Science.gov

Sample records for additional time needed

  1. Babies Need Tummy Time

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facts ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​ Printer-Friendly Email Page Skip sharing on social media links Babies Need Tummy Time! Page Content Tummy Time is not ...

  2. Metrology Needs for Metal Additive Manufacturing Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotwinski, John A.; Garboczi, Edward J.

    2015-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) processes can produce highly complex and customized parts without the need for dedicated tooling and can produce parts directly from the part design information. These types of processes are poised to revolutionize the manufacturing industry, yet several challenges are currently preventing more widespread adoption of AM technologies. Among these challenges are metrology issues associated with the measurement and characterization of the metal powders used for AM systems. This article will describe the technical challenges and needs for characterizing metal AM powders, recent research efforts to address those needs, and current work to standardize characterization methods in ASTM and ISO, such as the recently released ASTM F3049, Standard Guide for Characterizing Properties of Metal Powders Used for Additive Manufacturing Processes.

  3. Additional Support Needs Reforms and Social Justice in Scotland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddell, Sheila; Stead, Joan; Weedon, Elisabet; Wright, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    New additional support-needs legislation in Scotland sought to recognise the way in which poverty, as well as individual impairment, contribute to the creation of children's difficulties in learning. As well as identifying a wider range of needs, the legislation sought to provide parents, irrespective of social background, with more powerful means…

  4. Mapping Transitions in Interpersonal Learning for Students with Additional Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coles-Janess, Bernadette; Griffin, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on the development of an interpersonal measure for students with additional learning needs. A questionnaire and learning continuum were constructed using a methodology devised by Griffin (2007a) for creating criterion-referenced frameworks. Teachers reported on 1619 students, ranging in age from 3 to 18 years. Analysis of the…

  5. 20 CFR 416.263 - No additional application needed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false No additional application needed. 416.263 Section 416.263 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Eligibility Special Provisions for People Who Work Despite A...

  6. 20 CFR 416.263 - No additional application needed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false No additional application needed. 416.263 Section 416.263 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Eligibility Special Provisions for People Who Work Despite A...

  7. 20 CFR 416.263 - No additional application needed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false No additional application needed. 416.263 Section 416.263 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Eligibility Special Provisions for People Who Work Despite A...

  8. 20 CFR 416.263 - No additional application needed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false No additional application needed. 416.263 Section 416.263 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Eligibility Special Provisions for People Who Work Despite A...

  9. Overview of Materials Qualification Needs for Metal Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifi, Mohsen; Salem, Ayman; Beuth, Jack; Harrysson, Ola; Lewandowski, John J.

    2016-03-01

    This overview highlights some of the key aspects regarding materials qualification needs across the additive manufacturing (AM) spectrum. AM technology has experienced considerable publicity and growth in the past few years with many successful insertions for non-mission-critical applications. However, to meet the full potential that AM has to offer, especially for flight-critical components (e.g., rotating parts, fracture-critical parts, etc.), qualification and certification efforts are necessary. While development of qualification standards will address some of these needs, this overview outlines some of the other key areas that will need to be considered in the qualification path, including various process-, microstructure-, and fracture-modeling activities in addition to integrating these with lifing activities targeting specific components. Ongoing work in the Advanced Manufacturing and Mechanical Reliability Center at Case Western Reserve University is focusing on fracture and fatigue testing to rapidly assess critical mechanical properties of some titanium alloys before and after post-processing, in addition to conducting nondestructive testing/evaluation using micro-computerized tomography at General Electric. Process mapping studies are being conducted at Carnegie Mellon University while large area microstructure characterization and informatics (EBSD and BSE) analyses are being conducted at Materials Resources LLC to enable future integration of these efforts via an Integrated Computational Materials Engineering approach to AM. Possible future pathways for materials qualification are provided.

  10. Additional Research Needs to Support the GENII Biosphere Models

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, Bruce A.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Arimescu, Carmen

    2013-11-30

    In the course of evaluating the current parameter needs for the GENII Version 2 code (Snyder et al. 2013), areas of possible improvement for both the data and the underlying models have been identified. As the data review was implemented, PNNL staff identified areas where the models can be improved both to accommodate the locally significant pathways identified and also to incorporate newer models. The areas are general data needs for the existing models and improved formulations for the pathway models. It is recommended that priorities be set by NRC staff to guide selection of the most useful improvements in a cost-effective manner. Suggestions are made based on relatively easy and inexpensive changes, and longer-term more costly studies. In the short term, there are several improved model formulations that could be applied to the GENII suite of codes to make them more generally useful. • Implementation of the separation of the translocation and weathering processes • Implementation of an improved model for carbon-14 from non-atmospheric sources • Implementation of radon exposure pathways models • Development of a KML processor for the output report generator module data that are calculated on a grid that could be superimposed upon digital maps for easier presentation and display • Implementation of marine mammal models (manatees, seals, walrus, whales, etc.). Data needs in the longer term require extensive (and potentially expensive) research. Before picking any one radionuclide or food type, NRC staff should perform an in-house review of current and anticipated environmental analyses to select “dominant” radionuclides of interest to allow setting of cost-effective priorities for radionuclide- and pathway-specific research. These include • soil-to-plant uptake studies for oranges and other citrus fruits, and • Development of models for evaluation of radionuclide concentration in highly-processed foods such as oils and sugars. Finally, renewed

  11. The need for additional training for nutritional management of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Carney, Trish; Stein, Susan E; Quinlan, Jennifer J

    The purpose of this study was to investigate nurses' and nursing students'knowledge and perceived role in assisting patients with the nutritional management of diabetes. Three focus groups were conducted and the results were used to modify a previously developed survey regarding the nutritional management of diabetes. The survey was administered via an online survey tool and completed by 231 nurses and students. Over 70% of respondents agreed that nurses have an important role in reinforcing patient nutritional education. Results indicated,however, that knowledge gaps in the nutritional management of diabetes exist among nurses, including not knowing the carbohydrate content of 120ml of orange juice, a common treatment for hypoglycaemia (47.5%), not knowing where to locate carbohydrate content on a food label (60%), and not identifying the correct treatment for hypoglycaemia (47.5%). These results indicate that there may be a need to improve the nutritional education of nurses with respect to diabetes management. PMID:23752631

  12. Martial Arts: Time Needed for Training

    PubMed Central

    Burke, David T.; Protopapas, Marina; Bonato, Paolo; Burke, John T.; Landrum, Rpbert F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To measure the time needed to teach a series of martial arts techniques to proficiency. Methods Fifteen volunteer subjects without any prior martial arts or self-defense experience were recruited. A panel of martial arts experts selected 21 different techniques including defensive stances, arm blocks, elbow strikes, palm strikes, thumbs to eyes, instep kicks and a carotid neck restraint. The critical elements of each technique were identified by the panel and incorporated into a teaching protocol, and then into a scoring system. Two black belt martial arts instructors directed a total of forty-five 45-minute training sessions. Videotaped proficiency testing was performed weekly. The videotapes were reviewed by the investigators to determine the proficiency levels of each subject for each technique. Results The techniques were rated by the average number of training sessions needed for an individual to develop proficiency in that technique. The mean number of sessions necessary to train individuals to proficiency ranged from 27 to 38.3. Using this system, the most difficult techniques seemed to be elbow strikes to the rear, striking with thumbs to the eyes and arm blocking. Conclusions In this study 29 hours of training was necessary to train novice students to be proficient in 21 offensive and defensive martial arts techniques. To our knowledge, this is the first study that attempts to measure the learning curves involved when teaching martial arts techniques. PMID:22375215

  13. Additive manufacturing metrology: State of the art and needs assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koester, L.; Taheri, H.; Bond, L. J.; Barnard, D.; Gray, J.

    2016-02-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is a technology that first emerged in 1987 with stereolithography (SL) of plastic materials from 3D Systems. It saw light use for rapid prototyping and very low volume production for a number of years. However, in the past few years AM of metallic materials has become a practical fabrication technology, use is rapidly increasing and is projected to continue with double digit growth in coming years. The promise and flexibility shown by AM has spurred efforts to begin standardization of this type of process. This paper provides an assessment of the state of the art for in-situ process monitoring of AM processes with an emphasis on the production of metallic components. It is seen that with the implementation of proper process control there is potential to create reliable and reproducible materials and geometries previously unachievable using metal removal based means of production. A reliable methodology for detection and control of microstructure and defects would be of great value in terms of enabling broader AM utilization.

  14. The Capacity Profile: A Method to Classify Additional Care Needs in Children with Neurodevelopmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meester-Delver, Anke; Beelen, Anita; Hennekam, Raoul; Nollet, Frans; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the interrater reliability and stability over time of the Capacity Profile (CAP). The CAP is a standardized method for classifying additional care needs indicated by current impairments in five domains of body functions: physical health, neuromusculoskeletal and movement-related, sensory, mental, and voice…

  15. Experimental Tests of Cooling: Expectations and Additional Needs

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S

    2008-09-24

    Cooling is a critical aspect for a high-performance Neutrino Factory or a MuonCollider. For this reason, considerable effort is being put toward theexperimental verification of this technique. The international Muon IonizationCooling Experiment, MICE, was approved to operate at Rutherford AppletonLaboratory (RAL) in the UK and beam line commissioning commenced in March, 2008. The MICE collaboration comprises about 130 scientists and engineers from Asia, Europe, and the U.S. In this paper we present the motivation and goals for thisexperiment and describe its present status. MICE is scheduled for completion in2011. We will also indicate the prospects for a future 6D muon coolingexperiment and discuss its possible time schedule.

  16. Part-Time Learners Need Support Too

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazackerley, Anna

    2009-01-01

    In England, part-time students have to pay their fees up-front, they can't take out a government-supported loan, and their chances of securing any financial support are depressingly slim. While all full-time students are entitled to some state support, Parliamentary questions have revealed that nine out of 10 part-time students receive nothing at…

  17. Additional Support Needs Policy in Scotland: Challenging or Reinforcing Social Inequality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddell, Sheila; Weedon, Elisabet

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on Scottish policy on additional support needs and its material outcomes. The central question addressed is the extent to which the Scottish additional support needs system undermines or reinforces existing social and economic inequalities. Administrative data highlight the inflation of the additional support needs category,…

  18. Reticles, write time, and the need for speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackmann, Paul W.; Litt, Lloyd C.; Ning, Guo Xiang

    2014-10-01

    Historical data indicates reticle write times are increasing node-to-node. The cost of mask sets is increasing driven by the tighter requirements and more levels. The regular introduction of new generations of mask patterning tools with improved performance is unable to fully compensate for the increased data and complexity required. Write time is a primary metric that drives mask fabrication speed. Design (Raw data) is only the first step in the process and many interactions between mask and wafer technology such as OPC used, OPC efficiency for writers, fracture engines, and actual field size used drive total write time. Yield, technology, and inspection rules drive the remaining raw cycle time. Yield can be even more critical for speed of delivery as it drives re-writes and wasted time. While intrinsic process yield is important, repair capability is the reason mask delivery is still able to deliver 100% good reticles to the fab. Advanced nodes utilizing several layers of multiple patterning may require mask writer tool dedication to meet image placement specifications. This will increase the effective mask cycle time for a layer mask set and drive the need for additional mask write capability in order to deliver masks at the rate required by the wafer fab production schedules.

  19. 43 CFR 3430.2-2 - Additional time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional time. 3430.2-2 Section 3430.2-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) NONCOMPETITIVE LEASES Preference Right Leases § 3430.2-2 Additional time. (a) If the...

  20. Ultrafast amplifier additive timing jitter characterization and control.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Alexis; D'Acremont, Quentin; Santarelli, Giorgio; Dilhaire, Stefan; Courjaud, Antoine

    2016-03-01

    We report on the characterization and long-term compensation of additive timing jitter introduced by a femtosecond ytterbium regenerative amplifier with a 100 kHz repetition rate. A balanced optical cross-correlation technique is used to generate a jitter error signal. This approach is well suited to characterize the additive timing jitter of Yb amplifiers seeded by narrow spectrum Yb oscillators. The balanced optical cross-correlator is in a noncollinear configuration allowing a background free coindence detection. This setup enables the measurement of additive timing jitter from the amplifier, with a noise floor of 300 as integrated from 10 Hz to 10 kHz. The measured additive timing jitter level is about 5 fs, integrated from 0.1 Hz to 10 kHz. The amplifier timing drift characterization and control are performed for more than an hour. PMID:26974074

  1. DOD Health Care. Additional Efforts Needed To Verify Physicians' Qualifications. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    The Department of Defense's (DOD) efforts to assure that its physicians are qualified to perform their assigned duties are discussed. Five sections include: introduction; additional actions needed to help assure that military physicians have proper qualifications; hospital credentialing and privileging systems needed to comply with DOD…

  2. Teachers' Perceptions of Students' Additional Support Needs: In the Eye of the Beholder?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruggink, Marjon; Goei, Sui L.; Koot, Hans M.

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, teachers are regarded as key players in the process of identifying and catering to students' additional support needs within mainstream primary classrooms. However, teachers' professional judgements regarding students with special needs have been found to be contextually influenced (e.g. by school context, student population, level of…

  3. A Right to Be Heard: Learning from Learners with Additional Needs in Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPhillips, Therese; Shevlin, Michael; Long, Louise

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the consultation experiences of pupils who have additional needs in literacy. An opportunistic sample of eight schools--four in Northern Ireland and four in the Republic of Ireland--were chosen by the researchers; selected pupils were receiving additional literacy support. Focus group discussions and arts-based creative…

  4. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on the checklist...

  5. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on the checklist...

  6. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... particular occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on...

  7. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... particular occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on...

  8. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... particular occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on...

  9. Profiling Transitions in Emotional Development for Students with Additional Learning Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Eileen; Griffin, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the research described in this article was to build a protocol for describing students' development of emotional knowledge and understanding, and to tailor this to the requirements of assessing the progress of students with additional needs. The paper reports the establishment of such a developmental profile, using procedures for…

  10. 30 CFR 1210.206 - Will I need to submit additional documents or evidence to ONRR?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Will I need to submit additional documents or evidence to ONRR? 1210.206 Section 1210.206 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Natural Resources Revenue FORMS AND REPORTS Production and...

  11. 15 CFR 270.204 - Provision of additional resources and services needed by a Team.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Provision of additional resources and services needed by a Team. 270.204 Section 270.204 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TEAMS...

  12. 43 CFR 1823.13 - Is additional documentation needed when a third party requests a refund?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Is additional documentation needed when a third party requests a refund? 1823.13 Section 1823.13 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL MANAGEMENT...

  13. 43 CFR 1823.13 - Is additional documentation needed when a third party requests a refund?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Is additional documentation needed when a third party requests a refund? 1823.13 Section 1823.13 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL MANAGEMENT (1000) APPLICATION PROCEDURES Payments and...

  14. 43 CFR 3430.2-2 - Additional time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional time. 3430.2-2 Section 3430.2-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) NONCOMPETITIVE LEASES Preference Right Leases §...

  15. 43 CFR 3430.2-2 - Additional time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional time. 3430.2-2 Section 3430.2-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) NONCOMPETITIVE LEASES Preference Right Leases §...

  16. 43 CFR 3430.2-2 - Additional time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional time. 3430.2-2 Section 3430.2-2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) NONCOMPETITIVE LEASES Preference Right Leases §...

  17. 49 CFR 512.11 - What if I need an extension of time?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What if I need an extension of time? 512.11 Section 512.11 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONFIDENTIAL BUSINESS INFORMATION Additional Requirements § 512.11 What if I need...

  18. Intelligence is as intelligence does: can additional support needs replace disability?

    PubMed

    Arnold, Samuel R C; Riches, Vivienne C; Stancliffe, Roger J

    2011-12-01

    Abstract In many developed cultures there is an assumption that IQ is intelligence. However, emerging theories of multiple intelligences, of emotional intelligence, as well as the application of IQ testing to other cultural groups, and to people with disability, raises many questions as to what IQ actually measures. Despite recent research that shows IQ testing produces a floor effect when applied to people with lower IQ, as well as research that shows the Flynn effect also applies to people with lower IQ, in practice IQ scores below a certain cut-off are still being used to determine and classify a person's intellectual disability. However, a new paradigm is emerging, almost returning to the original intent of Binet, where measurement is made of the supports the person needs. In this paper, we argue that if one extends the notions of this supports paradigm that diagnosis of intellectual or physical disability could potentially be replaced by diagnosis of additional intellectual support needs, or additional physical support needs. PMID:21992715

  19. Time jitter versus additive noise in a game theory context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidi, Abdellatif; Boyer, Remy; Duhamel, Pierre

    2005-03-01

    Imperfectly synchronized watermark communication is almost the most hostile watermark channel. A desynchronization attack can yield a very high probability of bit error rate by simply moving the watermark from elements it has been embedded in, inhibiting hence its reliable retrieval from the original. In this paper, we adress attacks that can be modelled by an Additive White Gaussian Noise and Jitter (AWGN&J) channel in a game theory context. The AWGN&J channel was initially introduced to model local time fluctuations in the context of magnetic recording media. This channel is first briefly presented and characterized in terms of induced objective and perceptual distorsions. Also, performance loss of the one-bit watermarking Spread-Spectrum based scheme over an AWGN&J channel is derived. Then, results are applied in a game theoretic context to answer some questions such as: (i) for a given distortion budget, and from the attacker point of view, what part should be allocated to the desynchronization, and what part should be allocated to the additive noise?, (ii) from the defender point of view, what is the worst distortion? and (iii) is there means to countermeasure the attacker (limit the amount of objective distorsion)?

  20. 19 CFR 201.14 - Computation of time, additional hearings, postponements, continuances, and extensions of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Computation of time, additional hearings, postponements, continuances, and extensions of time. 201.14 Section 201.14 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION GENERAL RULES OF GENERAL APPLICATION Initiation and Conduct of Investigations § 201.14 Computation of time,...

  1. The Facial Aesthetic index: An additional tool for assessing treatment need

    PubMed Central

    Sundareswaran, Shobha; Ramakrishnan, Ranjith

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Facial Aesthetics, a major consideration in orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning, may not be judged correctly and completely by simply analyzing dental occlusion or osseous structures. Despite this importance, there is no index to guarantee availability of treatment or prioritize patients based on their soft tissue treatment needs. Individuals having well-aligned teeth but unaesthetic convex profiles do not get included for treatment as per current malocclusion indices. The aim of this investigation is to develop an aesthetic index based on facial profiles which could be used as an additional tool with malocclusion indices. Materials and Methods: A chart showing typical facial profile changes due to underlying malocclusions was generated by soft tissue manipulations of standardized profile photographs of a well-balanced male and female face. A panel of 62 orthodontists judged the profile photographs of 100 patients with different soft tissue patterns for assessing profile variations and treatment need. The index was later tested in a cross-section of school population. Statistical analysis was done using “irr” package of R environment version 2.15.1. Results: The index exhibited very good reliability in determining profile variations (Fleiss kappa 0.866, P < 0.001), excellent reproducibility (kappa 0.9078), high sensitivity, and specificity (95.7%). Testing in population yielded excellent agreement among orthodontists (kappa 0.9286). Conclusions: A new Facial Aesthetic index, based on patient's soft tissue profile requirements is proposed, which can complement existing indices to ensure treatment to those in need. PMID:27127752

  2. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  3. 19 CFR 210.6 - Computation of time, additional hearings, postponements, continuances, and extensions of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Computation of time, additional hearings, postponements, continuances, and extensions of time. 210.6 Section 210.6 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION INVESTIGATIONS OF UNFAIR PRACTICES IN IMPORT TRADE ADJUDICATION AND ENFORCEMENT Rules of General Applicability §...

  4. Laser-based additive manufacturing: where it has been, where it needs to go

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Khershed P.

    2014-03-01

    It is no secret that the laser was the driver for additive manufacturing (AM) of 3D objects since such objects were first demonstrated in the mid-1980s. A myriad of techniques utilizing the directed energy of lasers were invented. Lasers are used to selectively sinter or fuse incremental layers in powder-beds, melt streaming powder following a programmed path, and polymerize photopolymers in a liquid vat layer-by-layer. The laser is an energy source of choice for repair of damaged components, for manufacture of new or replacement parts, and for rapid prototyping of concept designs. Lasers enable microstructure gradients and heterogeneous structures designed to exhibit unique properties and behavior. Laserbased additive manufacturing has been successful in producing relatively simple near net-shape metallic parts saving material and cost, but requiring finish-machining and in repair and refurbishment of worn components. It has been routinely used to produce polymer parts. These capabilities have been widely recognized as evidenced by the explosion in interest in AM technology, nationally. These successes are, however, tempered by challenges facing practitioners such as process and part qualification and verification, which are needed to bring AM as a true manufacturing technology. The ONR manufacturing science program, in collaboration with other agencies, invested in basic R&D in AM since its beginnings. It continues to invest, currently focusing on developing cyber-enabled manufacturing systems for AM. It is believed that such computation, communication and control approaches will help in validating AM and moving it to the factory floor along side CNC machines.

  5. 49 CFR 40.303 - What happens if the SAP believes the employee needs additional treatment, aftercare, or support...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What happens if the SAP believes the employee... the Return-to-Duty Process § 40.303 What happens if the SAP believes the employee needs additional...? (a) As a SAP, if you believe that ongoing services (in addition to follow-up tests) are needed...

  6. 49 CFR 40.303 - What happens if the SAP believes the employee needs additional treatment, aftercare, or support...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What happens if the SAP believes the employee... the Return-to-Duty Process § 40.303 What happens if the SAP believes the employee needs additional...? (a) As a SAP, if you believe that ongoing services (in addition to follow-up tests) are needed...

  7. 49 CFR 40.303 - What happens if the SAP believes the employee needs additional treatment, aftercare, or support...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What happens if the SAP believes the employee... the Return-to-Duty Process § 40.303 What happens if the SAP believes the employee needs additional...? (a) As a SAP, if you believe that ongoing services (in addition to follow-up tests) are needed...

  8. 49 CFR 40.303 - What happens if the SAP believes the employee needs additional treatment, aftercare, or support...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What happens if the SAP believes the employee... the Return-to-Duty Process § 40.303 What happens if the SAP believes the employee needs additional...? (a) As a SAP, if you believe that ongoing services (in addition to follow-up tests) are needed...

  9. 49 CFR 40.303 - What happens if the SAP believes the employee needs additional treatment, aftercare, or support...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What happens if the SAP believes the employee... the Return-to-Duty Process § 40.303 What happens if the SAP believes the employee needs additional...? (a) As a SAP, if you believe that ongoing services (in addition to follow-up tests) are needed...

  10. Achievement as a Function of Time Spent in Learning and Time Needed for Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gettinger, Maribeth

    1984-01-01

    The causal effects of time spent in learning (TSL) and time needed for learning (TTL) on the reading and spelling achievement of 171 fourth and fifth grade students were investigated. TTL contributed significantly to achievement, and its direct effect was greater than TSL. Results also support a Carroll's learning model. (Author/BS)

  11. Teachers' Capacities to Meet Students' Additional Support Needs in Mainstream Primary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruggink, M.; Goei, S. L.; Koot, H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Mainstream primary school teachers generally acknowledge the need to implement adaptive teaching; however, meeting a variety of students' needs is a challenge. Studies have addressed the conditions under which teachers attribute their (in)capacities, but these have mainly involved vignettes. Therefore, it remains unknown whether teachers are…

  12. Timing of Getter Material Addition in Cementitious Wasteforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawter, A.; Qafoku, N. P.; Asmussen, M.; Neeway, J.; Smith, G. L.

    2015-12-01

    A cementitious waste form, Cast Stone, is being evaluated as a possible supplemental immobilization technology for the Hanford sites's low activity waste (LAW), which contains radioactive 99Tc and 129I, as part of the tank waste cleanup mission. Cast Stone is made of a dry blend 47% blast furnace slag, 45% fly ash, and 8% ordinary Portland cement, mixed with a low-activity waste (LAW). To improve the retention of Tc and/or I in Cast Stone, materials with a high affinity for Tc and/or I, termed "getters," can be added to provide a stable domain for the radionuclides of concern. Previous testing conducted with a variety of getters has identified Tin(II)-Apatite and Silver Exchanged Zeolite as promising candidates for Tc and I, respectively. Investigation into the sequence in which getters are added to Cast Stone was performed following two methods: 1) adding getters to the Cast Stone dry blend, and then mixing with liquid waste, and 2) adding getters to the liquid waste first, followed by addition of the Cast Stone dry blend. Cast Stone monolith samples were prepared with each method and leach tests, following EPA method 1315, were conducted in either distilled water or simulated vadose zone porewater for a period of up to 63 days. The leachate was analyzed for Tc, I, Na, NO3-, NO2- and Cr with ICP-MS, ICP-OES and ion chromatography and the results indicated that the Cast Stone with getter addition in the dry blend mix (method 1) has lower rates of Tc and I leaching. The mechanisms of radionuclide release from the Cast Stone were also investigated with a variety of solid phase characterization techniques of the monoliths before and after leaching, such as XRD, SEM/EDS, TEM/SAED and other spectroscopic techniques.

  13. Strengthen forensic entomology in court--the need for data exploration and the validation of a generalised additive mixed model.

    PubMed

    Baqué, Michèle; Amendt, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Developmental data of juvenile blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) are typically used to calculate the age of immature stages found on or around a corpse and thus to estimate a minimum post-mortem interval (PMI(min)). However, many of those data sets don't take into account that immature blow flies grow in a non-linear fashion. Linear models do not supply a sufficient reliability on age estimates and may even lead to an erroneous determination of the PMI(min). According to the Daubert standard and the need for improvements in forensic science, new statistic tools like smoothing methods and mixed models allow the modelling of non-linear relationships and expand the field of statistical analyses. The present study introduces into the background and application of these statistical techniques by analysing a model which describes the development of the forensically important blow fly Calliphora vicina at different temperatures. The comparison of three statistical methods (linear regression, generalised additive modelling and generalised additive mixed modelling) clearly demonstrates that only the latter provided regression parameters that reflect the data adequately. We focus explicitly on both the exploration of the data--to assure their quality and to show the importance of checking it carefully prior to conducting the statistical tests--and the validation of the resulting models. Hence, we present a common method for evaluating and testing forensic entomological data sets by using for the first time generalised additive mixed models. PMID:22370995

  14. Detection of continuous-time quaternion signals in additive noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Moreno, Jesús; Ruiz-Molina, Juan Carlos; Oya, Antonia; Quesada-Rubio, José M.

    2012-12-01

    Different kinds of quaternion signal detection problems in continuous-time by using a widely linear processing are dealt with. The suggested solutions are based on an extension of the Karhunen-Loève expansion to the quaternion domain which provides uncorrelated scalar real-valued random coefficients. This expansion presents the notable advantage of transforming the original four-dimensional eigen problem to a one-dimensional problem. Firstly, we address the problem of detecting a quaternion deterministic signal in quaternion Gaussian noise and a version of Pitcher's Theorem is given. Also the particular case of a general quaternion Wiener noise is studied and an extension of the Cameron-Martin formula is presented. Finally, the problem of detecting a quaternion random signal in quaternion white Gaussian noise is tackled. In such a case, it is shown that the detector depends on the quaternion widely linear estimator of the signal.

  15. Ultimate capacity of linear time-invariant bosonic channels with additive Gaussian noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Bardhan, Bhaskar; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2016-03-01

    Fiber-optic communications are moving to coherent detection in order to increase their spectral efficiency, i.e., their channel capacity per unit bandwidth. At power levels below the threshold for significant nonlinear effects, the channel model for such operation a linear time-invariant filter followed by additive Gaussian noise is one whose channel capacity is well known from Shannon's noisy channel coding theorem. The fiber channel, however, is really a bosonic channel, meaning that its ultimate classical information capacity must be determined from quantum-mechanical analysis, viz. from the Holevo-Schumacher-Westmoreland (HSW) theorem. Based on recent results establishing the HSW capacity of a linear (lossy or amplifying) channel with additive Gaussian noise, we provide a general continuous-time result, namely the HSW capacity of a linear time-invariant (LTI) bosonic channel with additive Gaussian noise arising from a thermal environment. In particular, we treat quasi-monochromatic communication under an average power constraint through a channel comprised of a stable LTI filter that may be attenuating at all frequencies or amplifying at some frequencies and attenuating at others. Phase-insensitive additive Gaussian noise-associated with the continuous-time Langevin noise operator needed to preserve free-field commutator brackets is included at the filter output. We compare the resulting spectral efficiencies with corresponding results for heterodyne and homodyne detection over the same channel to assess the increased spectral efficiency that might be realized with optimum quantum reception.

  16. Developing Social Skills of Students with Additional Needs within the Context of the Australian Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Michael; Cooper, Greta; Kettler, Ryan J.; Elliott, Stephen N.

    2015-01-01

    Decades of research on social skills assessment and intervention indicates the importance of social skills in improving academic achievement. Additionally, a strong evidence base promotes the inclusion of social-emotional learning into the whole school curriculum. In recognition of this evidence, the new Australian Curriculum, under Personal and…

  17. Speech Perception Results for Children Using Cochlear Implants Who Have Additional Special Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dettman, Shani J.; Fiket, Hayley; Dowell, Richard C.; Charlton, Margaret; Williams, Sarah S.; Tomov, Alexandra M.; Barker, Elizabeth J.

    2004-01-01

    Speech perception outcomes in young children with cochlear implants are affected by a number of variables including the age of implantation, duration of implantation, mode of communication, and the presence of a developmental delay or additional disability. The aim of this study is to examine the association between degree of developmental delay…

  18. Reduced Need of Lubricity Additives in Soybean Oil Blends Under Boundary Lubrication Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Converging prices of vegetable oils and petroleum, along with increased focus on renewable resources, gave more momentum to vegetable oil lubricants. Boundary lubrication properties of four Extreme Pressure (EP) additive blends in conventional Soy Bean Oil (SBO) and Paraffinic Mineral Oil (PMO) of ...

  19. Modeling the Impact of School-Based Universal Depression Screening on Additional Service Capacity Needs: A System Dynamics Approach.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Aaron R; Maras, Melissa A; Pate, Christina M; Igusa, Takeru; Vander Stoep, Ann

    2016-03-01

    Although it is widely known that the occurrence of depression increases over the course of adolescence, symptoms of mood disorders frequently go undetected. While schools are viable settings for conducting universal screening to systematically identify students in need of services for common health conditions, particularly those that adversely affect school performance, few school districts routinely screen their students for depression. Among the most commonly referenced barriers are concerns that the number of students identified may exceed schools' service delivery capacities, but few studies have evaluated this concern systematically. System dynamics (SD) modeling may prove a useful approach for answering questions of this sort. The goal of the current paper is therefore to demonstrate how SD modeling can be applied to inform implementation decisions in communities. In our demonstration, we used SD modeling to estimate the additional service demand generated by universal depression screening in a typical high school. We then simulated the effects of implementing "compensatory approaches" designed to address anticipated increases in service need through (1) the allocation of additional staff time and (2) improvements in the effectiveness of mental health interventions. Results support the ability of screening to facilitate more rapid entry into services and suggest that improving the effectiveness of mental health services for students with depression via the implementation of an evidence-based treatment protocol may have a limited impact on overall recovery rates and service availability. In our example, the SD approach proved useful in informing systems' decision-making about the adoption of a new school mental health service. PMID:25601192

  20. Reorganizing Nigeria's Vaccine Supply Chain Reduces Need For Additional Storage Facilities, But More Storage Is Required.

    PubMed

    Shittu, Ekundayo; Harnly, Melissa; Whitaker, Shanta; Miller, Roger

    2016-02-01

    One of the major problems facing Nigeria's vaccine supply chain is the lack of adequate vaccine storage facilities. Despite the introduction of solar-powered refrigerators and the use of new tools to monitor supply levels, this problem persists. Using data on vaccine supply for 2011-14 from Nigeria's National Primary Health Care Development Agency, we created a simulation model to explore the effects of variance in supply and demand on storage capacity requirements. We focused on the segment of the supply chain that moves vaccines inside Nigeria. Our findings suggest that 55 percent more vaccine storage capacity is needed than is currently available. We found that reorganizing the supply chain as proposed by the National Primary Health Care Development Agency could reduce that need to 30 percent more storage. Storage requirements varied by region of the country and vaccine type. The Nigerian government may want to consider the differences in storage requirements by region and vaccine type in its proposed reorganization efforts. PMID:26858383

  1. Additive manufacturing in biomedical sciences and the need for definitions and norms.

    PubMed

    Chhaya, Mohit P; Poh, Patrina S P; Balmayor, Elizabeth R; van Griensven, Martijn; Schantz, Jan-Thorsten; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2015-01-01

    The application of additive biomanufacturing represents one of the most rapidly advancing areas of biomedical science, in which engineers, scientists, and clinicians are contributing to the future of health care. The combined efforts of a large number of groups around the globe have developed a strong research thrust that has resulted in a large number of publications. Reviewing this body of literature, there is an increasing trend of research groups inventing their own definitions and terminology. This has made it difficult to find and compare the results. Therefore, to move the field constructively forward, it is a conditio sine qua non to clarify various terminologies and standards. Based on this background, this article advocates tightening the terminology and has the objective of penning out definitions that will ultimately allow the development of official industry standard terms, such as American Society for Testing and Materials and or International Organization for Standardization for technologies developed for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine. PMID:26305837

  2. The Unmet Educational Needs of Full-Time Employees: A Phase II Needs Assessment for New Dimensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarado, Andrew; Shaver, Jon

    To ascertain the extent to which full-time employees in the Los Angeles Community College District (LACCD) service area would be interested in participating in non-campus based educational opportunities, a needs assessment was conducted. Employee needs that might be met by educational programs, existing employer-sponsored programs, and the extent…

  3. Do we need time adjusted mean platelet volume measurements?

    PubMed

    Lancé, Marcus D; van Oerle, Rene; Henskens, Yvonne M C; Marcus, Marco A E

    2010-09-01

    Mean platelet volume (MPV) is associated with various diseases. Several authors reported anticoagulant and time dependency. Therefore, standardized laboratory methods are essential. The aim of this study was to standardize the MPV measurement. Blood was collected in potassium-ethylenediaminetetra-acid (EDTA) and sodium-citrate tubes. First, MPV and platelet count were determined every half hour for 4 hours in 20 healthy volunteers. The same parameters were acquired from a second group of 100 healthy donors. We measured at the point of highest stability determined in the first step and aimed to determine a reference range. Citrate samples revealed significantly smaller MPV (7.0 fL ± 0.69 standard deviation [SD]) than EDTA (8.0 fL ± 0.8 SD). Platelets swell until 120 minutes in EDTA and until 60 minutes in citrate. Mean platelet count changed significantly in citrate. In the second group, no inverse correlation between MPV and platelet count was seen. A reference range was calculated (EDTA, 7.2-10.8 fL; citrate, 6.1-9.5 fL). Platelets stored in citrate are significantly smaller compared to those stored in EDTA. Timing is important when measuring platelet volume. Optimal measuring time should be 120 minutes after venipuncture. For this we depicted a reference range. Platelet count is most stable in EDTA. There was no inverse relation between MPV and platelet count. PMID:20858586

  4. English as an Additional Language: Is There a Need to Embed Cultural Values and Beliefs in Institutional Practice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sood, Krishan; Mistry, Malini Tina

    2011-01-01

    The number of pupils who have English as an Additional Language (EAL) in English schools is increasing, with an influx of migrants from Europe. This paper investigates how schools are addressing the needs of these children. Using survey and interviews with teachers and paraprofessionals the identification of personal assumptions and challenges of…

  5. Colonoscopy appropriateness: Really needed or a waste of time?

    PubMed Central

    Gimeno-García, Antonio Z; Quintero, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Technical and quality improvements in colonoscopy along with the widespread implementation of population screening programs and the development of open-access units have resulted in an exponential increase in colonoscopy demands, forcing endoscopy units to bear an excessive burden of work. The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy appropriateness guideline and the European panel appropriateness of gastrointestinal endoscopy guideline have appeared as potential solutions to tackle this problem and to increase detection rates of relevant lesions. Inappropriate indications based on either guideline are as high as 30%. Strategies based on these clinical criteria or other systems may be used to reduce inappropriate indications, thus decreasing waiting lists for outpatient colonoscopy, saving costs, prioritizing colonoscopy referrals and subsequently decreasing interval times from diagnosis to treatment. Despite the potential role of appropriateness guidelines, they have not been widely adopted partly due to fear of missing significant lesions detected in inappropriate indications. We review the main appropriateness and prioritising systems, their usefulness for detecting relevant lesions, as well as interventions based on those systems and cost-effectiveness. PMID:25685265

  6. The Coral Data Time Series Need To Be Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juillet-Leclerc, A.

    2004-12-01

    Coral skeleton is formed under organism control and its geochemical properties are strongly influenced by biological effects embedding environmental signal. Geochemists have been puzzled by the diversity of geochemical responses showed by colonies grown in a same area. By revisiting the Weber and Woodhead data series (1972), gathering data from enough colonies developed in similar conditions to provide a statistical isotopic value representative of one site, we demonstrate that for Porites and Acropora, the expected isotopic thermometer is revealed when the "vital effect" is removed. On the other hand, by using Acropora cultured in controlled condition, with changing temperature on a range comprised between 23 and 29°C, the comparison of oxygen and carbon isotopic values revealed the role played by kinetic fractionation. This apparent paradox of two co-existing fractionations is explained by the isotopic analyzes of wild and cultured corals operated at micrometer size scale taking into account of microstructures of the skeleton. Two different crystals appear to be the growth units of the skeleton, each crystal corresponding to a specific deposition mechanism. Thus, the measurement performed with a conventional method is a "bulk" measurement, which depends upon two isotopic fractionations. Some investigations underlined the discrepancy of the meaning of the inter-annual and seasonal isotopic records, which could be illustrated by different isotopic calibrations assessed from seasonal or annual data. It has been also explained by micrometer analyses of Porites aragonite. A smoothing at around 400microns of isotopic measurements as well as Sr/Ca indicates that at seasonal time scale the growth unit is the month. This is in agreement with extensive studies conducted by biologists describing the mechanism governing the formation of Porites skeleton: every month is deposited a framework which is progressively filled in. By combining biologists and geochemists knowledge

  7. The perceptions of teachers and principals toward providing additional compensation to teachers in high-need subject areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longing, Jeffrey Lucian

    The purpose of this study was to determine possible differences in the perceptions of teachers teaching in high-need areas (i.e., math, science, special education, etc.) and teachers not teaching in high-need areas, (i.e., business education, physical education, etc.) as defined by the states of Arkansas and Louisiana, regarding higher compensation for high-need teachers. In addition, possible perception differences among principals and teachers were determined. The independent variables consisted of gender, position held, years of certified experience, and certification areas. The dependent variable was the perceptions of the participants on providing higher compensation for high-need teachers in order to attract and retain them. The data for all variables were collected using the Teacher Compensation Survey. The sample for this study was limited to teachers, grades 9 through 12, and principals of public high schools in south Arkansas and north Louisiana. Forty-four school districts in south Arkansas (Arkansas Department of Education, 2008a) and north Louisiana (Louisiana Department of Education, 2008a) met the criteria for this study. Twenty-two superintendents gave permission for their districts to participate in the research. A sample of 849 teachers and 38 principals were identified in these districts. Surveys were returned from 350 teachers, creating a 41% response rate. When the 31 principals that returned surveys were added to the total population, the response rate increased to 43% with 381 of the 887 surveyed responding. However, 42 of the teachers and two of the principals skipped some of the questions on the survey and were not included in the study. The researcher used a One-Way ANOVA and independent t-tests to determine the presence of statistical differences at the .05 level. The data showed that most math and science teachers agreed that high-need teachers should be compensated at a higher rate than teachers not teaching in high-need areas. The data

  8. 77 FR 8324 - Applications for the Environment: Real-Time Information Synthesis (AERIS) User Needs Workshop...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ... Applications for the Environment: Real-Time Information Synthesis (AERIS) User Needs Workshop; Notice of Public...: Real- Time Information Synthesis (AERIS) Program and solicit user needs for its Transformative Concepts... program is to generate and acquire environmentally-relevant real-time transportation data, and use...

  9. Postgraduate pharmacology curriculum in medical institutions in India: Time for need-based appraisal and modifications

    PubMed Central

    Badyal, Dinesh K.; Desai, Chetna; Tripathi, Santanu K.; Dhaneria, S. P.; Chandy, Sujith J.; Bezbaruah, B. K.

    2014-01-01

    The need to revise the curriculum for the postgraduate course (M.D.) in Pharmacology has been perceived by the academicians in India since quite some time. The changing professional requirements of the graduating students, the current scenario vis a vis animal experimentation and the emphasis of the Medical Council of India on a competency based curriculum has triggered this felt need. In spite of the fact that most medical institutions and universities in India offer postgraduate courses in pharmacology, the curriculum lacks uniformity with extreme variations observed at some places. This article attempts to analyze the existing curricula in pharmacology in India and suggest modifications that could be recommended to the suitable regulatory bodies for implementation. A revision of objectives in the three domains of learning, development of skills that help develop suitable competencies, adoption of teaching learning methods in addition to the conventional methods, and a rethink on the assessment methods have been recommended. Development and validation of alternatives skill-based modules in lieu of animal experiments are recommended. Additional skills like medical writing and communication skills, professionalism and ethics, multi and inter-disciplinary integration and collaboration and a wider exposure of students to the pharmaceutical, academic, regulatory and research institutions for onsite learning were also recommended to fulfill their future career requirements. PMID:25538327

  10. Postgraduate pharmacology curriculum in medical institutions in India: time for need-based appraisal and modifications.

    PubMed

    Badyal, Dinesh K; Desai, Chetna; Tripathi, Santanu K; Dhaneria, S P; Chandy, Sujith J; Bezbaruah, B K

    2014-01-01

    The need to revise the curriculum for the postgraduate course (M.D.) in Pharmacology has been perceived by the academicians in India since quite some time. The changing professional requirements of the graduating students, the current scenario vis a vis animal experimentation and the emphasis of the Medical Council of India on a competency based curriculum has triggered this felt need. In spite of the fact that most medical institutions and universities in India offer postgraduate courses in pharmacology, the curriculum lacks uniformity with extreme variations observed at some places. This article attempts to analyze the existing curricula in pharmacology in India and suggest modifications that could be recommended to the suitable regulatory bodies for implementation. A revision of objectives in the three domains of learning, development of skills that help develop suitable competencies, adoption of teaching learning methods in addition to the conventional methods, and a rethink on the assessment methods have been recommended. Development and validation of alternatives skill-based modules in lieu of animal experiments are recommended. Additional skills like medical writing and communication skills, professionalism and ethics, multi and inter-disciplinary integration and collaboration and a wider exposure of students to the pharmaceutical, academic, regulatory and research institutions for onsite learning were also recommended to fulfill their future career requirements. PMID:25538327

  11. 22 CFR 1429.22 - Additional time after service by mail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Additional time after service by mail. 1429.22 Section 1429.22 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE LABOR RELATIONS BOARD; FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY... MISCELLANEOUS AND GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General Requirements § 1429.22 Additional time after service by...

  12. 22 CFR 1429.22 - Additional time after service by mail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Additional time after service by mail. 1429.22 Section 1429.22 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE LABOR RELATIONS BOARD; FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY... MISCELLANEOUS AND GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General Requirements § 1429.22 Additional time after service by...

  13. 22 CFR 1429.22 - Additional time after service by mail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Additional time after service by mail. 1429.22 Section 1429.22 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE LABOR RELATIONS BOARD; FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY... MISCELLANEOUS AND GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General Requirements § 1429.22 Additional time after service by...

  14. 22 CFR 1429.22 - Additional time after service by mail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Additional time after service by mail. 1429.22 Section 1429.22 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE LABOR RELATIONS BOARD; FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY... MISCELLANEOUS AND GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General Requirements § 1429.22 Additional time after service by...

  15. 22 CFR 1429.22 - Additional time after service by mail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Additional time after service by mail. 1429.22 Section 1429.22 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE LABOR RELATIONS BOARD; FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY... MISCELLANEOUS AND GENERAL REQUIREMENTS General Requirements § 1429.22 Additional time after service by...

  16. How to Make Additional Time Matter: Integrating Individualized Tutorials into an Extended Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraft, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence on the effect of extending the school day is decidedly mixed because of the stark differences in how schools use additional time. In this paper, I focus narrowly on the effect of additional time used for individualized tutorials. In 2005, MATCH Charter Public High School integrated two hours of tutorials throughout an extended day. The…

  17. Learning Needs Time and Effort: A Time-Use Study of Engineering Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolari, S.; Savander-Ranne, C.; Viskari, E. -L.

    2008-01-01

    Several time-use studies in engineering education have shown that students use less time studying than has been allocated in the curricula. It is questionable whether a scarce use of time can lead to deeper understanding and the ability to apply knowledge in problem-solving. The alarming results from earlier time-use studies led to a search for…

  18. Assessment of PNGV fuels infrastructure. Phase 1 report: Additional capital needs and fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.; Stork, K.; Vyas, A.; Mintz, M.; Singh, M.; Johnson, L.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents the methodologies and results of Argonne`s assessment of additional capital needs and the fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of using six different fuels in the vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) that the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles is currently investigating. The six fuels included in this study are reformulated gasoline, low-sulfur diesel, methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen. Reformulated gasoline, methanol, and ethanol are assumed to be burned in spark-ignition, direct-injection engines. Diesel and dimethyl ether are assumed to be burned in compression-ignition, direct-injection engines. Hydrogen and methanol are assumed to be used in fuel-cell vehicles. The authors have analyzed fuels infrastructure impacts under a 3X vehicle low market share scenario and a high market share scenario. The assessment shows that if 3X vehicles are mass-introduced, a considerable amount of capital investment will be needed to build new fuel production plants and to establish distribution infrastructure for methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen. Capital needs for production facilities will far exceed those for distribution infrastructure. Among the four fuels, hydrogen will bear the largest capital needs. The fuel efficiency gain by 3X vehicles translates directly into reductions in total energy demand, fossil energy demand, and CO{sub 2} emissions. The combination of fuel substitution and fuel efficiency results in substantial petroleum displacement and large reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, sulfur oxide, and particulate matter of size smaller than 10 microns.

  19. 14 CFR 121.483 - Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one additional flight crewmember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Flag Operations § 121.483 Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one additional...

  20. 14 CFR 121.483 - Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one additional flight crewmember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Flag Operations § 121.483 Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one additional...

  1. 14 CFR 121.483 - Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one additional flight crewmember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Flag Operations § 121.483 Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one additional...

  2. Bifurcated method and apparatus for floating point addition with decreased latency time

    DOEpatents

    Farmwald, Paul M.

    1987-01-01

    Apparatus for decreasing the latency time associated with floating point addition and subtraction in a computer, using a novel bifurcated, pre-normalization/post-normalization approach that distinguishes between differences of floating point exponents.

  3. Beyond Traditional Sampling Synthesis: Real-Time Timbre Morphing Using Additive Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haken, Lippold; Fitz, Kelly; Christensen, Paul

    Because of its theoretical advantage for making timbral manipulations, sine wave additive synthesis is an attractive alternative to sampling synthesis, which is currently the most popular method for real-time synthesizers. Nevertheless, until recently performers have seldom used additive synthesis because of the practical difficulty of accomplishing these timbral manipulations, which inherently require modification of large numbers of time-varying amplitude and frequency control functions.

  4. Health behaviors among college students: the influence of future time perspective and basic psychological need satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Preston L.; Hirsch, Jameson K.

    2014-01-01

    Health behavior change may prevent many fatal diseases, and may be influenced by social and motivational constructs. We assessed the interaction effect of future time perspective and basic psychological need fulfillment on positive and negative health behaviors. Future time perspective was associated with more positive, and less negative, health behaviors. Need fulfillment was associated with only positive health behaviors. In moderation analyses, individuals reporting both high need fulfillment and future perspective reported greater positive health behaviors, and were especially unlikely to smoke. Enhancing future-mindedness and supporting need satisfaction in interventions targeting modifiable health behaviors is encouraged. PMID:25750770

  5. 43 CFR 2430.3 - Additional criteria for classification of lands needed for urban or suburban purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... lands needed for urban or suburban purposes. 2430.3 Section 2430.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations... for classification of lands needed for urban or suburban purposes. (a) To be needed for urban or... determined to be needed for urban or suburban purposes may be classified for sale pursuant to the Public...

  6. 43 CFR 2430.3 - Additional criteria for classification of lands needed for urban or suburban purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... lands needed for urban or suburban purposes. 2430.3 Section 2430.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations... for classification of lands needed for urban or suburban purposes. (a) To be needed for urban or... determined to be needed for urban or suburban purposes may be classified for sale pursuant to the Public...

  7. 43 CFR 2430.3 - Additional criteria for classification of lands needed for urban or suburban purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... lands needed for urban or suburban purposes. 2430.3 Section 2430.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations... for classification of lands needed for urban or suburban purposes. (a) To be needed for urban or... determined to be needed for urban or suburban purposes may be classified for sale pursuant to the Public...

  8. 43 CFR 2430.3 - Additional criteria for classification of lands needed for urban or suburban purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... lands needed for urban or suburban purposes. 2430.3 Section 2430.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations... for classification of lands needed for urban or suburban purposes. (a) To be needed for urban or... determined to be needed for urban or suburban purposes may be classified for sale pursuant to the Public...

  9. The effect of silane addition timing on mixing processability and properties of silica reinforced rubber compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hee-Hoon; Jin, Hyun-Ho; Ha, Sung-Ho; Jang, Suk-Hee; Kang, Yong-Gu; Han, Min-Hyun

    2016-03-01

    A series of experiments were performed to determine an optimum balance between processability and performance of a highly loaded silica compound. The experiments evaluated 4 different silane injection times. All mixing related to silane addition was conducted with a scaled up "Tandem" mixer line. With exception to silane addition timing, almost all operating conditions were controlled between experimental features. It was found that when the silane addition was introduced earlier in the mixing cycle both the reaction was more complete and the bound rubber content was higher. But processability indicators such as sheet forming and Mooney plasticity were negatively impacted. On the other hand, as silane injection was delayed to later in the mixing process the filler dispersion and good sheet forming was improved. However both the bound rubber content and Silane reaction completion were decreased. With the changes in silane addition time, the processability and properties of a silica compound can be controlled.

  10. The Role of Additional Processing Time and Lexical Constraint in Spoken Word Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoCasto, Paul C.; Connine, Cynthia M.; Patterson, David

    2007-01-01

    Three phoneme monitoring experiments examined the manner in which additional processing time influences spoken word recognition. Experiment 1a introduced a version of the phoneme monitoring paradigm in which a silent interval is inserted prior to the word-final target phoneme. Phoneme monitoring reaction time decreased as the silent interval…

  11. Competencies Needed by Full-Time Employees to Enter the Apple Production Industry. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, George W.

    A study identified the competencies needed by full-time employees entering the apple production industry. Other objectives of the study included: (1) identification of differences among competency areas needed for employees working for large, medium, and small growers (based on acreage); and (2) identification of differences among competency areas…

  12. Additional technician tasks and turnaround time in the clinical Stat laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Maria; López-Garrigós, Maite; Flores, Emilio; Leiva-Salinas, Maria; Lillo, Rosa; Leiva-Salinas, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Many additional tasks in the Stat laboratory (SL) increase the workload. It is necessary to control them because they can affect the service provided by the laboratory. Our aim is to calculate these tasks, study their evolution over a 10 year period, and compare turnaround times (TAT) in summer period to the rest of the year. Materials and methods Additional tasks were classified as “additional test request” and “additional sample”. We collected those incidences from the laboratory information system (LIS), and calculated their evolution over time. We also calculated the monthly TAT for troponin for Emergency department (ED) patients, as the difference between the verification and LIS registration time. A median time of 30 minutes was our indicator target. TAT results and tests workload in summer were compared to the rest of the year. Results Over a 10-year period, the technologists in the SL performed 51,385 additional tasks, a median of 475 per month. The workload was significantly higher during the summer (45,496 tests) than the rest of the year (44,555 tests) (P = 0.019). The troponin TAT did not show this variation between summer and the rest of the year, complying always with our 30 minutes indicator target. Conclusion The technicians accomplished a significant number of additional tasks, and the workload kept increasing over the period of 10 years. That did not affect the TAT results. PMID:27346970

  13. Dreams Do Come True: The Creation and Growth of a Recreational Dance Program for Children and Young Adults with Additional Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinders, Nicole; Fletcher, Paula; Bryden, Pam

    2015-01-01

    There are many benefits to dance, both for typically developing individuals and for individuals with additional needs. The purpose of this narrative case study was to analyse a dance program for children and young adults with additional needs from the perspective of the program creator and primary dance instructor. Data collection occurred at two…

  14. Cyclic additional optical true time delay for microwave beam steering with spectral filtering.

    PubMed

    Cao, Z; Lu, R; Wang, Q; Tessema, N; Jiao, Y; van den Boom, H P A; Tangdiongga, E; Koonen, A M J

    2014-06-15

    Optical true time delay (OTTD) is an attractive way to realize microwave beam steering (MBS) due to its inherent features of broadband, low-loss, and compactness. In this Letter, we propose a novel OTTD approach named cyclic additional optical true time delay (CAO-TTD). It applies additional integer delays of the microwave carrier frequency to achieve spectral filtering but without disturbing the spatial filtering (beam steering). Based on such concept, a broadband MBS scheme for high-capacity wireless communication is proposed, which allows the tuning of both spectral filtering and spatial filtering. The experimental results match well with the theoretical analysis. PMID:24978496

  15. Effects of Learner Ability and Instructional Modifications on Time Needed for Learning and Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gettinger, Maribeth

    1983-01-01

    A study examined the effects of two factors--learner ability and modifications of instruction through increased feedback and reduced size of instructional units--on the time required for learning and the retention of fourth-grade male students. While instructional modifications best predicted the time needed for learning, learner ability best…

  16. The Shifting Role of the Special Needs Assistant in Irish Classrooms: A Time for Change?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keating, Stephanie; O'Connor, Una

    2012-01-01

    The education of pupils with special educational needs in Ireland has generally been influenced by national and international inclusion policy and legislation so that the majority of these children now take their place alongside peers in mainstream classrooms. In Ireland, a support network comprising the teacher and additional classroom assistance…

  17. 14 CFR 121.483 - Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one additional flight crewmember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one additional flight crewmember. 121.483 Section 121.483 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight...

  18. 14 CFR 121.483 - Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one additional flight crewmember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Two pilots and one additional flight crewmember. 121.483 Section 121.483 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight...

  19. Passivity and Passification of Memristor-Based Recurrent Neural Networks With Additive Time-Varying Delays.

    PubMed

    Rakkiyappan, Rajan; Chandrasekar, Arunachalam; Cao, Jinde

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a new design scheme for the passivity and passification of a class of memristor-based recurrent neural networks (MRNNs) with additive time-varying delays. The predictable assumptions on the boundedness and Lipschitz continuity of activation functions are formulated. The systems considered here are based on a different time-delay model suggested recently, which includes additive time-varying delay components in the state. The connection between the time-varying delay and its upper bound is considered when estimating the upper bound of the derivative of Lyapunov functional. It is recognized that the passivity condition can be expressed in a linear matrix inequality (LMI) format and by using characteristic function method. For state feedback passification, it is verified that it is apathetic to use immediate or delayed state feedback. By constructing a Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and employing Jensen's inequality and reciprocal convex combination technique together with a tighter estimation of the upper bound of the cross-product terms derived from the derivatives of the Lyapunov functional, less conventional delay-dependent passivity criteria are established in terms of LMIs. Moreover, second-order reciprocally convex approach is employed for deriving the upper bound for terms with inverses of squared convex parameters. The model based on the memristor with additive time-varying delays widens the application scope for the design of neural networks. Finally, pertinent examples are given to show the advantages of the derived passivity criteria and the significant improvement of the theoretical approaches. PMID:25415991

  20. Capabilities needed for the next generation of thermo-hydraulic codes for use in real time applications

    SciTech Connect

    Arndt, S.A.

    1997-07-01

    The real-time reactor simulation field is currently at a crossroads in terms of the capability to perform real-time analysis using the most sophisticated computer codes. Current generation safety analysis codes are being modified to replace simplified codes that were specifically designed to meet the competing requirement for real-time applications. The next generation of thermo-hydraulic codes will need to have included in their specifications the specific requirement for use in a real-time environment. Use of the codes in real-time applications imposes much stricter requirements on robustness, reliability and repeatability than do design and analysis applications. In addition, the need for code use by a variety of users is a critical issue for real-time users, trainers and emergency planners who currently use real-time simulation, and PRA practitioners who will increasingly use real-time simulation for evaluating PRA success criteria in near real-time to validate PRA results for specific configurations and plant system unavailabilities.

  1. Experimental model and analytic solution for real-time observation of vehicle's additional steer angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Li, Liang; Pan, Deng; Cao, Chengmao; Song, Jian

    2014-03-01

    The current research of real-time observation for vehicle roll steer angle and compliance steer angle(both of them comprehensively referred as the additional steer angle in this paper) mainly employs the linear vehicle dynamic model, in which only the lateral acceleration of vehicle body is considered. The observation accuracy resorting to this method cannot meet the requirements of vehicle real-time stability control, especially under extreme driving conditions. The paper explores the solution resorting to experimental method. Firstly, a multi-body dynamic model of a passenger car is built based on the ADAMS/Car software, whose dynamic accuracy is verified by the same vehicle's roadway test data of steady static circular test. Based on this simulation platform, several influencing factors of additional steer angle under different driving conditions are quantitatively analyzed. Then ɛ-SVR algorithm is employed to build the additional steer angle prediction model, whose input vectors mainly include the sensor information of standard electronic stability control system(ESC). The method of typical slalom tests and FMVSS 126 tests are adopted to make simulation, train model and test model's generalization performance. The test result shows that the influence of lateral acceleration on additional steer angle is maximal (the magnitude up to 1°), followed by the longitudinal acceleration-deceleration and the road wave amplitude (the magnitude up to 0.3°). Moreover, both the prediction accuracy and the calculation real-time of the model can meet the control requirements of ESC. This research expands the accurate observation methods of the additional steer angle under extreme driving conditions.

  2. New Stabilization for Dynamical System with Two Additive Time-Varying Delays

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Chen, Xiaozhou

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a new delay-dependent stabilization criterion for systems with two additive time-varying delays. The novel functional is constructed, a tighter upper bound of the derivative of the Lyapunov functional is obtained. These results have advantages over some existing ones because the combination of the delay decomposition technique and the reciprocally convex approach. Two examples are provided to demonstrate the less conservatism and effectiveness of the results in this paper. PMID:24701159

  3. THE EDUCATIONAL NEEDS AND INTERESTS OF THE PART-TIME FARMERS IN HOCKING COUNTY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    YOUNG, DONALD G.

    A QUESTIONNAIRE LISTING SEVERAL SPECIFIC AREAS IN ADULT EDUCATION WAS USED TO SURVEY THE EDUCATIONAL NEEDS AND INTERESTS OF A RANDOM SAMPLE OF 246 PART-TIME FARMERS. RESULTS FROM THE 142 RESPONSES WERE INTERPRETED BY THE THREE GROUPINGS OF AGE, EDUCATION, AND FARM INCOME. IT WAS FOUND THAT THE MEDIAN AGE WAS 47.7 YEARS, THE MEDIAN EDUCATIONAL…

  4. Parent Perceptions of Time Spent Meaningfully by Young Adults with Pervasive Support Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossetti, Zachary; Lehr, Donna; Lederer, Leslie; Pelerin, Dana; Huang, Shuoxi

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a qualitative study that examined how 23 young adults with pervasive support needs and limited functional communication spent their time and how their parents (n = 23) and direct support professionals (DSPs; n = 2) defined meaningfulness in relation to the young adults' experiences. Data were collected through…

  5. European hospital reforms in times of crisis: aligning cost containment needs with plans for structural redesign?

    PubMed

    Clemens, Timo; Michelsen, Kai; Commers, Matt; Garel, Pascal; Dowdeswell, Barrie; Brand, Helmut

    2014-07-01

    Hospitals have become a focal point for health care reform strategies in many European countries during the current financial crisis. It has been called for both, short-term reforms to reduce costs and long-term changes to improve the performance in the long run. On the basis of a literature and document analysis this study analyses how EU member states align short-term and long-term pressures for hospital reforms in times of the financial crisis and assesses the EU's influence on the national reform agenda. The results reveal that there has been an emphasis on cost containment measures rather than embarking on structural redesign of the hospital sector and its position within the broader health care system. The EU influences hospital reform efforts through its enhanced economic framework governance which determines key aspects of the financial context for hospitals in some countries. In addition, the EU health policy agenda which increasingly addresses health system questions stimulates the process of structural hospital reforms by knowledge generation, policy advice and financial incentives. We conclude that successful reforms in such a period would arguably need to address both the organisational and financing sides to hospital care. Moreover, critical to structural reform is a widely held acknowledgement of shortfalls in the current system and belief that new models of hospital care can deliver solutions to overcome these deficits. Advancing the structural redesign of the hospital sector while pressured to contain cost in the short-term is not an easy task and only slowly emerging in Europe. PMID:24703855

  6. Predicting the Survival Time for Bladder Cancer Using an Additive Hazards Model in Microarray Data

    PubMed Central

    TAPAK, Leili; MAHJUB, Hossein; SADEGHIFAR, Majid; SAIDIJAM, Massoud; POOROLAJAL, Jalal

    2016-01-01

    Background: One substantial part of microarray studies is to predict patients’ survival based on their gene expression profile. Variable selection techniques are powerful tools to handle high dimensionality in analysis of microarray data. However, these techniques have not been investigated in competing risks setting. This study aimed to investigate the performance of four sparse variable selection methods in estimating the survival time. Methods: The data included 1381 gene expression measurements and clinical information from 301 patients with bladder cancer operated in the years 1987 to 2000 in hospitals in Denmark, Sweden, Spain, France, and England. Four methods of the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator, smoothly clipped absolute deviation, the smooth integration of counting and absolute deviation and elastic net were utilized for simultaneous variable selection and estimation under an additive hazards model. The criteria of area under ROC curve, Brier score and c-index were used to compare the methods. Results: The median follow-up time for all patients was 47 months. The elastic net approach was indicated to outperform other methods. The elastic net had the lowest integrated Brier score (0.137±0.07) and the greatest median of the over-time AUC and C-index (0.803±0.06 and 0.779±0.13, respectively). Five out of 19 selected genes by the elastic net were significant (P<0.05) under an additive hazards model. It was indicated that the expression of RTN4, SON, IGF1R and CDC20 decrease the survival time, while the expression of SMARCAD1 increase it. Conclusion: The elastic net had higher capability than the other methods for the prediction of survival time in patients with bladder cancer in the presence of competing risks base on additive hazards model. PMID:27114989

  7. Pre-operative risk factors associated with need for vasoepididymostomy at the time of vasectomy reversal.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, M E; Anderson, R E; Ostrowski, K A; Brant, W O; Fuchs, E F

    2016-01-01

    The absence of sperm in the ejaculate after vasectomy reversal is commonly caused by failure to recognize and subsequently bypass epididymal or proximal vasal obstruction at the time of vasectomy reversal. If intra-operative proximal obstruction is suspected, vasoepididymostomy (VE) is recommended rather than vasovasostomy (VV). We sought to calculate the associated risk of needing VE, rather than VV with time from original vasectomy (obstructive interval) using a large cohort of vasectomy reversal patients. We reviewed the electronic and paper vasectomy reversal database by a single surgeon from 1978 through 2012. We performed univariate analysis to identify variables that predicted the need for VE rather than VV, and then combined only significant univariates into our multi-variable analysis. 2697 total men underwent vasectomy reversal, and 239 were repeat procedures. Of the 5296 individual testes operated on, 1029 were VE. Significant variables that predicted the need for VE on univariate analysis included: age, obstructive time interval, vasectomy reversal after previous VV (repeat vasectomy reversal), and year the procedure was performed. On multi-variable analysis significant risk factors for VE were age above 50 (OR 1.36), repeat vasectomy reversal (OR 5.78), and greater obstructive time interval (OR 1.56). For every 3 years since original vasectomy, the risk of needing VE increases by 56%. There is a linear relationship between obstructive interval and need for VE. Men undergoing repeat vasectomy reversal have five times greater risk of requiring VE and men greater than 50 years of age are also at higher risk. Using these pre-operative predictors is helpful in identifying patients who will benefit from referral to an experienced surgeon who can perform VE. PMID:26663812

  8. Estimation of the lag time in a subsequent monomer addition model for fibril elongation.

    PubMed

    Shoffner, Suzanne K; Schnell, Santiago

    2016-08-01

    Fibrillogenesis, the production or development of protein fibers, has been linked to protein folding diseases. The progress curve of fibrils or aggregates typically takes on a sigmoidal shape with a lag phase, a rapid growth phase, and a final plateau regime. The study of the lag phase and the estimation of its critical timescale provide insight into the factors regulating the fibrillation process. However, methods to estimate a quantitative expression for the lag time rely on empirical expressions, which cannot connect the lag time to kinetic parameters associated with the reaction mechanisms of protein fibrillation. Here we introduce an approach for the estimation of the lag time using the governing rate equations of the elementary reactions of a subsequent monomer addition model for protein fibrillation as a case study. We show that the lag time is given by the sum of the critical timescales for each fibril intermediate in the subsequent monomer addition mechanism and therefore reveals causal connectivity between intermediate species. Furthermore, we find that single-molecule assays of protein fibrillation can exhibit a lag phase without a nucleation process, while dyes and extrinsic fluorescent probe bulk assays of protein fibrillation do not exhibit an observable lag phase during template-dependent elongation. Our approach could be valuable for investigating the effects of intrinsic and extrinsic factors to the protein fibrillation reaction mechanism and provides physicochemical insights into parameters regulating the lag phase. PMID:27250246

  9. Additional Nitrogen Fertilization at Heading Time of Rice Down-Regulates Cellulose Synthesis in Seed Endosperm

    PubMed Central

    Midorikawa, Keiko; Kuroda, Masaharu; Terauchi, Kaede; Hoshi, Masako; Ikenaga, Sachiko; Ishimaru, Yoshiro; Abe, Keiko; Asakura, Tomiko

    2014-01-01

    The balance between carbon and nitrogen is a key determinant of seed storage components, and thus, is of great importance to rice and other seed-based food crops. To clarify the influence of the rhizosphere carbon/nitrogen balance during the maturation stage of several seed components, transcriptome analysis was performed on the seeds from rice plants that were provided additional nitrogen fertilization at heading time. As a result, it was assessed that genes associated with molecular processes such as photosynthesis, trehalose metabolism, carbon fixation, amino acid metabolism, and cell wall metabolism were differentially expressed. Moreover, cellulose and sucrose synthases, which are involved in cellulose synthesis, were down-regulated. Therefore, we compared cellulose content of mature seeds that were treated with additional nitrogen fertilization with those from control plants using calcofluor staining. In these experiments, cellulose content in endosperm from plants receiving additional nitrogen fertilization was less than that in control endosperm. Other starch synthesis-related genes such as starch synthase 1, starch phosphorylase 2, and branching enzyme 3 were also down-regulated, whereas some α-amylase and β-amylase genes were up-regulated. On the other hand, mRNA expression of amino acid biosynthesis-related molecules was up-regulated. Moreover, additional nitrogen fertilization caused accumulation of storage proteins and up-regulated Cys-poor prolamin mRNA expression. These data suggest that additional nitrogen fertilization at heading time changes the expression of some storage substance-related genes and reduces cellulose levels in endosperm. PMID:24905454

  10. Meeting the Needs of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students with Additional Disabilities through Professional Teacher Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Susan; DiNatale, Patrice; Ford, Jeremiah

    2008-01-01

    According to even the most conservative estimates, at least a quarter of deaf children have additional disabilities. Most teacher preparation programs do not sufficiently prepare teacher candidates for the challenges posed by these children. This article describes a professional development effort to prepare in-service educators of the deaf to…

  11. A Modified Time-Delay Addition Method to Extract Resistive Leakage Current of MOSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodsuz, Masume; Mirzaie, Mohammad

    2015-06-01

    Metal oxide surge arresters are one of the most important equipment for power system protection against switching and lightning over-voltages. High-energy stresses and environmental features are the main factors which degrade surge arresters. In order to verify surge arresters good condition, their monitoring is necessary. The majority of surge arrester monitoring techniques is based on total leakage current decomposition of their capacitive and resistive components. This paper introduces a new approach based on time-delay addition method to extract the resistive current from the total leakage current without measuring voltage signal. Surge arrester model for calculating leakage current has been performed in ATP-EMTP. In addition, the signal processing has been done using MATLAB software. To show the accuracy of the proposed method, experimental tests have been performed to extract resistive leakage current by the proposed method.

  12. Meeting the needs of deaf and hard of hearing students with additional disabilities through professional teacher development.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Susan; DiNatale, Patrice; Ford, Jeremiah

    2008-01-01

    According to even the most conservative estimates, at least a quarter of deaf children have additional disabilities. Most teacher preparation programs do not sufficiently prepare teacher candidates for the challenges posed by these children. This article describes a professional development effort to prepare in-service educators of the deaf to work with students with additional disabilities. Over a 3-year period, teachers selected these in-service topics: etiologies, vision conditions, behavior, transition, sensory integration, seizures, alternate assessment, and instructional strategies. In-class consultation was requested for support in the areas of formal assessment instruments, behavior, and student performance. Elements of effective professional development programs, such as honoring teachers' choices about topics and participation, responding to teachers' immediate classroom concerns, and providing in-class follow-up support, facilitated the success of this effort. PMID:19146073

  13. Winter-time CO2 addition in high rate algal mesocosms for enhanced microalgal performance.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Donna L; Montemezzani, Valerio; Mehrabadi, Abbas; Craggs, Rupert J

    2016-02-01

    Carbon limitation in domestic wastewater high rate algal ponds is thought to constrain microalgal photo-physiology and productivity and CO2 augmentation is often used to overcome this limitation in summer. However, the implications of carbon limitation during winter are poorly understood. This paper investigates the effects of 0.5%, 2%, 5% and 10% CO2 addition on the winter-time performance of wastewater microalgae in high rate algal mesocosms. Performance was measured in terms of light absorption, photosynthetic efficiency, biomass production and nutrient removal rates, along with community composition. Varying percentage CO2 addition and associated change in culture pH resulted in 3 distinct microalgal communities. Light absorption by the microalgae increased by up to 144% with CO2 addition, while a reduction in the package effect meant that there was less internal self-shading thereby increasing the efficiency of light absorption. Carbon augmentation increased the maximum rate of photosynthesis by up to 172%, which led to increased microalgal biovolume by up to 181% and an increase in total organic biomass for all treatments except 10% CO2. While 10% CO2 improved light absorption and photosynthesis this did not translate to enhanced microalgal productivity. Increased microalgal productivity with CO2 addition did not result in increased dissolved nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) removal. This experiment demonstrated that winter-time carbon augmentation up to 5% CO2 improved microalgal light absorption and utilisation, which ultimately increased microalgal biomass and is likely to enhance total annual microalgal areal productivity in HRAPs. PMID:26707731

  14. Time is an affliction: Why ecology cannot be as predictive as physics and why it needs time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boero, F.; Kraberg, A. C.; Krause, G.; Wiltshire, K. H.

    2015-07-01

    Ecological systems depend on both constraints and historical contingencies, both of which shape their present observable system state. In contrast to ahistorical systems, which are governed solely by constraints (i.e. laws), historical systems and their dynamics can be understood only if properly described, in the course of time. Describing these dynamics and understanding long-term variability can be seen as the mission of long time series measuring not only simple abiotic features but also complex biological variables, such as species diversity and abundances, allowing deep insights in the functioning of food webs and ecosystems in general. Long time-series are irreplaceable for understanding change, and crucially inherent system variability and thus envisaging future scenarios. This notwithstanding current policies in funding and evaluating scientific research discourage the maintenance of long term series, despite a clear need for long-term strategies to cope with climate change. Time series are crucial for a pursuit of the much invoked Ecosystem Approach and to the passage from simple monitoring programs of large-scale and long-term Earth observatories - thus promoting a better understanding of the causes and effects of change in ecosystems. The few ongoing long time series in European waters must be integrated and networked so as to facilitate the formation of nodes of a series of observatories which, together, should allow the long-term management of the features and characteristics of European waters. Human capacity building in this region of expertise and a stronger societal involvement are also urgently needed, since the expertise in recognizing and describing species and therefore recording them reliably in the context of time series is rapidly vanishing from the European Scientific community.

  15. State to State and Charged Particle Kinetic Modeling of Time Filtering and Cs Addition

    SciTech Connect

    Capitelli, M.; Gorse, C.; Longo, S.; Diomede, P.; Pagano, D.

    2007-08-10

    We present here an account on the progress of kinetic simulation of non equilibrium plasmas in conditions of interest for negative ion production by using the 1D Bari code for hydrogen plasma simulation. The model includes the state to state kinetics of the vibrational level population of hydrogen molecules, plus a PIC/MCC module for the multispecies dynamics of charged particles. In particular we present new results for the modeling of two issues of great interest: the time filtering and the Cs addition via surface coverage.

  16. Complete positivity, finite-temperature effects, and additivity of noise for time-local qubit dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lankinen, Juho; Lyyra, Henri; Sokolov, Boris; Teittinen, Jose; Ziaei, Babak; Maniscalco, Sabrina

    2016-05-01

    We present a general model of qubit dynamics which entails pure dephasing and dissipative time-local master equations. This allows us to describe the combined effect of thermalization and dephasing beyond the usual Markovian approximation. We investigate the complete positivity conditions and introduce a heuristic model that is always physical and provides the correct Markovian limit. We study the effects of temperature on the non-Markovian behavior of the system and show that the noise additivity property discussed by Yu and Eberly [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 140403 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.140403] holds beyond the Markovian limit.

  17. Analysis of Time to Event Outcomes in Randomized Controlled Trials by Generalized Additive Models

    PubMed Central

    Argyropoulos, Christos; Unruh, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Randomized Controlled Trials almost invariably utilize the hazard ratio calculated with a Cox proportional hazard model as a treatment efficacy measure. Despite the widespread adoption of HRs, these provide a limited understanding of the treatment effect and may even provide a biased estimate when the assumption of proportional hazards in the Cox model is not verified by the trial data. Additional treatment effect measures on the survival probability or the time scale may be used to supplement HRs but a framework for the simultaneous generation of these measures is lacking. Methods By splitting follow-up time at the nodes of a Gauss Lobatto numerical quadrature rule, techniques for Poisson Generalized Additive Models (PGAM) can be adopted for flexible hazard modeling. Straightforward simulation post-estimation transforms PGAM estimates for the log hazard into estimates of the survival function. These in turn were used to calculate relative and absolute risks or even differences in restricted mean survival time between treatment arms. We illustrate our approach with extensive simulations and in two trials: IPASS (in which the proportionality of hazards was violated) and HEMO a long duration study conducted under evolving standards of care on a heterogeneous patient population. Findings PGAM can generate estimates of the survival function and the hazard ratio that are essentially identical to those obtained by Kaplan Meier curve analysis and the Cox model. PGAMs can simultaneously provide multiple measures of treatment efficacy after a single data pass. Furthermore, supported unadjusted (overall treatment effect) but also subgroup and adjusted analyses, while incorporating multiple time scales and accounting for non-proportional hazards in survival data. Conclusions By augmenting the HR conventionally reported, PGAMs have the potential to support the inferential goals of multiple stakeholders involved in the evaluation and appraisal of clinical trial

  18. "It's Almost a Mindset that Teachers Need to Change": First-Year Students' Need to Be Inducted into Time Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Meer, Jacques; Jansen, Ellen; Torenbeek, Marjolein

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the findings related to a number of research projects investigating students' expectations and experiences of the first year in higher education. In particular, findings with regard to first-year students' expectations and challenges with issues of time management are reported. It was found that many students were realistic…

  19. Toward a Deterministic Polynomial Time Algorithm with Optimal Additive Query Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bshouty, Nader H.; Mazzawi, Hanna

    In this paper, we study two combinatorial search problems: The coin weighing problem with a spring scale (also known as the vector reconstructing problem using additive queries) and the problem of reconstructing weighted graphs using additive queries. Suppose we are given n identical looking coins. Suppose that m out of the n coins are counterfeit and the rest are authentic. Assume that we are allowed to weigh subsets of coins with a spring scale. It is known that the optimal number of weighing for identifying the counterfeit coins and their weights is at least Ω(mlog n/log m). We give a deterministic polynomial time adaptive algorithm for identifying the counterfeit coins and their weights using O(mlog n/log m+ mlog log m) weighings, assuming that the weight of the counterfeit coins are greater than the weight of the authentic coin. This algorithm is optimal when m ≤ n c/loglogn , where c is any constant. Also our weighing complexity is within loglogm times the optimal complexity for all m.

  20. Identifiability of Additive, Time-Varying Actuator and Sensor Faults by State Augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Jason M.; Gonzalez, Oscar R.; Joshi, Suresh M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent work has provided a set of necessary and sucient conditions for identifiability of additive step faults (e.g., lock-in-place actuator faults, constant bias in the sensors) using state augmentation. This paper extends these results to an important class of faults which may affect linear, time-invariant systems. In particular, the faults under consideration are those which vary with time and affect the system dynamics additively. Such faults may manifest themselves in aircraft as, for example, control surface oscillations, control surface runaway, and sensor drift. The set of necessary and sucient conditions presented in this paper are general, and apply when a class of time-varying faults affects arbitrary combinations of actuators and sensors. The results in the main theorems are illustrated by two case studies, which provide some insight into how the conditions may be used to check the theoretical identifiability of fault configurations of interest for a given system. It is shown that while state augmentation can be used to identify certain fault configurations, other fault configurations are theoretically impossible to identify using state augmentation, giving practitioners valuable insight into such situations. That is, the limitations of state augmentation for a given system and configuration of faults are made explicit. Another limitation of model-based methods is that there can be large numbers of fault configurations, thus making identification of all possible configurations impractical. However, the theoretical identifiability of known, credible fault configurations can be tested using the theorems presented in this paper, which can then assist the efforts of fault identification practitioners.

  1. Time needed to evacuate the Netherlands in the event of large-scale flooding: strategies and consequences.

    PubMed

    Kolen, Bas; Helsloot, Ira

    2012-10-01

    On 30 May 2008, the Government of the Netherlands informed the national parliament about the effectiveness of preventive evacuation of coastal and river areas in case of flooding. Analysis of a case study showed that it is impossible to evacuate coastal areas preventively within a 48-hour time span preceding a worst credible scenario flood caused by a storm surge. This fact illustrates the need for alternative evacuation strategies, such as vertical evacuation (evacuating to safe havens, inside the flood zone) or shelter-in-place (hiding), to reduce loss of life and the impact of the evacuation. This paper defines these strategies and demonstrates, by returning to the case study used by the Dutch government, that they require different measures, methods of approach, and crisis management processes. In addition, it addresses the need for flexible and scalable preparation so that after detecting and understanding the threat, authorities and citizens can make decisions about different evacuation strategies. PMID:22356553

  2. RNA polymerase pausing regulates translation initiation by providing additional time for TRAP-RNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Yakhnin, Alexander V; Yakhnin, Helen; Babitzke, Paul

    2006-11-17

    RNA polymerase (RNAP) pause sites have been identified in several prokaryotic genes. Although the presumed biological function of RNAP pausing is to allow synchronization of RNAP position with regulatory factor binding and/or RNA folding, a direct causal link between pausing and changes in gene expression has been difficult to establish. RNAP pauses at two sites in the Bacillus subtilis trpEDCFBA operon leader. Pausing at U107 and U144 participates in transcription attenuation and trpE translation control mechanisms, respectively. Substitution of U144 caused a substantial pausing defect in vitro and in vivo. These mutations led to increased trp operon expression that was suppressed by overproduction of TRAP, indicating that pausing at U144 provides additional time for TRAP to bind to the nascent transcript and promote formation of an RNA structure that blocks translation of trpE. These results establish that pausing is capable of playing a role in regulating translation in bacteria. PMID:17114058

  3. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; Coughlin, Daniel R.; Clarke, Amy J.; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Gibbs, John W.; Roehling, John D.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Tourret, Damien; Wiezorek, Jörg M. K.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.

    2016-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology in both research and industrial environments, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al-Cu and Al-Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid-liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. The observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, and presence of a morphological instability at the solid-liquid interface in the Al-4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.

  4. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; Coughlin, Daniel R.; Clarke, Amy J.; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Gibbs, John W.; Roehling, John D.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; et al

    2016-01-27

    In research and industrial environments, additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al–Cu and Al–Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid–liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. We observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, andmore » presence of a morphological instability at the solid–liquid interface in the Al–4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.« less

  5. Developing the Understanding and Practice of Inclusion in Higher Education for International Students with Disabilities/Additional Needs: A Whole Schooling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Supple, Briony; Abgenyega, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present research on inclusion in higher education using a whole schooling philosophy. We seek insight into the perspectives of international students with disabilities/additional needs, three of whom from this particular research group are from non-English speaking backgrounds and attending the same university in Melbourne,…

  6. The Need for an Enlarged Vision and Additional Perspectives of Public Relations in the 21st Century: A Challenge to Existing Paradigms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruckeberg, Dean

    This paper asserts that an enlarged vision and additional perspectives of public relations will be needed in the 21st century: vision and perspectives that will not only complement but challenge existing paradigms. Future communication technological phenomena will require dramatic changes in public relations practitioners' efforts in relationship-…

  7. Regulation of Soil Microbial Carbon-use Efficiency by Soil Moisture, Substrate Addition, and Incubation Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, J.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial carbon-use efficiency (CUE) is a key variable in biogeochemical cycling that regulates soil C sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions, and retention of inorganic nutrients. Microbial CUE is the fraction of C converted to biomass rather than respired as CO2. Biogeochemical models have been shown to be highly sensitive to variation in CUE; however, we currently have a poor understanding of how CUE responds to environmental variables such as soil moisture and nutrient limitations. We examined the effect of soil moisture and C supply on CUE in soil from a western hemlock / sitka spruce forest in Oregon, USA, using a novel technique which supplies 13C and 15N substrates through the gas phase so that water addition is not necessary. Soil samples (28 g oven-dry equiv. wt) at two water potentials (-0.03 and -3.55 MPa) were exposed to 13C-acetic acid vapor for either 6 or 30 sec to provide two different concentrations of acetate to soil microbial communities. The soils were also injected with small amounts of 15NH3 gas to allow quantification of microbial N assimilation rates and to provide an alternate method of calculating CUE. Rates of 13CO2 respiration were measured continuously during a 48-h incubation using cavity ring-down spectroscopy. Soil samples were extracted at seven time intervals (0, 0.5, 1.5, 4.5, 12, 24, and 48 h) in 0.5 M K2SO4 and analyzed for DO13C, microbial 13C, DO15N, inorganic 15N, and microbial 15N to calculate how gross rates of C and N assimilation and microbial CUE change with incubation time. As expected, microbial C and N assimilation rates and CUE increased with soil moisture and the quantity of acetate added; however, C:N assimilated was higher at lower soil moisture, suggesting that either C-storage compounds were being created, or that fungal communities were responsible for a greater proportion of the assimilation in drier soils. Assimilation rates and CUE also changed with incubation time, demonstrating that estimates of CUE

  8. In response to need: an analysis of social work roles over time.

    PubMed

    Kerson, Toba Schwaber; McCoyd, Judith L M

    2013-10-01

    In this qualitative research synthesis, interviews with 22 early health-related social workers were reexamined to identify themes that emerged when these social workers discussed the roles and goals of their work. Those interviews, with colleagues of Ida M. Cannon and those leaders in the next generation of social workers who had practiced during the first half of the 20th century, were conducted in 1976. For this study, the themes that emerged from the original interview data as social workers' responses to perceived needs were then compared with data consisting of 80 cases, drawn from four more recent casebooks (1982, 1989, 1996, 2010), that followed a framework of practice in context. The comparison demonstrated that themes remain consistent over time and include responses to needs created by wars, due to new and underserved populations, created by public health crises, created by technological advances, experienced by organizations, and resulting from economic and policy issues, as well as needs of clients. Analysis also suggests that caution is in order to avoid being co-opted by organizations and others in power at the cost of the profession's social justice mission and ethical imperatives. PMID:24450020

  9. Real-Time Series Resistance Monitoring in PV Systems Without the Need for IV Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Deceglie, Michael G.; Silverman, Timothy J.; Marion, Bill; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    2015-06-14

    We apply the physical principles of a familiar method, suns-Voc, to a new application: the real-time detection of series resistance changes in modules and systems operating outside. The real-time series resistance (RTSR) method that we describe avoids the need for collecting IV curves or constructing full series-resistance-free IV curves. RTSR is most readily deployable at the module level on micro-inverters or module-integrated electronics, but it can also be extended to full strings. Automated detection of series resistance increases can provide early warnings of some of the most common reliability issues, which also pose fire risks, including broken ribbons, broken solder bonds, and contact problems in the junction or combiner box. We describe the method in detail and describe a sample application to data collected from modules operating in the field.

  10. Real-time seismic monitoring needs of a building owner - And the solution: A cooperative effort

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, M.; Sanli, A.; Sinclair, M.; Gallant, S.; Radulescu, D.

    2004-01-01

    A recently implemented advanced seismic monitoring system for a 24-story building facilitates recording of accelerations and computing displacements and drift ratios in near-real time to measure the earthquake performance of the building. The drift ratio is related to the damage condition of the specific building. This system meets the owner's needs for rapid quantitative input to assessments and decisions on post-earthquake occupancy. The system is now successfully working and, in absence of strong shaking to date, is producing low-amplitude data in real time for routine analyses and assessment. Studies of such data to date indicate that the configured monitoring system with its building specific software can be a useful tool in rapid assessment of buildings and other structures following an earthquake. Such systems can be used for health monitoring of a building, for assessing performance-based design and analyses procedures, for long-term assessment of structural characteristics, and for long-term damage detection.

  11. Analog quantum computing (AQC) and the need for time-symmetric physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werbos, Paul J.; Dolmatova, Ludmilla

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses what will be necessary to achieve the full potential capabilities of analog quantum computing (AQC), which is defined here as the enrichment of continuous-variable computing to include stochastic, nonunitary circuit elements such as dissipative spin gates and address the wider range of tasks emerging from new trends in engineering, such as approximation of stochastic maps, ghost imaging and new forms of neural networks and intelligent control. This paper focuses especially on what is needed in terms of new experiments to validate remarkable new results in the modeling of triple entanglement, and in creating a pathway which links fundamental theoretical work with hard core experimental work, on a pathway to AQC similar to the pathway to digital quantum computing already blazed by Zeilinger's group. It discusses the most recent experiments and reviews two families of alternative models based on the traditional eigenvector projection model of polarizers and on a new family of local realistic models based on Markov Random Fields across space-time adhering to the rules of time-symmetric physics. For both families, it reviews lumped parameter versions, continuous time extension and possibilities for extension to continuous space and time.

  12. Oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane at millisecond contact times: Effect of H{sub 2} addition

    SciTech Connect

    Bodke, A.S.; Henning, D.; Schmidt, L.D.; Bharadwaj, S.S.; Maj, J.J.; Siddall, J.

    2000-04-01

    The oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane using Pt/{alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and various bimetallic catalysts operating at {approximately}1,000 C and very short contact times is examined with H{sub 2} addition to the feed. When H{sub 2} is added with a Pt catalyst, the ethylene selectivity rises from 65 to 72% but ethane conversion drops from 70 to 52%. However, using a Pt-Sn/{alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst, the C{sub 2}H{sub 4} selectivity increases from 70 to greater than 85%, while the conversion remains {approximately}70%. The process also produces approximately as much H{sub 2} as is added to the feed. Effects of other metal promoters, sphere bed and fibermat supports, preheat, pressure, nitrogen dilution, and flow rate are examined in an effort to further elucidate the mechanism. Deactivation of the Pt-Sn catalyst is examined, and a simple method of regenerating the activity on-line is demonstrated. Possible mechanisms to explain high selectivities to ethylene are discussed. Although the process can be regarded as a simple two-step reaction sequence with the exothermic oxidation of hydrogen or ethane driving the endothermic dehydrogenation of ethane to ethylene, the exact contributions of heterogeneous or gas-phase reactions and their spatial variations within the catalyst are yet to be determined.

  13. Time- and Isomer-Resolved Measurements of Sequential Addition of Acetylene to the Propargyl Radical.

    PubMed

    Savee, John D; Selby, Talitha M; Welz, Oliver; Taatjes, Craig A; Osborn, David L

    2015-10-15

    Soot formation in combustion is a complex process in which polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are believed to play a critical role. Recent works concluded that three consecutive additions of acetylene (C2H2) to propargyl (C3H3) create a facile route to the PAH indene (C9H8). However, the isomeric forms of C5H5 and C7H7 intermediates in this reaction sequence are not known. We directly investigate these intermediates using time- and isomer-resolved experiments. Both the resonance stabilized vinylpropargyl (vp-C5H5) and 2,4-cyclopentadienyl (c-C5H5) radical isomers of C5H5 are produced, with substantially different intensities at 800 K vs 1000 K. In agreement with literature master equation calculations, we find that c-C5H5 + C2H2 produces only the tropyl isomer of C7H7 (tp-C7H7) below 1000 K, and that tp-C7H7 + C2H2 terminates the reaction sequence yielding C9H8 (indene) + H. This work demonstrates a pathway for PAH formation that does not proceed through benzene. PMID:26722791

  14. Outpatient management of postbiopsy pneumothorax with small-caliber chest tubes: factors affecting the need for prolonged drainage and additional interventions.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sanjay; Hicks, Marshall E; Wallace, Michael J; Ahrar, Kamran; Madoff, David C; Murthy, Ravi

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of outpatient management of postbiopsy pneumothoraces with small-caliber chest tubes and to assess the factors that influence the need for prolonged drainage or additional interventions. We evaluated the medical records of patients who were treated with small-caliber chest tubes attached to Heimlich valves for pneumothoraces resulting from image-guided transthoracic needle biopsy to determine the hospital admission rates, the number of days the catheters were left in place, and the need for further interventions. We also evaluated the patient, lesion, and biopsy technique characteristics to determine their influence on the need for prolonged catheter drainage or additional interventions. Of the 191 patients included in our study, 178 (93.2%) were treated as outpatients. Ten patients (5.2%) were admitted for chest tube-related problems, either for underwater suction (n = 8) or for pain control (n = 2). No further interventions were required in 146 patients (76.4%), with successful removal of the chest tubes the day after the biopsy procedure. Prolonged catheter drainage (mean, 4.3 days) was required in 44 patients (23%). Nineteen patients (9.9%) underwent additional interventions for management of pneumothorax. Presence of emphysema was noted more frequently in patients who required additional interventions or prolonged chest tube drainage than in those who did not (51.1% vs. 24.7%; p = 0.001). We conclude that use of the Heimlich valve allows safe and successful outpatient treatment of most patients requiring chest tube placement for postbiopsy pneumothorax. Additional interventions or prolonged chest tube drainage are needed more frequently in patients with emphysema in the needle path. PMID:18074173

  15. Outpatient Management of Postbiopsy Pneumothorax with Small-Caliber Chest Tubes: Factors Affecting the Need for Prolonged Drainage and Additional Interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Sanjay Hicks, Marshall E.; Wallace, Michael J.; Ahrar, Kamran; Madoff, David C.; Murthy, Ravi

    2008-03-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of outpatient management of postbiopsy pneumothoraces with small-caliber chest tubes and to assess the factors that influence the need for prolonged drainage or additional interventions.We evaluated the medical records of patients who were treated with small-caliber chest tubes attached to Heimlich valves for pneumothoraces resulting from image-guided transthoracic needle biopsy to determine the hospital admission rates, the number of days the catheters were left in place, and the need for further interventions. We also evaluated the patient, lesion, and biopsy technique characteristics to determine their influence on the need for prolonged catheter drainage or additional interventions. Of the 191 patients included in our study, 178 (93.2%) were treated as outpatients. Ten patients (5.2%) were admitted for chest tube-related problems, either for underwater suction (n = 8) or for pain control (n = 2). No further interventions were required in 146 patients (76.4%), with successful removal of the chest tubes the day after the biopsy procedure. Prolonged catheter drainage (mean, 4.3 days) was required in 44 patients (23%). Nineteen patients (9.9%) underwent additional interventions for management of pneumothorax. Presence of emphysema was noted more frequently in patients who required additional interventions or prolonged chest tube drainage than in those who did not (51.1% vs. 24.7%; p = 0.001).We conclude that use of the Heimlich valve allows safe and successful outpatient treatment of most patients requiring chest tube placement for postbiopsy pneumothorax. Additional interventions or prolonged chest tube drainage are needed more frequently in patients with emphysema in the needle path.

  16. Taming Wild Horses: The Need for Virtual Time-based Scheduling of VMs in Network Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Yoginath, Srikanth B; Perumalla, Kalyan S; Henz, Brian J

    2012-01-01

    The next generation of scalable network simulators employ virtual machines (VMs) to act as high-fidelity models of traffic producer/consumer nodes in simulated networks. However, network simulations could be inaccurate if VMs are not scheduled according to virtual time, especially when many VMs are hosted per simulator core in a multi-core simulator environment. Since VMs are by default free-running, on the outset, it is not clear if, and to what extent, their untamed execution affects the results in simulated scenarios. Here, we provide the first quantitative basis for establishing the need for generalized virtual time scheduling of VMs in network simulators, based on an actual prototyped implementations. To exercise breadth, our system is tested with multiple disparate applications: (a) a set of message passing parallel programs, (b) a computer worm propagation phenomenon, and (c) a mobile ad-hoc wireless network simulation. We define and use error metrics and benchmarks in scaled tests to empirically report the poor match of traditional, fairness-based VM scheduling to VM-based network simulation, and also clearly show the better performance of our simulation-specific scheduler, with up to 64 VMs hosted on a 12-core simulator node.

  17. Assessment of Professional Development Activities, Instructional Needs, and Delivery Methods of Part-Time Technical and Occupational Faculty in U.S. Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanford, Brian A.; McCaslin, N. L.

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to describe the frequency of professional development activities provided to part-time occupational and technical program faculty. Additionally, the perceptions of occupational education officers concerning the instructional professional development needs and their appropriate delivery method(s) for these faculty members…

  18. Lateralization of High-Frequency Clicks Based on Interaural Time: Additivity of Information across Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth Marie

    Lateralization performance based on interaural differences of time (IDTs) was measured for trains of Gaussian clicks which varied in spectral content. In the first experiment, thresholds ((DELTA)IDTs) were measured as a function of the number of clicks in the train (n = 1 to 32), the interclick interval (ICI = 2.5 or 5 ms), and the spectral content (1 vs. 2 or 4 carriers). Subjects' performance was compared to perfect statistical summation which predicts slopes of -.50 when log-(DELTA)IDT vs. long -n is plotted. The results showed that increasing the spectral content of the clicks decreased the intercepts of the log -log functions (decreased thresholds) while having little effect on their slopes. Shortening the ICIs caused the slopes of the functions to decrease in absolute value. To estimate the bandwidth of frequency-interaction in lateralization, d's were measured for clicks with constant IDTs (n = 1) with a fixed carrier (FF = 4000, 5200, 6000 or 7200 Hz), both alone and combined with a second click whose carrier (F) varied from 3500 to 8500 Hz. Performance in combined conditions was compared to independent summation of the information carried by the two frequency-bands. Performance improved as the separation between F and FF increased until the level predicted by independence was reached. The final experiment investigated the interaction of frequency content with IDT. d's were measured as a function of the IDT in clicks with carriers of 5200, 6000 or 7200 Hz, both alone and combined with a 4000-Hz click with a fixed IDT. Performance in combined conditions was again compared to independent additivity. The improvement with frequency was explained by an increase in the number of samples of the IDT reaching the binaural centers due to spread of excitation along the basilar membrane. Less than independent summation was explained by correlation between overlapping bands which reduced the amount of information exciting independent channels. The data also suggest that

  19. Performing forward-viewing endoscopy at time of pancreaticobiliary EUS and ERCP may detect additional upper gastrointestinal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Ashby; Vamadevan, Arunan S; Slattery, Eoin; Sejpal, Divyesh V; Trindade, Arvind J

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: It is unknown whether significant incidental upper gastrointestinal lesions are missed when using non-forward-viewing endoscopes without completing a forward-viewing exam in linear endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) exams. We evaluated whether significant upper GI lesions are missed during EUS and ERCP when upper endoscopy is not performed routinely with a gastroscope. Patients and methods: A retrospective analysis was performed in which an EGD with a forward-viewing gastroscope was performed after using a non-forward-viewing endoscope (linear echoendoscope, duodenoscope, or both) during a single procedure. Upper gastrointestinal tract findings were recorded separately for each procedure. Significant lesions found with a forward-viewing gastroscope were defined as findings that led to a change in the patient’s medication regimen, additional endoscopic surveillance/interventions, or the need for other imaging studies. Results: A total of 168 patients were evaluated. In 83 patients, a linear echoendoscope was used, in 52 patients a duodenoscope was used, and in 33 patients both devices were used. Clinically significant additional lesions diagnosed with a gastroscope but missed by a non-forward-viewing endoscope were found in 30 /168 patients (18 %). EGD after linear EUS resulted in additional lesion findings in 17 /83 patients (20.5 %, χ2 = 13.385, P = 0.00025). EGD after use of a duodenoscope resulted in additional lesions findings in 10 /52 patients (19.2 %, χ2 = 9.987, P = 0.00157). EGD after the use of both a linear echoendoscope and a duodenoscope resulted in additional lesions findings in 3/33 patients (9 %, χ2 = 3.219, P = 0.07). Conclusion: Non forward-viewing endoscopes miss a significant amount of incidental upper gastrointestinal lesions during pancreaticobiliary endoscopy. Performing an EGD with a gastroscope at the time of linear EUS or

  20. Needs of Near Real-Time Data: Perspectives for Supporting Disaster Observations -- Wildfires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosia, V. G.; Buechel, S.; Sullivan, D. V.; Enomoto, F. Y.; Hinkley, E.

    2010-12-01

    Between 2004 and 2010, the Wildfire Research and Applications Partnership (WRAP), a joint NASA / US Forest Service project, matured, demonstrated and transitioned innovative technologies and capabilities for real-time information data delivery to Incident Management Teams on wildland fires in the United States. The capabilities included the development of innovative unmanned airborne systems (UAS), multispectral sensors, on-board, real-time processing, and a COTS-driven visualization and common operating picture (COP) capability. The UAS airborne element involved demonstrating a medium-altitude, large payload capacity, long-duration, Unmanned Airborne Systems (UAS) the NASA Ikhana (Predator-B derivative). The sensor system, a redesigned Daedalus AADS1268 line-scanner with 16 spectral channels (VIS-IR-TIR), was further modified to allow long-duration mission capabilities, and full on-board geo-rectification and second-generation product development for delivery through a UAS / SatCom / Ground data telemetry system. The COP, the Collaborative Decision Environment (CDE) based on a mash-up of wildfire intelligence data in GoogleEarth, enabled operational use of the real-time UAS-acquired sensor data, along with other critical geospatial fire / weather data for incident management team use and visualization. The CDE allowed the shared integration of various additional asset information sets (satellite, other airborne sensor data, and ground condition information, comprising a simplified sensor web concept design. All of these capabilities and advancements are described from both a development and “end-user” perspective. The wildfire management agency end-users (primarily the U.S. Forest Service), are currently adopting some of these capabilities into operational utility. An assessment of the gaps in adaptation will also be addressed.

  1. On temporomandibular disorders. Time trends, associated factors, treatment need and treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Alkisti Anastassaki

    2012-01-01

    During the last few decades, and especially during the 1990s, an increase in musculoskeletal pain conditions and stress-related ill-health has been observed in Sweden. At the same time, an improvement in the oral health of the population has been noted. The overall aim of this thesis was to acquire knowledge relating to possible time trends for the presence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in the population. A further objective was to study factors that possibly influence the presence of these disorders and the outcome of their treatment. Studies I-III are based on a series of repeated cross-sectional population-based investigations. Three independent samples of 130 individuals in the age groups of 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70 years were randomly selected from the inhabitants of the city of Jönköping, Sweden in 1983, 1993 and 2003. The total participation rate was 21%, 22% and 29% respectively. The participants were examined using a questionnaire, interview and a clinical examination of the stomatognathic system regarding the presence of symptoms and signs indicative of TMD. Study IV is a retrospective survey of a clinical sample of patients referred to and treated at the Department of Stomatognathic Physiology, The Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, in 1995-2002. The overall frequencies of symptoms and the rates for some clinical signs and consequently of an estimated treatment need in adults increased during the study period. In 2003, the prevalence of frequent headache in 20-year-olds, mainly females, had markedly increased. The reports of bruxism among adults increased from 1983 to 2003. Awareness of bruxism and self-perceived health impairment were associated with TMD symptoms and signs. A favourable treatment outcome was observed for the majority of patients with common TMD sub-diagnoses and no strong predictors of treatment outcome were found. In conclusion, the results suggest some time trends towards an increased

  2. Effects of Wait Time When Communicating with Children Who Have Sensory and Additional Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Nicole; Parker, Amy T.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This study utilized wait-time procedures to determine if they are effective in helping children with deafblindness or multiple disabilities that include a visual impairment communicate in their home. Methods: A single subject with an alternating treatment design was used for the study. Zero- to one-second wait time was utilized…

  3. Addition of random run FM noise to the KPW time scale algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    2002-01-01

    The KPW (Kalman plus weights) time scale algorithm uses a Kalman filter to provide frequency and drift information to a basic time scale equation. This paper extends the algorithm to three-state clocks nd gives results for a simulated eight-clock ensemble.

  4. On the time needed to reach an equilibrium structure of the radiation belts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ripoll, J. -F.; Loran, V.; Cunningham, Gregory Scott; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Shprits, Y. Y.

    2016-06-04

    In this paper, we complement the notion of equilibrium states of the radiation belts with a discussion on the dynamics and time needed to reach equilibrium. We solve for the equilibrium states obtained using 1D radial diffusion with recently developed hiss and chorus lifetimes at constant values of Kp = 1, 3 and 6. We find that the equilibrium states at moderately low Kp, when plotted vs L-shell (L) and energy (E), display the same interesting S-shape for the inner edge of the outer belt as recently observed by the Van Allen Probes. The S-shape is also produced as themore » radiation belts dynamically evolve toward the equilibrium state when initialized to simulate the buildup after a massive dropout or to simulate loss due to outward diffusion from a saturated state. Physically, this shape, intimately linked with the slot structure, is due to the dependence of electron loss rate (originating from wave-particle interactions) on both energy and L-shell. Equilibrium electron flux profiles are governed by the Biot number (τDiffusion/τloss), with large Biot number corresponding to low fluxes and low Biot number to large fluxes. The time it takes for the flux at a specific (L, E) to reach the value associated with the equilibrium state, starting from these different initial states, is governed by the initial state of the belts, the property of the dynamics (diffusion coefficients), and the size of the domain of computation. Its structure shows a rather complex scissor form in the (L, E) plane. The equilibrium value (phase space density or flux) is practically reachable only for selected regions in (L, E) and geomagnetic activity. Convergence to equilibrium requires hundreds of days in the inner belt for E > 300 keV and moderate Kp (≤3). It takes less time to reach equilibrium during disturbed geomagnetic conditions (Kp ≥ 3), when the system evolves faster. Restricting our interest to the slot region, below L = 4, we find that only small regions in (L, E) space

  5. High-Challenge Teaching for Senior English as an Additional Language Learners in Times of Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alford, Jennifer; Jetnikoff, Anita

    2011-01-01

    This paper will present a brief overview of the recent shifts within English and EAL/D (English as an additional language/dialect) curriculum documents and their focus on critical literacy, using the Queensland context as a case in point. The English syllabus landscape in Queensland has continued to morph in recent years. From 2002 to 2009,…

  6. Impact of Storage Time on the Needed Capture Efficiency for Volatile Radionuclides - 13369

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.; Ilas, G.; Soelberg, N.R.; Strachan, D.M.

    2013-07-01

    During the processing of used nuclear fuel (UNF), volatile radionuclides will be discharged from the facility stack if no recovery processes are in place to limit their release. The volatile radionuclides of concern are {sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 85}Kr, and {sup 129}I. There are three key regulations that address the release of these radionuclides to the environment- 40 CFR 61, 40 CFR 190, and 10 CFR 20. These regulations apply to the total radionuclide release and establish dose limits for the maximum exposed individual (MEI) in the public both in terms of whole body dose and dose to specific organs such as the thyroid. Each radionuclide released to the environment contributes to the total dose to some degree. In this paper we attempt to evaluate the efficiency requirements for the capture processes to limit the doses to the MEI to regulatory levels. Since the total amount of each volatile radionuclide present in the UNF changes with the age of the fuel, the respective capture requirements also change with time. Specifically, we are interested in the impact of the decreasing contribution of {sup 3}H and {sup 85}Kr, which have relatively short half-lives, 12.32 y and 10.76 y, respectively, with the increasing age of the fuel (i.e., time between when the UNF is removed from the reactor and the time it is processed) on the capture requirements. In this paper we examine the capture requirements for these four radionuclides for three fuel types (pressurized water reactor [PWR] with uranium oxide fuel [UOX], PWR with mixed oxide fuel [MOX], and an advanced high temperature gas-cooled reactor [AHTGR]), several burnup values, and time out of reactor extending to 200 y. We calculate doses to the MEI with the EPA code CAP-88 and look at two dose contribution cases. In the first case, we assume that the total allowable dose is attributed to only the four volatile radionuclides. This establishes the lowest capture efficiency value possible. Since this is unrealistic, because

  7. Effect of Hydrogen Addition on Methane HCCI Engine Ignition Timing and Emissions Using a Multi-zone Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zi-han; Wang, Chun-mei; Tang, Hua-xin; Zuo, Cheng-ji; Xu, Hong-ming

    2009-06-01

    Ignition timing control is of great importance in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines. The effect of hydrogen addition on methane combustion was investigated using a CHEMKIN multi-zone model. Results show that hydrogen addition advances ignition timing and enhances peak pressure and temperature. A brief analysis of chemical kinetics of methane blending hydrogen is also performed in order to investigate the scope of its application, and the analysis suggests that OH radical plays an important role in the oxidation. Hydrogen addition increases NOx while decreasing HC and CO emissions. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) also advances ignition timing; however, its effects on emissions are generally the opposite. By adjusting the hydrogen addition and EGR rate, the ignition timing can be regulated with a low emission level. Investigation into zones suggests that NOx is mostly formed in core zones while HC and CO mostly originate in the crevice and the quench layer.

  8. Ocean-Science Mission Needs: Real-Time AUV Data for Command, Control, and Model Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carder, Kendall L.; Costello, D. K.; Warrior, H.; Langebrake, L. C.; Hou, W.; Patten, J. T.; Kaltenbacher, E.

    2001-01-01

    Predictive models for tides, hydrodynamics, and bio-optical properties affecting the visibility and buoyancy of coastal waters are needed to evaluate the safety of personnel and equipment engaged in maritime operations under potentially hazardous conditions. Predicted currents can be markedly different for two-layer systems affected by terrestrial runoff than for well-mixed conditions because the layering decouples the surface and bottom Ekman layers and rectifies the current response to oscillatory upwelling-and downwelling-favorable winds. Standard ocean models (e.g. Princeton Ocean Model) require initial-and boundary data on the physical and optical properties of the multilayered water column to provide accurate simulations of heat budgets and circulation. Two observational systems are designed to measure vertically structured conditions on the West Florida Shelf (WFS): a tethered buoy network and an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) observational system. The AUV system is described with a focus on the observational systems that challenge or limit the communications command and control network for various types of measurement programs. These include vertical oscillatory missions on shelf transects to observe the optical and hydrographic properties of the water column, and bottom-following missions for measuring the bottom albedo. Models of light propagation, absorption, and conversion to heat as well as determination of the buoyancy terms for physical models require these measurements. High data rates associated with video bottom imagery are the most challenging for the real-time, command and control communications system, but they are met through a combination of loss-less and lossy data-compression methods, depending upon the data-rate of the radio links.

  9. Filovirus Research: The Need for an Integrated Approach in Time and Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinzon, Jorge E.

    2010-01-01

    The episodic appearance of Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV) across central Africa over the last 15 years not only underscores the importance of filoviruses as uniquely virulent agents to both human and wildlife communities but also implies a very complex transmission scenario that must be understood if we are to prevent or mitigate filovirus outbreaks in the future. Efforts of a global network of scientists and healthcare workers have expanded our knowledge of filoviruses to meet the growing threat of Ebola and Marburg hemorrhagic fevers in Africa. In recent decades, several newly emerging diseases have resulted in major threats to both affected communities and global public health. Viruses from wildlife hosts in particular, have exhibited a capability for cross-species transmission (CST), and have caused high-impact diseases in humans Such as Ebola and Marburg hemorrhagic fevers, Nipah and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SAILS). It has been estimated that about 60.3% (Jones et al. 2008) of human infectious diseases are of animal origin (zoonoses) and even some important viral diseases that are traditionally considered of human origin, for example measles and smallpox, may very well have their prehistoric origins in wildlife (Wolfe et al 2007). It maybe logical and prudent therefore, to anticipate that there are other, new filoviruses out there that will cross into humans at some point in time. If we anticipate that these will happen and wish to be prepared for and mitigate this potential, then an understanding of filoviruses as a biologic system in the environment will be essential to that process. We will need to know how the ecological dynamic of CST interacts with a 'new' viruse's evolutionary factors to overcome environmental, demographic and host-specific barriers to transmission and infectivity to humans.

  10. Creative fund-raising for nursing homes. An additional revenue source in tough economic times.

    PubMed

    March, C; Kleckner, R; Schumer, M F

    1991-12-01

    Nursing home administrators and sponsors should look to fund-raising as a way to increase their facilities' revenues. The board should first appoint a development coordinator and a special board to be responsible for the fund-raising program. The nursing home can reach potential contributors by regularly sending printed material to specially selected persons from its mailing list. The staff must know the procedures to follow when someone wants to make a donation (e.g., to whom the check should be made payable). To generate interest and to motivate contributors, the fund-raising board should identify specific needs for which the contributions will be solicited. A computer program can help keep track of to whom acknowledgements must be sent. Options for a fund-raising program include memorial and honor gifts, gifts in kind, grants and special gifts, special events, deferred gifts, educational programs, and membership clubs. PMID:10115217

  11. The Time Needed to Implement the Blue Ribbon Commission Recommendation on Interim Storage - 13124

    SciTech Connect

    Voegele, Michael D.; Vieth, Donald

    2013-07-01

    The report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future [1] makes a number of important recommendations to be considered if Congress elects to redirect U.S. high-level radioactive waste disposal policy. Setting aside for the purposes of this discussion any issues related to political forces leading to stopping progress on the Yucca Mountain project and driving the creation of the Commission, an important recommendation of the Commission was to institute prompt efforts to develop one or more consolidated storage facilities. The Blue Ribbon Commission noted that this recommended strategy for future storage and disposal facilities and operations should be implemented regardless of what happens with Yucca Mountain. It is too easy, however, to focus on interim storage as an alternative to geologic disposal. The Blue Ribbon Commission report does not go far enough in addressing the magnitude of the contentious problems associated with reopening the issues of relative authorities of the states and federal government with which Congress wrestled in crafting the Nuclear Waste Policy Act [2]. The Blue Ribbon Commission recommendation for prompt adoption of an interim storage program does not appear to be fully informed about the actions that must be taken, the relative cost of the effort, or the realistic time line that would be involved. In essence, the recommendation leaves to others the details of the systems engineering analyses needed to understand the nature and details of all the operations required to reach an operational interim storage facility without derailing forever the true end goal of geologic disposal. The material presented identifies a number of impediments that must be overcome before the country could develop a centralized federal interim storage facility. In summary, and in the order presented, they are: 1. Change the law, HJR 87, PL 107-200, designating Yucca Mountain for the development of a repository. 2. Bring new nuclear waste

  12. Equivalence of time and aperture domain additive noise in ultrasound coherence

    PubMed Central

    Bottenus, Nick B.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonic echoes backscattered from diffuse media, recorded by an array transducer and appropriately focused, demonstrate coherence predicted by the van Cittert–Zernike theorem. Additive noise signals from off-axis scattering, reverberation, phase aberration, and electronic (thermal) noise can all superimpose incoherent or partially coherent signals onto the recorded echoes, altering the measured coherence. An expression is derived to describe the effect of uncorrelated random channel noise in terms of the noise-to-signal ratio. Equivalent descriptions are made in the aperture dimension to describe uncorrelated magnitude and phase apodizations of the array. Binary apodization is specifically described as an example of magnitude apodization and adjustments are presented to minimize the artifacts caused by finite signal length. The effects of additive noise are explored in short-lag spatial coherence imaging, an image formation technique that integrates the calculated coherence curve of acquired signals up to a small fraction of the array length for each lateral and axial location. A derivation of the expected contrast as a function of noise-to-signal ratio is provided and validation is performed in simulation. PMID:25618045

  13. Time To Talk About Dietary Supplements: 5 Things Consumers Need To Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... V W X Y Z 5 Tips: What Consumers Need To Know About Dietary Supplements Share: Many ... charge of your health by being an informed consumer . The standards for marketing supplements are very different ...

  14. Use of Time Domain Reflectometers (TDRs) in Permeable Pavement Systems to Predict Maintenance Needs and Effectiveness

    EPA Science Inventory

    As the surface in permeable pavement systems clogs, infiltration capacity decreases, so maintenance is required to maintain hydrologic performance. There is limited direct guidance for determining when maintenance is needed to prevent surface runoff bypass. Research is being co...

  15. Investigating critical effects of variegated lubricants, glidants and hydrophilic additives on lag time of press coated ethylcellulose tablets.

    PubMed

    Patadia, Riddhish; Vora, Chintan; Mittal, Karan; Mashru, Rajashree

    2016-01-01

    The research envisaged focuses on vital impacts of variegated lubricants, glidants and hydrophilic additives on lag time of press coated ethylcellulose (EC) tablets using prednisone as a model drug. Several lubricants and glidants such as magnesium stearate, colloidal SiO2, sodium stearyl fumarate, talc, stearic acid, polyethylene glycol (6000) and glyceryl behenate were investigated to understand their effects on lag time by changing their concentrations in outer coat. Further, the effects of hydrophilic additives on lag time were examined for hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (E5), hydroxypropylcellulose (EF and SSL), povidone (K30), copovidone, polyethylene glycol (4000), lactose and mannitol. In vitro drug release testing revealed that each selected lubricant/glidant, if present even at concentration of 0.25% w/w, significantly reduced the lag time of press coated tablets. Specifically, colloidal SiO2 and/or magnesium stearate were detrimental while other lubricants/glidants were relatively less injurious. Among hydrophilic additives, freely water soluble fillers had utmost influence in lag time, whereas, comparatively less impact was observed with polymeric binders. Concisely, glidant and lubricant should be chosen to have minimal impact on lag time and further judicious selection of hydrophilic additives should be exercised for modulating lag time of pulsatile release formulations. PMID:25566928

  16. Vectran Fiber Time-Dependent Behavior and Additional Static Loading Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fette, Russell B.; Sovinski, Marjorie F.

    2004-01-01

    Vectran HS appears from literature and testing to date to be an ideal upgrade from Kevlar braided cords for many long-term, static-loading applications such as tie-downs on solar arrays. Vectran is a liquid crystalline polymer and exhibits excellent tensile properties. The material has been touted as a zero creep product. Testing discussed in this report does not support this statement, though the creep is on the order of four times slower than with similar Kevlar 49 products. Previous work with Kevlar and new analysis of Vectran testing has led to a simple predictive model for Vectran at ambient conditions. The mean coefficient of thermal expansion (negative in this case) is similar to Kevlar 49, but is not linear. A positive transition in the curve occurs near 100 C. Out-gassing tests show that the material performs well within parameters for most space flight applications. Vectran also offers increased abrasion resistance, minimal moisture regain, and similar UV degradation. The effects of material construction appear to have a dramatic effect in stress relaxation for braided Vectran. To achieve the improved relaxation rate, upgrades must also examine alternate construction or preconditioning methods. This report recommends Vectran HS as a greatly improved replacement material for applications where time-dependent relaxation is a major factor.

  17. Effect of Powder Reuse Times on Additive Manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V by Selective Electron Beam Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, H. P.; Qian, M.; Liu, N.; Zhang, X. Z.; Yang, G. Y.; Wang, J.

    2015-03-01

    An advantage of the powder-bed-based metal additive manufacturing (AM) processes is that the powder can be reused. The powder reuse or recycling times directly affect the affordability of the additively manufactured parts, especially for the AM of titanium parts. This study examines the influence of powder reuse times on the characteristics of Ti-6Al-4V powder, including powder composition, particle size distribution (PSD), apparent density, tap density, flowability, and particle morphology. In addition, tensile samples were manufactured and evaluated with respect to powder reuse times and sample locations in the powder bed. The following findings were made from reusing the same batch of powder 21 times for AM by selective electron beam melting: (i) the oxygen (O) content increased progressively with increasing reuse times but both the Al content and the V content remained generally stable (a small decrease only); (ii) the powder became less spherical with increasing reuse times and some particles showed noticeable distortion and rough surfaces after being reused 16 times; (iii) the PSD became narrower and few satellite particles were observed after 11 times of reuse; (iv) reused powder showed improved flowability; and (v) reused powder showed no measurable undesired influence on the AM process and the samples exhibited highly consistent tensile properties, irrespective of their locations in the powder bed. The implications of these findings were discussed.

  18. A Comparison of Time Needed To Complete Measurement Tasks Using Customary and Metric Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tew, E. James, Jr.

    Adult students taking a dimensional metrology course usually do so to fulfill a need for their present employment, advancement, or expected employment. In order to assure that the quality of training is maintained it has become necessary to investigate alternatives to existing instructional approaches whereby the contents of the course can be…

  19. Beyond Banning War and Superhero Play: Meeting Children's Needs in Violent Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Diane E.

    2003-01-01

    Details reasons for children's fascination with war play, and teachers' concerns about such play. Asserts that although the best strategy is to reduce the amount of violence children see, children need to find ways to work out the violence they do see. Offers suggestions for addressing children's violent play, including promoting imaginative and…

  20. Families’ Stressors and Needs at Time of Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation: A Jordanian Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Masa’Deh, Rami; Saifan, Ahmad; Timmons, Stephen; Nairn, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Background: During cardio-pulmonary resuscitation, family members, in some hospitals, are usually pushed to stay out of the resuscitation room. However, growing literature implies that family presence during resuscitation could be beneficial. Previous literature shows controversial belief whether or not a family member should be present during resuscitation of their relative. Some worldwide association such as the American Heart Association supports family-witnessed resuscitation and urge hospitals to develop policies to ease this process. The opinions on family-witnessed resuscitation vary widely among various cultures, and some hospitals are not applying such polices yet. This study explores family members’ needs during resuscitation in adult critical care settings. Methods: This is a part of larger study. The study was conducted in six hospitals in two major Jordanian cities. A purposive sample of seven family members, who had experience of having a resuscitated relative, was recruited over a period of six months. Semi-structured interview was utilised as the main data collection method in the study. Findings: The study findings revealed three main categories: families’ need for reassurance; families’ need for proximity; and families’ need for support. The need for information about patient’s condition was the most important need. Updating family members about patient’s condition would reduce their tension and improve their acceptance for the end result of resuscitation. All interviewed family members wanted the option to stay beside their loved one at end stage of their life. Distinctively, most of family members want this option for some religious and cultural reasons such as praying and supplicating to support their loved one. Conclusions: This study emphasizes the importance of considering the cultural and religious dimensions in any family-witnessed resuscitation programs. The study recommends that family members of resuscitated patients should

  1. Review of information on the radiation chemistry of materials around waste canisters in salt and assessment of the need for additional experimental information

    SciTech Connect

    Jenks, G.H.; Baes, C.F. Jr.

    1980-03-01

    The brines, vapors, and salts precipitated from the brines will be exposed to gamma rays and to elevated temperatures in the regions close to a waste package in the salt. Accordingly, they will be subject to changes in composition brought about by reactions induced by the radiations and heat. This report reviews the status of information on the radiation chemistry of brines, gases, and solids which might be present around a waste package in salt and to assess the need for additional laboratory investigations on the radiation chemistry of these materials. The basic aspects of the radiation chemistry of water and aqueous solutions, including concentrated salt solutions, were reviewed briefly and found to be substantially unchanged from those presented in Jenks's 1972 review of radiolysis and hydrolysis in salt-mine brines. Some additional information pertaining to the radiolytic yields and reactions in brine solutions has become available since the previous review, and this information will be useful in the eventual, complete elucidation of the radiation chemistry of the salt-mine brines. 53 references.

  2. A Ride in the Time Machine: Information Management Capabilities Health Departments Will Need

    PubMed Central

    Grannis, Shaun; Ross, David; Smith, Torney

    2014-01-01

    We have proposed needed information management capabilities for future US health departments predicated on trends in health care reform and health information technology. Regardless of whether health departments provide direct clinical services (and many will), they will manage unprecedented quantities of sensitive information for the public health core functions of assurance and assessment, including population-level health surveillance and metrics. Absent improved capabilities, health departments risk vestigial status, with consequences for vulnerable populations. Developments in electronic health records, interoperability and information exchange, public information sharing, decision support, and cloud technologies can support information management if health departments have appropriate capabilities. The need for national engagement in and consensus on these capabilities and their importance to health department sustainability make them appropriate for consideration in the context of accreditation. PMID:25033122

  3. The time needed to refit an orthodontic wire: influence of the attachments.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Michel; Bachet, Christophe; Dameron, Cyril

    2014-12-01

    In this prospective clinical study, we assessed the relative speed with which archwires can be changed by comparing self-ligating brackets with classical methods using elastomeric and metal ties, as well as the impact of the stage of orthodontic treatment. The main judgement criterion was the time required to place orthodontic archwires with different cross-sections, alloys and compositions, using two types of brackets, conventional twin-tie and self-ligating. Placement time was recorded 10 times for each procedure by three operators experienced in the use of self-ligating bracket clips. The In-Ovation self-ligating bracket in the metal version (In-Ovation R) and its ceramic variant (In-Ovation C) has a shorter implementation (archwire removal and placement) time than a classical system (conventional MicroArch(®) bracket). Mean ligating time is halved with the In-Ovation self-ligating brackets versus elastomeric ties and is reduced four-fold versus metal ties (with the help of an assistant) and even six-fold versus metal ties placed unassisted. On average, the time-saving was 1.5 minutes per patient for ligating times ranging from 1.5 to 6 minutes. The time saved in this way at each session could be used easily and intelligently to improve patient hygiene, talk with the child about his/her treatment progress and improve communication with parents. PMID:25457393

  4. 26 CFR 301.6110-5 - Notice and time requirements; actions to restrain disclosure; actions to obtain additional...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the Internal Revenue Service determines that the request constitutes a request for disclosure of the... the Internal Revenue Service has determined that additional disclosure of information other than the... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Notice and time requirements; actions...

  5. Effect of enzyme concentration, addition of water and incubation time on increase in yield of starch from potato.

    PubMed

    Sit, Nandan; Agrawal, U S; Deka, Sankar C

    2014-05-01

    Enzymatic treatment process for starch extraction from potato was investigated using cellulase enzyme and compared with conventional process. The effects of three parameters, cellulase enzyme concentration, incubation time and addition of water were evaluated for increase in starch yield as compared to the conventional process i.e., without using enzyme. A two-level full factorial design was used to study the process. The results indicated that all the main parameters and their interactions are statistically significant. Enzyme concentration and incubation time had a positive effect on the increase in starch yield while addition of water had a negative effect. The increase in starch yield ranged from 1.9% at low enzyme concentration and incubation time and high addition of water to a maximum of 70% increase from conventional process in starch yield was achieved when enzyme concentration and incubation time were high and addition of water was low suggesting water present in the ground potato meal is sufficient for access to the enzyme with in the slurry ensuring adequate contact with the substrate. PMID:24803713

  6. 38 CFR 20.304 - Rule 304. Filing additional evidence does not extend time limit for appeal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rule 304. Filing additional evidence does not extend time limit for appeal. 20.304 Section 20.304 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) BOARD OF VETERANS' APPEALS: RULES OF PRACTICE Filing § 20.304 Rule 304. Filing...

  7. Processing time of addition or withdrawal of single or combined balance-stabilizing haptic and visual information.

    PubMed

    Honeine, Jean-Louis; Crisafulli, Oscar; Sozzi, Stefania; Schieppati, Marco

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the integration time of haptic and visual input and their interaction during stance stabilization. Eleven subjects performed four tandem-stance conditions (60 trials each). Vision, touch, and both vision and touch were added and withdrawn. Furthermore, vision was replaced with touch and vice versa. Body sway, tibialis anterior, and peroneus longus activity were measured. Following addition or withdrawal of vision or touch, an integration time period elapsed before the earliest changes in sway were observed. Thereafter, sway varied exponentially to a new steady-state while reweighting occurred. Latencies of sway changes on sensory addition ranged from 0.6 to 1.5 s across subjects, consistently longer for touch than vision, and were regularly preceded by changes in muscle activity. Addition of vision and touch simultaneously shortened the latencies with respect to vision or touch separately, suggesting cooperation between sensory modalities. Latencies following withdrawal of vision or touch or both simultaneously were shorter than following addition. When vision was replaced with touch or vice versa, adding one modality did not interfere with the effect of withdrawal of the other, suggesting that integration of withdrawal and addition were performed in parallel. The time course of the reweighting process to reach the new steady-state was also shorter on withdrawal than addition. The effects of different sensory inputs on posture stabilization illustrate the operation of a time-consuming, possibly supraspinal process that integrates and fuses modalities for accurate balance control. This study also shows the facilitatory interaction of visual and haptic inputs in integration and reweighting of stance-stabilizing inputs. PMID:26334013

  8. Time needed to board an airplane: a power law and the structure behind it.

    PubMed

    Frette, Vidar; Hemmer, Per C

    2012-01-01

    A simple model for the boarding of an airplane is studied. Passengers have reserved seats but enter the airplane in arbitrary order. Queues are formed along the aisle, as some passengers have to wait to reach the seats for which they have reservation. We label a passenger by the number of his or her reserved seat. In most cases the boarding process is much slower than for the optimal situation, where passenger and seat orders are identical. We study this dynamical system by calculating the average boarding time when all permutations of N passengers are given equal weight. To first order, the boarding time for a given permutation (ordering) of the passengers is given by the number s of sequences of monotonically increasing values in the permutation. We show that the distribution of s is symmetric on [1,N], which leads to an average boarding time (N+1)/2. We have found an exact expression for s and have shown that the full distribution of s approaches a normal distribution as N increases. However, there are significant corrections to the first-order results, due to certain correlations between passenger ordering and the substrate (seat ordering). This occurs for some cases in which the sequence of the seats is partially mirrored in the passenger ordering. These cases with correlations have a boarding time that is lower than predicted by the first-order results. The large number of cases with reduced boarding times have been classified. We also give some indicative results on the geometry of the correlations, with sorting into geometry groups. With increasing N, both the number of correlation types and the number of cases belonging to each type increase rapidly. Using enumeration we find that as a result of these correlations the average boarding time behaves like N(α), with α≃0.69, as compared with α=1.0 for the first-order approximation. PMID:22400535

  9. Time needed to board an airplane: A power law and the structure behind it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frette, Vidar; Hemmer, Per C.

    2012-01-01

    A simple model for the boarding of an airplane is studied. Passengers have reserved seats but enter the airplane in arbitrary order. Queues are formed along the aisle, as some passengers have to wait to reach the seats for which they have reservation. We label a passenger by the number of his or her reserved seat. In most cases the boarding process is much slower than for the optimal situation, where passenger and seat orders are identical. We study this dynamical system by calculating the average boarding time when all permutations of N passengers are given equal weight. To first order, the boarding time for a given permutation (ordering) of the passengers is given by the number s of sequences of monotonically increasing values in the permutation. We show that the distribution of s is symmetric on [1,N], which leads to an average boarding time (N+1)/2. We have found an exact expression for s and have shown that the full distribution of s approaches a normal distribution as N increases. However, there are significant corrections to the first-order results, due to certain correlations between passenger ordering and the substrate (seat ordering). This occurs for some cases in which the sequence of the seats is partially mirrored in the passenger ordering. These cases with correlations have a boarding time that is lower than predicted by the first-order results. The large number of cases with reduced boarding times have been classified. We also give some indicative results on the geometry of the correlations, with sorting into geometry groups. With increasing N, both the number of correlation types and the number of cases belonging to each type increase rapidly. Using enumeration we find that as a result of these correlations the average boarding time behaves like Nα, with α≃0.69, as compared with α=1.0 for the first-order approximation.

  10. Teaching in New Times: What Do Teachers Really Need to Know?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran-Smith, Marilyn

    2011-01-01

    In these complicated new times, many new teachers begin their careers in urban and other schools with increasingly diverse student populations. And as people know, many new teachers leave those schools--and some leave teaching altogether--after just a few years in the field. In today's world, policy makers, politicians, educational leaders, the…

  11. Using Part-Time Working to Support Graduate Employment: Needs and Perceptions of Employers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Carl; Maxfield, Tim; Gbadamosi, Gbolahan

    2015-01-01

    An exploration of the value attached to the work experience of graduates, and particularly the value of part-time working whilst studying for a degree, from an employer's perspective, is reported. A documentary analysis of graduate recruiters was conducted to assess the extent to which work experience was specified for graduate employment…

  12. Comment on "Time needed to board an airplane: a power law and the structure behind it".

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Noam

    2012-08-01

    Frette and Hemmer [Phys. Rev. E 85, 011130 (2012)] recently showed that for a simple model for the boarding of an airplane, the mean time to board scales as a power law with the number of passengers N and the exponent is less than 1. They note that this scaling leads to the prediction that the "back-to-front" strategy, where passengers are divided into groups from contiguous ranges of rows and each group is allowed to board in turn from back to front once the previous group has found their seats, has a longer boarding time than would a single group. Here I extend their results to a larger number of passengers using a sampling approach and explore a scenario where the queue is presorted into groups from back to front, but allowed to enter the plane as soon as they can. I show that the power law dependence on passenger numbers is different for large N and that there is a boarding time reduction for presorted groups, with a power law dependence on the number of presorted groups. PMID:23005813

  13. Comment on ``Time needed to board an airplane: A power law and the structure behind it''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Noam

    2012-08-01

    Frette and Hemmer [Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.85.011130 85, 011130 (2012)] recently showed that for a simple model for the boarding of an airplane, the mean time to board scales as a power law with the number of passengers N and the exponent is less than 1. They note that this scaling leads to the prediction that the “back-to-front” strategy, where passengers are divided into groups from contiguous ranges of rows and each group is allowed to board in turn from back to front once the previous group has found their seats, has a longer boarding time than would a single group. Here I extend their results to a larger number of passengers using a sampling approach and explore a scenario where the queue is presorted into groups from back to front, but allowed to enter the plane as soon as they can. I show that the power law dependence on passenger numbers is different for large N and that there is a boarding time reduction for presorted groups, with a power law dependence on the number of presorted groups.

  14. Timing of deep brain stimulation in Parkinson disease: a need for reappraisal?

    PubMed

    deSouza, Ruth-Mary; Moro, Elena; Lang, Anthony E; Schapira, Anthony H V

    2013-05-01

    We review the current application of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson disease (PD) and consider the evidence that earlier use of DBS confers long-term symptomatic benefit for patients compared to best medical therapy. Electronic searches were performed of PubMed, Web of Knowledge, Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials to identify all article types relating to the timing of DBS in PD. Current evidence suggests that DBS is typically performed in late stage PD, a mean of 14 to 15 years after diagnosis. Current guidelines recommend that PD patients who are resistant to medical therapies, have significant medication side effects and lengthening off periods, but are otherwise cognitively intact and medically fit for surgery be considered for DBS. If these criteria are rigidly interpreted, it may be that, by the time medical treatment options have been exhausted, the disease has progressed to the point that the patient may no longer be fit for neurosurgical intervention. From the evidence available, we conclude that surgical management of PD alone or in combination with medical therapy results in greater improvement of motor symptoms and quality of life than medical treatment alone. There is evidence to support the use of DBS in less advanced PD and that it may be appropriate for earlier stages of the disease than for which it is currently used. The improving short and long-term safety profile of DBS makes early application a realistic possibility. PMID:23483564

  15. Stone Soup Projects: Using real-time resources and creative partnering to meet multiple needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, S.; Searle, R.; Zala, K.

    2010-12-01

    Ocean Networks Canada oversees the VENUS and NEPTUNE Canada undersea cabled observatories. Its Centre for Enterprise and Engagement communicates the scientific discoveries and technological innovations happening at the two systems. Not surprisingly, funders in ocean science are interested in seeing evidence of increased recruitment of Highly Qualified Personnel into marine science and industry. This demand creates a series of opportunities for inspiring students, ranging from graduate school down to middle school, to pursue studies in chemistry, biology, physics, geology, engineering, and beyond. As the Engagement section is a small operation, we partner with others to produce educational assets incorporating real-time data from VENUS and NEPTUNE Canada observatories that enable frontline educators to create exciting ocean science experiences for students and the public. In one project, the lab component of an entire undergraduate course lets students conduct their own investigations into marine oxygen levels by using VENUS data. In another, Fine Arts graduate and undergraduate students are using high-tech tools to create a series of webisodes that map the principles of Ocean Literacy onto the science themes of VENUS and NEPTUNE Canada. In a third project, we hosted a website for a collaborative expedition to small coastal towns that focused on the marine science happening in the Salish Sea, British Columbia. Our projects and challenges for engaging students and the public with ocean science using real-time and other data offer strategies for outreach and education sections of similar organizations.

  16. Effect of ultrasound treatment, oil addition and storage time on lycopene stability and in vitro bioaccessibility of tomato pulp.

    PubMed

    Anese, Monica; Bot, Francesca; Panozzo, Agnese; Mirolo, Giorgio; Lippe, Giovanna

    2015-04-01

    This study was performed to investigate the influence of ultrasound processing on tomato pulp containing no sunflower oil, or increasing amounts (i.e. 2.5%, 5% and 10%), on lycopene concentration and in vitro bioaccessibility at time zero and during storage at 5 °C. Results confirmed previous findings in that ultrasonication was responsible for cell breakage and subsequent lycopene release in a highly viscous matrix. Neither the ultrasound process nor oil addition affected lycopene concentration. A decrease of approximately 35% lycopene content occurred at storage times longer than 15 days, due to isomerisation and oxidation reactions. No differences in lycopene in vitro bioaccessibility were found between the untreated and ultrasonically treated samples; this parameter decreased as a consequence of oil addition. Losses of lycopene in vitro bioaccessibility ranging between 50% and 80% occurred in the untreated and ultrasonically treated tomato pulps with and without oil during storage, mainly due to carotenoid degradation. PMID:25442608

  17. Optimizing the performance of a reactor by reducing the retention time and addition of glycerin for anaerobically digesting manure

    PubMed Central

    Timmerman, Maikel; Schuman, Els; van Eekert, Miriam; van Riel, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of manure is a widely accepted technology for energy production. However, only a minimal portion of the manure production in the EU is anaerobically digested and occurs predominantly in codigestion plants. There is substantial potential for biogas plants that primarily operate on manure (>90%); however, the methane yields of manure are less compared to coproducts, which is one of the reasons for manure-based biogas plants often being economically non-viable. Therefore, it is essential to begin increasing the efficiency of these biogas plants. This study investigated the effect of decreasing retention time and introducing a moderate amount of glycerin on the biogas production as methods to improve efficiency. An experiment has been conducted with two different manure types in four biogas reactors. The results of the study demonstrated that, first, it was possible to decrease the retention time to 10–15 days; however, the effect on biogas production varied per manure type. Secondly, the biogas production almost triples at a retention time of 15.6 days with an addition of 4% glycerin. The relative production-enhancing effect of glycerin did not vary significantly with both manure types. However, the absolute production-enhancing effect of glycerin differed per manure type since the biogas production per gram VS differed per manure type. Thirdly, the positive effect of the glycerin input declines with shorter retention times. Therefore, the effect of glycerin addition depends on the manure type and retention time. PMID:25401272

  18. Composite oscillator systems for meeting user needs for time and frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, S. R.; Walls, F. L.

    1978-01-01

    Frequency standards are used in most navigation and telecommunications systems to provide a long term memory of either frequency, phase, or time epoch. From a systems point of view, the performance aspects of the frequency standard are weighed against other systems characteristics, such as overall performance, cost, size, and accessibility; a number of examples are very briefly reviewed. The theory of phase lock and frequency lock systems is outlined in sufficient detail that total oscillator system performance can be predicted from measurements on the individual components. As an example, details of the performance of a high spectral purity oscillator phase locked to a long term stable oscillator are given. Results for several systems, including the best system stability that can be obtained from present commercially available 5-MHz sources, are shown.

  19. Routine Urine Culture at the Time of Percutaneous Urinary Drainage: Does Every Patient Need One?

    SciTech Connect

    Brody, L.A. Brown, K.T.; Covey, A.M.; Brown, A.E.; Getrajdman, G.I.

    2006-08-15

    Purpose. To determine the clinical variables associated with bacteriuria in patients undergoing primary percutaneous antegrade urinary drainage procedures in order to predict the utility of routinely obtaining urine cultures at the time of the procedure. Methods. Between October 1995 and March 1998 urine cultures were prospectively obtained in all patients undergoing a primary percutaneous antegrade urinary drainage procedure. One hundred and eighty-seven patients underwent 264 procedures. Results were available in 252 cases. Culture results were correlated with clinical, laboratory, and demographic variables. Anaerobic cultures were not uniformly performed. Results. Urine cultures were positive in 24 of 252 (9.5%) cases. An indwelling or recently removed ipsilateral device (catheter or stent) and a history of previous cystectomy with urinary diversion were significant predictors of a positive culture. Patients without either of these predictors, and without clinical or laboratory evidence of infection, were rarely found to have positive cultures. Conclusion. The likelihood of a positive urine culture can be predicted on the basis of the aforementioned clinical variables. In the absence of these clinical indicators routine urine cultures are neither useful nor cost-effective.

  20. IS IT TIME TO RETHINK CORD MANAGEMENT WHEN RESUSCITATION IS NEEDED?

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Judith S.; Erickson-Owens, Debra A.

    2015-01-01

    An infant who receives a placental transfusion at birth, either from cord milking or delayed cord clamping, obtains about 30% more blood volume than the infant whose cord is cut immediately. Receiving an adequate blood volume from placental transfusion at birth may be protective for the distressed neonate as it prevents hypovolemia and can support optimal perfusion to all organs. New research shows that ventilating before clamping the umbilical cord can reduce large swings in cardiovascular function and help to stabilize the infant. Hypovolemia, often associated with nuchal cord or shoulder dystocia, may lead to an inflammatory cascade and subsequent ischemic injury. A sudden unexpected neonatal asystole at birth may occur from severe hypovolemia. The restoration of blood volume is an important action to protect the hearts and brains of these neonates. Current protocols for resuscitation imply immediate cord clamping and the care of the infant away from the mother's bedside. We suggest that an obstetrical provider can achieve placental transfusion for the distressed neonate by milking the cord several times or resuscitating the infant at the perineum with an intact cord. Milking the cord can be done quickly within the current Neonatal Resuscitation Program guidelines. Cord blood gases can be collected with delayed cord clamping. “Bringing the resuscitation” to the mother's bedside is a novel concept and supports an intact cord. Adopting a policy for resuscitation with an intact cord in a hospital setting will take concentrated effort and team work by obstetrics, pediatrics, midwifery, and nursing. PMID:25297530

  1. Effect of cycle time on fungal morphology, broth rheology, and recombinant enzyme productivity during pulsed addition of limiting carbon source.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Swapnil; Wenger, Kevin S; Rane, Kishore; Rising, Vanessa; Marten, Mark R

    2005-03-01

    For many years, high broth viscosity has remained a key challenge in large-scale filamentous fungal fermentations. In previous studies, we showed that broth viscosity could be reduced by pulsed addition of limiting carbon during fed-batch fermentation. The objective in this study was to determine how changing the frequency of pulsed substrate addition affects fungal morphology, broth rheology, and recombinant enzyme productivity. To accomplish this, a series of duplicate fed-batch fermentations were performed in 20-L fermentors with a recombinant glucoamylase producing strain of Aspergillus oryzae. The total cycle time for substrate pulsing was varied over a wide range (30-2,700 s), with substrate added only during the first 30% of each cycle. As a control, a fermentation was conducted with continuous substrate feeding, and in all fermentations the same total amount of substrate was added. Results show that the total biomass concentration remained relatively unaltered, while a substantial decrease in the mean projected area of fungal elements (i.e., average size) was observed with increasing cycle time. This led to reduced broth viscosity and increased oxygen uptake rate. However, high values of cycle time (i.e., 900-2,700 s) showed a significant increase in fungal conidia formation and significantly reduced recombinant enzyme productivity, suggesting that the fungi channeled substrate to storage compounds rather than to recombinant protein. In addition to explaining the effect of cycle time on fermentation performance, these results may aid in explaining the discrepancies observed on scale-up to larger fermentors. PMID:15643626

  2. Real-time Data Fusion Platforms: The Need of Multi-dimensional Data-driven Research in Biomedical Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Raje, Satyajeet; Kite, Bobbie; Ramanathan, Jay; Payne, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Systems designed to expedite data preprocessing tasks such as data discovery, interpretation, and integration that are required before data analysis drastically impact the pace of biomedical informatics research. Current commercial interactive and real-time data integration tools are designed for large-scale business analytics requirements. In this paper we identify the need for end-to-end data fusion platforms from the researcher's perspective, supporting ad-hoc data interpretation and integration. PMID:26262406

  3. Impacts of warming and elevated CO2 on a semi-arid grassland are non-additive, shift with precipitation, and reverse over time.

    PubMed

    Mueller, K E; Blumenthal, D M; Pendall, E; Carrillo, Y; Dijkstra, F A; Williams, D G; Follett, R F; Morgan, J A

    2016-08-01

    It is unclear how elevated CO2 (eCO2 ) and the corresponding shifts in temperature and precipitation will interact to impact ecosystems over time. During a 7-year experiment in a semi-arid grassland, the response of plant biomass to eCO2 and warming was largely regulated by interannual precipitation, while the response of plant community composition was more sensitive to experiment duration. The combined effects of eCO2 and warming on aboveground plant biomass were less positive in 'wet' growing seasons, but total plant biomass was consistently stimulated by ~ 25% due to unique, supra-additive responses of roots. Independent of precipitation, the combined effects of eCO2 and warming on C3 graminoids became increasingly positive and supra-additive over time, reversing an initial shift toward C4 grasses. Soil resources also responded dynamically and non-additively to eCO2 and warming, shaping the plant responses. Our results suggest grasslands are poised for drastic changes in function and highlight the need for long-term, factorial experiments. PMID:27339693

  4. The effect of exercise training with an additional inspiratory load on inspiratory muscle fatigue and time-trial performance.

    PubMed

    McEntire, Serina J; Smith, Joshua R; Ferguson, Christine S; Brown, Kelly R; Kurti, Stephanie P; Harms, Craig A

    2016-08-01

    The purpose was to determine the effect of moderate-intensity exercise training (ET) on inspiratory muscle fatigue (IMF) and if an additional inspiratory load during ET (ET+IL) would further improve inspiratory muscle strength, IMF, and time-trial performance. 15 subjects were randomly divided to ET (n=8) and ET+IL groups (n=7). All subjects completed six weeks of exercise training three days/week at ∼70%V̇O2peak for 30min. The ET+IL group breathed through an inspiratory muscle trainer (15% PImax) during exercise. 5-mile, and 30-min time-trials were performed pre-training, weeks three and six. Inspiratory muscle strength increased (p<0.05) for both groups to a similar (p>0.05) extent. ET and ET+IL groups improved (p<0.05) 5-mile time-trial performance (∼10% and ∼18%) and the ET+IL group was significantly faster than ET at week 6. ET and ET+IL groups experienced less (p<0.05) IMF compared to pre-training following the 5-mile time-trial. In conclusion, these data suggest ET leads to less IMF, ET+IL improves inspiratory muscle strength and IMF, but not different than ET alone. PMID:27195511

  5. Understanding Solidification of Polythiophene Thin Films during Spin-Coating: Effects of Spin-Coating Time and Processing Additives

    PubMed Central

    Na, Jin Yeong; Kang, Boseok; Sin, Dong Hun; Cho, Kilwon; Park, Yeong Don

    2015-01-01

    Spin-coating has been used extensively in the fabrication of electronic devices; however, the effects of the processing parameters have not been fully explored. Here, we systematically characterize the effects of the spin-coating time on the microstructure evolution during semiconducting polymer solidification in an effort to establish the relationship between this parameter and the performances of the resulting polymer field-effect transistors (FETs). We found that a short spin-coating time of a few seconds dramatically improve the morphology and molecular order in a conjugated polymer thin film because the π-π stacking structures formed by the polymer molecules grow slowly and with a greater degree of order due to the residual solvent present in the wet film. The improved ordering is correlated with improved charge carrier transport in the FETs prepared from these films. We also demonstrated the effects of various processing additives on the resulting FET characteristics as well as on the film drying behavior during spin-coating. The physical properties of the additives are found to affect the film drying process and the resulting device performance. PMID:26299676

  6. The real-time state of the aurora -- a research to operations need with a citizen science solution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heavner, M.; MacDonald, E.; Case, N.; McCloat, S.

    2015-12-01

    A prototype citizen science application called Aurorasaurus has been developed and launched in 2014. The goal of this platform is crowdsourcing observations of the aurora in real-time in order to assess global visibility of the aurora for the public. Users can submit observations, verify relevant social media observations, learn about the aurora, and receive location-based alerts based on verified reports, all in near real-time. The size and distribution of the citizen scientist community around the world has tremendous potential both for documenting the visible manifestations of global space weather impacts as well as providing quality control on the reported sightings. Information with high spatial and temporal resolution of the largest, most dynamic and mysterious space weather events is made possible by this solution, and this data can be integrated with other ground and space based measures of auroral activity. We will present initial results during the large geomagnetic events of 2015 and comparison to other measures of auroral activity. Our findings indicate the prototype application can be a valuable tool for real-time aurora knowledge and should be included in discussions of real-time aurora nowcasting needs. We will discuss those needs and assess the feasibility of available systems for meeting them.

  7. Waiting times before dental care under general anesthesia in children with special needs in the Children's Hospital of Casablanca

    PubMed Central

    Badre, Bouchra; Serhier, Zineb; El Arabi, Samira

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Oral diseases may have an impact on quality of children's life. The presence of severe disability requires the use of care under general anesthesia (GA). However, because of the limited number of qualified health personnel, waiting time before intervention can be long. Aim: To evaluate the waiting time before dental care under general anesthesia for children with special needs in Morocco. Methods A retrospective cohort study was carried out in pediatric dentistry unit of the University Hospital of Casablanca. Data were collected from records of patients seen for the first time between 2006 and 2011. The waiting time was defined as the time between the date of the first consultation and intervention date. Results 127 children received dental care under general anesthesia, 57.5% were male and the average age was 9.2 (SD = 3.4). Decay was the most frequent reason for consultation (48%), followed by pain (32%). The average waiting time was 7.6 months (SD = 4.2 months). The average number of acts performed per patient was 13.5. Conclusion Waiting times were long, it is necessary to take measures to reduce delays and improve access to oral health care for this special population. PMID:25328594

  8. OAST Space Theme Workshop. Volume 3: Working group summary. 9: Aerothermodynamics (M-3). A: Statement. B: Technology needs (form 1). C. Priority assessment (form 2). D. Additional assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Twelve aerothermodynamic space technology needs were identified to reduce the design uncertainties in aerodynamic heating and forces experienced by heavy lift launch vehicles, orbit transfer vehicles, and advanced single stage to orbit vehicles for the space transportation system, and for probes, planetary surface landers, and sample return vehicles for solar system exploration vehicles. Research and technology needs identified include: (1) increasing the fluid dynamics capability by at least two orders of magnitude by developing an advanced computer processor for the solution of fluid dynamic problems with improved software; (2) predicting multi-engine base flow fields for launch vehicles; and (3) developing methods to conserve energy in aerothermodynamic ground test facilities.

  9. Identifying Additional Learning Needs in the Early Years: Listening to the Children. The Nursery World/Routledge Essential Guide for Early Years Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacIntyre, Christine

    2005-01-01

    "I know there is something wrong, but what? How do I know if outside help for this child is needed? How do I tell parents that their child could have a learning difficulty?" These are questions that most nursery workers, at some point in their careers, will have to face. Based on the lives of real children and typical situations in early years…

  10. Research Papers Sponsored by the Commission on Private Philanthropy and Public Needs. Volume II: Philanthropic Fields of Interest, Part II-Additional Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Treasury, Washington, DC.

    Twelve papers discuss future changes and trends in philanthropic giving and activities. The report is Volume II, Part II of a five volume series examining the relationship between nonprofit institutions and their donors. The opening paper reviews the needs for better definition of the government's role in contracting and grant making, and for…

  11. Confidence or Confusion: How Well Are Today's Newly Qualified Teachers in England Prepared to Meet the Additional Needs of Children in Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacBlain, Sean; Purdy, Noel

    2011-01-01

    Faced with growing numbers of pupils with special needs, as well as those whose first language is not English, head teachers are increasingly faced with the challenge of employing Newly Qualified Teachers who require not only a different type of skills and knowledge base but the necessary personal qualities to effectively respond to the "Every…

  12. OAST Space Theme Workshop. Volume 3: Working group summary. 3: Sensors (E-3). A. Statement. B. Technology needs (form 1). C. Priority assessment (form 2). D. Additional assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Developments required to support the space power, SETI, solar system exploration and global services programs are identified. Instrumentation and calibration sensors (rather than scientific) are needed for the space power system. Highly sophisticated receivers for narrowband detection of microwave sensors and sensors for automated stellar cataloging to provide a mapping data base for SETI are needed. Various phases of solar system exploration require large area solid state imaging arrays from UV to IR; a long focal plane telescope; high energy particle detectors; advanced spectrometers; a gravitometer; and atmospheric distanalyzer; sensors for penetrometers; in-situ sensors for surface chemical analysis, life detection, spectroscopic and microscopic analyses of surface soils, and for meteorological measurements. Active and passive multiapplication sensors, advanced multispectral scanners with improved resolution in the UV and IR ranges, and laser techniques for advanced probing and oceanographic characterization will enhance for global services.

  13. Real-Time Series Resistance Monitoring in PV Systems Without the Need for I-V Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Deceglie, Michael G.; Silverman, Timothy J.; Marion, Bill; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    2015-10-01

    We apply the physical principles of a familiar method, suns-Voc, to a new application: the real-time detection of series resistance changes in modules and systems operating outside. The real-time series resistance (RTSR) method that we describe avoids the need for collecting I-V curves or constructing full series resistance-free I-V curves. RTSR is most readily deployable at the module level on microinverters or module-integrated electronics, but it can also be extended to full strings. We found that automated detection of series resistance increases can provide early warnings of some of the most common reliability issues, which also pose fire risks, including broken ribbons, broken solder bonds, and contact problems in the junction or combiner box. We also describe the method in detail and describe a sample application to data collected from modules operating in the field.

  14. A new survey of methamphetamine users in treatment: who they are, why they like "meth," and why they need additional services.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Jane Carlisle

    2014-05-01

    The quality and quantity of illicit methamphetamine has recently increased due to introduction of a new precursor, 1-phenyl-2-propanone (P2P). This paper updates the problems associated with methamphetamine use. Methamphetamine-using clients (N = 222) entering a Texas program participated in computer-assisted interviews in 2010 and 2011 about routes of administration, other drugs used, severity of dependence, mental and physical health, perceived risks and benefits of use, family history, and abuse and neglect experienced as children and adults. Special needs of this population include therapies for trauma, gender-focused counseling, safe housing, and prevention messages to discourage use of the drug. PMID:24093526

  15. Effects of hydraulic retention time and bioflocculant addition on membrane fouling in a sponge-submerged membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lijuan; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Huu Hao; Du, Bing; Wei, Qin; Tran, Ngoc Han; Nguyen, Nguyen Cong; Chen, Shiao-Shing; Li, Jianxin

    2016-06-01

    The characteristics of activated sludge and membrane fouling were evaluated in a sponge-submerged membrane bioreactor (SSMBR) at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) (6.67, 5.33 and 4.00h). At shorter HRT, more obvious membrane fouling was caused by exacerbated cake layer formation and aggravated pore blocking. Activated sludge possessed more extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) due to excessive growth of biomass and lower protein to polysaccharide ratio in soluble microbial products (SMP). The cake layer resistance was aggravated by increased sludge viscosity together with the accumulated EPS and biopolymer clusters (BPC) on membrane surface. However, SMP showed marginal effect on membrane fouling when SSMBRs were operated at all HRTs. The SSMBR with Gemfloc® addition at the optimum HRT of 6.67h demonstrated superior sludge characteristics such as larger floc size, less SMP in mixed liquor with higher protein/polysaccharide ratio, less SMP and BPC in cake layer, thereby further preventing membrane fouling. PMID:26852274

  16. Service needs and factors related to quality of life at time of service enrollment among persons living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Huba, G J; Melchior, L A; Cherin, D A; Steinberg, J; Smereck, G A; Richardson-Nassif, K; Reis, P; Meredith, K L; McDonald, S S; Larson, T A; Jean-Louis, E; German, V F; Gallagher, T; Brown, V B; Panter, A T; Marconi, K

    2000-01-01

    This article explores the relationships of HIV risk factors, service needs, and vulnerabilities to health-related quality of life in a sample of 1,371 participants newly enrolled into 13 innovative HIV/AIDS treatment model service demonstration projects. These projects targeted services to traditionally underserved populations. Eight distinct quality of life clusters of HIV patients were used in this analysis along with patient self-identified risk factors. The quality of life clusters were based on patient self-reported quality of life dimensions. The eight clusters were differentiated based on relative strengths and weaknesses in physical functioning, energy levels, and social functioning. Data on patient need-vulnerability factors and demographic characteristics were related to these eight clusters using the data modeling method of Exhaustive CHAID (Chi-squared Automatic Interaction Detector). Through this method, the characteristics most likely to be associated with higher and lower levels of quality of life at the time of enrollment into services were identified. The results provide further support that quality of life assessment is a useful clinical tool for monitoring patient progress. PMID:11211320

  17. It’s about time: How do sky surveys manage uncertainty about scientific needs many years into the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darch, Peter T.; Sands, Ashley E.

    2016-06-01

    Sky surveys, such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), generate data on an unprecedented scale. While many scientific projects span a few years from conception to completion, sky surveys are typically on the scale of decades. This paper focuses on critical challenges arising from long timescales, and how sky surveys address these challenges.We present findings from a study of LSST, comprising interviews (n=58) and observation. Conceived in the 1990s, the LSST Corporation was formed in 2003, and construction began in 2014. LSST will commence data collection operations in 2022 for ten years.One challenge arising from this long timescale is uncertainty about future needs of the astronomers who will use these data many years hence. Sources of uncertainty include scientific questions to be posed, astronomical phenomena to be studied, and tools and practices these astronomers will have at their disposal. These uncertainties are magnified by the rapid technological and scientific developments anticipated between now and the start of LSST operations.LSST is implementing a range of strategies to address these challenges. Some strategies involve delaying resolution of uncertainty, placing this resolution in the hands of future data users. Other strategies aim to reduce uncertainty by shaping astronomers’ data analysis practices so that these practices will integrate well with LSST once operations begin.One approach that exemplifies both types of strategy is the decision to make LSST data management software open source, even now as it is being developed. This policy will enable future data users to adapt this software to evolving needs. In addition, LSST intends for astronomers to start using this software well in advance of 2022, thereby embedding LSST software and data analysis approaches in the practices of astronomers.These findings strengthen arguments for making the software supporting sky surveys available as open

  18. Polymerized complex synthesis of a pure 93 K Y2Ba4Cu7O(15-d) superconductor without the need of high oxygen pressure and additive catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berastegui, Pedro; Kakihana, Masato; Yoshimura, Masahiro; Mazaki, Hiromasa; Yasuoka, Hiroshi; Johansson, Lars-Gunnar; Eriksson, Sten; Borjesson, Lars; Kall, Mikael

    1993-03-01

    High-purity ceramic material of the superconducting phase Y2Ba4Cu7O(14.82) (247) has been synthesized at 870 C by the polymerized complex method using neither high oxygen pressure nor additive catalysts. The method is based on the formation of a polymer-metal complex precursor which is prepared through polyesterification between metal citrate complexes and ethylene glycol. Apart from obviating high oxygen pressure, the present preparation technique offers easier fabrication of highly pure 247 material compared with other 'wet' chemical routes, since it eliminates many steps (centrifugation, filtration, aging, and pH control). XRD and Raman scattering analyses show that the material is single-phase without any indication of secondary phases. Zero-resistance has been achieved at 88.0 K with a transition width narrower than 4 K. Complex ac magnetic susceptibility measurements confirm the presence of a single bulk superconducting 247 phase with Tc (onset) = 93.0 K and Delta-Tc (10-90 percent) = 4.5 K.

  19. Impact of Influenza on Outpatient Visits, Hospitalizations, and Deaths by Using a Time Series Poisson Generalized Additive Model

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ru-ning; Zheng, Hui-zhen; Ou, Chun-quan; Huang, Li-qun; Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Xin; Liang, Can-kun; Lin, Jin-yan; Zhong, Hao-jie; Song, Tie; Luo, Hui-ming

    2016-01-01

    Background The disease burden associated with influenza in developing tropical and subtropical countries is poorly understood owing to the lack of a comprehensive disease surveillance system and information-exchange mechanisms. The impact of influenza on outpatient visits, hospital admissions, and deaths has not been fully demonstrated to date in south China. Methods A time series Poisson generalized additive model was used to quantitatively assess influenza-like illness (ILI) and influenza disease burden by using influenza surveillance data in Zhuhai City from 2007 to 2009, combined with the outpatient, inpatient, and respiratory disease mortality data of the same period. Results The influenza activity in Zhuhai City demonstrated a typical subtropical seasonal pattern; however, each influenza virus subtype showed a specific transmission variation. The weekly ILI case number and virus isolation rate had a very close positive correlation (r = 0.774, P < 0.0001). The impact of ILI and influenza on weekly outpatient visits was statistically significant (P < 0.05). We determined that 10.7% of outpatient visits were associated with ILI and 1.88% were associated with influenza. ILI also had a significant influence on the hospitalization rates (P < 0.05), but mainly in populations <25 years of age. No statistically significant effect of influenza on hospital admissions was found (P > 0.05). The impact of ILI on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was most significant (P < 0.05), with 33.1% of COPD-related deaths being attributable to ILI. The impact of influenza on the mortality rate requires further evaluation. Conclusions ILI is a feasible indicator of influenza activity. Both ILI and influenza have a large impact on outpatient visits. Although ILI affects the number of hospital admissions and deaths, we found no consistent influence of influenza, which requires further assessment. PMID:26894876

  20. [A need to implement new tools for diagnosing tobacco-addition syndrome and readiness/motivation to quit smoking in the working-age population in Poland].

    PubMed

    Broszkiewicz, Marzenna; Drygas, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    High rates of tobacco use is still observed in working-age population in Poland. The present level of the state tobacco control has been achieved through adopting legal regulations and population-based interventions. In Poland a sufficient contribution of health professionals to the diagnosis of the tobacco-addition syndrome (TAS) and the application of the 5A's (ask, advice, assess, assist, arrange follow-up) brief intervention, has not been confirmed by explicit research results. Systemic solutions of the health care system of the professional control, specialist health care, health professional trainings and reference centres have not as yet been elaborated. The tools for diagnosing tobacco dependence and motivation to quit smoking, developed over 30 years ago and recommended by experts to be used in clinical and research practice, have not met the current addiction criteria. In this paper other tools than those previously recommended - tests developed in the first decade of the 21st century (including Cigarette Dependence Scale and Nicotine Dependence Syndrome Scale), reflecting modern concepts of nicotine dependence are presented. In the literature on the readiness/motivation to change health behaviors, a new approach dominates. The motivational interviewing (MI) by Miller and Rollnick concentrates on a smoking person and his or her internal motivation. Motivational interviewing is recommended by the World Health Organization as a 5R's (relevance, risks, rewards, roadblocks, repetition) brief motivational advice, addressed to tobacco users who are unwilling to make a quit attempt. In Poland new research studies on the implementation of new diagnostic tools and updating of binding guidelines should be undertaken, to strengthen primary health care in treating tobacco dependence, and to incorporate MI and 5R's into trainings in TAS diagnosing and treating addressed to health professionals. PMID:27044722

  1. 14 CFR 121.523 - Flight time limitations: Crew of three or more pilots and additional airmen as required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Crew of three or... OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Supplemental Operations § 121.523 Flight time limitations: Crew of three... duty for more than 30 hours. Such a crewmember is considered to be on continuous duty from the time...

  2. 14 CFR 121.485 - Flight time limitations: Three or more pilots and an additional flight crewmember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Three or more... OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Flag Operations § 121.485 Flight time limitations: Three or more pilots... excess of seven days may be given at any time before the pilot is again scheduled for flight duty on...

  3. 14 CFR 121.523 - Flight time limitations: Crew of three or more pilots and additional airmen as required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Crew of three or... OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Supplemental Operations § 121.523 Flight time limitations: Crew of three... hours before beginning flight duty, one half of the time spent in deadhead transportation must...

  4. 14 CFR 121.523 - Flight time limitations: Crew of three or more pilots and additional airmen as required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Crew of three or... OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Supplemental Operations § 121.523 Flight time limitations: Crew of three... hours before beginning flight duty, one half of the time spent in deadhead transportation must...

  5. 14 CFR 121.485 - Flight time limitations: Three or more pilots and an additional flight crewmember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Three or more... OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Flag Operations § 121.485 Flight time limitations: Three or more pilots... excess of seven days may be given at any time before the pilot is again scheduled for flight duty on...

  6. 14 CFR 121.485 - Flight time limitations: Three or more pilots and an additional flight crewmember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Three or more... OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Flag Operations § 121.485 Flight time limitations: Three or more pilots... excess of seven days may be given at any time before the pilot is again scheduled for flight duty on...

  7. 14 CFR 121.523 - Flight time limitations: Crew of three or more pilots and additional airmen as required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Crew of three or... OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Supplemental Operations § 121.523 Flight time limitations: Crew of three... hours before beginning flight duty, one half of the time spent in deadhead transportation must...

  8. 14 CFR 121.485 - Flight time limitations: Three or more pilots and an additional flight crewmember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Three or more... OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Flag Operations § 121.485 Flight time limitations: Three or more pilots... excess of seven days may be given at any time before the pilot is again scheduled for flight duty on...

  9. Coaching to vision versus coaching to improvement needs: a preliminary investigation on the differential impacts of fostering positive and negative emotion during real time executive coaching sessions

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Anita R.

    2015-01-01

    session predominantly in the PEA (or, alternatively, predominantly in the NEA) fosters emotional processing that is driven by this initial framing; and that both the PEA (and associated positive emotions) and NEA (and associated negative emotions) play an important and recurrent role in shaping the change process. Further study on these outcomes will enable researchers to shed more light on the differential impact of the PEA versus NEA on intentional change, and how to leverage the benefits of both emotional attractors. Findings also suggest that coaches can benefit from better understanding the importance of tapping intrinsic motivation and personal passions through coaching to vision/the PEA. Coaches additionally may benefit from better understanding how to leverage the long-term advantages, and restorative benefits, of positive emotions during coaching engagements. The findings also highlight coaches’ need to appreciate the impact of timing effects on coaching intentional change, and how coaches can play a critical role in calibrating the pace and focus of work on intentional change. Early arousal of the coachee’s PEA, accompanied by recurrent PEA–NEA induction, may help coachees be/become more creative, optimistic, and resilient during a given change process. Overall, primary focus on vision/PEA and secondary focus on improvement needs/NEA may better equip coaches and coaching recipients to work together on building robust learning, development, and change. Keywords-133pt executive coaching, vision, improvement needs, positive emotion, negative emotion, emotional appraisal, intentional change, positive psychology PMID:25964768

  10. Coaching to vision versus coaching to improvement needs: a preliminary investigation on the differential impacts of fostering positive and negative emotion during real time executive coaching sessions.

    PubMed

    Howard, Anita R

    2015-01-01

    session predominantly in the PEA (or, alternatively, predominantly in the NEA) fosters emotional processing that is driven by this initial framing; and that both the PEA (and associated positive emotions) and NEA (and associated negative emotions) play an important and recurrent role in shaping the change process. Further study on these outcomes will enable researchers to shed more light on the differential impact of the PEA versus NEA on intentional change, and how to leverage the benefits of both emotional attractors. Findings also suggest that coaches can benefit from better understanding the importance of tapping intrinsic motivation and personal passions through coaching to vision/the PEA. Coaches additionally may benefit from better understanding how to leverage the long-term advantages, and restorative benefits, of positive emotions during coaching engagements. The findings also highlight coaches' need to appreciate the impact of timing effects on coaching intentional change, and how coaches can play a critical role in calibrating the pace and focus of work on intentional change. Early arousal of the coachee's PEA, accompanied by recurrent PEA-NEA induction, may help coachees be/become more creative, optimistic, and resilient during a given change process. Overall, primary focus on vision/PEA and secondary focus on improvement needs/NEA may better equip coaches and coaching recipients to work together on building robust learning, development, and change. Keywords-133pt executive coaching, vision, improvement needs, positive emotion, negative emotion, emotional appraisal, intentional change, positive psychology. PMID:25964768

  11. 14 CFR 121.485 - Flight time limitations: Three or more pilots and an additional flight crewmember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Three or more... OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Flag Operations § 121.485 Flight time limitations: Three or more pilots... his base and who is a pilot on an airplane that has a crew of three or more pilots and an...

  12. 14 CFR 121.523 - Flight time limitations: Crew of three or more pilots and additional airmen as required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Crew of three or... OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Supplemental Operations § 121.523 Flight time limitations: Crew of three... operations may schedule an airman for flight deck duty as a flight engineer, or navigator in a crew of...

  13. 14 CFR 121.521 - Flight time limitations: Crew of two pilots and one additional airman as required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Crew of two pilots...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Supplemental Operations § 121.521 Flight time limitations: Crew of two pilots and one...

  14. 14 CFR 121.521 - Flight time limitations: Crew of two pilots and one additional airman as required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Crew of two pilots...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Supplemental Operations § 121.521 Flight time limitations: Crew of two pilots and one...

  15. 14 CFR 121.521 - Flight time limitations: Crew of two pilots and one additional airman as required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Crew of two pilots...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Supplemental Operations § 121.521 Flight time limitations: Crew of two pilots and one...

  16. 14 CFR 121.521 - Flight time limitations: Crew of two pilots and one additional airman as required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Crew of two pilots...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Supplemental Operations § 121.521 Flight time limitations: Crew of two pilots and one...

  17. Participatory Research to Design a Novel Telehealth System to Support the Night-Time Needs of People with Dementia: NOCTURNAL

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Suzanne; Augusto, Juan Carlos; Mc Cullagh, Paul; Carswell, William; Zheng, Huiru; Wang, Haiying; Wallace, Jonathan; Mulvenna, Maurice

    2013-01-01

    Strategies to support people living with dementia are broad in scope, proposing both pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions as part of the care pathway. Assistive technologies form part of this offering as both stand-alone devices to support particular tasks and the more complex offering of the “smart home” to underpin ambient assisted living. This paper presents a technology-based system, which expands on the smart home architecture, orientated to support people with daily living. The system, NOCTURNAL, was developed by working directly with people who had dementia, and their carers using qualitative research methods. The research focused primarily on the nighttime needs of people living with dementia in real home settings. Eight people with dementia had the final prototype system installed for a three month evaluation at home. Disturbed sleep patterns, night-time wandering were a focus of this research not only in terms of detection by commercially available technology but also exploring if automated music, light and visual personalized photographs would be soothing to participants during the hours of darkness. The NOCTURNAL platform and associated services was informed by strong user engagement of people with dementia and the service providers who care for them. NOCTURNAL emerged as a holistic service offering a personalised therapeutic aspect with interactive capabilities. PMID:24304507

  18. Participatory research to design a novel telehealth system to support the night-time needs of people with dementia: NOCTURNAL.

    PubMed

    Martin, Suzanne; Augusto, Juan Carlos; McCullagh, Paul; Carswell, William; Zheng, Huiru; Wang, Haiying; Wallace, Jonathan; Mulvenna, Maurice

    2013-12-01

    Strategies to support people living with dementia are broad in scope, proposing both pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions as part of the care pathway. Assistive technologies form part of this offering as both stand-alone devices to support particular tasks and the more complex offering of the "smart home" to underpin ambient assisted living. This paper presents a technology-based system, which expands on the smart home architecture, orientated to support people with daily living. The system, NOCTURNAL, was developed by working directly with people who had dementia, and their carers using qualitative research methods. The research focused primarily on the nighttime needs of people living with dementia in real home settings. Eight people with dementia had the final prototype system installed for a three month evaluation at home. Disturbed sleep patterns, night-time wandering were a focus of this research not only in terms of detection by commercially available technology but also exploring if automated music, light and visual personalized photographs would be soothing to participants during the hours of darkness. The NOCTURNAL platform and associated services was informed by strong user engagement of people with dementia and the service providers who care for them. NOCTURNAL emerged as a holistic service offering a personalised therapeutic aspect with interactive capabilities. PMID:24304507

  19. Green technology effect of injection pressure, timing and compression ratio in constant pressure heat addition cycle by an eco-friendly material.

    PubMed

    Karthikayan, S; Sankaranarayanan, G; Karthikeyan, R

    2015-11-01

    Present energy strategies focus on environmental issues, especially environmental pollution prevention and control by eco-friendly green technologies. This includes, increase in the energy supplies, encouraging cleaner and more efficient energy management, addressing air pollution, greenhouse effect, global warming, and climate change. Biofuels provide the panorama of new fiscal opportunities for people in rural area for meeting their need and also the demand of the local market. Biofuels concern protection of the environment and job creation. Renewable energy sources are self-reliance resources, have the potential in energy management with less emissions of air pollutants. Biofuels are expected to reduce dependability on imported crude oil with connected economic susceptibility, reduce greenhouse gases, other pollutants and invigorate the economy by increasing demand and prices for agricultural products. The use of neat paradise tree oil and induction of eco-friendly material Hydrogen through inlet manifold in a constant pressure heat addition cycle engine (diesel engine) with optimized engine operating parameters such as injection timing, injection pressure and compression ratio. The results shows the heat utilization efficiency for neat vegetable oil is 29% and neat oil with 15% Hydrogen as 33%. The exhaust gas temperature (EGT) for 15% of H2 share as 450°C at full load and the heat release of 80J/deg. crank angle for 15% Hydrogen energy share. PMID:26025643

  20. Evaluation of gold nanoparticles as the additive in real-time polymerase chain reaction with SYBR Green I dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenchao; Mi, Lijuan; Cao, Xueyan; Zhang, Xiaodong; Fan, Chunhai; Hu, Jun

    2008-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been proven to be able to improve the specificity or increase the efficiency of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) when a suitable amount of AuNPs was used. However, there is still a lack of systematic evaluation of AuNPs in real-time PCR. In this study, DNA degradation and the fluorescence quenching effect of AuNPs were first tested in real-time PCR. Then two different kinds of Taq DNA polymerase, native and recombinant Taq polymerase, were employed to evaluate the AuNPs' effect on the threshold cycle (CT) values, standard curves and melting curves in real-time PCR. Different ratios of the amount of native Taq DNA polymerase to the amount of AuNPs were also tested. It was found that AuNPs could be applied in real-time PCR with correlation coefficient R2>0.989. The combination of 2.09 nM AuNPs with 3.75 U of native Taq DNA polymerase could make the amplification curves shift to the left and enhance the efficiency of the real-time PCR (0.628 39 without AuNPs compared with 0.717 89 with 2.09 nM AuNPs), thus enabling faster detection in comparison with those of control samples. However, no improvement ability of AuNPs was found in real-time PCR based on recombinant rTaq DNA polymerase. Besides, the results suggest that a complex interaction exists between AuNPs and native Taq DNA polymerase.

  1. 77 FR 23239 - Bryant Mountain, LLC; Notice of Additional Scoping Meetings, Extension of Time To File Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-18

    ... Time To File Comments on the PAD and Scoping Document, and Identification of Issues and Associated... comments on the Pre- Application Document (PAD) and Scoping Document 1 (SD1). b. Type of Filing: Notice of..., filed with the Commission a PAD (including a proposed process plan and schedule), pursuant to 18 CFR...

  2. Chimpanzees remember the results of one-by-one addition of food items to sets over extended time periods.

    PubMed

    Beran, Michael J; Beran, Mary M

    2004-02-01

    Four chimpanzees were highly accurate in selecting the larger of two concurrent accumulations of bananas in two opaque containers over a span of 20 min. One at a time, bananas were placed into the containers, which were outside the chimpanzees' cages. The chimpanzees never saw more than one banana at a time, and there were no cues indicating the locations of the bananas after they were placed into the containers. The performance of these animals matched that of human infants and young children in similar tests. The chimpanzees were successful even when the sets to be compared were sufficiently large (5 vs. 8, 5 vs. 10, and 6 vs. 10) to cast doubt on the possibility that the chimpanzees were using an object file mechanism. These chimpanzees are the first nonhuman animals to demonstrate extended memory for accumulated quantity. PMID:14738515

  3. Intensifying instruction: Does additional instructional time make a difference for the most at-risk first graders?

    PubMed

    Harn, Beth A; Linan-Thompson, Sylvia; Roberts, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    Research is clear on the benefit of early intervention efforts and the importance of intensive instructional supports; however, understanding which features to intensify is less clear. General intervention features of group size, instructional delivery, and time are areas schools can consider manipulating to intensify instruction. Also, each of these features can vary along a continuum making them easier or more challenging for schools to implement. What is unclear is if implementing very intensive interventions early in school (first grade), which require significantly more school resources, provides accordingly accelerated student learning. This article investigates the role of intensifying instructional time for the most at-risk first graders in schools implementing research-based instructional and assessment practices within multitiered instructional support systems. Results indicate that students receiving more intensive intervention made significantly more progress across a range of early reading measures. Intervention features, limitations, recommendations for practice, and implications for treatment resisters are discussed. PMID:18354932

  4. Modeling of time dependent localized flow shear stress and its impact on cellular growth within additive manufactured titanium implants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ziyu; Yuan, Lang; Lee, Peter D; Jones, Eric; Jones, Julian R

    2014-01-01

    Bone augmentation implants are porous to allow cellular growth, bone formation and fixation. However, the design of the pores is currently based on simple empirical rules, such as minimum pore and interconnects sizes. We present a three-dimensional (3D) transient model of cellular growth based on the Navier–Stokes equations that simulates the body fluid flow and stimulation of bone precursor cellular growth, attachment, and proliferation as a function of local flow shear stress. The model's effectiveness is demonstrated for two additive manufactured (AM) titanium scaffold architectures. The results demonstrate that there is a complex interaction of flow rate and strut architecture, resulting in partially randomized structures having a preferential impact on stimulating cell migration in 3D porous structures for higher flow rates. This novel result demonstrates the potential new insights that can be gained via the modeling tool developed, and how the model can be used to perform what-if simulations to design AM structures to specific functional requirements. PMID:24664988

  5. A Study to Determine the Need for Night-Time Child Care Services at John C. Calhoun State Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratcliffe, Carl J.

    A study was conducted in 1981 at John C. Calhoun State Community College to determine the need for evening child care services, the possibility of state or federal funding for these services, and the attitudes of students without dependent children toward the use of student activity funds to provide child care. Surveys were administered to 144…

  6. A Lesson of Lost Political Capital in Public Higher Education: Leadership Challenges in a Time of Needed Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Mark; Jacobson, Rod

    2012-01-01

    All higher education institutions are struggling with a rapidly changing market and financial landscape. Here is a management-centered analysis of what happened when a college president, recognizing the need to make a radical adaptation to those changes, tried moving a campus community to a new organizational model, without collegial consensus,…

  7. Faithful Fathering in Trying Times: Religious Beliefs and Practices of Latter-Day Saint Fathers of Children with Special Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dollahite, David C.; Marks, Loren D.; Olson, Michael M.

    There has been relatively little social science research on the influence of religious beliefs and practices on fathering. This study examined narrative accounts obtained through in-depth interviews from 16 Mormon fathers of children with special needs in the context of Mormon religious belief and practice, research on stress and special needs…

  8. Performance analysis for time-frequency MUSIC algorithm in presence of both additive noise and array calibration errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodja, Mohamed; Belouchrani, Adel; Abed-Meraim, Karim

    2012-12-01

    This article deals with the application of Spatial Time-Frequency Distribution (STFD) to the direction finding problem using the Multiple Signal Classification (MUSIC)algorithm. A comparative performance analysis is performed for the method under consideration with respect to that using data covariance matrix when the received array signals are subject to calibration errors in a non-stationary environment. An unified analytical expression of the Direction Of Arrival (DOA) error estimation is derived for both methods. Numerical results show the effect of the parameters intervening in the derived expression on the algorithm performance. It is particularly observed that for low Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) and high Signal to sensor Perturbation Ratio (SPR) the STFD method gives better performance, while for high SNR and for the same SPR both methods give similar performance.

  9. Zoom-TOFMS: addition of a constant-momentum-acceleration "zoom" mode to time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Elise A; Gundlach-Graham, Alexander W; Ray, Steven J; Enke, Christie G; Barinaga, Charles J; Koppenaal, David W; Hieftje, Gary M

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the performance of a new mass spectrometry concept called zoom time-of-flight mass spectrometry (zoom-TOFMS). In our zoom-TOFMS instrument, we combine two complementary types of TOFMS: conventional, constant-energy acceleration (CEA) TOFMS and constant-momentum acceleration (CMA) TOFMS to provide complete mass-spectral coverage as well as enhanced resolution and duty factor for a narrow, targeted mass region, respectively. Alternation between CEA- and CMA-TOFMS requires only that electrostatic instrument settings (i.e., reflectron and ion optics) and ion acceleration conditions be changed. The prototype zoom-TOFMS instrument has orthogonal-acceleration geometry, a total field-free distance of 43 cm, and a direct-current glow-discharge ionization source. Experimental results demonstrate that the CMA-TOFMS "zoom" mode offers resolution enhancement of 1.6 times over single-stage acceleration CEA-TOFMS. For the atomic mass range studied here, the maximum resolving power at full-width half-maximum observed for CEA-TOFMS was 1,610 and for CMA-TOFMS the maximum was 2,550. No difference in signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio was observed between the operating modes of zoom-TOFMS when both were operated at equivalent repetition rates. For a 10-kHz repetition rate, S/N values for CEA-TOFMS varied from 45 to 990 and from 67 to 10,000 for CMA-TOFMS. This resolution improvement is the result of a linear TOF-to-mass scale and the energy-focusing capability of CMA-TOFMS. Use of CMA also allows ions outside a given m/z range to be rejected by simple ion-energy barriers to provide a substantial improvement in duty factor. PMID:24866712

  10. A Multiple Case Study Discovering Part-Time Faculties' Perceptions of Their Professional Needs, Working Conditions, Social Network, and Job Satisfaction at Three Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millner-Harlee, Tanya

    2010-01-01

    This study employed a multiple case study design to evaluate the perspectives of part-time faculties at three community colleges in the Northeast. The purpose of this study was to discover how needs, working conditions, and social networks influence the part-time faculties' job satisfaction. Maslow (1954), Bourdieu (1986), and Herzberg, Mausner, &…

  11. How Need-Based Financial Aid Reduces College Attrition among Low-Income Public University Students: The Role of Time Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldrick-Rab, Sara; Harris, Douglas N.; Benson, James

    2011-01-01

    The authors examine whether a need-based financial grant distribution "at random" to 1,500 Wisconsin Pell Grant recipients attending 13 public universities had an impact on how they allocated their time devoted to (a) working, (b) studying, (c) sleeping, and (d) socializing. To test whether time use mediates the relationship between aid and…

  12. Space Takes Time: Concentration Dependent Output Codes from Primary Olfactory Networks Rapidly Provide Additional Information at Defined Discrimination Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Kevin C.; Bradley, Samual; Chapman, Phillip D.; Staudacher, Erich M.; Tiede, Regina; Schachtner, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    As odor concentration increases, primary olfactory network representations expand in spatial distribution, temporal complexity and duration. However, the direct relationship between concentration dependent odor representations and the psychophysical thresholds of detection and discrimination is poorly understood. This relationship is absolutely critical as thresholds signify transition points whereby representations become meaningful to the organism. Here, we matched stimulus protocols for psychophysical assays and intracellular recordings of antennal lobe (AL) projection neurons (PNs) in the moth Manduca sexta to directly compare psychophysical thresholds and the output representations they elicit. We first behaviorally identified odor detection and discrimination thresholds across an odor dilution series for a panel of structurally similar odors. We then characterized spatiotemporal spiking patterns across a population of individually filled and identified AL PNs in response to those odors at concentrations below, at, and above identified thresholds. Using spatial and spatiotemporal based analyses we observed that each stimulus produced unique representations, even at sub-threshold concentrations. Mean response latency did not decrease and the percent glomerular activation did not increase with concentration until undiluted odor. Furthermore, correlations between spatial patterns for odor decreased, but only significantly with undiluted odor. Using time-integrated Euclidean distance (ED) measures, we determined that added spatiotemporal information was present at the discrimination but not detection threshold. This added information was evidenced by an increase in integrated distance between the sub-detection and discrimination threshold concentrations (of the same odor) that was not present in comparison of the sub-detection and detection threshold. After consideration of delays for information to reach the AL we find that it takes ~120–140 ms for the AL to

  13. Detonation of highly dilute porous explosives; II: Influence of inert additives on the structure of the front, the parameters, and the reaction time

    SciTech Connect

    Shvedov, K.K.; Aniskin, A.I.; Dremin, A.N.; Il'in, A.N.

    1982-06-01

    For the detonation of porous explosives with inert additives, as for the detonation of individual porous explosives, the basic postulates and conclusions of the modern gasdynamic theory of detonation are valid. The influence of solid, refractory inert additives on the decomposition mechanism of porous explosives depends on the individual properties of the explosives and mainly on the dispersity of the additives. With the elimination of pronounced heating of the additives in mixtures with TNT, a certain positive influence on the appearance of decomposition sources and the total reaction time is observed. In cases with hexogen, no such influence is observed, which is evidently the result of physical inhomogeneity of the porous structure of the charge and the sufficiently high detonation pressures of the mixtures. The basic influence of inert additives on the critical diameter, front structure, detonation parameters, and reaction time of porous explosives is exerted through processes of energy absorption in the reaction region and factors leading to energy losses may lead to ambiguity of the detonation conditions in a system with specified chemical potential energy. The state of the additive in the reaction region must be taken into account for reliable theoretical description of the detonation conditions of porous explosives with a large content of inert additives.

  14. Combined action of time-delay and colored cross-associated multiplicative and additive noises on stability and stochastic resonance for a stochastic metapopulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kang-Kang; Zong, De-Cai; Wang, Ya-Jun; Li, Sheng-Hong

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the transition between the stable state of a big density and the extinction state and stochastic resonance (SR) for a time-delayed metapopulation system disturbed by colored cross-correlated noises are investigated. By applying the fast descent method, the small time-delay approximation and McNamara and Wiesenfeld's SR theory, we investigate the impacts of time-delay, the multiplicative, additive noises and colored cross-correlated noise on the SNR and the shift between the two states of the system. Numerical results show that the multiplicative, additive noises and time-delay can all speed up the transition from the stable state to the extinction state, while the correlation noise and its correlation time can slow down the extinction process of the population system. With respect to SNR, the multiplicative noise always weakens the SR effect, while noise correlation time plays a dual role in motivating the SR phenomenon. Meanwhile, time-delay mainly plays a negative role in stimulating the SR phenomenon. Conversely, it could motivate the SR effect to increase the strength of the cross-correlation noise in the SNR-β plot, while the increase of additive noise intensity will firstly excite SR, and then suppress the SR effect.

  15. Assessing direct analysis in real-time-mass spectrometry (DART-MS) for the rapid identification of additives in food packaging.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, L K; Noonan, G O; Begley, T H

    2009-12-01

    The ambient ionization technique direct analysis in real time (DART) was characterized and evaluated for the screening of food packaging for the presence of packaging additives using a benchtop mass spectrometer (MS). Approximate optimum conditions were determined for 13 common food-packaging additives, including plasticizers, anti-oxidants, colorants, grease-proofers, and ultraviolet light stabilizers. Method sensitivity and linearity were evaluated using solutions and characterized polymer samples. Additionally, the response of a model additive (di-ethyl-hexyl-phthalate) was examined across a range of sample positions, DART, and MS conditions (temperature, voltage and helium flow). Under optimal conditions, molecular ion (M+H+) was the major ion for most additives. Additive responses were highly sensitive to sample and DART source orientation, as well as to DART flow rates, temperatures, and MS inlet voltages, respectively. DART-MS response was neither consistently linear nor quantitative in this setting, and sensitivity varied by additive. All additives studied were rapidly identified in multiple food-packaging materials by DART-MS/MS, suggesting this technique can be used to screen food packaging rapidly. However, method sensitivity and quantitation requires further study and improvement. PMID:19753496

  16. Generalized additive models with interval-censored data and time-varying covariates: application to human immunodeficiency virus infection in hemophiliacs.

    PubMed

    Bacchetti, Peter; Quale, Christopher

    2002-06-01

    We describe a method for extending smooth nonparametric modeling methods to time-to-event data where the event may be known only to lie within a window of time. Maximum penalized likelihood is used to fit a discrete proportional hazards model that also models the baseline hazard, and left-truncation and time-varying covariates are accommodated. The implementation follows generalized additive modeling conventions, allowing both parametric and smooth terms and specifying the amount of smoothness in terms of the effective degrees of freedom. We illustrate the method on a well-known interval-censored data set on time of human immunodeficiency virus infection in a multicenter study of hemophiliacs. The ability to examine time-varying covariates, not available with previous methods, allows detection and modeling of nonproportional hazards and use of a time-varying covariate that fits the data better and is more plausible than a fixed alternative. PMID:12071419

  17. Microbiological and physicochemical characterization of dry-cured Halal goat meat. Effect of salting time and addition of olive oil and paprika covering.

    PubMed

    Cherroud, Sanâa; Cachaldora, Aida; Fonseca, Sonia; Laglaoui, Amin; Carballo, Javier; Franco, Inmaculada

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this work was to define a simple technological process for dry-cured Halal goat meat elaboration. The aims of this study were to analyze physicochemical parameters and to enumerate the microbial population at the end of the different manufacturing processes (two salting times and the addition of olive oil and paprika covering) on 36 units of meat product. A total of 532 strains were isolated from several selective culture media and then identified using classical and molecular methods. In general, salt effect and the addition of olive oil and paprika were significant for all the studied microbial groups as well as on NaCl content and water activity. Molecular analysis proves that staphylococci, especially Staphylococcus xylosus and Staphylococcus equorum, were the most common naturally occurring microbiota. The best manufacturing process would be obtained with a longer salting time and the addition of the olive oil and paprika covering. PMID:24950081

  18. Timing of eyewitness expert testimony, jurors' need for cognition, and case strength as determinants of trial verdicts.

    PubMed

    Leippe, Michael R; Eisenstadt, Donna; Rauch, Shannon M; Seib, Hope M

    2004-06-01

    In 2 experiments, college students read a murder-trial transcript that included or did not include court-appointed expert testimony about eyewitness memory. The testimony either preceded or followed the evidence, and the judge's final instructions reminded or did not remind jurors about the expert's testimony. Expert testimony decreased perceptions of guilt and eyewitness believability when it followed the evidence and preceded the judge's reminder. This effect occurred whether the prosecution case was moderately weak or moderately strong. Jurors' need for cognition (NC) was curvilinearly related to convictions in a strong case. Low and high NC jurors convicted less than did moderate NC jurors. Greater scrutiny by high NC jurors may make them more likely to consider evidence for the weaker side. PMID:15161410

  19. The Library Needs of Part-Time Students Preparing for Professional Examinations. Library Research Digest No. 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blagden, Pauline

    The City of London Polytechnic offers a number of part-time courses leading to qualifications awarded by professional associations and similar examining bodies. The majority of the courses are taught by the departments of accounting and finance, banking and insurance, transport studies, and marketing. There are also courses in biological sciences,…

  20. There Is Enough Time: Accounting for Each Student's Learning Trajectory and Identity Needs With Proleptic-Ethnodrama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Sarah R.; Vu, Julie F.

    2015-01-01

    This paper draws upon an explanation of the proleptic, an understanding of time as being socially constructed within specific contexts, to interpret a series of dramatic sequences enacted in ethnodramatic pedagogy. The authors present two major arguments: (1) teachers can help students analyze the processes that influence and shape their…

  1. Psychological Needs as Mediators? The Relationship between Leisure-Time Physical Activity and Well Being in People Diagnosed with Osteoporosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunnell, Katie E.; Mack, Diane E.; Wilson, Philip M.; Adachi, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a skeletal disease characterized by reduced bone mass and micro-architectural deterioration of bone tissue resulting in compromised bone strength, increased fracture risk, and reduced well being. With evidence attesting to the positive effects of leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) on biomedical health in people with…

  2. The mouse is roaring. Internet technology is slashing the time it takes to get needed data to and from providers.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, J

    1999-08-01

    The process would have been highly costly and cumbersome, if not impossible, a couple of years ago. But a powerful combination of Internet technology and entrepreneurial enterprise is quickly connecting doctors and hospitals, slashing the time and expense it takes to share information and leading to quick, easy reaction by providers. PMID:10558247

  3. Barriers to Need-Based Financial Aid: Predictors of Timely FAFSA Completion among Low-Income Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feeney, Mary; Heroff, John

    2013-01-01

    Access to financial aid is dependent on a variety of factors, including the time of application; the earlier students apply for financial aid, the greater their access to institutional and often state resources. We use the Illinois Monetary Award Program (MAP) as a case for investigating the economic, social, and academic factors that affect…

  4. The uncertain role of diversity dependence in species diversification and the need to incorporate time-varying carrying capacities.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Charles R; Quental, Tiago B

    2016-04-01

    There is no agreement among palaeobiologists or biologists as to whether, or to what extent, there are limits on diversification and species numbers. Here, we posit that part of the disagreement stems from: (i) the lack of explicit criteria for defining the relevant species pools, which may be defined phylogenetically, ecologically or geographically; (ii) assumptions that must be made when extrapolating from population-level logistic growth to macro-evolutionary diversification; and (iii) too much emphasis being placed on fixed carrying capacities, rather than taking into account the opportunities for increased species richness on evolutionary timescales, for example, owing to increased biologically available energy, increased habitat complexity and the ability of many clades to better extract resources from the environment, or to broaden their resource base. Thus, we argue that a more effective way of assessing the evidence for and against the ideas of bound versus unbound diversification is through appropriate definition of the relevant species pools, and through explicit modelling of diversity-dependent diversification with time-varying carrying capacities. Here, we show that time-varying carrying capacities, either increases or decreases, can be accommodated through changing intrinsic diversification rates (diversity-independent effects), or changing the effects of crowding (diversity-dependent effects). PMID:26977059

  5. Crystallization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in a flowing system: Influence of Cu2+ additives on induction time and crystalline phase transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usmany, Y.; Putranto, W. A.; Bayuseno, A. P.; Muryanto, S.

    2016-04-01

    Scaling of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) is commonly found in piping systems in oil, gas, desalination and other chemical processes. The scale may create technical problems, leading to the reduction of heat transfer, increase of energy consumption and unscheduled equipment shutdown. This paper presents crystallization scaling experiments and evaluation of the effect of Cu2+ additives on the induction time and calcium carbonate transformation. The crystals precursors were prepared using equimolar of CaCl2 and Na2CO3 resulted in concentrations of 3000 ppm Ca2+ in the solution. The Cu2+ in amounts of 0, 1 and 10 ppm was separately added in the solution. The flow rates (20, 35, and 60 mL/min) and elevated temperatures (27, 35 and 45°C) were selected in the study. The induction time for crystallization of CaCO3 was observed by measuring the solution conductivity over time, while the phase transformation of calcium carbonate was examined by XRD method and SEM/EDX. It was found that the conductivity remained steady for a certain period reflecting to the induction time of crystal formation, and then decreased sharply afterwards,. The induction time was increased from 34 and 48 minutes in the presence of Cu additives (1 and 10 ppm), depending on the flow rates and temperature observed. In all the experiments, the Cu2+ addition leads to the reduction of mass of crystals. Apparently, the presence of Cu2+ could inhibit the CaCO3 crystallization. In the absence of Cu2+ and at elevated temperature, the crystals obtained were a mixture of vaterite and calcite. In the presence of Cu2+ and at elevated temperature, the crystals formed were aragonite and calcite. Here, the presence of Cu2+ additives might have controlled the crystal transformation of CaCO3.

  6. Re-evaluation of the need for multiple sampling times in the mouse bone marrow micronucleus assay: results for DMBA

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, J.; Mirkova, E.

    1987-01-01

    7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) is confirmed as active in the mouse bone marrow micronucleus assay 24 hr after dosing as corn-oil homogenate via either oral gavage or intraperitoneal (ip) injection. These data are consistent with recent observations made by several investigators. However, when dosed via ip injection as a solution in DMSO, peak activity was evident 48 hr after dosing and a dramatic reduction in erythropoiesis was observed. It is suggested that a maximum of two sampling times is adequate and that, as a consequence, the number of animals employed in the conduct of the test could be reduced with no loss of sensitivity. The present data also suggest that the use of a corn-oil homogenate of insoluble test agents may provide an efficient replacement for the use of ground suspensions or solutions in DMSO.

  7. Growth behavior of additional offspring with a beneficial reversal allele in the asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape in the coupled discrete-time mutation-selection model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Wonpyong

    2013-01-01

    The probability of additional offspring with a beneficial reversal allele for growing to a size NC for a range of population sizes N, sequence lengths L, selective advantages s, and measuring parameters C was calculated for a haploid, asexual population in the coupled discrete-time mutation-selection model in an asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape with a positive selective advantage of the reversal allele over the optimal allele. The growing probability in the stochastic region was inversely proportional to the measuring parameter when C < 1 /Ns, bent when C ≈ 1/ Ns and saturated when C > 1/ Ns. The crossing time and the time dependence of the increase in relative density of the reversal allele in the coupled discrete-time mutation-selection model was approximated using the Wright-Fisher two-allele model with the same selective advantage and corresponding effective mutation rate. The growth behavior of additional offspring with the reversal allele in the asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape in the coupled discrete-time mutation-selection model was controlled by the selective advantage of the reversal allele compared to the optimal allele and could be described by using the Wright-Fisher two-allele model, in spite of there being many other alleles with lower fitness, and in spite of there being two alleles, the optimal and reversal allele, separated by a low-fitness valley with a tunable depth and width.

  8. Time needed for first lichen colonization of terminal moraines in the Tröllaskagi peninsula (North Iceland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, Nuria; Palacios, David; Brynjólfsson, Skafti; Sæmundsson, Þorsteinn

    2015-04-01

    The Tröllaskagi peninsula is located in Central North Iceland. The peninsula belong to the Tertiary basaltic areas in Iceland and is characterised by numerous glacially eroded valleys and fjords. The altitude ranges from sea level to 1500 m. Around 150 glaciers, debris covered glaciers and clean glaciers exist in the cirques of the Tröllaskagi peninsula. Lichenometric techniques were applied to date moraines formed by some of these glaciers, especially from 1970-90, establishing growth rates for some species, e.g. 0.5 mm/year for Rizocarpon geographicum. However there is no information available on how long the lichens take to colonize the boulders in a moraine once it has become detached from the retreating glacier. The aim of this paper is to observe how long it takes for the boulders on the moraines to be colonized by lichens in the Tröllaskagi peninsula, where the separation date of a moraine from the retreating glacier tongue is known. Two case studies were used. The first was the surging glacier Búrfellsjökull, in the Búrfelllsdalur valley, an affluent of the Svarfaðardalur valley. The Búrfellsjökull glacier surged in 2001-2004 and the glacial terminus advanced 150-240 m, overrunnig a moraine formed around 1955 and formed a new moraine. About 2-3 years after the surge termination in 2004 the glacial terminus was already retreating and had left the moraine isolated (Brynjólfsson et al. 2012). The other case is the Gljúlfurárjökull glacier, in the Gljúlfurárdalur valley, an affluent of the Skíðadalur valley. It can be seen from the series of aerial photographs that the glacier terminus advanced during the 1990s until the year 2000. In 2004 the glacial terminus was already retreating and had separated from a small moraine formed during the previous advance. Thus, two different glaciers halted and formed one moraine each which they separated from almost similar time. During the detailed field work carried out in August 2014 on both moraines

  9. Perceived Farm Management Educational Needs of Part-Time and Small Scale Farmers in Selected Ohio Counties. Summary of Research 46.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uko, Okon E.; Miller, Larry E.

    A study described part-time and small farmers (PT/SF) on the basis of their demographic characteristics and determined their farm management educational needs. Findings revealed that the majority of the PT/SF were males who operated farms of 50-150 acres for 11 or more years, were 35-44 years of age, and were high school graduates who principally…

  10. Stochastic sampled-data control for synchronization of complex dynamical networks with control packet loss and additive time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Rakkiyappan, R; Sakthivel, N; Cao, Jinde

    2015-06-01

    This study examines the exponential synchronization of complex dynamical networks with control packet loss and additive time-varying delays. Additionally, sampled-data controller with time-varying sampling period is considered and is assumed to switch between m different values in a random way with given probability. Then, a novel Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional (LKF) with triple integral terms is constructed and by using Jensen's inequality and reciprocally convex approach, sufficient conditions under which the dynamical network is exponentially mean-square stable are derived. When applying Jensen's inequality to partition double integral terms in the derivation of linear matrix inequality (LMI) conditions, a new kind of linear combination of positive functions weighted by the inverses of squared convex parameters appears. In order to handle such a combination, an effective method is introduced by extending the lower bound lemma. To design the sampled-data controller, the synchronization error system is represented as a switched system. Based on the derived LMI conditions and average dwell-time method, sufficient conditions for the synchronization of switched error system are derived in terms of LMIs. Finally, numerical example is employed to show the effectiveness of the proposed methods. PMID:25797504

  11. All the Time They Need

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keene, Ellin Oliver

    2014-01-01

    "Reader, say something smart. Right now. Share a deep insight or a subtle point. Quick. No? OK (with obvious disappointment), I'll come back to you later. Anybody else?" We've all experienced this in school, the author notes--the teacher giving up, concluding that we weren't going to say something smart in the allotted…

  12. Suitability of live yeast addition to alleviate the adverse effects due to the restriction of the time of access to feed in sheep fed only pasture.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ruchel, A; Repetto, J L; Cajarville, C

    2013-12-01

    The effect of yeast addition on intake and digestive utilization of pasture was studied in ovines under restricted time of access to forage. Eighteen wethers housed in metabolic cages and fed fresh forage (predominantly Lotus corniculatus) were randomly assigned to three treatments: forage available all day (AD); forage available only 6 h/day (R) and forage available only 6 h/day plus live Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast (RY). Feed intake and digestibility, feeding behaviour, kinetics of passage, ruminal pH and ammonia concentration, nitrogen balance and microbial nitrogen synthesis (MNS) were determined in vivo, and ruminal liquor activity of animals was evaluated in vitro. Restricted animals consumed less than those fed all day but achieved more than 75% of the intake and spent less time ruminating (p = 0.014). Although animals without restriction consumed more feed, they had a lower rate of passage (p = 0.030). The addition of yeast did affect neither intake nor feeding behaviour, but increased digestibility. Organic matter digestibility tended to increase 11% by yeast addition (p = 0.051), mainly by a rise in NDF (27%, p = 0.032) and ADF digestibility (37%, p = 0.051). Ingested and retained N was lower in restricted animals, as MNS (p ≤ 0.045). The use of yeasts did not significantly change the N balance or MNS, but retained N tended to be higher in supplemented animals (p = 0.090). Neither ruminal pH nor ammonia concentrations were affected by the restriction, but restricted animals had a lower ruminal activity evidenced by a lower volume of gas (p = 0.020). The addition of yeast overcame this limitation, noted by a higher volume of gas of inocula from supplemented animals (p = 0.015). Yeast addition emerged as a useful tool to improve digestibility of forage cell walls in ovines under restricted time of access to forage. PMID:23020124

  13. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    Food additives are substances that become part of a food product when they are added during the processing or making of that food. "Direct" food additives are often added during processing to: Add nutrients ...

  14. Computer simulation for the growing probability of additional offspring with an advantageous reversal allele in the decoupled continuous-time mutation-selection model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Wonpyong

    2016-01-01

    This study calculated the growing probability of additional offspring with the advantageous reversal allele in an asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape using the decoupled continuous-time mutation-selection model. The growing probability was calculated for various population sizes, N, sequence lengths, L, selective advantages, s, fitness parameters, k and measuring parameters, C. The saturated growing probability in the stochastic region was approximately the effective selective advantage, s*, when C≫1/Ns* and s*≪1. The present study suggests that the growing probability in the stochastic region in the decoupled continuous-time mutation-selection model can be described using the theoretical formula for the growing probability in the Moran two-allele model. The selective advantage ratio, which represents the ratio of the effective selective advantage to the selective advantage, does not depend on the population size, selective advantage, measuring parameter and fitness parameter; instead the selective advantage ratio decreases with the increasing sequence length.

  15. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  16. Time needed to achieve changes in oxygen concentration at the T-Piece resuscitator during respiratory support in preterm infants in the delivery room

    PubMed Central

    Follett, Graeme; Cheung, Po-Yin; Pichler, Gerhard; Aziz, Khalid; Schmölzer, Georg M

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To measure the time needed to achieve changes in fraction of inspired oxygen concentration (FiO2) from the oxygen blender to the facemask during simulated neonatal resuscitation. METHOD: Two oxygen analyzers were placed at each end of the T-Piece. During simulated ventilation, the duration to achieve the set oxygen concentration at the facemask was measured. This was repeated at different gas flow rates (5 L/min, 8 L/min or 10 L/min) and different FiO2 changes (0.21 to 1.0 to 0.21, with stepwise increases and decreases in 0.05, 0.1 and 0.2 increments). RESULTS: A total of 1134 measurements (378 measurements for each flow) were recorded. Overall, the mean (± SD) time required to achieve FiO2 changes at 5 L/min, 8 L/min and 10 L/min was 36±15 s, 31±14 s and 28±14 s, respectively. CONCLUSION: There was a lag time of approximately 30 s to achieve the FiO2 at the facemask. This delay needs to be considered when making serial adjustments to FiO2 during neonatal resuscitation. PMID:25838786

  17. Effect of addition of lycopene to calcium hydroxide and chlorhexidine as intracanal medicament on fracture resistance of radicular dentin at two different time intervals: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Madhusudhana, Koppolu; Archanagupta, Kasamsetty; Suneelkumar, Chinni; Lavanya, Anumula; Deepthi, Mandava

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long-term use of intracanal medicaments such as calcium hydroxide (CH) reduces the fracture resistance of dentin. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the fracture resistance of radicular dentin on long-term use of CH, chlorhexidine (CHX) with lycopene (LP). Aim: To compare the fracture resistance of radicular dentin when intracanal medicaments such as CH, CHX with LP were used for 1-week and 1-month time interval. Settings and Design: Sixty single-rooted extracted human permanent premolars were collected, and complete instrumentation was done. Samples were divided into three groups based on intracanal medicament used. Materials and Methods: Group 1 - no medicament was placed (CON), group 2 - mixture of 1.5 g of CH and 1 ml of 2% CHX (CHCHX), group 3 - mixture of 1.5 g of CH, 1 ml of CHX and 1 ml of 5% LP solution (CHCHXLP). After storage period of each group for 1-week and 1-month, middle 8 mm root cylinder was sectioned and tested for fracture resistance. Statistical Analysis: Results were analyzed using paired t-test. Results: At 1-month time interval, there was a statistically significant difference in fracture resistance between CHCHX and CHCHXLP groups. Conclusion: Addition of LP has not decreased the fracture resistance of radicular dentin after 1-month. PMID:26069405

  18. Food additives.

    PubMed

    Berglund, F

    1978-01-01

    The use of additives to food fulfils many purposes, as shown by the index issued by the Codex Committee on Food Additives: Acids, bases and salts; Preservatives, Antioxidants and antioxidant synergists; Anticaking agents; Colours; Emulfifiers; Thickening agents; Flour-treatment agents; Extraction solvents; Carrier solvents; Flavours (synthetic); Flavour enhancers; Non-nutritive sweeteners; Processing aids; Enzyme preparations. Many additives occur naturally in foods, but this does not exclude toxicity at higher levels. Some food additives are nutrients, or even essential nutritents, e.g. NaCl. Examples are known of food additives causing toxicity in man even when used according to regulations, e.g. cobalt in beer. In other instances, poisoning has been due to carry-over, e.g. by nitrate in cheese whey - when used for artificial feed for infants. Poisonings also occur as the result of the permitted substance being added at too high levels, by accident or carelessness, e.g. nitrite in fish. Finally, there are examples of hypersensitivity to food additives, e.g. to tartrazine and other food colours. The toxicological evaluation, based on animal feeding studies, may be complicated by impurities, e.g. orthotoluene-sulfonamide in saccharin; by transformation or disappearance of the additive in food processing in storage, e.g. bisulfite in raisins; by reaction products with food constituents, e.g. formation of ethylurethane from diethyl pyrocarbonate; by metabolic transformation products, e.g. formation in the gut of cyclohexylamine from cyclamate. Metabolic end products may differ in experimental animals and in man: guanylic acid and inosinic acid are metabolized to allantoin in the rat but to uric acid in man. The magnitude of the safety margin in man of the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) is not identical to the "safety factor" used when calculating the ADI. The symptoms of Chinese Restaurant Syndrome, although not hazardous, furthermore illustrate that the whole ADI

  19. Prediction of Unmet Primary Care Needs for the Medically Vulnerable Post-Disaster: An Interrupted Time-Series Analysis of Health System Responses

    PubMed Central

    Runkle, Jennifer D.; Zhang, Hongmei; Karmaus, Wilfried; Brock-Martin, Amy; Svendsen, Erik R.

    2012-01-01

    Disasters serve as shocks and precipitate unanticipated disturbances to the health care system. Public health surveillance is generally focused on monitoring latent health and environmental exposure effects, rather than health system performance in response to these local shocks. The following intervention study sought to determine the long-term effects of the 2005 chlorine spill in Graniteville, South Carolina on primary care access for vulnerable populations. We used an interrupted time-series approach to model monthly visits for Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions, an indicator of unmet primary care need, to quantify the impact of the disaster on unmet primary care need in Medicaid beneficiaries. The results showed Medicaid beneficiaries in the directly impacted service area experienced improved access to primary care in the 24 months post-disaster. We provide evidence that a health system serving the medically underserved can prove resilient and display improved adaptive capacity under adverse circumstances (i.e., technological disasters) to ensure access to primary care for vulnerable sub-groups. The results suggests a new application for ambulatory care sensitive conditions as a population-based metric to advance anecdotal evidence of secondary surge and evaluate pre- and post-health system surge capacity following a disaster. PMID:23202752

  20. Time and Resources Needed to Document Patients with Breast Cancer from Primary Diagnosis to Follow-up – Results of a Single-center Study

    PubMed Central

    Lux, M. P.; Sell, C. S.; Fasching, P. A.; Seidl-Ertel, J.; Bani, M. R.; Schrauder, M. G.; Jud, S. M.; Loehberg, C. R.; Rauh, C.; Hartmann, A.; Schulz-Wendtland, R.; Strnad, V.; Beckmann, M. W.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Certification of breast centers helps improve the quality of care but requires additional resources, particularly for documentation. There are currently no published data on the actual staff costs and financial resources required for such documentation. The aim of this study was to determine the time and resources required to document a patient with primary breast cancer from diagnosis to the end of follow-up, to establish a database for future strategic decisions. Material and Methods: All diagnostic and therapeutic procedures of patients with primary breast cancer were recorded at the University Breast Center of Franconia. All time points for documentation were evaluated using structured interviews. The times required to document a representative number of patients were determined and combined with the staff costs of the different professional groups, to calculate the financial resources required for documentation. Results: A total of 494 time points for documentation were identified. The study also identified 21 departments and 20 different professional groups involved in the documentation. The majority (54 %) of documentation was done by physicians. 62 % of all documentation involved outpatients. The results of different scenarios for the diagnosis, therapy and follow-up of breast cancer patients in a certified breast center showed that the time required for documentation can be as much as 105 hours, costing € 4135. Conclusion: This analysis shows the substantial staffing and financial costs required for documentation in certified centers. A multi-center study will be carried out to compare the costs for certified breast centers of varying sizes with the costs of non-certified care facilities. PMID:25221342

  1. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  2. Phosphazene additives

    SciTech Connect

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  3. The effect of additional noradrenergic and serotonergic depletion on a lateralised choice reaction time task in rats with nigral 6-OHDA lesions.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Hanna S; Demirbugen, Merve; Bergqvist, Filip; Lane, Emma L; Dunnett, Stephen B

    2014-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients often suffer from visuospatial deficits, which have been considered a disruption of the representation of external space. The lateralised choice reaction time (CRT) task is an operant task for rodents in which similar deficits can be assessed. It has been demonstrated that specific parameters in this task is disrupted after unilateral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), which have been associated with the dopamine (DA) depletion that inevitably follows this type of lesion. However, studies have demonstrated that this type of lesion also affects the serotonergic (5HT) and noradrenergic (NA) systems. However, the impact of these systems on parameters in the CRT task had not yet been investigated. To this end, rats were pretrained on the CRT task before receiving selective lesions of the DAergic system, either alone or in combination with depletion of the NA or 5HT system. All rats with a 6-OHDA lesion displayed a gradual decline in the selection, initiation and execution of lateralised movements compared to sham-lesion controls on the side contralateral to the lesion. They also displayed a reduced number of useable trials as well as an increased number of procedural errors. Interestingly, the group with an additional noradrenergic lesion was significantly slower in reacting to lateralised stimuli throughout the testing period compared to the other two groups with a 6-OHDA lesion. There was however no difference between the three different lesion groups in the other parameters assessed in the task. These data confirm previous findings demonstrating that the majority of the parameters assessed in the lateralised CRT task are strongly dependent on DA. However, this study has also shown that the NAergic system may play an important role in contributing to the attentive performance influencing the capacity to react to the presented lateralised stimuli. PMID:24333808

  4. Nutritional Needs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dramatic growth of infants during the 1st yr of life (a 3-fold increase in weight; a 50% increase in length) and continued growth, albeit at lower rates, from 1 yr of age through adolescence impose unique nutritional needs. The needs for growth are superimposed on relatively high maintenance nee...

  5. Time-Resolved XAFS Spectroscopic Studies of B-H and N-H Oxidative Addition to Transition Metal Catalysts Relevant to Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Bitterwolf, Thomas E.

    2014-12-09

    Successful catalytic dehydrogenation of aminoborane, H3NBH3, prompted questions as to the potential role of N-H oxidative addition in the mechanisms of these processes. N-H oxidative addition reactions are rare, and in all cases appear to involve initial dative bonding to the metal by the amine lone pairs followed by transfer of a proton to the basic metal. Aminoborane and its trimethylborane derivative block this mechanism and, in principle, should permit authentic N-H oxidative attrition to occur. Extensive experimental work failed to confirm this hypothesis. In all cases either B-H complexation or oxidative addition of solvent C-H bonds dominate the chemistry.

  6. In situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction of tobermorite formation in autoclaved aerated concrete: Influence of silica source reactivity and Al addition

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Kunio; Kikuma, Jun; Tsunashima, Masamichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuji; Matsuno, Shin-ya; Ogawa, Akihiro; Sato, Masugu

    2011-05-15

    The hydrothermal formation of tobermorite during the processing of autoclaved aerated concrete was investigated by in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. High-energy X-rays from a synchrotron radiation source in combination with a newly developed autoclave cell and a photon-counting pixel array detector were used. To investigate the effects of the silica source, reactive quartz from chert and less-reactive quartz from quartz sand were used as starting materials. The effect of Al addition on tobermorite formation was also studied. In all cases, C-S-H, hydroxylellestadite and katoite were clearly observed as intermediates. Acceleration of tobermorite formation by Al addition was clearly observed. However, Al addition did not affect the dissolution rate of quartz. Two pathways, via C-S-H and katoite, were also observed in the Al-containing system. These results suggest that the structure of initially formed C-S-H is important for the subsequent tobermorite formation reactions.

  7. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. R.; St. Clair, T. L.; Burks, H. D.; Stoakley, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been found for enhancing the melt flow of thermoplastic polyimides during processing. A high molecular weight 422 copoly(amic acid) or copolyimide was fused with approximately 0.05 to 5 pct by weight of a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive, and this melt was studied by capillary rheometry. Excellent flow and improved composite properties on graphite resulted from the addition of a PMDA-aniline additive to LARC-TPI. Solution viscosity studies imply that amic acid additives temporarily lower molecular weight and, hence, enlarge the processing window. Thus, compositions containing the additive have a lower melt viscosity for a longer time than those unmodified.

  8. 5 CFR 2429.22 - Additional time for filing with the FLRA if you are filing in response to a document that has...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... effected. (c) Exception for applications for review filed under 5 CFR 2422.31. You do not get an additional 5 days to file an application for review of a Regional Director's Decision and Order under 5 CFR... rules that apply to filing exceptions to arbitration awards, see 5 CFR 2425.2(c)....

  9. 5 CFR 2429.22 - Additional time for filing with the FLRA if you are filing in response to a document that has...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... effected. (c) Exception for applications for review filed under 5 CFR 2422.31. You do not get an additional 5 days to file an application for review of a Regional Director's Decision and Order under 5 CFR... rules that apply to filing exceptions to arbitration awards, see 5 CFR 2425.2(c)....

  10. Special Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braswell, Ray, Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on special needs instruction and technology: (1) "Hawaii Special Education Teacher Induction" (Kalena Oliva and Quinn Avery); (2) "The Impact of Group v Individual Use of Hypermedia-Based Instruction" (Lewis R. Johnson, Louis P. Semrau, and Gail E. Fitzgerald); (3) "Assistive Technology Meets…

  11. Needs Appraisal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunnag, Jane

    The discussion paper consists principally of two checklists of preoperational research needs for development projects in developing nations. (Preoperational research is focused on the possibility or feasibility of introducing a given innovation, its implications, and necessary modification.) The checklists, the first on factors relevant for…

  12. Time?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoroso, Richard L.

    2013-09-01

    The concept of time in the `clockwork' Newtonian world was irrelevant; and has generally been ignored until recently by several generations of physicists since the implementation of quantum mechanics. We will set aside the utility of time as a property relating to physical calculations of events relating to a metrics line element or as an aspect of the transformation of a particles motion/interaction in a coordinate system or in relation to thermodynamics etc., i.e. we will discard all the usual uses of time as a concept used to circularly define physical parameters in terms of other physical parameters; concentrating instead on time as an aspect of the fundamental cosmic topology of our virtual reality especially as it inseparably relates to the nature and role of the observer in natural science.

  13. One-Time Addition of Nano-TiO2 Triggers Short-Term Responses in Benthic Bacterial Communities in Artificial Streams.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Alexandra; Adams, Erin; Binh, Chu Thi Thanh; Tong, Tiezheng; Gaillard, Jean-François; Gray, Kimberly A; Kelly, John J

    2016-02-01

    Nano-TiO2 is an engineered nanomaterial whose production and use are increasing rapidly. Hence, aquatic habitats are at risk for nano-TiO2 contamination due to potential inputs from urban and suburban runoff and domestic wastewater. Nano-TiO2 has been shown to be toxic to a wide range of aquatic organisms, but little is known about the effects of nano-TiO2 on benthic microbial communities. This study used artificial stream mesocosms to assess the effects of a single addition of nano-TiO2 (P25 at a final concentration of 1 mg l(-1)) on the abundance, activity, and community composition of sediment-associated bacterial communities. The addition of nano-TiO2 resulted in a rapid (within 1 day) decrease in bacterial abundance in artificial stream sediments, but bacterial abundance returned to control levels within 3 weeks. Pyrosequencing of partial 16S rRNA genes did not indicate any significant changes in the relative abundance of any bacterial taxa with nano-TiO2 treatment, indicating that nano-TiO2 was toxic to a broad range of bacterial taxa and that recovery of the bacterial communities was not driven by changes in community composition. Addition of nano-TiO2 also resulted in short-term increases in respiration rates and denitrification enzyme activity, with both returning to control levels within 3 weeks. The results of this study demonstrate that single-pulse additions of nano-TiO2 to aquatic habitats have the potential to significantly affect the abundance and activity of benthic microbial communities and suggest that interactions of TiO2 nanoparticles with environmental matrices may limit the duration of their toxicity. PMID:26156053

  14. Reducing Perceptions of Time Required to Complete Math Assignments by Adding Problems to Assignments: A Synthesis of the Additive Interspersal Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billington, Eric J.; Skinner, Christopher H.

    2006-01-01

    Results from nine experiments were analyzed to evaluate the relationship between relative problem completion rates (RPCR) and judgments of time involving mathematics assignments. For each experiment, control assignments contained only target mathematics computation or word problems. Matched experimental assignments contained similar target…

  15. Additive usage levels.

    PubMed

    Langlais, R

    1996-01-01

    With the adoption of the European Parliament and Council Directives on sweeteners, colours and miscellaneous additives the Commission is now embarking on the project of coordinating the activities of the European Union Member States in the collection of the data that are to make up the report on food additive intake requested by the European Parliament. This presentation looks at the inventory of available sources on additive use levels and concludes that for the time being national legislation is still the best source of information considering that the directives have yet to be transposed into national legislation. Furthermore, this presentation covers the correlation of the food categories as found in the additives directives with those used by national consumption surveys and finds that in a number of instances this correlation still leaves a lot to be desired. The intake of additives via food ingestion and the intake of substances which are chemically identical to additives but which occur naturally in fruits and vegetables is found in a number of cases to be higher than the intake of additives added during the manufacture of foodstuffs. While the difficulties are recognized in contributing to the compilation of food additive intake data, industry as a whole, i.e. the food manufacturing and food additive manufacturing industries, are confident that in a concerted effort, use data on food additives by industry can be made available. Lastly, the paper points out that with the transportation of the additives directives into national legislation and the time by which the food industry will be able to make use of the new food legislative environment several years will still go by; food additives use data by the food industry will thus have to be reviewed at the beginning of the next century. PMID:8792135

  16. Levan as a new additive for colon-specific films: a new approach in the use of exopolysaccharides in time-dependent free films (Aminoalkyl Methacrylate Copolymer RS).

    PubMed

    dos-Santos, Leandro Freire; Gómez-Pineda, Edgardo Alfonso; Colabone-Celligoi, Maria Antonia-Pedrine; Cavalcanti, Osvaldo Albuquerque

    2013-09-01

    Time-dependent films, augmented with prebiotics, offer potential strategy for colon-specific controlled drug release. In this study, we produced films containing levan (L) and Aminoalkyl Methacrylate Copolymer RS (ER). Free films of ER combined with levan were produced by the casting process and characterized by the mobility of the polymeric matrix, hydration, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TGA). The results of this study suggest that the exopolysaccharide levan can be used in combination with ER for colon specific materials. No evidence of incompatibilities between the levan and the synthetic polymer were detected, and levan improved the mobility of the polymeric matrix and the hydrophilicity of the system. Levan may have positively altered the density of the polymeric matrix, as visualized by thermal characterization. The endothermic decomposition peak was shifted with increasing amounts of levan. This new barrier polymer utilized a combination of time-dependent enzymatic mechanisms and can be considered promising for use in the coating of solid oral drugs for specific release. PMID:24035950

  17. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Deanin, R D

    1975-01-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products. PMID:1175566

  18. CALIFORNIA'S NEEDS FOR ADDITIONAL CENTERS OF PUBLIC HIGHER EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RICHARDS, JOHN R.; AND OTHERS

    SINCE 1959, 11 NEW JUNIOR COLLEGES HAVE BEEN ORGANIZED IN THE 21 AREAS RECOMMENDED IN THE MASTER PLAN. ANNEXATIONS AND CONSTRUCTION OR PLANNING OF NEW CAMPUSES HAVE TAKEN PLACE IN ALL THE REMAINING AREAS. AS A RESULT OF THIS GROWTH, PLUS INCREASE IN SIZE OF EXISTING DISTRICTS, OVER 80 PERCENT OF THE HIGH SCHOOL AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE AND OVER 80…

  19. 20 CFR 1002.104 - Is the employee required to accommodate his or her employer's needs as to the timing, frequency...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... concerns over the timing, frequency, or duration of the employee's service to the attention of the appropriate military authority. Regulations issued by the Department of Defense at 32 CFR 104.4...

  20. How much time is needed to form a kinetically stable glass? AC calorimetric study of vapor-deposited glasses of ethylcyclohexane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, Y. Z.; Ahrenberg, M.; Tylinski, M.; Ediger, M. D.; Schick, C.

    2015-02-01

    Glasses of ethylcyclohexane produced by physical vapor deposition have been characterized by in situ alternating current chip nanocalorimetry. Consistent with previous work on other organic molecules, we observe that glasses of high kinetic stability are formed at substrate temperatures around 0.85 Tg, where Tg is the conventional glass transition temperature. Ethylcyclohexane is the least fragile organic glass-former for which stable glass formation has been established. The isothermal transformation of the vapor-deposited glasses into the supercooled liquid state was also measured. At seven substrate temperatures, the transformation time was measured for glasses prepared with deposition rates across a range of four orders of magnitude. At low substrate temperatures, the transformation time is strongly dependent upon deposition rate, while the dependence weakens as Tg is approached from below. These data provide an estimate for the surface equilibration time required to maximize kinetic stability at each substrate temperature. This surface equilibration time is much smaller than the bulk α-relaxation time and within two orders of magnitude of the β-relaxation time of the ordinary glass. Kinetically stable glasses are formed even for substrate temperatures below the Vogel and the Kauzmann temperatures. Surprisingly, glasses formed in the limit of slow deposition at the lowest substrate temperatures are not as kinetically stable as those formed near 0.85 Tg.

  1. Gender and age-specific focus needed for cardiovascular outcome measures to improve life-time prevention in high risk women.

    PubMed

    Maas, Angela H E M; Leiner, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) have a large variety of clinical manifestations with multiple medical professionals involved. The focus of clinical endpoint trials has often been restricted to limited vascular territories, ignoring many other common manifestations of CVD. In addition, the lack of sex and gender- awareness among healthcare professionals has contributed to the underestimation of CVD risk in especially younger women. We plead for a more multidisciplinary and life-course approach to CVD risk assessment. PMID:26921932

  2. States Need to Fill in the Gaps on Expanded Learning Time: Troubling Lack of Detail Seen in No Child Left Behind Waiver Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Schedule redesign is only one small part of the much larger approach to turning around low-performing schools. Even so, most states' No Child Left Behind waiver applications show a disappointing lack of detail on learning time. While they've done some careful thinking about schedule redesign, states must continue to think critically and…

  3. Part-Time Work and the High School Student: Costs, Benefits and Future. A Review of the Literature and Research Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawton, Stephen B.

    This report assesses the literature on part-time work by high school students, describing the various types of studies that have been undertaken on this topic over the last 20 years. Most of the studies reviewed are from the United States or Canada, although a few are from the United Kingdom or Australia. Earlier studies were more likely to be…

  4. The Need for Future Alternatives: An Investigation of the Experiences and Future of Older Parents Caring for Offspring with Learning Disabilities over a Prolonged Period of Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cairns, Deborah; Tolson, Debbie; Brown, Jayne; Darbyshire, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on the results of a qualitative study (in-depth interviews) carried out in the United Kingdom as part of a larger (two-phased) study investigating the experiences, health and future perspectives of older parent carers (six mothers and two fathers) of offspring with learning disabilities over a prolonged period of time. The…

  5. Extending the Trans-Contextual Model in Physical Education and Leisure-Time Contexts: Examining the Role of Basic Psychological Need Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkoukis, Vassilis; Hagger, Martin S.; Lambropoulos, George; Tsorbatzoudis, Haralambos

    2010-01-01

    Background: The trans-contextual model (TCM) is an integrated model of motivation that aims to explain the processes by which agentic support for autonomous motivation in physical education promotes autonomous motivation and physical activity in a leisure-time context. It is proposed that perceived support for autonomous motivation in physical…

  6. Anthropogenic Trace Compounds (ATCs) in aquatic habitats - research needs on sources, fate, detection and toxicity to ensure timely elimination strategies and risk management.

    PubMed

    Gerbersdorf, Sabine U; Cimatoribus, Carla; Class, Holger; Engesser, Karl-H; Helbich, Steffen; Hollert, Henner; Lange, Claudia; Kranert, Martin; Metzger, Jörg; Nowak, Wolfgang; Seiler, Thomas-Benjamin; Steger, Kristin; Steinmetz, Heidrun; Wieprecht, Silke

    2015-06-01

    Anthropogenic Trace Compounds (ATCs) that continuously grow in numbers and concentrations are an emerging issue for water quality in both natural and technical environments. The complex web of exposure pathways as well as the variety in the chemical structure and potency of ATCs represents immense challenges for future research and policy initiatives. This review summarizes current trends and identifies knowledge gaps in innovative, effective monitoring and management strategies while addressing the research questions concerning ATC occurrence, fate, detection and toxicity. We highlight the progressing sensitivity of chemical analytics and the challenges in harmonization of sampling protocols and methods, as well as the need for ATC indicator substances to enable cross-national valid monitoring routine. Secondly, the status quo in ecotoxicology is described to advocate for a better implementation of long-term tests, to address toxicity on community and environmental as well as on human-health levels, and to adapt various test levels and endpoints. Moreover, we discuss potential sources of ATCs and the current removal efficiency of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) to indicate the most effective places and elimination strategies. Knowledge gaps in transport and/or detainment of ATCs through their passage in surface waters and groundwaters are further emphasized in relation to their physico-chemical properties, abiotic conditions and biological interactions in order to highlight fundamental research needs. Finally, we demonstrate the importance and remaining challenges of an appropriate ATC risk assessment since this will greatly assist in identifying the most urgent calls for action, in selecting the most promising measures, and in evaluating the success of implemented management strategies. PMID:25801101

  7. Improvements Needed in Administration of the Guaranteed Student Loan Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    This report identifies improvements needed in administration of the guaranteed student loan program. Improvements needed are based on the fact that that lenders are not informed when student borrowers drop out of school. Alternatives for providing lenders with timely information on enrollment terminations are indicated. Additional administrative…

  8. Additional requirements for charitable hospitals; community health needs assessments for charitable hospitals; requirement of a section 4959 excise tax return and time for filing the return. Final regulations and removal of temporary regulations.

    PubMed

    2014-12-31

    This document contains final regulations that provide guidance regarding the requirements for charitable hospital organizations added by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010. The regulations will affect charitable hospital organizations PMID:25562896

  9. Nurse leaders' Attitudes, Self-Efficacy and training Needs for Implementing Evidence-Based Practice: Is It Time for a Change toward Safe Care?

    PubMed Central

    Farokhzadian, Jamileh; Nayeri, Nahid Dehghan; Borhani, Fariba; Zare, Mohmmad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Evidence-based practice (EBP) has been recognized as the gold standard for safe and high quality care. Nurse leaders have a strategic position in terms of initiating changes in clinical settings for successfully implementing EBP. Therefore, the factors that influence implementing EBP must be measured. Aims To examine nurse leaders' attitudes, self-efficacy, and training needs for implementing evidence-based practice. Place and Duration of Study Four teaching hospitals affiliated to Kerman University of Medical Sciences in the southeast of Iran from January to April 2014. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on 70 nurse leaders from four teaching hospitals. After using a modified forward/backward translation procedure to create a Persian version of “perceptions of nurses of evidence-based practice questionnaire”, data were collected from the participants and analyzed using SPSS (version 20), descriptive statistics, Student's t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Pearson's correlation. Results Most (82.86%) of the participants had not attended any specific training course on the implementation of EBP and 80% had not been involved in any research activities. Nurse leaders' attitudes toward EBP were unfavorable (mean=2.55±0.88), their levels of self-efficacy in EBP skills were weak (mean=2.64±1.31), and their demand for training in all of the EBP areas was moderate (3.89±.97). Conclusion Current practice of nurse leaders is not evidence-based, which is worrisome and can result in serious deficiencies in the quality and safety of nursing care. Nurse leaders must attempt to equip themselves with the attitudes and skills required to change in practice using EBP. PMID:26877975

  10. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  11. [A sigh increases motivation for difficult and monotonous tasks: The effect of one-time voluntary brief exhalation on relief and achievement needs].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kana; Yamamoto, Yumi; Sugamura, Genji

    2016-06-01

    We tested possible intrapersonal effects of a sigh as a psychological "resetter/rebooter." Fifty-eight undergraduates were randomly assigned to a sigh or a normal exhalation (control) group. We asked participants on each task to model the experimenter demonstrating how to exhale air into a small plastic bag for breathing manipulation under the pretext that we were interested in the exhaled gas in stressful situations. Results revealed that the sigh group did not experience more relief (as shown by prolonged reaction time) after exposure to threat stimuli, but showed more persistence on a highly-difficult puzzle task (p = .03, d = .62) and more willingness to continue working on a monotonous task (p < .10, d = .48), than the normal exhalation group. A sigh may have an adaptive function to motivate further work; although it may not induce relief--suggesting that a "sigh of refresh" is a voluntary but a "sigh of relief" is an involuntary response. PMID:27476263

  12. Recruiting and retaining geoscience students at a large public university: Balancing the needs of first-time freshman and upper-division transfer students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, D. D.; Clemens-Knott, D.

    2012-12-01

    The Department of Geological Sciences at California State University, Fullerton (CSUF) is one of the largest geology programs in the state. Approximately 4,000 students at CSUF take general education geology classes; this provides a large pool from which to recruit undergraduate students for either the Geology B.S. or Earth Sciences B.A. offered by the department. The department has seen a dramatic increase in majors over the last decade, from a low of 28 majors in 2002 to more than 110 in 2012. This increase does not appear to be driven by growth in the oil industry; in a recent survey of CSUF geoscience (BS or BA) students, 15% of respondents indicated an interest in a career in petroleum. The department has engaged in aggressive recruitment and outreach efforts over the last decade, with activities ranging from earthquake preparedness rallies in conjunction with the annual California ShakeOut, to an emerging high school and community college intern program at the department's paleontology curation facility. Despite these efforts, the majority of CSUF geoscience students declared the geology major after taking an introductory physical geology course either at CSUF or a local community college. Over the last ten years, approximately 50% of the geoscience majors at CSUF transferred from a community college. Among the geoscience students who began their career at CSUF, only one third had declared a geoscience major in their freshman year. Over two thirds of geoscience majors at CSUF declared their major after completing more than 60 units. The strong tendency for students to declare a geoscience major late in their career poses significant challenges to students' ability to graduate in a timely manner. To mitigate this problem, the department has an aggressive advising program, wherein students attend mandatory advising with a faculty member every semester. The department is also working closely with community college partners to improve the preparation of transfer

  13. Electrophilic addition of astatine

    SciTech Connect

    Norseev, Yu.V.; Vasaros, L.; Nhan, D.D.; Huan, N.K.

    1988-03-01

    It has been shown for the first time that astatine is capable of undergoing addition reactions to unsaturated hydrocarbons. A new compound of astatine, viz., ethylene astatohydrin, has been obtained, and its retention numbers of squalane, Apiezon, and tricresyl phosphate have been found. The influence of various factors on the formation of ethylene astatohydrin has been studied. It has been concluded on the basis of the results obtained that the univalent cations of astatine in an acidic medium is protonated hypoastatous acid.

  14. Timely reconciliation of crude cargoes needed

    SciTech Connect

    Greenway, C.J.; Kochis, D.M.

    1982-07-19

    This article describes a loss control program to define and control oil losses set up by Standard Oil of Cal. Advises comparison of cargo volumes at various points of the custody transfer process during a vessel's voyage, with acceptable loss levels established for each transfer point and cause of loss explained. Points out that shore-to-shore net (loadport vs. discharge port) reconciliation depends on SandW (sediment and water) analysis which may not be available until after the vessel sails. Emphasizes that shore-to-shore gross reconciliation should be completed prior to sailing. Defines ship-to-shore difference, gross difference, SandW difference, and net difference.

  15. Tackifier for addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. M.; St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    A modification to the addition polyimide, LaRC-160, was prepared to improve tack and drape and increase prepeg out-time. The essentially solventless, high viscosity laminating resin is synthesized from low cost liquid monomers. The modified version takes advantage of a reactive, liquid plasticizer which is used in place of solvent and helps solve a major problem of maintaining good prepeg tack and drape, or the ability of the prepeg to adhere to adjacent plies and conform to a desired shape during the lay up process. This alternate solventless approach allows both longer life of the polymer prepeg and the processing of low void laminates. This approach appears to be applicable to all addition polyimide systems.

  16. Effect of ensiling time and exogenous protease addition to whole-plant corn silage of various hybrids, maturities, and chop lengths on nitrogen fractions and ruminal in vitro starch digestibility.

    PubMed

    Ferraretto, L F; Crump, P M; Shaver, R D

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of ensiling time and exogenous protease addition on soluble CP (% of CP), ammonia-N (% of N), and ruminal in vitro starch digestibility (ivSD) of whole-plant corn silage (WPCS) from 3 hybrids, 2 maturities, and 2 chop lengths. Samples from 3 nonisogenic hybrids [brown midrib containing the bm3 gene mutation (BM3), dual-purpose (DP), or floury-leafy (LFY)] at 2 harvest maturities [2/3 kernel milk line (early) or 7d later (late)] with 2 theoretical lengths of cut settings (0.64 or 1.95cm) on a forage harvester were collected at harvest, treated with or without exogenous protease, and ensiled in triplicate in vacuum heat-sealed plastic bags for 0, 30, 60, 120, and 240d. Thus, the experiment consisted of 120 treatments (3 hybrids × 2 maturities × 2 chop lengths × 2 protease treatments × 5 time points) and 360 mini-silos (3 replications per treatment). Vitreousness, measured by dissection on unfermented kernels on the day of harvest, averaged 66.8, 65.0, and 59.0% for BM3, DP, and LFY, respectively. A protease × maturity interaction was observed with protease increasing ivSD in late but not early maturity. Ensiling time × hybrid interactions were observed for ammonia-N and soluble CP concentrations with greater values for FLY than other hybrids only after 120d of ensiling. Ensiling time × hybrid or protease × hybrid interactions were not observed for ivSD. Measurements of ivSD were greatest for FLY and lowest for BM3. Length of the ensiling period did not attenuate negative effects of kernel vitreousness or maturity on ivSD in WPCS. Results suggest that the dosage of exogenous protease addition used in the present study may reduce but not overcome the negative effects of maturity on ivSD in WPCS. No interactions between chop length and ensiling time or exogenous protease addition were observed for ivSD. PMID:26433421

  17. Liquid chromatography coupled to different atmospheric pressure ionization sources-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry and post-column addition of metal salt solutions as a powerful tool for the metabolic profiling of Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Cirigliano, Adriana M; Rodriguez, M Alejandra; Gagliano, M Laura; Bertinetti, Brenda V; Godeas, Alicia M; Cabrera, Gabriela M

    2016-03-25

    Fusarium oxysporum L11 is a non-pathogenic soil-borne fungal strain that yielded an extract that showed antifungal activity against phytopathogens. In this study, reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) coupled to different atmospheric pressure ionization sources-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (API-QTOF-MS) was applied for the comprehensive profiling of the metabolites from the extract. The employed sources were electrospray (ESI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI). Post-column addition of metal solutions of Ca, Cu and Zn(II) was also tested using ESI. A total of 137 compounds were identified or tentatively identified by matching their accurate mass signals, suggested molecular formulae and MS/MS analysis with previously reported data. Some compounds were isolated and identified by NMR. The extract was rich in cyclic peptides like cyclosporins, diketopiperazines and sansalvamides, most of which were new, and are reported here for the first time. The use of post-column addition of metals resulted in a useful strategy for the discrimination of compound classes since specific adducts were observed for the different compound families. This technique also allowed the screening for compounds with metal binding properties. Thus, the applied methodology is a useful choice for the metabolic profiling of extracts and also for the selection of metabolites with potential biological activities related to interactions with metal ions. PMID:26655791

  18. Regional Needs Analysis Report. 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Higher Education Coordinating Board, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Higher Education Coordinating Board (HECB) is required to develop a comprehensive and ongoing needs assessment process to analyze demand for additional degrees and programs [RCW 28B.76.230 (1)]. This report fulfills a portion of that mandate by focusing on employer demand on the regional level, but also includes additional information on…

  19. Reduced risk of hypoglycemia with once-daily glargine versus twice-daily NPH and number needed to harm with NPH to demonstrate the risk of one additional hypoglycemic event in type 2 diabetes: Evidence from a long-term controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Rosenstock, Julio; Fonseca, Vivian; Schinzel, Stefan; Dain, Marie-Paule; Mullins, Peter; Riddle, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Aims This analysis evaluated HbA1c-adjusted hypoglycemia risk with glargine versus neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH) over a 5-year study in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Clinical significance was assessed using number needed to harm (NNH) to demonstrate the risk of one additional patient experiencing at least one hypoglycemic event. Methods Individual patient-level data for symptomatic documented hypoglycemia and HbA1c values from a 5-year randomized study comparing once-daily glargine (n = 513) with twice-daily NPH (n = 504) were analyzed. Symptomatic hypoglycemia was categorized according to concurrent self-monitoring blood glucose levels and need for assistance. Hypoglycemic events per patient-year as a function of HbA1c were fitted by negative binomial regression using treatment and HbA1c at endpoint as independent variables. An estimate of NNH was derived from logistic regression models. Results The cumulative number of symptomatic hypoglycemia events was consistently lower with glargine compared with NPH over 5 years. Compared with twice-daily NPH, once-daily glargine treatment resulted in significantly lower adjusted odds ratios (OR) for all daytime hypoglycemia (OR 0.74; p = 0.030) and any severe event (OR 0.64; p = 0.035), representing a 26% and 36% reduction in the odds of daytime and severe hypoglycemia, respectively. Our model predicts that, if 25 patients were treated with NPH instead of glargine, then one additional patient would experience at least one severe hypoglycemic event. Conclusions This analysis of long-term insulin treatment confirms findings from short-term studies and demonstrates that glargine provides sustained, clinically meaningful reductions in risk of hypoglycemia compared with NPH in patients with T2DM. PMID:24856612

  20. Global Neurosurgery: The Unmet Need.

    PubMed

    Park, Kee B; Johnson, Walter D; Dempsey, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Globally, the lack of access to basic surgical care causes 3 times as much deaths as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria combined. The magnitude of this unmet need has been described recently, and the numbers are startling. Major shifts in global health agenda have highlighted access to essential and emergency surgery as a high priority. A broad examination of the current global neurosurgical efforts to improve access has revealed some strengths, particularly in the realm of training; however, the demand grossly outstrips the supply; most people in low-income countries do not have access to basic surgical care, either due to lack of availability or affordability. Projects that help create a robust and resilient health system within low- and middle-income countries require urgent implementation. In this context, concurrent scale-up of human resources, investments in capacity building, local data collection, and analysis for accurate assessment are essential. In addition, through process of collaboration and consensus building within the neurosurgical community, a unified voice of neurosurgery is necessary to effectively advocate for all those who need neurosurgical care wherever, whenever. PMID:26732963

  1. Vocational Counseling Needs of Young Women as Perceived by Working Business and Professional Women. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haczynski, Sharon L.

    Designed to determine the additional competencies women need to obtain jobs and advance in them, a study focused on the counseling needs of young women as perceived by the membership of the Wisconsin Federation of Business and Professional Women's Clubs comprised of 2,700 women who are working part-time, full-time, or in partnership. The…

  2. Additive attacks on speaker recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrokh Baroughi, Alireza; Craver, Scott

    2014-02-01

    Speaker recognition is used to identify a speaker's voice from among a group of known speakers. A common method of speaker recognition is a classification based on cepstral coefficients of the speaker's voice, using a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) to model each speaker. In this paper we try to fool a speaker recognition system using additive noise such that an intruder is recognized as a target user. Our attack uses a mixture selected from a target user's GMM model, inverting the cepstral transformation to produce noise samples. In our 5 speaker data base, we achieve an attack success rate of 50% with a noise signal at 10dB SNR, and 95% by increasing noise power to 0dB SNR. The importance of this attack is its simplicity and flexibility: it can be employed in real time with no processing of an attacker's voice, and little computation is needed at the moment of detection, allowing the attack to be performed by a small portable device. For any target user, knowing that user's model or voice sample is sufficient to compute the attack signal, and it is enough that the intruder plays it while he/she is uttering to be classiffed as the victim.

  3. Chronic nitrogen addition causes a reduction in soil carbon dioxide efflux during the high stem-growth period in a tropical montane forest but no response from a tropical lowland forest on a decadal time scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, B.; Corre, M. D.; Veldkamp, E.; Sueta, J. P.

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition is rapidly increasing in tropical regions. We studied the response of soil carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux to long-term experimental N addition (125 kg N ha-1 yr-1) in mature lowland and montane forests in Panama. In the lowland forest, on soils with high nutrient-supplying and buffering capacity, fine litterfall and stem-growth were neither N- nor phosphorus-limited. In the montane forest, on soils with low nutrient supplying capacity and an organic layer, fine litterfall and stem-growth were N-limited. Our objectives were to 1) explore the influence of soil temperature and moisture on the dynamics of soil CO2 efflux and 2) determine the responses of soil CO2 efflux from an N-rich and N-limited forest to elevated N input. Annual soil CO2-C efflux was larger in the lowland (15.44 ± 1.02 Mg C ha-1) than in the montane forest (9.37 ± 0.28 Mg C ha-1). In the lowland forest, soil moisture explained the largest fraction of the variance in soil CO2 efflux while soil temperature was the main explanatory variable in the montane forest. Soil CO2 efflux in the lowland forest did not differ between the control and 9-11 yr N-addition plots, suggesting that chronic N input to nutrient-rich tropical lowland forests on well-buffered soils may not change their C balance on a decadal time scale. In the montane forest, first year N addition did not affect soil CO2 efflux but annual CO2 efflux was reduced by 14% and 8% in the 2nd and 3rd year N-addition plots, respectively, compared to the control. This reduction was caused by a decrease in soil CO2 efflux during the high stem-growth period of the year, suggesting a shift in carbon partitioning from below- to aboveground in the N-addition plots in which stem diameter growth was promoted.

  4. Screening of additives in plastics with high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry and different ionization sources: direct probe injection (DIP)-APCI, LC-APCI, and LC-ion booster ESI.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros-Gómez, Ana; Jonkers, Tim; Covaci, Adrian; de Boer, Jacob

    2016-04-01

    Plastics are complex mixtures consisting of a polymer and additives with different physico-chemical properties. We developed a broad screening method to elucidate the nature of compounds present in plastics used in electrical/electronic equipment commonly found at homes (e.g., electrical adaptors, computer casings, heaters). The analysis was done by (a) solvent extraction followed by liquid chromatography coupled to high accuracy/resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) with different ionization sources or (b) direct analysis of the solid by ambient mass spectrometry high accuracy/resolution TOFMS. The different ionization methods showed different selectivity and sensitivity for the different compound classes and were complementary. A variety of antioxidants, phthalates, UV filters, and flame retardants were found in most samples. Furthermore, some recently reported impurities or degradation products derived from flame retardants were identified, such as hydroxylated triphenyl phosphate and tetrabromobisphenol A monoglycidyl ether. PMID:26758596

  5. A needs-based method for estimating the behavioral health staff needs of community health centers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Federally Qualified Health Centers are expanding to increase access for millions of more Americans with a goal of doubling capacity to serve 40 million people. Health centers provide a lot of behavioral health services but many have difficulty accessing mental health and substance use professionals for their patients. To meet the needs of the underserved and newly insured it is important to better estimate how many behavioral health professionals are needed. Methods Using health center staffing data and behavioral health service patterns from the 2010 Uniform Data System and the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, we estimated the number of patients likely to need behavioral health care by insurance type, the number of visits likely needed by health center patients annually, and the number of full time equivalent providers needed to serve them. Results More than 2.5 million patients, 12 or older, with mild or moderate mental illness, and more than 357,000 with substance abuse disorders, may have gone without needed behavioral health services in 2010. This level of need would have required more than 11,600 full time providers. This translates to approximately 0.9 licensed mental health provider FTE, 0.1 FTE psychiatrist, 0.4 FTE other mental health staff, and 0.3 FTE substance abuse provider per 2,500 patients. These estimates suggest that 90% of current centers could not access mental health services or provide substance abuse services to fully meet patients’ needs in 2010. If needs are similar after health center expansion, more than 27,000 full time behavioral health providers will be needed to serve 40 million medical patients, and grantees will need to increase behavioral health staff more than four-fold. Conclusions More behavioral health is seen in primary care than in any other setting, and health center clients have greater behavioral health needs than typical primary care patients. Most health centers needed additional behavioral

  6. Future needs for biomedical transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooten, F. T.

    1971-01-01

    In summary there are three major classes of transducer improvements required: improvements in existing transducers, needs for unexploited physical science phenomena in transducer design, and needs for unutilized physiological phenomena in transducer design. During the next decade, increasing emphasis will be placed on noninvasive measurement in all of these areas. Patient safety, patient comfort, and the need for efficient utilization of the time of both patient and physician requires that noninvasive methods of monitoring be developed.

  7. Mobile consultant: evaluation of additional services.

    PubMed

    Banitsas, Konstantinos; Georgiadis, Pantelis; Tachakra, Sapal; Cavouras, Dionisis

    2007-01-01

    As the need for mobility in the medical world increases, newer systems and applications came to light; many of them based on wireless and mobile networks. PDA based systems were presented in the past, capable of videoconferencing and transmitting high quality images between a roaming consultant and a fixed point in the hospital. These systems not only had desirable characteristics but also incorporated additional services that were found of value: paging, Voice over IP calling, Internet, email, intranet, patient record update, etc This paper presents an engineering and clinical evaluation of those additional services based on both objective and subjective criteria. It concludes that such complementary services can be desirable as they increase personnel mobility, utilize the hospital resources more efficiently while at the same time increase productivity and decrease the cost of hardware and communications. PMID:18002803

  8. NEEDS - Information Adaptive System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, W. L.; Benz, H. F.; Meredith, B. D.

    1980-01-01

    The Information Adaptive System (IAS) is an element of the NASA End-to-End Data System (NEEDS) Phase II and is focused toward onboard image processing. The IAS is a data preprocessing system which is closely coupled to the sensor system. Some of the functions planned for the IAS include sensor response nonuniformity correction, geometric correction, data set selection, data formatting, packetization, and adaptive system control. The inclusion of these sensor data preprocessing functions onboard the spacecraft will significantly improve the extraction of information from the sensor data in a timely and cost effective manner, and provide the opportunity to design sensor systems which can be reconfigured in near real-time for optimum performance. The purpose of this paper is to present the preliminary design of the IAS and the plans for its development.

  9. Environmental restoration and statistics: Issues and needs

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, R.O.

    1991-10-01

    Statisticians have a vital role to play in environmental restoration (ER) activities. One facet of that role is to point out where additional work is needed to develop statistical sampling plans and data analyses that meet the needs of ER. This paper is an attempt to show where statistics fits into the ER process. The statistician, as member of the ER planning team, works collaboratively with the team to develop the site characterization sampling design, so that data of the quality and quantity required by the specified data quality objectives (DQOs) are obtained. At the same time, the statistician works with the rest of the planning team to design and implement, when appropriate, the observational approach to streamline the ER process and reduce costs. The statistician will also provide the expertise needed to select or develop appropriate tools for statistical analysis that are suited for problems that are common to waste-site data. These data problems include highly heterogeneous waste forms, large variability in concentrations over space, correlated data, data that do not have a normal (Gaussian) distribution, and measurements below detection limits. Other problems include environmental transport and risk models that yield highly uncertain predictions, and the need to effectively communicate to the public highly technical information, such as sampling plans, site characterization data, statistical analysis results, and risk estimates. Even though some statistical analysis methods are available off the shelf'' for use in ER, these problems require the development of additional statistical tools, as discussed in this paper. 29 refs.

  10. New additive retards coke formation in ethylene furnace tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-09

    Adding relatively small amounts of a new additive to the feed stream of a steam cracker can inhibit coke formation on the metal surfaces of processing equipment and increase furnace run time. The additive comprises a variable mixture of four to six inorganic salts in aqueous solution. The components of the additive mixture can be varied, as needed, for processing heavy feed materials such as heavy naphtha and gas oil. The process was first tested at a Korean petrochemical plant and is now operating successfully at a commercial facility in Russia. The results of the Korean trial are presented here.

  11. What responders need to respond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eifried, Gary

    2004-12-01

    Developing equipment and instrumentation for use by first responders and HAZMAT professionals in a Homeland Defense role requires an understanding of the real needs of those responders. These needs are driven by the manner in which the incident response takes place and how the response actions occur over time. This paper describes a chemical terrorist incident, the response functions and related timelines, and the detection and identification needs during each phase. From this information, developers will be able to better understand requirements related to sensitivity, specificity, response time, weight, ruggedness, ease of use, and other design parameters.

  12. Adults Need Vaccines, Too!

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Adult Vaccinations Adults Need Vaccines, Too! Past Issues / Summer 2015 Table of Contents ... of the millions of adults not receiving the vaccines you need? What vaccines do you need? All ...

  13. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects. PMID:24772784

  14. Supply and demand: estimating the real need for care while meeting the 48 hour waiting time target in a genitourinary medicine clinic by a closed appointment system

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, J; Christodoulides, H; Taylor, Y

    2006-01-01

    Aim To attempt to assess demand for access to sexual health services in a community where a “closed” appointment system operates in the local genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinic. Setting A large GUM clinic serving a provincial city in England. Appointments for new episodes are available only 1 or 2 days ahead. Service user complaints about repeated difficulty in getting through to book a visit prompted a review of all methods of access. Methods A prospective review of all calls received in the departmental telephone booking service was performed. Temporary extra staff manned a cascade sequence of telephone lines and recorded all calls and caller characteristics such as age and declaration of symptoms. All attempts to book an appointment in person, by written referral, or by telephone in a period of 5 working days were also logged. This total demand was compared with the actual capacity and maximum theoretical capacity of the clinic during the same time period. Results 626 appointments would be required in the working week to accommodate all patients within 48 hours of requesting to be seen. 84% of all calls requested a new appointment, and 77% all new appointment requests were by phone. There were 181 new appointments available; 72% of those requesting an appointment could not be seen. The clinic was working at 103% capacity. To accommodate demand at this quiet time of the academic year, the GUM service would need to increase capacity by 3–4‐fold. Conclusions Closed appointment systems in GUM services may produce an apparent “improvement” in waiting times to 48 hours, but many callers are not able to book an appointment at all. Demand for GUM services outstrips capacity to an extent that internal efficiency savings cannot hope to address. PMID:16461602

  15. No need for speed.

    PubMed

    Boland, Lori L; Hagstrom, Steve G

    2012-07-01

    Confirmation by a nursing home resident's physician is frequently required prior to transport from the facility to a hospital. So in cases for which the need to transport isn't truly urgent but the assigned priority is lights and siren, EMS often rush to the scene only to wait while physician confirmation is obtained. With the protocol in place, routine response for non-urgent transport needs means that confirmation from the physician is often already being sought or has been received by the time the ambulance arrives. This theoretically places the crew "back in service" sooner. Reducing unnecessary lights-and-siren ambulance response in communities employing this type of response model can improve use of EMS resources. For example, some community-level EMS protocols in the Allina Health EMS service area have local police and fire dispatched to all medical 9-1-1 calls. In non-emergent situations for which the protocol is now used, police and fire are no longer dispatched in situations they would previously have been dispatched concurrent with an unnecessary emergent response. The Allina Health Skilled Facility Ambulance Response Program provides an example of how EMS agencies can partner successfully with skilled-nursing facilities to promote the most appropriate use of ambulance services and effectively reduce the frequency of unnecessary emergent response. Limiting the use of lights-and-siren arrival to only those situations for which it's truly warranted improves safety and benefits nursing home residents by alleviating anxiety and disruption. PMID:22997667

  16. Supplier Selection Using Weighted Utility Additive Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karande, Prasad; Chakraborty, Shankar

    2015-10-01

    Supplier selection is a multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) problem which mainly involves evaluating a number of available suppliers according to a set of common criteria for choosing the best one to meet the organizational needs. For any manufacturing or service organization, selecting the right upstream suppliers is a key success factor that will significantly reduce purchasing cost, increase downstream customer satisfaction and improve competitive ability. The past researchers have attempted to solve the supplier selection problem employing different MCDM techniques which involve active participation of the decision makers in the decision-making process. This paper deals with the application of weighted utility additive (WUTA) method for solving supplier selection problems. The WUTA method, an extension of utility additive approach, is based on ordinal regression and consists of building a piece-wise linear additive decision model from a preference structure using linear programming (LP). It adopts preference disaggregation principle and addresses the decision-making activities through operational models which need implicit preferences in the form of a preorder of reference alternatives or a subset of these alternatives present in the process. The preferential preorder provided by the decision maker is used as a restriction of a LP problem, which has its own objective function, minimization of the sum of the errors associated with the ranking of each alternative. Based on a given reference ranking of alternatives, one or more additive utility functions are derived. Using these utility functions, the weighted utilities for individual criterion values are combined into an overall weighted utility for a given alternative. It is observed that WUTA method, having a sound mathematical background, can provide accurate ranking to the candidate suppliers and choose the best one to fulfill the organizational requirements. Two real time examples are illustrated to prove

  17. Needs of Seeds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeley, Page

    2011-01-01

    The "Needs of Seeds" formative assessment probe can be used to find out whether students recognize that seeds have needs both similar to and different from plants and other living organisms (Keeley, Eberle, and Tugel 2007). The probe reveals whether students overgeneralize the needs of seeds by assuming they have the same needs as the adult plants…

  18. International Business Program Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakland Community Coll., Farmington, MI. Office of Institutional Planning and Analysis.

    In 1991, a study was conducted by Oakland Community College to evaluate the need for a proposed International Business program. General information was obtained from a literature search, various governmental and public interest agencies involved in international business, and other southeast Michigan community colleges. In addition, a survey was…

  19. An additional middle cuneiform?

    PubMed Central

    Brookes-Fazakerley, S.D.; Jackson, G.E.; Platt, S.R.

    2015-01-01

    Additional cuneiform bones of the foot have been described in reference to the medial bipartite cuneiform or as small accessory ossicles. An additional middle cuneiform has not been previously documented. We present the case of a patient with an additional ossicle that has the appearance and location of an additional middle cuneiform. Recognizing such an anatomical anomaly is essential for ruling out second metatarsal base or middle cuneiform fractures and for the preoperative planning of arthrodesis or open reduction and internal fixation procedures in this anatomical location. PMID:26224890

  20. Carbamate deposit control additives

    SciTech Connect

    Honnen, L.R.; Lewis, R.A.

    1980-11-25

    Deposit control additives for internal combustion engines are provided which maintain cleanliness of intake systems without contributing to combustion chamber deposits. The additives are poly(oxyalkylene) carbamates comprising a hydrocarbyloxyterminated poly(Oxyalkylene) chain of 2-5 carbon oxyalkylene units bonded through an oxycarbonyl group to a nitrogen atom of ethylenediamine.

  1. Gente Joven: meeting needs.

    PubMed

    Lopez Juarez, A

    1993-01-01

    To meet the sexual and reproductive health needs of adolescents, the Mexican family planning association MEXFAM established the Gente Joven (young people) project in 1986. Rather than expending scarce resources on setting up youth centers, Gente Joven was introduced at sites where young people are already assembled--schools, recreation centers, meeting points for street gangs. To date, the program has reached hundreds of thousands of young people in every state and large town in Mexico; in addition, thousands of teachers have been trained to take sexuality education to schools throughout the country. Preliminary surveys of adolescents identified 5 major subjects about which sex education was most in demand: communication within the family, anatomy and the physiology of the reproductive organs, premarital sex decision making, sexually transmitted diseases, and family planning and pregnancy. The sex education module is implemented in 4 2-hour sessions. Young people have been involved not only in designing the curriculum, but also in preparing the print materials, films, and videos used in the schools. Emphasized is the importance of overcoming gender inequalities and promoting reciprocal relationships between the sexes. Despite some attempts by pro-life groups to close down the program, Gente Joven has become one of the most popular, effective MEXFAM activities and is at the cutting edge of social change in Mexico. PMID:12345369

  2. Time Manager Software for a Flight Processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoerne, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Data analysis is a process of inspecting, cleaning, transforming, and modeling data to highlight useful information and suggest conclusions. Accurate timestamps and a timeline of vehicle events are needed to analyze flight data. By moving the timekeeping to the flight processor, there is no longer a need for a redundant time source. If each flight processor is initially synchronized to GPS, they can freewheel and maintain a fairly accurate time throughout the flight with no additional GPS time messages received. How ever, additional GPS time messages will ensure an even greater accuracy. When a timestamp is required, a gettime function is called that immediately reads the time-base register.

  3. Special Needs and the Need for Fun

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuill, Ronald D.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes his experience teaching a "special needs," or "SPED" class. In this class, he has sixth, seventh, and eighth grade students that have the most difficulty of any students in the school in grasping new concepts. The author explains that these same students, however, are also the ones who best appreciate what you…

  4. Absolute biological needs.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    Absolute needs (as against instrumental needs) are independent of the ends, goals and purposes of personal agents. Against the view that the only needs are instrumental needs, David Wiggins and Garrett Thomson have defended absolute needs on the grounds that the verb 'need' has instrumental and absolute senses. While remaining neutral about it, this article does not adopt that approach. Instead, it suggests that there are absolute biological needs. The absolute nature of these needs is defended by appeal to: their objectivity (as against mind-dependence); the universality of the phenomenon of needing across the plant and animal kingdoms; the impossibility that biological needs depend wholly upon the exercise of the abilities characteristic of personal agency; the contention that the possession of biological needs is prior to the possession of the abilities characteristic of personal agency. Finally, three philosophical usages of 'normative' are distinguished. On two of these, to describe a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' is to describe it as value-dependent. A description of a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' in the third sense does not entail such value-dependency, though it leaves open the possibility that value depends upon the phenomenon or upon the truth of the claim. It is argued that while survival needs (or claims about them) may well be normative in this third sense, they are normative in neither of the first two. Thus, the idea of absolute need is not inherently normative in either of the first two senses. PMID:23586876

  5. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  6. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  7. Smog control fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lundby, W.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described of controlling, reducing or eliminating, ozone and related smog resulting from photochemical reactions between ozone and automotive or industrial gases comprising the addition of iodine or compounds of iodine to hydrocarbon-base fuels prior to or during combustion in an amount of about 1 part iodine per 240 to 10,000,000 parts fuel, by weight, to be accomplished by: (a) the addition of these inhibitors during or after the refining or manufacturing process of liquid fuels; (b) the production of these inhibitors for addition into fuel tanks, such as automotive or industrial tanks; or (c) the addition of these inhibitors into combustion chambers of equipment utilizing solid fuels for the purpose of reducing ozone.

  8. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wender, Ester H.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that food additives are causally associated with hyperkinesis and learning disabilities in children is reviewed, and available data are summarized. Available from: American Medical Association 535 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610. (JG)

  9. Additional Types of Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A Listen En Español Additional Types of Neuropathy Charcot's Joint Charcot's Joint, also called neuropathic arthropathy, ... can stop bone destruction and aid healing. Cranial Neuropathy Cranial neuropathy affects the 12 pairs of nerves ...

  10. XY Needs in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neidlinger, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    This project examined the unique needs of boys in education. Biologically and physically, male students' developmental needs differ from their female counterparts. As a result, their educational needs are typically underserved and misunderstood in the standard co-educational classroom. This misunderstanding has led to a gap in educational…

  11. Assessing Special Educational Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfendale, Sheila, Ed.

    This essays in this book contain valuable and up-to-date information about current issues and developments in assessing special educational needs. The context of the book is the mainstream setting in the United Kingdom. The aim of these chapters is to consider special needs in inclusive education, consistent with British special needs legislation.…

  12. Turnaround time.

    PubMed

    Baumgardner, H W; Boyer, B P; Cavenaugh, B; Keller, C

    1992-01-01

    Advances in instrumentation have enabled laboratories to deliver results much more quickly. But as equipment has advanced so have expectations on turnaround time (TAT), driving up costs in the process. Laboratories must balance the needs of their clients against the need to cover their costs. In this issue, we asked our respondents: How do you address the issue of turnaround time? PMID:10118449

  13. 15 CFR 990.66 - Additional considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Restoration Implementation Phase § 990.66 Additional considerations... restoration success and the need for corrective action. (b) The reasonable costs of such actions are...

  14. 15 CFR 990.66 - Additional considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Restoration Implementation Phase § 990.66 Additional considerations... restoration success and the need for corrective action. (b) The reasonable costs of such actions are...

  15. 15 CFR 990.66 - Additional considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Restoration Implementation Phase § 990.66 Additional considerations... restoration success and the need for corrective action. (b) The reasonable costs of such actions are...

  16. Global trends, needs, issues.

    PubMed

    Kieffer, R G

    1998-01-01

    Worldwide, Pharmaceutical Plant Management struggles with the competing priorities of lowering costs, rising customer expectations, more demanding government regulations, and the need to reduce cycle times especially in the introduction of new products. All of this takes place in an environment of global competition, regulatory harmonization, mergers and downsizing, and employee insecurity. Employees are expected to do more with less, work with more sophisticated equipment and processes, take more personal responsibility for quality and productivity, work in teams, etc. In summary, we are talking about CHANGE, the speed of which will accelerate in the years to come. This presentation will discuss how some pharmaceutical plants are addressing these challenges. Examples will be given in the areas of validation, process reengineering, risk analysis, role of the quality function and people. It is my contention that most of the global trends today are insufficient to meet the challenges that we face. I hope that this presentation will generate some ideas on what the global trends should be. PMID:9752708

  17. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  18. Meeting Teen Sleep Needs Creatively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfson, Amy R.; Carskadon, Mary A.

    2005-01-01

    Research on the sleep needs of adolescents and the influence of sleep on learning and behavior have captured the interest of school districts nationwide and in other countries as well. As a result, school officials are being urged to acknowledge the evidence and to adjust school schedules accordingly (e.g., to delay high school start times). The…

  19. Biobased lubricant additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fully biobased lubricants are those formulated using all biobased ingredients, i.e. biobased base oils and biobased additives. Such formulations provide the maximum environmental, safety, and economic benefits expected from a biobased product. Currently, there are a number of biobased base oils that...

  20. Multifunctional fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Baillargeon, D.J.; Cardis, A.B.; Heck, D.B.

    1991-03-26

    This paper discusses a composition comprising a major amount of a liquid hydrocarbyl fuel and a minor low-temperature flow properties improving amount of an additive product of the reaction of a suitable diol and product of a benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride and a long-chain hydrocarbyl aminoalcohol.

  1. 12 CFR 1010.116 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional information. 1010.116 Section 1010...) Reporting Requirements § 1010.116 Additional information. (a) Property Owners' Association. (1) Will there... obligation to retire the debt. (c) Violations and litigations. This information need appear only if any...

  2. 12 CFR 1010.116 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Additional information. 1010.116 Section 1010...) Reporting Requirements § 1010.116 Additional information. (a) Property Owners' Association. (1) Will there... obligation to retire the debt. (c) Violations and litigations. This information need appear only if any...

  3. Robust stability under additive perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhaya, A.; Desoer, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    A MIMO linear time-invariant feedback system 1S(P,C) is considered which is assumed to be U-stable. The plant P is subjected to an additive perturbation Delta P which is proper but not necessarily stable. It is proved that the perturbed system is U-stable if and only if Delta P(I + Q x Delta P) exp -1 is U-stable.

  4. Determination of hydrologic properties needed to calculate average linear velocity and travel time of ground water in the principal aquifer underlying the southeastern part of Salt Lake Valley, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freethey, G.W.; Spangler, L.E.; Monheiser, W.J.

    1994-01-01

    A 48-square-mile area in the southeastern part of the Salt Lake Valley, Utah, was studied to determine if generalized information obtained from geologic maps, water-level maps, and drillers' logs could be used to estimate hydraulic conduc- tivity, porosity, and slope of the potentiometric surface: the three properties needed to calculate average linear velocity of ground water. Estimated values of these properties could be used by water- management and regulatory agencies to compute values of average linear velocity, which could be further used to estimate travel time of ground water along selected flow lines, and thus to determine wellhead protection areas around public- supply wells. The methods used to estimate the three properties are based on assumptions about the drillers' descriptions, the depositional history of the sediments, and the boundary con- ditions of the hydrologic system. These assump- tions were based on geologic and hydrologic infor- mation determined from previous investigations. The reliability of the estimated values for hydro- logic properties and average linear velocity depends on the accuracy of these assumptions. Hydraulic conductivity of the principal aquifer was estimated by calculating the thickness- weighted average of values assigned to different drillers' descriptions of material penetrated during the construction of 98 wells. Using these 98 control points, the study area was divided into zones representing approximate hydraulic- conductivity values of 20, 60, 100, 140, 180, 220, and 250 feet per day. This range of values is about the same range of values used in developing a ground-water flow model of the principal aquifer in the early 1980s. Porosity of the principal aquifer was estimated by compiling the range of porosity values determined or estimated during previous investigations of basin-fill sediments, and then using five different values ranging from 15 to 35 percent to delineate zones in the study area that were assumed to

  5. Boron addition to alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Coad, B. C.

    1985-08-20

    A process for addition of boron to an alloy which involves forming a melt of the alloy and a reactive metal, selected from the group consisting of aluminum, titanium, zirconium and mixtures thereof to the melt, maintaining the resulting reactive mixture in the molten state and reacting the boric oxide with the reactive metal to convert at least a portion of the boric oxide to boron which dissolves in the resulting melt, and to convert at least portion of the reactive metal to the reactive metal oxide, which oxide remains with the resulting melt, and pouring the resulting melt into a gas stream to form a first atomized powder which is subsequently remelted with further addition of boric oxide, re-atomized, and thus reprocessed to convert essentially all the reactive metal to metal oxide to produce a powdered alloy containing specified amounts of boron.

  6. Vinyl capped addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D. (Inventor); Malarik, Diane C. (Inventor); Delvigs, Peter (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimide resins (PMR) are generally useful where high strength and temperature capabilities are required (at temperatures up to about 700 F). Polyimide resins are particularly useful in applications such as jet engine compressor components, for example, blades, vanes, air seals, air splitters, and engine casing parts. Aromatic vinyl capped addition polyimides are obtained by reacting a diamine, an ester of tetracarboxylic acid, and an aromatic vinyl compound. Low void materials with improved oxidative stability when exposed to 700 F air may be fabricated as fiber reinforced high molecular weight capped polyimide composites. The aromatic vinyl capped polyimides are provided with a more aromatic nature and are more thermally stable than highly aliphatic, norbornenyl-type end-capped polyimides employed in PMR resins. The substitution of aromatic vinyl end-caps for norbornenyl end-caps in addition polyimides results in polymers with improved oxidative stability.

  7. [Biologically active food additives].

    PubMed

    Velichko, M A; Shevchenko, V P

    1998-07-01

    More than half out of 40 projects for the medical science development by the year of 2000 have been connected with the bio-active edible additives that are called "the food of XXI century", non-pharmacological means for many diseases. Most of these additives--nutricevtics and parapharmacevtics--are intended for the enrichment of food rations for the sick or healthy people. The ecologicaly safest and most effective are combined domestic adaptogens with immuno-modulating and antioxidating action that give anabolic and stimulating effect,--"leveton", "phytoton" and "adapton". The MKTs-229 tablets are residue discharge means. For atherosclerosis and general adiposis they recommend "tsar tablets" and "aiconol (ikhtien)"--on the base of cod-liver oil or "splat" made out of seaweed (algae). All these preparations have been clinically tested and received hygiene certificates from the Institute of Dietology of the Russian Academy of Medical Science. PMID:9752776

  8. Hydrocarbon fuel additive

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrogio, S.

    1989-02-28

    This patent describes the method of fuel storage or combustion, wherein the fuel supply contains small amounts of water, the step of adding to the fuel supply an additive comprising a blend of a hydrophilic agent chosen from the group of ethylene glycol, n-butyl alcohol, and cellosolve in the range of 22-37% by weight; ethoxylated nonylphenol in the range of 26-35% by weight; nonylphenol polyethylene glycol ether in the range of 32-43% by weight.

  9. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online. PMID:24729671

  10. The Need for Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Martin R.; Shatkin, Laurence

    1987-01-01

    The need for research in computerized career guidance is pervasive. It is an expression of developers' needs to make sense of their work, to clarify what they are doing, to guide them in constructing and implementing a model, to observe the consequences and efficacy of a system, and to provide feedback. (JOW)

  11. Assessing Campus Counseling Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrar, William R.; Affsprung, Eric H.; Long, Jeffrey C.

    2010-01-01

    Campus mental health needs are in the spotlight. Whether the nature and severity of problems presenting in college counseling centers are increasing or not, it is important to provide appropriate services for the campus as a whole. By surveying the general campus population, a better basis for determining the needs of students can be established…

  12. CELSS science needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    Questions and areas of study that need to be persued in order to develope a Controlled Ecological Life Support System are posed. Research topics needing attention are grouped under various leadings: ecology, genetics, plant pathology, cybernetics, chemistry, computer science, fluid dynamics, optics, and solid-state physics.

  13. Technical Writing Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakland Community Coll., Farmington, MI. Office of Institutional Planning and Analysis.

    In fall 1991, a study was conducted by Oakland Community College (OCC) to evaluate the need for a proposed Technical Writing program. General information was gathered from a literature review, Michigan Occupational Information System data, interviews with professionals in the field, and a 1987 needs assessment conducted by Washtenaw Community…

  14. The University Needs "You"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Allen

    2009-01-01

    Colleges and universities need English education professors who know what it is to teach five classes a day, accommodate IEPs, and still take on extracurricular activities. They need English education professors who not only present at NCTE Annual Conventions, but who also want to be in schools talking to teachers on a regular basis. They need…

  15. Siloxane containing addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maudgal, S.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Addition polyimide oligomers have been synthesized from bis(gamma-aminopropyl) tetramethyldisiloxane and 3, 3', 4, 4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride using a variety of latent crosslinking groups as endcappers. The prepolymers were isolated and characterized for solubility (in amide, chlorinated and ether solvents), melt flow and cure properties. The most promising systems, maleimide and acetylene terminated prepolymers, were selected for detailed study. Graphite cloth reinforced composites were prepared and properties compared with those of graphite/Kerimid 601, a commercially available bismaleimide. Mixtures of the maleimide terminated system with Kerimid 601, in varying proportions, were also studied.

  16. Oil additive process

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, H.

    1988-10-18

    This patent describes a method of making an additive comprising: (a) adding 2 parts by volume of 3% sodium hypochlorite to 45 parts by volume of diesel oil fuel to form a sulphur free fuel, (b) removing all water and foreign matter formed by the sodium hypochlorite, (c) blending 30 parts by volume of 24% lead naphthanate with 15 parts by volume of the sulphur free fuel, 15 parts by volume of light-weight material oil to form a blended mixture, and (d) heating the blended mixture slowly and uniformly to 152F.

  17. Fluency with Basic Addition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garza-Kling, Gina

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, learning basic facts has focused on rote memorization of isolated facts, typically through the use of flash cards, repeated drilling, and timed testing. However, as many experienced teachers have seen, "drill alone does not develop mastery of single-digit combinations." In contrast, a fluency approach to learning basic addition…

  18. Robot Technicians: Is There a Need?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minty, Gordon

    1987-01-01

    The study attempted to determine needs for training robotic technicians in Michigan. The survey had three parts: (1) needed technical specialities, (2) current problems with robot maintenance and repair, and (3) number of robots needed to keep a full-time technician occupied. (CH)

  19. 47 CFR 25.111 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional information. 25.111 Section 25.111... Applications and Licenses General Application Filing Requirements § 25.111 Additional information. (a) The Commission may request from any party at any time additional information concerning any application, or...

  20. Projecting Health Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has developed a computer model for planning future health care needs in the Los Angeles area. The model integrates demographic health and other data to provide rational projections of hospital bed and physician specialty requirements.

  1. Selecting Needs Analysis Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newstrom, John W.; Lilyquist, John M.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a contingency model for decision making with regard to needs analysis methods. Focus is on 12 methods with brief discussion of their defining characteristics and some operational guidelines for their use. (JOW)

  2. ANTHRAX REMEDIATION RESEARCH NEEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Protection Agency has initiated a research program to respond to the immediate needs arising from the recent Bacillus anthracis bioterrorism events. Although the program has a strong emphasis on anthrax, other pathogens and chemical agents, including toxic indu...

  3. Performance Boosting Additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mainstream Engineering Corporation was awarded Phase I and Phase II contracts from Goddard Space Flight Center's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program in early 1990. With support from the SBIR program, Mainstream Engineering Corporation has developed a unique low cost additive, QwikBoost (TM), that increases the performance of air conditioners, heat pumps, refrigerators, and freezers. Because of the energy and environmental benefits of QwikBoost, Mainstream received the Tibbetts Award at a White House Ceremony on October 16, 1997. QwikBoost was introduced at the 1998 International Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Exposition. QwikBoost is packaged in a handy 3-ounce can (pressurized with R-134a) and will be available for automotive air conditioning systems in summer 1998.

  4. Sewage sludge additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Mueller, W. A.; Ingham, J. D. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The additive is for a raw sewage treatment process of the type where settling tanks are used for the purpose of permitting the suspended matter in the raw sewage to be settled as well as to permit adsorption of the dissolved contaminants in the water of the sewage. The sludge, which settles down to the bottom of the settling tank is extracted, pyrolyzed and activated to form activated carbon and ash which is mixed with the sewage prior to its introduction into the settling tank. The sludge does not provide all of the activated carbon and ash required for adequate treatment of the raw sewage. It is necessary to add carbon to the process and instead of expensive commercial carbon, coal is used to provide the carbon supplement.

  5. Perspectives on Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourell, David L.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has skyrocketed in visibility commercially and in the public sector. This article describes the development of this field from early layered manufacturing approaches of photosculpture, topography, and material deposition. Certain precursors to modern AM processes are also briefly described. The growth of the field over the last 30 years is presented. Included is the standard delineation of AM technologies into seven broad categories. The economics of AM part generation is considered, and the impacts of the economics on application sectors are described. On the basis of current trends, the future outlook will include a convergence of AM fabricators, mass-produced AM fabricators, enabling of topology optimization designs, and specialization in the AM legal arena. Long-term developments with huge impact are organ printing and volume-based printing.

  6. New addition curing polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frimer, Aryeh A.; Cavano, Paul

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to improve the thermal-oxidative stability (TOS) of PMR-type polymers, the use of 1,4-phenylenebis (phenylmaleic anhydride) PPMA, was evaluated. Two series of nadic end-capped addition curing polyimides were prepared by imidizing PPMA with either 4,4'-methylene dianiline or p-phenylenediamine. The first resulted in improved solubility and increased resin flow while the latter yielded a compression molded neat resin sample with a T(sub g) of 408 C, close to 70 C higher than PME-15. The performance of these materials in long term weight loss studies was below that of PMR-15, independent of post-cure conditions. These results can be rationalized in terms of the thermal lability of the pendant phenyl groups and the incomplete imidization of the sterically congested PPMA. The preparation of model compounds as well as future research directions are discussed.

  7. Unmet contraceptive needs among refugees

    PubMed Central

    Aptekman, Marina; Rashid, Meb; Wright, Vanessa; Dunn, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe what women of reproductive age who received primary care at a refugee health clinic were using for contraception upon arrival to the clinic, and to quantify the unmet contraceptive needs within that population. Design Retrospective chart review. Setting Crossroads Clinic in downtown Toronto, Ont. Participants Women of reproductive age (15 to 49 years) who first presented for care between December 1, 2011, and December 1, 2012. To be included, a woman had to have had 2 or more clinic visits or an annual health examination. Exclusion criteria for the contraception prevalence calculation were female sexual partner, menopause, hysterectomy, pregnancy, or trying to conceive. Main outcome measures Contraception use prevalence was measured, as was unmet contraceptive need, which was calculated using a modified version of the World Health Organization’s definition: the number of women with an unmet need was expressed as a percentage of women of reproductive age who were married or in a union, or who were sexually active. Results Overall, 52 women met the criteria for inclusion in the contraceptive prevalence calculation. Of these, 16 women (30.8%) did not use any form of contraception. Twelve women were pregnant at some point in the year and stated the pregnancy was unwanted or mistimed. An additional 14 women were not using contraception but had no intention of becoming pregnant within the next 2 years. There were no women with postpartum amenorrhea not using contraception and who had wanted to delay or prevent their previous pregnancy. In total, 97 women were married or in a union, or were sexually active. Unmet need was calculated as follows: (12 + 14 + 0)/97 = 26.8%. Conclusion There was a high unmet contraceptive need in the refugee population in our study. All women of reproductive age should be screened for contraceptive need when first seeking medical care in Canada. PMID:25642489

  8. Neonates need tailored drug formulations

    PubMed Central

    Allegaert, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Drugs are very strong tools used to improve outcome in neonates. Despite this fact and in contrast to tailored perfusion equipment, incubators or ventilators for neonates, we still commonly use drug formulations initially developed for adults. We would like to make the point that drug formulations given to neonates need to be tailored for this age group. Besides the obvious need to search for active compounds that take the pathophysiology of the newborn into account, this includes the dosage and formulation. The dosage or concentration should facilitate the administration of low amounts and be flexible since clearance is lower in neonates with additional extensive between-individual variability. Formulations need to be tailored for dosage variability in the low ranges and also to the clinical characteristics of neonates. A specific focus of interest during neonatal drug development therefore is a need to quantify and limit excipient exposure based on the available knowledge of their safety or toxicity. Until such tailored vials and formulations become available, compounding practices for drug formulations in neonates should be evaluated to guarantee the correct dosing, product stability and safety. PMID:25254168

  9. Fuel additive programs at crossroads of regulation, market dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, K.

    1998-01-01

    Fuel additive manufacturers, gasoline marketers and automakers seem to be forgetting about the power of the marketplace in their efforts to use additives to help reduce emissions and improve vehicle performance. Recall that the port fuel injector (PFI) and intake valve deposit (IVD) problems of the 1980s were addressed quickly by the fuels industry. In just a few months after the PFID problem surfaced, additive makers had detergents on the market, and fuel marketers followed up with an effective advertising campaign. Formal regulations came about a decade later. The solution to the BMW IVD problem was similar. BMW provided an enticing incentive for oil companies to differentiate through better additives and many did. Contrast those developments with the command-and-control approach that has been in effect since January 1995. EPA`s additive rule is working almost to perfection - if adherence to strict rules is considered. All gasolines in the US are additized, and a wide variety of packages have been developed that meet the regulatory standards. But by the measure of real-world performance, the circumstances can look quite different. And with industry finalizing a better IVD test and conducting research into the need for a combustion chamber deposit (CCD) regulation, now may be the time to limit the regulatory approach and let refiners and additive suppliers return to creating products that target excellence instead of regulatory minimums.

  10. Maryland Workforce Educational Needs Assessment Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollander, Cohen, and McBride, Towson, MD.

    The Maryland Workforce Educational Needs Assessment Survey was conducted to determine employer satisfaction with Maryland's educational systems and to identify areas where more training is needed. In June 1999, questionnaires were mailed to 8,175 Maryland employers. An additional 2,395 questionnaires were sent to business organizations and local…

  11. DRINKING WATER INFRASTRUCTURE NEEDS SURVEY (1999)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resource Purpose:EPA is conducting the 1999 Needs Survey to meet requirements of the SDWA. Section 1452(h) of the SDWA requires EPA to conduct an assessment every 4 years of capital investments that are needed by public water systems (PWSs). In addition, SDWS sec 1452(i)...

  12. Additive manufacturing of RF absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Matthew S.

    The ability of additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate integrated electromagnetic absorbers tuned for specific radio frequency bands within structural composites allows for unique combinations of mechanical and electromagnetic properties. These composites and films can be used for RF shielding of sensitive electromagnetic components through in-plane and out-of-plane RF absorption. Structural composites are a common building block of many commercial platforms. These platforms may be placed in situations in which there is a need for embedded RF absorbing properties along with structural properties. Instead of adding radar absorbing treatments to the external surface of existing structures, which adds increased size, weight and cost; it could prove to be advantageous to integrate the microwave absorbing properties directly into the composite during the fabrication process. In this thesis, a method based on additive manufacturing techniques of composites structures with prescribed electromagnetic loss, within the frequency range 1 to 26GHz, is presented. This method utilizes screen printing and nScrypt micro dispensing to pattern a carbon based ink onto low loss substrates. The materials chosen for this study will be presented, and the fabrication technique that these materials went through to create RF absorbing structures will be described. The calibration methods used, the modeling of the RF structures, and the applications in which this technology can be utilized will also be presented.

  13. Preferences, needs and QALYs.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, J

    1996-01-01

    Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALYs) have become a household word among health economists. Their use as a means of comparing the value of health programmes and medical interventions has stirred up controversy in the medical profession and the academic community. In this paper, I argue that QALY analysis does not adequately take into account the differentiated nature of the health state values it measures. Specifically, it does not distinguish between needs and preferences with respect to its valuation of health states. I defend the view that needs and preferences are clearly distinguishable, and that the concept of needs cannot be dispensed with, as many health economists suggest. It is argued that the scale along which health states are measured in QALY analysis is not a continuous interval scale, but one which concerns two distinctly different value dimensions. Measuring the values of health state intervals may reveal the weighting attached to the different value dimensions. PMID:8910777

  14. Bearings: Technology and needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    A brief status report on bearing technology and present and near-term future problems that warrant research support is presented. For rolling element bearings a material with improved fracture toughness, life data in the low Lambda region, a comprehensive failure theory verified by life data and incorporated into dynamic analyses, and an improved corrosion resistant alloy are perceived as important needs. For hydrodynamic bearings better definition of cavitation boundaries and pressure distributions for squeeze film dampers, and geometry optimization for minimum power loss in turbulent film bearings are needed. For gas film bearings, foil bearing geometries that form more nearly optimum film shapes for maximum load capacity, and more effective surface protective coatings for high temperature operation are needed.

  15. Who Needs Affirmative Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginger, Ann Fagan

    1979-01-01

    Affirmative action and reverse discrimination are discussed. Facts that were omitted from the court record on the Bakke case are examined. The need for encouraging minority students and women to continue to press for school admission and for lawyers to continue to press affirmative action suits is stressed. (MC)

  16. Occupational Needs Assessment Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donsky, Aaron P.; And Others

    To gather data on the future educational needs for successful employment in Seminole County, Florida, a cooperative study was conducted by Seminole Community College and the Seminole County Public Schools. A sample was developed of 450 employers selected by types of businesses employing technology education graduates in Seminole, Orange, and…

  17. Online Teaching Needs Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Glenda; Sivakumaran, Thillainatarajan; Dawson, Marcus Dewayne; Davis, Lucy; Choi, Yung Yu; Absher, Ashley

    2010-01-01

    The study utilized a descriptive research approach to analyze the professional development needs of participants. Researchers for this study wanted to know the kinds of support and incentives that are being offered for faculty members who are teaching online courses, the kinds of professional development opportunities that are being offered, the…

  18. I Need A Friend.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Charlotte Baker

    1980-01-01

    Contains the second part of the "I Need a Friend" Copy Master Series designed for use by educators to teach children about the responsibilities humans have for their fellow creatures. The stories can be reproduced for distribution to students or used as a coloring book. (Author/SA)

  19. Meeting Children's Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keniston, Kenneth

    1979-01-01

    Until government policy puts greater emphasis on changing the social and economic factors that contribute so massively to family problems, our social programs will remain directed at healing wounds, not preventing them. More resources of money and authority are needed to strengthen parents' abilities to do their jobs. (Author/EB)

  20. Provoking Intellectual Need

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Kien H.

    2009-01-01

    This article illustrates how activities or tasks can be designed that are based on the Necessity Principle. Two sections illustrate how tasks can be formulated to provoke the need to use two mathematical ideas--prime factorization and least common multiple. In each section, the author presents two examples to illustrate how some mathematical tasks…

  1. Everybody Needs a Betsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanuscin, Deborah L.

    2010-01-01

    The author's most meaningful professional development (PD) experience was not a workshop or institute; nor did it result from a course or professional reading. Rather, it came in the form of Betsy--the second-grade teacher down the hall. This article describes the role of a mentor in professional development--and why everybody needs a Betsy!

  2. "i" Am Needed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The mysteries of mathematics are not easily revealed. Much of present day school mathematics is the product of years, sometimes centuries, of inquiring, wrestling and discovering by men of the highest intellect. The number "i" (designation for the square root of -1) is no exception. This article presents a lesson on the need for "i".

  3. Biotechnician Needs Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Charles W., III

    The need for the development of a biotechnician curriculum was investigated. A search for operational job descriptions for biotechnicians was conducted. Industry consensus was that this is a generic term too broad to be useful. Biotechnology companies within a 300-mile radius of Chicago and universities and other colleges in Illinois that hire…

  4. High Technology Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southeastern Louisiana Univ., Hammond.

    A project produced a high technology status report providing needs assessment data for educational planning. The purpose was to determine the impact and future of high technology in Louisiana. Information was obtained from 68 Louisiana manufacturing industries by mailed questionnaire. Data indicated that 45 industries were involved in high tech. A…

  5. Who Needs Heart Surgery?

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease (CHD) Fix heart valves that don't work well Control abnormal heart rhythms Place medical devices Replace a damaged heart with a healthy one If other treatments—such as lifestyle changes, medicines, and medical ... surgeon will work with you to decide whether you need heart ...

  6. Why physics needs mathematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrlich, Fritz

    2011-12-01

    Classical and the quantum mechanical sciences are in essential need of mathematics. Only thus can the laws of nature be formulated quantitatively permitting quantitative predictions. Mathematics also facilitates extrapolations. But classical and quantum sciences differ in essential ways: they follow different laws of logic, Aristotelian and non-Aristotelian logics, respectively. These are explicated.

  7. Children's Needs: Psychological Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Alex, Ed.; Grimes, Jeff, Ed.

    This monograph was written as a reference for practitioners who need an authoritative source of information on a wide variety of topics beyond the classroom and the child's own personal characteristics that influence school success. Included are 93 separate chapters, written by a diverse group of school psychologists and arranged alphabetically…

  8. Assessing Technical Training Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwaller, Anthony E.; Slipy, Dave

    1985-01-01

    Describes the results of a joint project of St. Cloud State University (Minnesota) and DeZURIK Corporation (a manufacturer and distributor of industrial valves) which developed and implemented a technical training needs questionnaire for use with the company's employees. Student involvement in the process is noted. (MBR)

  9. Big Brother Not Needed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinen, Edward

    1983-01-01

    Cites the recent United States State Department's labeling of recent Canadian films--one on nuclear war and two on acid rain--as political propaganda as a sign of the need to review the nature of propaganda. Suggests that teaching students to intelligently evaluate propaganda is preferable to submitting to government dictum. (MM)

  10. TEXPAC needs you.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2014-09-01

    TEXPAC is poised to get even tougher in an increasingly difficult political environment. TMA's advocacy arm wants to ensure medicine's voice rings in the Texas Legislature and good health policy prevails. The medical profession needs to be politically active now more than ever. PMID:25225810

  11. Needs Assessment Validation Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainone, Rocco; Kaiser, Robert

    This resource guide is intended for local school district personnel involved in planning activities for establishing educational priorities, phase two of the Local Planning and Assessment Process (LPAP). Information is presented on the development of performance indicators and the validation of perceived needs. The guide is organized in two…

  12. Students' Perceived Supervisory Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling, Susann; Wittkopp, Jane

    1982-01-01

    Perceived practicum supervisory needs of 191 students from six Michigan University speech-language pathology training programs were evaluated using a 43 item questionnaire. Attention was directed to five areas: lesson plan and report writing, supervisor observation, conferencing, professional responsibility, and general supervisory practices.…

  13. Exceptional Students: Exceptional Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burt, Marilyn; And Others

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the needs and problems of exceptional middle school students as well as their perceptions of guidance services. Participants in the study were 229 educable mentally-retarded (EMR) and 245 gifted (GIF) students in six Alachua County (Florida) middle schools. The racial distribution of the students…

  14. Infants Understand Others' Needs.

    PubMed

    Köster, Moritz; Ohmer, Xenia; Nguyen, Thanh Dung; Kärtner, Joscha

    2016-04-01

    Infants begin to help other individuals in the second year of life. However, it is still unclear whether early helping behavior is based on an understanding of other individuals' needs and is thus motivated prosocially. In the present eye-tracking study, 9- to 18-month-old infants (N= 71) saw a character in need of help, unable to reach its goal because of an obstacle, and a second character that was able to achieve a goal on its own. When a third individual (a helper) initiated an action, the infants expected the helper to help the character in need (as indicated during the anticipatory-looking and violation-of-expectation phases). Their prosocial understanding did not differ between age groups and was not related to their helping behavior (measured in two behavioral tasks). Thus, infants understand other individuals' needs even before they start to help others themselves. This indicates that early helping may indeed be motivated prosocially and raises the question of which other competences underlie the ontogeny of helping behavior. PMID:26902106

  15. Special Needs Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Board of Vocational Education, Boise.

    The curriculum guide was designed for Vocational Special Needs Programs in Idaho and concentrates on preparing handicapped and disadvantaged students to succeed in regular vocational programs. The subjects, pre-vocational in nature, include: Living Skills (self concept, life management, community resources, food and nutrition, clothing and…

  16. Radiologic sciences. Faculty needs assessment.

    PubMed

    Powers, Kevin J

    2005-01-01

    A total of 326 programs are represented in the data collected. Based on the average number of full- and part-time faculty members reported per program, this survey represents more than 1500 faculty positions. Based on the forecast of retirement and career change for all faculty members, there will be a turnover of 700 to 800 positions over the next 5 to 10 years. Part-time/adjunct faculty vacancies are expected to create the greatest number of opportunities for technologists to make the transition to education, with approximately one third of current part-time/adjunct educators planning on leaving radiologic sciences education within 5 years. To encourage retention of part-time/adjunct educators, annual evaluations should be modified to recognize the important educational role these instructors play. There is a need to create enthusiasm and interest in education as a career pathway for radiologic technologists. Resources are needed that help radiologic technologists make the transition to teaching. Finally, the retention of educators must be emphasized. Program applicant trends indicate radiologic technology students are older, have prior postsecondary education experience or are making a career change. This data emphasizes the need for educators, both full time and part time, to understand the characteristics and needs of the adult learner. Adult learners bring a wealth of education, experience and life skills that create both opportunities and challenges in the classroom and clinical setting. All categories of respondents indicated that their current salaries were greater than those of program graduates in their firstjob. Of interest is that 1 in 5 (20%) of part-time/adjunct educators indicated the opposite--that program graduates earn more in their firstjob than educators earn. When asked about salaries if working full time in clinical practice, the majority of all groups indicated their salary would be about the same or would decrease. Only 20% of program

  17. Children and Their Basic Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince, Debra Lindsey; Howard, Esther M.

    2002-01-01

    Describes obstacles presented by poverty in the fulfillment of the basic needs of children. Individually addresses Maslow's five basic needs with regard to children reared in poverty: (1) physiological needs; (2) safety needs; (3) belonging and love needs; (4) self-esteem needs; and (5) self-actualization needs. (Author/SD)

  18. [Use of partially hydrolyzed and untreated straw meal in the feeding of breeding sows. 3. Nutrient digestibility, feed passage time and mineral balance with the addition of variously treated straw materials compared to concentrate feeding alone].

    PubMed

    Münchow, H; Häger, H; Bergner, H

    1986-01-01

    In studies with 16 breeding sows of the country species the feed value of straw materials and their fitness for use were ascertained in a long-term experiment. On the feeding basis of a concentrate ration (IV) untreated (I), HCl treated (II = HCl treatment without steaming) and partly hydrolysed straw meal (III = HCl treatment with subsequent steaming) were tested. In the course of the experiment and at a nutrient level of 1 (maintenance requirement), the digestibility of the organic matter of the ration and that of some major and trace elements, N and mineral balances as well as feed passage rate and water excretion in faeces were ascertained at selected measuring times. The following mean results were achieved: The integration of all straw materials tested lead to a significant reduction of the digestibility of the organic matter of the total ration, the least negative effect was caused by partly hydrolysed straw meal (III). The fractions crude protein, crude fibre and N-free extracts were mainly affected. Straw meal integration had a gravidity-conditioned influence on the daily N balance. Increased N excretion in faeces could only be compensated by non-pregnant animals by a decreased N excretion in urine. The mineral balance (Ca, P, Na, Cu and Mn) remained largely uninfluenced by the straw supplement. The feed passage rate was reduced by the use of all straw meal variants to ca. 50% of the value measured after the sole feeding of concentrate (IV). Feed passage rate and water excretion in faeces were approximately reciprocal. The digestibility of the organic matter of the straw materials ascertained according to the difference method amounted to 7.4 (I), 18.1 (II) and 27.9% (III); that of the N-free extracts in the same sequence to 10.0, 22.0 and 34.9%. The calculated energetic feed value was for I = 70.7, for II = 154.9 and for III = 240.7 EFUpig/kg DM. PMID:3741131

  19. The Classroom Experiences of Pupils with Special Educational Needs in Mainstream Primary Schools--1976 to 2012. What Do Data from Systematic Observation Studies Reveal about Pupils' Educational Experiences over Time?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Rob

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents results of an analysis of primary-aged pupils' educational experiences over a 35 year period. Data drawn from a set of large-scale systematic observation studies, conducted in the UK between 1976 and 2012, are used to describe pupils' average classroom experiences at six points in time over this period. These data are then used…

  20. Managing Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Linda; Della Corte, Suzanne

    1991-01-01

    This newsletter issue discusses time management techniques for parents of special needs children. Techniques include changing one's attitudes about perfection, prioritizing tasks, having a back-up plan, learning to say "no," asking for help, keeping things simple, hiring others, using waiting time wisely, and doing two things at once. Household…

  1. VENTILATION NEEDS DURING CONSTRUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    C.R. Gorrell

    1998-07-23

    The purpose of this analysis is to determine ventilation needs during construction and development of the subsurface repository and develop systems to satisfy those needs. For this analysis, construction is defined as pre-emplacement excavation and development is excavation that takes place simultaneously with emplacement. The three options presented in the ''Overall Development and Emplacement Ventilation Systems'' analysis (Reference 5.5) for development ventilation will be applied to construction ventilation in this analysis as well as adding new and updated ventilation factors to each option for both construction and development. The objective of this analysis is to develop a preferred ventilation system to support License Application Design. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Description of ventilation conditions; (2) Ventilation factors (fire hazards, dust control, construction logistics, and monitoring and control systems); (3) Local ventilation alternatives; (4) Global ventilation options; and (5) Evaluation of options.

  2. Elderly Mental Health: Needs*

    PubMed Central

    Parkar, Shubhangi R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper highlights the mental health needs of the elderly. It tackles the issues of their institutionalisation and community care. Rapid urbanisation in Indian society throws up special problems in elderly care. There is great evidence of a raise in morbidity, mortality, hospitalisation and loss of functional status related to common mental disorders in the elderly patients. Overlap of depression and anxiety is very common with up to almost half of the elderly patients reporting significant depressive and anxiety symptoms. Also, depression is the most common psychiatric disorder in late life. Growth in the elderly population means a direct increase in age related diseases such as dementia and poor mental health outcomes such as depression, anxiety, suicide and serious constraints on the quality of life among elderly individuals. The need to identify new and unmet problem areas and develop efficient therapeutic outcomes for this special population is stressed. PMID:25838727

  3. What All Novices Need

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuddapah, Jennifer Locraft; Burtin, Anika Spratley

    2012-01-01

    The assumption behind movements to get alternatively certified teachers quickly into classrooms as full-time teachers is that high-performing college graduates with content knowledge can become good teachers through a summer of training and full-time, evening, teacher training courses. But when the authors asked new, precertified teachers who were…

  4. NASA Astrophysics Technology Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2012-01-01

    July 2010, NASA Office of Chief Technologist (OCT) initiated an activity to create and maintain a NASA integrated roadmap for 15 key technology areas which recommend an overall technology investment strategy and prioritize NASA?s technology programs to meet NASA?s strategic goals. Science Instruments, Observatories and Sensor Systems(SIOSS) roadmap addresses technology needs to achieve NASA?s highest priority objectives -- not only for the Science Mission Directorate (SMD), but for all of NASA.

  5. Accident management information needs

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.J.; Ward, L.W.; Nelson, W.R.; Meyer, O.R. )

    1990-04-01

    In support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Accident Management Research Program, a methodology has been developed for identifying the plant information needs necessary for personnel involved in the management of an accident to diagnose that an accident is in progress, select and implement strategies to prevent or mitigate the accident, and monitor the effectiveness of these strategies. This report describes the methodology and presents an application of this methodology to a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) with a large dry containment. A risk-important severe accident sequence for a PWR is used to examine the capability of the existing measurements to supply the necessary information. The method includes an assessment of the effects of the sequence on the measurement availability including the effects of environmental conditions. The information needs and capabilities identified using this approach are also intended to form the basis for more comprehensive information needs assessment performed during the analyses and development of specific strategies for use in accident management prevention and mitigation. 3 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. 'Nonprofits' need surplus too.

    PubMed

    Young, D W

    1982-01-01

    By definition profit refers to the difference between revenue and expenses. In for-profit organizations profit or surplus gives a return to the owners of the company and serves as a source of financing for capital acquisitions and working capital. Nonprofit organizations, which are not allowed a surplus, don't suffer on the first count because they have no owners. But they do suffer on the second count because, if expected to grow, they need to finance asset replacement and growth. In these days when funds for long-term debt are becoming scarcer, this author asserts, the need for regulators to allow 'nonprofits' to keep a surplus is increasing. In this article, he argues for a surplus and then discusses how managers and regulators can determine how much a nonprofit organization should be allowed. He presents a combination of a modified version of the return-on-asset pricing model used in for-profit organizations and a model for assessing working capital needs associated with growth. PMID:10253782

  7. English as an Additional Language: Changing Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Constant, Ed.; Cable, Carrie, Ed.

    This volume highlights the language and learning needs of pupils with English as an additional language in the United Kingdom. It includes chapters by British teachers and researchers working in this field. The book addresses a number of issues of interest to practitioners, scholars, teacher educators, and policy makers. Each chapter is prefaced…

  8. Relation of NEEDS to OSTA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The NEEDS program was examined, the interfaces between OSTA and NEEDS were identified, and the responsiveness of the NEEDS program to OSTA technological requirements were assessed. Existing and planned NEEDS elements are discussed.

  9. 42 CFR 57.317 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... school under § 57.305, impose additional conditions prior to or at the time of any award when in his or... TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans §...

  10. 42 CFR 57.317 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... school under § 57.305, impose additional conditions prior to or at the time of any award when in his or... TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans §...

  11. 42 CFR 57.317 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... school under § 57.305, impose additional conditions prior to or at the time of any award when in his or... TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans §...

  12. 42 CFR 57.317 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... school under § 57.305, impose additional conditions prior to or at the time of any award when in his or... TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans §...

  13. 42 CFR 57.317 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... school under § 57.305, impose additional conditions prior to or at the time of any award when in his or... TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans §...

  14. Who Needs a Pacemaker?

    MedlinePlus

    ... have one or more of the following tests. EKG (Electrocardiogram) An EKG is a simple, painless test that detects and ... beating and its rhythm (steady or irregular). An EKG also records the strength and timing of electrical ...

  15. The Evolution of Children's Mental Addition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashcraft, Mark H.; Hamann, Mary Sue

    Students in grades 1, 4, 7, and 10 were tested in a two-part investigation of simple and complex mental addition (with college students as a reference point). One session involved a normal reaction time task in which children made true/false judgments about a series of addition examples. The other session involved a verbal protocol interview, the…

  16. 10 CFR 810.14 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional information. 810.14 Section 810.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.14 Additional information. The Department of Energy may at any time require a person engaging in any generally or specifically...

  17. 10 CFR 810.14 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Additional information. 810.14 Section 810.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.14 Additional information. The Department of Energy may at any time require a person engaging in any generally or specifically...

  18. 42 CFR 1008.39 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... AUTHORITIES ADVISORY OPINIONS BY THE OIG Submission of a Formal Request for an Advisory Opinion § 1008.39 Additional information. (a) If the request for an advisory opinion does not contain all of the information... advisory opinion, the OIG may, at any time, request whatever additional information or documents it...

  19. 42 CFR 1008.39 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... AUTHORITIES ADVISORY OPINIONS BY THE OIG Submission of a Formal Request for an Advisory Opinion § 1008.39 Additional information. (a) If the request for an advisory opinion does not contain all of the information... advisory opinion, the OIG may, at any time, request whatever additional information or documents it...

  20. 42 CFR 1008.39 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... AUTHORITIES ADVISORY OPINIONS BY THE OIG Submission of a Formal Request for an Advisory Opinion § 1008.39 Additional information. (a) If the request for an advisory opinion does not contain all of the information... advisory opinion, the OIG may, at any time, request whatever additional information or documents it...

  1. 42 CFR 1008.39 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... AUTHORITIES ADVISORY OPINIONS BY THE OIG Submission of a Formal Request for an Advisory Opinion § 1008.39 Additional information. (a) If the request for an advisory opinion does not contain all of the information... advisory opinion, the OIG may, at any time, request whatever additional information or documents it...

  2. 42 CFR 1008.39 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... AUTHORITIES ADVISORY OPINIONS BY THE OIG Submission of a Formal Request for an Advisory Opinion § 1008.39 Additional information. (a) If the request for an advisory opinion does not contain all of the information... advisory opinion, the OIG may, at any time, request whatever additional information or documents it...

  3. 10 CFR 810.14 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional information. 810.14 Section 810.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.14 Additional information. The Department of Energy may at any time require a person engaging in any generally or specifically...

  4. 10 CFR 810.14 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional information. 810.14 Section 810.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.14 Additional information. The Department of Energy may at any time require a person engaging in any generally or specifically...

  5. Meeting clients' spiritual needs.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Cheryl

    2007-06-01

    True holistic care requires attention to spiritual as well as physical needs, but many health care providers do not feel comfortable discussing spiritual matters with clients. Although recognized by national nursing groups as a standard of care, nurses are not well prepared or rewarded for spiritual care efforts. There are several spiritual assessment tools available and many suggestions for interventions, but little research-based evidence on the effectiveness of spiritual care assessments or interventions. Nurses are well positioned by their continued intimate contact with clients and the importance of caring to nursing to lead the health care profession in developing spiritual care theory and practices. PMID:17544683

  6. Geomatics Education: Need Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, A.

    2014-11-01

    the other hand, the industry requires high skilled manpower, high experienced manpower. This is a low equilibrium situation. Since the need is enhancing day by day, the shortage of the skilled manpower is increasing, the need of the geomatics education emerges. This paper researches on the need assessment of the education in geospatial specialization. It emphasises on the challenges and issues prevail in geospatial education and in the specialized fields of remote sensing and GIS. This paper analyse the need assessment through all the three actors: government, geospatial industry and education institutions.

  7. Neutron Characterization for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Thomas; Bilheux, Hassina; An, Ke; Payzant, Andrew; DeHoff, Ryan; Duty, Chad; Peter, William; Blue, Craig; Brice, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is leveraging decades of experience in neutron characterization of advanced materials together with resources such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) shown in Fig. 1 to solve challenging problems in additive manufacturing (AM). Additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3-D) printing, is a rapidly maturing technology wherein components are built by selectively adding feedstock material at locations specified by a computer model. The majority of these technologies use thermally driven phase change mechanisms to convert the feedstock into functioning material. As the molten material cools and solidifies, the component is subjected to significant thermal gradients, generating significant internal stresses throughout the part (Fig. 2). As layers are added, inherent residual stresses cause warping and distortions that lead to geometrical differences between the final part and the original computer generated design. This effect also limits geometries that can be fabricated using AM, such as thin-walled, high-aspect- ratio, and overhanging structures. Distortion may be minimized by intelligent toolpath planning or strategic placement of support structures, but these approaches are not well understood and often "Edisonian" in nature. Residual stresses can also impact component performance during operation. For example, in a thermally cycled environment such as a high-pressure turbine engine, residual stresses can cause components to distort unpredictably. Different thermal treatments on as-fabricated AM components have been used to minimize residual stress, but components still retain a nonhomogeneous stress state and/or demonstrate a relaxation-derived geometric distortion. Industry, federal laboratory, and university collaboration is needed to address these challenges and enable the U.S. to compete in the global market. Work is currently being conducted on AM technologies at the ORNL

  8. Additive Construction with Mobile Emplacement (ACME)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickers, John

    2015-01-01

    The Additive Construction with Mobile Emplacement (ACME) project is developing technology to build structures on planetary surfaces using in-situ resources. The project focuses on the construction of both 2D (landing pads, roads, and structure foundations) and 3D (habitats, garages, radiation shelters, and other structures) infrastructure needs for planetary surface missions. The ACME project seeks to raise the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of two components needed for planetary surface habitation and exploration: 3D additive construction (e.g., contour crafting), and excavation and handling technologies (to effectively and continuously produce in-situ feedstock). Additionally, the ACME project supports the research and development of new materials for planetary surface construction, with the goal of reducing the amount of material to be launched from Earth.

  9. Sexuality and Aging: A Timely Addition to the Gerontology Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Tanya R.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the development and content of a course on sexuality in aging for a gerontology master's program. Topics include physical health, AIDS, gay/lesbian issues, widows/widowers, marriage, ethnic issues, menopause, and impotence. Provides a 33-item bibliography. (SK)

  10. Home Schooling Children with Special Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffey, Jane G.

    2002-01-01

    A survey of 121 families who were home schooling children with special needs found family profiles were similar to the general home schooling population and, unlike the general home schooling population, children often spent as much time in a school setting as in a home school environment. Four case studies identified themes as needs-based…

  11. The Kind of Schools We Need.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisner, Elliot W.

    2002-01-01

    Elliot Eisner, Lee Jacks Professor of Education and Art, Stanford University, imparts his thoughts about the salient features of schools he believes America needs, for example, having principals spend about one-third of their time in the classroom. (PKP)

  12. Cells need safety valves.

    PubMed

    Danchin, Antoine

    2009-07-01

    In Escherichia coli, the role of lacA, the third gene of the lactose operon, has remained an enigma. I suggest that its role is the consequence of the need for cells to have safety valves that protect them from the osmotic effect created by their permeases. Safety valves allow them to cope with the buildup of osmotic pressure under accidental transient conditions. Multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux, thus named because of our anthropocentrism, is ubiquitous. Yet, the formation of simple leaks would result in futile influx/efflux cycles. Versatile modification enzymes with low sensitivity solve the problem if the modified metabolite is the one exported by MDR permeases. This may account for the pervasive presence of acetyltransferases, such as LacA, associated to acetyl-metabolite exporters. This scenario of constraints imposed by efficient influx of metabolites provides us with a model that should be followed when constructing synthetic cells. PMID:19472369

  13. Geological science needs studied

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Geological Sciences Board of the National Academy of Science is conducting a study of the trends, needs, and priorities of the geological sciences for the 1980s. Many organizations and individuals already have been contacted regarding this task; however, in order to ensure that the forthcoming report is based broadly on ideas from the scientific community, the Geological Sciences Board solicits the thoughts of AGU members about the substance of the study. Please send your questions and comments by early this fall to William Dickinson, chairman of the Geological Sciences Board, National Academy of Sciences, Room 69, 2101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20418. A draft report is expected in January 1983.

  14. The needs of caregivers.

    PubMed

    Koffman, J; Taylor, S

    Caring for elderly mentally ill people impacts on many aspects of informal caregivers' lives. Respite care is one of the few strategies aimed directly at caregivers and its benefits have been well documented. As part of a wider strategy review of continuing care and respite care for the growing elderly population in an inner London health authority we focused specifically on the needs of caregivers and their elderly dependants with a diagnosis of dementia. A focus group was organised in order to elicit caregivers' perspectives on caring and their views on local services. This component of our overall review highlights the importance of investing further in informal caregivers who, to date, have successfully prevented a large number of admissions to continuing care facilities. PMID:9510693

  15. No Need to See.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vetrone, Karen

    1986-01-01

    A literature unit is based on three books with major characters to whom gifted students can relate: "A Wrinkle in Time" by M. Engel, "The Mark of Conte" by S. Levitin, and "Very Far Away from Any Place Else" by U. LeGuin. (CL)

  16. Who Needs Oxygen Therapy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... a progressive disease in which damage to the air sacs prevents them from moving enough oxygen into the bloodstream. "Progressive" means the disease gets worse over time. Late-stage heart failure . This is a condition in which the heart can't pump enough oxygen-rich blood to meet the body's ...

  17. Computational mechanics needs study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, O. Hayden, Jr.

    1993-01-01

    In order to assess the needs in computational mechanics over the next decade, we formulated a questionnaire and contacted computational mechanics researchers and users in industry, government, and academia. As expected, we found a wide variety of computational mechanics usage and research. This report outlines the activity discussed with those contacts, as well as that in our own organizations. It should be noted that most of the contacts were made before the recent decline of the defense industry. Therefore, areas which are strongly defense-oriented may decrease in relative importance. In order to facilitate updating of this study, names of a few key researchers in each area are included as starting points for future literature surveys. These lists of names are not intended to represent those persons doing the best research in that area, nor are they intended to be comprehensive. They are, as previously stated, offered as starting points for future literature searches. Overall, there is currently a broad activity in computational mechanics in this country, with the breadth and depth increasing as more sophisticated software and faster computers become more available. The needs and desires of the workers in this field are as diverse as their background and organizational products. There seems to be some degree of software development in any organization (although the level of activity is highly variable from one organization to another) which has any research component in its mission. It seems, however, that there is considerable use of commercial software in almost all organizations. In most industrial research organizations, it appears that very little actual software development is contracted out, but that most is done in-house, using a mixture of funding sources. Government agencies vary widely in the ratio of in-house to out-house ratio. There is a considerable amount of experimental verification in most, but not all, organizations. Generally, the amount of

  18. Production scheduling with discrete and renewable additional resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinowski, K.; Grabowik, C.; Paprocka, I.; Kempa, W.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper an approach to planning of additional resources when scheduling operations are discussed. The considered resources are assumed to be discrete and renewable. In most research in scheduling domain, the basic and often the only type of regarded resources is a workstation. It can be understood as a machine, a device or even as a separated space on the shop floor. In many cases, during the detailed scheduling of operations the need of using more than one resource, required for its implementation, can be indicated. Resource requirements for an operation may relate to different resources or resources of the same type. Additional resources are most often referred to these human resources, tools or equipment, for which the limited availability in the manufacturing system may have an influence on the execution dates of some operations. In the paper the concept of the division into basic and additional resources and their planning method was shown. A situation in which sets of basic and additional resources are not separable - the same additional resource may be a basic resource for another operation is also considered. Scheduling of operations, including greater amount of resources can cause many difficulties, depending on whether the resource is involved in the entire time of operation, only in the selected part(s) of operation (e.g. as auxiliary staff at setup time) or cyclic - e.g. when an operator supports more than one machine, or supervises the execution of several operations. For this reason the dates and work times of resources participation in the operation can be different. Presented issues are crucial when modelling of production scheduling environment and designing of structures for the purpose of scheduling software development.

  19. Serve the unmet needs.

    PubMed

    Nahariya, R

    1992-08-01

    The Philippine Family Planning Program component of the UN Population Fund (UNFPA) defines the demand for family planning (FP) as the desire of couples to space or limit their children, and reduce the risks of pregnancy and childbirth. Although the teachings of the Catholic Church oppose FP, at the local level priests do not enforce this strict code. Funding is relatively sufficient, but the public support of legislators is lacking, and implementation is problematic. Nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) are instrumental in delivering 38% of FP health care service focusing on comprehensive reproductive health concerns of low- and middle-class women in urban areas exclusive of the very poor. The reporting system is ill-functioning, perinatal deaths often go unreported, and in remote areas underreporting is the rule. The collected data are not used for management or in the communities and municipalities. The prevalence of FP is 42-44%, but only 22-24% of it consists of effective methods. 23% of women aged 15-44 have unmet needs of FP. The program could be improved significantly in view of a 90% female literacy rate in 1991, an independent streak in women in urban areas, and a less male-oriented culture. The program of the UNFPA is on a 5-year cycle, and from 1993 the support of USAID, the World Bank, the German government, and the Japan International Cooperation Agency is expected. PMID:12343891

  20. Scientists need political literacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simarski, Lynn Teo

    Scientists need to sharpen their political literacy to promote public and congressional awareness of science policy issues. This was the message of a panel of politically savvy scientists at a recent workshop at the American Association for the Advancement of Science's annual meeting in Washington, D.C. Researchers can maximize their lobbying efforts by targeting critical points of the legislative and federal funding cycles, the panel said, and by understanding the differences between the science and policy processes.Drastic modifications to the federal budget process this year will influence how much funding flows to research and development. A new feature for FY 1991-1993 is caps on federal expenditure in three areas: defense, foreign aid, and domestic “discretionary” spending. (Most of the agencies that fund geophysics fall into the domestic category.) Money cannot now be transferred from one of these areas to another, said Michael L. Telson, analyst for the House Budget Committee, and loopholes will be “very tough to find.” What is more, non-defense discretionary spending has dropped over a decade from 24% of the budget to the present 15%. Another new requirement is the “pay-as-you-go” system. Under this, a bill that calls for an increase in “entitlement” or other mandatory spending must offset this by higher taxes or by a cut in other spending.

  1. Needs assessment final report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepulveda, Jose A.

    1992-01-01

    The stated purposes of the Management Science Faculty Fellowship Project were to: (1) provide a comprehensive analysis of KSC management training for engineers and other management professionals from project/program lead through executive levels; and (2) development of evaluation methodologies which can be used to perform ongoing program-wide course-to-course assessments. This report will focus primarily in the first stated purpose for the project. Ideally, the analysis of KSC management training will build in the current system and efficiently propose improvements to achieve existing goals and objectives while helping to identify new visions and new outcomes for the Center's Management Training Mission. Section 2 describes the objectives, approach, and specific tasks used to analyze KSC's Management training System. Section 3 discusses the main conclusions derived from an analysis of the available training data. Section 4 discusses the characteristics and benefits envisioned for a Management Training System. Section 5 proposes a Training System as identified by the results of a Needs Assessment exercise conducted at KSC this summer. Section 6 presents a number of recommendations for future work.

  2. The current and future needs of our medical systems.

    PubMed

    Ehrenfeld, Jesse M

    2015-02-01

    As another publishing year come to a close at the Journal of Medical Systems, it is clear that as a scientific community, the need for a more detailed understanding of the impact of medical systems has never been greater. Technologies that were emerging just a short time ago including radio frequency identification (RFID), wireless body area networks (WBAN), and telecare medicine information systems (TMIS) are now ubiquitous. Additionally, closed-loop controller systems have gained regulatory approval in many settings. As the complexity of these medical systems grow, so to do the challenges of ensuring we have secure, efficient, and reliable systems that integrate into our clinical workflows. PMID:25638720

  3. Patients' need for information prior to colonic surgery.

    PubMed

    Sjöstedt, Lisbeth; Hellström, Renee; Stomberg, Margareta Warrén

    2011-01-01

    Perioperative information and communication between patients and health professionals is central to the quality of care and patient involvement for elective colon surgery. Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) means that the care process is accelerated with comprehensive information and additional requirements on an individual. The purpose of this study was to identify nurses' and doctors' experience of patients' need for information before intraoperative care. Nurses (n = 39) with different specialties and professional experience were interviewed in focus groups. Ten anesthesiologists with differing professional experience were interviewed individually. Data were analyzed with qualitative content analysis. The result shows the need to provide information to reduce anxiety, to make the patient feel safe, to explain postoperative pain management, and to provide a comprehensive care pathway. There was no difference between the informants' perception of patients' information needs. All respondents agreed that patients generally have a great need for information. The perioperative information should be repeated at different points in time. The patients' need for information on diagnosis is recurrent. Knowledge, good communication, and attitude from a multiprofessional perspective support the patient's feeling comfortable and involved in the care prior to surgery. PMID:21979401

  4. Meeting human needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, Arnauld E.

    1992-01-01

    Manned space flight can be viewed as an interaction of three general elements: the human crewmember, spacecraft systems, and the environment. While the human crewmember is a crucial element in the system, certain physiological, psychological, environ- mental and spacecraft systems factors can compromise human performance in space. These factors include atmospheric pressure, physiology, uncertainties associated with space radiation, the potential for exposure to toxic materials in the closed environment, and spacecraft habitability. Health protection in space, for current and future missions, relies on a philosophy of risk reduction, which in the space program is achieved in four ways-through health maintenance, health care, design criteria, an selection and training. Emphasis is place upon prevention, through selection criteria and careful screening. Spacecraft health care systems must be absolutely reliable, and they will be automated and computerized to the maximum extent possible, but still designed with the human crewmember's capabilities in mind. The autonomy and technological sophistication of future missions will require a greater emphasis on high-level interaction between the human operator and automated systems, with effective allocation of tasks between humans and machines. Performance in space will include complex tasks during extravehicular activity (EVA) and on planetary surfaces, and knowledge of crewmembers' capability and limitations during such operations will be critical to mission success. Psychological support will become increasingly important on space missions, as crews spend long periods in remote and potentially hazardous environments. The success of future missions will depend on both individual psychological health and group cohesion and productivity, particularly as crew profiles become more heterogeneous. Thus, further human factors are needed in the area of small-group dynamics and performance.

  5. About time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1990-01-01

    Time has historically been a measure of progress of recurrent physical processes. Coordination of future actions, prediction of future events, and assigning order to events are three practical reasons for implementing clocks and signalling mechanisms. In large networks of computers, these needs lead to the problem of synchronizing the clocks throughout the network. Recent methods allow this to be done in large networks with precision around 1 millisecond despite mean message exchange times near 5 milliseconds. These methods are discussed.

  6. Filling a need.

    PubMed

    Del Mundo, F; Leuterio, L; Cruz, A; Morisky, D

    1979-10-01

    492 hilots (traditional birth attendants) underwent a 1-week training program in a pilot project in the Philippines. Hilots were divided into 3 groups: training alone, training plus supervision, and training plus supervision plus a monetary incentive to determine their effects on number of acceptors recruited. Analysis of 1-year program statistics indicated that a combination of training methods (lectures, audiovisuals, and role-playing) increased both test and field performance. Field performance correlated highly with test performance. Hilots receiving supervision recruited twice as many acceptors as hilots who received only training. The monetary incentive did not significantly increase the average monthly number of acceptors recruited. The hilot is instrumental in motivating and recruiting acceptors who are more traditional rural women and have a lower income. Continuation rates for the pill and the IUD were similar to those in the National Family Planning Program, which used nurses and midwives as motivators. While hilots do not have the education and technical skill that their superiors do, their credibility among the community and their reach of areas that doctors seldom visit make the hilot a valuable addition to the family planning network. PMID:12261732

  7. The grays of medical device color additives.

    PubMed

    Seidman, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    The United States' medical device color additive regulations are unknown to some, and confusing to many. This article reviews statutory language on color additives in the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA), as amended, including the Delaney Clause on carcinogenicity; color additive regulatory language as it relates to medical devices in Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Parts 70-82; reports on the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) likely current and historical practices in dealing with color additives in medical devices; and speculates on what may have given rise to decades of seemingly ad hoc color additives practices, which may now be difficult to reconstruct and satisfactorily modify. Also addressed is the Center for Devices and Radiological Health's (CDRH's) recent publicly-vetted approach to color additives in Section 7 of its April 2013 draft guidance, Use of International Standard ISO-10993, "Biological Evaluation of Medical Devices Part 1: Evaluation and Testing," which the author concludes is a change in the right direction, but which, at least in its current draft form, is not a fix to the CDRH's color additives dilemma. Lastly, the article suggests what the CDRH might consider in further developing a new approach to color additives. Such an approach would treat color additives as if they were any other potentially toxic group of chemicals, and could be fashioned in such a way that the CDRH could still satisfy the broad aspects of Congressional color additives mandates, and.yet be consistent with ISO 10993. In doing this, the CDRH would need to recommend a more directed use of its Quality System Regulation, 21 C.F.R. Part 820, for material and vendor qualification and validation in general; approach Congress for needed statutory changes; or make administrative changes. In order for any approach to be successful, whether it is a new twist on past practices, or an entirely new path forward, the FDA must, to the best of its

  8. Additively manufactured porous tantalum implants.

    PubMed

    Wauthle, Ruben; van der Stok, Johan; Amin Yavari, Saber; Van Humbeeck, Jan; Kruth, Jean-Pierre; Zadpoor, Amir Abbas; Weinans, Harrie; Mulier, Michiel; Schrooten, Jan

    2015-03-01

    The medical device industry's interest in open porous, metallic biomaterials has increased in response to additive manufacturing techniques enabling the production of complex shapes that cannot be produced with conventional techniques. Tantalum is an important metal for medical devices because of its good biocompatibility. In this study selective laser melting technology was used for the first time to manufacture highly porous pure tantalum implants with fully interconnected open pores. The architecture of the porous structure in combination with the material properties of tantalum result in mechanical properties close to those of human bone and allow for bone ingrowth. The bone regeneration performance of the porous tantalum was evaluated in vivo using an orthotopic load-bearing bone defect model in the rat femur. After 12 weeks, substantial bone ingrowth, good quality of the regenerated bone and a strong, functional implant-bone interface connection were observed. Compared to identical porous Ti-6Al-4V structures, laser-melted tantalum shows excellent osteoconductive properties, has a higher normalized fatigue strength and allows for more plastic deformation due to its high ductility. It is therefore concluded that this is a first step towards a new generation of open porous tantalum implants manufactured using selective laser melting. PMID:25500631

  9. Network Reconstruction Using Nonparametric Additive ODE Models

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, James; Michailidis, George

    2014-01-01

    Network representations of biological systems are widespread and reconstructing unknown networks from data is a focal problem for computational biologists. For example, the series of biochemical reactions in a metabolic pathway can be represented as a network, with nodes corresponding to metabolites and edges linking reactants to products. In a different context, regulatory relationships among genes are commonly represented as directed networks with edges pointing from influential genes to their targets. Reconstructing such networks from data is a challenging problem receiving much attention in the literature. There is a particular need for approaches tailored to time-series data and not reliant on direct intervention experiments, as the former are often more readily available. In this paper, we introduce an approach to reconstructing directed networks based on dynamic systems models. Our approach generalizes commonly used ODE models based on linear or nonlinear dynamics by extending the functional class for the functions involved from parametric to nonparametric models. Concomitantly we limit the complexity by imposing an additive structure on the estimated slope functions. Thus the submodel associated with each node is a sum of univariate functions. These univariate component functions form the basis for a novel coupling metric that we define in order to quantify the strength of proposed relationships and hence rank potential edges. We show the utility of the method by reconstructing networks using simulated data from computational models for the glycolytic pathway of Lactocaccus Lactis and a gene network regulating the pluripotency of mouse embryonic stem cells. For purposes of comparison, we also assess reconstruction performance using gene networks from the DREAM challenges. We compare our method to those that similarly rely on dynamic systems models and use the results to attempt to disentangle the distinct roles of linearity, sparsity, and derivative

  10. CREATION OF THE MODEL ADDITIONAL PROTOCOL

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, F.; Rosenthal, M.; Wulf, N.

    2010-05-25

    In 1991, the international nuclear nonproliferation community was dismayed to discover that the implementation of safeguards by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) under its NPT INFCIRC/153 safeguards agreement with Iraq had failed to detect Iraq's nuclear weapon program. It was now clear that ensuring that states were fulfilling their obligations under the NPT would require not just detecting diversion but also the ability to detect undeclared materials and activities. To achieve this, the IAEA initiated what would turn out to be a five-year effort to reappraise the NPT safeguards system. The effort engaged the IAEA and its Member States and led to agreement in 1997 on a new safeguards agreement, the Model Protocol Additional to the Agreement(s) between States and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards. The Model Protocol makes explicit that one IAEA goal is to provide assurance of the absence of undeclared nuclear material and activities. The Model Protocol requires an expanded declaration that identifies a State's nuclear potential, empowers the IAEA to raise questions about the correctness and completeness of the State's declaration, and, if needed, allows IAEA access to locations. The information required and the locations available for access are much broader than those provided for under INFCIRC/153. The negotiation was completed in quite a short time because it started with a relatively complete draft of an agreement prepared by the IAEA Secretariat. This paper describes how the Model Protocol was constructed and reviews key decisions that were made both during the five-year period and in the actual negotiation.

  11. Intelligence Is as Intelligence Does: Can Additional Support Needs Replace Disability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Samuel R. C.; Riches, Vivienne C.; Stancliffe, Roger J.

    2011-01-01

    In many developed cultures there is an assumption that IQ is intelligence. However, emerging theories of multiple intelligences, of emotional intelligence, as well as the application of IQ testing to other cultural groups, and to people with disability, raises many questions as to what IQ actually measures. Despite recent research that shows IQ…

  12. Dispute Resolution in Additional and Special Educational Needs: Local Authority Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddell, Sheila; Harris, Neville; Smith, Emily; Weedon, Elisabet

    2010-01-01

    The UK Government is keen to encourage the use of mediation, rather than court or tribunal, as the best means of resolving disputes between citizen and state on the grounds that legal proceedings are costly, lengthy and stressful. The policy of proportionate dispute resolution appears to be particularly applicable to the field of special…

  13. User needs for propagation data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Thomas M.

    1993-01-01

    New and refined models of radio signal propagation phenomena are needed to support studies of evolving satellite services and systems. Taking an engineering perspective, applications for propagation measurements and models in the context of various types of analyses that are of ongoing interest are reviewed. Problems that were encountered in the signal propagation aspects of these analyses are reviewed, and potential solutions to these problems are discussed. The focus is on propagation measurements and models needed to support design and performance analyses of systems in the Mobile-Satellite Service (MSS) operating in the 1-3 GHz range. These systems may use geostationary or non-geostationary satellites and Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA), Time Division Multiple Access Digital (TDMA), or Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) techniques. Many of the propagation issues raised in relation to MSS are also pertinent to other services such as broadcasting-satellite (sound) at 2310-2360 MHz. In particular, services involving mobile terminals or terminals with low gain antennas are of concern.

  14. Rain underscores need for injection

    SciTech Connect

    Stelling, K.F.

    1996-01-01

    Since 1987, steam production totals at The Geysers Geothermal field have fallen and water injection totals have remained quite stable, except for the unusually dry winter months of 1994 when injection fell by a record amount. The heavy rainfall in the first half of 1995 altered the long-term production and injection patterns and underscored the need to increase injection in the field. From January to June 1995, steam production at The Geysers was reduced by 37 percent form the amount produced during the same period in 1994--because the rain increased availability of hydroelectric power. At the same time, water injection in the field rose by 25 percent because more rainwater was available for injection. Consequently, both reservoir pressure and available steam reserves grew, and most power plants that returned on line in the second half of the year produced more megawatts with less steam. This confirmed findings form several injection studies at The Geyser`s.

  15. Incorporation of additives into polymers

    DOEpatents

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Yates, Matthew Z.

    2003-07-29

    There has been invented a method for incorporating additives into polymers comprising: (a) forming an aqueous or alcohol-based colloidal system of the polymer; (b) emulsifying the colloidal system with a compressed fluid; and (c) contacting the colloidal polymer with the additive in the presence of the compressed fluid. The colloidal polymer can be contacted with the additive by having the additive in the compressed fluid used for emulsification or by adding the additive to the colloidal system before or after emulsification with the compressed fluid. The invention process can be carried out either as a batch process or as a continuous on-line process.

  16. Deciphering the roles of multiple additives in organocatalyzed Michael additions.

    PubMed

    Günler, Z Inci; Companyó, Xavier; Alfonso, Ignacio; Burés, Jordi; Jimeno, Ciril; Pericàs, Miquel A

    2016-05-21

    The synergistic effects of multiple additives (water and acetic acid) on the asymmetric Michael addition of acetone to nitrostyrene catalyzed by primary amine-thioureas (PAT) were precisely determined. Acetic acid facilitates hydrolysis of the imine intermediates, thus leading to catalytic behavior, and minimizes the formation of the double addition side product. In contrast, water slows down the reaction but minimizes catalyst deactivation, eventually leading to higher final yields. PMID:27128165

  17. Technology development needs summary, FY 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    Historic activities of DOE during the period of nuclear weapons development, and disposal practices of that time, resulted in the discharge of chemical and radioactive materials to the environment at many DOE facilities and sites. DOE has now focused a major technical effort on mitigating the effects of those discharges through an environmental restoration program. Since this could lead to prohibitive costs if conventional technology is applied for remedial action, a national program will be initiated to develop and demonstrate faster, better, cheaper, and safer means of restoring the DOE sites to conditions that will meet state and federal environment regulations. Key elements of the initiative are the Integrated Programs and Integrated Demonstrations, which work together to identify possible solutions to major environmental problems. Needed statements are given for the following programs: mixed waste landfill, uranium in soils, VOC-arid, decontamination and decommissioning of facilities, buried waste, characterization/monitoring/sensor technology, mixed waste, in situ remediation, efficient separations/processing, minimum additive waste stabilization, supercritical water oxidation. A section on how to get involved is included.

  18. Models of Personnel Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Beverly

    This report presents samples of models and strategies for determining professional development needs of special education personnel. The following areas are covered: definitions of needs and the needs assessment process; personnel needs assessment regulations under the Comprehensive System of Personnel Development, the Individuals with…

  19. Middle School Students' Guidance and Counseling Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kesici, Sahin

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the guidance and counseling needs of middle school (i.e., sixth, seventh, and eighth grades) students from their points of views by using qualitative research techniques. In addition, while collecting the data, semi-structured interview technique is used as a method of data collection. The study was…

  20. Communications Arts and Technology Program Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakland Community Coll., Farmington, MI. Office of Institutional Planning and Analysis.

    In 1992, Oakland Community College conducted a needs assessment study to assist in reviewing and evaluating proposed changes to the college's existing Communications Arts and Technology Program. Businesses and employers in the communications field were surveyed (n=40) regarding employment requirements and opportunities. Additional information was…

  1. Tanks Focus Area Site Needs Assessment - FY 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Robert W.; Josephson, Gary B.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Nickola, Cheryl L.

    2001-04-30

    The TFA uses a systematic process for developing its annual program that draws from the tanks science and technology development needs expressed by the five DOE tank waste sites. TFA's annual program development process is iterative and involves the following steps: Collection of site needs; Needs analysis; Development of technical responses and initial prioritization; Refinement of the program for the next fiscal year; Formulation of the Corporate Review Budget (CRB); Preparation of Program Execution Guidance (PEG) for the next FY Revision of the Multiyear Program Plan (MYPP). This document describes the outcomes of the first phase of this process, from collection of site needs to the initial prioritization of technical activities. The TFA received site needs in October - December 2000. A total of 170 site needs were received, an increase of 30 over the previous year. The needs were analyzed and integrated, where appropriate. Sixty-six distinct technical responses were drafted and prioritized. In addition, seven strategic tasks were approved to compete for available funding in FY 2002 and FY 2003. Draft technical responses were prepared and provided to the TFA Site Representatives and the TFA User Steering Group (USG) for their review and comment. These responses were discussed at a March 15, 2001, meeting where the TFA Management Team established the priority listing in preparation for input to the DOE Office of Science and Technology (OST) budget process. At the time of publication of this document, the TFA continues to finalize technical responses as directed by the TFA Management Team and clarify the intended work scopes for FY 2002 and FY 2003.

  2. A survey of attitudes, behaviors, and needs of team dentists.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Lesley A; Spolarich, Ann Eshenaur; Keim, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Elite athletes strive to attain superior levels of health and fitness; however, many have high levels of oral disease. Oral screenings detect disease and need for treatment and identify opportunities for preventive interventions. Many dentists volunteer their time with sports organizations, but their scope of practice and needs are unknown. The purposes of this study were to gather baseline data about attitudes, practice behaviors, and needs of team dentists and to assess dental services provided, including the type and frequency of oral screenings conducted on athletes and any associated barriers to those screenings. This descriptive study utilized an original online survey, comprising 37 supplied-response questions, that was pilot tested for face and content validity. All dentist members of the Academy for Sports Dentistry were invited to participate (n = 491), and 150 responded, yielding a 31% response rate. The survey format allowed respondents to skip questions, and some respondents chose not to answer some questions. Quantitative data collected included level of athletes, league affiliation, scope of services provided, and types of oral screening performed. Dentists' attitudes regarding athletes' treatment and preventive needs, practice behaviors, and self-identified needs were assessed. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Results revealed that 116 of 146 respondents (80%) had a league affiliation. Among 112 dentists who reported providing services to athletes, the most frequently provided services were emergency treatment (96%), mouthguards (96%), restorative treatment (79%), oral hygiene instruction (63%), prophylaxis (61%), periodontal charting (61%), and dental charting (60%). Most team dentists (80%; n = 90/112) performed oral screenings for the athletes. Among 87 respondents who performed screenings and reported the type of screening they provided, 36 (41%) screened all athletes prior to the season and then provided individualized

  3. Environmental factors and puberty timing: Expert panel research needs

    EPA Science Inventory

    An expert panel reviewed the literature on endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), body size and puberty. The panel concluded that available experimental animal and human data support a possible role of EDCs and body size in relation to alterations in pubertal onset and progressio...

  4. Deep ice cores: the need for going back in time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouzel, Jean; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie

    2010-12-01

    After the success of EPICA, the European Project for Ice coring in Antarctica which, at Dome C (East Antarctica) has provided access to climate and environmental records covering the last 800 ka (thousands of years), the ice core community is now engaged in the challenge to obtain older records. Obtaining a 1.5 million year (Ma) record of climate and greenhouse gases is one of the priorities of the International Partnerships in Ice Core Sciences (IPICS) largely motivated by the yet unexplained shift in climate cyclicity around the Mid-Pleistocene transition (MPT) around 1.2 Ma ago. From EPICA results and recently published articles, we further examine how such a 1.5 Ma old ice core will help, and is indeed indispensable, to depict and understand this transition.

  5. Language Teaching in Nativist Times: A Need for Sociopolitical Awareness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Sandra Lee; Wong, Sau-Ling Cynthia

    1988-01-01

    Outlines a historical context for the nativist ideology of the English-only movement in the United States, and the movement's effect on language teaching. A survey of journal contents of TESOL Quarterly, Modern Language Journal, and Foreign Language Annals from 1974-1987 identifying eight categories of articles checked particularly for…

  6. What Presidents Need from Boards in Uncertain Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trusteeship, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The steep economic recession, coupled with increased national expectations and demand for higher education, poses serious challenges for board and presidential leadership. A special panel at the recent National Conference on Trusteeship of the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB), moderated by AGB President Richard…

  7. No-Need Grants...Scions of the Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowley, Susan Cheever; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Students who don't require financial aid but who qualify on the basis of academic merit have been receiving more of the scholarship money. And students who have too much money, inherited fortunes, have found some ways to be productive while contributing to social change in the community. (RK)

  8. Real-Time Teaching: Learners Need Purposeful and Systematic Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Donna; Frey, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    This article provides readers with information about an instructional framework that gradually releases responsibility from teachers to learners. Pearson and Gallagher (1983) introduced a model that depicts learning as a purposeful process that allows for a systematic shift in the cognitive load (responsibility) from the teacher to the student. In…

  9. Internal Organization to Serve Part-Time Student Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massey, T. Benjamin

    Two questions are addressed: (1) How can existing organizational structures and practices be developed where none have previously existed? The phenomenon of the adult postsecondary student is a fundamental demographic shift not initiated by the institutions but to which they must nonetheless respond. The organizational structure of the University…

  10. Who needs budgets?

    PubMed

    Hope, Jeremy; Fraser, Robin

    2003-02-01

    Budgeting, as most corporations practice it, should be abolished. That may sound radical, but doing so would further companies' long-running efforts to transform themselves into developed networks that can nimbly adjust to market conditions. Most other building blocks are in place, but companies continue to restrict themselves by relying on inflexible budget processes and the command-and-control culture that budgeting entails. A number of companies have rejected the foregone conclusions embedded in budgets, and they've given up the self-interested wrangling over what the data indicate. In the absence of budgets, alternative goals and measures--some financial, such as cost-to-income ratios, and some nonfinancial, such as time to market-move to the foreground. Companies that have rejected budgets require employees to measure themselves against the performance of competitors and against internal peer groups. Because employees don't know whether they've succeeded until they can look back on the results of a given period, they must use every ounce of energy to ensure that they beat the competition. A key feature of many companies that have rejected budgets is the use of rolling forecasts, which are created every few months and typically cover five to eight quarters. Because the forecasts are regularly revised, they allow companies to continuously adapt to market conditions. The forecasting practices of two such companies, both based in Sweden, are examined in detail: the bank Svenska Handelsbanken and the wholesaler Ahlsell. Though the first companies to reject budgets were located in Northern Europe, organizations that have gone beyond budgeting can be found in a range of countries and industries. Their practices allow them to unleash the power of today's management tools and realize the potential of a fully decentralized organization. PMID:12577658

  11. Needs and subjective well-being around the world.

    PubMed

    Tay, Louis; Diener, Ed

    2011-08-01

    Across a sample of 123 countries, we examined the association between the fulfillment of needs and subjective well-being (SWB), including life evaluation, positive feelings, and negative feelings. Need fulfillment was consistently associated with SWB across world regions. Life evaluation was most associated with fulfilling basic needs; positive feelings were most associated with social and respect needs; and negative feelings were most associated with basic, respect, and autonomy needs. Societal need fulfillment predicted SWB, particularly for life evaluation, beyond individuals' fulfillment of their own needs, indicating the desirability of living in a flourishing society. In addition, the associations of SWB with the fulfillment of specific needs were largely independent of whether other needs were fulfilled. These trends persisted when household income was taken into account. The emergent ordering of need fulfillment for psychosocial needs were fairly consistent across country conditions, but the fulfillment of basic and safety needs were contingent on country membership. PMID:21688922

  12. Evaluating additives and impurities in zinc electrowinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Dominguez, J. A.; Lew, R. W.

    1995-01-01

    The zinc electrowinning (EW) process is very sensitive to the presence of impurities. There is only one EW plant in the world that we know of that operates at moderate current efficiency and deposition times without using any additives. All the others must use them continuously. Additives allow zinc EW to occur at high current efficiencies while suppressing excessive acid mist formation. The study of the electrochemical effects of additives in zinc EW is not straightforward. This article presents a review of the experimental techniques currently used at Cominco Research: Cyclic voltammetry, Hull cells, laboratory and mini-cell electrowinning techniques are all described and their relationship to the industrial operation is discussed.

  13. Cockpit weather information needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scanlon, Charles H.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective is to develop an advanced pilot weather interface for the flight deck and to measure its utilization and effectiveness in pilot reroute decision processes, weather situation awareness, and weather monitoring. Identical graphical weather displays for the dispatcher, air traffic control (ATC), and pilot crew should also enhance the dialogue capabilities for reroute decisions. By utilizing a broadcast data link for surface observations, forecasts, radar summaries, lightning strikes, and weather alerts, onboard weather computing facilities construct graphical displays, historical weather displays, color textual displays, and other tools to assist the pilot crew. Since the weather data is continually being received and stored by the airborne system, the pilot crew has instantaneous access to the latest information. This information is color coded to distinguish degrees of category for surface observations, ceiling and visibilities, and ground radar summaries. Automatic weather monitoring and pilot crew alerting is accomplished by the airborne computing facilities. When a new weather information is received, the displays are instantaneously changed to reflect the new information. Also, when a new surface or special observation for the intended destination is received, the pilot crew is informed so that information can be studied at the pilot's discretion. The pilot crew is also immediately alerted when a severe weather notice, AIRMET or SIGMET, is received. The cockpit weather display shares a multicolor eight inch cathode ray tube and overlaid touch panel with a pilot crew data link interface. Touch sensitive buttons and areas are used for pilot selection of graphical and data link displays. Time critical ATC messages are presented in a small window that overlays other displays so that immediate pilot alerting and action can be taken. Predeparture and reroute clearances are displayed on the graphical weather system so pilot review of weather along

  14. Propulsion Technology Needs for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of currently planned exploration efforts, as well as those further in the future, require significant advancements in propulsion technologies. The current Lunar exploration architecture has set goals and mission objectives that necessitate the use of new systems and the extension of existing technologies beyond present applications. In the near term, the majority of these technologies are the result of a need to apply high performing cryogenic propulsion systems to long duration in-space applications. Advancement of cryogenic propulsion to these applications is crucial to provide higher performing propulsion systems that reduce the vehicle masses; enhance the safety of vehicle systems and ground operations; and provide a path for In-situ Resource Utilization (ISRU).Use of a LOX/LH2 main propulsion system for Lunar Lander Descent is a top priority because more conventional storable propellants are far from meeting the performance needs of the current architecture. While LOX/LH2 pump feed engines have been used in flight applications for many years, these engines have limited throttle capabilities. Engines that are capable of much greater throttling while still meeting high performance goals are a necessity to achieving exploration goals. Applications of LOX/CH4 propulsion to Lander ascent propulsion systems and reaction control systems are also if interest because of desirable performance and operations improvements over conventional storable systems while being more suitable for use of in-situ produced propellants. Within the current lunar architecture, use of cryogenic propulsion for the Earth Departure Stage and Lunar Lander elements also necessitate the need for advanced Cryogenic Fluid Management technologies. These technologies include long duration propellant storage/distribution, low-gravity propellant management, cryogenic couplings and disconnects, light weight composite tanks and support structure, and subsystem integration. In addition to

  15. Load forecast and need for power

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This portion of the Energy Vision 2020 draft report discusses the models used for forecasting the load growth over the period of this report. To deal with uncertainties in load growth, TVA has used a range of forecasts: low, medium, and high. Based on the medium forecast, TVA has determined that an additional 800 MWe will be required by 1998 and 16,500 MWe by 2020. based on the high growth forecast, additional power will be needed in 1997 and increasing thereafter. Based on the low growth forecast, no additional capacity would be needed during the period of this report. These estimates include a reserve margin of 15% through 1997, 13% average through the period 1998 to 2010, and 12% average during the remainder of the reporting period.

  16. Enantioselective Michael Addition of Water

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Resch, Verena; Otten, Linda G; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The enantioselective Michael addition using water as both nucleophile and solvent has to date proved beyond the ability of synthetic chemists. Herein, the direct, enantioselective Michael addition of water in water to prepare important β-hydroxy carbonyl compounds using whole cells of Rhodococcus strains is described. Good yields and excellent enantioselectivities were achieved with this method. Deuterium labeling studies demonstrate that a Michael hydratase catalyzes the water addition exclusively with anti-stereochemistry. PMID:25529526

  17. Estimating the additional cost of disability: beyond budget standards.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson-Meyers, Laura; Brown, Paul; McNeill, Robert; Patston, Philip; Dylan, Sacha; Baker, Ronelle

    2010-11-01

    Disabled people have long advocated for sufficient resources to live a life with the same rights and responsibilities as non-disabled people. Identifying the unique resource needs of disabled people relative to the population as a whole and understanding the source of these needs is critical for determining adequate levels of income support and for prioritising service provision. Previous attempts to identify the resources and costs associated with disability have tended to rely on surveys of current resource use. These approaches have been criticised as being inadequate for identifying the resources that would be required to achieve a similar standard of living to non-disabled people and for not using methods that are acceptable to and appropriate for the disabled community. The challenge is therefore to develop a methodology that accurately identifies these unique resource needs, uses an approach that is acceptable to the disabled community, enables all disabled people to participate, and distinguishes 'needs' from 'wants.' This paper describes and presents the rationale for a mixed methodology for identifying and prioritising the resource needs of disabled people. The project is a partnership effort between disabled researchers, a disability support organisation and academic researchers in New Zealand. The method integrates a social model of disability framework and an economic cost model using a budget standards approach to identify additional support, equipment, travel and time required to live an 'ordinary life' in the community. A survey is then used to validate the findings and identify information gaps and resource priorities of the community. Both the theoretical basis of the approach and the practical challenges of designing and implementing a methodology that is acceptable to the disabled community, service providers and funding agencies are discussed. PMID:20933315

  18. Gasoline additives, emissions, and performance

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The papers included in this publication deal with the influence of fuel, additive, and hardware changes on a variety of vehicle performance characteristics. Advanced techniques for measuring these performance parameters are also described. Contents include: Fleet test evaluation of gasoline additives for intake valve and combustion chamber deposit clean up; A technique for evaluating octane requirement additives in modern engines on dynamometer test stands; A fleet test of two additive technologies comparing their effects on tailpipe emissions; Investigation into the vehicle exhaust emissions of high percentage ethanol blends; Variability in hydrocarbon speciation measurements at low emission (ULEV) levels; and more.

  19. Needs for Robotic Assessments of Nuclear Disasters

    SciTech Connect

    Victor Walker; Derek Wadsworth

    2012-06-01

    Following the nuclear disaster at the Fukushima nuclear reactor plant in Japan, the need for systems which can assist in dynamic high-radiation environments such as nuclear incidents has become more apparent. The INL participated in delivering robotic technologies to Japan and has identified key components which are needed for success and obstacles to their deployment. In addition, we are proposing new work and methods to improve assessments and reactions to such events in the future. Robotics needs in disaster situations include phases such as: Assessment, Remediation, and Recovery Our particular interest is in the initial assessment activities. In assessment we need collection of environmental parameters, determination of conditions, and physical sample collection. Each phase would require key tools and efforts to develop. This includes study of necessary sensors and their deployment methods, the effects of radiation on sensors and deployment, and the development of training and execution systems.

  20. Purge needs in absorption chillers

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.G. )

    1993-10-01

    Absorption chillers are regaining a significant share of large tonnage chiller sales, such as they had 20 years ago. Gas-fired chillers are now available that have a base energy (ultimate fuel usage) consumption rate per ton comparable to that in electric units. Effective purging in an absorption chiller is an absolute necessity to achieve the low chilled water temperature needed for dehumidification and to fully benefit from the energy savings offered by double-effect cycles. Although the purge system is usually not shown on the typical cycle schematic, its proper functioning is a key requirement for satisfactory machine operation. This article discusses the effect of noncondensible (N/C) gases on the absorption cooling process and the basics of purge systems. In addition, the article discusses the rationale for the important design step of selecting the location of the N/C probe, and discusses purge systems applicable to the direct-fired, double-effect machines now entering the marketplace.

  1. Sequencing Needs for Viral Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S N; Lam, M; Mulakken, N J; Torres, C L; Smith, J R; Slezak, T

    2004-01-26

    We built a system to guide decisions regarding the amount of genomic sequencing required to develop diagnostic DNA signatures, which are short sequences that are sufficient to uniquely identify a viral species. We used our existing DNA diagnostic signature prediction pipeline, which selects regions of a target species genome that are conserved among strains of the target (for reliability, to prevent false negatives) and unique relative to other species (for specificity, to avoid false positives). We performed simulations, based on existing sequence data, to assess the number of genome sequences of a target species and of close phylogenetic relatives (''near neighbors'') that are required to predict diagnostic signature regions that are conserved among strains of the target species and unique relative to other bacterial and viral species. For DNA viruses such as variola (smallpox), three target genomes provide sufficient guidance for selecting species-wide signatures. Three near neighbor genomes are critical for species specificity. In contrast, most RNA viruses require four target genomes and no near neighbor genomes, since lack of conservation among strains is more limiting than uniqueness. SARS and Ebola Zaire are exceptional, as additional target genomes currently do not improve predictions, but near neighbor sequences are urgently needed. Our results also indicate that double stranded DNA viruses are more conserved among strains than are RNA viruses, since in most cases there was at least one conserved signature candidate for the DNA viruses and zero conserved signature candidates for the RNA viruses.

  2. Summary of NDE of additive manufacturing efforts in NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waller, Jess M.; Saulsberry, Regor L.; Parker, Bradford H.; Hodges, Kenneth L.; Burke, Eric R.; Taminger, Karen M.

    2015-03-01

    One of the major obstacles slowing the acceptance of parts made by additive manufacturing (AM) in NASA applications is the lack of a broadly accepted materials and process quality systems; and more specifically, the lack of adequate nondestructive evaluation (NDE) processes integrated into AM. Matching voluntary consensus standards are also needed to control the consistency of input materials, process equipment, process methods, finished part properties, and how those properties are characterized. As for nondestructive characterization, procedures are needed to interrogate features unique to parts made by AM, such as fine-scale porosity, deeply embedded flaws, complex part geometry, and intricate internal features. The NDE methods developed must be tailored to meet materials, design and test requirements encountered throughout the part life cycle, whether during process optimization, real-time process monitoring, finished part qualification and certification (especially of flight hardware), or in situ health monitoring. Restated, individualized process/product-specific NDE methods are needed to satisfy NASA's various quality assurance requirements. To date, only limited data have been acquired by NASA on parts made by AM. This paper summarizes the NASA AM effort, highlights available NDE data, and outlines the approach NASA is taking to apply NDE to its various AM efforts.

  3. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step…

  4. 75 FR 27313 - Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... FROM PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED PROCUREMENT LIST Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed additions to the... or Severely Disabled, Jefferson Plaza 2, Suite 10800, 1421 Jefferson Davis Highway,...

  5. Adaptive collective foraging in groups with conflicting nutritional needs.

    PubMed

    Senior, Alistair M; Lihoreau, Mathieu; Charleston, Michael A; Buhl, Jerome; Raubenheimer, David; Simpson, Stephen J

    2016-04-01

    Collective foraging, based on positive feedback and quorum responses, is believed to improve the foraging efficiency of animals. Nutritional models suggest that social information transfer increases the ability of foragers with closely aligned nutritional needs to find nutrients and maintain a balanced diet. However, whether or not collective foraging is adaptive in a heterogeneous group composed of individuals with differing nutritional needs is virtually unexplored. Here we develop an evolutionary agent-based model using concepts of nutritional ecology to address this knowledge gap. Our aim was to evaluate how collective foraging, mediated by social retention on foods, can improve nutrient balancing in individuals with different requirements. The model suggests that in groups where inter-individual nutritional needs are unimodally distributed, high levels of collective foraging yield optimal individual fitness by reducing search times that result from moving between nutritionally imbalanced foods. However, where nutritional needs are highly bimodal (e.g. where the requirements of males and females differ) collective foraging is selected against, leading to group fission. In this case, additional mechanisms such as assortative interactions can coevolve to allow collective foraging by subgroups of individuals with aligned requirements. Our findings indicate that collective foraging is an efficient strategy for nutrient regulation in animals inhabiting complex nutritional environments and exhibiting a range of social forms. PMID:27152206

  6. Adaptive collective foraging in groups with conflicting nutritional needs

    PubMed Central

    Senior, Alistair M.; Lihoreau, Mathieu; Charleston, Michael A.; Buhl, Jerome; Raubenheimer, David; Simpson, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Collective foraging, based on positive feedback and quorum responses, is believed to improve the foraging efficiency of animals. Nutritional models suggest that social information transfer increases the ability of foragers with closely aligned nutritional needs to find nutrients and maintain a balanced diet. However, whether or not collective foraging is adaptive in a heterogeneous group composed of individuals with differing nutritional needs is virtually unexplored. Here we develop an evolutionary agent-based model using concepts of nutritional ecology to address this knowledge gap. Our aim was to evaluate how collective foraging, mediated by social retention on foods, can improve nutrient balancing in individuals with different requirements. The model suggests that in groups where inter-individual nutritional needs are unimodally distributed, high levels of collective foraging yield optimal individual fitness by reducing search times that result from moving between nutritionally imbalanced foods. However, where nutritional needs are highly bimodal (e.g. where the requirements of males and females differ) collective foraging is selected against, leading to group fission. In this case, additional mechanisms such as assortative interactions can coevolve to allow collective foraging by subgroups of individuals with aligned requirements. Our findings indicate that collective foraging is an efficient strategy for nutrient regulation in animals inhabiting complex nutritional environments and exhibiting a range of social forms. PMID:27152206

  7. Vocational Services to High Need Clients: The Importance of Need Determination and Person-Environment Match.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schalock, Robert L.

    The paper describes a system used in Nebraska in which vocational rehabilitation specialists determine who is a high need client and develop programs via a social-ecological or "person-environment" perspective. A high need client is defined as an individual who will require considerable staff support, intervention, and time. A three-phase study…

  8. Information needs of the rural physician: a descriptive study.

    PubMed Central

    Dee, C; Blazek, R

    1993-01-01

    The study was designed to describe the information needs and the information-seeking behavior of rural physicians. Data were collected from twelve rural physicians in Central Florida through face-to-face interviews and observation. From a review of 144 patient charts, 48 produced unique, factual patient care questions. Seventy-five percent of the questions were on treatment, 14.7% on diagnosis, 8.3% on etiology, and 2.1% on the psychological aspects of disease. All physicians in the survey relied on colleagues; eleven attended medical meetings; nine subscribed to medical journals, and nine owned medical textbooks. Of the physicians with access to a hospital library, two used the library frequently while ten seldom used the library. Lack of time due to heavy workloads was an obstacle to systematic information retrieval. Rural physicians need immediate access to high-quality, synthesized answers to specific patient care questions at the time of patient contact. Information must be concise and up-to-date, although not necessarily state-of-the-art. A database composed of selected textbooks with integrated keyword access would meet the criteria. In addition, a computerized expert system focused on rural physicians' information needs is a possible remedy for the existing problem. PMID:8374579

  9. What Vaccinations Do You Need?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsroom Contact Us You are here Home » What Vaccinations Do You Need? A Guide for Adults with ... a Kidney Transplant Why do I need a vaccination? Vaccinations, usually given as a shot, protect you ...

  10. Diphtheria Vaccination: Who Needs It?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and adults - Tetanus-diphtheria-acellular Pertussis vaccine Diphtheria Vaccination: Who Needs It? Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... need this vaccine? Yes, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends 5 doses of diphtheria and ...

  11. DRINKING WATER INFRASTRUCTURE NEEDS SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conducted every 4 years, the Drinking Water Infrastructure Needs Survey (DWINS) is an EPA-conducted statistically-based survey of the infrastructure investment needs of the Nation's drinking water systems for the next 20 years.

  12. Computational Process Modeling for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagg, Stacey; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Computational Process and Material Modeling of Powder Bed additive manufacturing of IN 718. Optimize material build parameters with reduced time and cost through modeling. Increase understanding of build properties. Increase reliability of builds. Decrease time to adoption of process for critical hardware. Potential to decrease post-build heat treatments. Conduct single-track and coupon builds at various build parameters. Record build parameter information and QM Meltpool data. Refine Applied Optimization powder bed AM process model using data. Report thermal modeling results. Conduct metallography of build samples. Calibrate STK models using metallography findings. Run STK models using AO thermal profiles and report STK modeling results. Validate modeling with additional build. Photodiode Intensity measurements highly linear with power input. Melt Pool Intensity highly correlated to Melt Pool Size. Melt Pool size and intensity increase with power. Applied Optimization will use data to develop powder bed additive manufacturing process model.

  13. Special Food and Nutrition Needs in School Nutrition Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molaison, Elaine Fontenot; Nettles, Mary Frances

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this research was to determine the prevalence of special food and/or nutrition needs in school nutrition programs. In addition, researchers focused on the issues surrounding these needs and the role of the school nutrition (SN) directors and managers in meeting these needs. Methods: An expert panel was used to…

  14. Technology needs for decommissioning and decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Bundy, R.D.; Kennerly, J.M.

    1993-12-01

    This report summarizes the current view of the most important decontamination and decommissioning (D & D) technology needs for the US Department of Energy facilities for which the D & D programs are the responsibility of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. The source of information used in this assessment was a survey of the D & D program managers at each facility. A summary of needs presented in earlier surveys of site needs in approximate priority order was supplied to each site as a starting point to stimulate thinking. This document reflects a brief initial assessment of ongoing needs; these needs will change as plans for D & D are finalized, some of the technical problems are solved through successful development programs, and new ideas for D and D technologies appear. Thus, this assessment should be updated and upgraded periodically, perhaps, annually. This assessment differs from others that have been made in that it directly and solely reflects the perceived need for new technology by key personnel in the D & D programs at the various facilities and does not attempt to consider the likelihood that these technologies can be successfully developed. Thus, this list of technology needs also does not consider the cost, time, and effort required to develop the desired technologies. An R & D program must include studies that have a reasonable chance for success as well as those for which there is a high need. Other studies that considered the cost and probability of successful development as well as the need for new technology are documented. However, the need for new technology may be diluted in such studies; this document focuses only on the need for new technology as currently perceived by those actually charged with accomplishing D & D.

  15. Families with Special Health Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This document contains teacher's materials for a five-unit secondary education vocational home economics course on families with special health needs. The units cover: (1) family health needs (including the impact of special needs on financial well-being, the impact on the psychological health of the family, and the relationship of society to…

  16. Educational Needs in Northwest Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Steven R.; Hegg, Lauren

    This needs assessment identified six educational needs and issues of schools in the Northwest region, prioritized Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL) areas of emphasis, evaluated research/development strategies to address these needs and priorities, and applied assessment results to NWREL program planning activities. Assessment…

  17. Narrative Frames and Needs Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macalister, John

    2012-01-01

    Needs analysis plays an important role in curriculum design. In particular, needs analysis largely determines the goal and content of the course being designed. When selecting among the many tools available to analyze needs the course designer must consider practicality as well as validity and reliability. In this paper, I report on the novel use…

  18. Civil Engineering Technology Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakland Community Coll., Farmington, MI. Office of Institutional Planning and Analysis.

    In 1991, a study was conducted by Oakland Community College (OCC) to evaluate the need for a proposed Civil Engineering Technology program. An initial examination of the literature focused on industry needs and the job market for civil engineering technicians. In order to gather information on local area employers' hiring practices and needs, a…

  19. A need for faculty development in developmental and behavioral pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Schor, Edward L; Elfenbein, Caren

    2004-10-01

    Identifying and managing issues of child development and behavior is a crucial part of primary care pediatrics. Despite its importance, many pediatricians do not receive adequate training in developmental and behavioral pediatrics (DBP). In a Web-based survey, general pediatric faculty reported a need for improved resident education and additional faculty development. Only 4 percent of respondents felt the quality of current residency training in DBP was excellent and most (64%) felt that too little time was devoted to training in this subject. Nearly all the respondents agreed that increasing faculty skills in this area would significantly improve residents' training but cited the lack of release time (67%) and funding (74%) to attend continuing education as important barriers. To improve faculty skills and resident training, the authors recommend expanding the scope of DBP fellowship programs to include faculty development and making faculty development a regular expectation within academic pediatrics. PMID:15521107

  20. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-10-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step in understanding mathematical representations of RGB color. Finally, color addition and subtraction are presented for the X11 colors from web design to illustrate yet another real-life application of color mixing.