Because of this broad spectrum of biological activities, a possible role of the ET-system in solid organ transplantation has soon become a focus of research. Several studies demonstrated a pathogenetic involvement of ET in ischemia/reperfusion injury of heart, liver, kidney, and lung grafts. ET accumulates during cold storage of organs and can be detected in the effluent preservation solution. In addition ET is very, likely to play a pivotal role in the development of chronic rejection, which represents the major cause of late allograft loss. Increased expression of components of the ET-system has been described in areas of neointimal proliferation, a hallmark of chronic graft rejection. Both selective ET-A as well as non-selective ET-A/B receptor antagonists improved histomorphological and functional sequelae of chronic rejection. However these data have largely been derived from experimental animal transplantation, and ET receptor blockers have only recently been introduced in clinical medicine. A significant number of investigational drugs are now being tested in humans, with a main focus on cardiovascular diseases, such as congestive heart failure and pulmonary hypertension. First results have markedly dampened the initial enthusiastic vision of ET receptor blockers being organoprotective super-weapons. Thus the clinical potential of ET antagonists in general, and especially in solid-organ transplantation, is still to be defined.

  17. Covered Biodegradable Stent: New Therapeutic Option for the Management of Esophageal Perforation or Anastomotic Leak

    SciTech Connect

    Cerna, Marie; Koecher, Martin Valek, Vlastimil; Aujesky, Rene; Neoral, Cestmir; Andrasina, Tomas; Panek, Jiri; Mahathmakanthi, Shankari

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate our experience with the treatment of postoperative anastomotic leaks and benign esophageal perforations with covered biodegradable stents. Materials and Methods: From 2008 to 2010, we treated five men with either an anastomotic leak or benign esophageal perforation by implanting of covered biodegradable Ella-BD stents. The average age of the patients was 60 (range, 38-74) years. Postoperative anastomotic leaks were treated in four patients (1 after esophagectomy, 1 after resection of diverticulum, 2 after gastrectomy). In one patient, perforation occurred as a complication of the treatment of an esophageal rupture (which occurred during a balloon dilatation of benign stenosis) with a metallic stent. Results: Seven covered biodegradable stents were implanted in five patients. Primary technical success was 100%. Clinical success (leak sealing) was achieved in four of the five patients (80%). Stent migration occurred in three patients. In two of these patients, the leak had been sealed by the time of stent migration, therefore no reintervention was necessary. In one patient an additional stent had to be implanted. Conclusion: The use of biodegradable covered stents for the treatment of anastomotic leaks or esophageal perforations is technically feasible and safe. The initial results are promising; however, larger number of patients will be required to evaluate the capability of these biodegradable stents in the future. The use of biodegradable material for coverage of the stent is essential.

  18. ROS1 rearrangements in lung adenocarcinoma: prognostic impact, therapeutic options and genetic variability

    PubMed Central

    Teixido, Cristina; Michels, Sebastian; Morales-Espinosa, Daniela; Viteri, Santiago; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Merkelbach-Bruse, Sabine; Fischer, Rieke; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Fassunke, Jana; Sebastian, Martin; Serke, Monika; Kaminsky, Britta; Randerath, Winfried; Gerigk, Ulrich; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Krüger, Stefan; Schnell, Roland; Rothe, Achim; Kropf-Sanchen, Cornelia; Heukamp, Lukas; Rosell, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Background While recent data show that crizotinib is highly effective in patients with ROS1 rearrangement, few data is available about the prognostic impact, the predictive value for different treatments, and the genetic heterogeneity of ROS1-positive patients. Patients and Methods 1137 patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung were analyzed regarding their ROS1 status. In positive cases, next-generation sequencing (NGS) was performed. Clinical characteristics, treatments and outcome of these patients were assessed. Overall survival (OS) was compared with genetically defined subgroups of ROS1-negative patients. Results 19 patients of 1035 evaluable (1.8%) had ROS1-rearrangement. The median OS has not been reached. Stage IV patients with ROS1-rearrangement had the best OS of all subgroups (36.7 months, p < 0.001). 9 of 14 (64.2%) patients had at least one response to chemotherapy. Estimated mean OS for patients receiving chemotherapy and crizotinib was 5.3 years. Ten patients with ROS1-rearrangement (52.6%) harbored additional aberrations. Conclusion ROS1-rearangement is not only a predictive marker for response to crizotinib, but also seems to be the one of the best prognostic molecular markers in NSCLC reported so far. In stage IV patients, response to chemotherapy was remarkable high and overall survival was significantly better compared to other subgroups including EGFR-mutated and ALK-fusion-positive NSCLC. PMID:25868855

  19. Diagnosis, Management, and New Therapeutic Options in Childhood Neurofibromatosis Type 2 and Related Forms.

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Martino; Praticò, Andrea Domenico; Evans, Dafydd Gareth

    2015-12-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2; MIM # 101000) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the development of vestibular schwannomas (VSs); schwannomas of other cranial, spinal, and cutaneous nerves; cranial and spinal meningiomas or other central nervous system tumors (eg, ependymomas and astrocytomas) or both. Additional features include eye (eg, early onset cataracts, optic nerve sheath meningiomas, retinal or pigment epithelial hamartomas or both, and epithelial retinal membranes) and skin abnormalities (eg, flat dermal [NF2 plaques] or spherical subcutaneous nodular schwannomas or both, and few, atypical café-au-lait spots). Clinically, children with NF2 fall into 2 main groups: (1) congenital NF2 with bilateral VSs detected as early as the first days to months of life, which can be stable or asymptomatic for 1-2 decades and suddenly progress; and (2) severe prepubertal (Wishart type) NF2 with multiple (and rapidly progressive) central nervous system tumors other-than-VS, which usually presents first, years before VSs, both associated with more marked skin and eye involvement (vs the classical mild adult [Gardner type] NF2, with bilateral VSs presenting in young adulthood, sometimes as the only disease feature). Individuals manifesting unilateral VS associated with ipsilateral meningiomas or multiple schwannomas localized to a part of the peripheral nervous system have mosaic or segmental NF2; individuals developing multiple nonVS, nonintradermal cranial, spinal, and peripheral schwannomas (histologically proven) have schwannomatosis (SWNTS). NF2 is caused by mutations in the NF2 gene at chromosome 22q12.1, which encodes for a protein called merlin or schwannomin, most similar to the exrin-readixin-moesin proteins; mosaic or segmental NF2 is because of mosaic phenomena for the NF2 gene, whereas SWNTS is caused by germline and possibly mosaic mutations either in the SMARCB1 gene (SWNTS1; MIM # 162091) or the LZTR1 gene (SWNTS2; MIM # 615670), both falling

  20. Ureteroscopic treatment of ureteral stones: only an auxiliary measure of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy or a primary therapeutic option?

    PubMed

    Osti, A H; Hofmockel, G; Frohmüller, H

    1997-01-01

    Both extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) and ureteroscopy are well-established methods in stone treatment; however, the therapeutic procedure in ureteral calculi, especially in the distal third of the ureter, is still controversially discussed. The aim of the present study was to examine the role of ureteroscopy as an auxiliary measure after ESWL and its importance as an alternative therapeutic option in the treatment of distal ureteral stones. Between 1991 and 1994, 115 ureteroscopic procedures in 104 patients with ureteral stones or stone fragments were carried out at our institution. During the same period of time, 1,595 patients with ureteral calculi (in the proximal two thirds of the ureter: n = 956; in the distal third of the ureter: n = 639) were treated with a Dornier HM-3 lithotriptor. In 77 of those 104 patients treated by ureteroscopy, this procedure was indicated as an auxiliary measure after failure of ESWL including 34 out of the 639 patients (5.3%) with stones in the distal part of the ureter. The overall direct success rate during the ureteroscopic stone treatment (including 11 cases with a second procedure) in the proximal, middle and distal third of the ureter was 74, 81 and 92%, respectively. The success rate of primary ureteroscopic removal of distal-third ureteral stones alone was 100% in 27 of these 104 patients. After 3 months the overall stone-free rate of all patients treated with ureteroscopy was 94%. Ureteroscopy appears to be a safe and effective treatment modality, if used as an auxiliary measure after failure of ESWL as well as a primary treatment modality in the case of stones in the distal third of the ureter. On the other hand, ESWL alone is a noninvasive and also successful procedure in treating stones situated in the distal part of the ureter.

  1. [Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) as therapeutic option in supraspinatus tendon syndrome? One year results of a placebo controlled study].

    PubMed

    Schmitt, J; Tosch, A; Hünerkopf, M; Haake, M

    2002-07-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is seen as a therapeutic option in the treatment of chronic supraspinatus tendinitis by some authors. To test whether ESWT comprising 3 x 2000 pulses with the positive energy flux density ED+ of 0.33 mJ/mm2 is clinically superior to a sham ESWT treatment, a prospective, randomized, single-blinded, placebo-controlled study with an independent observer was performed. Forty patients were treated either by verum ESWT or sham ESWT under local anesthesia. Target criteria were the age-corrected Constant score, pain at rest and during activity on a visual analogue scale, and subjective improvement. Patients who reported no subjective improvement after 12 weeks were deblinded and received verum ESWT if they had belonged to the placebo group (partial crossover). The results of the verum group lie within the range of results for ESWT published by other authors. Patients in the placebo group with local anesthetic showed equally good results. At 12 weeks, and 1 year after intervention, no difference could be found between the verum and placebo groups regarding Constant score, pain, shoulder function, or subjective improvement. The nonresponders to the placebo ESWT continued to show no improvement after receiving verum ESWT. This contradicts a specific ESWT effect. Based on the results of this placebo-controlled study, ESWT appears to have no clinically relevant effect on supraspinatus tendinitis. The study underlines the importance of a control group in evaluating new treatment methods for diseases with unknown natural history.

  2. Diabetic gastroparesis: Therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Alam, Uazman; Asghar, Omar; Malik, Rayaz Ahmed

    2010-08-01

    Gastroparesis is a condition characterized by delayed gastric emptying and the most common known underlying cause is diabetes mellitus. Symptoms include nausea, vomiting, abdominal fullness, and early satiety, which impact to varying degrees on the patient's quality of life. Symptoms and deficits do not necessarily relate to each other, hence despite significant abnormalities in gastric emptying, some individuals have only minimal symptoms and, conversely, severe symptoms do not always relate to measures of gastric emptying. Prokinetic agents such as metoclopramide, domperidone, and erythromycin enhance gastric motility and have remained the mainstay of treatment for several decades, despite unwanted side effects and numerous drug interactions. Mechanical therapies such as endoscopic pyloric botulinum toxin injection, gastric electrical stimulation, and gastrostomy or jejunostomy are used in intractable diabetic gastroparesis (DG), refractory to prokinetic therapies. Mitemcinal and TZP-101 are novel investigational motilin receptor and ghrelin agonists, respectively, and show promise in the treatment of DG. The aim of this review is to provide an update on prokinetic and mechanical therapies in the treatment of DG. PMID:22127672

  3. New therapeutic options in patients prone to hypertension: a focus on direct Renin inhibition and aldosterone blockade.

    PubMed

    Basile, Jan

    2009-06-01

    Certain patient populations have a high prevalence of hypertension, including black, elderly, or obese patients; patients with metabolic syndrome, or frank diabetes; and patients with chronic kidney disease. Many of these patients experience renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) dysregulation, which is important because the RAAS plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and renal dysfunction. Data available regarding newer approaches that target the RAAS, including direct renin inhibition and aldosterone receptor antagonism, in patients who often have hypertension are reviewed. Aliskiren, the first direct renin inhibitor, is effective in a number of these patient groups, including those who are black or obese or who have metabolic syndrome, renal impairment, or diabetes. In addition, in the setting of long-term angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker therapy, aldosterone receptor antagonists (spironolactone and eplerenone) provide another rational therapeutic approach for patients whose blood pressure is not controlled by standard therapies.

  4. 46 CFR Appendix E to Subpart C of... - Optional Rider for Additional NVOCC Financial Responsibility (Optional Rider to Form FMC-48...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Responsibility (Optional Rider to Form FMC-48) E Appendix E to Subpart C of Part 515 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME...; Claims Against Ocean Transportation Intermediaries Pt. 515, Subpt. C, App. E Appendix E to Subpart C of... Commission, 800 North Capitol Street, NW., Washington, DC 20573-0001 or e-mail: secretary@fmc.gov....

  5. Inhibitors of phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE 4): A new therapeutic option in the treatment of psoriasis vulgaris and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Małgorzata; Karczewski, Jacek; Lodyga, Martha; Żaba, Ryszard; Adamski, Zygmunt

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris and psoriatic arthritis are inflammatory diseases in which inflammation and sustained inducing lesions result from immune disorders associated with overactivity of T cells that produce multiple proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL): IL-2, IL-12, IL-17, IL-22 or IL-23. Modern treatment of these diseases is focused on reducing the inflammatory process responsible for the development of the disease. In recent years, the treatment of psoriasis is developing at a dynamic rate. Such therapeutic advances are contributed to the possibility of patient therapy through the use of some registered biologic agents, such as TNF-α inhibitors (infliximab, etanercept and adalimumab), and an inhibitor of the p40 subunit common to IL-12 and IL-23 (ustekinumab). In addition to the already registered medications for the indications mentioned above, there is a large group of preparations that are currently undergoing clinical trials in Europe, Canada and the United States, which provides hopes of therapy efficacy and safety.

  6. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  7. Current therapy and the development of therapeutic options for the treatment of diseases due to bacterial agents of potential biowarfare and bioterrorism.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, Ronald A; Bronze, Michael S

    2004-02-01

    An important part of biodefense is the optimization of current therapy and the development of new therapeutic options for the treatment of the diseases most likely encountered in the form of biological weapons. Guidelines for the prevention and treatment of anthrax, plague, tularemia and botulinum toxin intoxication are reviewed. The strategies in development for the prevention of anthrax focus primarily on active and passive immunization against protective antigen, because of its central role as a toxin delivery module. Novel vaccine strategies for plague, tularemia and botulism are also reviewed.

  8. Morphoproteomics Identifies Etiopathogenetic Correlates of HHV-8-Associated Kaposi's Sarcoma and Provides Pathways with Therapeutic Options: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Salihi, Suhair Al; Buryanek, Jamie; Rios, Adan A; Brown, Robert E

    2016-09-01

    A morphoproteomic analysis was performed to identify the proteins and corresponding molecular pathways activated for a case of non-HIV Kaposi's sarcoma. This analysis provides insight into the biology of the tumor and identifies etiopathogenetic correlates of HHV-8-Associated Kaposi's sarcoma that are useful in formulating therapeutic alternatives. PMID:27650622

  9. Co-activation of AMPK and mTORC1 as a new therapeutic option for acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sujobert, Pierre; Tamburini, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report the therapeutic potential of GSK621, an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) agonist, in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). GSK621-induced cytotoxicity is restricted to AML cells compared to normal hematopoietic progenitors due to a unique synthetic lethal interaction of co-activation of AMPK and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) that involves the stress response pathway. AMPK activation thus represents an attractive perspective for cancer therapy. PMID:27652311

  10. Co-activation of AMPK and mTORC1 as a new therapeutic option for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sujobert, Pierre; Tamburini, Jerome

    2016-07-01

    We report the therapeutic potential of GSK621, an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) agonist, in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). GSK621-induced cytotoxicity is restricted to AML cells compared to normal hematopoietic progenitors due to a unique synthetic lethal interaction of co-activation of AMPK and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) that involves the stress response pathway. AMPK activation thus represents an attractive perspective for cancer therapy. PMID:27652311

  11. Combination of JAK2 and HSP90 inhibitors: an effective therapeutic option in drug-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandip N; Leng, Xiaohong; Perazzona, Bastianella; Sun, Xiaoping; Lin, Yu-Hsi; Arlinghaus, Ralph B

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that JAK2 serves as a novel therapeutic target in Bcr-Abl+ chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). We have reported the existence of an HSP90- associated high molecular weight network complex (HMWNC) that is composed of HSP90 client proteins BCR-ABL, JAK2, and STAT3 in wild type Bcr-Abl+ leukemic cells. Here we showed that the HSP90-HMWNC is present in leukemia cells from CML patients in blast stage, and in Imatinib (IM)-resistant 32Dp210 (T315I) leukemia cells. We found that the HSP90-HMWNC could be disassembled by depleting JAK2 with either Jak2-specific shRNA or treatment with JAK2 inhibitors (TG101209 or Ruxolitinib) and HSP90 inhibitor (AUY922). Combinational treatment with JAK2 and HSP90 inhibitors diminished the activation of BCR-ABL, JAK2 and its downstream targets. As a result, the IM-resistant 32Dp210 T315I cells underwent apoptosis. When administered in mice bearing 32Dp210 T315I leukemia, combinational therapy using Ruxolitinib and AUY922 prolonged the survival significantly. Thus, a combination of JAK2 and HSP90 inhibitors could be a powerful strategy for the treatment of CML, especially in IM-resistant patients. PMID:27551334

  12. Combination of JAK2 and HSP90 inhibitors: an effective therapeutic option in drug-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Perazzona, Bastianella; Sun, Xiaoping; Lin, Yu-Hsi; Arlinghaus, Ralph B.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that JAK2 serves as a novel therapeutic target in Bcr-Abl+ chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). We have reported the existence of an HSP90- associated high molecular weight network complex (HMWNC) that is composed of HSP90 client proteins BCR-ABL, JAK2, and STAT3 in wild type Bcr-Abl+ leukemic cells. Here we showed that the HSP90-HMWNC is present in leukemia cells from CML patients in blast stage, and in Imatinib (IM)-resistant 32Dp210 (T315I) leukemia cells. We found that the HSP90-HMWNC could be disassembled by depleting JAK2 with either Jak2-specific shRNA or treatment with JAK2 inhibitors (TG101209 or Ruxolitinib) and HSP90 inhibitor (AUY922). Combinational treatment with JAK2 and HSP90 inhibitors diminished the activation of BCR-ABL, JAK2 and its downstream targets. As a result, the IM-resistant 32Dp210 T315I cells underwent apoptosis. When administered in mice bearing 32Dp210 T315I leukemia, combinational therapy using Ruxolitinib and AUY922 prolonged the survival significantly. Thus, a combination of JAK2 and HSP90 inhibitors could be a powerful strategy for the treatment of CML, especially in IM-resistant patients. PMID:27551334

  13. The Role of Topical Brimonidine Tartrate Gel as a Novel Therapeutic Option for Persistent Facial Erythema Associated with Rosacea.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Andrew William; Johnson, Sandra Marchese

    2015-09-01

    Rosacea is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that commonly presents with persistent facial erythema with or without the coincident presence of flushing, telangiectasias, inflammatory papules or pustules, phymatous changes, or ocular involvement. Patients often present with a constellation of various signs and symptoms of the disease, and an individualized treatment plan should be tailored to a patient's unique clinical presentation. Previously available medications for rosacea have all targeted the inflammatory erythematous papules and pustules frequently associated with the disease, leaving a therapeutic gap for the common manifestation of persistent facial erythema. Brimonidine tartrate 0.33% gel was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in August 2013 as the first medication available for the topical treatment of persistent facial erythema associated with rosacea. Brimonidine gel is a highly selective α2-adrenergic receptor agonist with potent vasoconstrictive effects, which leads to significant reduction of persistent facial erythema in the majority of patients when applied once daily. Based on large-scale clinical trials and post-marketing reports, brimonidine gel has maintained a good safety profile with a minority of patients experiencing adverse effects from its use, most of which are cutaneous in nature, mild-to-moderate in degree, occur early after initiation of treatment, often resolve spontaneously with continued use, and generally resolve after discontinuation of use. Among the reported adverse effects, two distinct manifestations of worsened erythema have been described. Brimonidine gel can be integrated into a treatment regimen along with concomitant therapies for facial papules and pustules with no increased risk of adverse events with combination therapy. Education about optimal application methods, setting reasonable expectations for treatment, and minimizing inflammation are important factors for the successful use of brimonidine

  14. Combinatorial therapeutic activation with heparin and AICAR stimulates additive effects on utrophin A expression in dystrophic muscles.

    PubMed

    Péladeau, Christine; Ahmed, Aatika; Amirouche, Adel; Crawford Parks, Tara E; Bronicki, Lucas M; Ljubicic, Vladimir; Renaud, Jean-Marc; Jasmin, Bernard J

    2016-01-01

    Upregulation of utrophin A is an attractive therapeutic strategy for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Over the years, several studies revealed that utrophin A is regulated by multiple transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms, and that pharmacological modulation of these pathways stimulates utrophin A expression in dystrophic muscle. In particular, we recently showed that activation of p38 signaling causes an increase in the levels of utrophin A mRNAs and protein by decreasing the functional availability of the destabilizing RNA-binding protein called K-homology splicing regulatory protein, thereby resulting in increases in the stability of existing mRNAs. Here, we treated 6-week-old mdx mice for 4 weeks with the clinically used anticoagulant drug heparin known to activate p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and determined the impact of this pharmacological intervention on the dystrophic phenotype. Our results show that heparin treatment of mdx mice caused a significant ∼1.5- to 3-fold increase in utrophin A expression in diaphragm, extensor digitorum longus and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles. In agreement with these findings, heparin-treated diaphragm and TA muscle fibers showed an accumulation of utrophin A and β-dystroglycan along their sarcolemma and displayed improved morphology and structural integrity. Moreover, combinatorial drug treatment using both heparin and 5-amino-4-imidazolecarboxamide riboside (AICAR), the latter targeting 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and the transcriptional activation of utrophin A, caused an additive effect on utrophin A expression in dystrophic muscle. These findings establish that heparin is a relevant therapeutic agent for treating DMD, and illustrate that combinatorial treatment of heparin with AICAR may serve as an effective strategy to further increase utrophin A expression in dystrophic muscle via activation of distinct signaling pathways.

  15. Inhibition of hepatic microsomal triglyceride transfer protein - a novel therapeutic option for treatment of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Vuorio, Alpo; Tikkanen, Matti J; Kovanen, Petri T

    2014-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-receptor gene (LDLR). Patients with homozygous FH (hoFH) have inherited a mutated LDLR gene from both parents, and therefore all their LDL-receptors are incapable of functioning normally. In hoFH, serum LDL levels often exceed 13 mmol/L and tendon and cutaneous xanthomata appear early (under 10 years of age). If untreated, this extremely severe form of hypercholesterolemia may cause death in childhood or in early adulthood. Based on recent data, it can be estimated that the prevalence of hoFH is about 1:500,000 or even 1:400,000. Until now, the treatment of hoFH has been based on high-dose statin treatment combined with LDL apheresis. Since the LDL cholesterol-lowering effect of statins is weak in this disease, and apheresis is a cumbersome treatment and not available at all centers, alternative novel pharmaceutical therapies are needed. Lomitapide is a newly introduced drug, capable of effectively decreasing serum LDL cholesterol concentration in hoFH. It inhibits the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP). By inhibiting in hepatocytes the transfer of triglycerides into very low density lipoprotein particles, the drug blocks their assembly and secretion into the circulating blood. Since the very low density lipoprotein particles are precursors of LDL particles in the circulation, the reduced secretion of the former results in lower plasma concentration of the latter. The greatest concern in lomitapide treatment has been the increase in liver fat, which can be, however, counteracted by strictly adhering to a low-fat diet. Lomitapide is a welcome addition to the meager selection of drugs currently available for the treatment of refractory hypercholesterolemia in hoFH patients. PMID:24851052

  16. Inhibition of hepatic microsomal triglyceride transfer protein – a novel therapeutic option for treatment of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Vuorio, Alpo; Tikkanen, Matti J; Kovanen, Petri T

    2014-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-receptor gene (LDLR). Patients with homozygous FH (hoFH) have inherited a mutated LDLR gene from both parents, and therefore all their LDL-receptors are incapable of functioning normally. In hoFH, serum LDL levels often exceed 13 mmol/L and tendon and cutaneous xanthomata appear early (under 10 years of age). If untreated, this extremely severe form of hypercholesterolemia may cause death in childhood or in early adulthood. Based on recent data, it can be estimated that the prevalence of hoFH is about 1:500,000 or even 1:400,000. Until now, the treatment of hoFH has been based on high-dose statin treatment combined with LDL apheresis. Since the LDL cholesterol-lowering effect of statins is weak in this disease, and apheresis is a cumbersome treatment and not available at all centers, alternative novel pharmaceutical therapies are needed. Lomitapide is a newly introduced drug, capable of effectively decreasing serum LDL cholesterol concentration in hoFH. It inhibits the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP). By inhibiting in hepatocytes the transfer of triglycerides into very low density lipoprotein particles, the drug blocks their assembly and secretion into the circulating blood. Since the very low density lipoprotein particles are precursors of LDL particles in the circulation, the reduced secretion of the former results in lower plasma concentration of the latter. The greatest concern in lomitapide treatment has been the increase in liver fat, which can be, however, counteracted by strictly adhering to a low-fat diet. Lomitapide is a welcome addition to the meager selection of drugs currently available for the treatment of refractory hypercholesterolemia in hoFH patients. PMID:24851052

  17. Infections caused by carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae among patients in intensive care units in Greece: a multi-centre study on clinical outcome and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Kontopidou, F; Giamarellou, H; Katerelos, P; Maragos, A; Kioumis, I; Trikka-Graphakos, E; Valakis, C; Maltezou, H C

    2014-02-01

    Infections due to carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CR-KP) have emerged as a public health problem worldwide given their spread dynamics and the limited therapeutic options. Our aim was to study the clinical outcome of patients with CR-KP infections in relation to antimicrobial treatment. CR-KP infections that occurred in a 10-month period (September 2009 to June 2010) in patients admitted to 19 intensive care units all over Greece were studied. A total of 127 CR-KP infections were reported. Central venous catheter bacteraemia was the most frequent infection, followed by ventilator-associated pneumonia (39 (30.7%) and 35 (27.6%) cases, respectively). Resistance to colistin, tigecycline, gentamicin and amikacin was detected in 20%, 33%, 21% and 64% of isolates, respectively. Regarding treatment, 107 cases received active treatment, including 1 or ≥2 active antibiotics in 65 (60.7%) and 42 (39.3%) cases, respectively. The most frequent combination was colistin plus aminoglycoside and tigecycline plus aminoglycoside (17 and 11 cases, respectively). Forty-eight (45.2%) of the cases that received active treatment were considered clinical failures, with 23.5% mortality at 14 days. Logistic regression analysis revealed that age ≤55 years, non-immunocompromised patients and patients who received colistin had higher successful response rates, while patients ≤55 years old had lower mortality rates at 14 days after the introduction of active treatment. CR-KP infections are associated with a significant clinical failure rate. Colistin remains a valuable antimicrobial agent for treating these infections, while the rise of resistance to the last available antibiotics further limits treatment options.

  18. Radiation Therapy: Additional Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... This is refered to as immunotherapy . Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy given during surgery is called intraoperative ... external beam therapy or as brachytherapy . Novel Targeted Therapies Cancer doctors now know much more about how ...

  19. Informal Reading-Thinking Inventory: An Informal Reading Inventory (IRI) with Options for Assessing Additional Elements of Higher-Order Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manzo, Anthony V.; And Others

    Focusing on better assessing the thinking, or meaning-making, aspects of reading that are emphasized in current views of the reading process, this book presents the Informal Reading-Thinking Inventory (IR-TI) which offers options to enhance assessment beyond assessing students' listening level, oral reading of words, and basic comprehension. The…

  20. Energy metabolic disorder is a major risk factor in severe influenza virus infection: Proposals for new therapeutic options based on animal model experiments.

    PubMed

    Kido, Hiroshi; Indalao, Irene L; Kim, Hyejin; Kimoto, Takashi; Sakai, Satoko; Takahashi, Etsuhisa

    2016-09-01

    Severe influenza is characterized by cytokine storm and multiorgan failure. Influenza patients with underlying diseases show a rapid progression in disease severity. The major mechanism that underlies multiorgan failure during the progressive stage of infection, particularly in patients with underlying risk factors, is mitochondrial energy crisis. The relationship between the factors that determine infection severity, such as influenza virus, cytokines, cellular trypsin as a hemagglutinin processing protease for viral multiplication, accumulation of metabolic intermediates and ATP crisis in mitochondria, is termed the "influenza virus-cytokine-trypsin" cycle. This occurs during the initial stages of infection, and is interconnected with the "metabolic disorders-cytokine" cycle in the middle to late phase of infection. Experiments using animal models have highlighted the complex relationship between these two cycles. New treatment options have been proposed that target the ATP crisis and multiorgan failure during the late phase of infection, rather than antiviral treatments with neuraminidase inhibitors that work during the initial phase. These options are (i) restoration of glucose oxidation in mitochondria by diisopropylamine dichloroacetate, which inhibits infection-induced pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 activity, and (ii) restoration of long-chain fatty acid oxidation in mitochondria by l-carnitine and bezafibrate, an agonist of peroxisome proliferation-activated receptors-β/δ, which transcriptionally upregulates carnitine palmitoyltransferase II. The latter is particularly effective in patients with influenza-associated encephalopathy who have thermolabile and short half-life compound variants of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II. PMID:27566378

  1. Platelet-derived growth factor type BB and collagen matrix for soft tissue reconstruction after muco-epidermoid carcinoma removal: a possible therapeutic option.

    PubMed

    Cicciù, Marco; Herford, Alan Scott; Maria, Vecchio Giada; Bramanti, Ennio

    2015-01-01

    Muco-epidermoid carcinoma (MEC) is a rare malignant tumor occurring in major and minor salivary glands. The described case shows a patient undergoing tumor resection without neck dissection. A quick diagnosis performed through clinical investigation and incisional biopsy revealed the nature of the tumor. A porcine collagen matrix was applied after the surgery in order to improve soft tissue healing. The matrix was saturated with platelet-derived growth factor type BB in order to favorite healing process and then fixed on the palate with a dental support device. Follow-up visit performed at first, second, and third weeks highlighted a quick healing of oral mucosa. Here reported is a case of a 34-year-old man who developed a muco-epidermoid oral carcinoma localized in the left upper jaw palatal side. The clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic findings, plus differential diagnoses of the case and reconstructive treatment options are also presented.

  2. Sonographic Evaluation and Sonographic-Guided Therapeutic Options of Lateral Ankle Pain: Peroneal Tendon Pathology Associated with the Presence of an Os Peroneum

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Ronald S.; Saboeiro, Gregory R.; Pavlov, Helene

    2010-01-01

    Clinical implications of acute injuries of the os peroneum have been described, with the recommendation in some cases being the excision of the bone fragments. We describe the spectrum of sonographic appearances associated with pain in the region of the os peroneum, document associated peroneal tendon pathology, and describe the use of sonography to direct and guide therapeutic and/or diagnostic injections. All sonographic examinations in our ultrasound database from Jan 1, 2001–Jan 30, 2007 with the words “os peroneum” were reviewed. Patients were cross-referenced in our radiology database to find relevant foot or ankle radiographs for correlation. There were 47 patients (18 men and 29 women, age range 16 to 83) referred for sonographic evaluation of lateral foot and/or ankle pain who had an os peroneum identified during the sonographic evaluation. Eighteen patients were referred specifically for targeted injection of the lateral ankle, including peroneal tendon sheath injections (N = 10), calcaneocuboid joint injections (N = 1), and injections around symptomatic os peroneum (N = 7). All 47 patients had tendinosis of the peroneus longus, in varying degrees of severity. Radiographs were available for correlation in 28 patients. The causes of lateral ankle pain with a co-existent os peroneum are multifactorial and may not directly relate to the presence of an os peroneum. Ultrasound can be of value in separating out the specific etiology for pain, as well as provide a method for problem solving by the performance of targeted diagnostic or therapeutic injections in the lateral ankle. PMID:21886533

  3. Genomics and drug profiling of fatal TCF3-HLF-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia identifies recurrent mutation patterns and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Bornhauser, Beat; Gombert, Michael; Kratsch, Christina; Stütz, Adrian M.; Sultan, Marc; Tchinda, Joelle; Worth, Catherine L.; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav; Badarinarayan, Nandini; Baruchel, André; Bartram, Thies; Basso, Giuseppe; Canpolat, Cengiz; Cario, Gunnar; Cavé, Hélène; Dakaj, Dardane; Delorenzi, Mauro; Dobay, Maria Pamela; Eckert, Cornelia; Ellinghaus, Eva; Eugster, Sabrina; Frismantas, Viktoras; Ginzel, Sebastian; Haas, Oskar A.; Heidenreich, Olaf; Hemmrich-Stanisak, Georg; Hezaveh, Kebria; Höll, Jessica I.; Hornhardt, Sabine; Husemann, Peter; Kachroo, Priyadarshini; Kratz, Christian P.; te Kronnie, Geertruy; Marovca, Blerim; Niggli, Felix; McHardy, Alice C.; Moorman, Anthony V.; Panzer-Grümayer, Renate; Petersen, Britt S.; Raeder, Benjamin; Ralser, Meryem; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schäfer, Daniel; Schrappe, Martin; Schreiber, Stefan; Schütte, Moritz; Stade, Björn; Thiele, Ralf; von der Weid, Nicolas; Vora, Ajay; Zaliova, Marketa; Zhang, Langhui; Zichner, Thomas; Zimmermann, Martin; Lehrach, Hans; Borkhardt, Arndt; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Franke, Andre; Korbel, Jan O.; Stanulla, Martin; Yaspo, Marie-Laure

    2015-01-01

    TCF3-HLF-fusion positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is currently incurable. Employing an integrated approach, we uncovered distinct mutation, gene expression, and drug response profiles in TCF3-HLF-positive and treatment-responsive TCF3-PBX1-positive ALL. Recurrent intragenic deletions of PAX5 or VPREB1 were identified in constellation with TCF3-HLF. Moreover somatic mutations in the non-translocated allele of TCF3 and a reduction of PAX5 gene dosage in TCF3-HLF ALL suggest cooperation within a restricted genetic context. The enrichment for stem cell and myeloid features in the TCF3-HLF signature may reflect reprogramming by TCF3-HLF of a lymphoid-committed cell of origin towards a hybrid, drug-resistant hematopoietic state. Drug response profiling of matched patient-derived xenografts revealed a distinct profile for TCF3-HLF ALL with resistance to conventional chemotherapeutics, but sensitivity towards glucocorticoids, anthracyclines and agents in clinical development. Striking on-target sensitivity was achieved with the BCL2-specific inhibitor venetoclax (ABT-199). This integrated approach thus provides alternative treatment options for this deadly disease. PMID:26214592

  4. Genomics and drug profiling of fatal TCF3-HLF-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia identifies recurrent mutation patterns and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Ute; Forster, Michael; Rinaldi, Anna; Risch, Thomas; Sungalee, Stéphanie; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Bornhauser, Beat; Gombert, Michael; Kratsch, Christina; Stütz, Adrian M; Sultan, Marc; Tchinda, Joelle; Worth, Catherine L; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav; Badarinarayan, Nandini; Baruchel, André; Bartram, Thies; Basso, Giuseppe; Canpolat, Cengiz; Cario, Gunnar; Cavé, Hélène; Dakaj, Dardane; Delorenzi, Mauro; Dobay, Maria Pamela; Eckert, Cornelia; Ellinghaus, Eva; Eugster, Sabrina; Frismantas, Viktoras; Ginzel, Sebastian; Haas, Oskar A; Heidenreich, Olaf; Hemmrich-Stanisak, Georg; Hezaveh, Kebria; Höll, Jessica I; Hornhardt, Sabine; Husemann, Peter; Kachroo, Priyadarshini; Kratz, Christian P; Kronnie, Geertruy Te; Marovca, Blerim; Niggli, Felix; McHardy, Alice C; Moorman, Anthony V; Panzer-Grümayer, Renate; Petersen, Britt S; Raeder, Benjamin; Ralser, Meryem; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schäfer, Daniel; Schrappe, Martin; Schreiber, Stefan; Schütte, Moritz; Stade, Björn; Thiele, Ralf; Weid, Nicolas von der; Vora, Ajay; Zaliova, Marketa; Zhang, Langhui; Zichner, Thomas; Zimmermann, Martin; Lehrach, Hans; Borkhardt, Arndt; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Franke, Andre; Korbel, Jan O; Stanulla, Martin; Yaspo, Marie-Laure

    2015-09-01

    TCF3-HLF-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is currently incurable. Using an integrated approach, we uncovered distinct mutation, gene expression and drug response profiles in TCF3-HLF-positive and treatment-responsive TCF3-PBX1-positive ALL. We identified recurrent intragenic deletions of PAX5 or VPREB1 in constellation with the fusion of TCF3 and HLF. Moreover somatic mutations in the non-translocated allele of TCF3 and a reduction of PAX5 gene dosage in TCF3-HLF ALL suggest cooperation within a restricted genetic context. The enrichment for stem cell and myeloid features in the TCF3-HLF signature may reflect reprogramming by TCF3-HLF of a lymphoid-committed cell of origin toward a hybrid, drug-resistant hematopoietic state. Drug response profiling of matched patient-derived xenografts revealed a distinct profile for TCF3-HLF ALL with resistance to conventional chemotherapeutics but sensitivity to glucocorticoids, anthracyclines and agents in clinical development. Striking on-target sensitivity was achieved with the BCL2-specific inhibitor venetoclax (ABT-199). This integrated approach thus provides alternative treatment options for this deadly disease. PMID:26214592

  5. Rehabilitation Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Speech Pathology Occupational Therapy Art Therapy Recreational therapy Neuropsychology Home Care Options Advanced Care Planning Palliative Care ... Speech Pathology Occupational Therapy Art Therapy Recreational therapy Neuropsychology Home Care Options Advanced Care Planning Palliative Care ...

  6. Pricing Options.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol

    1998-01-01

    Presents results of a recent survey of over 100 public and academic libraries about pricing options from online companies. Most options fall into three categories: pay-as-you-go, fixed-rate, and user-based. Results are discussed separately for public and academic libraries and for consortial discounts. Trends in pricing options preferred by…

  7. Lidocaine 8 mg sore throat lozenges in the treatment of acute pharyngitis. A new therapeutic option investigated in comparison to placebo treatment.

    PubMed

    Wonnemann, Meinolf; Helm, Ilka; Stauss-Grabo, Manuela; Röttger-Luer, Patricia; Tran, Cam-Tuan; Canenbley, Rainer; Donath, Frank; Nowak, Horst; Schug, Barbara S; Blume, Henning H

    2007-01-01

    . Therefore, the results of the trial emphasise lidocaine 8 mg sore throat lozenges to be a favourable option in the treatment of pain symptoms of an acute sore throat.

  8. Lidocaine 8 mg sore throat lozenges in the treatment of acute pharyngitis. A new therapeutic option investigated in comparison to placebo treatment.

    PubMed

    Wonnemann, Meinolf; Helm, Ilka; Stauss-Grabo, Manuela; Röttger-Luer, Patricia; Tran, Cam-Tuan; Canenbley, Rainer; Donath, Frank; Nowak, Horst; Schug, Barbara S; Blume, Henning H

    2007-01-01

    . Therefore, the results of the trial emphasise lidocaine 8 mg sore throat lozenges to be a favourable option in the treatment of pain symptoms of an acute sore throat. PMID:18193690

  9. A novel in vitro platform for the study of SN38-induced mucosal damage and the development of Toll-like receptor 4-targeted therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Wardill, Hannah R; Gibson, Rachel J; Van Sebille, Ysabella Za; Secombe, Kate R; Logan, Richard M; Bowen, Joanne M

    2016-07-01

    metabolize SN38 as well as expressing TLR4, making this an excellent platform to study clinically relevant therapeutic interventions for SN38-induced mucosal damage by targeting TLR4. PMID:27037276

  10. Long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, fibrates and niacin as therapeutic options in the treatment of hypertriglyceridemia: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ito, Matthew K

    2015-10-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia affects approximately 33% of the US population. Elevated triglyceride levels are independently associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, and severe hypertriglyceridemia is a risk factor for acute pancreatitis. Guidelines for the management of severe hypertriglyceridemia (≥5.6 mmol/L [≥500 mg/dL]) recommend immediate use of triglyceride-lowering agents; however, statins remain the first line of therapy for the management of mild to moderate hypertriglyceridemia (1.7-5.6 mmol/L [150-499 mg/dL]). Statins primarily target elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, but have also been shown to reduce mean triglyceride levels by up to 18% (or 43% in patients with triglyceride levels≥3.1 mmol/L [≥273 mg/dL]). However, individuals with hypertriglyceridemia may need additional reduction in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and remnant particles to further reduce residual CVD risk. A number of guidelines recommend the addition of fibrates, niacin, or long-chain omega-3 fatty acids if elevated triglyceride or non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels persist despite the use of high-intensity statin therapy. This review evaluates the impact of fibrates, niacin, and long-chain omega-3 fatty acids on lipid profiles and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with hypertriglyceridemia. It also assesses the adverse effects and drug-drug interactions associated with these triglyceride-lowering agents, because although they have all been shown to effectively reduce triglyceride levels in patients with hypertriglyceridemia, they differ with regard to their associated benefit-risk profiles. Long-chain omega-3 fatty acids may be a well-tolerated and effective alternative to fibrates and niacin, yet further large-scale clinical studies are required to evaluate their effects on cardiovascular outcomes and CVD risk reduction in patients with hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:26296750

  11. Long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, fibrates and niacin as therapeutic options in the treatment of hypertriglyceridemia: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ito, Matthew K

    2015-10-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia affects approximately 33% of the US population. Elevated triglyceride levels are independently associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, and severe hypertriglyceridemia is a risk factor for acute pancreatitis. Guidelines for the management of severe hypertriglyceridemia (≥5.6 mmol/L [≥500 mg/dL]) recommend immediate use of triglyceride-lowering agents; however, statins remain the first line of therapy for the management of mild to moderate hypertriglyceridemia (1.7-5.6 mmol/L [150-499 mg/dL]). Statins primarily target elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, but have also been shown to reduce mean triglyceride levels by up to 18% (or 43% in patients with triglyceride levels≥3.1 mmol/L [≥273 mg/dL]). However, individuals with hypertriglyceridemia may need additional reduction in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and remnant particles to further reduce residual CVD risk. A number of guidelines recommend the addition of fibrates, niacin, or long-chain omega-3 fatty acids if elevated triglyceride or non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels persist despite the use of high-intensity statin therapy. This review evaluates the impact of fibrates, niacin, and long-chain omega-3 fatty acids on lipid profiles and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with hypertriglyceridemia. It also assesses the adverse effects and drug-drug interactions associated with these triglyceride-lowering agents, because although they have all been shown to effectively reduce triglyceride levels in patients with hypertriglyceridemia, they differ with regard to their associated benefit-risk profiles. Long-chain omega-3 fatty acids may be a well-tolerated and effective alternative to fibrates and niacin, yet further large-scale clinical studies are required to evaluate their effects on cardiovascular outcomes and CVD risk reduction in patients with hypertriglyceridemia.

  12. Proteases as therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Craik, Charles S.; Page, Michael J.; Madison, Edwin L.

    2015-01-01

    Proteases are an expanding class of drugs that hold great promise. The U.S. FDA (Food and Drug Administration) has approved 12 protease therapies, and a number of next generation or completely new proteases are in clinical development. Although they are a well-recognized class of targets for inhibitors, proteases themselves have not typically been considered as a drug class despite their application in the clinic over the last several decades; initially as plasma fractions and later as purified products. Although the predominant use of proteases has been in treating cardiovascular disease, they are also emerging as useful agents in the treatment of sepsis, digestive disorders, inflammation, cystic fibrosis, retinal disorders, psoriasis and other diseases. In the present review, we outline the history of proteases as therapeutics, provide an overview of their current clinical application, and describe several approaches to improve and expand their clinical application. Undoubtedly, our ability to harness proteolysis for disease treatment will increase with our understanding of protease biology and the molecular mechanisms responsible. New technologies for rationally engineering proteases, as well as improved delivery options, will expand greatly the potential applications of these enzymes. The recognition that proteases are, in fact, an established class of safe and efficacious drugs will stimulate investigation of additional therapeutic applications for these enzymes. Proteases therefore have a bright future as a distinct therapeutic class with diverse clinical applications. PMID:21406063

  13. Human albumin eye drops as a therapeutic option for the management of keratoconjunctivitis sicca secondary to chronic graft-versus-host disease after stem-cell allografting

    PubMed Central

    Seki, J.T.; Sakurai, N.; Moldenhauer, S.; Dam, J.; Atenafu, E.G.; Yip, P.M.; Mazzulli, T.; Henderson, T.; Pendergrast, J.; Cserti, C.; Velazquez, J.P.; Simpson, R.; Felluga, G.; Messner, H.A.; Lipton, J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Keratoconjunctivitis sicca from chronic graft-versus-host disease (cgvhd) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation is common, leading to severe corneal damage and blindness if not treated. We retrospectively examined the efficacy and safety of pooled human albumin eye drops (haeds) for symptom relief in 40 stem-cell transplantation patients after other alternatives had failed. Methods The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 4.0) and the cgvhd grading scale were used to compare response in the patients during January 2000 and July 2013. In addition, on days 1 and 30, the haeds were subjected to quality assurance testing for sterility, oncotic pressure, albumin measurement, viscosity, pH, and purity by protein electrophoresis. Results Use of haeds resulted in symptom relief for 37 patients (92.5%); 3 patients (7.5%) failed to improve with use of haeds (p ≤ 0.0001). Of the 37 patients having symptom relief, 7 (19%) improved from grade 3 to no dry eye symptoms. Proportionately, post-treatment symptom improvement by two grade levels, from 3 to 1 (70%), was significantly higher than improvement by one grade level, from 3 to 2 (11%) or from 2 to 1 (19%, p ≤ 0.0001). Time to symptom relief ranged from 2 weeks to 28 weeks. Of the 40 patients, 38 (95%) had no adverse reactions. Days 1 and 30 quality assurance testing results were equivalent. Conclusions Complications of keratoconjunctivitis sicca were well managed and well tolerated with haeds when other remedies failed. Quality assurance testing confirmed that haeds were safe and stable in extreme conditions. PMID:26628876

  14. Antiviral options for biodefense.

    PubMed

    Byrd, Chelsea M; Grosenbach, Douglas W; Hruby, Dennis E

    2013-10-01

    A key to biodefense strategies is an assessment of current therapies available as well as the expedited development of new antiviral therapeutic options. Viruses make up the majority of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Category A Priority Pathogens, agents that are considered to pose the greatest risk to public health and national security, and yet there are currently no approved treatments for most of these viral biodefense threats. A review of the Category A viral biothreat agents and strategies for the development of new therapeutics are presented here. PMID:23773331

  15. Gallbladder carcinoma: Prognostic factors and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Goetze, Thorsten Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of gallbladder carcinoma is poor, and the overall 5-year survival rate is less than 5%. In early-stage disease, a 5-year survival rate up to 75% can be achieved if stage-adjusted therapy is performed. There is wide geographic variability in the frequency of gallbladder carcinoma, which can only be explained by an interaction between genetic factors and their alteration. Gallstones and chronic cholecystitis are important risk factors in the formation of gallbladder malignancies. Factors such as chronic bacterial infection, primary sclerosing cholangitis, an anomalous junction of the pancreaticobiliary duct, and several types of gallbladder polyps are associated with a higher risk of gallbladder cancer. There is also an interesting correlation between risk factors and the histological type of cancer. However, despite theoretical risk factors, only a third of gallbladder carcinomas are recognized preoperatively. In most patients, the tumor is diagnosed by the pathologist after a routine cholecystectomy for a benign disease and is termed ‘‘incidental or occult gallbladder carcinoma’’ (IGBC). A cholecystectomy is performed frequently due to the minimal invasiveness of the laparoscopic technique. Therefore, the postoperative diagnosis of potentially curable early-stage disease is more frequent. A second radical re-resection to complete a radical cholecystectomy is required for several IGBCs. However, the literature and guidelines used in different countries differ regarding the radicality or T-stage criteria for performing a radical cholecystectomy. The NCCN guidelines and data from the German registry (GR), which records the largest number of incidental gallbladder carcinomas in Europe, indicate that carcinomas infiltrating the muscularis propria or beyond require radical surgery. According to GR data and current literature, a wedge resection with a combined dissection of the lymph nodes of the hepatoduodenal ligament is adequate for T1b and T2 carcinomas. The reason for a radical cholecystectomy after simple CE in a formally R0 situation is either occult invasion or hepatic spread with unknown lymphogenic dissemination. Unfortunately, there are diverse interpretations and practices regarding stage-adjusted therapy for gallbladder carcinoma. The current data suggest that more radical therapy is warranted. PMID:26604631

  16. Therapeutic Options of Chondrodermatitis Nodularis Helicis

    PubMed Central

    Juul Nielsen, Lea; Holkmann Olsen, Caroline; Lock-Andersen, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Chondrodermatitis Nodularis Helicis is a benign inflammatory process affecting the skin and cartilage of the ear. It typically presents as a painful nodule surrounded by an area of erythema and often prevents the patient from sleeping on the affected side. Many treatments have been described in the literature, but the condition is prone to recurrence. A literature search was performed in order to identify the best possible treatment. Fifty-eight articles were included, describing and investigating nonsurgical as well as surgical treatment modalities. Large prospective, controlled, and randomised long-term studies are lacking, but based on the available literature, we recommend starting with a conservative approach using decompression devices. Simple surgical procedures should only be used if conservative measures fail. PMID:26925262

  17. Myeloid Sarcoma: Current Approach and Therapeutic Options

    PubMed Central

    Avni, Batia; Koren-Michowitz, Maya

    2011-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma is a rare disease that can present as an isolated extramedullary leukemic tumor, concurrently with or at relapse of acute myeloid leukemia. Owing to the rarity of this disorder, most of the literature comprises small retrospective studies and case reports. The aim of this review is to summarize the current published data regarding the clinical presentation, morphological, cytogenetic and molecular features, prognosis and treatment of myeloid sarcoma. PMID:23556098

  18. Therapeutic options in peripheral T cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaping; Xu, Wei; Liu, Hong; Li, Jianyong

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral T cell lymphoma (PTCL) is a rare and heterogeneous group of non-Hodgkin lymphomas with a very poor prognosis. The standard first-line treatments have resulted in unsatisfactory patient outcomes. With the exception of low-risk anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), the majority of patients relapse rapidly; the current 5-year overall survival rates are only 10-30%. Novel targeted therapies and combination chemotherapies are required for the treatment of patients with PTCL. In recent years, some retrospective and prospective studies have been performed concerning PTCL. Consequently, a number of novel agents and their relevant combination therapies have been identified, including histone deacetylase inhibitors, immunoconjugates, antifolates, monoclonal antibodies, immunomodulatory agents, nucleoside analogs, proteasome inhibitors, kinase inhibitors, bendamustine, L-asparaginase, and other targeted agents. It is hoped that these innovative approaches will finally improve outcomes in patients with PTCL. This review summarizes the currently available approaches for the treatment of PTCL with an emphasis on potential new agents, including the role of stem cell transplantation. PMID:27071634

  19. Natural Therapeutic Options in Endodontics - A Review

    PubMed Central

    Venkateshbabu, Nagendrababu; Anand, Suresh; Abarajithan, Mohan; Sheriff, Sultan O.; Jacob, Pulikkotil S.; Sonia, Nath

    2016-01-01

    Complete eradication of microbial biofilms and elimination of the smear layer are the key factors during endodontic treatment. Various chemical irrigants have been proposed in the literature for the same. The major setback with these chemical irrigants is that they are not bio-friendly to the dental and peri-radicular tissues. In the recent years, research to use natural products for root canal disinfection has gained importance. The aim of this article is to compile various herbal products that have been used as an irrigants and intracanal medicaments in the field of Endodontics to eradicate the biofilm and remove smear layer. PMID:27386007

  20. Natural Therapeutic Options in Endodontics - A Review.

    PubMed

    Venkateshbabu, Nagendrababu; Anand, Suresh; Abarajithan, Mohan; Sheriff, Sultan O; Jacob, Pulikkotil S; Sonia, Nath

    2016-01-01

    Complete eradication of microbial biofilms and elimination of the smear layer are the key factors during endodontic treatment. Various chemical irrigants have been proposed in the literature for the same. The major setback with these chemical irrigants is that they are not bio-friendly to the dental and peri-radicular tissues. In the recent years, research to use natural products for root canal disinfection has gained importance. The aim of this article is to compile various herbal products that have been used as an irrigants and intracanal medicaments in the field of Endodontics to eradicate the biofilm and remove smear layer. PMID:27386007

  1. Prehypertension: Underlying pathology and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Albarwani, Sulayma; Al-Siyabi, Sultan; Tanira, Musbah O

    2014-01-01

    Prehypertension (PHTN) is a global major health risk that subjects individuals to double the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) independent of progression to overt hypertension. Its prevalence rate varies considerably from country to country ranging between 21.9% and 52%. Many hypotheses are proposed to explain the underlying pathophysiology of PHTN. The most notable of these implicate the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and vascular endothelium. However, other processes that involve reactive oxygen species, the inflammatory cytokines, prostglandins and C-reactive protein as well as the autonomic and central nervous systems are also suggested. Drugs affecting RAS have been shown to produce beneficial effects in prehypertensives though such was not unequivocal. On the other hand, drugs such as β-adrenoceptor blocking agents were not shown to be useful. Leading clinical guidelines suggest using dietary and lifestyle modifications as a first line interventional strategy to curb the progress of PHTN; however, other clinically respected views call for using drugs. This review provides an overview of the potential pathophysiological processes associated with PHTN, abridges current intervention strategies and suggests investigating the value of using the “Polypill” in prehypertensive subjects to ascertain its potential in delaying (or preventing) CVD associated with raised blood pressure in the presence of other risk factors. PMID:25228952

  2. Acquired facial lipoatrophy: pathogenesis and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Olszewska, Barbara; Lemańska, Małgorzata; Purzycka-Bohdan, Dorota; Nowicki, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Facial lipoatrophy refers to the loss of subcutaneous fat tissue presenting by flattening or indentation of convex contour of the face. Facial lipoatrophy is a feature of the normal ageing process. It may be also a manifestation of chronic diseases, most frequently it affects HIV-infected individuals treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and may constitute a complication of connective tissue diseases, like lupus erythematosus profundus or morphea. Early recognition and treatment of the active stage of connective tissue diseases is of essential significance in prevention of subsequent scarring and atrophy lesions. In HIV-positive patients undergoing HAART therapy, the attempt to modify thetreatment scheme so it has a less lipemic effect seems to be justified. Esthetic correction of facial lipoatrophy in chronic diseases is a great challenge. Improvement of appearance is very important for affected individuals, because it diminishes their stigmatization and psychosocial dysfunction. Facial volumetric correction includes surgical and dermatological procedures such as adipose transfer and injectable dermal fillers. PMID:26015783

  3. Sporotrichosis: an overview and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Vikram K

    2014-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a chronic granulomatous mycotic infection caused by Sporothrix schenckii, a common saprophyte of soil, decaying wood, hay, and sphagnum moss, that is endemic in tropical/subtropical areas. The recent phylogenetic studies have delineated the geographic distribution of multiple distinct Sporothrix species causing sporotrichosis. It characteristically involves the skin and subcutaneous tissue following traumatic inoculation of the pathogen. After a variable incubation period, progressively enlarging papulo-nodule at the inoculation site develops that may ulcerate (fixed cutaneous sporotrichosis) or multiple nodules appear proximally along lymphatics (lymphocutaneous sporotrichosis). Osteoarticular sporotrichosis or primary pulmonary sporotrichosis are rare and occur from direct inoculation or inhalation of conidia, respectively. Disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis or involvement of multiple visceral organs, particularly the central nervous system, occurs most commonly in persons with immunosuppression. Saturated solution of potassium iodide remains a first line treatment choice for uncomplicated cutaneous sporotrichosis in resource poor countries but itraconazole is currently used/recommended for the treatment of all forms of sporotrichosis. Terbinafine has been observed to be effective in the treatment of cutaneous sporotrichosis. Amphotericin B is used initially for the treatment of severe, systemic disease, during pregnancy and in immunosuppressed patients until recovery, then followed by itraconazole for the rest of the therapy. PMID:25614735

  4. Sporotrichosis: An Overview and Therapeutic Options

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Vikram K.

    2014-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a chronic granulomatous mycotic infection caused by Sporothrix schenckii, a common saprophyte of soil, decaying wood, hay, and sphagnum moss, that is endemic in tropical/subtropical areas. The recent phylogenetic studies have delineated the geographic distribution of multiple distinct Sporothrix species causing sporotrichosis. It characteristically involves the skin and subcutaneous tissue following traumatic inoculation of the pathogen. After a variable incubation period, progressively enlarging papulo-nodule at the inoculation site develops that may ulcerate (fixed cutaneous sporotrichosis) or multiple nodules appear proximally along lymphatics (lymphocutaneous sporotrichosis). Osteoarticular sporotrichosis or primary pulmonary sporotrichosis are rare and occur from direct inoculation or inhalation of conidia, respectively. Disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis or involvement of multiple visceral organs, particularly the central nervous system, occurs most commonly in persons with immunosuppression. Saturated solution of potassium iodide remains a first line treatment choice for uncomplicated cutaneous sporotrichosis in resource poor countries but itraconazole is currently used/recommended for the treatment of all forms of sporotrichosis. Terbinafine has been observed to be effective in the treatment of cutaneous sporotrichosis. Amphotericin B is used initially for the treatment of severe, systemic disease, during pregnancy and in immunosuppressed patients until recovery, then followed by itraconazole for the rest of the therapy. PMID:25614735

  5. Options Week

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornscheuer, Joan H.

    1974-01-01

    Urges the practice of providing optional assignments within the framework of any given course in order to sustain student interest in foreign language learning. Specific lesson plans are provided. (LG)

  6. Novel operative treatment options.

    PubMed

    Ricketts, D N J; Pitts, N B

    2009-01-01

    There are an increasing number of more novel options available for operative intervention. This chapter outlines a series of operative treatment options which are available to the modern clinician to select from once a decision has been made to treat a carious lesion operatively. A series of novel methods of caries removal have been described; including chemomechanical caries removal, air abrasion, sono-abrasion, polymer rotary burs and lasers. There are also novel approaches to ensure complete caries removal and novel approaches for the management of deep caries. A novel question increasingly asked by clinicians is: does all the caries need to be removed? Operative management options here include: therapeutic fissure sealants, ultraconservative caries removal, stepwise excavation and the Hall technique. In conclusion, there is now a growing wealth of evidence that questions the traditional methods of caries removal and restoring the tooth. In parallel, there is a growing movement exploring the merits of therapeutically sealing caries into the tooth. This philosophy is alien to many of today's dentists and, until further randomized controlled trials are carried out in primary care, prudent caution must be exercised with this promising approach. Research is required into techniques which will allow monitoring of sealed caries to detect any rare, but insidious, failures. These novel techniques are an alternative way of managing the later stages of the caries process from a sounder biological basis and have marked potential benefits to patients from treatment, pain and outcome perspectives.

  7. Nevada Transportatoion Options Study

    SciTech Connect

    P. GEHNER; E.M. WEAVER; L. FOSSUM

    2006-05-25

    This study performs a cost and schedule analysis of three Nevada Transportation options that support waste receipt at the repository. Based on the U.S. Department of Energy preference for rail transportation in Nevada (given in the Final Environmental Impact Statement), it has been assumed that a branch rail line would be constructed to support waste receipt at the repository. However, due to potential funding constraints, it is uncertain when rail will be available. The three Nevada Transportation options have been developed to meet a varying degree of requirements for transportation and to provide cost variations used in meeting the funding constraints given in the Technical Direction Letter guidelines for this study. The options include combinations of legal-weight truck, heavy-haul truck, and rail. Option 1 uses a branch rail line that would support initial waste receipt at the repository in 2010. Rail transportation would be the primary mode, supplemented by legal weight trucks. This option provides the highest level of confidence in cost and schedule, lowest public visibility, greatest public acceptability, lowest public dose, and is the recommended option for support of waste receipt. The completion of rail by 2010 will require spending approximately $800 million prior to 2010. Option 2 uses a phased rail approach to address a constrained funding scenario. To meet funding constraints, Option 2 uses a phased approach to delay high cost activities (final design and construction) until after initial waste receipt in 2010. By doing this, approximately 95 percent of the cost associated with completion of a branch rail line is deferred until after 2010. To support waste receipt until a branch rail line is constructed in Nevada, additional legal-weight truck shipments and heavy-haul truck shipments (on a limited basis for naval spent nuclear fuel) would be used to meet the same initial waste receipt rates as in Option 1. Use of heavy-haul shipments in the absence

  8. Cannabinoid receptor 1 antagonist treatment induces glucagon release and shows an additive therapeutic effect with GLP-1 agonist in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kartikkumar Navinchandra; Joharapurkar, Amit Arvind; Patel, Vishal; Kshirsagar, Samadhan Govind; Bahekar, Rajesh; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Jain, Mukul R

    2014-12-01

    Cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor antagonists reduce body weight and improve insulin sensitivity. Preclinical data indicates that an acute dose of CB1 antagonist rimonabant causes an increase in blood glucose. A stable analog of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), exendin-4 improves glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreas, and reduces appetite through activation of GLP-1 receptors in the central nervous system and liver. We hypothesized that the insulin secretagogue effect of GLP-1 agonist exendin-4 may synergize with the insulin-sensitizing action of rimonabant. Intraperitoneal as well as intracerebroventricular administration of rimonabant increased serum glucose upon glucose challenge in overnight fasted, diet-induced obese C57 mice, with concomitant rise in serum glucagon levels. Exendin-4 reversed the acute hyperglycemia induced by rimonabant. The combination of exendin-4 and rimonabant showed an additive effect in the food intake, and sustained body weight reduction upon repeated dosing. The acute efficacy of both the compounds was additive for inducing nausea-like symptoms in conditioned aversion test in mice, whereas exendin-4 treatment antagonized the effect of rimonabant on forced swim test upon chronic dosing. Thus, the addition of exendin-4 to rimonabant produces greater reduction in food intake owing to increased aversion, but reduces the other central nervous system side effects of rimonabant. The hyperglucagonemia induced by rimonabant is partially responsible for enhancing the antiobesity effect of exendin-4. PMID:25361428

  9. The Additive Inflammatory In Vivo and In Vitro Effects of IL-7 and TSLP in Arthritis Underscore the Therapeutic Rationale for Dual Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Hillen, Maarten R.; Hartgring, Sarita A. Y.; Willis, Cynthia R.; Radstake, Timothy R. D. J.; Hack, Cornelis E.; Lafeber, Floris P. J. G.; van Roon, Joel A. G

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The cytokines interleukin (IL)-7 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) signal through the IL-7R subunit and play proinflammatory roles in experimental arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We evaluated the effect of inhibition of IL-7R- and TSLPR-signalling as well as simultaneous inhibition of IL-7R- and TSLPR-signalling in murine experimental arthritis. In addition, the effects of IL-7 and TSLP in human RA dendritic cell (DC)/T-cell co-cultures were studied. Methods Arthritis was induced with proteoglycan in wildtype mice (WT) and in mice deficient for the TSLP receptor subunit (TSLPR-/-). Both mice genotypes were treated with anti-IL-7R or phosphate buffered saline. Arthritis severity was assessed and local and circulating cytokines were measured. Autologous CD1c-positive DCs and CD4 T-cells were isolated from peripheral blood of RA patients and were co-cultured in the presence of IL-7, TSLP or both and proliferation and cytokine production were assessed. Results Arthritis severity and immunopathology were decreased in WT mice treated with anti-IL-7R, in TSLPR-/- mice, and the most robustly in TSLPR-/- mice treated with anti-IL-7R. This was associated with strongly decreased levels of IL-17, IL-6 and CD40L. In human DC/T-cell co-cultures, TSLP and IL-7 additively increased T-cell proliferation and production of Th17-associated cytokines, chemokines and tissue destruction factors. Conclusion TSLP and IL-7 have an additive effect on the production of Th17-cytokines in a human in vitro model, and enhance arthritis in mice linked with enhanced inflammation and immunopathology. As both cytokines signal via the IL-7R, these data urge for IL-7R-targeting to prevent the activity of both cytokines in RA. PMID:26110994

  10. Radiation Therapy in the Management of Head-and-Neck Cancer of Unknown Primary Origin: How Does the Addition of Concurrent Chemotherapy Affect the Therapeutic Ratio?

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Lau, Derick H.; Li Baoqing; Luu, Quang; Donald, Paul J.

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To determine how the addition of cisplatin-based concurrent chemotherapy to radiation therapy influences outcomes among a cohort of patients treated for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 60 consecutive patients treated by radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck presenting as cervical lymph node metastasis of occult primary origin were reviewed. Thirty-two patients (53%) were treated by concurrent chemoradiation, and 28 patients (47%) were treated by radiation therapy alone. Forty-five patients (75%) received radiation therapy after surgical resection, and 15 patients (25%) received primary radiation therapy. Thirty-five patients (58%) were treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Results: The 2-year estimates of overall survival, local-regional control, and progression-free survival were 89%, 89%, and 79%, respectively, among patients treated by chemoradiation, compared to 90%, 92%, and 83%, respectively, among patients treated by radiation therapy alone (p > 0.05, for all). Exploratory analysis failed to identify any subset of patients who benefited from the addition of concurrent chemotherapy to radiation therapy. The use of concurrent chemotherapy was associated with a significantly increased incidence of Grade 3+ acute and late toxicity (p < 0.001, for both). Conclusions: Concurrent chemoradiation is associated with significant toxicity without a clear advantage to overall survival, local-regional control, and progression-free survival in the treatment of head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin. Although selection bias cannot be ignored, prospective data are needed to further address this question.

  11. FS65 Disposition Option Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wenz, Tracy R.

    2015-09-25

    This report outlines the options for dispositioning the MOX fuel stored in FS65 containers at LANL. Additional discussion regarding the support equipment for loading and unloading the FS65 transport containers is included at the end of the report.

  12. Newer Management Options in Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Rao, P Narasimha; Jain, Suman

    2013-01-01

    Newer management options are needed for leprosy control even at present, as it is predicted that new cases of leprosy will continue to appear for many more years in future. This article detail newer methods of clinical grading of peripheral nerve involvement (thickening, tenderness and nerve pain which are subjective in nature) and the advances made in the use of Ultrasonography and Colour Doppler as an objective imaging tool for nerves in leprosy. It also briefly discusses the newer drugs and alternative regimens as therapeutic management options which hold promise for leprosy in future. PMID:23372204

  13. [Additional administration of dutasteride in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia who did not respond sufficiently to α1-adrenoceptor antagonist : investigation of clinical factors affecting the therapeutic effect of dutasteride].

    PubMed

    Masuda, Mitsunobu; Murai, Tetsuo; Osada, Yutaka; Kawai, Masaki; Kasuga, Jun; Yokomizo, Yumiko; Kuroda, Shinnosuke; Nakamura, Mami; Noguchi, Go

    2014-02-01

    We performed additional administration of dutasteride in patients who did not respond sufficiently to α1-adrenoceptor antagonist treatment for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) (LUTS/BPH). Among 76 registered patients, efficacy was analyzed in 58 patients. International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), subscores for voiding and storage symptoms and quality of life (QOL) on the IPSS, and Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS) were all significantly improved from the third month of administration compared to the time of initiating additional administration of dutasteride. Additional administration of dutasteride also significantly reduced prostate volume, and residual urine with the exception of the sixth month after administration. Age at initiation of administration and voiding symptom subscore on the IPSS were clinical factors affecting the therapeutic effects of dutasteride. The rate of improvement with treatment decreased with increasing age at initiation of dutasteride administration, and increased as voiding symptom subscore on the IPSS increased. Therefore, additional administration of dutasteride appears useful for cases of LUTS/BPH in which a sufficient response is not achieved with α1-adrenoceptor antagonist treatment. Because patients who have severe voiding symptoms or begin dutasteride at an early age may be expected to respond particularly well to dutasteride in terms of clinical efficacy, they were considered to be suitable targets for additional administration. PMID:24755815

  14. Achalasia: current treatment options.

    PubMed

    Familiari, Pietro; Greco, Santi; Volkanovska, Ance; Gigante, Giovanni; Cali, Anna; Boškoski, Ivo; Costamagna, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Achalasia is a rare esophageal motility disorder, characterized by impaired swallow-induced, lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation and defective esophageal peristalsis. Unfortunately, there are no etiological therapies for achalasia. Patients present with dysphagia, chest pain and regurgitation of undigested food, often leading to weight loss. The currently available treatments have the common aim of relieving symptoms by decreasing the pressure of the LES. This can be achieved with some medications, by inhibiting the cholinergic innervation (botulinum toxin), by stretching (endoscopic dilation) or cutting (surgery) the LES. Recently, other therapeutic options, including per-oral endoscopic myotomy have been developed and are gaining international consensus. The authors report on the benefits and weaknesses of the different therapies and provide an updated approach to the management of achalasia. PMID:26186641

  15. Neuropeptides as therapeutic targets in anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Lin, En-Ju D

    2012-01-01

    In addition to the classical neurotransmitters, neuropeptides represent an important class of modulators for affective behaviors and associated disorders, such as anxiety disorders. Many neuropeptides are abundantly expressed in brain regions involved in emotional processing and anxiety behaviors. Moreover, risk factors for anxiety disorders such as stress modulate the expression of various neuropeptides in the brain. Due to the high prevalence of anxiety disorders and yet limited treatment options, there is a clear need for more effective therapeutics. In this regard, the various neuropeptides represent exciting candidates for new therapeutic designs. In this review, I will provide an up-to-date summary on the evidences for the involvement of seven neuropeptides in anxiety: corticotropin-releasing factor, urocortins, vasopressin, oxytocin, substance P, neuropeptide Y and galanin. This review will cover the behavioral effects of these neuropeptides in animal models of anxiety by both genetic and pharmacological manipulations. Human studies indicating a role for these neuropeptides in anxiety disorders will also be discussed.

  16. Therapeutic Applications of Curcumin Nanoformulations.

    PubMed

    Yallapu, Murali M; Nagesh, Prashanth K Bhusetty; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C

    2015-11-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is a bioactive and major phenolic component of turmeric derived from the rhizomes of curcuma longa linn. For centuries, curcumin has exhibited excellent therapeutic benefits in various diseases. Owing to its anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, curcumin plays a significant beneficial and pleiotropic regulatory role in various pathological conditions including cancer, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's disease, inflammatory disorders, neurological disorders, and so on. Despite such phenomenal advances in medicinal applications, the clinical implication of native curcumin is hindered due to low solubility, physico-chemical instability, poor bioavailability, rapid metabolism, and poor pharmacokinetics. However, these issues can be overcome by utilizing an efficient delivery system. Active scientific research was initiated in 2005 to improve curcumin's pharmacokinetics, systemic bioavailability, and biological activity by encapsulating or by loading curcumin into nanoform(s) (nanoformulations). A significant number of nanoformulations exist that can be translated toward medicinal use upon successful completion of pre-clinical and human clinical trials. Considering this perspective, current review provides an overview of an efficient curcumin nanoformulation for a targeted therapeutic option for various human diseases. In this review article, we discuss the clinical evidence, current status, and future opportunities of curcumin nanoformulation(s) in the field of medicine. In addition, this review presents a concise summary of the actions required to develop curcumin nanoformulations as pharmaceutical or nutraceutical candidates. PMID:26335307

  17. Therapeutic Applications of Curcumin Nanoformulations.

    PubMed

    Yallapu, Murali M; Nagesh, Prashanth K Bhusetty; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C

    2015-11-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is a bioactive and major phenolic component of turmeric derived from the rhizomes of curcuma longa linn. For centuries, curcumin has exhibited excellent therapeutic benefits in various diseases. Owing to its anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, curcumin plays a significant beneficial and pleiotropic regulatory role in various pathological conditions including cancer, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's disease, inflammatory disorders, neurological disorders, and so on. Despite such phenomenal advances in medicinal applications, the clinical implication of native curcumin is hindered due to low solubility, physico-chemical instability, poor bioavailability, rapid metabolism, and poor pharmacokinetics. However, these issues can be overcome by utilizing an efficient delivery system. Active scientific research was initiated in 2005 to improve curcumin's pharmacokinetics, systemic bioavailability, and biological activity by encapsulating or by loading curcumin into nanoform(s) (nanoformulations). A significant number of nanoformulations exist that can be translated toward medicinal use upon successful completion of pre-clinical and human clinical trials. Considering this perspective, current review provides an overview of an efficient curcumin nanoformulation for a targeted therapeutic option for various human diseases. In this review article, we discuss the clinical evidence, current status, and future opportunities of curcumin nanoformulation(s) in the field of medicine. In addition, this review presents a concise summary of the actions required to develop curcumin nanoformulations as pharmaceutical or nutraceutical candidates.

  18. Treatment options for hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Walling, Hobart W; Swick, Brian L

    2011-10-01

    Hyperhidrosis is a disorder of excessive sweating beyond what is expected for thermoregulatory needs and environmental conditions. Primary hyperhidrosis has an estimated prevalence of nearly 3% and is associated with significant medical and psychosocial consequences. Most cases of hyperhidrosis involve areas of high eccrine density, particularly the axillae, palms, and soles, and less often the craniofacial area. Multiple therapies are available for the treatment of hyperhidrosis. Options include topical medications (most commonly aluminum chloride), iontophoresis, botulinum toxin injections, systemic medications (including glycopyrrolate and clonidine), and surgery (most commonly endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy [ETS]). The purpose of this article is to comprehensively review the literature on the subject, with a focus on new and emerging treatment options. Updated therapeutic algorithms are proposed for each commonly affected anatomic site, with practical procedural guidelines. For axillary and palmoplantar hyperhidrosis, topical treatment is recommended as first-line treatment. For axillary hyperhidrosis, botulinum toxin injections are recommended as second-line treatment, oral medications as third-line treatment, local surgery as fourth-line treatment, and ETS as fifth-line treatment. For palmar and plantar hyperhidrosis, we consider a trial of oral medications (glycopyrrolate 1-2 mg once or twice daily preferred to clonidine 0.1 mg twice daily) as second-line therapy due to the low cost, convenience, and emerging literature supporting their excellent safety and reasonable efficacy. Iontophoresis is considered third-line therapy for palmoplantar hyperhidrosis; efficacy is high although so are the initial levels of cost and inconvenience. Botulinum toxin injections are considered fourth-line treatment for palmoplantar hyperhidrosis; efficacy is high though the treatment remains expensive, must be repeated every 3-6 months, and is associated with pain and

  19. Peptide-modified gold nanoparticles for improved cancer therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Celina; Prooijen, Monique V.; Chithrani, Devika B.

    2014-03-01

    The field of nanotechnology is currently undergoing explosive development on many fronts. The technology is expected to generate innovations and play a critical role in cancer therapeutics. Among other nanoparticle (NP) systems, there has been tremendous progress made in the use of spherical gold NPs (GNPs) in cancer therapeutics. In treating cancer, radiation therapy and chemotherapy remain the most widely used treatment options. These nanostructures further provide strategies for improving loading, targeting, and controlling the release of drugs to minimize the side effects of highly toxic anticancer drugs used in chemotherapy. Our recent results show enhancement of cell death during radiation therapy when GNPs are targeted to nucleus. In addition, we have seen enhanced therapeutic effects when GNPs are used as anticancer drug carriers. Hence, gold nanostructures provide a versatile platform to integrate many therapeutic options leading to effective combinational therapy in the fight against cancer. A multifunctional platform based on gold nanostructures with targeting ligands, therapeutic molecules, and imaging contrast agents will hold the possibility of promising directions in cancer research.

  20. Unmet needs of patients with narcolepsy: perspectives on emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Wozniak, Dariusz R; Quinnell, Timothy G

    2015-01-01

    The treatment options currently available for narcolepsy are often unsatisfactory due to suboptimal efficacy, troublesome side effects, development of drug tolerance, and inconvenience. Our understanding of the neurobiology of narcolepsy has greatly improved over the last decade. This knowledge has not yet translated into additional therapeutic options for patients, but progress is being made. Some compounds, such as histaminergic H3 receptor antagonists, may prove useful in symptom control of narcolepsy. The prospect of finding a cure still seems distant, but hypocretin replacement therapy offers some promise. In this narrative review, we describe these developments and others which may yield more effective narcolepsy treatments in the future. PMID:26045680

  1. Therapeutics in Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Killoran, Annie; Biglan, Kevin M

    2012-02-01

    OPINION STATEMENT: There is no specific treatment for Huntington's disease (HD). Its many symptoms of motor, psychiatric, and cognitive deterioration are managed with symptomatic relief, rehabilitation, and support. The only drug approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of HD is an antichoreic agent, tetrabenazine, but this drug is used sparingly because of uneasiness regarding its propensity to cause depression and suicidality in this population, which is already at risk for these complications. Neuroleptics are still first-line treatments for chorea accompanied by comorbid depression and/or behavioral or psychotic symptoms, as is often the case. Psychiatric features, which have a significant impact on a patient's professional and personal life, often become the major focus of management. In addition to neuroleptics, commonly used medications include antidepressants, mood stabilizers, anxiolytics, and psychostimulants. In contrast, few treatment options are available for cognitive impairment in HD; this remains an important and largely unmet therapeutic need. HD patients typically lack insight into their disease manifestations, failing to recognize their need for treatment, and possibly even arguing against it. Multipurpose medications are employed advantageously to simplify the medication regimen, so as to facilitate compliance and not overwhelm the patient. For example, haloperidol can be prescribed for a patient with chorea, agitation, and anorexia, rather than targeting each symptom with a different drug. This approach also limits the potential for adverse effects, which can be difficult to distinguish from the features of the disease itself. With HD's complexity, it is best managed with a multidisciplinary approach that includes a movement disorders specialist, a genetic counselor, a mental health professional, a physical therapist, and a social worker for support and coordination of services. As the disease progresses, there

  2. Dark circles: etiology and management options.

    PubMed

    Friedmann, Daniel P; Goldman, Mitchel P

    2015-01-01

    Given their multifactorial nature and the fact that individual patients may have more than a single underlying cause, cosmetic practitioners should be well versed in a number of potential treatment options encompassing all facets of under-eye dark circles. New therapeutic options are also forthcoming. Longer-lasting HA fillers, wavelength tunable laser devices, and topicals speeding up healing and enhancing results after fractionated laser therapy will all serve to make the future of dark circle treatment unabatedly bright.

  3. Androgenetic Alopecia: An Update of Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Yanna; Blanco, Aline; Tosti, Antonella

    2016-09-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is characterized by a non-scarring progressive miniaturization of the hair follicle in predisposed men and women with a pattern distribution. Although AGA is a very prevalent condition, approved therapeutic options are limited. This article discusses the current treatment alternatives including their efficacy, safety profile, and quality of evidence. Finasteride and minoxidil for male androgenetic alopecia and minoxidil for female androgenetic alopecia still are the therapeutic options with the highest level evidence. The role of antiandrogens for female patients, the importance of adjuvant therapies, as well as new drugs and procedures are also addressed. PMID:27554257

  4. [New treatment options for chronic pruritus].

    PubMed

    Zeidler, C; Pfleiderer, B; Ständer, S

    2016-08-01

    Prevalent in 14-17 % of the population, chronic pruritus is among the most common and stressful symptoms in medicine. In spite of new findings regarding the origin and chronification of the symptom, therapy remains a great challenge. There is a lack of approved therapies that provide rapid and efficient reduction of pruritus. As a result, the affected patients suffer a long time (even months to years), and somatic (scratch lesions, super infections, sleep disorders) and psychosomatic disorders develop. Interdisciplinary cooperation with various specialists is important not just for these reasons, but also due to different etiologies of the symptom and common comorbidities. In addition, there remains a great need for uniformly devised, clinically controlled studies, recommendations and guidelines. New therapeutic approaches are currently being verified in clinical trials. This allows for future prospects of possible new and partially targeted therapies. This article provides a summary of current therapeutic options based on case series, individual randomized controlled trials and the current S2K guideline. PMID:27351559

  5. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as skeletal therapeutics - an update.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Hamid; Ahsan, Muhammad; Saleem, Zikria; Iqtedar, Mehwish; Islam, Muhammad; Danish, Zeeshan; Khan, Asif Manzoor

    2016-04-16

    Mesenchymal stem cells hold the promise to treat not only several congenital and acquired bone degenerative diseases but also to repair and regenerate morbid bone tissues. Utilizing MSCs, several lines of evidences advocate promising clinical outcomes in skeletal diseases and skeletal tissue repair/regeneration. In this context, both, autologous and allogeneic cell transfer options have been utilized. Studies suggest that MSCs are transplanted either alone by mixing with autogenous plasma/serum or by loading onto repair/induction supportive resorb-able scaffolds. Thus, this review is aimed at highlighting a wide range of pertinent clinical therapeutic options of MSCs in the treatment of skeletal diseases and skeletal tissue regeneration. Additionally, in skeletal disease and regenerative sections, only the early and more recent preclinical evidences are discussed followed by all the pertinent clinical studies. Moreover, germane post transplant therapeutic mechanisms afforded by MSCs have also been conversed. Nonetheless, assertive use of MSCs in the clinic for skeletal disorders and repair is far from a mature therapeutic option, therefore, posed challenges and future directions are also discussed. Importantly, for uniformity at all instances, term MSCs is used throughout the review.

  6. Biomimetic Particles as Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jordan J.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there have been major advances in the development of novel nanoparticle and microparticle-based therapeutics. An emerging paradigm is the incorporation of biomimetic features into these synthetic therapeutic constructs to enable them to better interface with biological systems. Through the control of size, shape, and material consistency, particle cores have been generated that better mimic natural cells and viruses. In addition, there have been significant advances in biomimetic surface functionalization of particles through the integration of bio-inspired artificial cell membranes and naturally derived cell membranes. Biomimetic technologies enable therapeutic particles to have increased potency to benefit human health. PMID:26277289

  7. Comprehensive risk reduction in patients with atrial fibrillation: emerging diagnostic and therapeutic options--a report from the 3rd Atrial Fibrillation Competence NETwork/European Heart Rhythm Association consensus conference.

    PubMed

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Lip, Gregory Y H; Van Gelder, Isabelle C; Bax, Jeroen; Hylek, Elaine; Kaab, Stefan; Schotten, Ulrich; Wegscheider, Karl; Boriani, Giuseppe; Brandes, Axel; Ezekowitz, Michael; Diener, Hans; Haegeli, Laurent; Heidbuchel, Hein; Lane, Deirdre; Mont, Luis; Willems, Stephan; Dorian, Paul; Aunes-Jansson, Maria; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina; Borentain, Maria; Breitenstein, Stefanie; Brueckmann, Martina; Cater, Nilo; Clemens, Andreas; Dobrev, Dobromir; Dubner, Sergio; Edvardsson, Nils G; Friberg, Leif; Goette, Andreas; Gulizia, Michele; Hatala, Robert; Horwood, Jenny; Szumowski, Lukas; Kappenberger, Lukas; Kautzner, Josef; Leute, Angelika; Lobban, Trudie; Meyer, Ralf; Millerhagen, Jay; Morgan, John; Muenzel, Felix; Nabauer, Michael; Baertels, Christoph; Oeff, Michael; Paar, Dieter; Polifka, Juergen; Ravens, Ursula; Rosin, Ludger; Stegink, W; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Vardas, Panos; Vincent, Alphons; Walter, Maureen; Breithardt, Günter; Camm, A John

    2012-01-01

    While management of atrial fibrillation (AF) patients is improved by guideline-conform application of anticoagulant therapy, rate control, rhythm control, and therapy of accompanying heart disease, the morbidity and mortality associated with AF remain unacceptably high. This paper describes the proceedings of the 3rd Atrial Fibrillation NETwork (AFNET)/European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) consensus conference that convened over 60 scientists and representatives from industry to jointly discuss emerging therapeutic and diagnostic improvements to achieve better management of AF patients. The paper covers four chapters: (i) risk factors and risk markers for AF; (ii) pathophysiological classification of AF; (iii) relevance of monitored AF duration for AF-related outcomes; and (iv) perspectives and needs for implementing better antithrombotic therapy. Relevant published literature for each section is covered, and suggestions for the improvement of management in each area are put forward. Combined, the propositions formulate a perspective to implement comprehensive management in AF. PMID:21791573

  8. Therapeutic cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Acres, Bruce; Paul, Stephane; Haegel-Kronenberger, Helene; Calmels, Bastien; Squiban, Patrick

    2004-02-01

    Therapeutic vaccination against cancer-associated antigens represents an attractive option for cancer therapy in view of the comparatively low toxicity and, so far, excellent safety profile of this treatment. Nevertheless, it is now recognized that the vaccination strategies used for prophylactic vaccinations against infectious diseases cannot necessarily be used for therapeutic cancer vaccination. Cancer patients are usually immunosuppressed, and most cancer-associated antigens are self antigens. Therefore, various immunostimulation techniques are under investigation in an effort to bolster immune systems and to overcome immune tolerance to self antigens. Various strategies to stimulate antigen presentation, T-cell reactivity and innate immune activity are under investigation. Similarly, strategies to produce an immunological 'danger signal' at the site of the tumor itself are under evaluation, as it is recognized that while tumor-specific T-cells can be activated at the site of vaccination, they require appropriate signals to be attracted to a tumor. The detection, evaluation and quantification of specific immune responses generated by vaccination with cancer-associated antigens is another important area of therapeutic cancer vaccine evaluation receiving much attention and novel strategies. Multiple clinical trials have been undertaken to evaluate therapeutic vaccines in patients. Aggressive protocols such as those combining specific stimulation of T-cells and chemotherapy or strategies to block immune regulation are having some success. PMID:15011780

  9. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer - Treatment Options Request Permissions Print to PDF Breast Cancer - Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... recommendations for ovarian ablation . Hormonal therapy for metastatic breast cancer Hormonal therapies are also commonly used to treat ...

  10. Morphoproteomics identifies constitutive activation of the mTORC2/Akt and NF-κB pathways and expressions of IGF-1R, Sirt1, COX-2, and FASN in peripheral T-cell lymphomas: pathogenetic implications and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Quesada, Andrés E; Nguyen, Nghia D; Rios, Adan; Brown, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    Background: Gaining a better understanding of the molecular circuitries and pathways implicated in the malignant growth and biological behavior of T cell lymphomas may identify potential cellular targets with clinical therapeutic potential. The immunohistochemical characterization of key cellular proteins participating in these pathways can provide surrogate markers of biological activity. The mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC) signaling pathway has been implicated in T-cell lymphopoiesis. The mTORC2 pathway involves downstream activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and p-Akt (Ser 473). Fatty acid synthase (FASN) and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) are expressed upstream of the mTORC and NF-κB signaling pathways. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 products influence these pathways. Our goal was to use morphoproteomics to characterize the expression patterns of the proteins in various peripheral T-cell lymphomas. Design: Ten cases of peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) were examined for expression of proteins along the mTORC, Akt and NF-κB pathways and affiliated tumorigenic molecules. These included two angioimmunoblastic PTCL, one natural killer/PTCL, one anaplastic large PTCL, and six PTCL not otherwise specified. Immunostaining for phosphorylated (p) mTOR (Ser 2448), p-Akt (Ser 473), p-NF-κBp65 (Ser 536), IGF-1R (Tyr1165/1166), silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (Sirt1), COX-2 and FASN was performed on paraffin-embedded tissue for each case. Percent expression was scored using bright-field microscopy with high expression designated as more than 50% of the cells with positive stain in the appropriate subcellular compartment. Results: All ten cases demonstrated nuclear staining for p-mTOR (Ser 2448) corresponding to mTORC 2, and all cases showed strong, diffuse nuclear staining for p-NF-κBp65 (Ser 536). All ten also showed nuclear and cytoplasmic staining for p-Akt (Ser 473) and cytoplasmic staining for IGF-1R. High expressions

  11. MACROMOLECULAR THERAPEUTICS

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiyuan; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2014-01-01

    This review covers water-soluble polymer-drug conjugates and macromolecules that possess biological activity without attached low molecular weight drugs. The main design principles of traditional and backbone degradable polymer-drug conjugates as well as the development of a new paradigm in nanomedicines – (low molecular weight) drug-free macromolecular therapeutics are discussed. To address the biological features of cancer, macromolecular therapeutics directed to stem/progenitor cells and the tumor microenvironment are deliberated. Finally, the future perspectives of the field are briefly debated. PMID:24747162

  12. Therapeutic Nanodevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Stephen; Ruegsegger, Mark; Barnes, Philip; Smith, Bryan; Ferrari, Mauro

    Therapeutic nanotechnology offers minimally invasive therapies with high densities of function concentrated in small volumes, features that may reduce patient morbidity and mortality. Unlike other areas of nanotechnology, novel physical properties associated with nanoscale dimensionality are not the raison d'être of therapeutic nanotechnology, whereas the aggregation of multiple biochemical (or comparably precise) functions into controlled nanoarchitectures is. Multifunctionality is a hallmark of emerging nanotherapeutic devices, and multifunctionality can allow nanotherapeutic devices to perform multistep work processes, with each functional component contributing to one or more nanodevice subroutine such that, in aggregate, subroutines sum to a cogent work process. Cannonical nanotherapeutic subroutines include tethering (targeting) to sites of disease, dispensing measured doses of drug (or bioactive compound), detection of residual disease after therapy and communication with an external clinician/operator. Emerging nanotherapeutics thus blur the boundaries between medical devices and traditional pharmaceuticals. Assembly of therapeutic nanodevices generally exploits either (bio)material self-assembly properties or chemoselective bioconjugation techniques, or both. Given the complexity, composition, and the necessity for their tight chemical and structural definition inherent in the nature of nanotherapeutics, their cost of goods (COGs) might exceed that of (already expensive) biologics. Early therapeutic nanodevices will likely be applied to disease states which exhibit significant unmet patient need (cancer and cardiovascular disease), while application to other disease states well-served by conventional therapy may await perfection of nanotherapeutic design and assembly protocols.

  13. Therapeutic Nanodevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Stephen C.; Ruegsegger, Mark; Barnes, Philip D.; Smith, Bryan R.; Ferrari, Mauro

    Therapeutic nanotechnology offers minimally invasive therapies with high densities of function concentrated in small volumes, features that may reduce patient morbidity and mortality. Unlike other areas of nanotechnology, novel physical properties associated with nanoscale dimensionality are not the raison d'etre of therapeutic nanotechnology, whereas the aggregation of multiple biochemical (or comparably precise) functions into controlled nanoarchitectures is. Multifunctionality is a hallmark of emerging nanotherapeutic devices, and multifunctionality can allow nanotherapeutic devices to perform multi-step work processes, with each functional component contributing to one or more nanodevice subroutine such that, in aggregate, subroutines sum to a cogent work process. Cannonical nanotherapeutic subroutines include tethering (targeting) to sites of disease, dispensing measured doses of drug (or bioactive compound), detection of residual disease after therapy and communication with an external clinician/operator. Emerging nanotherapeutics thus blur the boundaries between medical devices and traditional pharmaceuticals. Assembly of therapeutic nanodevices generally exploits either (bio)material self assembly properties or chemoselective bioconjugation techniques, or both. Given the complexity, composition, and the necessity for their tight chemical and structural definition inherent in the nature of nanotherapeutics, their cost of goods (COGs) might exceed that of (already expensive) biologics. Early therapeutic nanodevices will likely be applied to disease states which exhibit significant unmet patient need (cancer and cardiovascular disease), while application to other disease states well-served by conventional therapy may await perfection of nanotherapeutic design and assembly protocols.

  14. TANK SPACE OPTIONS REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    WILLIS WL; AHRENDT MR

    2009-08-11

    Since this report was originally issued in 2001, several options proposed for increasing double-shell tank (DST) storage space were implemented or are in the process of implementation. Changes to the single-shell tank (SST) waste retrieval schedule, completion of DST space saving options, and the DST space saving options in progress have delayed the projected shortfall of DST storage space from the 2007-2011 to the 2018-2025 timeframe (ORP-11242, River Protection Project System Plan). This report reevaluates options from Rev. 0 and includes evaluations of new options for alleviating projected restrictions on SST waste retrieval beginning in 2018 because of the lack of DST storage space.

  15. Lunar Cube Transfer Trajectory Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Dichmann, Donald J.; Clark, Pamela; Haapala, Amanda; Howell, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Numerous Earth-Moon trajectory and lunar orbit options are available for Cubesat missions. Given the limited Cubesat injection infrastructure, transfer trajectories are contingent upon the modification of an initial condition of the injected or deployed orbit. Additionally, these transfers can be restricted by the selection or designs of Cubesat subsystems such as propulsion or communication. Nonetheless, many trajectory options can be considered which have a wide range of transfer durations, fuel requirements, and final destinations. Our investigation of potential trajectories highlights several options including deployment from low Earth orbit (LEO), geostationary transfer orbits (GTO), and higher energy direct lunar transfers and the use of longer duration Earth-Moon dynamical systems. For missions with an intended lunar orbit, much of the design process is spent optimizing a ballistic capture while other science locations such as Sun-Earth libration or heliocentric orbits may simply require a reduced Delta-V imparted at a convenient location along the trajectory.

  16. Lunar Cube Transfer Trajectory Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Dichmann, Donald James; Clark, Pamela E.; Haapala, Amanda; Howell, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Numerous Earth-Moon trajectory and lunar orbit options are available for Cubesat missions. Given the limited Cubesat injection infrastructure, transfer trajectories are contingent upon the modification of an initial condition of the injected or deployed orbit. Additionally, these transfers can be restricted by the selection or designs of Cubesat subsystems such as propulsion or communication. Nonetheless, many trajectory options can b e considered which have a wide range of transfer duration, fuel requirements, and final destinations. Our investigation of potential trajectories highlights several options including deployment from low Earth orbit (LEO) geostationary transfer orbits (GTO) and higher energy direct lunar transfer and the use of longer duration Earth-Moon dynamical systems. For missions with an intended lunar orbit, much of the design process is spent optimizing a ballistic capture while other science locations such as Sun-Earth libration or heliocentric orbits may simply require a reduced Delta-V imparted at a convenient location along the trajectory.

  17. Treatment-resistant depression: therapeutic trends, challenges, and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Al-Harbi, Khalid Saad

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with major depression respond to antidepressant treatment, but 10%–30% of them do not improve or show a partial response coupled with functional impairment, poor quality of life, suicide ideation and attempts, self-injurious behavior, and a high relapse rate. The aim of this paper is to review the therapeutic options for treating resistant major depressive disorder, as well as evaluating further therapeutic options. Methods In addition to Google Scholar and Quertle searches, a PubMed search using key words was conducted, and relevant articles published in English peer-reviewed journals (1990–2011) were retrieved. Only those papers that directly addressed treatment options for treatment-resistant depression were retained for extensive review. Results Treatment-resistant depression, a complex clinical problem caused by multiple risk factors, is targeted by integrated therapeutic strategies, which include optimization of medications, a combination of antidepressants, switching of antidepressants, and augmentation with non-antidepressants, psychosocial and cultural therapies, and somatic therapies including electroconvulsive therapy, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, magnetic seizure therapy, deep brain stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, and vagus nerve stimulation. As a corollary, more than a third of patients with treatment-resistant depression tend to achieve remission and the rest continue to suffer from residual symptoms. The latter group of patients needs further study to identify the most effective therapeutic modalities. Newer biomarker-based antidepressants and other drugs, together with non-drug strategies, are on the horizon to address further the multiple complex issues of treatment-resistant depression. Conclusion Treatment-resistant depression continues to challenge mental health care providers, and further relevant research involving newer drugs is warranted to improve the quality of life of patients

  18. Therapeutic perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Fiore, Carmelo E.; Pennisi, Pietra; Tinè, Marianna

    2008-01-01

    Osteoporosis and atherosclerosis are linked by biological association. This encourages the search for therapeutic strategies having both cardiovascular and skeletal beneficial effects. Among drugs that may concordantly enhance bone density and reduce the progression of atherosclerosis we can include bisphosphonates (BP), statins, β -blockers, and possibly anti-RANKL antibodies. Available data come from experimental animals and human studies. All these treatments however lack controlled clinical studies designed to demonstrate dual-action effects. PMID:22460845

  19. Therapeutic insemination.

    PubMed

    Alexander, N J; Ackerman, S

    1987-12-01

    Except in special circumstances, therapeutic insemination with a husband's sample has a low success rate. Couples in whom oligozoospermia has been identified as the principal cause of infertility do not benefit from therapeutic insemination by husband. Because of this low success rate, intrauterine insemination to provide sperm in closer proximity to the egg has become popular, but intrauterine insemination also has a low success rate. We suggest that intrauterine insemination should be approached aggressively in cases of male factor infertility. The recipient should be stimulated to enhance egg production and closely monitored for ovulation. A semen specimen of not less than 1 X 10(6) motile sperm with antibiotics added should be placed in the uterus the day after ovulation. If no pregnancies occur within four cycles, alternate approaches should be considered. Therapeutic insemination by donor involves careful donor selection to avoid inheritance of malformations and familial diseases. Because of the possibilities of sexually transmitted diseases, careful and repeated screening should be conducted. A complete sexual history should be obtained, and donors should be excluded if they have had any homosexual contact since 1978, if they have been an intravenous drug user, if they come from a geographic area where the sex ratio of AIDS is close to 1:1, or if they have recently had multiple sexual partners. A permanent record preserving the confidentiality but allowing the tracing of genetic anomalies, even if not present at birth, should be kept. PMID:3328130

  20. The Impact of Endometriosis across the Lifespan of Women: Foreseeable Research and Therapeutic Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, C. L.; Foster, W. G.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to estrogen dependence, endometriosis is characterized by chronic pelvic inflammation. The impact of the chronic pelvic inflammatory state on other organ systems and women's health is unclear. Endometriosis associated chronic inflammation and potential adverse health effects across the lifespan render it imperative for renewed research vigor into the identification of novel biomarkers of disease and therapeutic options. Herein we propose a number of opportunities for research and development of new therapeutics to address the unmet needs in the treatment of endometriosis per se and its ancillary risks for other diseases in women across the lifespan. PMID:26064879

  1. Therapeutic targets of triple-negative breast cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Jamdade, Vinayak S; Sethi, Nikunj; Mundhe, Nitin A; Kumar, Parveen; Lahkar, Mangala; Sinha, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the second most common cause of cancer deaths. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) does not show immunohistochemical expression of oestrogen receptors, progesterone receptors or HER2. At present, no suitable treatment option is available for patients with TNBC. This dearth of effective conventional therapies for the treatment of advanced stage breast cancer has provoked the development of novel strategies for the management of patients with TNBC. This review presents recent information associated with different therapeutic options for the treatment of TNBC focusing on promising targets such as the Notch signalling, Wnt/β-catenin and Hedgehog pathways, in addition to EGFR, PARP1, mTOR, TGF-β and angiogenesis inhibitors. PMID:26040571

  2. Approximate option pricing

    SciTech Connect

    Chalasani, P.; Saias, I.; Jha, S.

    1996-04-08

    As increasingly large volumes of sophisticated options (called derivative securities) are traded in world financial markets, determining a fair price for these options has become an important and difficult computational problem. Many valuation codes use the binomial pricing model, in which the stock price is driven by a random walk. In this model, the value of an n-period option on a stock is the expected time-discounted value of the future cash flow on an n-period stock price path. Path-dependent options are particularly difficult to value since the future cash flow depends on the entire stock price path rather than on just the final stock price. Currently such options are approximately priced by Monte carlo methods with error bounds that hold only with high probability and which are reduced by increasing the number of simulation runs. In this paper the authors show that pricing an arbitrary path-dependent option is {number_sign}-P hard. They show that certain types f path-dependent options can be valued exactly in polynomial time. Asian options are path-dependent options that are particularly hard to price, and for these they design deterministic polynomial-time approximate algorithms. They show that the value of a perpetual American put option (which can be computed in constant time) is in many cases a good approximation to the value of an otherwise identical n-period American put option. In contrast to Monte Carlo methods, the algorithms have guaranteed error bounds that are polynormally small (and in some cases exponentially small) in the maturity n. For the error analysis they derive large-deviation results for random walks that may be of independent interest.

  3. Race-based therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Yancy, Clyde W

    2008-08-01

    The issue of race in medicine is problematic. Race is not a physiologic grouping, and all persons of a given race do not necessarily share the same clinical phenotype or genetic substrate. Despite clear signals that certain risk factors and diseases vary as a function of race, translating those differences into race-based therapeutics has been awkward and has done little to change the natural history of cardiovascular disease as it affects special populations. Among the varied special populations, the African American population appears to have the most significant and adverse variances for cardiovascular disease as well as worrisome signals that drug responsiveness varies. Recent guideline statements have now acknowledged certain treatment options that are most appropriate for African Americans with cardiovascular disease, especially hypertension and heart failure. As more physiologic markers of disease and drug responsiveness become available, the need for racial designations in medicine may lessen, and therapies can be optimized for all patients without regard to race or ethnicity.

  4. Therapeutic alliance.

    PubMed

    Fox, Valerie

    2002-01-01

    I have been very fortunate in my journey of mental illness. I respond well to medication, but I don't think that is the complete answer to living successfully with serious, persistent mental illness. I believe a person's environment is also of utmost importance, enabling the person suffering with mental illness to continually grow in life. I found early in my struggle with mental illness a psychiatrist with whom I have always had a very good rapport. Until recently I didn't know that what I have with this psychiatrist is professionally known as a therapeutic alliance. Over the years, when I need someone to talk over anything that is troubling to me, I seek my psychiatrist. A therapeutic alliance is non-judgmental; it is nourishing; and finally it is a relationship of complete trust. Perhaps persons reading this article who have never experienced this alliance will seek it. I believe it can make an insecure person secure; a frightened person less frightened; and allow a person to continue the journey of mental health with a sense of belief in oneself. PMID:12433224

  5. Therapeutics targeting the inflammasome after central nervous system injury.

    PubMed

    de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo; Dietrich, W Dalton; Keane, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    Innate immunity is part of the early response of the body to deal with tissue damage and infections. Because of the early nature of the innate immune inflammatory response, this inflammatory reaction represents an attractive option as a therapeutic target. The inflammasome is a component of the innate immune response involved in the activation of caspase 1 and the processing of pro-interleukin 1β. In this article, we discuss the therapeutic potential of the inflammasome after central nervous system (CNS) injury and stroke, as well as the basic knowledge we have gained so far regarding inflammasome activation in the CNS. In addition, we discuss some of the therapies available or under investigation for the treatment of brain injury, spinal cord injury, and stroke. PMID:26024799

  6. The Origins of Options

    PubMed Central

    Smaldino, Paul E.; Richerson, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Most research on decision making has focused on how human or animal decision makers choose between two or more options, posed in advance by the researchers. The mechanisms by which options are generated for most decisions, however, are not well understood. Models of sequential search have examined the trade-off between continued exploration and choosing one’s current best option, but still cannot explain the processes by which new options are generated. We argue that understanding the origins of options is a crucial but untapped area for decision making research. We explore a number of factors which influence the generation of options, which fall broadly into two categories: psycho-biological and socio-cultural. The former category includes factors such as perceptual biases and associative memory networks. The latter category relies on the incredible human capacity for culture and social learning, which doubtless shape not only our choices but the options available for choice. Our intention is to start a discussion that brings us closer toward understanding the origins of options. PMID:22514515

  7. A less aggressive therapeutic option for electrical storm.

    PubMed

    Bertero, G; Agosti, S; Brunelli, C

    2013-01-01

    Electrical storm (ES) describes the rapidly clustering ventricular fibrillation (VF) that requires multiple cardioversions. Emerging evidence suggests that Purkinje arborization and sympathetic nerve regeneration play a major role in initiating malignant arrhythmias. We report the case of two patients who, after having survived an acute myocardial infarction (MI), developed repetitive episodes of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and VF one week after percutaneous revascularization, triggered by monomorphic premature ventricular contractions (PVCs). Owing to repetitive and drug-refractory VF episodes, temporary atrial overdrive pacing was attempted with complete suppression of VF. In the following month, recurrence of ventricular arrhythmia was inversely related to the atrial pacing rate. Although antiarrhythmic drugs other than beta-blockers had been discontinued, neither PVCs nor ventricular arrhythmias recurred at one-month follow-up when the lower pacing rate was set at 60 bpm. In conclusion in these patients, ES was likely related to nerve sprouting after ischemic injury. This chaotic phenomenon occurs early after tissue damage and shows a peak seven days after acute MI with degeneration of superfluous axon branches. High pacing rates can reduce early after depolarizations and suppress PVCs, thus preventing ES. On these grounds, ES patients may be treated with temporary overdrive pacing rather than early radiofrequency ablation.

  8. Diagnosis and therapeutic options for peripheral vasculitic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Vasculitis can affect the peripheral nervous system alone (nonsystemic vasculitic neuropathy) or can be a part of primary or secondary systemic vasculitis. In cases of pre-existing systemic vasculitis, the diagnosis can easily be made, whereas suspected vasculitic neuropathy as initial or only manifestation of vasculitis requires careful clinical, neurophysiological, laboratory and histopathological workout. The typical clinical syndrome is mononeuropathia multiplex or asymmetric neuropathy, but distal-symmetric neuropathy can frequently be seen. Standard treatments include steroids, azathioprine, methotrexate and cyclophosphamide. More recently the B-cell antibody rituximab and intravenous immunoglobulins have shown to be effective in some vasculitic neuropathy types. PMID:25829955

  9. Functional foods as potential therapeutic options for metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brown, L; Poudyal, H; Panchal, S K

    2015-11-01

    Obesity as part of metabolic syndrome is a major lifestyle disorder throughout the world. Current drug treatments for obesity produce small and usually unsustainable decreases in body weight with the risk of major adverse effects. Surgery has been the only treatment producing successful long-term weight loss. As a different but complementary approach, lifestyle modification including the use of functional foods could produce a reliable decrease in obesity with decreased comorbidities. Functional foods may include fruits such as berries, vegetables, fibre-enriched grains and beverages such as tea and coffee. Although health improvements continue to be reported for these functional foods in rodent studies, further evidence showing the translation of these results into humans is required. Thus, the concept that these fruits and vegetables will act as functional foods in humans to reduce obesity and thereby improve health remains intuitive and possible rather than proven. PMID:26345360

  10. Functional foods as potential therapeutic options for metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brown, L; Poudyal, H; Panchal, S K

    2015-11-01

    Obesity as part of metabolic syndrome is a major lifestyle disorder throughout the world. Current drug treatments for obesity produce small and usually unsustainable decreases in body weight with the risk of major adverse effects. Surgery has been the only treatment producing successful long-term weight loss. As a different but complementary approach, lifestyle modification including the use of functional foods could produce a reliable decrease in obesity with decreased comorbidities. Functional foods may include fruits such as berries, vegetables, fibre-enriched grains and beverages such as tea and coffee. Although health improvements continue to be reported for these functional foods in rodent studies, further evidence showing the translation of these results into humans is required. Thus, the concept that these fruits and vegetables will act as functional foods in humans to reduce obesity and thereby improve health remains intuitive and possible rather than proven.

  11. Therapeutic options in Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Stéphane; Magy, Laurent; Vallat, Jean-Michel

    2015-04-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) diseases represent a heterogeneous genetic disorder (more than 80 genes are implicated in these inherited neuropathies), but sharing a similar phenotype. In recent years, advances in molecular genetics and molecular biology, and also the development of various animal models of CMT, have led to a better understanding. Taken together, this knowledge represents a prerequisite for the development of future therapies in CMT, and in peripheral nervous system disorders in general. The efficacy of various substances has been shown in vitro and also in vivo (in animal models); but, no significant positive effect has yet been confirmed in humans. However, some of these trials are still in development, and we may expect positive results in the future. Although CMT is still an incurable disease, symptomatic treatments (physiotherapy, surgery, analgesic, etc.) are crucial to improve the quality of life of CMT patients.

  12. Contemporary therapeutic options for children with high risk neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Sterba, J

    2002-01-01

    Despite the use of aggressive chemotherapy, stage 4 high risk neuroblastoma still has a very poor prognosis, which is estimated at 25%. Therefore, novel treatment approaches are needed. Increasing number of reports has been concerned with the use of novel treatment modalities. Literature regarding intensive induction, local therapy, myeloablative therapy and immunotherapy and biotherapy was reviewed in order to draw conclusions and recommendations for the management of children with high risk neuroblastic tumors.

  13. Cancer cachexia syndrome: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and new therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Mondello, Patrizia; Mian, Michael; Aloisi, Carmela; Famà, Fausto; Mondello, Stefania; Pitini, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome (CACS) is the most frequent paraneoplastic syndrome occurring in half of all oncologic patients and is considered as a poor prognosticator. Patients usually present with weight loss, lipolysis, muscle wasting, anorexia, chronic nausea, inflammation, and asthenia. The etiopathogenesis of CACS is still poorly understood, although several factors and biological pathways are known to be involved. Because of the complexity of this multifactorial condition, a single agent therapy may not be sufficient. Indeed, there is a tendency toward an integrated multiple approach including nonpharmacological and pharmacological treatments. However, despite encouraging preliminary results, currently there is not enough evidence to support a change in clinical practice. This review provides a brief and practical summary of the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and treatment of CACS. Future perspectives will also be discussed.

  14. Infective endocarditis: therapeutic options and indications for surgery.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Aneil; Rayner, Jenny; Williams, Timothy M; Prendergast, Bernard

    2014-04-01

    Infective endocarditis is a serious, life-threatening condition with mortality of 30% at one year. Established treatment is a combination of anti-microbial therapy and close interface between multiple specialist teams of cardiologists, microbiologists and cardiac surgeons to ensure availability of early surgery to those patients who require it. There are evidence-based established indications for surgery and a shifting body of evidence advocating earlier surgical intervention. The development of complications is often the driving cause of referral for surgical intervention. Here we discuss the management of infective endocarditis, considering both antimicrobial therapy and indications for surgery to treat this debilitating disease.

  15. Aromatase inhibitors in men: effects and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors effectively delay epiphysial maturation in boys and improve testosterone levels in adult men Therefore, aromatase inhibitors may be used to increase adult height in boys with gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty, idiopathic short stature and constitutional delay of puberty. Long-term efficacy and safety of the use of aromatase inhibitors has not yet been established in males, however, and their routine use is therefore not yet recommended. PMID:21693046

  16. Cardiogenic shock induced by Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: A new therapeutic option.

    PubMed

    Silva, Marisa Passos; Vilela, Eduardo Matos; Lopes, Ricardo Ladeiras; de Morais, Gustavo Pires; Fernandes, Paula; Santos, Lino; Dias, Adelaide; Ribeiro, Vasco Gama

    2015-11-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) is characterized by the sudden onset of reversible left ventricular dysfunction, with a presentation similar to that of an acute coronary syndrome. Although cardiogenic shock is a rare occurrence in TC, if it does occur it may require the use of a left ventricular assist device. We report the use of extracorporeal life support (ECLS) in a patient with TC and refractory cardiogenic shock. With ECLS it was possible to reduce inotropic support, and a normal left ventricular ejection fraction was documented by echocardiography on day 2. This is, to our knowledge, the first reported case of TC with refractory cardiogenic shock treated with ECLS in Portugal.

  17. New Therapeutic Options for Autism Spectrum Disorder: Experimental Evidences

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by impairment in two behavioral domains: social interaction/communication together with the presence of stereotyped behaviors and restricted interests. The heterogeneity in the phenotype among patients and the complex etiology of the disorder have long impeded the advancement of the development of successful pharmacotherapies. However, in the recent years, the integration of findings of multiple levels of research, from human genetics to mouse models, have made considerable progress towards the understanding of ASD pathophysiology, allowing the development of more effective targeted drug therapies. The present review discusses the current state of pharmacological research in ASD based on the emerging common pathophysiology signature. PMID:26713078

  18. Treatment of autoimmune liver disease: current and future therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Palak J.

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune liver disease spans three predominant processes, from the interface hepatitis of autoimmune hepatitis to the lymphocytic cholangitis of primary biliary cirrhosis, and finally the obstructive fibrosing sclerotic cholangiopathy of primary sclerosing cholangitis. Although all autoimmune in origin, they differ in their epidemiology, presentation and response to immunosuppressive therapy and bile acid based treatments. With an ongoing better appreciation of disease aetiology and pathogenesis, treatment is set ultimately to become more rational. We provide an overview of current and future therapies for patients with autoimmune liver disease, with an emphasis placed on some of the evidence that drives current practice. PMID:23634279

  19. Therapeutical options for the treatment of Cheyne-Stokes respiration.

    PubMed

    Randerath, Winfried J

    2009-03-01

    The awareness of Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) and of the co-existence of the obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome and central breathing disturbances has rapidly grown in recent years. CSR is defined by a waxing and waning pattern of the breathing amplitude. Sleep related breathing disorders in patients with heart failure are associated with impaired clinical outcome and survival. While continuous positive airway pressure treatment (CPAP) is widely used to treat CSR, it has failed to improve overall survival of heart failure patients. Nevertheless, it has been shown that CPAP reduces mortality if breathing disturbances were sufficiently eliminated. Therefore, optimal suppression of CSR is critical. While CPAP reduces CSR by 50% on average, adaptive servoventilation (ASV) normalises CSR in most patients. ASV devices apply different levels of pressure support: during periods of hypoventilation the inspiratory pressure is increased while it is reduced to the lowest possible level during hyperventilation. The devices deliver an expiratory pressure to overcome upper airways obstruction. Pressure support is defined by the difference between expiratory and inspiratory pressure. Thus, while pressure support is fixed in bilevel devices, it varies under ASV. However, the hypothesis that ASV might improve survival in CSR patients has to be proved in prospective studies in CPAP nonresponders. There is a lack of evidence on the use of bilevel devices in CSR. However, ASV has proven both to effectively treat CSR and to be superior to CPAP in respiratory and sleep parameters in short term and medium term studies. Nevertheless, data on the long term use and the influence on cardiac parameters are necessary.

  20. [Hypertrophic scars and keloids: which therapeutic options today?].

    PubMed

    Gailloud-Matthieu, M C; Raffoul, W; Egloff, D V

    1999-09-01

    Hypertrophic scars and keloids are a hyperproliferative response of connective tissue to trauma. Histologically the difference between the two is that keloids invade normal tissue whereas hypertrophic scars remain confined within the original wound. A variety of treatments have been proposed, which we will review according to their efficiency. Prevention of pathological scarring will also be discussed, and we will present our current attitude to treat these scars. As a surgical treatment for keloids, we have been using the intralesional technique which we think gives better results.

  1. MMPs as therapeutic targets – still a viable option?

    PubMed Central

    Fingleton, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) appear to be ideal drug targets – they are disease-associated, extracellular enzymes with a dependence on zinc for activity. This apparently straightforward target, however, is much more complex than initially realized. Although disease associated, the roles for particular enzymes may be healing rather than harmful making broad-spectrum inhibition unwise; targeting the catalytic zinc with specificity is difficult, since other related proteases as well as non-related proteins can be affected by some chelating groups. While the failure of early-generation MMP inhibitors dampened enthusiasm for this type of drug, there has recently been a wealth of studies examining the basic biology of MMPs which will greatly inform new drug trials in this field. PMID:17693104

  2. [Skin microbiota and atopic dermatitis: toward new therapeutic options?].

    PubMed

    Lacour, J-Ph

    2015-01-01

    The skin in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) is constantly colonized by S. aureus, in part due to a deficit in epidermal antimicrobial peptides. S. aureus can cause secondary infections but is also involved in the occurrence and severity of the inflammatory flares of AD. Thus, the diversity of skin microbiota is abnormal in AD. Dynamic studies of the microbiota showed that the prevalence of staphylococcae sp. is further increased during flares of AD. This dysbiosis leads to an increase in inflammatory reactions in which staphylococcal toxins play an important role. Changes in the gut microbiota also play a role in the early maturation of the immune system and the occurrence of allergic reactions. Attempts in the modulation of skin microbiota have recently been made showing that a cream containing a lysate of a non pathogenic Gram negative bacteria, V. filiformis, is capable of improving the manifestations of AD. These effects may be driven by a regulation of skin innate immunity through Toll like receptors (TLR-2), the secretion of IL-10 and the induction of regulatory T cells.

  3. [Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy - phenotype, genetics, therapeutic options].

    PubMed

    Gallenmüller, C; Klopstock, T

    2014-03-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a rare genetic disorder affecting the retinal ganglion cells leading to a persistent severe bilateral loss of visual acuity within weeks or months. Males are much more likely to be affected than females, disease onset in most cases takes place between age 15 and 35 years. The disease is caused by point mutations in the mitochondrial DNA. The penetrance of the disease is incomplete, i.e., not all mutation carriers develop clinical symptoms. The phenotype is relatively uniform, but age at onset, severity and prognosis may vary even within the same family. Environmental and endocrine factors, optic disc anatomy as well as mitochondrial and nuclear genetic factors are discussed to influence penetrance as well as interindividual and intrafamilial variability. However, only cigarette smoking and excessive alcohol consumption have been shown to trigger disease onset. The disease is characterised by a central visual field defect, impaired colour vision and fundoscopically a peripapillary microangiopathy in the acute phase. Most patients end up after some months with a severe visual loss below 0.1 and in most cases there is no significant improvement of visual acuity in the course. In rare cases patients experience a mostly partial visual recovery which depends on the type of mutation. For confirmation of the diagnosis a detailed ophthalmological examination with fundoscopy, family history and genetic analysis of the mitochondrial DNA is needed. To date, there is no proven causal therapy, but at early disease stages treatment with idebenone can be tried.

  4. Diagnosis and therapeutic options for peripheral vasculitic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Blaes, Franz

    2015-04-01

    Vasculitis can affect the peripheral nervous system alone (nonsystemic vasculitic neuropathy) or can be a part of primary or secondary systemic vasculitis. In cases of pre-existing systemic vasculitis, the diagnosis can easily be made, whereas suspected vasculitic neuropathy as initial or only manifestation of vasculitis requires careful clinical, neurophysiological, laboratory and histopathological workout. The typical clinical syndrome is mononeuropathia multiplex or asymmetric neuropathy, but distal-symmetric neuropathy can frequently be seen. Standard treatments include steroids, azathioprine, methotrexate and cyclophosphamide. More recently the B-cell antibody rituximab and intravenous immunoglobulins have shown to be effective in some vasculitic neuropathy types.

  5. 48 CFR 217.207 - Exercise of options.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Exercise of options. 217.207 Section 217.207 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM... Exercise of options. (c) In addition to the requirements at FAR 17.207(c), exercise an option only...

  6. 48 CFR 217.207 - Exercise of options.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Exercise of options. 217.207 Section 217.207 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM... Exercise of options. (c) In addition to the requirements at FAR 17.207(c), exercise an option only...

  7. 48 CFR 217.207 - Exercise of options.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Exercise of options. 217.207 Section 217.207 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM... Exercise of options. (c) In addition to the requirements at FAR 17.207(c), exercise an option only...

  8. 48 CFR 217.207 - Exercise of options.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Exercise of options. 217.207 Section 217.207 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM... Exercise of options. (c) In addition to the requirements at FAR 17.207(c), exercise an option only...

  9. 48 CFR 217.207 - Exercise of options.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exercise of options. 217.207 Section 217.207 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM... Exercise of options. (c) In addition to the requirements at FAR 17.207(c), exercise an option only...

  10. Expensing options solves nothing.

    PubMed

    Sahlman, William A

    2002-12-01

    The use of stock options for executive compensation has become a lightning rod for public anger, and it's easy to see why. Many top executives grew hugely rich on the back of the gains they made on their options, profits they've been able to keep even as the value they were supposed to create disappeared. The supposed scam works like this: Current accounting regulations let companies ignore the cost of option grants on their income statements, so they can award valuable option packages without affecting reported earnings. Not charging the cost of the grants supposedly leads to overstated earnings, which purportedly translate into unrealistically high share prices, permitting top executives to realize big gains when they exercise their options. If an accounting anomaly is the problem, then the solution seems obvious: Write off executive share options against the current year's revenues. The trouble is, Sahlman writes, expensing option grants won't give us a more accurate view of earnings, won't add any information not already included in the financial statements, and won't even lead to equal treatment of different forms of executive pay. Far worse, expensing evades the real issue, which is whether compensation (options and other-wise) does what it's supposed to do--namely, help a company recruit, retain, and provide the right people with appropriate performance incentives. Any performance-based compensation system has the potential to encourage cheating. Only ethical management, sensible governance, adequate internal control systems, and comprehensive disclosure will save the investor from disaster. If, Sahlman warns, we pass laws that require the expensing of options, thinking that's fixed the fundamental flaws in corporate America's accounting, we will have missed a golden opportunity to focus on the much more extensive defects in the present system. PMID:12510541

  11. SEATSAT programs option analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckl, L.

    1976-01-01

    A preliminary analysis of the costs of SEASAT follow-on options is presented. All the options assume the existence of SEASAT-A as currently defined in the SEASAT Economic Assessment. It is assumed that each option will continue through the year 2000 and approach operational system status in the 1983-1986 period, depending upon the sensor package selected. The launch vehicle assumed through 1983 is the Atlas Agena. After 1983, it is assumed SEASAT-A will switch to the use of the Space Shuttle. All cost estimates are 1976 dollars for fiscal year cost accounting, with no inflation rate included.

  12. Gold nanostructures as a platform for combinational therapy in future cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Jelveh, Salomeh; Chithrani, Devika B

    2011-03-04

    The field of nanotechnology is currently undergoing explosive development on many fronts. The technology is expected to generate innovations and play a critical role in cancer therapeutics. Among other nanoparticle (NP) systems, there has been tremendous progress made in the use of spherical gold NPs (GNPs), gold nanorods (GNRs), gold nanoshells (GNSs) and gold nanocages (GNCs) in cancer therapeutics. In treating cancer, radiation therapy and chemotherapy remain the most widely used treatment options and recent developments in cancer research show that the incorporation of gold nanostructures into these protocols has enhanced tumor cell killing. These nanostructures further provide strategies for better loading, targeting, and controlling the release of drugs to minimize the side effects of highly toxic anticancer drugs used in chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy. In addition, the heat generation capability of gold nanostructures upon exposure to UV or near infrared light is being used to damage tumor cells locally in photothermal therapy. Hence, gold nanostructures provide a versatile platform to integrate many therapeutic options leading to effective combinational therapy in the fight against cancer. In this review article, the recent progress in the development of gold-based NPs towards improved therapeutics will be discussed. A multifunctional platform based on gold nanostructures with targeting ligands, therapeutic molecules, and imaging contrast agents, holds an array of promising directions for cancer research.

  13. Gold Nanostructures as a Platform for Combinational Therapy in Future Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Jelveh, Salomeh; Chithrani, Devika B.

    2011-01-01

    The field of nanotechnology is currently undergoing explosive development on many fronts. The technology is expected to generate innovations and play a critical role in cancer therapeutics. Among other nanoparticle (NP) systems, there has been tremendous progress made in the use of spherical gold NPs (GNPs), gold nanorods (GNRs), gold nanoshells (GNSs) and gold nanocages (GNCs) in cancer therapeutics. In treating cancer, radiation therapy and chemotherapy remain the most widely used treatment options and recent developments in cancer research show that the incorporation of gold nanostructures into these protocols has enhanced tumor cell killing. These nanostructures further provide strategies for better loading, targeting, and controlling the release of drugs to minimize the side effects of highly toxic anticancer drugs used in chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy. In addition, the heat generation capability of gold nanostructures upon exposure to UV or near infrared light is being used to damage tumor cells locally in photothermal therapy. Hence, gold nanostructures provide a versatile platform to integrate many therapeutic options leading to effective combinational therapy in the fight against cancer. In this review article, the recent progress in the development of gold-based NPs towards improved therapeutics will be discussed. A multifunctional platform based on gold nanostructures with targeting ligands, therapeutic molecules, and imaging contrast agents, holds an array of promising directions for cancer research. PMID:24212654

  14. Direct renin inhibition: from pharmacological innovation to novel therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Massimo; Pontremoli, Roberto; Borghi, Claudio

    2011-09-01

    Nowadays, social and economic burden related to cardiovascular and renal diseases still remains extremely high, although there has been a dramatic improvement of diagnostic options and therapeutic strategies reported in the last 30 years. The progressively higher attention towards integrated pharmacological strategies, which are able to interfere with different pathophysiological mechanisms, has certainly led to better control of cardiovascular and renal diseases. In view of the large involvement of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the vast majority of pathophysiological mechanisms leading to the development and progression of cardiovascular and renal diseases, it can be easily understood why it has been long viewed as the 'ideal' target for the pharmacological treatment of several clinical conditions. Recently, besides the well known therapeutic approaches for RAS blockade, based on the use of ACE inhibitors, angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists (angiotensin receptor blockers [ARBs]) and aldosterone antagonists, both the scientific and medical community have focused their attention on a novel therapeutic option. In 2007, aliskiren, the first compound of a new drug class, the direct renin inhibitors (DRIs), has become available for clinical use, being a novel and innovative therapeutic option. Aliskiren is able to interfere with the enzymatic activity of renin by blocking the catalytic site of the molecule and inducing an 'upstream' RAS blockade. This leads to a modulation of the biological properties of renin, thus resulting in the missed cleavage of angiotensinogen to angiotensin I. Aliskiren has demonstrated antihypertensive efficacy comparable or even superior to that of other classes of antihypertensive drugs, both in monotherapy and in combination therapies. Its safety and tolerability are comparable with those of other antihypertensive drug classes and almost similar to placebo. In addition, it has been demonstrated to reduce progression of

  15. Porphyria Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... only. For treatment options for Porphyria Cutanea Tarda (PCT) , Congenital Erythropoietic Protoporphyria (CEP) and Hepatoerythropoietic Porphyria (HEP) ... Contact Us About Porphyria AIP VP HCP ADP PCT EPP CEP HEP Diet and Nutrition History of ...

  16. Therapeutic itineraries and explanations for tuberculosis: an indigenous perspective

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Laura Maria Vidal; Teixeira, Elizabeth; Basta, Paulo Cesar; da Motta, Maria Catarina Salvador

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To analyze explanations for tuberculosis and therapeutic itineraries of Brazilian indigenous people. METHODS Case study with a qualitative-descriptive approach. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 11 Munduruku indigenous, including direct observation of treatment for tuberculosis in the municipality of Jacareacanga, south-western region of the state of Para, Brazil. To identify explanations for tuberculosis and therapeutic itineraries, we performed thematic content analysis. RESULTS Traditional medicine was the first therapeutic option chosen by the indigenous. However, biomedicine was also employed, which indicates a circulation between different therapeutic contexts and health concepts among the Munduruku. The explanations provided ranged from recognition of the signs and symptoms specific to tuberculosis to the attribution of the disease to a spirit that leaves the body and wanders in the woods, returning ill into the body. Unlike the biomedical model, which links tuberculosis transmission strictly to interpersonal contact, in closed spaces without natural lighting and ventilation (preferably domestic environments), the Munduruku associate the disease to an indirect contact between people socially distant (enemies or adversaries) in public and open places. CONCLUSIONS The explanations made by the indigenous are unique and deserve the attention of those who are responsible for developing health public policies, as well as of the teams who work on the villages. To guarantee an efficient control of tuberculosis in these regions, it is necessary that the developed actions integrate biomedicine knowledge and the traditional medicine of the indigenous people, in addition to respecting and welcoming local culture manifestations. PMID:26815161

  17. Options Study - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

    2010-09-01

    The Options Study has been conducted for the purpose of evaluating the potential of alternative integrated nuclear fuel cycle options to favorably address the issues associated with a continuing or expanding use of nuclear power in the United States. The study produced information that can be used to inform decisions identifying potential directions for research and development on such fuel cycle options. An integrated nuclear fuel cycle option is defined in this study as including all aspects of the entire nuclear fuel cycle, from obtaining natural resources for fuel to the ultimate disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) or radioactive wastes. Issues such as nuclear waste management, especially the increasing inventory of used nuclear fuel, the current uncertainty about used fuel disposal, and the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation have contributed to the reluctance to expand the use of nuclear power, even though it is recognized that nuclear power is a safe and reliable method of producing electricity. In this Options Study, current, evolutionary, and revolutionary nuclear energy options were all considered, including the use of uranium and thorium, and both once-through and recycle approaches. Available information has been collected and reviewed in order to evaluate the ability of an option to clearly address the challenges associated with the current implementation and potential expansion of commercial nuclear power in the United States. This Options Study is a comprehensive consideration and review of fuel cycle and technology options, including those for disposal, and is not constrained by any limitations that may be imposed by economics, technical maturity, past policy, or speculated future conditions. This Phase II report is intended to be used in conjunction with the Phase I report, and much information in that report is not repeated here, although some information has been updated to reflect recent developments. The focus in this Options Study was to

  18. [Poorly healing periorbital wounds. Therapeutic use of maggots].

    PubMed

    Pitz, S; Renieri, G; Gericke, A

    2012-05-01

    The treatment of poorly healing wounds, although not a typical problem in the periorbital area, has been enriched by the option of biosurgery, the therapeutic application of larvae of the blow fly (Lucilia sericata).

  19. Transdermal delivery of therapeutic agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwiatkowski, Krzysztof C. (Inventor); Hayes, Ryan T. (Inventor); Magnuson, James W. (Inventor); Giletto, Anthony (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A device for the transdermal delivery of a therapeutic agent to a biological subject that includes a first electrode comprising a first array of electrically conductive microprojections for providing electrical communication through a skin portion of the subject to a second electrode comprising a second array of electrically conductive microprojections. Additionally, a reservoir for holding the therapeutic agent surrounding the first electrode and a pulse generator for providing an exponential decay pulse between the first and second electrodes may be provided. A method includes the steps of piercing a stratum corneum layer of skin with two arrays of conductive microprojections, encapsulating the therapeutic agent into biocompatible charged carriers, surrounding the conductive microprojections with the therapeutic agent, generating an exponential decay pulse between the two arrays of conductive microprojections to create a non-uniform electrical field and electrokinetically driving the therapeutic agent through the stratum corneum layer of skin.

  20. Fertility options in transgender people.

    PubMed

    De Roo, Chloë; Tilleman, Kelly; T'Sjoen, Guy; De Sutter, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Hormonal and surgical treatments for transgender people have a devastating effect on the possibility for these patients to reproduce. Additionally, transgender people tend to start sex reassignment treatment at a young age, when reproductive wishes are not yet clearly defined nor fulfilled. The most recent Standards of Care of the World Professional Association for Transgender Health recommend clearly informing patients regarding their future reproductive options prior to initiation of treatment. This review gives an overview of the current knowledge and state-of-the-art techniques in the field of fertility preservation for transgender people. Where genital reconstructive surgery definitely results in sterility, hormone therapy on the other hand also has an important, but partially reversible impact on fertility. The current fertility preservation options for trans men are embryo cryopreservation, oocyte cryopreservation and ovarian tissue cryopreservation. For trans women, sperm cryopreservation, surgical sperm extraction and testicular tissue cryopreservation are possible. Although certain fertility preservation techniques could be applicable in a standardized manner based on clear biological criteria, the technique that eventually will be performed should be the preferred choice of the patient after extended explanation of all possible options.

  1. Pawnee Nation Energy Option Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Matlock, M.; Kersey, K.; Riding In, C.

    2009-07-31

    introduced two model energy codes Pawnee Nation should consider for adoption. Summary of Current and Expected Future Electricity Usage The research team provided a summary overview of electricity usage patterns in current buildings and included discussion of known plans for new construction. Utility Options Review Pawnee Nation electric utility options were analyzed through a four-phase process, which included: 1) summarizing the relevant utility background information; 2) gathering relevant utility assessment data; 3) developing a set of realistic Pawnee electric utility service options, and 4) analyzing the various Pawnee electric utility service options for the Pawnee Energy Team’s consideration. III. Findings and Recommendations Due to a lack of financial incentives for renewable energy, particularly at the state level, combined mediocre renewable energy resources, renewable energy development opportunities are limited for Pawnee Nation. However, near-term potential exists for development of solar hot water at the gym, and an exterior wood-fired boiler system at the tribe’s main administrative building. Pawnee Nation should also explore options for developing LFGTE resources in collaboration with the City of Pawnee. Significant potential may also exist for development of bio-energy resources within the next decade. Pawnee Nation representatives should closely monitor market developments in the bio-energy industry, establish contacts with research institutions with which the tribe could potentially partner in grant-funded research initiatives. In addition, a substantial effort by the Kaw and Cherokee tribes is underway to pursue wind development at the Chilocco School Site in northern Oklahoma where Pawnee is a joint landowner. Pawnee Nation representatives should become actively involved in these development discussions and should explore the potential for joint investment in wind development at the Chilocco site.

  2. Therapeutic Hypothermia for Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Karnatovskaia, Lioudmila V.; Wartenberg, Katja E.

    2014-01-01

    The earliest recorded application of therapeutic hypothermia in medicine spans about 5000 years; however, its use has become widespread since 2002, following the demonstration of both safety and efficacy of regimens requiring only a mild (32°C-35°C) degree of cooling after cardiac arrest. We review the mechanisms by which hypothermia confers neuroprotection as well as its physiological effects by body system and its associated risks. With regard to clinical applications, we present evidence on the role of hypothermia in traumatic brain injury, intracranial pressure elevation, stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, spinal cord injury, hepatic encephalopathy, and neonatal peripartum encephalopathy. Based on the current knowledge and areas undergoing or in need of further exploration, we feel that therapeutic hypothermia holds promise in the treatment of patients with various forms of neurologic injury; however, additional quality studies are needed before its true role is fully known. PMID:24982721

  3. Lunar Cube Transfer Trajectory Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David C.; Dichman, Don; Clark, Pamela; Haapala, Amanda; Howell, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Contingent upon the modification of an initial condition of the injected or deployed orbit. Additionally, these designs can be restricted by the selection of the Cubesat subsystem design such as propulsion or communication. Nonetheless, many trajectory options can be designed with have a wide range of transfer durations, fuel requirements, and final destinations. Our investigation of potential trajectories highlights several design options including deployment into low Earth orbit (LEO), geostationary transfer orbits (GTO), and higher energy direct lunar transfer orbits. In addition to direct transfer options from these initial orbits, we also investigate the use of longer duration Earth-Moon dynamical systems. For missions with an intended lunar orbit, much of the design process is spent optimizing a ballistic capture while other science locations such as Sun-Earth libration or heliocentric orbits may simply require a reduced Delta-V imparted at a convenient location along the trajectory. In this article we examine several design options that meet the above limited deployment and subsystem drivers. We study ways that both impulsive and low-thrust Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) engines can be used to place the Cubesat first into a highly eccentric Earth orbit, enter the Moon's Sphere of Influence, and finally achieve a highly eccentric lunar orbit. We show that such low-thrust transfers are feasible with a realistic micro-thruster model, assuming that the Cubesat can generate sufficient power for the SEP. Two examples are shown here: (1) A Cubestat injected by Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1) then employing low thrust; and (2) a CubSat deployed in a GTO, then employing impulsive maneuvers. For the EM-1 injected initial design, we increase the EM-1 targeted lunar flyby distance to reduce the energy of the lunar flyby to match that of a typical lMoon system heteroclinic manifold. Figure 1 presents an option that encompasses the similar dynamics as that of the ARTEMIS

  4. Treatment options for post-transplantation diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Treatment options for management of post-transplantation diabetes mellitus (PTDM) are limited with regards to the availability of strong clinical evidence base. This is a concern as PTDM is common after solid organ transplantation and associated with poor clinical outcomes. PTDM and type 2 diabetes mellitus are distinct pathophysiological entities that have important differences with regards to aetiology, clinical course and management. Therefore, any clinical evidence of treatment benefit from the general population with type 2 diabetes mellitus may not be directly translated to the solid organ transplant recipient. In addition, the potential risk and benefit of using many of these therapeutic agents must take account of the complicated post-transplantation milieu of immunosuppression. While there is reasonable evidence base for treatment of diabetes mellitus in the general population, the same is not true in a post-transplantation setting. In this article the treatment options available for PTDM will be discussed, with a transplant-specific focus on the pros and cons of each particular component of the glucose lowering therapy armoury.

  5. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  6. [Intracerebral aneurysm--treatment options, informed consent, and legal aspects].

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Burkhardt, Werner Friedrich; Zinn, Pascal Olivier; Bozinov, Oliver; Bertalanffy, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    All medical subspecialties and, in particular, high-tech field neurosurgery are subject to continuous change in therapeutic concepts due to novel treatment options emerging through research and evolution in the field. Hence, the question arises if the patient's informed consent needs to be adjusted in the face of multiple therapeutic options with different configurations of risk/benefit relationships. In this paper we discuss different therapeutic scenarios with regard to ruptured intracerebral aneurysms (RIA) and unruptured intracerebral aneurysms (UIA), and we advise the medical doctor involved in the process. Indeed, experienced neurosurgeons and endovascular interventionalists are very familiar with the management of these scenarios; likewise, interns, residents, and otherwise affiliated physicians may be faced with these situations. In general, asymptomatic and mentally capacitated patients as well as legal guardians of minor patients and of mentally incapacitated patients with incidental aneurysms and more than one therapeutic option need to be accurately informed about the advantages and disadvantages of the treatment options available to them. In case of emergency or when treating a mentally disabled patient who is incapable of making a sound judgment and has no legal guardian, the attending doctor will have to choose the best possible treatment option. PMID:21958620

  7. The hydrogen hybrid option

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.

    1993-10-15

    The energy efficiency of various piston engine options for series hybrid automobiles are compared with conventional, battery powered electric, and proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell hybrid automobiles. Gasoline, compressed natural gas (CNG), and hydrogen are considered for these hybrids. The engine and fuel comparisons are done on a basis of equal vehicle weight, drag, and rolling resistance. The relative emissions of these various fueled vehicle options are also presented. It is concluded that a highly optimized, hydrogen fueled, piston engine, series electric hybrid automobile will have efficiency comparable to a similar fuel cell hybrid automobile and will have fewer total emissions than the battery powered vehicle, even without a catalyst.

  8. Fluorosis varied treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, I Anand

    2010-01-01

    Fluorosis has been reported way back in 1901. The treatment options for fluorosis are varied depending upon individual cases. This article comes from Madurai in India where its surrounding towns are fluorosis-prone zones. The purpose of this article is to report various treatment options available for dental fluorosis; this is the first time that complete full mouth rehabilitation for dental fluorosis is being reported. This article also dwells on the need for the dentists to be aware of their local indigenous pathologies to treat it in a better manner. PMID:20582220

  9. Thermal test options

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, J.A.; Keltner, N.R.; Sobolik, K.B.

    1993-02-01

    Shipping containers for radioactive materials must be qualified to meet a thermal accident environment specified in regulations, such at Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. Aimed primarily at the shipping container design, this report discusses the thermal testing options available for meeting the regulatory requirements, and states the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. The principal options considered are testing with radiant heat, furnaces, and open pool fires. The report also identifies some of the facilities available and current contacts. Finally, the report makes some recommendations on the appropriate use of these different testing methods.

  10. Lighting Options for Homes.

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, W.S.

    1991-04-01

    This report covers many aspects of various lighting options for homes. Types of light sources described include natural light, artificial light, incandescent lamps, fluorescent lamps, and high intensity discharge lamps. A light source selection guide gives the physical characteristics of these, design considerations, and common applications. Color, strategies for efficient lighting, and types of lighting are discussed. There is one section giving tips for various situations in specific rooms. Rooms and types of fixtures are shown on a matrix with watts saved by using the recommended type lighting for that room and room location. A major emphasis of this report is saving energy by utilizing the most suitable, recommended lighting option. (BN)

  11. The Therapeutic School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, John Steadman

    2002-01-01

    Contributes to the recent research on specific institutional carriers of the therapeutic culture, such as the state, the corporation, and the self- help movement, defining therapeutic discourse and discussing the therapeutic ethic, the therapeutic school, schools of education and their critics, and disappointing results of therapeutic schooling.…

  12. Achieving glycemic control in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes: a critical comparison of current options

    PubMed Central

    Du, Ye-Fong; Ou, Horng-Yih; Beverly, Elizabeth A; Chiu, Ching-Ju

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is increasing in the elderly. Because of the unique characteristics of elderly people with T2DM, therapeutic strategy and focus should be tailored to suit this population. This article reviews the guidelines and studies related to older people with T2DM worldwide. A few important themes are generalized: 1) the functional and cognitive status is critical for older people with T2DM considering their life expectancy compared to younger counterparts; 2) both severe hypoglycemia and persistent hyperglycemia are deleterious to older adults with T2DM, and both conditions should be avoided when determining therapeutic goals; 3) recently developed guidelines emphasize the avoidance of hypoglycemic episodes in older people, even in the absence of symptoms. In addition, we raise the concern of glycemic variability, and discuss the rationale for the selection of current options in managing this patient population. PMID:25429208

  13. 40 CFR 80.163 - Detergent certification options.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Detergent certification options. 80... (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Detergent Gasoline § 80.163 Detergent certification options. To be used to satisfy the detergency requirements under § 80.161(a), a detergent additive must...

  14. 40 CFR 80.163 - Detergent certification options.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Detergent certification options. 80... (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Detergent Gasoline § 80.163 Detergent certification options. To be used to satisfy the detergency requirements under § 80.161(a), a detergent additive must...

  15. 40 CFR 80.163 - Detergent certification options.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Detergent certification options. 80... (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Detergent Gasoline § 80.163 Detergent certification options. To be used to satisfy the detergency requirements under § 80.161(a), a detergent additive must...

  16. 40 CFR 80.163 - Detergent certification options.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Detergent certification options. 80... (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Detergent Gasoline § 80.163 Detergent certification options. To be used to satisfy the detergency requirements under § 80.161(a), a detergent additive must...

  17. Our Energy Options.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Paul A.; Witt, Frank C.

    Presented is an analysis of alternatives available to the United States in dealing with energy problems. Options explained and evaluated include coal, solar, hydroelectric, nuclear, geothermal, wind, biomass, and energy conservation. The booklet is part of Project APEC (America's Possible Energy Choices), a nationally validated Title IVc project…

  18. Idaho's Energy Options

    SciTech Connect

    Robert M. Neilson

    2006-03-01

    This report, developed by the Idaho National Laboratory, is provided as an introduction to and an update of the status of technologies for the generation and use of energy. Its purpose is to provide information useful for identifying and evaluating Idaho’s energy options, and for developing and implementing Idaho’s energy direction and policies.

  19. Alternative Education Options.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Washington, DC.

    This guide deals with various areas of alternative education programs, including current practices and different options available to school and community personnel. Steps are outlined to assess present educational settings, design new programs, select the participants, and implement and evaluate the new program. The first appendix contains…

  20. Career Options in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belloli, Robert C.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a credit/no credit course which focuses on career options in chemistry. The course (consisting of 15 one-hour seminar-type sessions) includes guest speakers for several sessions and an emphasis (in introductory sessions) on graduate school in chemistry, the chemical industry, resumes, and interviews. Also briefly describes an internship…

  1. Central Retinal Vein Occlusion: A Review of Current Evidence-based Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Amy; Nguyen, Christine; Lu, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    A central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) can induce an ischemic and hypoxic state with resulting sequelae of macular edema and neovascularization. Many treatment options have been studied. Our review aims to investigate the safety and efficacy of the multiple treatment options of CRVO. A PubMed and Cochrane literature search was performed. Well-controlled randomized clinical trials that demonstrated strong level 1 evidence-based on the rating scale developed by the British Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine were included. Seven clinical trials met inclusion criteria to be included in this review. These included studies that investigated the safety and efficacy of retinal photocoagulation (1 study), intravitreal steroid treatment (2 studies), and antivascular endothelial growth factor treatment (4 studies) for the treatment of CRVO. In addition, studies evaluating surgical treatment options for CRVO were also included. Many treatment modalities have been demonstrated to be safe and efficacious in the treatment of CRVO. These treatment options offer therapeutic benefits for patients and clinically superior visual acuity and perhaps the quality of life after suffering from a CRVO. PMID:26957838

  2. Indications and interventional options for non-resectable tracheal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, Jenny Louise; Patterson, Caroline Marie

    2014-01-01

    Non-specific presentation and normal examination findings in early disease often result in tracheal obstruction being overlooked as a diagnosis until patients present acutely. Once diagnosed, surgical options should be considered, but often patient co-morbidity necessitates other interventional options. Non-resectable tracheal stenosis can be successfully managed by interventional bronchoscopy, with therapeutic options including airway dilatation, local tissue destruction and airway stenting. There are common aspects to the management of tracheal obstruction, tracheomalacia and tracheal fistulae. This paper reviews the pathogenesis, presentation, investigation and management of tracheal disease, with a focus on tracheal obstruction and the role of endotracheal intervention in management. PMID:24624290

  3. Therapeutic approaches to cellulite.

    PubMed

    Green, Jeremy B; Cohen, Joel L; Kaufman, Joely; Metelitsa, Andrei I; Kaminer, Michael S

    2015-09-01

    Cellulite is a condition that affects the vast majority of women. Although it is of no danger to one's overall health, cellulite can be psychosocially debilitating. Consequently, much research has been devoted to understanding cellulite and its etiopathogenesis. With additional insights into the underlying causes of its clinical presentation, therapeutic modalities have been developed that offer hope to cellulite sufferers. This review examines evidence for topical treatments, noninvasive energy-based devices, and recently developed minimally invasive interventions that may finally provide a solution.

  4. Novel topical therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Bleier, Benjamin S

    2010-06-01

    Intranasal drug delivery is a rapidly growing field that offers the potential for enhanced treatment of local and systemic disease. Novel preclinical screening tools such as in vitro assays and 3-dimensional imaging are currently being used to improve drug design and delivery. In addition, new evidence has emerged underlining the importance of surgical marsupialization of the sinuses to allow for improved topical delivery. Although multiple barriers to administration and absorption exist, implantable therapeutics using new classes of drug-eluting polymers allow for prolonged, site-specific drug delivery and hold great promise in overcoming these obstacles.

  5. [Therapeutic plasmas available worldwide].

    PubMed

    Martinaud, C; Cauet, A; Sailliol, A

    2013-05-01

    Therapeutic plasma is a current product; French guidelines were reviewed in 2012. Connections between more or less closed countries are frequent, during relief disasters as well as in war settings. This is associated with the increasing use of plasma in the management of casualties. Additionally, The real possibility of lack of plasma supply in some countries provides a fundamental interest of the knowledge of foreign blood supply organizations. We present here the main divergences and mutual point between plasmas available worldwide. We present the main characteristics of each product.

  6. The Therapeutic Roller Coaster

    PubMed Central

    CHU, JAMES A.

    1992-01-01

    Survivors of severe childhood abuse often encounter profound difficulties. In addition to posttraumatic and dissociative symptomatology, abuse survivors frequently have characterologic problems, particularly regarding self-care and maintaining relationships. Backgrounds of abuse, abandonment, and betrayal are often recapitulated and reenacted in therapy, making the therapeutic experience arduous and confusing for therapists and patients. Efforts must be directed at building an adequate psychotherapeutic foundation before undertaking exploration and abreaction of past traumatic experiences. This discussion sets out a model for treatment of childhood abuse survivors, describing stages of treatment and suggesting interventions. Common treatment dilemmas or "traps" are discussed, with recommendations for their resolution. PMID:22700116

  7. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Therapeutic Drug Monitoring Share this page: Was this page ... Monitored Drugs | Common Questions | Related Pages What is therapeutic drug monitoring? Therapeutic drug monitoring is the measurement ...

  8. The safeguards options study

    SciTech Connect

    Hakkila, E.A.; Mullen, M.F.; Olinger, C.T.; Stanbro, W.D.; Olsen, A.P.; Roche, C.T.; Rudolph, R.R.; Bieber, A.M.; Lemley, J.; Filby, E.

    1995-04-01

    The Safeguards Options Study was initiated to aid the International Safeguards Division (ISD) of the DOE Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation in developing its programs in enhanced international safeguards. The goal was to provide a technical basis for the ISD program in this area. The Safeguards Options Study has been a cooperative effort among ten organizations. These are Argonne National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mound Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Sandia National Laboratories, and Special Technologies Laboratory. Much of the Motivation for the Safeguards Options Study is the recognition after the Iraq experience that there are deficiencies in the present approach to international safeguards. While under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards at their declared facilities, Iraq was able to develop a significant weapons program without being noticed. This is because negotiated safeguards only applied at declared sites. Even so, their nuclear weapons program clearly conflicted with Iraq`s obligations under the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) as a nonnuclear weapon state.

  9. Emerging treatment options for early mycosis fungoides

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Guarino, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides is a candidate for skin-directed therapies in its initial stages. In recent years, therapeutic options outside of the normal treatment recommendations such as topical imiquimod, topical tazarotene, topical methotrexate, excimer light sources, and photodynamic therapy have been published with variable results. These alternatives have been useful in cases of localized mycosis fungoides that do not respond to routine treatments; nevertheless, more studies on these methods are still needed. This article summarizes the literature and data that are known so far about these treatments. PMID:23450851

  10. Sleep Physiology, Abnormal States, and Therapeutic Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Wickboldt, Alvah T.; Bowen, Alex F.; Kaye, Aaron J.; Kaye, Adam M.; Rivera Bueno, Franklin; Kaye, Alan D.

    2012-01-01

    Sleep is essential. Unfortunately, a significant portion of the population experiences altered sleep states that often result in a multitude of health-related issues. The regulation of sleep and sleep-wake cycles is an area of intense research, and many options for treatment are available. The following review summarizes the current understanding of normal and abnormal sleep-related conditions and the available treatment options. All clinicians managing patients must recommend appropriate therapeutic interventions for abnormal sleep states. Clinicians' solid understanding of sleep physiology, abnormal sleep states, and treatments will greatly benefit patients regardless of their disease process. PMID:22778676

  11. [Chronic hand eczema: epidemiology and therapeutic evidence].

    PubMed

    Diepgen, T L

    2008-09-01

    Hand eczema (HE) is one of the most frequent skin diseases, although it is not a homogenous entity. The degree of severity can range from mild manifestations to severe chronic cases which are refractory to therapy and tend to disable patients. Chronic HE is a high social and economic impact and often leads to a loss in quality of life. Although there are many options, the therapy of chronic HE is difficult and often unsuccessful. Randomized controlled clinical trials demonstrating the efficacy of therapeutic options, including established ones, are lacking. PMID:18709342

  12. Pawnee Nation Energy Option Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Matlock, M.; Kersey, K.; Riding In, C.

    2009-07-21

    market developments in the bio-energy industry, establish contacts with research institutions with which the tribe could potentially partner in grant-funded research initiatives. In addition, a substantial effort by the Kaw and Cherokee tribes is underway to pursue wind development at the Chilocco School Site in northern Oklahoma where Pawnee is a joint landowner. Pawnee Nation representatives should become actively involved in these development discussions and should explore the potential for joint investment in wind development at the Chilocco site. Financial incentives for project development are generally structured to provide tribes with access to conventional financing mechanisms. Grant funding for project construction is currently difficult to obtain. Substantial new opportunities for bio-fuel development may exist in the next few years with passage of the 2007 Farm Bill, and through opportunities made available through Oklahoma’s new Bio-energy Center. A review of potential alternatives to Pawnee Nation’s current electricity supply scenario revealed that a range of options could be viable. These include the following scenarios: business as usual, alternative supply, negotiate lower rates with City of Pawnee, focus on reducing energy usage, develop electric utility organization. Under any circumstances, Pawnee Nation should purse strategies to reduce energy usage, as this is the simplest means of reducing electric costs and environmental impacts. The research team also recommends that Pawnee Nation initiate some focused discussions with the City of Pawnee, with GRDA, and with IEC to discuss its wholesale supply purchase options. These discussions will better inform the Pawnee Energy Team of the specific pros and cons of its wholesale power supply options, and will assist the Team’s broader decision-making on utility-related issues. The ultimate path chosen by Pawnee Nation will depend on further consideration of priorities and potential barriers by Pawnee

  13. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  14. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  15. Targeting DNA Polymerase β for Therapeutic Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Goellner, Eva M.; Svilar, David; Almeida, Karen H.; Sobol, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage plays a causal role in numerous disease processes. Hence, it is suggested that DNA repair proteins, which maintain the integrity of the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, play a critical role in reducing the onset of multiple diseases, including cancer, diabetes and neurodegeneration. As the primary DNA polymerase involved in base excision repair, DNA polymerase β (Polβ) has been implicated in multiple cellular processes, including genome maintenance and telomere processing and is suggested to play a role in oncogenic transformation, cell viability following stress and the cellular response to radiation, chemotherapy and environmental genotoxicants. Therefore, Polβ inhibitors may prove to be effective in cancer treatment. However, Polβ has a complex and highly regulated role in DNA metabolism. This complicates the development of effective Polβ-specific inhibitors useful for improving chemotherapy and radiation response without impacting normal cellular function. With multiple enzymatic activities, numerous binding partners and complex modes of regulation from post-translational modifications, there are many opportunities for Polβ inhibition that have yet to be resolved. To shed light on the varying possibilities and approaches of targeting Polβ for potential therapeutic intervention, we summarize the reported small molecule inhibitors of Polβ and discuss the genetic, biochemical and chemical studies that implicate additional options for Polβ inhibition. Further, we offer suggestions on possible inhibitor combinatorial approaches and the potential for tumor specificity for Polβ-inhibitors. PMID:22122465

  16. Congenital Aniridia: Clinic, Genetics, Therapeutics, and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Silva, R.; Falcão-Reis, F.; Rocha-Sousa, A.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital aniridia is a rare condition related to a deficiency in the PAX6 gene expression, which may occur as a result of a family inheritance or a sporadic occurrence. Additionally, this condition may occur as an isolated ocular phenotype or in association with a systemic syndrome. The most common abnormality is iris hypoplasia; however, a panocular disease which also affects the cornea, anterior chamber of the eye, lens, and the posterior segment with presence of optic nerve and foveal hypoplasia is also evident. The development of keratopathy, glaucoma, and cataract is frequent and its presence has implications in the patient's visual acuity. Managing aniridia is challenging since the focus is on treating the previously mentioned disorders, and the outcomes are often disappointing. In this paper, we shall review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical characteristics of patients with aniridia. We shall also make a review of the therapeutic options for the several conditions affecting this syndrome and consider the genetics and prognostic factors. PMID:27355034

  17. Operational options for green ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherbaz, Salma; Duan, Wenyang

    2012-09-01

    Environmental issues and rising fuel prices necessitate better energy-efficiency in all sectors. The shipping industry is one of the major stakeholders, responsible for 3% of global CO2 emissions, 14%-15% of global NO X emissions, and 16% of global SO X emissions. In addition, continuously rising fuel prices are also an incentive to focus on new ways for better energy-effectiveness. The green ship concept requires exploring and implementing technology on ships to increase energy-efficiency and reduce emissions. Ship operation is an important topic with large potential to increase cost-and-energy-effectiveness. This paper provided a comprehensive review of basic concepts, principles, and potential of operational options for green ships. The key challenges pertaining to ship crew i.e. academic qualifications prior to induction, in-service training and motivation were discussed. The author also deliberated on remedies to these challenges.

  18. Frankincense--therapeutic properties.

    PubMed

    Al-Yasiry, Ali Ridha Mustafa; Kiczorowska, Bożena

    2016-01-01

    Recently, increasing interest in natural dietary and therapeutic preparations used as dietary supplements has been observed. One of them is frankincense. This traditional medicine of the East is believed to have anti-inflammatory, expectorant, antiseptic, and even anxiolytic and anti-neurotic effects. The present study aims to verify the reported therapeutic properties of Boswellia resin and describe its chemical composition based on available scientific studies. The main component of frankincense is oil (60%). It contains mono- (13%) and diterpenes (40%) as well as ethyl acetate (21.4%), octyl acetate (13.4%) and methylanisole (7.6%). The highest biological activity among terpenes is characteristic of 11-keto-ß-acetyl-beta-boswellic acid, acetyl-11-keto-ß-boswellic acid and acetyl-α-boswellic acid. Contemporary studies have shown that resin indeed has an analgesic, tranquilising and anti-bacterial effects. From the point of view of therapeutic properties, extracts from Boswellia serrata and Boswellia carterii are reported to be particularly useful. They reduce inflammatory conditions in the course of rheumatism by inhibiting leukocyte elastase and degrading glycosaminoglycans. Boswellia preparations inhibit 5-lipoxygenase and prevent the release of leukotrienes, thus having an anti-inflammatory effect in ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel syndrome, bronchitis and sinusitis. Inhalation and consumption of Boswellia olibanum reduces the risk of asthma. In addition, boswellic acids have an antiproliferative effect on tumours. They inhibit proliferation of tumour cells of the leukaemia and glioblastoma subset. They have an anti-tumour effect since they inhibit topoisomerase I and II-alpha and stimulate programmed cell death (apoptosis). PMID:27117114

  19. Cystic Fibrosis Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Bonnie W.

    2013-01-01

    A great deal of excitement and hope has followed the successful trials and US Food and Drug Administration approval of the drug ivacaftor (Kalydeco), the first therapy available that targets the underlying defect that causes cystic fibrosis (CF). Although this drug has currently demonstrated a clinical benefit for a small minority of the CF population, the developmental pathway established by ivacaftor paves the way for other CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) modulators that may benefit many more patients. In addition to investigating CFTR modulators, researchers are actively developing numerous other innovative CF therapies. In this review, we use the catalog of treatments currently under evaluation with the support of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, known as the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics Pipeline, as a platform to discuss the variety of candidate treatments for CF lung disease that promise to improve CF care. Many of these approaches target the individual components of the relentless cycle of airway obstruction, inflammation, and infection characteristic of lung disease in CF, whereas others are aimed directly at the gene defect, or the resulting dysfunctional protein, that instigates this cycle. We discuss how new findings from the laboratory have informed not only the development of novel therapeutics, but also the rationales for their use and the outcomes used to measure their effects. By reviewing the breadth of candidate treatments currently in development, as well as the recent progress in CF therapies reflected by the evolution of the therapeutics pipeline over the past few years, we hope to build upon the optimism and anticipation generated by the recent success of Kalydeco. PMID:23276843

  20. Scenario Writing: A Therapeutic Application.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddock, Billy D.

    1989-01-01

    Introduces scenario writing as useful therapeutic technique. Presents case study of woman in midst of divorce and custody fight to illustrate context in which technique was applied. Suggests additional applications. Concludes that good response is more likely for clients who possess good writing skills although other clients may use their own…

  1. Technological options for acid rain control

    SciTech Connect

    Princiotta, F.T.; Sedman, C.B.

    1993-01-01

    The paper discusses technological options for acid rain control. Compliance with Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 will require careful scrutiny of a number of issues before selecting control options to reduce sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions. One key consideration is the effect of fuel switching or control technology upon the existing dust collector, with additional air toxics legislation looming ahead. A number of likely SO2 and NOx retrofit technologies and estimated costs are presented, along with results of retrofit case studies. New hybrid particulate controls are also being developed to meet future requirements.

  2. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, David Sherman

    2012-12-31

    A number of infectious agents have the potential of causing significant clinical symptomology and even death, but dispite this, the number of incidence remain below the level that supports producing a vaccine. Therapeutic antibodies provide a viable treatment option for many of these diseases. We proposed that antibodies derived from West Nile Virus (WNV) immunized geese would be able to treat WNV infection in mammals and potential humans. We demonstrated that WNV specific goose antibodies are indeed successful in treating WNV infection both prophylactically and therapeutically in a golden hamster model. We demonstrated that the goose derived antibodies are non-reactogenic, i.e. do not cause an inflammatory response with multiple exposures in mammals. We also developed both a specific pathogen free facility to house the geese during the antibody production phase and a patent-pending purification process to purify the antibodies to greater than 99% purity. Therefore, the success of these study will allow a cost effective rapidly producible therapeutic toward clinical testing with the necessary infrastructure and processes developed and in place.

  3. Achilles Tendinosis: Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Roberto Gabriel L.

    2015-01-01

    Athletes usually complain of an ongoing or chronic pain over the Achilles tendon, but recently even non-athletes are experiencing the same kind of pain which affects their daily activities. Achilles tendinosis refers to a degenerative process of the tendon without histologic or clinical signs of intratendinous inflammation. Treatment is based on whether to stimulate or prevent neovascularization. Thus, until now, there is no consensus as to the best treatment for this condition. This paper aims to review the common ways of treating this condition from the conservative to the surgical options. PMID:25729512

  4. Adolescent pregnancy options.

    PubMed

    Resnick, M D

    1992-09-01

    The range of pregnancy options available to adolescents each have significant ramifications for future educational and economic achievement. The changing societal context of adolescent pregnancy decision-making are described, and the characteristics of adolescents who choose to terminate their pregnancy, parent their child, or place for adoption are examined. The role of significant others in decision-making and the implications of mandatory parental involvement in pregnancy decision-making is discussed, as well as the roles of schools in promoting the well-being and potential of adolescents considering pregnancy decisions. PMID:1434557

  5. Adolescent pregnancy options.

    PubMed

    Resnick, M D

    1992-09-01

    The range of pregnancy options available to adolescents each have significant ramifications for future educational and economic achievement. The changing societal context of adolescent pregnancy decision-making are described, and the characteristics of adolescents who choose to terminate their pregnancy, parent their child, or place for adoption are examined. The role of significant others in decision-making and the implications of mandatory parental involvement in pregnancy decision-making is discussed, as well as the roles of schools in promoting the well-being and potential of adolescents considering pregnancy decisions.

  6. Evaluation of Cysteinyl Leukotriene Signaling as a Therapeutic Target for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Lorraine; Butler, Clare T.; Murphy, Adrian; Moran, Bruce; Gallagher, William M.; O'Sullivan, Jacintha; Kennedy, Breandán N.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Current pharmacotherapy options include cytotoxic chemotherapy, anti-VEGF, and anti-EGFR targeting drugs, but these are limited by toxic side effects, limited responses and ultimately resistance. Cysteinyl leukotriene (CysLT) signaling regulates intestinal homeostasis with mounting evidence suggesting that CysLT signaling also plays a role in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. Therefore, CysLT signaling represents a novel target for this malignancy. This review evaluates reported links between CysLT signaling and established hallmarks of cancer in addition to its pharmacological potential as a new therapeutic target. PMID:27709113

  7. Therapeutic Devices for Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic devices provide new options for treating drug-resistant epilepsy. These devices act by a variety of mechanisms to modulate neuronal activity. Only vagus nerve stimulation, which continues to develop new technology, is approved for use in the United States. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of anterior thalamus for partial epilepsy recently was approved in Europe and several other countries. Responsive neurostimulation, which delivers stimuli to one or two seizure foci in response to a detected seizure, recently completed a successful multicenter trial. Several other trials of brain stimulation are in planning or underway. Transcutaneous magnetic stimulation (TMS) may provide a noninvasive method to stimulate cortex. Controlled studies of TMS split on efficacy, and may depend on whether a seizure focus is near a possible region for stimulation. Seizure detection devices in the form of “shake” detectors via portable accelerometers can provide notification of an ongoing tonic-clonic seizure, or peace of mind in the absence of notification. Prediction of seizures from various aspects of EEG is in early stages. Prediction appears to be possible in a subpopulation of people with refractory seizures and a clinical trial of an implantable prediction device is underway. Cooling of neocortex or hippocampus reversibly can attenuate epileptiform EEG activity and seizures, but engineering problems remain in its implementation. Optogenetics is a new technique that can control excitability of specific populations of neurons with light. Inhibition of epileptiform activity has been demonstrated in hippocampal slices, but use in humans will require more work. In general, devices provide useful palliation for otherwise uncontrollable seizures, but with a different risk profile than with most drugs. Optimizing the place of devices in therapy for epilepsy will require further development and clinical experience. PMID:22367987

  8. Mechanisms of Plasma Therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, David

    2015-09-01

    In this talk, I address research directed towards biomedical applications of atmospheric pressure plasma such as sterilization, surgery, wound healing and anti-cancer therapy. The field has seen remarkable growth in the last 3-5 years, but the mechanisms responsible for the biomedical effects have remained mysterious. It is known that plasmas readily create reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). ROS and RNS (or RONS), in addition to a suite of other radical and non-radical reactive species, are essential actors in an important sub-field of aerobic biology termed ``redox'' (or oxidation-reduction) biology. It is postulated that cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) can trigger a therapeutic shielding response in tissue in part by creating a time- and space-localized, burst-like form of oxy-nitrosative stress on near-surface exposed cells through the flux of plasma-generated RONS. RONS-exposed surface layers of cells communicate to the deeper levels of tissue via a form of the ``bystander effect,'' similar to responses to other forms of cell stress. In this proposed model of CAP therapeutics, the plasma stimulates a cellular survival mechanism through which aerobic organisms shield themselves from infection and other challenges.

  9. Novel preventive treatment options.

    PubMed

    Longbottom, C; Ekstrand, K; Zero, D; Kambara, M

    2009-01-01

    A number of novel preventive treatment options which, as with traditional methods, can be differentiated into 3 categories of prevention (primary, secondary and tertiary), have been and are being currently investigated. Those reviewed are either commercially available or appear relatively close to that point. These include: approximal sealants; fluoride applications, including slow-release devices; measures to help remineralize demineralized tissue, including 3 different methods of delivering amorphous calcium phosphate; measures to help modify the biofilm to reduce the cariogenic challenge, including ozone therapy and probiotics; measures to increase enamel resistance to demineralization, including laser treatment of enamel, and a novel 'hybrid' technique for the treatment of primary molar caries which involves 'overlapping' of secondary and tertiary prevention--the Hall technique. Although many of these techniques show considerable promise and dentists should be aware of these developments and follow their progress, the evidence for each of these novel preventive treatment options is currently insufficient to make widespread recommendations. Changes in dental practice should be explored to see how oral health can be best supported through novel preventive systems. Further research is also required involving double-blind randomized controlled trials in order to bring further benefits of more effective caries control to patients. Implementation in practice should follow promptly as new techniques are shown to be clinically valuable for individual patients.

  10. Traditional preventive treatment options.

    PubMed

    Longbottom, C; Ekstrand, K; Zero, D

    2009-01-01

    Preventive treatment options can be divided into primary, secondary and tertiary prevention techniques, which can involve patient- or professionally applied methods. These include: oral hygiene (instruction), pit and fissure sealants ('temporary' or 'permanent'), fluoride applications (patient- or professionally applied), dietary assessment and advice (modification), other measures to help remineralize demineralized tissue and other measures to help modify the biofilm to reduce the cariogenic challenge. There is a considerable body of strong evidence supporting the use of specific techniques for primary prevention of caries in children, e.g. pit and fissure sealants and topically applied fluorides (including patient-applied fluoride toothpastes and professionally applied fluoride varnishes), but limited strong evidence for these techniques for secondary prevention--i.e. where early to established lesions with ICDAS codes 1-4 (and also the severer lesions coded 5 or 6) are involved--and in relation to adults. This lack of evidence reflects a shortage of high-quality trials in the area, as opposed to a series of good studies showing no effect. Since there is also limited longitudinal evidence supporting conventional operative care, and since controlling the caries process prior to first restoration is the key to breaking the repair cycle and improving care for patients, future research should address the shortcomings in the current level of supporting evidence for the various traditional preventive treatment options.

  11. Mixed waste management options

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, C.B.; Kirner, N.P.

    1991-12-31

    Disposal fees for mixed waste at proposed commercial disposal sites have been estimated to be $15,000 to $40,000 per cubit foot. If such high disposal fees are imposed, generators may be willing to apply extraordinary treatment or regulatory approaches to properly dispose of their mixed waste. This paper explores the feasibility of several waste management scenarios and attempts to answer the question: Can mixed waste be managed out of existence? Existing data on commercially generated mixed waste streams are used to identify the realm of mixed waste known to be generated. Each waste stream is evaluated from both a regulatory and technical perspective in order to convert the waste into a strictly low-level radioactive or a hazardous waste. Alternative regulatory approaches evaluated in this paper include a delisting petition, no migration petition, and a treatability variance. For each waste stream, potentially available treatment options are identified that could lead to these variances. Waste minimization methodology and storage for decay are also considered. Economic feasibility of each option is discussed broadly.

  12. Retrieval options study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    This Retrieval Options Study is part of the systems analysis activities of the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation to develop the scientific and technological bases for radioactive waste repositories in various geologic media. The study considers two waste forms, high level waste and spent fuel, and defines various classes of waste retrieval and recovery. A methodology and data base are developed which allow the relative evaluation of retrieval and recovery costs and the following technical criteria: safety; technical feasibility; ease of retrieval; probable intact retrieval time; safeguards; monitoring; criticality; and licensability. A total of 505 repository options are defined and the cost and technical criteria evaluated utilizing a combination of facts and engineering judgments. The repositories evaluated are selected combinations of the following parameters: Geologic Media (salt, granite, basalt, shale); Retrieval Time after Emplacement (5 and 25 years); Emplacement Design (nominal hole, large hole, carbon steel canister, corrosion resistant canister, backfill in hole, nominal sleeves, thick wall sleeves); Emplacement Configuration (single vertical, multiple vertical, single horizontal, multiple horizontal, vaults; Thermal Considerations; (normal design, reduced density, once-through ventilation, recirculated ventilation); Room Backfill; (none, run-of-mine, early, 5 year delay, 25 year delay, decommissioned); and Rate of Retrieval; (same as emplacement, variably slower depending on repository/canister condition).

  13. 18 CFR 808.4 - Optional joint hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Optional joint hearing... HEARINGS AND ENFORCEMENT ACTIONS Conduct of Hearings § 808.4 Optional joint hearing. (a) The Commission may... agent pursuant to such additional designation and may conduct joint hearings for the Commission and...

  14. 18 CFR 808.4 - Optional joint hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Optional joint hearing... HEARINGS AND ENFORCEMENT ACTIONS Conduct of Hearings § 808.4 Optional joint hearing. (a) The Commission may... agent pursuant to such additional designation and may conduct joint hearings for the Commission and...

  15. 75 FR 29893 - Business Reply Mail Online Application Option

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ... 111 Business Reply Mail Online Application Option AGENCY: Postal Service TM . ACTION: Final rule..., Domestic Mail Manual (DMM ) 507.9.3.2 and 507.9.5.2 to eliminate the option to obtain a Business Reply Mail (BRM) permit online. Additionally, the electronic version of PS Form 6805, Qualified Business...

  16. College Student Receptiveness to Various Alcohol Treatment Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epler, Amee J.; Sher, Kenneth J.; Loomis, Tiffany B.; O'Malley, Stephanie S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Heavy episodic drinking remains a significant problem on college campuses. Although most interventions for college students are behavioral, pharmacological treatments, such as naltrexone, could provide additional options. Participants: The authors evaluated receptivity to various alcohol treatment options in a general population of…

  17. NASA's EOSDIS: options for data providers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalsa, Siri J.; Ujhazy, John E.

    1995-12-01

    EOSDIS, the data and information system being developed by NASA to support interdisciplinary earth science research into the 21st century, will do more than manage and distribute data from EOS-era satellites. It will also promote the exchange of data, tools, and research results across disciplinary, agency, and national boundaries. This paper describes the options that data providers will have for interacting with the EOSDIS Core System (ECS), the infrastructure of EOSDIS. The options include: using the ECS advertising service to announce the availability of data at the provider's site; submitting a candidate data set to one of the Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs); establishing a data server that will make the data accessible via ECS and establishing Local Information Manager (LIM) which would make the data available for multi-site searches. One additional option is through custom gateway interfaces which would provide access to existing data archives. The gateway, data server, and LIM options require the implementation of ECS code at the provider site to insure proper protocols. The advertisement and ingest options require no part of ECS design to reside at the provider site.

  18. [Cerebral oedema: new therapeutic ways].

    PubMed

    Quintard, H; Ichai, C

    2014-06-01

    Cerebral oedema (CO) after brain injury can occur from different ways. The vasogenic and cytotoxic oedema are usually described but osmotic and hydrostatic CO, respectively secondary to plasmatic hypotonia or increase in blood pressure, can also be encountered. Addition of these several mechanisms can worsen injuries. Consequences are major, leading quickly to death secondary to intracerebral hypertension and later to neuropsychic sequelae. So therapeutic care to control this phenomenon is essential and osmotherapy is actually the only way. A better understanding of physiopathological disorders, particularly energetic ways (lactate), aquaporine function, inflammation lead to new therapeutic hopes. The promising experimental results need now to be confirmed by clinical data.

  19. American Therapeutic Recreation Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Remember Me I forgot my password American Therapeutic Recreation Association Empowering Recreational Therapists Call for 2017 Webinars – ... http://ow.ly/qzAj304HTCi Join thousands of Therapeutic Recreation specialists today Join Now Renew your membership today ...

  20. Therapeutic drug levels

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003430.htm Therapeutic drug levels To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Therapeutic drug levels are lab tests to look for the presence ...

  1. [Treatment options for brachymetatarsia].

    PubMed

    Wingenfeld, C; Arbab, D; Abbara-Czardybon, M

    2013-01-01

    Brachymetatarsia can be congenital, idiopathic or secondary and describes an abnormal shortening of a metatarsal bone. The indications for treatment are not only due to cosmesis. The shortening of a ray changes the biomechanics of the foot and can lead to metatarsalgia. A frequent clinical feature is dorsal dislocation of a toe causing painful shoe conflict and disturbed proprioception. There are three main options for operative correction: lengthening osteotomy, interposition of a tricortical bone and gradual lengthening by callus distraction. While one stage lengthening procedures such as osteotomy and interposition are more appropriate for correction of moderate length deficiencies, the callus distraction method is more suitable for larger elongation. Common to all procedures is a long-term treatment with a high risk of different complications whereby patient compliance can be problematical. PMID:23238881

  2. Mars Surface Habitability Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, A. Scott; Simon, Matthew; Smitherman, David; Howard, Robert; Toups, Larry; Hoffman, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on current habitability concepts for an Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC) prepared by the NASA Human Spaceflight Architecture Team (HAT). For many years NASA has investigated alternative human Mars missions, examining different mission objectives, trajectories, vehicles, and technologies; the combinations of which have been referred to as reference missions or architectures. At the highest levels, decisions regarding the timing and objectives for a human mission to Mars continue to evolve while at the lowest levels, applicable technologies continue to advance. This results in an on-going need for assessments of alternative system designs such as the habitat, a significant element in any human Mars mission scenario, to provide meaningful design sensitivity characterizations to assist decision-makers regarding timing, objectives, and technologies. As a subset of the Evolvable Mars Campaign activities, the habitability team builds upon results from past studies and recommends options for Mars surface habitability compatible with updated technologies.

  3. Novel therapeutic strategies for cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Sluijter, Joost P G; Condorelli, Gianluigi; Davidson, Sean M; Engel, Felix B; Ferdinandy, Peter; Hausenloy, Derek J; Lecour, Sandrine; Madonna, Rosalinda; Ovize, Michel; Ruiz-Meana, Marisol; Schulz, Rainer; Van Laake, Linda W

    2014-10-01

    The morbidity and mortality from ischemic heart disease (IHD) remain significant worldwide. The treatment for acute myocardial infarction has improved over the past decades, including early reperfusion of occluded coronary arteries. Although it is essential to re-open the artery as soon as possible, paradoxically this leads to additional myocardial injury, called acute ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), for which currently no effective therapy is available. Therefore, novel therapeutic strategies are required to protect the heart from acute IRI in order to reduce myocardial infarction size, preserve cardiac function and improve clinical outcomes in patients with IHD. In this review article, we will first outline the pathophysiology of acute IRI and review promising therapeutic strategies for cardioprotection. These include novel aspects of mitochondrial function, epigenetics, circadian clocks, the immune system, microvesicles, growth factors, stem cell therapy and gene therapy. We discuss the therapeutic potential of these novel cardioprotective strategies in terms of pharmacological targeting and clinical application. PMID:24837132

  4. Novel therapeutic strategies for cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Sluijter, Joost P G; Condorelli, Gianluigi; Davidson, Sean M; Engel, Felix B; Ferdinandy, Peter; Hausenloy, Derek J; Lecour, Sandrine; Madonna, Rosalinda; Ovize, Michel; Ruiz-Meana, Marisol; Schulz, Rainer; Van Laake, Linda W

    2014-10-01

    The morbidity and mortality from ischemic heart disease (IHD) remain significant worldwide. The treatment for acute myocardial infarction has improved over the past decades, including early reperfusion of occluded coronary arteries. Although it is essential to re-open the artery as soon as possible, paradoxically this leads to additional myocardial injury, called acute ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), for which currently no effective therapy is available. Therefore, novel therapeutic strategies are required to protect the heart from acute IRI in order to reduce myocardial infarction size, preserve cardiac function and improve clinical outcomes in patients with IHD. In this review article, we will first outline the pathophysiology of acute IRI and review promising therapeutic strategies for cardioprotection. These include novel aspects of mitochondrial function, epigenetics, circadian clocks, the immune system, microvesicles, growth factors, stem cell therapy and gene therapy. We discuss the therapeutic potential of these novel cardioprotective strategies in terms of pharmacological targeting and clinical application.

  5. Peak load management: Potential options

    SciTech Connect

    Englin, J.E.; De Steese, J.G.; Schultz, R.W.; Kellogg, M.A.

    1989-10-01

    This report reviews options that may be alternatives to transmission construction (ATT) applicable both generally and at specific locations in the service area of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Some of these options have potential as specific alternatives to the Shelton-Fairmount 230-kV Reinforcement Project, which is the focus of this study. A listing of 31 peak load management (PLM) options is included. Estimated costs and normalized hourly load shapes, corresponding to the respective base load and controlled load cases, are considered for 15 of the above options. A summary page is presented for each of these options, grouped with respect to its applicability in the residential, commercial, industrial, and agricultural sectors. The report contains comments on PLM measures for which load shape management characteristics are not yet available. These comments address the potential relevance of the options and the possible difficulty that may be encountered in characterizing their value should be of interest in this investigation. The report also identifies options that could improve the efficiency of the three customer utility distribution systems supplied by the Shelton-Fairmount Reinforcement Project. Potential cogeneration options in the Olympic Peninsula are also discussed. These discussions focus on the options that appear to be most promising on the Olympic Peninsula. Finally, a short list of options is recommended for investigation in the next phase of this study. 9 refs., 24 tabs.

  6. Strategic Options Development and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, Fran; Eden, Colin

    Strategic Options Development and Analysis (SODA) enables a group or individual to construct a graphical representation of a problematic situation, and thus explore options and their ramifications with respect to a complex system of goals or objectives. In addition the method aims to help groups arrive at a negotiated agreement about how to act to resolve the situation. It is based upon the use of causal mapping - a formally constructed means-ends network - as representation form. Because the picture has been constructed using the natural language of the problem owners it becomes a model of the situation that is ‘owned' by those who define the problem. The use of formalities for the construction of the model makes it amenable to a range of analyses as well as encouraging reflection and a deeper understanding. These analyses can be used in a ‘rough and ready' manner by visual inspection or through the use of specialist causal mapping software (Decision Explorer). Each of the analyses helps a group or individual discover important features of the problem situation, and these features facilitate agreeing agood solution. The SODA process is aimed at helping a group learn about the situation they face before they reach agreements. Most significantly the exploration through the causal map leads to a higher probability of more creative solutions and promotes solutions that are more likely to be implemented because the problem construction process is wider and more likely to include richer social dimensions about the blockages to action and organizational change. The basic theories that inform SODA derive from cognitive psychology and social negotiation, where the model acts as a continuously changing representation of the problematic situation - changing as the views of a person or group shift through learning and exploration. This chapter, jointly written by two leading practitioner academics and the original developers of SODA, Colin Eden and Fran Ackermann

  7. Bacterial meningitis: new therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Nau, Roland; Djukic, Marija; Spreer, Annette; Eiffert, Helmut

    2013-10-01

    Bacterial meningitis remains a disease with high mortality and long-term morbidity. Outcome critically depends on the rapid initiation of effective antibiotic therapy. Since a further increase of the incidence of pathogens resistant to antibacterials can be expected both in community-acquired and nosocomial bacterial meningitis, the choice of an optimum initial empirical antibiotic regimen will gain significance. In this context, the use of antibiotics which are bactericidal but do not lyse bacteria, may emerge as a therapeutic option. Conversely, the role of corticosteroids, which decrease the entry of hydrophilic antibacterials into the cerebrospinal fluid, as adjunctive therapy will probably decline as a consequence of the increasing antibiotic resistance of bacteria causing meningitis. Consequent vaccination of all children at present is the most efficient manner to reduce disease burden. PMID:24073921

  8. Systemic Sclerosis—A systematic review on therapeutic management from 2011–2014

    PubMed Central

    Young, Amber; Khanna, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review To review pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapies in the treatment of systemic sclerosis (SSc) from 2011 to 2014 through a systematic review. Recent Findings Our systematic review identifies randomized controlled trials (RCT), meta-analyses, systematic reviews, case series and observational studies which support organ based therapy with known immunosuppressive agents, novel agents, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), and also includes non-pharmacologic therapies improving visceral and physical function. Summary SSc is an orphan autoimmune disorder with significant morbidity and mortality. Although there has been significant progress over the years in therapeutic options for SSc, the mainstays of treatment are organ based and primarily symptom management. Our systematic review of the last 4 years of treatment emphasizes known treatment strategies already in practice, but also identifies new therapeutic approaches with additional biologic agents and HSCT. PMID:25775190

  9. Sjögren's syndrome: from pathogenesis to novel therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Barone, Francesca; Colafrancesco, Serena

    2016-01-01

    Primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease, characterised by a chronic infiltration of exocrine glands, mainly salivary glands, with the histological features of focal lymphocytic sialoadenitis. Disease spectrum is broad and the occurrence of several extra-glandular manifestations, and in rare cases lymphoma development, is well known. A specific approved treatment for pSS is still lacking and the detection of novel therapeutic biologic target is ongoing. The identification of biological fingerprints seems essential in order to stratify patients both in clinical trials and in real life. Discovery of new components of the inflammatory response will be the key in the future for the identification of novel additional therapeutic options. PMID:27586806

  10. 48 CFR 570.401 - Renewal options.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Requirements 570.401 Renewal options. (a) Exercise of options. Before exercising an option to renew, follow the... information review. Before exercising an option to renew a lease, review current market information...

  11. 48 CFR 570.401 - Renewal options.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Requirements 570.401 Renewal options. (a) Exercise of options. Before exercising an option to renew, follow the... survey. Before exercising an option to renew a lease, review current market information to ensure...

  12. Options for the Future of the US National Strong-Motion Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1997-01-01

    This report constitutes the requested 'Options Document'. This report considers three options. Option I assumes a constant level of financial support for Operating Expenses (OE) with not additional personnel support. Option II assumes a slight increase in OE support of $150K for FY 99 and beyond. Option III considers the role that a NSMP must play if the nation's urgent need to record the main earthquake at locations of significance for society is to be met. Two parts of Option III are considered. The first part of this option, termed Option III A, considers the role that strong-motion recording in and near man-made structures must play if a near-real time hazard initiative is to be implemented in the United States; The second part of Option III; termed Option III B, considers the scope of a NSMP needed to address society's needs to record the main earthquake in locations of significance for future public earthquake safety.

  13. Regenerative medicine and hair loss: how hair follicle culture has advanced our understanding of treatment options for androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Claire A; Christiano, Angela M

    2014-01-01

    Many of the current drug therapies for androgenetic alopecia were discovered serendipitously, with hair growth observed as an off-target effect when drugs were used to treat a different disorder. Subsequently, several studies using cultured cells have enabled identification of hair growth modulators with similar properties to the currently available drugs, which may also provide clinical benefit. In situations where the current therapeutics do not work, follicular unit transplantation is an alternative surgical option. More recently, the concept of follicular cell implantation, or hair follicle neogenesis, has been attempted, exploiting the inherent properties of cultured hair follicle cells to induce de novo hair growth in balding scalp. In this review, we discuss both the advances in cell culture techniques that have led to a wider range of potential therapeutics to promote hair growth, in addition to detailing current knowledge on follicular cell implantation, and the challenges in making this approach a reality.

  14. Therapeutic Angiogenesis in Critical Limb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Ouma, Geoffrey O.; Zafrir, Barak; Mohler, Emile R.; Flugelman, Moshe Y.

    2013-01-01

    Critical limb ischemia (CLI) is a severe form of peripheral artery disease associated with high morbidity and mortality. The primary therapeutic goals in treating CLI are to reduce the risk of adverse cardiovascular events, relieve ischemic pain, heal ulcers, prevent major amputation, and improve quality of life (QoL) and survival. These goals may be achieved by medical therapy, endovascular intervention, open surgery, or amputation and require a multidisciplinary approach including pain management, wound care, risk factors reduction, and treatment of comorbidities. No-option patients are potential candidates for the novel angiogenic therapies. The application of genetic, molecular, and cellular-based modalities, the so-called therapeutic angiogenesis, in the treatment of arterial obstructive diseases has not shown consistent efficacy. This article summarizes the current status related to the management of patients with CLI and discusses the current findings of the emerging modalities for therapeutic angiogenesis. PMID:23129733

  15. Selected Energy Conservation Options for Homeowners: Options, Expenses and Payoffs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lengyel, Dorothy L.; And Others

    This publication is a check list for homeowners and renters to help them reduce energy costs. The list consists of 126 energy conservation options. These options range from "change clothes instead of adjusting thermostat" and "air conditioners turned off when not home" to "use sink stopper" and "weatherstripping and caulking applied." For each…

  16. Traditional operative treatment options.

    PubMed

    Ricketts, D N J; Pitts, N B

    2009-01-01

    Operative intervention should be avoided, whenever possible, by adopting a preventive approach. Timely management of early caries can lead to arrest and possibly remineralization of the lesion rendering operative intervention unnecessary. The dentist must judge when the tooth tissue has become sufficiently demineralized to allow bacterial ingress leading to irreversible changes in the tissue. Once a decision has been made to restore a tooth, the clinician must decide, from a series of traditional operative treatment options, what materials should be used in the restoration and what preparation will achieve good retention and best preservation of tooth structure. With the development of new adhesive materials and a more conservative approach, a new era of minimally invasive dentistry has dawned. Improvements in the properties of composite materials have made them the choice for coronal aesthetic restorations: for posterior restorations involving load-bearing occlusal surfaces, amalgam is still the most commonly used material in UK dental practice; glass ionomer materials also have a place in minimally invasive dentistry--patterns of use differing in different counties. The numbers of studies investigating minimal caries removal are relatively limited; there are still scope and need for research in this field.

  17. AFCI Options Study

    SciTech Connect

    R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

    2009-09-01

    This report describes the background and framework for both organizing the discussion and providing information on the potential for nuclear energy R&D to develop alternative nuclear fuel cycles that would address the issues with the current implementations of nuclear power, including nuclear waste disposal, proliferation risk, safety, security, economics, and sustainability. The disposition of used fuel is the cause of many of the concerns, and the possible approaches to used fuel management identify a number of basic technology areas that need to be considered. The basic science in each of the technology areas is discussed, emphasizing what science is currently available, where scientific knowledge may be insufficient, and especially to identify specific areas where transformational discoveries may allow achievement of performance goals not currently attainable. These discussions lead to the wide range of technical options that have been the basis for past and current research and development on advanced nuclear fuel cycles in the United States. The results of this work are then briefly reviewed to show the extent to which such approaches are capable of addressing the issues with nuclear power, the potential for moving further, and the inherent limitations.

  18. Treatment Options for Narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Barateau, Lucie; Lopez, Régis; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2016-05-01

    Narcolepsy type 1 and narcolepsy type 2 are central disorders of hypersomnolence. Narcolepsy type 1 is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy and is associated with hypocretin-1 deficiency. On the other hand, in narcolepsy type 2, cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1 levels are normal and cataplexy absent. Despite major advances in our understanding of narcolepsy mechanisms, its current management is only symptomatic. Treatment options may vary from a single drug that targets several symptoms, or multiple medications that each treats a specific symptom. In recent years, narcolepsy treatment has changed with the widespread use of modafinil/armodafinil for daytime sleepiness, antidepressants (selective serotonin and dual serotonin and noradrenalin reuptake inhibitors) for cataplexy, and sodium oxybate for both symptoms. Other psychostimulants can also be used, such as methylphenidate, pitolisant and rarely amphetamines, as third-line therapy. Importantly, clinically relevant subjective and objective measures of daytime sleepiness are required to monitor the treatment efficacy and to provide guidance on whether the treatment goals are met. Associated symptoms and comorbid conditions, such as hypnagogic/hypnopompic hallucinations, sleep paralysis, disturbed nighttime sleep, unpleasant dreams, REM- and non REM-related parasomnias, depressive symptoms, overweight/obesity, and obstructive sleep apnea, should also be taken into account and managed, if required. In the near future, the efficacy of new wake-promoting drugs, anticataplectic agents, hypocretin replacement therapy and immunotherapy at the early stages of the disease should also be evaluated. PMID:27155860

  19. Synroc processing options

    SciTech Connect

    Rozsa, R.B.; Hoenig, C.L.

    1981-09-01

    Synroc is a titanate-based ceramic material currently being developed for immobilizing high-level nuclear reactor wastes in solid form. Synroc D is a unique variation of Synroc. It can contain the high-level defense wastes, particularly those in storage at the Savannah River Plant. In this report, we review the early development of the initial Synroc process, discuss modification and other options that simplify it overall, and recommend the future direction of research and development in the processing area. A reference Synroc process is described briefly and contrasted with the Savannah River Laboratory glass-based reference case. Preliminary engineering layouts show Synroc to be a more complex processing operation and, thus, more expensive than the glass-based process. However, we believe that simplifications, which will significantly reduce the cost difference, are possible. Further research and development will continue in the areas of slurry processing, fluidized bed calcination, and mineralization. This last will use sintering, hot uniaxial pressing, or hot isostatic pressing.

  20. Maintenance and supply options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The object of the Maintenance and Supply Option was to develop a high level operational philosophy related to maintenance and supply operations and incorporate these concepts into the Lunar Base Study. Specific products to be generated during this task were three trade studies and a conceptual design of the Logistic Supply Module. The crew size study was performed to evaluate crew sizes from the baseline size of four to a crew size of eight and determine the preferred crew size. The second trade study was to determine the impact of extending surface stay times and recommend a preferred duration of stay time as a function of crew, consumables, and equipment support capabilities. The third trade study was an evaluation of packaging and storage methods to determine the preferred logistics approach to support the lunar base. A modified scenario was developed and served as the basis of the individual trade studies. Assumptions and guidelines were also developed from experience with Apollo programs, Space Shuttle operations, and Space Station studies. With this information, the trade studies were performed and a conceptual design for the Logistic Supply Module was developed.

  1. Therapeutic modification of arterial stiffness: An update and comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ching-Fen; Liu, Pang-Yen; Wu, Tsung-Jui; Hung, Yuan; Yang, Shih-Ping; Lin, Gen-Min

    2015-01-01

    Arterial stiffness has been recognized as a marker of cardiovascular disease and associated with long-term worse clinical outcomes in several populations. Age, hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia, known as traditional vascular risk factors, as well as diabetes, obesity, and systemic inflammation lead to both atherosclerosis and arterial stiffness. Targeting multiple modifiable risk factors has become the main therapeutic strategy to improve arterial stiffness in patients at high cardiovascular risk. Additionally to life style modifications, long-term ω-3 fatty acids (fish oil) supplementation in diet may improve arterial stiffness in the population with hypertension or metabolic syndrome. Pharmacological treatment such as renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system antagonists, metformin, and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors were useful in individuals with hypertension and diabetes. In obese population with obstructive sleep apnea, weight reduction, aerobic exercise, and continuous positive airway pressure treatment may also improve arterial stiffness. In the populations with chronic inflammatory disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, a use of antibodies against tumor necrosis factor-alpha could work effectively. Other therapeutic options such as renal sympathetic nerve denervation for patients with resistant hypertension are investigated in many ongoing clinical trials. Therefore our comprehensive review provides knowledge in detail regarding many aspects of pathogenesis, measurement, and management of arterial stiffness in several populations, which would be helpful for physicians to make clinical decision. PMID:26635922

  2. Therapeutic alpha-interferons protein: structure, production, and biosimilar.

    PubMed

    El-Baky, Nawal Abd; Redwan, Elrashdy M

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, the world solemnized the golden jubilee of the discovery of interferon (IFN). Interferon is a small protein messenger called a pluripotent cytokine, produced by several cells of the host in response to various biological as well as synthetic stimuli. There are three major classes of interferons in humans: IFN-alpha, IFN-beta, and IFN-gamma. As a treatment option, interferon-alpha (IFN-α) is the most effective one. IFN-α has proved to be effective as an antiviral therapy and tumor-fighting drug in the past two decades. Meanwhile, great progress has been achieved in establishing IFN-α as the first choice of antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients. Recently, novel pegylated IFN-α2 products with extended in vivo half-lives and consensus interferon, an artificially engineered type I interferon, have been developed to substantially improve treatment regimes for HCV patients. Undesirable acute and chronic side effects in addition to immunogenicity of therapeutic IFN products remain constraints to conquer for further improvements in clinical applications of IFN. It is certainly expected that more research will be conducted in the future, not only to face these challenges but also to extend the range of IFN products and their clinical targets. The objective herein is to review the current therapeutic alpha-interferons production, formulation technologies, and prospective future for the original entity and its biogeneric version.

  3. Therapeutic modification of arterial stiffness: An update and comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-Fen; Liu, Pang-Yen; Wu, Tsung-Jui; Hung, Yuan; Yang, Shih-Ping; Lin, Gen-Min

    2015-11-26

    Arterial stiffness has been recognized as a marker of cardiovascular disease and associated with long-term worse clinical outcomes in several populations. Age, hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia, known as traditional vascular risk factors, as well as diabetes, obesity, and systemic inflammation lead to both atherosclerosis and arterial stiffness. Targeting multiple modifiable risk factors has become the main therapeutic strategy to improve arterial stiffness in patients at high cardiovascular risk. Additionally to life style modifications, long-term ω-3 fatty acids (fish oil) supplementation in diet may improve arterial stiffness in the population with hypertension or metabolic syndrome. Pharmacological treatment such as renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system antagonists, metformin, and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors were useful in individuals with hypertension and diabetes. In obese population with obstructive sleep apnea, weight reduction, aerobic exercise, and continuous positive airway pressure treatment may also improve arterial stiffness. In the populations with chronic inflammatory disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, a use of antibodies against tumor necrosis factor-alpha could work effectively. Other therapeutic options such as renal sympathetic nerve denervation for patients with resistant hypertension are investigated in many ongoing clinical trials. Therefore our comprehensive review provides knowledge in detail regarding many aspects of pathogenesis, measurement, and management of arterial stiffness in several populations, which would be helpful for physicians to make clinical decision.

  4. Redox Control of Leukemia: From Molecular Mechanisms to Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Mary E.; Rivera-Del Valle, Nilsa

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play both positive and negative roles in the proliferation and survival of a cell. This dual nature has been exploited by leukemia cells to promote growth, survival, and genomic instability—some of the hallmarks of the cancer phenotype. In addition to altered ROS levels, many antioxidants are dysregulated in leukemia cells. Together, the production of ROS and the expression and activity of antioxidant enzymes make up the primary redox control of leukemia cells. By manipulating this system, leukemia cells gain proliferative and survival advantages, even in the face of therapeutic insults. Standard treatment options have improved leukemia patient survival rates in recent years, although relapse and the development of resistance are persistent challenges. Therapies targeting the redox environment show promise for these cases. This review highlights the molecular mechanisms that control the redox milieu of leukemia cells. In particular, ROS production by the mitochondrial electron transport chain, NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidoreductase, and cytochrome P450 will be addressed. Expression and activation of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, heme oxygenase, glutathione, thioredoxin, and peroxiredoxin are perturbed in leukemia cells, and the functional consequences of these molecular alterations will be described. Lastly, we delve into how these pathways can be potentially exploited therapeutically to improve treatment regimens and promote better outcomes for leukemia patients. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1349–1383. PMID:22900756

  5. Therapeutic potential of turmeric in Alzheimer's disease: curcumin or curcuminoids?

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Touqeer; Gilani, Anwarul-Hassan

    2014-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. There is limited choice in modern therapeutics, and drugs available have limited success with multiple side effects in addition to high cost. Hence, newer and alternate treatment options are being explored for effective and safer therapeutic targets to address AD. Turmeric possesses multiple medicinal uses including treatment for AD. Curcuminoids, a mixture of curcumin, demethoxycurcumin, and bisdemethoxycurcumin, are vital constituents of turmeric. It is generally believed that curcumin is the most important constituent of the curcuminoid mixture that contributes to the pharmacological profile of parent curcuminoid mixture or turmeric. A careful literature study reveals that the other two constituents of the curcuminoid mixture also contribute significantly to the effectiveness of curcuminoids in AD. Therefore, it is emphasized in this review that each component of the curcuminoid mixture plays a distinct role in making curcuminoid mixture useful in AD, and hence, the curcuminoid mixture represents turmeric in its medicinal value better than curcumin alone. The progress in understanding the disease etiology demands a multiple-site-targeted therapy, and the curcuminoid mixture of all components, each with different merits, makes this mixture more promising in combating the challenging disease.

  6. Therapeutic modification of arterial stiffness: An update and comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-Fen; Liu, Pang-Yen; Wu, Tsung-Jui; Hung, Yuan; Yang, Shih-Ping; Lin, Gen-Min

    2015-11-26

    Arterial stiffness has been recognized as a marker of cardiovascular disease and associated with long-term worse clinical outcomes in several populations. Age, hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia, known as traditional vascular risk factors, as well as diabetes, obesity, and systemic inflammation lead to both atherosclerosis and arterial stiffness. Targeting multiple modifiable risk factors has become the main therapeutic strategy to improve arterial stiffness in patients at high cardiovascular risk. Additionally to life style modifications, long-term ω-3 fatty acids (fish oil) supplementation in diet may improve arterial stiffness in the population with hypertension or metabolic syndrome. Pharmacological treatment such as renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system antagonists, metformin, and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors were useful in individuals with hypertension and diabetes. In obese population with obstructive sleep apnea, weight reduction, aerobic exercise, and continuous positive airway pressure treatment may also improve arterial stiffness. In the populations with chronic inflammatory disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, a use of antibodies against tumor necrosis factor-alpha could work effectively. Other therapeutic options such as renal sympathetic nerve denervation for patients with resistant hypertension are investigated in many ongoing clinical trials. Therefore our comprehensive review provides knowledge in detail regarding many aspects of pathogenesis, measurement, and management of arterial stiffness in several populations, which would be helpful for physicians to make clinical decision. PMID:26635922

  7. Identity Options in Russian Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shardakova, Marya; Pavlenko, Aneta

    2004-01-01

    This article introduces a new analytical approach to the study of identity options offered in foreign and second language textbooks. This approach, grounded in poststructuralist theory and critical discourse analysis, is applied to 2 popular beginning Russian textbooks. Two sets of identity options are examined in the study: imagined learners…

  8. A Smorgasbord of Assessment Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, Kathy A.

    2010-01-01

    The wealth of assessment options that exists offers teachers and students a "menu" of selections. Just as matching appetite needs with appropriate food selection is fundamental to a successful dining experience, matching assessment options to targeted achievement needs is crucial to an effective assessment experience. The author uses a geometry…

  9. [THERAPEUTIC GUIDE IN VENOUS ULCERS].

    PubMed

    López Herranz, Marta; Bas Caro, Pedro; García Jábega, Rosa Ma; García Carmona, Francisco Javier; Villalta García, Pedro; Postigo Mota, Salvador

    2014-11-01

    The treatment of venous ulcers and wounds in general, is a complex and important public health problem, with personal effects, family and health, without addressing the economic impact includes assistance, care of patients with ulcerative lesions. The increase in life expectancy, driven by improved socio-sanitary conditions that this aging population, facilitates the emergence of chronic diseases may be complicated by the presence of skin ulcers. There is no doubt that the best way to treat a skin ulcer is avoiding to occur, hence the importance of early diagnosis and risk factors act alone them. In relation to venous ulcers is crucial, provide local treatment, act on the cause, because if not, relapse is the norm in this type of injury. Currently, the moist wound healing, is an important step in solving earlier of these chronic wounds. This has meant that the pharmaceutical industry has been involved in researching and creating different types of dressings, having specific activity at different stages of venous ulcer healing, ie inflammatory phase, proliferative and remodeling. The proliferation of these products has been increasing over the years, not surprisingly, are described therapeutic 12 families that are applied in the management, care of these injuries. The fact of existing therapeutic options highlights the ineffectiveness of these products individually. Therefore, the nurse will not forget that the optimal treatment of venous ulcers, necessarily involves choosing the right product for every type and stage of the lesion. In this decision process, strongly influenced by the specific characteristics of each patient and injury, the nurse will take into account a lot of factors when choosing the product, not forgetting that an ulcer is not cured with a single therapeutic element, several products being used throughout the process to evolutionary venous ulcer until complete resolution.

  10. Investigation of Neptunium Precipitator Cleanout Options

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, B.C.

    2003-09-08

    Oxalate precipitation followed by filtration is used to prepare plutonium oxalate. Historically, plutonium oxalate has tended to accumulate in the precipitation tanks. These solids are periodically removed by flushing with concentrated (64 percent) nitric acid. The same precipitation tanks will now be used in the processing of neptunium. Literature values indicate that neptunium oxalate may not be as soluble as plutonium oxalate in nitric acid. Although a wide variety of options is available to improve neptunium oxalate solubility for precipitator flushing, most of these options are not practical for use. Many of these options require the use of incompatible or difficult to handle chemicals. Other options would require expensive equipment modifications or are likely to lead to product contamination. Based on review of literature and experimental results, the two best options for flushing the precipitator are (1) 64 percent nitric acid and (2) addition of sodium permanganate follow ed by sodium nitrite. Nitric acid is the easiest option to implement. It is already used in the facility and will not lead to product contamination. Experimental results indicate that neptunium oxalate can be dissolved in concentrated nitric acid (64 percent) at 60 degree C to a concentration of 2.6 to 5.6 grams of Np/liter after at least three hours of heating. A lower concentration (1.1 grams of Np/liter) was measured at 60 degree C after less than two hours of heating. These concentrations are acceptable for flushing if precipitator holdup is low (approximately 100-250 grams), but a second method is required for effective flushing if precipitator holdup is high (approximately 2 kilograms). The most effective method for obtaining higher neptunium concentrations is the use of sodium permanganate followed by the addition of sodium nitrite. There is concern that residual manganese from these flushes could impact product purity. Gas generation during permanganate addition is also a concern

  11. Options for Technology Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Richard E.; Sugarman, Barry

    1989-01-01

    Structural means by which institutions of higher education can tap technology are explored with an examination of the licensing of technological discoveries as well as the creation of start-up companies based upon university-developed technology. Additionally, the corporate structures that are being formed so that institutions can more easily hold…

  12. 77 FR 33259 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Notice of Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-05

    ... additional time to implement new system enhancements for trading Flexible Exchange Options (``FLEX Options...'') System platform (which is limited to open outcry trading only) are contained in Chapter XXIVA. The rules governing the trading of FLEX Options on the FLEX Hybrid Trading System platform (which combines both...

  13. New treatment options for alcoholic hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Shasthry, Saggere Muralikrishna; Sarin, Shiv Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The burden of alcoholic liver disease has rapidly grown in the past two decades and is expected to increase further in the coming years. Alcoholic hepatitis, the most florid presentation of alcoholic liver disease, continues to have high morbidity and mortality, with significant financial and healthcare burden with limited treatment options. Steroids remain the current standard of care in severe alcoholic hepatitis in carefully selected patients. No specific treatments are available for those patients who are steroid ineligible, intolerant or unresponsive. Liver transplant has shown good short-term outcome; however, feasibility, ethical and economic concerns remain. Modification of gut microbiota composition and their products, such as lipopolysaccharide, nutritional interventions, immune modulation, increasing steroid sensitivity, genetic polymorphism and epigenetic modification of alcohol induced liver damage, augmenting hepatic regeneration using GCSF are potential therapeutic avenues in steroid non-responsive/ineligible patients. With better understanding of the pathophysiology, using “Omics” platforms, newer options for patients with alcoholic hepatitis are expected soon. PMID:27099434

  14. Therapeutic Recreation Practicum Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneegas, Kay

    This manual provides information on the practicum program offered by Moraine Valley Community College (MVCC) for students in its therapeutic recreation program. Sections I and II outline the rationale and goals for providing practical, on-the-job work experiences for therapeutic recreation students. Section III specifies MVCC's responsibilities…

  15. Cannabis: its therapeutic use.

    PubMed

    Wall, J; Davis, S; Ridgway, S

    This article provides an overview of the issues surrounding the use of cannabis for therapeutic purposes. Examples of some of the ethical issues related to professional practice are discussed. The authors do not advocate legalising cannabis for all, but the therapeutic advantages and disadvantages of using cannabis are highlighted.

  16. Endothelin therapeutics in cancer: Where are we?

    PubMed

    Rosanò, Laura; Bagnato, Anna

    2016-03-15

    In human cancers, the autocrine and paracrine loop mediated by the aberrantly activation of endothelin-1 (ET-1) receptor (ET-1R) elicits pleiotropic effects, preferentially mediated by the scaffold protein β-arrestin 1 (β-arr1), on tumor cells and on the host microenvironment, providing a strong rationale for targeting ET-1 receptors. This review describes the most up-to-date preclinical and clinical results obtained by using ET-1 therapeutics. The previous negative clinical results of ET-1 therapeutics should not prevent us from setting the standard of this class of drugs for future well-designed clinical trials. The preclinical data obtained with the dual ETAR and ETBR antagonist macitentan indicate that this molecule, which targets cancer cells and tumor-associated microenvironmental elements, could be a cancer therapeutic option. The field of ET-1 therapeutics will be improved in the next decade, facilitated by the new knowledge on the genomic landscape of the human stroma and tumor, and by the low invasive approaches based on liquid biopsies for the discovery of predictive biomarkers. The information obtained from preclinical studies in patient-derived models and from the Cancer Genome Atlas will set the scene of precision medicine for cancer. Results from these studies are expected to open the possibility that ET-1R antagonists might be more efficacious as molecular cancer therapeutics, able to hamper the functional β-arr1-dependent signaling complexes, either alone or coupled with new targeted approaches.

  17. Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options

    SciTech Connect

    Roald Wigeland; Temitope Taiwo; Michael Todosow; William Halsey; Jess Gehin

    2010-06-01

    A systematic evaluation has been conducted of the potential for advanced nuclear fuel cycle strategies and options to address the issues ascribed to the use of nuclear power. Issues included nuclear waste management, proliferation risk, safety, security, economics and affordability, and sustainability. The two basic strategies, once-through and recycle, and the range of possibilities within each strategy, are considered for all aspects of the fuel cycle including options for nuclear material irradiation, separations if needed, and disposal. Options range from incremental changes to today’s implementation to revolutionary concepts that would require the development of advanced nuclear technologies.

  18. Recent additions in the treatment of cough

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Worldwide, cough is regarded as a challenging clinical problem due to its frequency and often limited therapeutic options. Chronic cough that remains refractory to usual medical treatment causes significant quality of life impairment in people with this problem. Methods We have examined current evidence on recent additions in the treatment of cough, specifically treatment of refractory chronic cough with speech pathology and gabapentin. Relevant randomised control trials, reviews and case reports were identified through a PubMed and SCOPUS search of English-language literature referring to these concepts over the last eight years. Summary Of the one hundred and two articles comprising this review the majority investigated the role of the transient receptor potential (TRP) receptors TRP Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and TRPA1 in cough and the potential of TRP antagonists as effective anti-tussives. However, these have only been tested in the laboratory and therefore their clinical effectiveness is unknown. Behavioural treatments such as speech pathology have gained momentum and this was evident in the increasing number of articles investigating its positive effect on cough. Investigation on the effectiveness of neuromodulating medications in the treatment of cough have been supported primarily through case series reports and prospective reviews however; their use (particularly gabapentin) has been significantly advanced through recently conducted randomised controlled trials. Conclusions Recent additions in the treatment of chronic cough have been significant as they consider cough to have a unifying diagnosis of cough hypersensitivity with or without the presence of a neuropathic basis. Primarily, effective treatments for chronic cough target these areas and include behavioural treatment such as speech pathology and pharmaceutical treatment with neuromodulating medications such as gabapentin. PMID:25383209

  19. Cytokines and therapeutic oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, G; Bidlingmaier, M; Eigler, A; Hacker, U; Endres, S

    1997-12-01

    Therapeutic oligonucleotides - short strands of synthetic nucleic acids - encompass antisense and aptamer oligonucleotides. Antisense oligonucleotides are designed to bind to target RNA by complementary base pairing and to inhibit translation of the target protein. Antisense oligonucleotides enable specific inhibition of cytokine synthesis. In contrast, aptamer oligonucleotides are able to bind directly to specific proteins. This binding depends on the sequence of the oligonucleotide. Aptamer oligonucleotides with CpG motifs can exert strong immunostimulatory effects. Both kinds of therapeutic oligonucleotides - antisense and aptamer oligonucleotides - provide promising tools to modulate immunological functions. Recently, therapeutic oligonucleotides have moved towards clinical application. An antisense oligonucleotide directed against the proinflammatory intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) is currently being tested in clinical trials for therapy of inflammatory disease. Immunostimulatory aptamer oligonucleotides are in preclinical development for immunotherapy. In the present review we summarize the application of therapeutic oligonucleotides to modulate immunological functions. We include technological aspects as well as current therapeutic concepts and clinical studies.

  20. [Implementation of therapeutic hypothermia into clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Himmel, Friederike; Desch, Steffen; Wolfrum, Sebastian

    2015-08-01

    Implementation of mild therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest into clinical practice is a continuing process. Although ILCOR recommendation was given in 2003, only 24% of the German hospitals reported the use of hypothermia in this setting in 2005. Growing evidence and most importantly the implementation of hypothermia into the guidelines led to a significant increase of acceptance of this therapeutic option leading to a user rate of 69% in 2009. Encouraged by the new guidelines from 2010 86% of German hospitals finally reported to use hypothermia after cardiac arrest routinely in 2012, a decade after publication of the mile stone studies. The phenomenon of a delayed implementation of hypothermia into clinical practice can be seen throughout the world as many surveys from different countries at different time points have shown. When hypothermia is used, hospitals go with the guidelines quite strictly with respect to indication, duration of treatment and target temperature. This strengthens the importance of guidelines in the process to implement new therapeutic options. However, although a recent study still promotes a strict target temperature management it questions the need for a markedly reduced target temperature of 33°C. It remains to be elucidated how this study will affect the daily routine in the hospitals and most interestingly how this study will change the coming guidelines in 2015. PMID:26261928

  1. Oral Therapeutics for Rhinosinusitis with Nasal Polyposis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andrew J; Alt, Jeremiah A

    2016-01-01

    Oral therapeutics for chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) include oral corticosteroids (OCS), antibiotics, antifungals and anti-leukotrienes. Of these treatments, the strongest evidence exists to support the use of a short course of OCS for treatment of CRSwNP, and OCS are the most consistently recommended oral therapy in practice guidelines. Antibiotics have demonstrated some utility, which appears more likely related to an anti-inflammatory rather than antimicrobial effect. The non-macrolide antibiotics lack sufficient evidence to support their use, though among this class doxycycline has some limited evidence of benefit in CRSwNP. Greater evidence exists for the use of macrolide antibiotics which have shown reduction of subjective and objective measures of CRSwNP severity. A short course of a macrolide should be considered as an option. Oral antifungals are not recommended in the treatment of CRSwNP given disappointing results and known potential adverse effects, except in allergic fungal rhinosinusitis where they may play a role. Leukotriene antagonists have demonstrated some promise in the treatment of CRSwNP, though studies are limited, but should be considered a potentially useful oral therapeutic. The current level of evidence for these oral therapeutic options for CRSwNP is reviewed in this chapter. PMID:27466856

  2. Option pricing: Stock price, stock velocity and the acceleration Lagrangian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baaquie, Belal E.; Du, Xin; Bhanap, Jitendra

    2014-12-01

    The industry standard Black-Scholes option pricing formula is based on the current value of the underlying security and other fixed parameters of the model. The Black-Scholes formula, with a fixed volatility, cannot match the market's option price; instead, it has come to be used as a formula for generating the option price, once the so called implied volatility of the option is provided as additional input. The implied volatility not only is an entire surface, depending on the strike price and maturity of the option, but also depends on calendar time, changing from day to day. The point of view adopted in this paper is that the instantaneous rate of return of the security carries part of the information that is provided by implied volatility, and with a few (time-independent) parameters required for a complete pricing formula. An option pricing formula is developed that is based on knowing the value of both the current price and rate of return of the underlying security which in physics is called velocity. Using an acceleration Lagrangian model based on the formalism of quantum mathematics, we derive the pricing formula for European call options. The implied volatility of the market can be generated by our pricing formula. Our option price is applied to foreign exchange rates and equities and the accuracy is compared with Black-Scholes pricing formula and with the market price.

  3. Pelvic radiation disease: Updates on treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Frazzoni, Leonardo; La Marca, Marina; Guido, Alessandra; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe; Bazzoli, Franco; Fuccio, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic cancers are among the most frequently diagnosed neoplasms and radiotherapy represents one of the main treatment options. The irradiation field usually encompasses healthy intestinal tissue, especially of distal large bowel, thus inducing gastrointestinal (GI) radiation-induced toxicity. Indeed, up to half of radiation-treated patients say that their quality of life is affected by GI symptoms (e.g., rectal bleeding, diarrhoea). The constellation of GI symptoms - from transient to long-term, from mild to very severe - experienced by patients who underwent radiation treatment for a pelvic tumor have been comprised in the definition of pelvic radiation disease (PRD). A correct and evidence-based therapeutic approach of patients experiencing GI radiation-induced toxicity is mandatory. Therapeutic non-surgical strategies for PRD can be summarized in two broad categories, i.e., medical and endoscopic. Of note, most of the studies have investigated the management of radiation-induced rectal bleeding. Patients with clinically significant bleeding (i.e., causing chronic anemia) should firstly be considered for medical management (i.e., sucralfate enemas, metronidazole and hyperbaric oxygen); in case of failure, endoscopic treatment should be implemented. This latter should be considered the first choice in case of acute, transfusion requiring, bleeding. More well-performed, high quality studies should be performed, especially the role of medical treatments should be better investigated as well as the comparative studies between endoscopic and hyperbaric oxygen treatments. PMID:26677440

  4. [Therapeutic Effects of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells after Irradiation].

    PubMed

    Kalmykova, N V; Alexandrova, S A

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are now considered to be a perspective multifunctional treatment option for radiation side effects. At present.a great number of sufficient evidence has been collected in favor of therapeutic effects of MSCs in acute radiation reactions. It has been shown that MSC-based products injected locally or systemically have therapeutic effects on irradiated organs and tissues. This review presents summarized experimental and clinical data about protective and regenerative effects of MSCs on different radiation-injured organs and tissues; the main probable therapeutic mechanisms of their action are also discussed. PMID:27534063

  5. Level 2 Therapeutic Model site.

    PubMed

    Spears, Brad; Sanchez, David; Bishop, Jane; Rogers, Sharon; DeJong, Judith A

    2006-01-01

    L2, one of the original sites first funded under the Therapeutic Residential Model Initiative in 2001-2002, is operated as a peripheral dormitory. This dormitory cares for 185 boys and girls in grades 1-12 who attend local public schools. L2 presented an outstanding proposal which identified gaps in services and presented a reasonable budget to address those gaps by adding additional mental health services and increasing the number of residential and recreation staff. With only minor modifications to this budget, the site efficiently and effectively implemented the strategies it had proposed and utilized evaluation feedback to fine-tune systems and maximize positive outcomes. The Therapeutic Residential Model funds enabled the site to move from a functional dormitory to a therapeutic residential situation where the needs of students are assessed and addressed. Outcome indicators in spring 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2005 showed impacts in a number of areas when compared with the baseline year of 2000-2001: Retention of students steadily increased going from 40.7% in 2000-2001 to 68.4% in 2004-2005; 75 students graduated from high school during the four Therapeutic Residential Model years, compared with 41 in the preceding four years; Academic Proficiency and ACT scores improved significantly; Thirty-day cigarette use dropped from 62% in spring 2001 to 38% in spring 2005 among 7th and 8th graders, from 58% to 33% among 9th and 10th graders, and from 72% to 29% among 11th and 12th graders; Alienation indices showed an increase in feelings of inclusion and a decrease in lack of meaning. This site is an outstanding example of what can be done with a well-designed and responsibly implemented Therapeutic Model Program, and the measurable impacts which can result from such strategic use of resources. PMID:17602401

  6. Therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells for pulmonary complications associated with preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Laube, Mandy; Stolzing, Alexandra; Thome, Ulrich H; Fabian, Claire

    2016-05-01

    Preterm infants frequently suffer from pulmonary complications resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Physiological and structural lung immaturity impairs perinatal lung transition to air breathing resulting in respiratory distress. Mechanical ventilation and oxygen supplementation ensure sufficient oxygen supply but enhance inflammatory processes which might lead to the establishment of a chronic lung disease called bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Current therapeutic options to prevent or treat BPD are limited and have salient side effects, highlighting the need for new therapeutic approaches. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have demonstrated therapeutic potential in animal models of BPD. This review focuses on MSC-based therapeutic approaches to treat pulmonary complications and critically compares results obtained in BPD models. Thereby bottlenecks in the translational systems are identified that are preventing progress in combating BPD. Notably, current animal models closely resemble the so-called "old" BPD with profound inflammation and injury, whereas clinical improvements shifted disease pathology towards a "new" BPD in which arrest of lung maturation predominates. Future studies need to evaluate the utility of MSC-based therapies in animal models resembling the "new" BPD though promising in vitro evidence suggests that MSCs do possess the potential to stimulate lung maturation. Furthermore, we address the mode-of-action of MSC-based therapies with regard to lung development and inflammation/fibrosis. Their therapeutic efficacy is mainly attributed to an enhancement of regeneration and immunomodulation due to paracrine effects. In addition, we discuss current improvement strategies by genetic modifications or precondition of MSCs to enhance their therapeutic efficacy which could also prove beneficial for BPD therapies. PMID:26928452

  7. Reporting therapeutic discourse in a therapeutic community.

    PubMed

    Chapman, G E

    1988-03-01

    Research in nurses' communications has concentrated on nurse to patient interactions. Those few studies which focus on nurse to nurse communications seem to be generated by a pragmatic and normative concern with effective information sharing. In this paper, which describes one aspect of a larger case study of a hospital-based therapeutic community, the description and analysis of nurses' reports flows not from a normative model of professional practice, but rather an exploration of how professional practice is articulated as discourse in nurses' written accounts. Foucault's ideas about therapeutic discourse inform the theoretical framework of the research. Ethnomethodological concerns with the importance of documentary analysis provide the methodological rationale for examining nurses' 24-hour report documents, as official discourse, reflecting therapeutic practice in this setting. A content analysis of nurses' reports, collected over a period of 4 months, demonstrated the importance of domesticity and ordinary everyday activities in nurses' accounts of hospital life. Disruption to the 'life as usual' domesticity in the community seemed to be associated with admission to and discharge from the hospital when interpersonal and interactional changes between patients occur. It is suggested that nurses in general hospital wards and more orthodox psychiatric settings might usefully consider the impact of admissions and discharges on the group of patients they manage, and make this a discursive focus of their work. PMID:3372900

  8. Personalized Therapeutic Cocktail of Wild Environmental Phages Rescues Mice from Acinetobacter baumannii Wound Infections.

    PubMed

    Regeimbal, James M; Jacobs, Anna C; Corey, Brendan W; Henry, Matthew S; Thompson, Mitchell G; Pavlicek, Rebecca L; Quinones, Javier; Hannah, Ryan M; Ghebremedhin, Meron; Crane, Nicole J; Zurawski, Daniel V; Teneza-Mora, Nimfa C; Biswas, Biswajit; Hall, Eric R

    2016-10-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens are an increasing threat to public health, and lytic bacteriophages have reemerged as a potential therapeutic option. In this work, we isolated and assembled a five-member cocktail of wild phages against Acinetobacter baumannii and demonstrated therapeutic efficacy in a mouse full-thickness dorsal infected wound model. The cocktail lowers the bioburden in the wound, prevents the spread of infection and necrosis to surrounding tissue, and decreases infection-associated morbidity. Interestingly, this effective cocktail is composed of four phages that do not kill the parent strain of the infection and one phage that simply delays bacterial growth in vitro via a strong but incomplete selection event. The cocktail here appears to function in a combinatorial manner, as one constituent phage targets capsulated A. baumannii bacteria and selects for loss of receptor, shifting the population to an uncapsulated state that is then sensitized to the remaining four phages in the cocktail. Additionally, capsule is a known virulence factor for A. baumannii, and we demonstrated that the emergent uncapsulated bacteria are avirulent in a Galleria mellonella model. These results highlight the importance of anticipating population changes during phage therapy and designing intelligent cocktails to control emergent strains, as well as the benefits of using phages that target virulence factors. Because of the efficacy of this cocktail isolated from a limited environmental pool, we have established a pipeline for developing new phage therapeutics against additional clinically relevant multidrug-resistant pathogens by using environmental phages sourced from around the globe.

  9. Designer blood vessels and therapeutic revascularization

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, Joseph D; Galis, Zorina S

    2003-01-01

    Inadequate vascular perfusion leads to fatal heart attacks, chronic ulcers, and other serious clinical conditions. The body's capacity to restore vascular perfusion through angiogenesis and arteriogenesis is often impaired by pre-existing disease, and availability of native replacements for nonfunctional arteries is limited in many patients. Thus, recreating blood vessels of various calibres through novel engineering technologies has emerged as a radical option among therapeutic strategies for revascularization. Ranging from artificial, recycled or reassembled natural conduits to sophisticated microdevices, we refer to these as ‘designer blood vessels'. Our common efforts to continuously improve vascular replacement design have provided many clues about our own blood vessels, but nature's ability to create nonthrombogenic, immunocompatible, strong, yet biologically responsive blood vessels remains unparalleled. Just as art reproductions never equal the original masterpiece, designer blood vessels may never attain nature's perfection. Nevertheless, they will provide a valuable option as long as they come close enough and are available to many. PMID:14534146

  10. Non-coding RNAs Enabling Prognostic Stratification and Prediction of Therapeutic Response in Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Perakis, Samantha O; Thomas, Joseph E; Pichler, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a heterogeneous disease and current treatment options for patients are associated with a wide range of outcomes and tumor responses. Although the traditional TNM staging system continues to serve as a crucial tool for estimating CRC prognosis and for stratification of treatment choices and long-term survival, it remains limited as it relies on macroscopic features and cases of surgical resection, fails to incorporate new molecular data and information, and cannot perfectly predict the variety of outcomes and responses to treatment associated with tumors of the same stage. Although additional histopathologic features have recently been applied in order to better classify individual tumors, the future might incorporate the use of novel molecular and genetic markers in order to maximize therapeutic outcome and to provide accurate prognosis. Such novel biomarkers, in addition to individual patient tumor phenotyping and other validated genetic markers, could facilitate the prediction of risk of progression in CRC patients and help assess overall survival. Recent findings point to the emerging role of non-protein-coding regions of the genome in their contribution to the progression of cancer and tumor formation. Two major subclasses of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs, are often dysregulated in CRC and have demonstrated their diagnostic and prognostic potential as biomarkers. These ncRNAs are promising molecular classifiers and could assist in the stratification of patients into appropriate risk groups to guide therapeutic decisions and their expression patterns could help determine prognosis and predict therapeutic options in CRC. PMID:27573901

  11. Non-coding RNAs Enabling Prognostic Stratification and Prediction of Therapeutic Response in Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Perakis, Samantha O; Thomas, Joseph E; Pichler, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a heterogeneous disease and current treatment options for patients are associated with a wide range of outcomes and tumor responses. Although the traditional TNM staging system continues to serve as a crucial tool for estimating CRC prognosis and for stratification of treatment choices and long-term survival, it remains limited as it relies on macroscopic features and cases of surgical resection, fails to incorporate new molecular data and information, and cannot perfectly predict the variety of outcomes and responses to treatment associated with tumors of the same stage. Although additional histopathologic features have recently been applied in order to better classify individual tumors, the future might incorporate the use of novel molecular and genetic markers in order to maximize therapeutic outcome and to provide accurate prognosis. Such novel biomarkers, in addition to individual patient tumor phenotyping and other validated genetic markers, could facilitate the prediction of risk of progression in CRC patients and help assess overall survival. Recent findings point to the emerging role of non-protein-coding regions of the genome in their contribution to the progression of cancer and tumor formation. Two major subclasses of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs, are often dysregulated in CRC and have demonstrated their diagnostic and prognostic potential as biomarkers. These ncRNAs are promising molecular classifiers and could assist in the stratification of patients into appropriate risk groups to guide therapeutic decisions and their expression patterns could help determine prognosis and predict therapeutic options in CRC.

  12. Engineering antibody therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Mark L; Gilliland, Gary L

    2016-06-01

    The successful introduction of antibody-based protein therapeutics into the arsenal of treatments for patients has within a few decades fostered intense innovation in the production and engineering of antibodies. Reviewed here are the methods currently used to produce antibodies along with how our knowledge of the structural and functional characterization of immunoglobulins has resulted in the engineering of antibodies to produce protein therapeutics with unique properties, both biological and biophysical, that are leading to novel therapeutic approaches. Antibody engineering includes the introduction of the antibody combining site (variable regions) into a host of architectures including bi and multi-specific formats that further impact the therapeutic properties leading to further advantages and successes in patient treatment. PMID:27525816

  13. Therapeutic strategies for the treatment of neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Izbicka, Elzbieta; Izbicki, Tadeusz

    2005-12-01

    Neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial solid tumor in children, has a highly heterogeneous clinical presentation and course. Current risk-based therapy is usually effective in patients who have intermediate risk features, however, intensive treatment of advanced neuroblastoma in children over two years of age is far from satisfactory. Current therapeutic approaches include the optimization of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of conventional agents, as well as the development of novel targeted drugs, such as signal transduction and angiogenesis inhibitors, apoptosis/differentiation stimulators and immunotherapeutics. This review provides an overview of current treatment options and future perspectives for the therapy and prevention of neuroblastoma.

  14. Therapeutic cloning applications for organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Koh, Chester J; Atala, Anthony

    2004-04-01

    A severe shortage of donor organs available for transplantation in the United States leaves patients suffering from diseased and injured organs with few treatment options. Scientists in the field of tissue engineering apply the principles of cell transplantation, material science, and engineering to construct biological substitutes that will restore and maintain normal function in diseased and injured tissues. Therapeutic cloning, where the nucleus from a donor cell is transferred into an enucleated oocyte in order to extract pluripotent embryonic stem cells, offers a potentially limitless source of cells for tissue engineering applications. The present chapter reviews recent advances that have occurred in therapeutic cloning and tissue engineering and describes applications of these new technologies that may offer novel therapies for patients with end-stage organ failure. PMID:15157913

  15. Are therapeutic communities therapeutic for women?

    PubMed Central

    Eliason, Michele J

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the growing phenomena of therapeutic community (TC) treatment approaches for women in correctional settings. Although rapidly increasing in number across the country, there is very little empirical research to support the effectiveness of TC treatment for women. Therefore, the literature on the efficacy and effectiveness of TC treatment for women is reviewed in relation to the literature on women's treatment issues. The literature review highlights the gaps where TC treatment ignores or exacerbates issues that are common to addicted women, or uses methods that may be contradictory to women's recovery. PMID:16722560

  16. The potential therapeutic effects of THC on Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cao, Chuanhai; Li, Yaqiong; Liu, Hui; Bai, Ge; Mayl, Jonathan; Lin, Xiaoyang; Sutherland, Kyle; Nabar, Neel; Cai, Jianfeng

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential therapeutic qualities of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) with respect to slowing or halting the hallmark characteristics of Alzheimer's disease. N2a-variant amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) cells were incubated with THC and assayed for amyloid-β (Aβ) levels at the 6-, 24-, and 48-hour time marks. THC was also tested for synergy with caffeine, in respect to the reduction of the Aβ level in N2a/AβPPswe cells. THC was also tested to determine if multiple treatments were beneficial. The MTT assay was performed to test the toxicity of THC. Thioflavin T assays and western blots were performed to test the direct anti-Aβ aggregation significance of THC. Lastly, THC was tested to determine its effects on glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and related signaling pathways. From the results, we have discovered THC to be effective at lowering Aβ levels in N2a/AβPPswe cells at extremely low concentrations in a dose-dependent manner. However, no additive effect was found by combining caffeine and THC together. We did discover that THC directly interacts with Aβ peptide, thereby inhibiting aggregation. Furthermore, THC was effective at lowering both total GSK-3β levels and phosphorylated GSK-3β in a dose-dependent manner at low concentrations. At the treatment concentrations, no toxicity was observed and the CB1 receptor was not significantly upregulated. Additionally, low doses of THC can enhance mitochondria function and does not inhibit melatonin's enhancement of mitochondria function. These sets of data strongly suggest that THC could be a potential therapeutic treatment option for Alzheimer's disease through multiple functions and pathways.

  17. Some ceramic options

    SciTech Connect

    Zievers, J.F.; Eggerstedt, P.M.; Aguilar, P.C.; Zievers, E.C.

    1993-06-01

    Ceramic candle filters have proven to be an effective means of removing particulates to levels exceeding New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) in high temperature applications. The traditional {open_quotes}hard{close_quotes} ceramic filter elements, typically formed form granules however, have shown to be susceptible to failure from physical shock, thermal stress, and chemical attack. Additionally, these hard, dense candles can be costly and present internal filter design problems due to their relatively high weight. A good deal has been written about to use to porous ceramics in the filtration of high temperature gases for removal of particulate matter. Unlike the dense, granular ceramic filter elements, vacuum formed chopped ceramic fiber (VFCF) filters represent an attractive alternative. Composed of commercially available chopped ceramic fibers and utilizing existing vacuum forming technology, low cost filter elements with excellent physical and thermal shock resistance are now available. The ceramic fiber filter {open_quotes}skeleton{close_quotes} can be {open_quotes}post-treated{close_quotes} with refractory materials to enhance strength and chemical resistance, as well as to change permeability to suit a particular application. Also, because the ceramic fiber skeleton has greater porosity and is composed of low density materials, the final product is significantly lighter in weight than the traditional dense ceramic elements, making overall filter design an easier task. The use of ceramics extends beyond that of filter elements, however. Ceramics in the form of refractory have long been used to protect metal structures from high temperature and abrasion, and an extensive body of literature deals with this subject.

  18. Shiga Toxins as Multi-Functional Proteins: Induction of Host Cellular Stress Responses, Role in Pathogenesis and Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Moo-Seung; Koo, Sunwoo; Jeong, Dae Gwin; Tesh, Vernon L.

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxins (Stxs) produced by Shiga toxin-producing bacteria Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 and select serotypes of Escherichia coli are primary virulence factors in the pathogenesis of hemorrhagic colitis progressing to potentially fatal systemic complications, such as hemolytic uremic syndrome and central nervous system abnormalities. Current therapeutic options to treat patients infected with toxin-producing bacteria are limited. The structures of Stxs, toxin-receptor binding, intracellular transport and the mode of action of the toxins have been well defined. However, in the last decade, numerous studies have demonstrated that in addition to being potent protein synthesis inhibitors, Stxs are also multifunctional proteins capable of activating multiple cell stress signaling pathways, which may result in apoptosis, autophagy or activation of the innate immune response. Here, we briefly present the current understanding of Stx-activated signaling pathways and provide a concise review of therapeutic applications to target tumors by engineering the toxins. PMID:26999205

  19. Punishment in optional public goods games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Xu, Zhao-Jin; Zhang, Lian-Zhong

    2010-11-01

    In this work, the optional public goods games with punishment are studied. By adopting the approximate best response dynamics, a micro model is given to explain the evolutionary process. Simultaneously, the magnitude of rationality is also considered. Under the condition of bounded rationality which provides a light to interpret phenomena in human society, the model leads to two types of equilibriums. One is the equilibrium without punishers and the other is the equilibrium including only punishers and cooperators. In addition, the effects of rationality on equilibriums are briefly investigated.

  20. Bioengineering Lantibiotics for Therapeutic Success

    PubMed Central

    Field, Des; Cotter, Paul D.; Hill, Colin; Ross, R. P.

    2015-01-01

    Several examples of highly modified antimicrobial peptides have been described. While many such peptides are non-ribosomally synthesized, ribosomally synthesized equivalents are being discovered with increased frequency. Of the latter group, the lantibiotics continue to attract most attention. In the present review, we discuss the implementation of in vivo and in vitro engineering systems to alter, and even enhance, the antimicrobial activity, antibacterial spectrum and physico-chemical properties, including heat stability, solubility, diffusion and protease resistance, of these compounds. Additionally, we discuss the potential applications of these lantibiotics for use as therapeutics. PMID:26640466

  1. Fibromyalgia syndrome: novel therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Ablin, Jacob N; Häuser, Winfried

    2016-05-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic disorder characterized by widespread pain and tenderness, accompanied by disturbed sleep, chronic fatigue and multiple additional functional symptoms. FMS continues to pose an unmet need regarding pharmacological treatment and many patients fail to achieve sufficient relief from existing treatments. As FMS is considered to be a condition in which pain amplification occurs within the CNS, therapeutic interventions, both pharmacological and otherwise, have revolved around attempts to influence pain processing in the CNS. In the current review, we present an update on novel targets in the search for effective treatment of FMS. PMID:27296699

  2. Imaging enabled platforms for development of therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celli, Jonathan; Rizvi, Imran; Blanden, Adam R.; Evans, Conor L.; Abu-Yousif, Adnan O.; Spring, Bryan Q.; Muzikansky, Alona; Pogue, Brian W.; Finkelstein, Dianne M.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2011-03-01

    Advances in imaging and spectroscopic technologies have enabled the optimization of many therapeutic modalities in cancer and noncancer pathologies either by earlier disease detection or by allowing therapy monitoring. Amongst the therapeutic options benefiting from developments in imaging technologies, photodynamic therapy (PDT) is exceptional. PDT is a photochemistry-based therapeutic approach where a light-sensitive molecule (photosensitizer) is activated with light of appropriate energy (wavelength) to produce reactive molecular species such as free radicals and singlet oxygen. These molecular entities then react with biological targets such as DNA, membranes and other cellular components to impair their function and lead to eventual cell and tissue death. Development of PDT-based imaging also provides a platform for rapid screening of new therapeutics in novel in vitro models prior to expensive and labor-intensive animal studies. In this study we demonstrate how an imaging platform can be used for strategizing a novel combination treatment strategy for multifocal ovarian cancer. Using an in vitro 3D model for micrometastatic ovarian cancer in conjunction with quantitative imaging we examine dose and scheduling strategies for PDT in combination with carboplatin, a chemotherapeutic agent presently in clinical use for management of this deadly form of cancer.

  3. Comparison between three option, four option and five option multiple choice question tests for quality parameters: A randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Vegada, Bhavisha; Shukla, Apexa; Khilnani, Ajeetkumar; Charan, Jaykaran; Desai, Chetna

    2016-01-01

    Background: Most of the academic teachers use four or five options per item of multiple choice question (MCQ) test as formative and summative assessment. Optimal number of options in MCQ item is a matter of considerable debate among academic teachers of various educational fields. There is a scarcity of the published literature regarding the optimum number of option in each item of MCQ in the field of medical education. Objectives: To compare three options, four options, and five options MCQs test for the quality parameters – reliability, validity, item analysis, distracter analysis, and time analysis. Materials and Methods: Participants were 3rd semester M.B.B.S. students. Students were divided randomly into three groups. Each group was given one set of MCQ test out of three options, four options, and five option randomly. Following the marking of the multiple choice tests, the participants’ option selections were analyzed and comparisons were conducted of the mean marks, mean time, validity, reliability and facility value, discrimination index, point biserial value, distracter analysis of three different option formats. Results: Students score more (P = 0.000) and took less time (P = 0.009) for the completion of three options as compared to four options and five options groups. Facility value was more (P = 0.004) in three options group as compared to four and five options groups. There was no significant difference between three groups for the validity, reliability, and item discrimination. Nonfunctioning distracters were more in the four and five options group as compared to three option group. Conclusion: Assessment based on three option MCQs is can be preferred over four option and five option MCQs. PMID:27721545

  4. Amino Acid PET - An Imaging Option to Identify Treatment Response, Posttherapeutic Effects, and Tumor Recurrence?

    PubMed

    Galldiks, Norbert; Langen, Karl-Josef

    2016-01-01

    Routine diagnostics and treatment monitoring in patients with primary and secondary brain tumors is usually based on contrast-enhanced standard MRI. However, the capacity of standard MRI to differentiate neoplastic tissue from non-specific posttreatment effects may be limited particularly after therapeutic interventions such as radio- and/or chemotherapy or newer treatment options, e.g., immune therapy. Metabolic imaging using PET may provide relevant additional information on tumor metabolism, which allows a more accurate diagnosis especially in clinically equivocal situations, particularly when radiolabeled amino acids are used. Amino acid PET allows a sensitive monitoring of a response to various treatment options, the early detection of tumor recurrence, and an improved differentiation of tumor recurrence from posttherapeutic effects. In the past, this method had only limited availability due to the use of PET tracers with a short half-life, e.g., C-11. In recent years, however, novel amino acid PET tracers labeled with positron emitters with a longer half-life (F-18) have been developed and clinically validated, which allow a more efficient and cost-effective application. These developments and the well-documented diagnostic performance of PET using radiolabeled amino acids suggest that its application continues to spread and that this technique may be available as a routine diagnostic tool for several indications in the field of neuro-oncology. PMID:27516754

  5. Amino Acid PET – An Imaging Option to Identify Treatment Response, Posttherapeutic Effects, and Tumor Recurrence?

    PubMed Central

    Galldiks, Norbert; Langen, Karl-Josef

    2016-01-01

    Routine diagnostics and treatment monitoring in patients with primary and secondary brain tumors is usually based on contrast-enhanced standard MRI. However, the capacity of standard MRI to differentiate neoplastic tissue from non-specific posttreatment effects may be limited particularly after therapeutic interventions such as radio- and/or chemotherapy or newer treatment options, e.g., immune therapy. Metabolic imaging using PET may provide relevant additional information on tumor metabolism, which allows a more accurate diagnosis especially in clinically equivocal situations, particularly when radiolabeled amino acids are used. Amino acid PET allows a sensitive monitoring of a response to various treatment options, the early detection of tumor recurrence, and an improved differentiation of tumor recurrence from posttherapeutic effects. In the past, this method had only limited availability due to the use of PET tracers with a short half-life, e.g., C-11. In recent years, however, novel amino acid PET tracers labeled with positron emitters with a longer half-life (F-18) have been developed and clinically validated, which allow a more efficient and cost-effective application. These developments and the well-documented diagnostic performance of PET using radiolabeled amino acids suggest that its application continues to spread and that this technique may be available as a routine diagnostic tool for several indications in the field of neuro-oncology. PMID:27516754

  6. Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission: Robotic Boulder Capture Option Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazanek, Daniel D.; Merrill, Raymond G.; Belbin, Scott P.; Reeves, David M.; Earle, Kevin D.; Naasz, Bo J.; Abell, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is currently studying an option for the Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission (ARRM) that would capture a multi-ton boulder (typically 2-4 meters in size) from the surface of a large (is approximately 100+ meter) Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) and return it to cislunar space for subsequent human and robotic exploration. This alternative mission approach, designated the Robotic Boulder Capture Option (Option B), has been investigated to determine the mission feasibility and identify potential differences from the initial ARRM concept of capturing an entire small NEA (4-10 meters in size), which has been designated the Small Asteroid Capture Option (Option A). Compared to the initial ARRM concept, Option B allows for centimeter-level characterization over an entire large NEA, the certainty of target NEA composition type, the ability to select the boulder that is captured, numerous opportunities for mission enhancements to support science objectives, additional experience operating at a low-gravity planetary body including extended surface contact, and the ability to demonstrate future planetary defense strategies on a hazardous-size NEA. Option B can leverage precursor missions and existing Agency capabilities to help ensure mission success by targeting wellcharacterized asteroids and can accommodate uncertain programmatic schedules by tailoring the return mass.

  7. New therapeutic approaches in PV

    PubMed Central

    Falchi, Lorenzo; Newberry, Kate J.; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2015-01-01

    Polycytemia vera (PV) is one of the three Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms. Clinically, PV is an indolent disease but its course can be complicated by arterial and venous vascular accidents, evolution to myelofibrosis or leukemic transformation. Treatment of PV is, therefore, aimed at preventing such acute complications. The cornerstone of therapy of low-risk patients remains strict control of cardiovascular risk factors, the use of phlebotomy and low dose aspirin. Higher risk patients should also receive cytoreductive treatments. Hydroxyurea and interferon-α represent standard first-line options for newly diagnosed high-risk PV patients. Recommendations for patients who fail these therapies are less clearly defined. The discovery of a mutation in the Janus kinase 2 gene (V617F) in almost all cases of PV has prompted the development of molecularly targeted agents for the treatment of these patients. In this review we will discuss key clinical aspects, the current therapeutic armamentarium and data on the use of novel agents in patients with PV. PMID:26297275

  8. Steam generator waste disposal options

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, H.O.M.

    1994-12-31

    The steam generator waste stream has been examined, and disposal options associated with the decommissioning of the reference pressurized water reactor (PWR) power station have been investigated as described in NUREG/CR-0130. Specifically, the removal and disposal of the steam generators and those activities and associated occupational doses inherent in the activities have been examined. The results of this effort are compared in this paper to more recent data for the reference PWR contained in NUREG/CR-5884, and a determination of the appropriate volumes and activities is made. These data are used to complete projections of steam generator waste volumes and activities generated from light water reactor decommissioning using the DECON decommissioning alternative. Several disposal options for the steam generators are considered and the segmentation, one-piece waste package, and smelting options are detailed.

  9. Design Evolution Study - Aging Options

    SciTech Connect

    P. McDaniel

    2002-04-05

    The purpose of this study is to identify options and issues for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel received for disposal at the Yucca Mountain Mined Geologic Repository. Some early shipments of commercial spent nuclear fuel to the repository may be received with high-heat-output (younger) fuel assemblies that will need to be managed to meet thermal goals for emplacement. The capability to age as much as 40,000 metric tons of heavy metal of commercial spent nuclear he1 would provide more flexibility in the design to manage this younger fuel and to decouple waste receipt and waste emplacement. The following potential aging location options are evaluated: (1) Surface aging at four locations near the North Portal; (2) Subsurface aging in the permanent emplacement drifts; and (3) Subsurface aging in a new subsurface area. The following aging container options are evaluated: (1) Complete Waste Package; (2) Stainless Steel inner liner of the waste package; (3) Dual Purpose Canisters; (4) Multi-Purpose Canisters; and (5) New disposable canister for uncanistered commercial spent nuclear fuel. Each option is compared to a ''Base Case,'' which is the expected normal waste packaging process without aging. A Value Engineering approach is used to score each option against nine technical criteria and rank the options. Open issues with each of the options and suggested future actions are also presented. Costs for aging containers and aging locations are evaluated separately. Capital costs are developed for direct costs and distributable field costs. To the extent practical, unit costs are presented. Indirect costs, operating costs, and total system life cycle costs will be evaluated outside of this study. Three recommendations for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel--subsurface, surface, and combined surface and subsurface are presented for further review in the overall design re-evaluation effort. Options that were evaluated but not recommended are: subsurface aging in a new

  10. Development and novel therapeutics in hepatocellular carcinoma: a review.

    PubMed

    Ingle, Pravinkumar Vishwanath; Samsudin, Sarah Zakiah; Chan, Pei Qi; Ng, Mei Kei; Heng, Li Xuan; Yap, Siu Ching; Chai, Amy Siaw Hui; Wong, Audrey San Ying

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes the epidemiological trend, risk factors, prevention strategies such as vaccination, staging, current novel therapeutics, including the drugs under clinical trials, and future therapeutic trends for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). As HCC is the third most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide, its overall incidence remains alarmingly high in the developing world and is steadily rising across most of the developed and developing world. Over the past 15 years, the incidence of HCC has more than doubled and it increases with advancing age. Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus is the leading cause of HCC, closely followed by infection with hepatitis C virus. Other factors contributing to the development of HCC include alcohol abuse, tobacco smoking, and metabolic syndrome (including obesity, diabetes, and fatty liver disease). Treatment options have improved in the past few years, particularly with the approval of several molecular-targeted therapies. The researchers are actively pursuing novel therapeutic targets as well as predictive biomarker for treatment of HCC. Advances are being made in understanding the mechanisms underlying HCC, which in turn could lead to novel therapeutics. Nevertheless, there are many emerging agents still under clinical trials and yet to show promising results. Hence, future therapeutic options may include different combination of novel therapeutic interventions. PMID:27042086

  11. 48 CFR 2917.207 - Exercising options.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Exercising options. 2917... AND CONTRACT TYPES SPECIAL CONTRACTING METHODS Options 2917.207 Exercising options. The contracting officer must use a standardized determination and finding before exercising an option in accordance...

  12. 48 CFR 2917.207 - Exercising options.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Exercising options. 2917... AND CONTRACT TYPES SPECIAL CONTRACTING METHODS Options 2917.207 Exercising options. The contracting officer must use a standardized determination and finding before exercising an option in accordance...

  13. 48 CFR 2917.207 - Exercising options.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Exercising options. 2917... AND CONTRACT TYPES SPECIAL CONTRACTING METHODS Options 2917.207 Exercising options. The contracting officer must use a standardized determination and finding before exercising an option in accordance...

  14. 48 CFR 2917.207 - Exercising options.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Exercising options. 2917... AND CONTRACT TYPES SPECIAL CONTRACTING METHODS Options 2917.207 Exercising options. The contracting officer must use a standardized determination and finding before exercising an option in accordance...

  15. 48 CFR 2917.207 - Exercising options.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exercising options. 2917... AND CONTRACT TYPES SPECIAL CONTRACTING METHODS Options 2917.207 Exercising options. The contracting officer must use a standardized determination and finding before exercising an option in accordance...

  16. New options in the management of tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, Nicola; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Loppini, Mattia; Spiezia, Filippo; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    Tendon injuries can be acute or chronic, and caused by intrinsic or extrinsic factors, either alone or in combination. Tendinopathies are a common cause of disability in occupational medicine and account for a substantial proportion of overuse injuries in sports. Tendinopathy is essentially a failed healing response, with haphazard proliferation of tenocytes, abnormalities in tenocytes, with disruption of collagen fibres and subsequent increase in noncollagenous matrix. The scientific evidence base for managing tendinopathies is limited. What may appear clinically as an "acute tendinopathy" is actually a well advanced failure of a chronic healing response in which there is neither histologic nor biochemical evidence of inflammation. In this review we report the new options for the management of tendinopathy, including eccentric exercises, extracorporeal shockwave therapy, injections (intratendinous injections of corticosteroids, aprotinin, polidocanol platelet-rich plasma, autologous blood injection, high-volume injections) and surgery. Open surgery aims to excise fibrotic adhesions, remove areas of failed healing and make multiple longitudinal incisions in the tendon to detect intratendinous lesions, and to restore vascularity and possibly stimulate the remaining viable cells to initiate cell matrix response and healing. New surgical techniques aim to disrupt the abnormal neoinnervation to interfere with the pain sensation caused by tendinopathy. These procedures are intrinsically different from the classical ones in present use, because they do not attempt to address directly the pathologic lesion, but act only to denervate them. They include endoscopy, electrocoagulation, and minimally invasive stripping. Further randomized controlled trials are necessary to clarify better the best therapeutic options for the management of tendinopathy.

  17. Treatment Options to Manage Wound Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Curtis E.; Kennedy, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Bioburden is an accepted barrier to chronic wound healing. Defining the significance, phenotype, clinical classification, and treatment guidelines has been historically lacking of evidence and based on paradigms that do not represent the scientific or clinical reality. The Problem Chronic wound bioburden is typically abundant, polymicrobial, and extremely diverse. These microbes naturally adopt biofilm phenotypes, which are quite often viable but not culturable, thereby going undetected. The failures of culture-based detection have led to abandonment of routine bioburden evaluation and aggressive treatment or, worse, to assume bioburden is not a significant barrier. Predictably, treatment regimens to address biofilm phenotypes lagged behind our diagnostic tools and understanding. Basic/Clinical Science Advances Microbial DNA-based diagnostic tools and treatment regimens have emerged, which provide and leverage objective information, resulting in a dramatic impact on outcomes. Relevance to Clinical Care Modern medicine demands decisions based on objective evidence. The diagnostic and treatment protocols reviewed herein empower clinicians to practice modern medicine with regard to bioburden, with DNA level certainty. Conclusion Bioburden is a significant barrier to healing for all chronic wounds. Molecular diagnostics provide the first objective means of assessing wound bioburden. The accuracy and comprehensive data from such diagnostic methodologies provide clinicians with the ability to employ patient-specific treatment options, targeted to each patient's microbial wound census. Based on current outcomes data, the most effective therapeutic options are topical (TPL) antibiofilm agents (ABF) combined with TPL antibiotics (ABX). In specific patients, systemic ABX and selective biocides are also appropriate, but not exclusive of ABF combined with TPL ABX. PMID:24527291

  18. Emerging therapy options in heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Ranjit K; Khanal, Nabin; Giri, Smith; Pathak, Ranjan; Bhatt, Vijaya R

    2014-01-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a life and limb-threatening thrombotic complication of heparin, which is the result of platelet activation by anti-PF4/heparin antibodies. With lepirudin and danaparoid no longer available in the US, treatment options are limited to argatroban, fondaparinux (off-label use) and bivalirudin (for patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention). Both argatroban and bivalirudin are parenteral drugs and require close monitoring and hospitalization. Fondaparinux is contraindicated in patients with significant renal impairment and is associated with a small risk of HIT. Anticoagulants approved for thromboprophylaxis and management of thromboembolic conditions such as rivaroxaban, dabigatran, and apixaban have fixed oral dose, rapid onset of action and does not require monitoring. These novel agents do not interact with anti-PF4/heparin antibody and offer attractive therapy options for HIT. Their utility in HIT has been supported by a few clinical reports, however, larger studies are needed before they can be utilized in clinical practice. Therapeutic plasma exchange has been utilized with some success in patients with HIT, who need heparin reexposure for cardiac surgery but their safety and efficacy needs further exploration. 2-O, 3-O desulfated heparin, which lacks any anticoagulant effect, has been shown to reduce the development of HIT in murine models. Finally, novel targets based on the molecular pathogenesis of HIT are being studied for therapeutic drug development. We hope that the availability of novel therapies in the future will expand the options available for the management of HIT. PMID:25374012

  19. Therapeutic touch: an extension of professional skills.

    PubMed

    Cugelman, A

    1998-01-01

    Therapeutic touch, developed 25 years ago by Dolores Krieger, RN, PhD, and Dora Kunz, continues to gain ever wider acceptance in the health care field for one reason--it works. In our high-tech dialysis world of invasive, often painful procedures, therapeutic touch offers a welcome reprieve for patients and staff alike. For patients it has decreased restlessness, anxiety, fear and the pain from cannulations and central venous catheter insertions. Besides helping the recipients, therapeutic touch also affects the practitioners, with most practitioners reporting a greater sense of calm and well-being, in addition to the personal satisfaction of being able to offer a treatment that brings such relief to stressed-out patients. This article will introduce therapeutic touch and its use in the clinical setting. PMID:9807324

  20. Options for English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minaya-Rowe, Liliana

    2008-01-01

    Between 69 percent and 90 percent of English language learners (ELLs) in middle and high schools were born in the United States and have been in U.S. schools since kindergarten still have not achieved the academic proficiency to succeed in an all-English mainstream program. Various ELL program options are available for school districts to…

  1. Exploring Higher Education Financing Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nkrumah-Young, Kofi K.; Powell, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Higher education can be financed privately, financed by governments, or shared. Given that the benefits of education accrue to the individual and the state, many governments opt for shared financing. This article examines the underpinnings of different options for financing higher education and develops a model to compare conditions to choices and…

  2. Tool for Ranking Research Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, James N.; Scott, Kelly; Smith, Harold

    2005-01-01

    Tool for Research Enhancement Decision Support (TREDS) is a computer program developed to assist managers in ranking options for research aboard the International Space Station (ISS). It could likely also be adapted to perform similar decision-support functions in industrial and academic settings. TREDS provides a ranking of the options, based on a quantifiable assessment of all the relevant programmatic decision factors of benefit, cost, and risk. The computation of the benefit for each option is based on a figure of merit (FOM) for ISS research capacity that incorporates both quantitative and qualitative inputs. Qualitative inputs are gathered and partly quantified by use of the time-tested analytical hierarchical process and used to set weighting factors in the FOM corresponding to priorities determined by the cognizant decision maker(s). Then by use of algorithms developed specifically for this application, TREDS adjusts the projected benefit for each option on the basis of levels of technical implementation, cost, and schedule risk. Based partly on Excel spreadsheets, TREDS provides screens for entering cost, benefit, and risk information. Drop-down boxes are provided for entry of qualitative information. TREDS produces graphical output in multiple formats that can be tailored by users.

  3. 77 FR 25319 - Commodity Options

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ..., CPOs, Large Traders, ECPs, and ESPs 2. SDs, MSPs, SEFs, and SDRs 3. Entities Eligible To Engage in... Recordkeeping, 76 FR 29818, May 23, 2011 (``Product Definitions NPRM''). The final rule and interpretations that... not applicable. \\7\\ Commodity Options and Agricultural Swaps, 76 FR 6095, Feb. 3, 2011. Note that...

  4. Pluristem Therapeutics, Inc.

    PubMed

    Prather, William

    2008-01-01

    Pluristem Therapeutics, Inc., based in Haifa, Israel, is a regenerative, biotherapeutics Company dedicated to the commercialization of nonpersonalized (allogeneic) cell therapy products. The Company is expanding noncontroversial placental-derived mesenchymal stem cells via a proprietary 3D process, named PluriX, into therapeutics for a variety of degenerative, malignant and autoimmune disorders. Pluristem will be conducting Phase I trials in the USA with its first product, PLX-I, which addresses the global shortfall of matched tissue for bone marrow transplantation by improving the engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells contained in umbilical cord blood. PMID:18154467

  5. DELIVERY OF THERAPEUTIC PROTEINS

    PubMed Central

    Pisal, Dipak S.; Kosloski, Matthew P.; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V.

    2009-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of protein therapeutics are limited by three interrelated pharmaceutical issues, in vitro and in vivo instability, immunogenicity and shorter half-lives. Novel drug modifications for overcoming these issues are under investigation and include covalent attachment of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), polysialic acid, or glycolic acid, as well as developing new formulations containing nanoparticulate or colloidal systems (e.g. liposomes, polymeric microspheres, polymeric nanoparticles). Such strategies have the potential to develop as next generation protein therapeutics. This review includes a general discussion on these delivery approaches. PMID:20049941

  6. Advances in Therapeutic Cholangioscopy

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Renata Nobre; de Moura, Eduardo Guimarães Hourneaux

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, cholangioscopy is an established modality in diagnostic and treatment of pancreaticobiliary diseases. The more widespread use and the recent development of new technologies and accessories had renewed the interest of endoscopic visualization of the biliary tract, increasing the range of indications and therapeutic procedures, such as diagnostic of indeterminate biliary strictures, lithotripsy of difficult bile duct stones, ablative techniques for intraductal malignancies, removal of foreign bodies and gallbladder drainage. These endoscopic interventions will probably be the last frontier in the near future. This paper presents the new advances in therapeutic cholangioscopy, focusing on the current clinical applications and on research areas. PMID:27403156

  7. Therapeutic advances for the tumors associated with neurofibromatosis type 1, type 2, and schwannomatosis.

    PubMed

    Blakeley, Jaishri O; Plotkin, Scott R

    2016-05-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), and schwannomatosis (SWN) are tumor-suppressor syndromes. Each syndrome is an orphan disease; however, the tumors that arise within them represent the most common tumors of the nervous system worldwide. Systematic investigation of the pathways impacted by the loss of function of neurofibromin (encoded byNF1) and merlin (encoded byNF2) have led to therapeutic advances for patients with NF1 and NF2. In the syndrome of SWN, the genetic landscape is more complex, with 2 known causative genes (SMARCB1andLZTR1) accounting for up to 50% of familial SWN patients. The understanding of the molecular underpinnings of these syndromes is developing rapidly and offers more therapeutic options for the patients. In addition, common sporadic cancers harbor somatic alterations inNF1(ie, glioblastoma, breast cancer, melanoma),NF2(ie, meningioma, mesothelioma) andSMARCB1(ie, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors) such that advances in management of syndromic tumors may benefit patients both with and without germline mutations. In this review, we discuss the clinical and genetic features of NF1, NF2 and SWN, the therapeutic advances for the tumors that arise within these syndromes and the interaction between these rare tumor syndromes and the common tumors that share these mutations. PMID:26851632

  8. International veterinary epilepsy task force consensus proposal: outcome of therapeutic interventions in canine and feline epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Potschka, Heidrun; Fischer, Andrea; Löscher, Wolfgang; Patterson, Ned; Bhatti, Sofie; Berendt, Mette; De Risio, Luisa; Farquhar, Robyn; Long, Sam; Mandigers, Paul; Matiasek, Kaspar; Muñana, Karen; Pakozdy, Akos; Penderis, Jacques; Platt, Simon; Podell, Michael; Rusbridge, Clare; Stein, Veronika; Tipold, Andrea; Volk, Holger A

    2015-01-01

    Common criteria for the diagnosis of drug resistance and the assessment of outcome are needed urgently as a prerequisite for standardized evaluation and reporting of individual therapeutic responses in canine epilepsy. Thus, we provide a proposal for the definition of drug resistance and partial therapeutic success in canine patients with epilepsy. This consensus statement also suggests a list of factors and aspects of outcome, which should be considered in addition to the impact on seizures. Moreover, these expert recommendations discuss criteria which determine the validity and informative value of a therapeutic trial in an individual patient and also suggest the application of individual outcome criteria. Agreement on common guidelines does not only render a basis for future optimization of individual patient management, but is also a presupposition for the design and implementation of clinical studies with highly standardized inclusion and exclusion criteria. Respective standardization will improve the comparability of findings from different studies and renders an improved basis for multicenter studies. Therefore, this proposal provides an in-depth discussion of the implications of outcome criteria for clinical studies. In particular ethical aspects and the different options for study design and application of individual patient-centered outcome criteria are considered. PMID:26314300

  9. TDP-43 Proteinopathy and ALS: Insights into Disease Mechanisms and Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Scotter, Emma L; Chen, Han-Jou; Shaw, Christopher E

    2015-04-01

    Therapeutic options for patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are currently limited. However, recent studies show that almost all cases of ALS, as well as tau-negative frontotemporal dementia (FTD), share a common neuropathology characterized by the deposition of TAR-DNA binding protein (TDP)-43-positive protein inclusions, offering an attractive target for the design and testing of novel therapeutics. Here we demonstrate how diverse environmental stressors linked to stress granule formation, as well as mutations in genes encoding RNA processing proteins and protein degradation adaptors, initiate ALS pathogenesis via TDP-43. We review the progressive development of TDP-43 proteinopathy from cytoplasmic mislocalization and misfolding through to macroaggregation and the addition of phosphate and ubiquitin moieties. Drawing from cellular and animal studies, we explore the feasibility of therapeutics that act at each point in pathogenesis, from mitigating genetic risk using antisense oligonucleotides to modulating TDP-43 proteinopathy itself using small molecule activators of autophagy, the ubiquitin-proteasome system, or the chaperone network. We present the case that preventing the misfolding of TDP-43 and/or enhancing its clearance represents the most important target for effectively treating ALS and frontotemporal dementia.

  10. Therapeutic advances for the tumors associated with neurofibromatosis type 1, type 2, and schwannomatosis.

    PubMed

    Blakeley, Jaishri O; Plotkin, Scott R

    2016-05-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), and schwannomatosis (SWN) are tumor-suppressor syndromes. Each syndrome is an orphan disease; however, the tumors that arise within them represent the most common tumors of the nervous system worldwide. Systematic investigation of the pathways impacted by the loss of function of neurofibromin (encoded byNF1) and merlin (encoded byNF2) have led to therapeutic advances for patients with NF1 and NF2. In the syndrome of SWN, the genetic landscape is more complex, with 2 known causative genes (SMARCB1andLZTR1) accounting for up to 50% of familial SWN patients. The understanding of the molecular underpinnings of these syndromes is developing rapidly and offers more therapeutic options for the patients. In addition, common sporadic cancers harbor somatic alterations inNF1(ie, glioblastoma, breast cancer, melanoma),NF2(ie, meningioma, mesothelioma) andSMARCB1(ie, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors) such that advances in management of syndromic tumors may benefit patients both with and without germline mutations. In this review, we discuss the clinical and genetic features of NF1, NF2 and SWN, the therapeutic advances for the tumors that arise within these syndromes and the interaction between these rare tumor syndromes and the common tumors that share these mutations.

  11. Antibody Therapeutics in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Wold, Erik D; Smider, Vaughn V; Felding, Brunhilde H

    2016-01-01

    One of the newer classes of targeted cancer therapeutics is monoclonal antibodies. Monoclonal antibody therapeutics are a successful and rapidly expanding drug class due to their high specificity, activity, favourable pharmacokinetics, and standardized manufacturing processes. Antibodies are capable of recruiting the immune system to attack cancer cells through complement-dependent cytotoxicity or antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity. In an ideal scenario the initial tumor cell destruction induced by administration of a therapeutic antibody can result in uptake of tumor associated antigens by antigen-presenting cells, establishing a prolonged memory effect. Mechanisms of direct tumor cell killing by antibodies include antibody recognition of cell surface bound enzymes to neutralize enzyme activity and signaling, or induction of receptor agonist or antagonist activity. Both approaches result in cellular apoptosis. In another and very direct approach, antibodies are used to deliver drugs to target cells and cause cell death. Such antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) direct cytotoxic compounds to tumor cells, after selective binding to cell surface antigens, internalization, and intracellular drug release. Efficacy and safety of ADCs for cancer therapy has recently been greatly advanced based on innovative approaches for site-specific drug conjugation to the antibody structure. This technology enabled rational optimization of function and pharmacokinetics of the resulting conjugates, and is now beginning to yield therapeutics with defined, uniform molecular characteristics, and unprecedented promise to advance cancer treatment. PMID:27081677

  12. Developing Therapeutic Listening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Billy; Prior, Seamus

    2013-01-01

    We present an experience-near account of the development of therapeutic listening in first year counselling students. A phenomenological approach was employed to articulate the trainees' lived experiences of their learning. Six students who had just completed a one-year postgraduate certificate in counselling skills were interviewed and the…

  13. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  14. Natural history of hepatocellular carcinoma and current treatment options.

    PubMed

    Raoul, Jean-Luc

    2008-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most frequent primary liver cancer and the most severe complication of chronic liver disease. The annual number of new cases worldwide is approximately 550,000, representing more than 5% of human cancers and is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths. The stages of the malignancy as well as the severity of the underlying liver disease are essential factors in planning the therapeutic approach. Curative treatment options are represented mainly by surgery (ie, resection or transplantation), but most patients are not candidates for a curative option, and only palliative treatment could be given to these patients. Among palliative treatments, only chemoembolization has been proven to be effective, but other options are currently being investigated. Major risk factors for HCC are well known and are dependent on the geographic area. In Europe, the United States, and Japan, the main risk factors are liver cirrhosis, hepatitis B and C virus, alcohol, and tobacco; in contrast, in Africa and Asia, these factors are hepatitis B and C virus, tobacco use, and aflatoxin exposure. Cirrhosis from any cause is a predisposing factor for HCC and could be considered as a premalignant condition. The present concept of carcinogenesis in HCC is a multistage process. This article describes the natural history of HCC and discusses the various treatment options available at present. PMID:18243838

  15. Current options for the treatment of pathological scarring.

    PubMed

    Poetschke, Julian; Gauglitz, Gerd G

    2016-05-01

    Scarring is the consequence of surgery, trauma or different skin diseases. Apart from fresh, immature scars,that transform into mature scars over the course of would healing and that do not require further treatment,linear hypertrophic scars, widespread hypertrophic scars, keloids and atrophic scars exist. Symptoms like pruritusand pain, stigmatization as well as functional and aesthetic impairments that are very disturbing for the affected patients can bethe basis for the desire for treatment. Today, a multitude of options for the treatment and prevention of scars exists. Topical agents based on silicone or onion extract, intralesional injections of cristalline glucocorticoids (oftentimes in combinationwith cryotherapy) or 5-Fluorouracil as well as ablative and nonablative laser treatment are used. Current guidelines summarize the multitude of available treatment options and the currently available datafor the treating physicians, allowing them to make clear therapy recommendations for every single scar type. Relieving patients of their discomfort and doing their aesthetic demands justice is thus possible. Apart from scar prevention becoming more and more important, the increased use of modernlaser treatment options constitutes a key point in clinical scar treatment. At the same time the attention is turned to evaluating current therapeutic options with the help of contemporary study designs so as to graduallyimprove the level of evidence in scar treatment. PMID:27119465

  16. Therapeutics in food allergy: the current state of the art.

    PubMed

    Otsu, Kanao; Fleischer, David M

    2012-02-01

    Food allergy is an increasing public health dilemma in Westernized countries, yet no viable treatments are currently available for those who are afflicted. The only options available for patients with food allergies are prevention of reactions by strict avoidance of the offending food(s) and symptomatic treatment of any adverse effects from accidental exposures. Approaches are being pursued to develop treatments, and allergen-specific therapies such as oral immunotherapy, sublingual immunotherapy, and epicutaneous immunotherapy with different foods have shown promise. Other modalities are also being investigated, potentially leading to the discovery of novel therapeutic options.

  17. Implementation of power barrier option valuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahyani, Agatha C. P.; Sumarti, Novriana

    2015-09-01

    Options are financial instruments that can be utilized to reduce risk in stock investment. Barrier options are one of the major types of options actively used in financial markets where its life period depends on the path of the underlying stock prices. The features of the barrier option can be used to modify other types of options. In this research, the barrier option will be implemented into power option, so it is called power barrier option. This option is an extension of the vanilla barrier options where the Call payoff being considered is defined as P C =max (STβ-Kβ,0 ) , and the Put payoff being considered is defined as P P =max (Kβ-STβ,0 ) . Here β > 0 and β ≠ 1, K is the strike price of the option, and ST is the price of the underlying stock at time maturity T. In this paper, we generate the prices of stock using binomial method which is adjusted to the power option. In the conclusion, the price of American power barrier option is more expensive than the price of European power barrier option.

  18. Pancreatic cancer, treatment options, and GI-4000

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Marion L; Bade, Najeebah A; Prins, Petra A; Ampie, Leonel; Marshall, John L

    2015-01-01

    Although pancreatic cancer is but the eleventh most prevalent cancer in the US, it is predicted that of all the patients newly diagnosed with this disease in 2014, only 27% will still be alive at the end of the first year and only 6% will make it past 5 years. The choice of chemotherapy in the treatment of pancreatic cancer is dependent on disease stage and patient performance status but, in general, the most widely used approved regimens include 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) combinations and gemcitabine combinations. Recent therapeutic strategies have resulted in an improvement in survival of patients with pancreatic cancer but the magnitude of change is disappointing and vast improvements are still needed. The goal of immunotherapy is to enhance and guide the body's immune system to recognize tumor-specific antigens and mount an attack against the disease. Among newer immune therapies, GI-4000 consists of 4 different targeted molecular immunogens, each containing a different Ras protein (antigen) encoded by the most commonly found mutant RAS genes in solid tumors—RAS mutations exist in over 90% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. We will review pancreatic cancer epidemiology and its current treatment options, and consider the prospects of immunotherapy, focusing on GI-4000. We discuss the potential mechanism of action of GI-4000, and the performance of this vaccination series thus far in early phase clinical trials. PMID:25585100

  19. Pancreatic cancer, treatment options, and GI-4000

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Marion L; Bade, Najeebah A; Prins, Petra A; Ampie, Leonel; Marshall, John L

    2015-01-01

    Although pancreatic cancer is but the eleventh most prevalent cancer in the US, it is predicted that of all the patients newly diagnosed with this disease in 2014, only 27% will still be alive at the end of the first year, which is reduced to 6% after 5 years. The choice of chemotherapy in the treatment of pancreatic cancer is dependent on disease stage and patient performance status but, in general, the most widely used approved regimens include 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) combinations and gemcitabine combinations. Recent therapeutic strategies have resulted in an improvement in survival of patients with pancreatic cancer but the magnitude of change is disappointing and vast improvements are still needed. The goal of immunotherapy is to enhance and guide the body's immune system to recognize tumor-specific antigens and mount an attack against the disease. Among newer immune therapies, GI-4000 consists of 4 different targeted molecular immunogens, each containing a different Ras protein (antigen) encoded by the most commonly found mutant RAS genes in solid tumors—RAS mutations exist in over 90% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. We will review pancreatic cancer epidemiology and its current treatment options, and consider the prospects of immunotherapy, focusing on GI-4000. We discuss the potential mechanism of action of GI-4000, and the performance of this vaccination series thus far in early phase clinical trials. PMID:25933185

  20. Olmsted syndrome: clinical, molecular and therapeutic aspects.

    PubMed

    Duchatelet, Sabine; Hovnanian, Alain

    2015-03-17

    itching is important to reduce the morbidity of the disease. The disease is debilitating and progressive keratoderma and auto-amputation of digits can prevent patients from grasping and walking, and confine them to a wheelchair. New therapeutic options are therefore crucial and are expected from a better understanding of the disease mechanisms. The use of TRPV3 antagonists would represent such a targeted and potentially powerful strategy.

  1. Managing Nuclear Waste: Options Considered

    SciTech Connect

    DOE

    2002-05-02

    Starting in the 1950s, U.S. scientists began to research ways to manage highly radioactive materials accumulating at power plants and other sites nationwide. Long-term surface storage of these materials poses significant potential health, safety, and environmental risks. Scientists studied a broad range of options for managing spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The options included leaving it where it is, disposing of it in various ways, and making it safer through advanced technologies. International scientific consensus holds that these materials should eventually be disposed of deep underground in what is called a geologic repository. In a recent special report, the National Academy of Sciences summarized the various studies and emphasized that geologic disposal is ultimately necessary.

  2. Wastewater treatment plant cogeneration options

    SciTech Connect

    Stringfield, J.G.

    1995-12-31

    This paper reviews municipal sewage cogeneration and digester gas utilization options available to wastewater treatment plants, and will focus on utilizing the digester gas in combustion turbines and engine-generator systems. Defining the digestion and gas generation process is crucial to understanding the best gas utilization system. In municipal wastewater treatment plants biosolids (sludge) reduction is accomplished using aerobic or anaerobic digestion. The basic process of treating sewage solids with digestion is not new and has been practiced as far back as the nineteenth century. High energy usage consumed by aerobic blow systems supplying air to the process and the potential ``free`` energy generated by anaerobic digesters sometimes sways designers to select anaerobic over aerobic digestion. The following areas will be covered in this paper: gas utilization and cogeneration; definition of digestion process; sizing the cogeneration system and reviewing the systems components; emissions requirements and options; and capital, and O and M cost analysis.

  3. Emerging Options for Emergency Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Atsuko; Hagopian, Laura; Linden, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Emergency post-coital contraception (EC) is an effective method of preventing pregnancy when used appropriately. EC has been available since the 1970s, and its availability and use have become widespread. Options for EC are broad and include the copper intrauterine device (IUD) and emergency contraceptive pills such as levonorgestrel, ulipristal acetate, combined oral contraceptive pills (Yuzpe method), and less commonly, mifepristone. Some options are available over-the-counter, while others require provider prescription or placement. There are no absolute contraindications to the use of emergency contraceptive pills, with the exception of ulipristal acetate and mifepristone. This article reviews the mechanisms of action, efficacy, safety, side effects, clinical considerations, and patient preferences with respect to EC usage. The decision of which regimen to use is influenced by local availability, cost, and patient preference. PMID:24453516

  4. Depleted uranium disposal options evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.; Otis, M.D.

    1994-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, has chartered a study to evaluate alternative management strategies for depleted uranium (DU) currently stored throughout the DOE complex. Historically, DU has been maintained as a strategic resource because of uses for DU metal and potential uses for further enrichment or for uranium oxide as breeder reactor blanket fuel. This study has focused on evaluating the disposal options for DU if it were considered a waste. This report is in no way declaring these DU reserves a ``waste,`` but is intended to provide baseline data for comparison with other management options for use of DU. To PICS considered in this report include: Retrievable disposal; permanent disposal; health hazards; radiation toxicity and chemical toxicity.

  5. Endoscopy and polyps-diagnostic and therapeutic advances in management

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Scott R; Johnson, Eric K; Champagne, Bradley; Davis, Brad; Lee, Sang; Rivadeneira, David; Ross, Howard; Hayden, Dana A; Maykel, Justin A

    2013-01-01

    Despite multiple efforts aimed at early detection through screening, colon cancer remains the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States, with an estimated 51000 deaths during 2013 alone. The goal remains to identify and remove benign neoplastic polyps prior to becoming invasive cancers. Polypoid lesions of the colon vary widely from hyperplastic, hamartomatous and inflammatory to neoplastic adenomatous growths. Although these lesions are all benign, they are common, with up to one-quarter of patients over 60 years old will develop pre-malignant adenomatous polyps. Colonoscopy is the most effective screening tool to detect polyps and colon cancer, although several studies have demonstrated missed polyp rates from 6%-29%, largely due to variations in polyp size. This number can be as high as 40%, even with advanced (> 1 cm) adenomas. Other factors including sub-optimal bowel preparation, experience of the endoscopist, and patient anatomical variations all affect the detection rate. Additional challenges in decision-making exist when dealing with more advanced, and typically larger, polyps that have traditionally required formal resection. In this brief review, we will explore the recent advances in polyp detection and therapeutic options. PMID:23885138

  6. Designing flexible engineering systems utilizing embedded architecture options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Jeff G.

    This dissertation develops and applies an integrated framework for embedding flexibility in an engineered system architecture. Systems are constantly faced with unpredictability in the operational environment, threats from competing systems, obsolescence of technology, and general uncertainty in future system demands. Current systems engineering and risk management practices have focused almost exclusively on mitigating or preventing the negative consequences of uncertainty. This research recognizes that high uncertainty also presents an opportunity to design systems that can flexibly respond to changing requirements and capture additional value throughout the design life. There does not exist however a formalized approach to designing appropriately flexible systems. This research develops a three stage integrated flexibility framework based on the concept of architecture options embedded in the system design. Stage One defines an eight step systems engineering process to identify candidate architecture options. This process encapsulates the operational uncertainty though scenario development, traces new functional requirements to the affected design variables, and clusters the variables most sensitive to change. The resulting clusters can generate insight into the most promising regions in the architecture to embed flexibility in the form of architecture options. Stage Two develops a quantitative option valuation technique, grounded in real options theory, which is able to value embedded architecture options that exhibit variable expiration behavior. Stage Three proposes a portfolio optimization algorithm, for both discrete and continuous options, to select the optimal subset of architecture options, subject to budget and risk constraints. Finally, the feasibility, extensibility and limitations of the framework are assessed by its application to a reconnaissance satellite system development problem. Detailed technical data, performance models, and cost estimates

  7. Therapeutic Strategies in HCC: Radiation Modalities.

    PubMed

    Gallicchio, R; Nardelli, A; Mainenti, P; Nappi, A; Capacchione, D; Simeon, V; Sirignano, C; Abbruzzi, F; Barbato, F; Landriscina, M; Storto, G

    2016-01-01

    Patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) comply with an advanced disease and are not eligible for radical therapy. In this distressed scenario new treatment options hold great promise; among them transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and transarterial metabolic radiotherapy (TAMR) have shown efficacy in terms of both tumor shrinking and survival. External radiation therapy (RTx) by using novel three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy has also been used for HCC patients with encouraging results while its role had been limited in the past for the low tolerance of surrounding healthy liver. The rationale of TAMR derives from the idea of delivering exceptional radiation dose locally to the tumor, with cell killing intent, while preserving normal liver from undue exposition and minimizing systemic irradiation. Since the therapeutic efficacy of TACE is being continuously disputed, the TAMR with (131)I Lipiodol or (90)Y microspheres has gained consideration providing adequate therapeutic responses regardless of few toxicities. The implementation of novel radioisotopes and technological innovations in the field of RTx constitutes an intriguing field of research with important translational aspects. Moreover, the combination of different therapeutic approaches including chemotherapy offers captivating perspectives. We present the role of the radiation-based therapies in hepatocellular carcinoma patients who are not entitled for radical treatment.

  8. Therapeutic Strategies in HCC: Radiation Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Gallicchio, R.; Nardelli, A.; Mainenti, P.; Nappi, A.; Capacchione, D.; Simeon, V.; Sirignano, C.; Abbruzzi, F.; Barbato, F.; Landriscina, M.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) comply with an advanced disease and are not eligible for radical therapy. In this distressed scenario new treatment options hold great promise; among them transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and transarterial metabolic radiotherapy (TAMR) have shown efficacy in terms of both tumor shrinking and survival. External radiation therapy (RTx) by using novel three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy has also been used for HCC patients with encouraging results while its role had been limited in the past for the low tolerance of surrounding healthy liver. The rationale of TAMR derives from the idea of delivering exceptional radiation dose locally to the tumor, with cell killing intent, while preserving normal liver from undue exposition and minimizing systemic irradiation. Since the therapeutic efficacy of TACE is being continuously disputed, the TAMR with 131I Lipiodol or 90Y microspheres has gained consideration providing adequate therapeutic responses regardless of few toxicities. The implementation of novel radioisotopes and technological innovations in the field of RTx constitutes an intriguing field of research with important translational aspects. Moreover, the combination of different therapeutic approaches including chemotherapy offers captivating perspectives. We present the role of the radiation-based therapies in hepatocellular carcinoma patients who are not entitled for radical treatment. PMID:27563661

  9. Cannabidiol and epilepsy: Rationale and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Leo, Antonio; Russo, Emilio; Elia, Maurizio

    2016-05-01

    Despite the introduction of new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), the quality of life and therapeutic response for patients with epilepsy remains still poor. Unfortunately, besides several advantages, these new AEDs have not satisfactorily reduced the number of refractory patients. Therefore, the need for different other therapeutic options to manage epilepsy is still a current issue. To this purpose, emphasis has been given to phytocannabinoids, which have been medicinally used since ancient time in the treatment of neurological disorders including epilepsy. In particular, the nonpsychoactive compound cannabidiol (CBD) has shown anticonvulsant properties, both in preclinical and clinical studies, with a yet not completely clarified mechanism of action. However, it should be made clear that most phytocannabinoids do not act on the endocannabinoid system as in the case of CBD. In in vivo preclinical studies, CBD has shown significant anticonvulsant effects mainly in acute animal models of seizures, whereas restricted data exist in chronic models of epilepsy as well as in animal models of epileptogenesis. Likewise, clinical evidence seems to indicate that CBD is able to manage epilepsy both in adults and children affected by refractory seizures, with a favourable side effect profile. However, to date, clinical trials are both qualitatively and numerically limited, thus yet inconsistent. Therefore, further preclinical and clinical studies are undoubtedly needed to better evaluate the potential therapeutic profile of CBD in epilepsy, although the actually available data is promising. PMID:26976797

  10. Therapeutic Strategies in HCC: Radiation Modalities.

    PubMed

    Gallicchio, R; Nardelli, A; Mainenti, P; Nappi, A; Capacchione, D; Simeon, V; Sirignano, C; Abbruzzi, F; Barbato, F; Landriscina, M; Storto, G

    2016-01-01

    Patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) comply with an advanced disease and are not eligible for radical therapy. In this distressed scenario new treatment options hold great promise; among them transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and transarterial metabolic radiotherapy (TAMR) have shown efficacy in terms of both tumor shrinking and survival. External radiation therapy (RTx) by using novel three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy has also been used for HCC patients with encouraging results while its role had been limited in the past for the low tolerance of surrounding healthy liver. The rationale of TAMR derives from the idea of delivering exceptional radiation dose locally to the tumor, with cell killing intent, while preserving normal liver from undue exposition and minimizing systemic irradiation. Since the therapeutic efficacy of TACE is being continuously disputed, the TAMR with (131)I Lipiodol or (90)Y microspheres has gained consideration providing adequate therapeutic responses regardless of few toxicities. The implementation of novel radioisotopes and technological innovations in the field of RTx constitutes an intriguing field of research with important translational aspects. Moreover, the combination of different therapeutic approaches including chemotherapy offers captivating perspectives. We present the role of the radiation-based therapies in hepatocellular carcinoma patients who are not entitled for radical treatment. PMID:27563661

  11. Pancreatic cancer and SBRT: A new potential option?

    PubMed Central

    Hajj, Carla; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Local control remains a major issue for patients with unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). The role of radiation therapy in the management of LAPC represents an area of some controversy. Stereotactic body radiotherapy is an emerging treatment option for LAPC as it can provide a therapeutic benefit with significant advantages for patients’ quality of life over standard conventional chemoradiation. The objective of this review is to present the rationale for stereotactic body radiotherapy in LAPC, as well as to discuss the potential limitations and caveats of the currently available studies. PMID:26549996

  12. Trajectory options for the DART mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atchison, Justin A.; Ozimek, Martin T.; Kantsiper, Brian L.; Cheng, Andrew F.

    2016-06-01

    This study presents interplanetary trajectory options for the Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) spacecraft to reach the near Earth object, Didymos binary system, during its 2022 Earth conjunction. DART represents a component of a joint NASA-ESA mission to study near Earth object kinetic impact deflection. The DART trajectory must satisfy mission objectives for arrival timing, geometry, and lighting while minimizing launch vehicle and spacecraft propellant requirements. Chemical propulsion trajectories are feasible from two candidate launch windows in late 2020 and 2021. The 2020 trajectories are highly perturbed by Earth's orbit, requiring post-launch deep space maneuvers to retarget the Didymos system. Within these windows, opportunities exist for flybys of additional near Earth objects: Orpheus in 2021 or 2007 YJ in 2022. A second impact attempt, in the event that the first impact is unsuccessful, can be added at the expense of a shorter launch window and increased (∼3x) spacecraft ΔV . However, the second impact arrival geometry has poor lighting, high Earth ranges, and would require additional degrees of freedom for solar panel and/or antenna gimbals. A low-thrust spacecraft configuration increases the trajectory flexibility. A solar electric propulsion spacecraft could be affordably launched as a secondary spacecraft in an Earth orbit and spiral out to target the requisite interplanetary departure condition. A sample solar electric trajectory was constructed from an Earth geostationary transfer using a representative 1.5 kW thruster. The trajectory requires 9 months to depart Earth's sphere of influence, after which its interplanetary trajectory includes a flyby of Orpheus and a second Didymos impact attempt. The solar electric spacecraft implementation would impose additional bus design constraints, including large solar arrays that could pose challenges for terminal guidance. On the basis of this study, there are many feasible options for DART to

  13. Therapeutic antibodies against cancer

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Mark J.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-based therapeutics against cancer are highly successful in clinic and currently enjoy unprecedented recognition of their potential; 13 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been approved for clinical use in the European Union and in the United States (one, mylotarg, was withdrawn from market in 2010). Three of the mAbs (bevacizumab, rituximab, trastuzumab) are in the top six selling protein therapeutics with sales in 2010 of more than $5 bln each. Hundreds of mAbs including bispecific mAbs and multispecific fusion proteins, mAbs conjugated with small molecule drugs and mAbs with optimized pharmacokinetics are in clinical trials. However, challenges remain and it appears that deeper understanding of mechanisms is needed to overcome major problems including resistance to therapy, access to targets, complexity of biological systems and individual variations. PMID:22520975

  14. Therapeutic cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Melief, Cornelis J M; van Hall, Thorbald; Arens, Ramon; Ossendorp, Ferry; van der Burg, Sjoerd H

    2015-09-01

    The clinical benefit of therapeutic cancer vaccines has been established. Whereas regression of lesions was shown for premalignant lesions caused by HPV, clinical benefit in cancer patients was mostly noted as prolonged survival. Suboptimal vaccine design and an immunosuppressive cancer microenvironment are the root causes of the lack of cancer eradication. Effective cancer vaccines deliver concentrated antigen to both HLA class I and II molecules of DCs, promoting both CD4 and CD8 T cell responses. Optimal vaccine platforms include DNA and RNA vaccines and synthetic long peptides. Antigens of choice include mutant sequences, selected cancer testis antigens, and viral antigens. Drugs or physical treatments can mitigate the immunosuppressive cancer microenvironment and include chemotherapeutics, radiation, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) inhibitors, inhibitors of T cell checkpoints, agonists of selected TNF receptor family members, and inhibitors of undesirable cytokines. The specificity of therapeutic vaccination combined with such immunomodulation offers an attractive avenue for the development of future cancer therapies.

  15. Platelet-delivered therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lyde, R; Sabatino, D; Sullivan, S K; Poncz, M

    2015-06-01

    We have proposed that modified platelets could potentially be used to correct intrinsic platelet defects as well as for targeted delivery of therapeutic molecules to sights of vascular injury. Ectopic expression of proteins within α-granules prior to platelet activation has been achieved for several proteins, including urokinase, factor (F) VIII, and partially for FIX. Potential uses of platelet-directed therapeutics will be discussed, focusing on targeted delivery of urokinase as a thromboprophylactic agent and FVIII for the treatment of hemophilia A patients with intractable inhibitors. This presentation will discuss new strategies that may be useful in the care of patients with vascular injury as well as remaining challenges and limitations of these approaches.

  16. Toxicity of therapeutic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Maurer-Jones, Melissa A; Bantz, Kyle C; Love, Sara A; Marquis, Bryce J; Haynes, Christy L

    2009-02-01

    A total of six nanotherapeutic formulations are already approved for medical use and more are in the approval pipeline currently. Despite the massive research effort in nanotherapeutic materials, there is relatively little information about the toxicity of these materials or the tools needed to assess this toxicity. Recently, the scientific community has begun to respond to the paucity of information by investing in the field of nanoparticle toxicology. This review is intended to provide an overview of the techniques needed to assess toxicity of these therapeutic nanoparticles and to summarize the current state of the field. We begin with background on the toxicological assessment techniques used currently as well as considerations in nanoparticle dosing. The toxicological research overview is divided into the most common applications of therapeutic nanoparticles: drug delivery, photodynamic therapy and bioimaging. We end with a perspective section discussing the current technological gaps and promising research aimed at addressing those gaps.

  17. Therapeutic advances in immunosuppression.

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, A W; Forrester, J V

    1994-01-01

    Immunosuppressive therapy is appropriate for the prevention or reversal of allograft rejection, and for the treatment of autoimmune disorders and allergic disease. Recent advances in our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate immune responses have paralleled elucidation of the modes of action of a variety of therapeutic immunosuppressive agents, both 'old' and new. These developments have identified potential targets for more refined and specific intervention strategies that are now being tested in the clinic. PMID:7994898

  18. Therapeutic Robotics: A Technology Push

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Hermano Igo; Hogan, Neville

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a retrospective and chronological review of our efforts to revolutionize the way physical medicine is practiced by developing and deploying therapeutic robots. We present a sample of our clinical results with well over 300 stroke patients, both inpatients and outpatients, proving that movement therapy has a measurable and significant impact on recovery following brain injury. Bolstered by this result, we embarked on a two-pronged approach: 1) to determine what constitutes best therapy practice and 2) to develop additional therapeutic robots. We review our robots developed over the past 15 years and their unique characteristics. All are configured both to deliver reproducible therapy but also to measure outcomes with minimal encumbrance, thus providing critical measurement tools to help unravel the key question posed under the first prong: what constitutes “best practice”? We believe that a “gym” of robots like these will become a central feature of physical medicine and the rehabilitation clinic within the next ten years. PMID:19779587

  19. Ethylene glycol poisoning in three dogs: Importance of early diagnosis and role of hemodialysis as a treatment option.

    PubMed

    Schweighauser, A; Francey, T

    2016-02-01

    Poisoning with ethylene glycol as contained in antifreeze can rapidly lead to irreversible acute renal failure and other organ damage. It carries a grave prognosis unless diagnosed early and adequate treatment is initiated within 8 hours of ingestion. Toxicity of ethylene glycol is related to the production of toxic metabolites by the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), leading to early signs of severe polyuria (PU) and polydipsia (PD), gastritis, ataxia and central nervous depression, followed by progressive dehydration, and ultimately oligoanuric renal failure. In addition to general supportive care, therapeutic interventions must include either antidotes blocking ADH-mediated metabolism or blood purification techniques to remove both the parent compound and the toxic metabolites. The goal of this case report is to describe three cases of acute antifreeze intoxication in dogs, and to discuss treatment options available for this poisoning. PMID:27145686

  20. Ethylene glycol poisoning in three dogs: Importance of early diagnosis and role of hemodialysis as a treatment option.

    PubMed

    Schweighauser, A; Francey, T

    2016-02-01

    Poisoning with ethylene glycol as contained in antifreeze can rapidly lead to irreversible acute renal failure and other organ damage. It carries a grave prognosis unless diagnosed early and adequate treatment is initiated within 8 hours of ingestion. Toxicity of ethylene glycol is related to the production of toxic metabolites by the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), leading to early signs of severe polyuria (PU) and polydipsia (PD), gastritis, ataxia and central nervous depression, followed by progressive dehydration, and ultimately oligoanuric renal failure. In addition to general supportive care, therapeutic interventions must include either antidotes blocking ADH-mediated metabolism or blood purification techniques to remove both the parent compound and the toxic metabolites. The goal of this case report is to describe three cases of acute antifreeze intoxication in dogs, and to discuss treatment options available for this poisoning.

  1. Space station needs, attributes and architectural options study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    All the candidate Technology Development missions investigated during the space station needs, attributes, and architectural options study are described. All the mission data forms plus additional information such as, cost, drawings, functional flows, etc., generated in support of these mission is included with a computer generated mission data form.

  2. 75 FR 47710 - TRICARE; Extended Care Health Option

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-09

    .... By final rule published in the Federal Register (FR) on August 20, 2004, (69 FR 51559) the Department... (74 FR 44800) on August 30, 2009. No comments were received. However, following additional Department... of the Secretary 32 CFR Part 199 RIN 0720-AB33 TRICARE; Extended Care Health Option AGENCY: Office...

  3. The valuation of currency options by fractional Brownian motion.

    PubMed

    Shokrollahi, Foad; Kılıçman, Adem

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to investigate a model for pricing of currency options in which value governed by the fractional Brownian motion model (FBM). The fractional partial differential equation and some Greeks are also obtained. In addition, some properties of our pricing formula and simulation studies are presented, which demonstrate that the FBM model is easy to use. PMID:27504243

  4. 78 FR 54970 - Cotton Futures Classification: Optional Classification Procedure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ... process in March 2012 (77 FR 5379). When verified by a futures classification, Smith-Doxey data serves as...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 27 RIN 0581-AD33 Cotton Futures... for the addition of an optional cotton futures classification procedure--identified and known...

  5. 26 CFR 1.422-2 - Incentive stock options defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... incentive stock option to F to purchase 50,000 shares of R stock at $3 per share, the fair market value of R.... In addition, a change in the granting corporation or the stock available for purchase or award under... purchased under the plan and forfeited back to the plan; shares surrendered in payment of the exercise...

  6. Fertility-preserving options for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Plante, Marie; Roy, Michel

    2006-04-01

    Childbearing is one of the most important life goals for many women, and fertility preservation is a very important factor in the overall quality of life of cancer survivors. Cervical cancer frequently affects young women; because some women tend to delay childbearing, fertility preservation must be considered when treatment options are discussed. Over the past decade, the radical trachelectomy procedure has become a well established fertility-preserving option for young women with early-stage cancer; this procedure is associated with low morbidity, good oncologic outcome, and a high proportion of pregnancies that reach the third trimester and babies that are delivered at term. This article will review available literature on the vaginal radical trachelectomy procedure and data from other surgical approaches, such as the abdominal radical trachelectomy. In addition, the potential future application of neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by fertility-preserving surgery in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer will be examined. Finally, ultraconservative surgical approaches (eg, conization alone with or without laparoscopic lymphadenectomy) in very early-stage disease will be discussed.

  7. Retinoblastoma: might photodynamic therapy be an option?

    PubMed

    Teixo, Ricardo; Laranjo, Mafalda; Abrantes, Ana Margarida; Brites, Gonçalo; Serra, Arménio; Proença, Rui; Botelho, Maria Filomena

    2015-12-01

    Retinoblastoma is a tumor that mainly affects children under 5 years, all over the world. The origin of these tumors is related with mutations in the RB1 gene, which may result from genetic alterations in cells of the germ line or in retinal somatic cells. In developing countries, the number of retinoblastoma-related deaths is higher due to less access to treatment, unlike what happens in developed countries where survival rates are higher. However, treatments such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy, although quite effective in treating this type of cancer, do not avoid high indices of mortality due to secondary malignances which are quite frequent in these patients. Additionally, treatments such as cryotherapy, thermotherapy, thermochemotherapy, or brachytherapy represent other options for retinoblastoma. When all these approaches fail, enucleation is the last option. Photodynamic therapy might be considered as an alternative, particularly because of its non-mutagenic character. Photodynamic therapy is a treatment modality based on the administration of photosensitizing molecules that only upon irradiation of the tumor with a light source of appropriate wavelength are activated, triggering its antitumor action. This activity may be not only due to direct damage to tumor cells but also due to damage caused to the blood vessels responsible for the vascular supply of the tumor. Over the past decades, several in vitro and in vivo studies were conducted to assess the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy in the treatment of retinoblastoma, and very promising results were achieved.

  8. Current treatment options for Dientamoeba fragilis infections

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Noriyuki; Marriott, Deborah; Harkness, John; Ellis, John T.; Stark, Damien

    2012-01-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis belongs to the trichomonad group of protozoan parasites and it has been implicated as a cause of gastrointestinal disease with world-wide prevalences ranging from 0.5% to 16%. The majority of patients with dientamoebiasis present with gastrointestinal complaints. Chronic symptoms are common with up to a third of patients exhibiting persistent diarrhoea. Numerous studies have successfully demonstrated parasite clearance, coupled with complete resolution of clinical symptoms following treatment with various antiparasitic compounds. Treatments reported to be successful for dientamoebiasis include carbarsone, diphetarsone, tetracyclines, paromomycin, erythromycin, hydroxyquinolines and the 5-nitroimidazoles, including metronidazole, secnidazole, tinidazole and ornidazole. It is of note that most current treatment data is based only on small number of case reports. No large scale double blind randomised placebo controlled trials testing the efficacy of antimicrobial agents against D. fragilis has been undertaken highlighting the need for further study. In addition there is very little in vitro susceptibility data available for the organism making some current treatment options questionable. The aim of this review is to critically discuss all treatment options currently available for dientamoebiasis. PMID:24533282

  9. Current treatment options for Dientamoeba fragilis infections.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Noriyuki; Marriott, Deborah; Harkness, John; Ellis, John T; Stark, Damien

    2012-12-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis belongs to the trichomonad group of protozoan parasites and it has been implicated as a cause of gastrointestinal disease with world-wide prevalences ranging from 0.5% to 16%. The majority of patients with dientamoebiasis present with gastrointestinal complaints. Chronic symptoms are common with up to a third of patients exhibiting persistent diarrhoea. Numerous studies have successfully demonstrated parasite clearance, coupled with complete resolution of clinical symptoms following treatment with various antiparasitic compounds. Treatments reported to be successful for dientamoebiasis include carbarsone, diphetarsone, tetracyclines, paromomycin, erythromycin, hydroxyquinolines and the 5-nitroimidazoles, including metronidazole, secnidazole, tinidazole and ornidazole. It is of note that most current treatment data is based only on small number of case reports. No large scale double blind randomised placebo controlled trials testing the efficacy of antimicrobial agents against D. fragilis has been undertaken highlighting the need for further study. In addition there is very little in vitro susceptibility data available for the organism making some current treatment options questionable. The aim of this review is to critically discuss all treatment options currently available for dientamoebiasis. PMID:24533282

  10. Peripheral Nerve Regeneration – an Appraisal of the Current Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    CINTEZA, Dragos; PERSINARU, Iulia; MACIUCEANU ZARNESCU, Bogdan Mircea; IONESCU, Dan; LASCAR, Ioan

    2015-01-01

    During the last decades significant progress was made in the understanding of the physiopathology of the peripheral nerve regeneration. Although the evolution of therapy is not as spectacular, a series of new treatment solutions were developed. The gold standard in therapy remains the use of autografts. We present the current concepts and therapeutic options available. PMID:26225155

  11. Vitamin A-aldehyde adducts: AMD risk and targeted therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Sparrow, Janet R.

    2016-01-01

    Although currently available treatment options for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are limited, particularly for atrophic AMD, the identification of predisposing genetic variations has informed clinical studies addressing therapeutic options such as complement inhibitors and anti-inflammatory agents. To lower risk of early AMD, recommended lifestyle interventions such as the avoidance of smoking and the intake of low glycemic antioxidant-rich diets have largely followed from the identification of nongenetic modifiable factors. On the other hand, the challenge of understanding the complex relationship between aging and cumulative damage leading to AMD has fueled investigations of the visual cycle adducts that accumulate in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and are a hallmark of aging retina. These studies have revealed properties of these compounds that provide insights into processes that may compromise RPE and could contribute to disease mechanisms in AMD. This work has also led to the design of targeted therapeutics that are currently under investigation. PMID:27071115

  12. Review article: current treatment options and management of functional dyspepsia

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, B. E.; Talley, N. J.; Locke, G. R.; Bouras, E. P.; DiBaise, J. K.; El-Serag, H. B.; Abraham, B. P.; Howden, C. W.; Moayyedi, P.; Prather, C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Functional dyspepsia (FD), a common functional gastrointestinal disorder, is defined by the Rome III criteria as symptoms of epigastric pain or discomfort (prevalence in FD of 89–90%), postprandial fullness (75–88%), and early satiety (50–82%) within the last 3 months with symptom onset at least 6 months earlier. Patients cannot have any evidence of structural disease to explain symptoms and predominant symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux are exclusionary. Symptoms of FD are non-specific and the pathophysiology is diverse, which explains in part why a universally effective treatment for FD remains elusive. Aim To present current management options for the treatment of FD (therapeutic gain/response rate noted when available). Results The utility of Helicobacter pylori eradication for the treatment of FD is modest (6–14% therapeutic gain), while the therapeutic efficacy of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) (7–10% therapeutic gain), histamine-type-2-receptor antagonists (8–35% therapeutic gain), prokinetic agents (18–45%), tricyclic antidepressants (TCA) (response rates of 64–70%), serotonin reuptake inhibitors (no better than placebo) is limited and hampered by inadequate data. This review discusses dietary interventions and analyses studies involving complementary and alternative medications, and psychological therapies. Conclusions A reasonable treatment approach based on current evidence is to initiate therapy with a daily PPI in H. pylori-negative FD patients. If symptoms persist, a therapeutic trial with a tricyclic antidepressant may be initiated. If symptoms continue, the clinician can possibly initiate therapy with an antinociceptive agent, a prokinetic agent, or some form of complementary and alternative medications, although evidence from prospective studies to support this approach is limited. PMID:22591037

  13. Treatment of Mycobacterium marinum with lymecycline: new therapeutic alternative?

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, Maria Gertrudes Fernandes Pereira; Neugebauer, Samuel Antônio; Almeida Junior, Hiram Larangeira; Mota, Laís Marques

    2015-01-01

    Skin infections by Mycobacterium marinum are quite rare in our environment and, therefore, little studied. The majority of the lesions appear three weeks after traumas in aquariums, beaches and fish tanks. Lymph node drainage and systematization of the disease are rare and most lesions disappear in about three years. This case aims to show the effectiveness of the treatment used (lymecycline 150 mg/orally/day). This medication may be a new therapeutic option for the treatment of Mycobacterium marinum. PMID:25672310

  14. 38 CFR 8.25 - Options.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Options. 8.25 Section 8.25 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS NATIONAL SERVICE LIFE INSURANCE Optional Settlements § 8.25 Options. Insurance will be paid in a lump sum only when selected...

  15. Option Fixation: A Cognitive Contributor to Overconfidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sieck, Winston R.; Merkle, Edgar C.; Van Zandt, Trisha

    2007-01-01

    The ASC model of choice and confidence in general knowledge proposes that respondents first Assess the familiarity of presented options, and then use the high-familiarity option as a retrieval cue to Search memory for the purposes of Constructing an explanation about why that high-familiarity option is true. The ASC process implies that…

  16. Help Options in CALL: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardenas-Claros, Monica S.; Gruba, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a systematic review of research investigating help options in the different language skills in computer-assisted language learning (CALL). In this review, emerging themes along with is-sues affecting help option research are identified and discussed. We argue that help options in CALL are application resources that do not only seem…

  17. Flexible Work Options within the Organisational System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albion, Majella J.; Chee, Munli

    2006-01-01

    The availability of flexible work options provides an opportunity for individuals to shape their careers in order to optimise their work and life goals. This study takes a systems theory approach to examine how the use of flexible work options influences relationships and interactions in the workplace. The "Flexible Work Options Questionnaire"…

  18. 32 CFR 48.201 - Options.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Options. 48.201 Section 48.201 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN RETIRED SERVICEMAN'S FAMILY PROTECTION PLAN Election of Options § 48.201 Options. As provided in § 48.203, a member...

  19. 32 CFR 48.201 - Options.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Options. 48.201 Section 48.201 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN RETIRED SERVICEMAN'S FAMILY PROTECTION PLAN Election of Options § 48.201 Options. As provided in § 48.203, a member...

  20. 32 CFR 48.201 - Options.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Options. 48.201 Section 48.201 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN RETIRED SERVICEMAN'S FAMILY PROTECTION PLAN Election of Options § 48.201 Options. As provided in § 48.203, a member...

  1. A comparison of the psychometric properties of three- and four-option multiple-choice questions in nursing assessments.

    PubMed

    Tarrant, Marie; Ware, James

    2010-08-01

    In multiple-choice tests, four-option items are the standard in nursing education. There are few evidence-based reasons, however, for MCQs to have four or more options as studies have shown that three-option items perform equally as well and the additional options most often do not improve test reliability and validity. The aim of this study was to examine and compare the psychometric properties of four-option items with the same items rewritten as three-option items. Using item-analysis data to eliminate the distractor with the lowest response rate, we compared three- and four-option versions of 41 multiple-choice items administered to two student cohorts over two subsequent academic years. Removing the non-functioning distractor resulted in minimal changes in item difficulty and discrimination. Three-option items contained more functioning distractors despite having fewer distractors overall. Existing distractors became more discriminating when infrequently selected distractors were removed from items. Overall, three-option items perform equally as well as four-option items. Since three-option items require less time to develop and administer and additional options provide no psychometric advantage, teachers are encouraged to adopt three-option items as the standard on multiple-choice tests. PMID:20053488

  2. [Treatment options for patellar tendinopathy].

    PubMed

    Duthon, V B; Borloz, S; Ziltener, J-L

    2012-07-25

    Patellar tendinopathy is also called jumper's knee because of its high incidence in athletes with jumping or cutting activities as soccer, basketball, volleyball. Many different treatment methods have been described. However, no consensus exists regarding the optimal treatment for this condition. According to the literature, eccentric exercise-based physical therapy should be proposed first because of its strong scientific evidence. Shockwave therapy and injections may be useful but their real efficacy still has to be proven by randomized controlled study. For patients recalcitrant to more conservative options, operative management may be indicated.

  3. Energy Options for the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, John; Obenschain, Stephen; Conover, David; Bajura, Rita; Greene, David; Brown, Marilyn; Boes, Eldon; McCarthy, Kathyrn; Christian, David; Dean, Stephen; Kulcinski, Gerald; Denholm, P. L.

    2004-06-01

    This paper summarizes the presentations and discussion at the Energy Options for the Future meeting held at the Naval Research Laboratory in March of 2004. The presentations covered the present status and future potential for coal, oil, natural gas, nuclear, wind, solar, geothermal, and biomass energy sources and the effect of measures for energy conservation. The longevity of current major energy sources, means for resolving or mitigating environmental issues, and the role to be played by yet to be deployed sources, like fusion, were major topics of presentation and discussion.

  4. Psychodynamic Perspective on Therapeutic Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Nancy A.

    1999-01-01

    Discussion of boundaries in therapeutic work most often focuses on boundary maintenance, risk management factors, and boundary violations. The psychodynamic meaning and clinical management of boundaries in therapeutic relationships remains a neglected area of discourse. Clinical vignettes will illustrate a psychodynamic, developmental-relational perspective using boundary dilemmas to deepen and advance the therapeutic process. This article contributes to the dialogue about the process of making meaning and constructing therapeutically useful and creative boundaries that further the psychotherapeutic process. PMID:10523432

  5. [Is therapeutic deadlock inevitable?].

    PubMed

    Vignat, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Many long-term treatments appear to be an expression of therapeutic deadlock. The situation leads to a questioning of the concept of chronicity and the identification of the determining factors of situations which are apparently blocked, marked by the search for solutions taking a back seat to the taking of action. The interaction between patients' mental apparatus and the care apparatus lies at the heart of the question, interpreted from an institutional, collective and individual perspective, supported by the clinical and psychopathological approach, and the return to the prioritisation of the thought. PMID:27389427

  6. Revitalizing Psychiatric Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, Steven E

    2014-01-01

    Despite high prevalence and enormous unmet medical need, the pharmaceutical industry has recently de-emphasized neuropsychiatric disorders as ‘too difficult' a challenge to warrant major investment. Here I describe major obstacles to drug discovery and development including a lack of new molecular targets, shortcomings of current animal models, and the lack of biomarkers for clinical trials. My major focus, however, is on new technologies and scientific approaches to neuropsychiatric disorders that give promise for revitalizing therapeutics and may thus answer industry's concerns. PMID:24317307

  7. microRNA Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Broderick, JA; Zamore, PD

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) provide new therapeutic targets for many diseases, while their myriad roles in development and cellular processes make them fascinating to study. We still do not fully understand the molecular mechanisms by which miRNAs regulate gene expression nor do we know the complete repertoire of mRNAs each miRNA regulates. However, recent progress in the development of effective strategies to block miRNAs suggests that anti-miRNA drugs may soon be used in the clinic. PMID:21525952

  8. Therapeutic Endoscopic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Cheriyan, Danny

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) technology has evolved dramatically over the past 20 years, from being a supplementary diagnostic aid available only in large medical centers to being a core diagnostic and therapeutic tool that is widely available. Although formal recommendations and practice guidelines have not been developed, there are considerable data supporting the use of EUS for its technical accuracy in diagnosing pancreaticobiliary and gastrointestinal pathology. Endosonography is now routine practice not only for pathologic diagnosis and tumor staging but also for drainage of cystic lesions and celiac plexus neurolysis. In this article, we cover the use of EUS in biliary and pancreatic intervention, ablative therapy, enterostomy, and vascular intervention. PMID:27118942

  9. Therapeutic strategies in pneumonia: going beyond antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Müller-Redetzky, Holger; Lienau, Jasmin; Suttorp, Norbert; Witzenrath, Martin

    2015-09-01

    Dysregulation of the innate immune system drives lung injury and its systemic sequelae due to breakdown of vascular barrier function, harmful hyperinflammation and microcirculatory failure, which contribute to the unfavourable outcome of patients with severe pneumonia. A variety of promising therapeutic targets have been identified and numerous innovative therapeutic approaches demonstrated to improve lung injury in experimental preclinical studies. However, at present specific preventive or curative strategies for the treatment of lung failure in pneumonia in addition to antibiotics are still missing. The aim of this mini-review is to give a short overview of some, but not all, adjuvant therapeutic strategies for pneumonia and its most important complications, sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome, and briefly discuss future perspectives.

  10. [Therapeutic abortion, unjustified absence in health policy].

    PubMed

    Chávez-Alvarado, Susana

    2013-07-01

    Although abortion for health reasons is not considered a crime in Peru, the State does not allow its inclusion in public policy, thus violating women's right to terminate a pregnancy when it affects their health. When examining the article in the Criminal Code which decriminalizes this type of abortion, provisions are identified which protect women and set the conditions to offer this type of service. This document sets the debate about the arguments used by the Peruvian State for not approving a therapeutic abortion protocol which would regulate the provision and financing of therapeutic abortion in public services, and explains why this obligation should be complied with, based on the conceptual framework of "health exception" In addition, it presents two cases brought before the judicial court in which the Peruvian State was found guilty of violating the human rights of two adolescents to whom a therapeutic abortion was denied.

  11. When Standard Therapy Fails in Breast Cancer: Current and Future Options for HER2-Positive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Erin; Mullins, D’Anna

    2013-01-01

    The area of HER2-positive breast cancer is a rapidly changing field. The use of the humanized monoclonal antibody, trastuzumab, significantly improved the prognosis for patients with HER2-positive breast cancer, however, increasing knowledge regarding mechanisms of resistance to trastuzumab have come to light, prompting research into additional methods to target the HER2 protein. The purpose of this article is to discuss evidence for why continued blockade of the HER2 pathway continues to be important despite progression on trastuzumab, as well as to review additional HER2-targeted therapies and progression in the central nervous system. With the availability of new drugs comes the need to determine the appropriate therapeutic combinations and optimal order in which to deliver these therapies. This review summarizes the practice-changing phase III trials and some supporting phase II data regarding the various targeted HER2 therapies available for patients with advanced HER2-positive breast cancer, proposes order for anti-HER2 therapy in the advanced HER2-positive breast cancer patient, and includes information on future strategies. While other reviews on HER2-targeted therapy are available, this review specifically aims at addressing treatment options after trastuzumab failure in the patient with advanced HER2-positive breast cancer. PMID:24527366

  12. [Gastroparesis and its treatment options].

    PubMed

    Igaz, Péter; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2008-03-01

    Gastroparesis is a disorder of gastric emptying that occurs in the absence of mechanical obstruction. Its cardinal features include nausea, vomiting, bloating, early satiety and discomfort. Weight loss, dehydration, electrolyte disturbances and malnutrition may develop in severe cases. The majority of cases is idiopathic, long standing diabetes mellitus is responsible for about 25-30% of cases. Diabetic gastroparesis may render glucose control extremely difficult, its treatment represents a major challenge. Besides frequent, small meals and psychological support, several drug options are available, however, their efficacy is limited and only a few randomized studies have been performed to date. Prokinetic agents (erythromycin, domperidone, metoclopramide) and antiemetics (phenothiazines, serotonin antagonists, butyrophenones) are the most wide-spread medicaments. Among the novel, recently developed agents, 5-HT4 serotonin receptor agonists and dopamine D2 receptor antagonists are the most promising. Injection of botulinum toxin into the pyloric sphincter resulted in faster gastric emptying and symptom alleviation in some studies. Gastric electric stimulation appears to be one of the most effective options, both low and high-frequency stimulation may alleviate symptoms. Gastrostomy/jejunostomy and other surgical interventions are considered as "last resort". PMID:18292033

  13. Treatment options for threatened miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, N S

    2009-12-01

    Threatened miscarriage, as demonstrated by vaginal bleeding with or without abdominal cramps, is a common complication of pregnancy. It occurs in about 20% of recognised pregnancies. Risk of miscarriage is increased in older women and those with a history of miscarriage. Low serum levels of progesterone or human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) are a risk factor for miscarriage. Other risk factors include heavy bleeding, early gestational age and an empty gestational sac of >15-17 mm diameter. Clinical history and examination, maternal serum biochemistry and ultrasound findings provide valuable information about the prognosis and are important to establish in order to determine potential treatment options. Although bed rest is the most common choice of treatment, there is little evidence of its value. Other options include luteal support with progesterone, dydrogesterone or hCG. There is some evidence from clinical studies indicating that progesterone or dydrogesterone may reduce the rate of miscarriage, although further data from double-blind, randomised-controlled trials are necessary to confirm efficacy. PMID:19945236

  14. Pricing foreign equity option with stochastic volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qi; Xu, Weidong

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we propose a general foreign equity option pricing framework that unifies the vast foreign equity option pricing literature and incorporates the stochastic volatility into foreign equity option pricing. Under our framework, the time-changed Lévy processes are used to model the underlying assets price of foreign equity option and the closed form pricing formula is obtained through the use of characteristic function methodology. Numerical tests indicate that stochastic volatility has a dramatic effect on the foreign equity option prices.

  15. Advanced propulsion options for the Mars cargo mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisbee, Robert H.; Blandino, John J.; Sercel, Joel C.; Sargent, Mark S.; Gowda, Nandini

    1990-01-01

    Several advanced propulsion options for a split-mission piloted Mars exploration scenario are presented. The primary study focus is on identifying concepts that can reduce total initial mass in low earth orbit (IMLEO) for the cargo delivery portion of the mission; in addition, concepts that can reduce the trip time of the piloted option are assessed. The propulsion options considered are nuclear thermal propulsion, solar sails, multimegawatt-class nuclear electric propulsion, solar electric propulsion, magnetic sails, mass drivers, rail guns, solar thermal rockets, beamed-energy propulsion systems, and tethers. For the cargo mission, solar sails are found to provide the greatest mass savings over the baseline chemical system, although they suffer from having very long trip times; a good performance compromise between a low IMLEO and a short trip time can be obtained using multimegawatt-class nuclear electric propulsion systems.

  16. 48 CFR 552.217-71 - Notice Regarding Option(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... consider the quality of the Contractor's past performance under this contract in accordance with 48 CFR 517... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Notice Regarding Option(s... Notice Regarding Option(s). As prescribed in 517.208(b), insert the following provision: Notice...

  17. [Lithiasis and ectopic pelvic kidney. Therapeutic aspects].

    PubMed

    Aboutaieb, R; Rabii, R; el Moussaoui, A; Joual, A; Sarf, I; el Mrini, M; Benjelloun, S

    1996-01-01

    Kidney in ectopic position is dysplasic, and associated to other malformations. The advent of a lithiasis in these conditions rises questions about therapeutic options. We report on five observations of pelvic ectopic kidney with urinary lithiasis. Patients were aged from 16 to 42 years. Kidney was non functional in two cases, or with normal appearance sized 10 to 12 cm. We performed total nephrectomy in two cases, pyelolithotomy in the other cases. Surgical approach was subperitoneal via iliac route. A dismembered pyeloplasty was associated in one case. All patients did well. Radiologic control at 6 and 12 months showed no recurrence in a well functioning kidney. Surgical lithotomy is advocated as a treatment in urinary lithiasis affecting ectopic kidney. It is an easy procedure which permits correction of other associated malformations.

  18. Diagnostic and therapeutic biomarkers in pancreaticobiliary malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Viterbo, Domenico; Gausman, Valerie; Gonda, Tamas

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) are two malignancies that carry significant morbidity and mortality. The poor prognoses of these cancers are strongly related to lack of effective screening modalities as well as few therapeutic options. In this review, we highlight novel biomarkers that have the potential to be used as diagnostic, prognostic and predictive markers. The focus of this review is biomarkers that can be evaluated on endoscopically-obtained biopsies or brush specimens in the pre-operative setting. We also provide an overview of novel serum based markers in the early diagnosis of both PDAC and CCA. In pancreatic cancer, the emphasis is placed on prognostic and theranostic markers, whereas in CCA the utility of molecular markers in diagnosis and prognosis are highlighted. PMID:26862363

  19. Nitrones as Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Floyd, Robert A.; Kopke, Richard D.; Choi, Chul-Hee; Foster, Steven B.; Doblas, Sabrina; Towner, Rheal A.

    2008-01-01

    Nitrones have the general chemical formula X-CH=NO-Y. They were first used to trap free radicals in chemical systems and then subsequently in biochemical systems. More recently several nitrones including PBN (α-phenyl-tert-butylnitrone) have been shown to have potent biological activity in many experimental animal models. Many diseases of aging including stroke, cancer development, Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease are known to have enhanced levels of free radicals and oxidative stress. Some derivatives of PBN are significantly more potent than PBN and have undergone extensive commercial development in stroke. Recent research has shown that PBN-related nitrones also have anti-cancer activity in several experimental cancer models and have potential as therapeutics in some cancers. Also in recent observations nitrones have been shown to act synergistically in combination with antioxidants in the prevention of acute acoustic noise induced hearing loss. The mechanistic basis of the potent biological activity of PBN-related nitrones is not known. Even though PBN-related nitrones do decrease oxidative stress and oxidative damage, their potent biological anti-inflammatory activity and their ability to alter cellular signaling processes can not readily be explained by conventional notions of free radical trapping biochemistry. This review is focused on our observations and others where the use of selected nitrones as novel therapeutics have been evaluated in experimental models in the context of free radical biochemical and cellular processes considered important in pathologic conditions and age-related diseases. PMID:18793715

  20. Person-centered Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Cloninger, C. Robert; Cloninger, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    A clinician’s effectiveness in treatment depends substantially on his or her attitude toward -- and understanding of -- the patient as a person endowed with self-awareness and the will to direct his or her own future. The assessment of personality in the therapeutic encounter is a crucial foundation for forming an effective working alliance with shared goals. Helping a person to reflect on their personality provides a mirror image of their strengths and weaknesses in adapting to life’s many challenges. The Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) provides an effective way to describe personality thoroughly and to predict both the positive and negative aspects of health. Strengths and weaknesses in TCI personality traits allow strong predictions of individual differences of all aspects of well-being. Diverse therapeutic techniques, such as diet, exercise, mood self-regulation, meditation, or acts of kindness, influence health and personality development in ways that are largely indistinguishable from one another or from effective allopathic treatments. Hence the development of well-being appears to be the result of activating a synergistic set of mechanisms of well-being, which are expressed as fuller functioning, plasticity, and virtue in adapting to life’s challenges PMID:26052429