Science.gov

Sample records for additional transcription unit

  1. Reducing nontemplated 3' nucleotide addition to polynucleotide transcripts

    DOEpatents

    Kao, C. Cheng

    2000-01-01

    Non-template 3' nucleotide addition to a transcript is reduced by transcribing a transcript from a template comprising an ultimate and/or penultimate 5' ribose having a C'2 substituent such as methoxy, which reduces non-template 3' nucleotide addition to the transcript. The methods are shown to be applicable to a wide variety of polymerases, including Taq, T7 RNA polymerase, etc.

  2. The Transcription Unit Architecture of the Escherichia Coli Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Byung-Kwan; Zengler, Karsten; Qiu, Yu; Park, Young S.; Knight, Eric M.; Barrett, Christian; Gao, Yuan; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2009-11-01

    Under EMSL User Proposal 25660, the authors reported that bacterial genomes are organized by structural and functional elements, including promoters, transcription start and termination sites, open reading frames, regulatory noncoding regions, untranslated regions and transcription units. Here, we iteratively integrate high-throughput, genome-wide measurements of RNA polymerase binding locations and mRNA transcript abundance, 5' sequences and translation into proteins to determine the organizational structure of the Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 genome. Integration of the organizational elements provides an experimentally annotated transcription unit architecture, including alternative transcription start sites, 5' untranslated region, boundaries and open reading frames of each transcription unit. A total of 4,661 transcription units were identified, representing an increase of >530% over current knowledge. This comprehensive transcription unit architecture allows for the elucidation of condition-specific uses of alternative sigma factors at the genome scale. Furthermore, the transcription unit architecture provides a foundation on which to construct genome-scale transcriptional and translational regulatory networks.

  3. Inactivation of transcription by UV irradiation of T. brucei provides evidence for a multicistronic transcription unit including a VSG gene

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.J.; Kooter, J.M.; Borst, P.

    1987-10-23

    We have used inactivation of transcription by UV irradiation to map transcription units in trypanosomes. The relative inactivation rate of the transcription of mini-exon, 5S, and rRNA genes was inversely proportional to the previously estimated lengths of these transcription units. The telomeric transcription unit containing the gene for variant-specific surface glycoprotein (VSG) 221 was inactivated as a single unit of 60 kb. This long transcription unit comprises at least one other protein-coding gene and yields seven other stable mRNAs. These data thus provide evidence for a multicistronic transcription unit for cellular genes in a eukaryote.

  4. 42 CFR 412.29 - Excluded rehabilitation units: Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Excluded rehabilitation units: Additional... Costs and Inpatient Capital-Related Costs § 412.29 Excluded rehabilitation units: Additional... paid under the prospective payment system specified in § 412.1(a)(3), a rehabilitation unit must...

  5. Additional Crime Scenes for Projectile Motion Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullerton, Dan; Bonner, David

    2011-12-01

    Building students' ability to transfer physics fundamentals to real-world applications establishes a deeper understanding of underlying concepts while enhancing student interest. Forensic science offers a great opportunity for students to apply physics to highly engaging, real-world contexts. Integrating these opportunities into inquiry-based problem solving in a team environment provides a terrific backdrop for fostering communication, analysis, and critical thinking skills. One such activity, inspired jointly by the museum exhibit "CSI: The Experience"2 and David Bonner's TPT article "Increasing Student Engagement and Enthusiasm: A Projectile Motion Crime Scene,"3 provides students with three different crime scenes, each requiring an analysis of projectile motion. In this lesson students socially engage in higher-order analysis of two-dimensional projectile motion problems by collecting information from 3-D scale models and collaborating with one another on its interpretation, in addition to diagramming and mathematical analysis typical to problem solving in physics.

  6. Genes on a Wire: The Nucleoid-Associated Protein HU Insulates Transcription Units in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Michael; Gerganova, Veneta; Berger, Petya; Rapiteanu, Radu; Lisicovas, Viktoras; Dobrindt, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which chromosomal gene position in prokaryotes affects local gene expression remains an open question. Several studies have shown that chromosomal re-positioning of bacterial transcription units does not alter their expression pattern, except for a general decrease in gene expression levels from chromosomal origin to terminus proximal positions, which is believed to result from gene dosage effects. Surprisingly, the question as to whether this chromosomal context independence is a cis encoded property of a bacterial transcription unit, or if position independence is a property conferred by factors acting in trans, has not been addressed so far. For this purpose, we established a genetic test system assessing the chromosomal positioning effects by means of identical promoter-fluorescent reporter gene fusions inserted equidistantly from OriC into both chromosomal replichores of Escherichia coli K-12. Our investigations of the reporter activities in mutant cells lacking the conserved nucleoid associated protein HU uncovered various drastic chromosomal positional effects on gene transcription. In addition we present evidence that these positional effects are caused by transcriptional activity nearby the insertion site of our reporter modules. We therefore suggest that the nucleoid-associated protein HU is functionally insulating transcription units, most likely by constraining transcription induced DNA supercoiling. PMID:27545593

  7. 15. MAP OF ALAMEDA SHIPYARD SHOWING PROPOSED ADDITIONAL FACILITIES. United ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. MAP OF ALAMEDA SHIPYARD SHOWING PROPOSED ADDITIONAL FACILITIES. United Engineering Company Ltd., Alameda Shipyard. A site map with all existing structures keyed to an identification legend. Also shows proposed new structures. No architect noted. Drawn by "J.B.H." (John Hudspeth?). Sheet 2. Plan no. 10,528. Scale one inch to 100 feet. November 12, 1943, last revised 1/18/44. pencil on vellum - United Engineering Company Shipyard, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  8. ALTERATIONS AND ADDITIONS TO THE GATE HOUSE, United Engineering Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ALTERATIONS AND ADDITIONS TO THE GATE HOUSE, United Engineering Company Ltd., Alameda Shipyard. Plan, elevations, and details of expanded structure. No architect noted. Drawn by "J.B.H." (John Hudspeth?). Sheet 2 of 2. Plan no. 10,504. Scale 1/4 inch to the foot. November 28, 1942, last revised 5/5/45. pencil on vellum - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Gate House, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  9. 3. ELEVATIONS, ADDITION TO POWER HOUSE. United Engineering Company Ltd., ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. ELEVATIONS, ADDITION TO POWER HOUSE. United Engineering Company Ltd., Alameda Shipyard. John Hudspeth, architect, foot of Main Street, Alameda, California. Sheet 4. Plan no. 10,548. Scale 1/4 inch to the foot, elevations, and one inch to the foot, sections and details. April 30, 1945, last revised 6/19/45. pencil on vellum - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Boiler House, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  10. 4. FLOOR PLAN AND SECTIONS, ADDITION TO POWER HOUSE. United ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. FLOOR PLAN AND SECTIONS, ADDITION TO POWER HOUSE. United Engineering Company Ltd., Alameda Shipyard. Also includes plot plan at 1 inch to 100 feet. John Hudspeth, architect, foot of Main Street, Alameda, California. Sheet 3. Plan no. 10,548. Scale 1/4 inch and h inch to the foot. April 30, 1945, last revised 6/22/45. pencil on vellum - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Boiler House, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  11. RegulonDB version 7.0: transcriptional regulation of Escherichia coli K-12 integrated within genetic sensory response units (Gensor Units)

    PubMed Central

    Gama-Castro, Socorro; Salgado, Heladia; Peralta-Gil, Martin; Santos-Zavaleta, Alberto; Muñiz-Rascado, Luis; Solano-Lira, Hilda; Jimenez-Jacinto, Verónica; Weiss, Verena; García-Sotelo, Jair S.; López-Fuentes, Alejandra; Porrón-Sotelo, Liliana; Alquicira-Hernández, Shirley; Medina-Rivera, Alejandra; Martínez-Flores, Irma; Alquicira-Hernández, Kevin; Martínez-Adame, Ruth; Bonavides-Martínez, César; Miranda-Ríos, Juan; Huerta, Araceli M.; Mendoza-Vargas, Alfredo; Collado-Torres, Leonardo; Taboada, Blanca; Vega-Alvarado, Leticia; Olvera, Maricela; Olvera, Leticia; Grande, Ricardo; Morett, Enrique; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2011-01-01

    RegulonDB (http://regulondb.ccg.unam.mx/) is the primary reference database of the best-known regulatory network of any free-living organism, that of Escherichia coli K-12. The major conceptual change since 3 years ago is an expanded biological context so that transcriptional regulation is now part of a unit that initiates with the signal and continues with the signal transduction to the core of regulation, modifying expression of the affected target genes responsible for the response. We call these genetic sensory response units, or Gensor Units. We have initiated their high-level curation, with graphic maps and superreactions with links to other databases. Additional connectivity uses expandable submaps. RegulonDB has summaries for every transcription factor (TF) and TF-binding sites with internal symmetry. Several DNA-binding motifs and their sizes have been redefined and relocated. In addition to data from the literature, we have incorporated our own information on transcription start sites (TSSs) and transcriptional units (TUs), obtained by using high-throughput whole-genome sequencing technologies. A new portable drawing tool for genomic features is also now available, as well as new ways to download the data, including web services, files for several relational database manager systems and text files including BioPAX format. PMID:21051347

  12. Glucocorticoids and protein kinase A coordinately modulate transcription factor recruitment at a glucocorticoid-responsive unit.

    PubMed Central

    Espinás, M L; Roux, J; Pictet, R; Grange, T

    1995-01-01

    The rat tyrosine aminotransferase gene is a model system to study transcriptional regulation by glucocorticoid hormones. We analyzed transcription factor binding to the tyrosine aminotransferase gene glucocorticoid-responsive unit (GRU) at kb -2.5, using in vivo footprinting studies with both dimethyl sulfate and DNase I. At this GRU, glucocorticoid activation triggers a disruption of the nucleosomal structure. We show here that various regulatory pathways affect transcription factor binding to this GRU. The binding differs in two closely related glucocorticoid-responsive hepatoma cell lines. In line H4II, glucocorticoid induction promotes the recruitment of hepatocyte nuclear factor 3 (HNF3), presumably through the nucleosomal disruption. However, the footprint of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is not visible, even though a regular but transient interaction of the GR is necessary to maintain HNF3 binding. In contrast, in line FTO2B, HNF3 binds to the GRU in the absence of glucocorticoids and nucleosomal disruption, showing that a "closed" chromatin conformation does not repress the binding of certain transcription factors in a uniform manner. In FTO2B cells, the footprint of the GR is detectable, but this requires the activation of protein kinase A. In addition, protein kinase A stimulation also improves the recruitment of HNF3 independently of glucocorticoids and enhances the glucocorticoid response mediated by this GRU in an HNF3-dependent manner. In conclusion, the differences in the behavior of this regulatory sequence in the two cell lines show that various regulatory pathways are integrated at this GRU through modulation of interrelated events: transcription factor binding to DNA and nucleosomal disruption. PMID:7565684

  13. Addition and Subtraction. Mathematics-Methods Program Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBlanc, John F.; And Others

    This unit is 1 of 12 developed for the university classroom portion of the Mathematics-Methods Program (MMP), created by the Indiana University Mathematics Education Development Center (MEDC) as an innovative program for the mathematics training of prospective elementary school teachers (PSTs). Each unit is written in an activity format that…

  14. Gene expression of herpes simplex virus. II. Uv radiological analysis of viral transcription units

    SciTech Connect

    Millette, R. L.; Klaiber, R.

    1980-06-01

    The transcriptional organization of the genome of herpes simplex virus type 1 was analyzed by measuring the sensitivity of viral polypeptide synthesis to uv irradiation of the infecting virus. Herpes simplex virus type 1 was irradiated with various doses of uv light and used to infect xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts. Immediate early transcription units were analyzed by having cycloheximide present throughout the period of infection, removing the drug at 8 h postinfection, and pulse-labeling proteins with (355)methionine. Delayed early transcription units were analyzed in similar studies by having 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine present during the experiment to block replication of the input irradiated genome. The results indicate that none of the immediate early genes analyzed can be cotranscribed, whereas some of the delayed early genes might be cotranscribed. No evidence was found for the existence of large, multigene transcription units.

  15. Single ribosomal transcription units are linear, compacted Christmas trees in plant nucleoli.

    PubMed

    González-Melendi, P; Wells, B; Beven, A F; Shaw, P J

    2001-08-01

    The rDNA transcription units are enormous macromolecular structures located in the nucleolus and containing 50-100 RNA polymerases together with the nascent pre-rRNA attached to the rDNA. It has not previously been possible to visualize nucleolar transcription units directly in intact nucleoli, although highly spread preparations in the electron microscope have been imaged as "Christmas trees" 2-3 microm long. Here we determine the relative conformation of individual transcription units in Pisum sativum plant nucleoli using a novel labelling technique. Nascent transcripts were detected by a highly sensitive silver-enhanced 1 nm gold procedure, followed by 3D electron microscopy of entire nucleoli. Individual transcription units are seen as conical, elongated clusters approximately 300 nm in length and 130 nm in width at the thickest end. We further show that there were approximately 300 active ribosomal genes in the nucleoli examined. The underlying chromatin structure of the transcribing rDNA was directly visualized by applying a novel limited extraction procedure to fixed specimens in order to wash out the proteins and RNA, thus specifically revealing DNA strands after uranyl acetate staining. Using this technique, followed by post-embedding in situ hybridization, we observed that the nucleolar rDNA fibres are not extended but show a coiled, thread-like appearance. Our results show for the first time that native rDNA transcription units are linear, compacted Christmas trees.

  16. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Transcription Unit Organization: Genome Survey and Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, Franciele Maboni; Schrank, Augusto; Schrank, Irene Silveira

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is associated with swine respiratory diseases. Although gene organization and regulation are well known in many prokaryotic organisms, knowledge on mycoplasma is limited. This study performed a comparative analysis of three strains of M. hyopneumoniae (7448, J and 232), with a focus on genome organization and gene comparison for open read frame (ORF) cluster (OC) identification. An in silico analysis of gene organization demonstrated 117 OCs and 34 single ORFs in M. hyopneumoniae 7448 and J, while 116 OCs and 36 single ORFs were identified in M. hyopneumoniae 232. Genomic comparison revealed high synteny and conservation of gene order between the OCs defined for 7448 and J strains as well as for 7448 and 232 strains. Twenty-one OCs were chosen and experimentally confirmed by reverse transcription–PCR from M. hyopneumoniae 7448 genome, validating our prediction. A subset of the ORFs within an OC could be independently transcribed due to the presence of internal promoters. Our results suggest that transcription occurs in ‘run-on’ from an upstream promoter in M. hyopneumoniae, thus forming large ORF clusters (from 2 to 29 ORFs in the same orientation) and indicating a complex transcriptional organization. PMID:22086999

  17. Cross-Family Transcription Factor Interactions: An Additional Layer of Gene Regulation.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Marian; van Dijk, Aalt D J; Immink, Richard G H; Angenent, Gerco C

    2017-01-01

    Specific and dynamic gene expression strongly depends on transcription factor (TF) activity and most plant TFs function in a combinatorial fashion. They can bind to DNA and control the expression of the corresponding gene in an additive fashion or cooperate by physical interactions, forming larger protein complexes. The importance of protein-protein interactions between members of a particular plant TF family has long been recognised; however, a significant number of interfamily TF interactions has recently been reported. The biological implications and the molecular mechanisms involved in cross-family interactions have now started to be elucidated and the examples illustrate potential roles in the bridging of biological processes. Hence, cross-family TF interactions expand the molecular toolbox for plants with additional mechanisms to control and fine-tune robust gene expression patterns and to adapt to their continuously changing environment.

  18. SeqTU: A Web Server for Identification of Bacterial Transcription Units

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Chou, Wen-Chi; Ma, Qin; Xu, Ying

    2017-01-01

    A transcription unit (TU) consists of K ≥ 1consecutive genes on the same strand of a bacterial genome that are transcribed into a single mRNA molecule under certain conditions. Their identification is an essential step in elucidation of transcriptional regulatory networks. We have recently developed a machine-learning method to accurately identify TUs from RNA-seq data, based on two features of the assembled RNA reads: the continuity and stability of RNA-seq coverage across a genomic region. While good performance was achieved by the method on Escherichia coli and Clostridium thermocellum, substantial work is needed to make the program generally applicable to all bacteria, knowing that the program requires organism specific information. A web server, named SeqTU, was developed to automatically identify TUs with given RNA-seq data of any bacterium using a machine-learning approach. The server consists of a number of utility tools, in addition to TU identification, such as data preparation, data quality check and RNA-read mapping. SeqTU provides a user-friendly interface and automated prediction of TUs from given RNA-seq data. The predicted TUs are displayed intuitively using HTML format along with a graphic visualization of the prediction. PMID:28266571

  19. SeqTU: A Web Server for Identification of Bacterial Transcription Units.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Chou, Wen-Chi; Ma, Qin; Xu, Ying

    2017-03-07

    A transcription unit (TU) consists of K ≥ 1consecutive genes on the same strand of a bacterial genome that are transcribed into a single mRNA molecule under certain conditions. Their identification is an essential step in elucidation of transcriptional regulatory networks. We have recently developed a machine-learning method to accurately identify TUs from RNA-seq data, based on two features of the assembled RNA reads: the continuity and stability of RNA-seq coverage across a genomic region. While good performance was achieved by the method on Escherichia coli and Clostridium thermocellum, substantial work is needed to make the program generally applicable to all bacteria, knowing that the program requires organism specific information. A web server, named SeqTU, was developed to automatically identify TUs with given RNA-seq data of any bacterium using a machine-learning approach. The server consists of a number of utility tools, in addition to TU identification, such as data preparation, data quality check and RNA-read mapping. SeqTU provides a user-friendly interface and automated prediction of TUs from given RNA-seq data. The predicted TUs are displayed intuitively using HTML format along with a graphic visualization of the prediction.

  20. The Chinese hamster dihydrofolate reductase replication origin decision point follows activation of transcription and suppresses initiation of replication within transcription units.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Takayo; Ramanathan, Sunita; Okuno, Yukiko; Kumagai, Chiharu; Shaikh, Seemab S; Gilbert, David M

    2006-02-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells select specific replication origin sites within the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) locus at a discrete point during G1 phase, the origin decision point (ODP). Origin selection is sensitive to transcription but not protein synthesis inhibitors, implicating a pretranslational role for transcription in origin specification. We have constructed a DNA array covering 121 kb surrounding the DHFR locus, to comprehensively investigate replication initiation and transcription in this region. When nuclei isolated within the first 3 h of G1 phase were stimulated to initiate replication in Xenopus egg extracts, replication initiated without any detectable preference for specific sites. At the ODP, initiation became suppressed from within the Msh3, DHFR, and 2BE2121 transcription units. Active transcription was mostly confined to these transcription units, and inhibition of transcription by alpha-amanitin resulted in the initiation of replication within transcription units, indicating that transcription is necessary to limit initiation events to the intergenic region. However, the resumption of DHFR transcription after mitosis took place prior to the ODP and so is not on its own sufficient to suppress initiation of replication. Together, these results demonstrate a remarkable flexibility in sequence selection for initiating replication and implicate transcription as one important component of origin specification at the ODP.

  1. The Chinese Hamster Dihydrofolate Reductase Replication Origin Decision Point Follows Activation of Transcription and Suppresses Initiation of Replication within Transcription Units

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Takayo; Ramanathan, Sunita; Okuno, Yukiko; Kumagai, Chiharu; Shaikh, Seemab S.; Gilbert, David M.

    2006-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells select specific replication origin sites within the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) locus at a discrete point during G1 phase, the origin decision point (ODP). Origin selection is sensitive to transcription but not protein synthesis inhibitors, implicating a pretranslational role for transcription in origin specification. We have constructed a DNA array covering 121 kb surrounding the DHFR locus, to comprehensively investigate replication initiation and transcription in this region. When nuclei isolated within the first 3 h of G1 phase were stimulated to initiate replication in Xenopus egg extracts, replication initiated without any detectable preference for specific sites. At the ODP, initiation became suppressed from within the Msh3, DHFR, and 2BE2121 transcription units. Active transcription was mostly confined to these transcription units, and inhibition of transcription by alpha-amanitin resulted in the initiation of replication within transcription units, indicating that transcription is necessary to limit initiation events to the intergenic region. However, the resumption of DHFR transcription after mitosis took place prior to the ODP and so is not on its own sufficient to suppress initiation of replication. Together, these results demonstrate a remarkable flexibility in sequence selection for initiating replication and implicate transcription as one important component of origin specification at the ODP. PMID:16428457

  2. CRISPR-Cas system presents multiple transcriptional units including antisense RNAs that are expressed in minimal medium and upregulated by pH in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    PubMed

    Medina-Aparicio, Liliana; Rebollar-Flores, Javier E; Beltrán-Luviano, América A; Vázquez, Alejandra; Gutiérrez-Ríos, Rosa M; Olvera, Leticia; Calva, Edmundo; Hernández-Lucas, Ismael

    2017-02-01

    The CRISPR-Cas system is involved in bacterial immunity, virulence, gene regulation, biofilm formation and sporulation. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, this system consists of five transcriptional units including antisense RNAs. It was determined that these genetic elements are expressed in minimal medium and are up-regulated by pH. In addition, a transcriptional characterization of cas3 and ascse2-1 is included herein.

  3. Enhancers as non-coding RNA transcription units: recent insights and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenbo; Notani, Dimple; Rosenfeld, Michael G

    2016-04-01

    Networks of regulatory enhancers dictate distinct cell identities and cellular responses to diverse signals by instructing precise spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression. However, 35 years after their discovery, enhancer functions and mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Intriguingly, recent evidence suggests that many, if not all, functional enhancers are themselves transcription units, generating non-coding enhancer RNAs. This observation provides a fundamental insight into the inter-regulation between enhancers and promoters, which can both act as transcription units; it also raises crucial questions regarding the potential biological roles of the enhancer transcription process and non-coding enhancer RNAs. Here, we review research progress in this field and discuss several important, unresolved questions regarding the roles and mechanisms of enhancers in gene regulation.

  4. Genome-wide transcript analysis of maize hybrids: allelic additive gene expression and yield heterosis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mei; Rupe, Mary A; Yang, Xiaofeng; Crasta, Oswald; Zinselmeier, Christopher; Smith, Oscar S; Bowen, Ben

    2006-09-01

    Heterosis, or hybrid vigor, has been widely exploited in plant breeding for many decades, but the molecular mechanisms underlying the phenomenon remain unknown. In this study, we applied genome-wide transcript profiling to gain a global picture of the ways in which a large proportion of genes are expressed in the immature ear tissues of a series of 16 maize hybrids that vary in their degree of heterosis. Key observations include: (1) the proportion of allelic additively expressed genes is positively associated with hybrid yield and heterosis; (2) the proportion of genes that exhibit a bias towards the expression level of the paternal parent is negatively correlated with hybrid yield and heterosis; and (3) there is no correlation between the over- or under-expression of specific genes in maize hybrids with either yield or heterosis. The relationship of the expression patterns with hybrid performance is substantiated by analysis of a genetically improved modern hybrid (Pioneer hybrid 3394) versus a less improved older hybrid (Pioneer hybrid 3306) grown at different levels of plant density stress. The proportion of allelic additively expressed genes is positively associated with the modern high yielding hybrid, heterosis and high yielding environments, whereas the converse is true for the paternally biased gene expression. The dynamic changes of gene expression in hybrids responding to genotype and environment may result from differential regulation of the two parental alleles. Our findings suggest that differential allele regulation may play an important role in hybrid yield or heterosis, and provide a new insight to the molecular understanding of the underlying mechanisms of heterosis.

  5. Additional regulatory activities of MrkH for the transcriptional expression of the Klebsiella pneumoniae mrk genes: Antagonist of H-NS and repressor

    PubMed Central

    Ares, Miguel A.; Fernández-Vázquez, José L.; Pacheco, Sabino; Martínez-Santos, Verónica I.; Jarillo-Quijada, Ma. Dolores; Torres, Javier; Alcántar-Curiel, María D.; González-y-Merchand, Jorge A.; De la Cruz, Miguel A.

    2017-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common opportunistic pathogen causing nosocomial infections. One of the main virulence determinants of K. pneumoniae is the type 3 pilus (T3P). T3P helps the bacterial interaction to both abiotic and biotic surfaces and it is crucial for the biofilm formation. T3P is genetically organized in three transcriptional units: the mrkABCDF polycistronic operon, the mrkHI bicistronic operon and the mrkJ gene. MrkH is a regulatory protein encoded in the mrkHI operon, which positively regulates the mrkA pilin gene and its own expression. In contrast, the H-NS nucleoid protein represses the transcriptional expression of T3P. Here we reported that MrkH and H-NS positively and negatively regulate mrkJ expression, respectively, by binding to the promoter of mrkJ. MrkH protein recognized a sequence located at position -63.5 relative to the transcriptional start site of mrkJ gene. Interestingly, our results show that, in addition to its known function as classic transcriptional activator, MrkH also positively controls the expression of mrk genes by acting as an anti-repressor of H-NS; moreover, our results support the notion that high levels of MrkH repress T3P expression. Our data provide new insights about the complex regulatory role of the MrkH protein on the transcriptional control of T3P in K. pneumoniae. PMID:28278272

  6. Additional regulatory activities of MrkH for the transcriptional expression of the Klebsiella pneumoniae mrk genes: Antagonist of H-NS and repressor.

    PubMed

    Ares, Miguel A; Fernández-Vázquez, José L; Pacheco, Sabino; Martínez-Santos, Verónica I; Jarillo-Quijada, Ma Dolores; Torres, Javier; Alcántar-Curiel, María D; González-Y-Merchand, Jorge A; De la Cruz, Miguel A

    2017-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common opportunistic pathogen causing nosocomial infections. One of the main virulence determinants of K. pneumoniae is the type 3 pilus (T3P). T3P helps the bacterial interaction to both abiotic and biotic surfaces and it is crucial for the biofilm formation. T3P is genetically organized in three transcriptional units: the mrkABCDF polycistronic operon, the mrkHI bicistronic operon and the mrkJ gene. MrkH is a regulatory protein encoded in the mrkHI operon, which positively regulates the mrkA pilin gene and its own expression. In contrast, the H-NS nucleoid protein represses the transcriptional expression of T3P. Here we reported that MrkH and H-NS positively and negatively regulate mrkJ expression, respectively, by binding to the promoter of mrkJ. MrkH protein recognized a sequence located at position -63.5 relative to the transcriptional start site of mrkJ gene. Interestingly, our results show that, in addition to its known function as classic transcriptional activator, MrkH also positively controls the expression of mrk genes by acting as an anti-repressor of H-NS; moreover, our results support the notion that high levels of MrkH repress T3P expression. Our data provide new insights about the complex regulatory role of the MrkH protein on the transcriptional control of T3P in K. pneumoniae.

  7. 10 CFR 35.647 - Additional technical requirements for mobile remote afterloader units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional technical requirements for mobile remote afterloader units. 35.647 Section 35.647 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic...

  8. 10 CFR 35.647 - Additional technical requirements for mobile remote afterloader units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Additional technical requirements for mobile remote afterloader units. 35.647 Section 35.647 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic...

  9. Technical options for processing additional light tight oil volumes within the United States

    EIA Publications

    2015-01-01

    This report examines technical options for processing additional LTO volumes within the United States. Domestic processing of additional LTO would enable an increase in petroleum product exports from the United States, already the world’s largest net exporter of petroleum products. Unlike crude oil, products are not subject to export limitations or licensing requirements. While this is one possible approach to absorbing higher domestic LTO production in the absence of a relaxation of current limitations on crude exports, domestic LTO would have to be priced at a level required to encourage additional LTO runs at existing refinery units, debottlenecking, or possible additions of processing capacity.

  10. CpG methylation is targeted to transcription units in an invertebrate genome

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Miho M.; Kerr, Alastair R.W.; De Sousa, Dina; Bird, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    DNA is methylated at the dinucleotide CpG in genomes of a wide range of plants and animals. Among animals, variable patterns of genomic CpG methylation have been described, ranging from undetectable levels (e.g., in Caenorhabditis elegans) to high levels of global methylation in the vertebrates. The most frequent pattern in invertebrate animals, however, is mosaic methylation, comprising domains of methylated DNA interspersed with unmethylated domains. To understand the origin of mosaic DNA methylation patterns, we examined the distribution of DNA methylation in the Ciona intestinalis genome. Bisulfite sequencing and computational analysis revealed methylated domains with sharp boundaries that strongly colocalize with ∼60% of transcription units. By contrast, promoters, intergenic DNA, and transposons are not preferentially targeted by DNA methylation. Methylated transcription units include evolutionarily conserved genes, whereas the most highly expressed genes preferentially belong to the unmethylated fraction. The results lend support to the hypothesis that CpG methylation functions to suppress spurious transcriptional initiation within infrequently transcribed genes. PMID:17420183

  11. 5 CFR 3101.111 - Additional rules for United States Secret Service employees. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional rules for United States Secret Service employees. 3101.111 Section 3101.111 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... rules for United States Secret Service employees....

  12. 5 CFR 3101.111 - Additional rules for United States Secret Service employees. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Additional rules for United States Secret Service employees. 3101.111 Section 3101.111 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... rules for United States Secret Service employees....

  13. 5 CFR 3101.111 - Additional rules for United States Secret Service employees. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional rules for United States Secret Service employees. 3101.111 Section 3101.111 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... rules for United States Secret Service employees....

  14. 5 CFR 3101.111 - Additional rules for United States Secret Service employees. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Additional rules for United States Secret Service employees. 3101.111 Section 3101.111 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... rules for United States Secret Service employees....

  15. 5 CFR 3101.111 - Additional rules for United States Secret Service employees. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional rules for United States Secret Service employees. 3101.111 Section 3101.111 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... rules for United States Secret Service employees....

  16. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  17. 10 CFR 35.2647 - Records of additional technical requirements for mobile remote afterloader units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of additional technical requirements for mobile remote afterloader units. 35.2647 Section 35.2647 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Records § 35.2647 Records of additional technical requirements for mobile...

  18. Inulin isoforms differ by repeated additions of one crystal unit cell.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Peter D; Barclay, Thomas G; Ginic-Markovic, Milena; Gerson, Andrea R; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2014-03-15

    Inulin isoforms, especially delta inulin, are important biologically as immune activators and clinically as vaccine adjuvants. In exploring action mechanisms, we previously found regular increments in thermal properties of the seven-member inulin isoform series that suggested regular additions of some energetic structural unit. Because the previous isolates carried additional longer chains that masked defining ranges, these were contrasted with new isoform isolates comprising only inulin chain lengths defining that isoform. The new series began with 19 fructose units per chain (alpha-1 inulin), increasing regularly by 6 fructose units per isoform. Thus the 'energetic unit' equates to 6 fructose residues per chain. All isoforms showed indistinguishable X-ray diffraction patterns that were also identical with known inulin crystals. We conclude that an 'energetic unit' equates to one helix turn of 6 fructose units per chain as found in one unit cell of the inulin crystal. Each isoform chain comprised progressively more helix turns plus one additional fructose and glucose residues per chain.

  19. Continued Discovery of Transcriptional Units Expressed in Cells of the Mouse Mononuclear Phagocyte Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Christine A.; Ravasi, Timothy; Sultana, Razvan; Yagi, Ken; Carninci, Piero; Bono, Hidemasa; Faulkner, Geoffrey; Okazaki, Yasushi; Quackenbush, John; Hume, David A.; Lyons, Paul A.

    2003-01-01

    The current RIKEN transcript set represents a significant proportion of the mouse transcriptome but transcripts expressed in the innate and acquired immune systems are poorly represented. In the present study we have assessed the complexity of the transcriptome expressed in mouse macrophages before and after treatment with lipopolysaccharide, a global regulator of macrophage gene expression, using existing RIKEN 19K arrays. By comparison to array profiles of other cells and tissues, we identify a large set of macrophage-enriched genes, many of which have obvious functions in endocytosis and phagocytosis. In addition, a significant number of LPS-inducible genes were identified. The data suggest that macrophages are a complex source of mRNA for transcriptome studies. To assess complexity and identify additional macrophage expressed genes, cDNA libraries were created from purified populations of macrophage and dendritic cells, a functionally related cell type. Sequence analysis revealed a high incidence of novel mRNAs within these cDNA libraries. These studies provide insights into the depths of transcriptional complexity still untapped amongst products of inducible genes, and identify macrophage and dendritic cell populations as a starting point for sampling the inducible mammalian transcriptome. PMID:12819134

  20. Systematic Dissection of Coding Exons at Single Nucleotide Resolution Supports an Additional Role in Cell-Specific Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mee J.; Findlay, Gregory M.; Martin, Beth; Zhao, Jingjing; Bell, Robert J. A.; Smith, Robin P.; Ku, Angel A.; Shendure, Jay; Ahituv, Nadav

    2014-01-01

    In addition to their protein coding function, exons can also serve as transcriptional enhancers. Mutations in these exonic-enhancers (eExons) could alter both protein function and transcription. However, the functional consequence of eExon mutations is not well known. Here, using massively parallel reporter assays, we dissect the enhancer activity of three liver eExons (SORL1 exon 17, TRAF3IP2 exon 2, PPARG exon 6) at single nucleotide resolution in the mouse liver. We find that both synonymous and non-synonymous mutations have similar effects on enhancer activity and many of the deleterious mutation clusters overlap known liver-associated transcription factor binding sites. Carrying a similar massively parallel reporter assay in HeLa cells with these three eExons found differences in their mutation profiles compared to the liver, suggesting that enhancers could have distinct operating profiles in different tissues. Our results demonstrate that eExon mutations could lead to multiple phenotypes by disrupting both the protein sequence and enhancer activity and that enhancers can have distinct mutation profiles in different cell types. PMID:25340400

  1. Chlorobaculum tepidum TLS displays a complex transcriptional response to sulfide addition.

    PubMed

    Eddie, Brian J; Hanson, Thomas E

    2013-01-01

    Chlorobaculum tepidum is a green sulfur bacterium (GSB) that is a model system for phototrophic sulfur oxidation. Despite over 2 decades of research, conspicuous gaps exist in our understanding of its electron donor metabolism and regulation. RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) was used to provide a global picture of the C. tepidum transcriptome during growth on thiosulfate as the sole electron donor and at time points following the addition of sulfide to such a culture. Following sulfide addition, 121 to 150 protein-coding genes displayed significant changes in expression depending upon the time point. These changes included a rapid decrease in expression of thiosulfate and elemental sulfur oxidation genes. Genes and gene loci with increased expression included CT1087, encoding a sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase required for growth in high sulfide concentrations; a polysulfide reductase-like complex operon, psrABC (CT0496 to CT0494); and, surprisingly, a large cluster of genes involved in iron acquisition. Finally, two genes that are conserved as a cassette in anaerobic bacteria and archaea, CT1276 and CT1277, displayed a strong increase in expression. The CT1277 gene product contains a DNA-binding domain, suggesting a role for it in sulfide-dependent gene expression changes.

  2. Impact of Transcription Units rearrangement on the evolution of the regulatory network of gamma-proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    González Pérez, Abel D; González González, Evelyn; Espinosa Angarica, Vladimir; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza R; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2008-01-01

    Background In the past years, several studies begun to unravel the structure, dynamical properties, and evolution of transcriptional regulatory networks. However, even those comparative studies that focus on a group of closely related organisms are limited by the rather scarce knowledge on regulatory interactions outside a few model organisms, such as E. coli among the prokaryotes. Results In this paper we used the information annotated in Tractor_DB (a database of regulatory networks in gamma-proteobacteria) to calculate a normalized Site Orthology Score (SOS) that quantifies the conservation of a regulatory link across thirty genomes of this subclass. Then we used this SOS to assess how regulatory connections have evolved in this group, and how the variation of basic regulatory connection is reflected on the structure of the chromosome. We found that individual regulatory interactions shift between different organisms, a process that may be described as rewiring the network. At this evolutionary scale (the gamma-proteobacteria subclass) this rewiring process may be an important source of variation of regulatory incoming interactions for individual networks. We also noticed that the regulatory links that form feed forward motifs are conserved in a better correlated manner than triads of random regulatory interactions or pairs of co-regulated genes. Furthermore, the rewiring process that takes place at the most basic level of the regulatory network may be linked to rearrangements of genetic material within bacterial chromosomes, which change the structure of Transcription Units and therefore the regulatory connections between Transcription Factors and structural genes. Conclusion The rearrangements that occur in bacterial chromosomes-mostly inversion or horizontal gene transfer events – are important sources of variation of gene regulation at this evolutionary scale. PMID:18366643

  3. Internal promoter in the ilvGEDA transcription unit of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, D H; Wallen, J W; Traub, L; Gray, J E; Kung, H F

    1985-01-01

    Segments of the ilvGEDA transcription unit have been cloned into the promoter tester plasmid pMC81. This vector contains cloning sites situated upstream of the lacZ gene coding for beta-galactosidase. Using this method we have quantitatively evaluated in vivo (i) the activity of previously described promoter, pG, preceding ilvG; (ii) the relative activity of pE promoter, previously postulated to be located between ilvG and ilvE; and (iii) the effect of the frameshift site present in the wild-type ilvG gene by comparison with mutant derivatives lacking this frameshift site. Isogenic derivatives of strain MC1000 were constructed by transduction with phage P1 grown on rho-120, delta(ilvGEDA), delta(ilvED), and ilvA538 hosts. The potential effects of these alleles that were previously postulated to affect ilvGEDA expression were assessed in vivo by monitoring beta-galactosidase production directed by ilv DNA fragments. Cloned ilv segments were also tested for activity in vitro with a DNA-directed coupled transcription and translation system. The production in vitro of ilv-directed ilv gene expression and beta-galactosidase expression with ara-ilv-lac fusions paralleled the in vivo activity.

  4. Internal promoter in the ilvGEDA transcription unit of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Calhoun, D H; Wallen, J W; Traub, L; Gray, J E; Kung, H F

    1985-01-01

    Segments of the ilvGEDA transcription unit have been cloned into the promoter tester plasmid pMC81. This vector contains cloning sites situated upstream of the lacZ gene coding for beta-galactosidase. Using this method we have quantitatively evaluated in vivo (i) the activity of previously described promoter, pG, preceding ilvG; (ii) the relative activity of pE promoter, previously postulated to be located between ilvG and ilvE; and (iii) the effect of the frameshift site present in the wild-type ilvG gene by comparison with mutant derivatives lacking this frameshift site. Isogenic derivatives of strain MC1000 were constructed by transduction with phage P1 grown on rho-120, delta(ilvGEDA), delta(ilvED), and ilvA538 hosts. The potential effects of these alleles that were previously postulated to affect ilvGEDA expression were assessed in vivo by monitoring beta-galactosidase production directed by ilv DNA fragments. Cloned ilv segments were also tested for activity in vitro with a DNA-directed coupled transcription and translation system. The production in vitro of ilv-directed ilv gene expression and beta-galactosidase expression with ara-ilv-lac fusions paralleled the in vivo activity. Images PMID:3917997

  5. Yeast Golden Gate (yGG) for the Efficient Assembly of S. cerevisiae Transcription Units.

    PubMed

    Agmon, Neta; Mitchell, Leslie A; Cai, Yizhi; Ikushima, Shigehito; Chuang, James; Zheng, Allen; Choi, Woo-Jin; Martin, J Andrew; Caravelli, Katrina; Stracquadanio, Giovanni; Boeke, Jef D

    2015-07-17

    We have adapted the Golden Gate DNA assembly method to the assembly of transcription units (TUs) for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in a method we call yeast Golden Gate (yGG). yGG allows for the easy assembly of TUs consisting of promoters (PRO), coding sequences (CDS), and terminators (TER). Carefully designed overhangs exposed by digestion with a type IIS restriction enzyme enable virtually seamless assembly of TUs that, in principle, contain all of the information necessary to express a gene of interest in yeast. We also describe a versatile set of yGG acceptor vectors to be used for TU assembly. These vectors can be used for low or high copy expression of assembled TUs or integration into carefully selected innocuous genomic loci. yGG provides synthetic biologists and yeast geneticists with an efficient new means by which to engineer S. cerevisiae.

  6. The primary transcription unit of the human alpha 2 globin gene defined by quantitative RT/PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Owczarek, C M; Enriquez-Harris, P; Proudfoot, N J

    1992-01-01

    We have set up an experimental system to map the primary transcription unit of the human alpha 2 globin gene. The duplicated human alpha globin genes (alpha 2-alpha 1) were linked to the alpha globin locus Positive Regulatory Element (PRE) and stably transfected into murine erythroleukaemia cells. We then developed a quantitative reverse transcriptase, polymerase chain reaction assay to map alpha 2 primary transcripts using primer pairs derived from different parts of the alpha 2 globin gene and its 3' flanking region. This approach has revealed the presence of steady state nuclear RNA past the poly(A) site of the alpha 2 globin gene at approximately 40% of the level of unspliced intron transcript. Furthermore, these 3' flanking transcripts diminish 500 bp into the 3' flanking region, identifying this part of the alpha 2 globin gene as the principal region of termination of transcription. Images PMID:1371868

  7. Short Synthetic Terminators for Assembly of Transcription Units in Vitro and Stable Chromosomal Integration in Yeast S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    MacPherson, Murray; Saka, Yasushi

    2017-01-20

    Assembly of synthetic genetic circuits is central to synthetic biology. Yeast S. cerevisiae, in particular, has proven to be an ideal chassis for synthetic genome assemblies by exploiting its efficient homologous recombination. However, this property of efficient homologous recombination poses a problem for multigene assemblies in yeast, since repeated usage of standard parts, such as transcriptional terminators, can lead to rearrangements of the repeats in assembled DNA constructs in vivo. To address this issue in developing a library of orthogonal genetic components for yeast, we designed a set of short synthetic terminators based on a consensus sequence with random linkers to avoid repetitive sequences. We constructed a series of expression vectors with these synthetic terminators for efficient assembly of synthetic genes using Gateway recombination reactions. We also constructed two BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) vectors for assembling multiple transcription units with the synthetic terminators in vitro and their integration in the yeast genome. The tandem array of synthetic genes integrated in the genome by this method is highly stable because there are few homologous segments in the synthetic constructs. Using this system of assembly and genomic integration of transcription units, we tested the synthetic terminators and their influence on the proximal transcription units. Although all the synthetic terminators have the common consensus with the identical length, they showed different activities and impacts on the neighboring transcription units.

  8. Life without post-transcriptional addition of G-1: two alternatives for tRNAHis identity in Eukarya.

    PubMed

    Rao, Bhalchandra S; Jackman, Jane E

    2015-02-01

    The identity of tRNA(His) is strongly associated with the presence of an additional 5'-guanosine residue (G-1) in all three domains of life. The critical nature of the G-1 residue is underscored by the fact that two entirely distinct mechanisms for its acquisition are observed, with cotranscriptional incorporation observed in Bacteria, while post-transcriptional addition of G-1 occurs in Eukarya. Here, through our investigation of eukaryotes that lack obvious homologs of the post-transcriptional G-1-addition enzyme Thg1, we identify alternative pathways to tRNA(His) identity that controvert these well-established rules. We demonstrate that Trypanosoma brucei, like Acanthamoeba castellanii, lacks the G-1 identity element on tRNA(His) and utilizes a noncanonical G-1-independent histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HisRS). Purified HisRS enzymes from A. castellanii and T. brucei exhibit a mechanism of tRNA(His) recognition that is distinct from canonical G-1-dependent synthetases. Moreover, noncanonical HisRS enzymes genetically complement the loss of THG1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, demonstrating the biological relevance of the G-1-independent aminoacylation activity. In contrast, in Caenorhabditis elegans, which is another Thg1-independent eukaryote, the G-1 residue is maintained, but here its acquisition is noncanonical. In this case, the G-1 is encoded and apparently retained after 5' end processing, which has so far only been observed in Bacteria and organelles. Collectively, these observations unearth a widespread and previously unappreciated diversity in eukaryotic tRNA(His) identity mechanisms.

  9. Three Additional Linkage Groups That Repress Transcription and Meiotic Recombination in the Mating-Type Region of Schizosaccharomyces Pombe

    PubMed Central

    Thon, G.; Cohen, A.; Klar, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    The mating-type genes of Schizosaccharomyces pombe are found at three locations in the same chromosomal region. These genes are in an active configuration at the mat1 locus and in an inactive configuration at the mat2 and mat3 loci. The mechanism that represses transcription of mat2 and mat3 also inactivates other promoters introduced nearby and is accompanied by a block to meiotic recombination in the mat2-mat3 interval, suggesting that this mechanism involves a particular chromatin structure. We present evidence that the transcription and recombination blocks require three newly defined trans-acting loci, clr2, clr3 and clr4, in addition to the previously identified clr1, rik1 and swi6 loci. We also investigated the role of mat2 cis-acting sequences in silencing. Four cis-acting elements that repress mat2 in a plasmid context were previously identified. Deletion of two of these elements proved to have little effect in a chromosomal context. However, when combined with mutations in trans-acting genes, deletion of the same two elements greatly enhanced mat2 expression. The observed cumulative effects suggest a redundancy in the silencing mechanism. PMID:8001791

  10. Additive effects of microRNAs and transcription factors on CCL2 production in human white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Kulyté, Agné; Belarbi, Yasmina; Lorente-Cebrián, Silvia; Bambace, Clara; Arner, Erik; Daub, Carsten O; Hedén, Per; Rydén, Mikael; Mejhert, Niklas; Arner, Peter

    2014-04-01

    Adipose tissue inflammation is present in insulin-resistant conditions. We recently proposed a network of microRNAs (miRNAs) and transcription factors (TFs) regulating the production of the proinflammatory chemokine (C-C motif) ligand-2 (CCL2) in adipose tissue. We presently extended and further validated this network and investigated if the circuits controlling CCL2 can interact in human adipocytes and macrophages. The updated subnetwork predicted that miR-126/-193b/-92a control CCL2 production by several TFs, including v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 1 (avian) (ETS1), MYC-associated factor X (MAX), and specificity protein 12 (SP1). This was confirmed in human adipocytes by the observation that gene silencing of ETS1, MAX, or SP1 attenuated CCL2 production. Combined gene silencing of ETS1 and MAX resulted in an additive reduction in CCL2 production. Moreover, overexpression of miR-126/-193b/-92a in different pairwise combinations reduced CCL2 secretion more efficiently than either miRNA alone. However, although effects on CCL2 secretion by co-overexpression of miR-92a/-193b and miR-92a/-126 were additive in adipocytes, the combination of miR-126/-193b was primarily additive in macrophages. Signals for miR-92a and -193b converged on the nuclear factor-κB pathway. In conclusion, TF and miRNA-mediated regulation of CCL2 production is additive and partly relayed by cell-specific networks in human adipose tissue that may be important for the development of insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes.

  11. Mechanics of additively manufactured porous biomaterials based on the rhombicuboctahedron unit cell.

    PubMed

    Hedayati, R; Sadighi, M; Mohammadi-Aghdam, M; Zadpoor, A A

    2016-01-01

    Thanks to recent developments in additive manufacturing techniques, it is now possible to fabricate porous biomaterials with arbitrarily complex micro-architectures. Micro-architectures of such biomaterials determine their physical and biological properties, meaning that one could potentially improve the performance of such biomaterials through rational design of micro-architecture. The relationship between the micro-architecture of porous biomaterials and their physical and biological properties has therefore received increasing attention recently. In this paper, we studied the mechanical properties of porous biomaterials made from a relatively unexplored unit cell, namely rhombicuboctahedron. We derived analytical relationships that relate the micro-architecture of such porous biomaterials, i.e. the dimensions of the rhombicuboctahedron unit cell, to their elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio, and yield stress. Finite element models were also developed to validate the analytical solutions. Analytical and numerical results were compared with experimental data from one of our recent studies. It was found that analytical solutions and numerical results show a very good agreement particularly for smaller values of apparent density. The elastic moduli predicted by analytical and numerical models were in very good agreement with experimental observations too. While in excellent agreement with each other, analytical and numerical models somewhat over-predicted the yield stress of the porous structures as compared to experimental data. As the ratio of the vertical struts to the inclined struts, α, approaches zero and infinity, the rhombicuboctahedron unit cell respectively approaches the octahedron (or truncated cube) and cube unit cells. For those limits, the analytical solutions presented here were found to approach the analytic solutions obtained for the octahedron, truncated cube, and cube unit cells, meaning that the presented solutions are generalizations of the

  12. Failure mechanisms of additively manufactured porous biomaterials: Effects of porosity and type of unit cell.

    PubMed

    Kadkhodapour, J; Montazerian, H; Darabi, A Ch; Anaraki, A P; Ahmadi, S M; Zadpoor, A A; Schmauder, S

    2015-10-01

    Since the advent of additive manufacturing techniques, regular porous biomaterials have emerged as promising candidates for tissue engineering scaffolds owing to their controllable pore architecture and feasibility in producing scaffolds from a variety of biomaterials. The architecture of scaffolds could be designed to achieve similar mechanical properties as in the host bone tissue, thereby avoiding issues such as stress shielding in bone replacement procedure. In this paper, the deformation and failure mechanisms of porous titanium (Ti6Al4V) biomaterials manufactured by selective laser melting from two different types of repeating unit cells, namely cubic and diamond lattice structures, with four different porosities are studied. The mechanical behavior of the above-mentioned porous biomaterials was studied using finite element models. The computational results were compared with the experimental findings from a previous study of ours. The Johnson-Cook plasticity and damage model was implemented in the finite element models to simulate the failure of the additively manufactured scaffolds under compression. The computationally predicted stress-strain curves were compared with the experimental ones. The computational models incorporating the Johnson-Cook damage model could predict the plateau stress and maximum stress at the first peak with less than 18% error. Moreover, the computationally predicted deformation modes were in good agreement with the results of scaling law analysis. A layer-by-layer failure mechanism was found for the stretch-dominated structures, i.e. structures made from the cubic unit cell, while the failure of the bending-dominated structures, i.e. structures made from the diamond unit cells, was accompanied by the shearing bands of 45°.

  13. Weapons of the Spirit, Transcript of the Feature Documentary. Bill Moyers Interviews Filmmaker Pierre Sauvage, Transcript of the P. B. S. Broadcast, and Additional Background Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauvage, Pierre

    This documentary tells the wartime story of Le Chambon, a tiny Protestant village in France that defied the Nazi occupation and provided a safe haven for thousands of Jews. Using interviews, old photographs and footage, and specially declassified documents, the film [and transcript] examine the difference between being a bystander and a…

  14. Structured additive distributional regression for analysing landings per unit effort in fisheries research.

    PubMed

    Mamouridis, Valeria; Klein, Nadja; Kneib, Thomas; Cadarso Suarez, Carmen; Maynou, Francesc

    2017-01-01

    We analysed the landings per unit effort (LPUE) from the Barcelona trawl fleet targeting the red shrimp (Aristeus antennatus) using novel Bayesian structured additive distributional regression to gain a better understanding of the dynamics and determinants of variation in LPUE. The data set, covering a time span of 17 years, includes fleet-dependent variables (e.g. the number of trips performed by vessels), temporal variables (inter- and intra-annual variability) and environmental variables (the North Atlantic Oscillation index). Based on structured additive distributional regression, we evaluate (i) the gain in replacing purely linear predictors by additive predictors including nonlinear effects of continuous covariates, (ii) the inclusion of vessel-specific effects based on either fixed or random effects, (iii) different types of distributions for the response, and (iv) the potential gain in not only modelling the location but also the scale/shape parameter of these distributions. Our findings support that flexible model variants are indeed able to improve the fit considerably and that additional insights can be gained. Tools to select within several model specifications and assumptions are discussed in detail as well.

  15. Comparison of transcriptional responses to osmotic stresses induced by NaCl and sorbitol additions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Hirasawa, Takashi; Ashitani, Kengo; Yoshikawa, Katsunori; Nagahisa, Keisuke; Furusawa, Chikara; Katakura, Yoshio; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Shioya, Suteaki

    2006-12-01

    Transcriptional responses of laboratory and brewing strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to osmotic stresses induced by adding either NaCl or sorbitol to their cultures were compared by clustering DNA microarray data. Our results suggest that the difference in the transcriptional responses of the two strains between NaCl and sorbitol additions is small when the dynamics of the total change in gene expression are similar.

  16. The chloroplast atpA gene cluster in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Functional analysis of a polycistronic transcription unit.

    PubMed

    Drapier, D; Suzuki, H; Levy, H; Rimbault, B; Kindle, K L; Stern, D B; Wollman, F A

    1998-06-01

    Most chloroplast genes in vascular plants are organized into polycistronic transcription units, which generate a complex pattern of mono-, di-, and polycistronic transcripts. In contrast, most Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast transcripts characterized to date have been monocistronic. This paper describes the atpA gene cluster in the C. reinhardtii chloroplast genome, which includes the atpA, psbI, cemA, and atpH genes, encoding the alpha-subunit of the coupling-factor-1 (CF1) ATP synthase, a small photosystem II polypeptide, a chloroplast envelope membrane protein, and subunit III of the CF0 ATP synthase, respectively. We show that promoters precede the atpA, psbI, and atpH genes, but not the cemA gene, and that cemA mRNA is present only as part of di-, tri-, or tetracistronic transcripts. Deletions introduced into the gene cluster reveal, first, that CF1-alpha can be translated from di- or polycistronic transcripts, and, second, that substantial reductions in mRNA quantity have minimal effects on protein synthesis rates. We suggest that posttranscriptional mRNA processing is common in C. reinhardtii chloroplasts, permitting the expression of multiple genes from a single promoter.

  17. Alternative poly(A) site selection in complex transcription units: means to an end?

    PubMed Central

    Edwalds-Gilbert, G; Veraldi, K L; Milcarek, C

    1997-01-01

    Many genes have been described and characterized which result in alternative polyadenylation site use at the 3'-end of their mRNAs based on the cellular environment. In this survey and summary article 95 genes are discussed in which alternative polyadenylation is a consequence of tandem arrays of poly(A) signals within a single 3'-untranslated region. An additional 31 genes are described in which polyadenylation at a promoter-proximal site competes with a splicing reaction to influence expression of multiple mRNAs. Some have a composite internal/terminal exon which can be differentially processed. Others contain alternative 3'-terminal exons, the first of which can be skipped in some cells. In some cases the mRNAs formed from these three classes of genes are differentially processed from the primary transcript during the cell cycle or in a tissue-specific or developmentally specific pattern. Immunoglobulin heavy chain genes have composite exons; regulated production of two different Ig mRNAs has been shown to involve B cell stage-specific changes in trans -acting factors involved in formation of the active polyadenylation complex. Changes in the activity of some of these same factors occur during viral infection and take-over of the cellular machinery, suggesting the potential applicability of at least some aspects of the Ig model. The differential expression of a number of genes that undergo alternative poly(A) site choice or polyadenylation/splicing competition could be regulated at the level of amounts and activities of either generic or tissue-specific polyadenylation factors and/or splicing factors. PMID:9185563

  18. Monoclonal antibodies that recognize transcription unit proteins on newt lampbrush chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    We prepared hybridoma cell lines from mice injected with newt germinal vesicle proteins. We tested culture supernates from these cell lines for antibodies that bound to specific morphological structures in lampbrush chromosome preparations (nucleoli, loops, chromomeres, etc.). Four mAbs that recognize antigens on the lateral transcription loops are described here. We suggest that these antigens are proteins associated with nascent RNA transcripts, although they are not among the 30-40-kD "core" heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins. PMID:3308902

  19. Novel deletion mutants that enhance a distant upstream 5' splice in the E3 transcription unit of adenovirus 2.

    PubMed Central

    Deutscher, S L; Bhat, B M; Pursley, M H; Cladaras, C; Wold, W S

    1985-01-01

    Region E3 of adenovirus is a "complex" transcription unit: i.e. different mRNAs and proteins arise by differential RNA 3' end selection and differential splicing of the primary transcript. We are using viable virus mutants to understand the controls that dictate the specificity and efficiency of the RNA processing signals. We describe a novel class of deletion mutations that enhance a natural 5' splice site located approximately 740 nucleotides (nt) upstream. In particular, deletions within nt 1691-2044 in the E3 transcription unit result in a 5-fold enhancement of the 5' splice site at nt 951 (as reflected in steady-state mRNA). The effect is specific, because the deletions do not affect the 5' splice site at nt 372, and because deletions within nt 2044-2214 do not affect either the 951 or the 372 5' splice sites. As a consequence of the enhanced splicing at the 951 5' site, synthesis of the major E3 mRNA and the major E3 protein (gp19K) are dramatically reduced. At least one of the natural 3' splice sites, located at nt 2157, is the recipient of the enhanced splicing at the 951 5' splice site. We conclude that sequences located within nt 1691-2044 affect (probably in cis) splicing at the 951 5' splice site. We speculate that nt 1691-2044 includes a splicing control region which functions to suppress splicing at the 951 5' splice site. Images PMID:2412208

  20. 40 CFR 60.5423 - What additional recordkeeping and reporting requirements apply to my sweetening unit affected...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reporting requirements apply to my sweetening unit affected facilities at onshore natural gas processing... Oil and Natural Gas Production, Transmission and Distribution § 60.5423 What additional recordkeeping and reporting requirements apply to my sweetening unit affected facilities at onshore natural...

  1. 40 CFR 60.5423 - What additional recordkeeping and reporting requirements apply to my sweetening unit affected...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reporting requirements apply to my sweetening unit affected facilities at onshore natural gas processing... Oil and Natural Gas Production, Transmission and Distribution § 60.5423 What additional recordkeeping and reporting requirements apply to my sweetening unit affected facilities at onshore natural...

  2. An Additional Regulatory Gene for Actinorhodin Production in Streptomyces lividans Involves a LysR-Type Transcriptional Regulator

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Costa, Oscar H.; Martín-Triana, Angel J.; Martínez, Eduardo; Fernández-Moreno, Miguel A.; Malpartida, Francisco

    1999-01-01

    The sequence of a 4.8-kbp DNA fragment adjacent to the right-hand end of the actinorhodin biosynthetic (act) cluster downstream of actVB-orf6 from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) reveals six complete open reading frames, named orf7 to orf12. The deduced amino acid sequences from orf7, orf10, and orf11 show significant similarities with the following products in the databases: a putative protein from the S. coelicolor SCP3 plasmid, LysR-type transcriptional regulators, and proteins belonging to the family of short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases, respectively. The deduced product of orf8 reveals low similarities with several methyltransferases from different sources, while orf9 and orf12 products show no similarities with other known proteins. Disruptions of orf10 and orf11 genes in S. coelicolor appear to have no significant effect on the production of actinorhodin. Nevertheless, disruption or deletion of orf10 in Streptomyces lividans causes actinorhodin overproduction. The introduction of extra copies of orf10 and orf11 genes in an S. coelicolor actIII mutant restores the ability to produce actinorhodin. Transcriptional analysis and DNA footprinting indicate that Orf10 represses its own transcription and regulates orf11 transcription, expression of which might require the presence of an unknown inducer. No DNA target for Orf10 protein was found within the act cluster. PMID:10400594

  3. A precise termination site in the mouse beta major-globin transcription unit.

    PubMed Central

    Salditt-Georgieff, M; Darnell, J E

    1983-01-01

    Nascent labeled RNA from induced, globin-producing mouse erythroleukemia cells was hybridized to cloned regions of the beta major-globin gene. Transcription ceases about 1,000 bases downstream from the poly(A) site as indicated by protection from nuclease digestion of a discrete-sized RNA fragment that it shorter than the protecting cloned DNA fragment. This defines an apparently unique termination site for a protein-coding gene that is transcribed by RNA polymerase II. Images PMID:6192441

  4. Stages in Constructing and Coordinating Units Additively and Multiplicatively (Part 1)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulrich, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    This is the first of a two-part article that presents a theory of unit construction and coordination that underlies radical constructivist empirical studies of student learning ranging from young students' counting strategies to high school students' algebraic reasoning. My explanation starts with the formation of arithmetical units, which presage…

  5. Stages in Constructing and Coordinating Units Additively and Multiplicatively (Part 2)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulrich, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    This is the second of a two-part article that presents a theory of unit construction and coordination that underlies radical constructivist empirical studies of student learning ranging from young students' counting strategies to high school students' algebraic reasoning. In Part I, I discussed the formation of arithmetical units and composite…

  6. ATTAAA as well as downstream sequences are required for RNA 3'-end formation in the E3 complex transcription unit of adenovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, B M; Wold, W S

    1985-01-01

    We mapped the location of the E3A RNA 3' end site in the E3 transcription unit of adenovirus 2. The procedure used was nuclease-gel analysis with 32P-labeled RNA probes. The poly(A) addition sites were microheterogeneous and were located approximately 17 to 29 nucleotides downstream from an ATTAAA sequence. To identify the sequences that make up the E3A RNA 3' end signal, we constructed five viable virus mutants with deletions in or near the E3A RNA 3' end site. The mutants were analyzed for E3A RNA 3' end formation in vivo. No effect was observed from a 47-base-pair (bp) deletion (dl716) or a 72-bp deletion (dl714) located 22 and 19 nucleotides, respectively, upstream of the ATTAAA. In contrast, E3A RNA 3' end formation was abolished by a 554-bp deletion (dl708) that removes both the ATTAAA and the poly(A) addition sites, a 124-bp deletion (dl713) that removes the ATTAAA but leaves the poly(A) addition sites, and a 65-bp deletion (dl719) that leaves the ATTAAA but removes the poly(A) addition sites. These results indicate that the ATTAAA, as well as downstream sequences, including the poly(A) addition sites, are required for E3A RNA 3' end formation. Images PMID:3018506

  7. High atomic weight, high-energy radiation (HZE) induces transcriptional responses shared with conventional stresses in addition to a core "DSB" response specific to clastogenic treatments.

    PubMed

    Missirian, Victor; Conklin, Phillip A; Culligan, Kevin M; Huefner, Neil D; Britt, Anne B

    2014-01-01

    Plants exhibit a robust transcriptional response to gamma radiation which includes the induction of transcripts required for homologous recombination and the suppression of transcripts that promote cell cycle progression. Various DNA damaging agents induce different spectra of DNA damage as well as "collateral" damage to other cellular components and therefore are not expected to provoke identical responses by the cell. Here we study the effects of two different types of ionizing radiation (IR) treatment, HZE (1 GeV Fe(26+) high mass, high charge, and high energy relativistic particles) and gamma photons, on the transcriptome of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. Both types of IR induce small clusters of radicals that can result in the formation of double strand breaks (DSBs), but HZE also produces linear arrays of extremely clustered damage. We performed these experiments across a range of time points (1.5-24 h after irradiation) in both wild-type plants and in mutants defective in the DSB-sensing protein kinase ATM. The two types of IR exhibit a shared double strand break-repair-related damage response, although they differ slightly in the timing, degree, and ATM-dependence of the response. The ATM-dependent, DNA metabolism-related transcripts of the "DSB response" were also induced by other DNA damaging agents, but were not induced by conventional stresses. Both Gamma and HZE irradiation induced, at 24 h post-irradiation, ATM-dependent transcripts associated with a variety of conventional stresses; these were overrepresented for pathogen response, rather than DNA metabolism. In contrast, only HZE-irradiated plants, at 1.5 h after irradiation, exhibited an additional and very extensive transcriptional response, shared with plants experiencing "extended night." This response was not apparent in gamma-irradiated plants.

  8. 77 FR 2492 - United States Pharmacopeial Convention; Filing of Food Additive Petition; Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-18

    ... Pharmacopeial Convention; Filing of Food Additive Petition; Amendment AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... for a food additive petition filed by the U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention requesting that the food additive regulations that incorporate by reference food-grade specifications from prior editions of...

  9. Comparison of Automated Quantitative Reverse Transcription-PCR and Direct Fluorescent-Antibody Detection for Routine Rabies Diagnosis in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Dupuis, Michelle; Brunt, Scott; Appler, Kim; Rudd, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Rabies virus found worldwide and prevalent throughout the United States continues to be a public health concern. Direct-fluorescent antibody (DFA) detection remains the gold standard for rabies virus diagnostics. Assessing the utility of a high-throughput molecular platform such as the QIAsymphony SP/AS, in conjunction with quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR), to augment or potentially replace the DFA test, was the focus of this project. Here we describe a triplex qRT-PCR assay, including assembly and evaluation for sensitivity, specificity, and ability to detect variants. Additionally, we compared the qRT-PCR assay to the gold standard direct fluorescent-antibody test. More than 1,000 specimens submitted for routine rabies diagnosis were tested to directly compare the two methods. All results were in agreement between the two methods, with one additional specimen detected by qRT-PCR below the limits of the DFA sensitivity. With the proper continued validation for variant detection, molecular methods have a place in routine rabies diagnostics within the United States. PMID:26179300

  10. Additive estrogenic effects of mixtures of frequently used UV filters on pS2-gene transcription in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Heneweer, Marjoke; Muusse, Martine; van den Berg, Martin; Sanderson, J Thomas

    2005-10-15

    In order to protect consumers from ultraviolet (UV) radiation and enhance light stability of the product, three to eight UV filters are usually added to consumer sunscreen products. High lipophilicity of the UV filters has been shown to cause bioaccumulation in fish and humans, leading to environmental levels of UV filters that are similar to those of PCBs and DDT. In this paper, estrogen-regulated pS2 gene transcription in the human mammary tumor cell line MCF-7 was used as a measure of estrogenicity of four individual UV filters. Since humans are exposed to more than one UV filter at a time, an equipotent binary mixture of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxy-benzophenone (BP-3) and its metabolite 2,4-dihydroxy benzophenone (BP-1), as well as an equipotent multi-component mixture of BP-1, BP-3, octyl methoxy cinnamate (OMC) and 3-(4-methylbenzylidene) camphor (4-MBC), were also evaluated for their ability to induce pS2 gene transcription in order to examine additivity. An estrogen receptor-mediated mechanism of action was expected for all UV filters. Therefore, our null-hypothesis was that combined estrogenic responses, measured as increased pS2 gene transcription in MCF-7 cells after exposure to mixtures of UV filters, are additive, according to a concentration-addition model. Not all UV filters produced a full concentration-response curve within the concentration range tested (100 nM-1 microM). Therefore, instead of using EC50 values for comparison, the concentration at which each compound caused a 50% increase of basal pS2 gene transcription was defined as the C50 value for that compound and used to calculate relative potencies. For comparison, the EC50 value of a compound is the concentration at which the compound elicits an effect that is 50% of its maximal effect. Individual UV filters increased pS2 gene transcription concentration-dependently with C50 values of 0.12 microM, 0.5 microM, 1.9 microM, and 1.0 microM for BP-1, BP-3, 4-MBC and OMC, respectively. Estradiol (E2

  11. Additive estrogenic effects of mixtures of frequently used UV filters on pS2-gene transcription in MCF-7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Heneweer, Marjoke . E-mail: M.Heneweer@iras.uu.nl; Muusse, Martine; Berg, Martin van den; Sanderson, J. Thomas

    2005-10-15

    In order to protect consumers from ultraviolet (UV) radiation and enhance light stability of the product, three to eight UV filters are usually added to consumer sunscreen products. High lipophilicity of the UV filters has been shown to cause bioaccumulation in fish and humans, leading to environmental levels of UV filters that are similar to those of PCBs and DDT. In this paper, estrogen-regulated pS2 gene transcription in the human mammary tumor cell line MCF-7 was used as a measure of estrogenicity of four individual UV filters. Since humans are exposed to more than one UV filter at a time, an equipotent binary mixture of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxy-benzophenone (BP-3) and its metabolite 2,4-dihydroxy benzophenone (BP-1), as well as an equipotent multi-component mixture of BP-1, BP-3, octyl methoxy cinnamate (OMC) and 3-(4-methylbenzylidene) camphor (4-MBC), were also evaluated for their ability to induce pS2 gene transcription in order to examine additivity. An estrogen receptor-mediated mechanism of action was expected for all UV filters. Therefore, our null-hypothesis was that combined estrogenic responses, measured as increased pS2 gene transcription in MCF-7 cells after exposure to mixtures of UV filters, are additive, according to a concentration-addition model. Not all UV filters produced a full concentration-response curve within the concentration range tested (100 nM-1 {mu}M). Therefore, instead of using EC{sub 50} values for comparison, the concentration at which each compound caused a 50% increase of basal pS2 gene transcription was defined as the C50 value for that compound and used to calculate relative potencies. For comparison, the EC{sub 50} value of a compound is the concentration at which the compound elicits an effect that is 50% of its maximal effect. Individual UV filters increased pS2 gene transcription concentration-dependently with C50 values of 0.12 {mu}M, 0.5 {mu}M, 1.9 {mu}M, and 1.0 {mu}M for BP-1, BP-3, 4-MBC and OMC, respectively. Estradiol

  12. Differential Use of Signal Peptides and Membrane Domains Is a Common Occurrence in the Protein Output of Transcriptional Units

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Melissa J; Hanson, Kelly A; Clark, Francis; Fink, J. Lynn; Zhang, Fasheng; Kasukawa, Takeya; Kai, Chikatoshi; Kawai, Jun; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Teasdale, Rohan D

    2006-01-01

    Membrane organization describes the orientation of a protein with respect to the membrane and can be determined by the presence, or absence, and organization within the protein sequence of two features: endoplasmic reticulum signal peptides and alpha-helical transmembrane domains. These features allow protein sequences to be classified into one of five membrane organization categories: soluble intracellular proteins, soluble secreted proteins, type I membrane proteins, type II membrane proteins, and multi-spanning membrane proteins. Generation of protein isoforms with variable membrane organizations can change a protein's subcellular localization or association with the membrane. Application of MemO, a membrane organization annotation pipeline, to the FANTOM3 Isoform Protein Sequence mouse protein set revealed that within the 8,032 transcriptional units (TUs) with multiple protein isoforms, 573 had variation in their use of signal peptides, 1,527 had variation in their use of transmembrane domains, and 615 generated protein isoforms from distinct membrane organization classes. The mechanisms underlying these transcript variations were analyzed. While TUs were identified encoding all pairwise combinations of membrane organization categories, the most common was conversion of membrane proteins to soluble proteins. Observed within our high-confidence set were 156 TUs predicted to generate both extracellular soluble and membrane proteins, and 217 TUs generating both intracellular soluble and membrane proteins. The differential use of endoplasmic reticulum signal peptides and transmembrane domains is a common occurrence within the variable protein output of TUs. The generation of protein isoforms that are targeted to multiple subcellular locations represents a major functional consequence of transcript variation within the mouse transcriptome. PMID:16683029

  13. A potential Z-DNA-forming sequence is located between two transcription units alternatively expressed during development of Drosophila hydei.

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Ruiz, A; Requena, J M; Lopez, M C; Alonso, C

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that Z-DNA exists in vivo in Escherichia coli as well as in Drosophila and mammalian cells. In the present paper, we show the existence in vivo of Z-DNA epitopes in the developmentally regulated subregion 4-75C of polytene chromosomes in Drosophila hydei. The Z-DNA epitopes were detected in subdivision C2 only during late third instar when the transcriptional activity of the locus was high. Accumulation of nonhistone chromosomal proteins in that locus was also detected during late third instar only at the time of the Z-DNA formation. Northern blot data and nucleotide sequence analysis indicated that the Z-DNA-forming sequence is located between two transcription units whose expression is regulated during the third instar. Our results suggest that in subdivision 4-75C2 a B- to Z-DNA flux occurs at a specific time during late third instar and that this flux may play a negative as well as a positive role in gene expression. Images PMID:1840694

  14. The MES-1 murine enhancer element is closely associated with the heterogeneous 5' ends of two divergent transcription units.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, T J; Fried, M

    1986-01-01

    The location in the mouse genome of the 149-base pair MES-1 element, previously isolated by its ability to restore expression to an enhancerless selectable gene, was analyzed. The active moiety of the single-copy MES-1 element is located between the 5' ends of two divergent transcription units, SURF-1 and SURF-2, both of which specify more than one mRNA species by differential splicing. The heterogeneous 5' ends of the SURF transcripts are separated by only 50 to 75 base pairs, and this sequence possesses a high G + C content (65%) and contains neither the TATA and CAAT box motifs normally associated with many highly expressed genes nor the GC box motif (Sp1-binding site) associated with a number of housekeeping genes. Although MES-1 appears to have enhancerlike properties when linked to heterologous genes, its normal genomic location suggests that it functions as a bidirectional promoter. Thus, MES-1 may represent a new class of enhancer-promoter element. Images PMID:3025660

  15. Structure, organization, and transcription units of the human {alpha}-platelet-derived growth factor receptor gene, PDGFRA

    SciTech Connect

    Kawagishi, Jun; Yamamoto, Tokuo; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Yoshimoto, Takashi

    1995-11-20

    Isolation and characterization of genomic clones encoding human {alpha}-platelet derived growth factor receptor (HGAM-approved symbol PDGFRA) revealed that the gene spans approximately 65 kb and contains 23 exons. The 5{prime}-untranslated region of the mRNA is encoded by exon 1, and a large intron of 23 kb separates exon 2 encoding the translation initiator codon AUG and the signal sequence. The locations of exon/intron boundaries in the extracellular immunoglobulin-like domains, the transmembrane domain, the two cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase domains, and the kinase insertion domain are very similar to those in c-kit and macrophage colony stimulating factor-1 receptor genes. The transcription start site was mapped to a position 393 bp upstream of the AUG translation initiator codon by Si mapping and primer extension analysis. The 5{prime}-flanking region of the gene lacks a typical TATA box but contains a typical CCAAT box and GATA motifs. This region also contains potential sites for AP-1, AP-2, Oct-1, Oct-2, and Sp1. The 5{prime}-flanking region of the gene was fused to the luciferase reporter gene, and transcription units of the gene were determined. 49 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Bovine herpesvirus 1 productive infection and immediate early transcription unit 1 promoter are stimulated by the synthetic corticosteroid dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Kook, Insun; Henley, Caitlin; Meyer, Florencia; Hoffmann, Federico G; Jones, Clinton

    2015-10-01

    The primary site for life-long latency of bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) is sensory neurons. The synthetic corticosteroid dexamethasone consistently induces reactivation from latency; however the mechanism by which corticosteroids mediate reactivation is unclear. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that dexamethasone stimulates productive infection, in part, because the BHV-1 genome contains more than 100 potential glucocorticoid receptor (GR) response elements (GREs). Immediate early transcription unit 1 (IEtu1) promoter activity, but not IEtu2 or VP16 promoter activity, was stimulated by dexamethasone. Two near perfect consensus GREs located within the IEtu1 promoter were necessary for dexamethasone-mediated stimulation. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that the GR interacts with IEtu1 promoter sequences containing the GREs. Although we hypothesize that DEX-mediated stimulation of IEtu1 promoter activity is important during productive infection and perhaps reactivation from latency, stress likely has pleiotropic effects on virus-infected cells.

  17. Recent trends in the use of food additives in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Saltmarsh, Mike

    2015-03-15

    The E number system for food additives was introduced in the 1960s and the E was intended to reassure consumers that permitted additives were safe. In the 1980s full ingredient declarations had to be provided on food products for the first time and manufacturers were permitted to use either the name or the number of the additive on the ingredient list. This paper outlines some of the trends in the sourcing, use and labelling of additives since the introduction of full ingredient listing. Generally, sourcing has become more global with a large number of suppliers being based in China. From an initial use of E numbers in ingredient lists, manufacturers are increasingly using the names of additives. This trend is being extended to avoid the use of anything the consumer might consider an additive, particularly in connection with colours and preservatives. Specifically, the colours used in the Southampton study on the impact of food colours on hyperactivity in children have largely been replaced by colouring foodstuffs, and the preservative used in the study, sodium benzoate, has been replaced by potassium sorbate in the majority of soft drinks.

  18. Implications of Export/Import Reporting Requirements in the United States - International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Additional Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Killinger, Mark H.; Benjamin, Eugene L.; McNair, Gary W.

    2001-02-20

    The United States has signed but not ratified the US/IAEA Safeguards Additional Protocol. If ratified, the Additional Protocol will require the US to report to the IAEA certain nuclear-related exports and imports to the IAEA. This document identifies and assesses the issues associated with the US making those reports. For example, some regulatory changes appear to be necessary. The document also attempts to predict the impact on the DOE Complex by assessing the historical flow of exports and imports that would be reportable if the Additional Protocol were in force.

  19. Evidence for an additional uppermost geological unit in the Medusae Fossae Formation, Equatorial Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Samantha; Balme, Matt; Hagermann, Axel

    2013-04-01

    The Medusae Fossae Formation (MFF) is a geological formation comprising three geological units (members) spread across five principal outcrops. The MFF dominates roughly a quarter of the longitudinal extent of the equatorial region of Mars, extending east-west across a distance of ~ 5,500 km between the southern Elysium Planitia and the Tharsis region. The nature of these materials is often referred to as enigmatic, as their exact origin remains unknown. Harrison et al. (Icarus, 2010) presented new observations of outlying occurrences of MFF materials on the southern highlands, atop the dichotomy boundary. They presented two hypotheses to explain these observation: 1) the MFF had a much larger pre-erosional extent than previously thought or 2) these materials had initially been eroded from the main outcrops of the formation, then transported southward by wind and subsequently reworked. A subsequent extension of this work provided evidence for an even larger extent of outlying MFF materials, particularly around and south of the easternmost portions of the MFF. Here we present these new outlier data, together with new textural classification and facies mapping of this region of the MFF. These data show that MFF outlier textures, whilst external to the main MFF outcrops in many places, are also found superposing large areas of the "main" MFF formations. These data support the first of the two working hypotheses presented, but also suggest that these so-called outlying materials represent a previously unmapped, stratigraphically uppermost unit of the Medusae Fossae Formation. We also suggest that, based upon our own morphometric study of yardangs across members and analogue studies by de Silva et al. (Icarus, 2010), these represent a less indurated material than other units of the formation. In the overall context of the origins of the MFF, we find that our data are consistent with the Medusae Fossae materials being a large-scale ignimbrite complex, perhaps with

  20. Control features within the rplJL-rpoBC transcription unit of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Barry, G; Squires, C L; Squires, C

    1979-10-01

    Gene fusions constructed in vitro have been used to examine transcription regulatory signals from the operon which encodes ribosomal proteins L10 and L7/12 and the RNA polymerase beta and beta' subunits (the rplJL-rpoBC operon). Portions of this operon, which were obtained by in vitro deletions, have been placed between the ara promoter and the lacZ gene in the gene-fusion plasmid pMC81 developed by M. Casadaban and S. Cohen. The effect of the inserted DNA segment on the expression of the lacZ gene (in the presence and absence of arabinose) permits the localization of regulatory signals to discrete regions of the rplJL-rpoBC operon. An element that reduces the level of distal gene expression to one-sixth is located on a fragment which spans the rplL-rpoB intercistronic region. This strongly supports the idea that there is an attenuator in this region. The terminator for the operon is located on a fragment which spans the 3' end of the rpoC gene. The major promoter for the operon precedes the rplJ gene [Yamamoto, M. & Nomura, M. (1978) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 75, 3891-3895 and Linn, T. & Scaife, J. (1978) Nature (London) 276, 33-37] and was not examined in this study. However, a weak promoter is observed on the fragment that spans the rplJ-rplL intercistronic region. Other regions of the operon may also contain weak promoters. The contribution of these elements to the regulation of this complex operon is discussed.

  1. Non-additive interactions involving two distinct elements mediate sloppy-paired regulation by pair-rule transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Prazak, Lisa; Fujioka, Miki; Gergen, J. Peter

    2010-01-01

    The relatively simple combinatorial rules responsible for establishing the initial metameric expression of sloppy-paired-1 (slp1) in the Drosophila blastoderm embryo make this system an attractive model for investigating the mechanism of regulation by pair rule transcription factors. This investigation of slp1 cis-regulatory architecture identifies two distinct elements, a proximal early stripe element (PESE) and a distal early stripe element (DESE) located from −3.1 kb to −2.5 kb and from −8.1 kb to −7.1 kb upstream of the slp1 promoter, respectively, that mediate this early regulation. The proximal element expresses only even-numbered stripes and mediates repression by Even-skipped (Eve) as well as by the combination of Runt and Fushi-tarazu (Ftz). A 272 basepair sub-element of PESE retains Eve-dependent repression, but is expressed throughout the even-numbered parasegments due to the loss of repression by Runt and Ftz. In contrast, the distal element expresses both odd and even-numbered stripes and also drives inappropriate expression in the anterior half of the odd-numbered parasegments due to an inability to respond to repression by Eve. Importantly, a composite reporter gene containing both early stripe elements recapitulates pair-rule gene-dependent regulation in a manner beyond what is expected from combining their individual patterns. These results indicate interactions involving distinct cis-elements contribute to the proper integration of pair-rule regulatory information. A model fully accounting for these results proposes that metameric slp1 expression is achieved through the Runt-dependent regulation of interactions between these two pair-rule response elements and the slp1 promoter. PMID:20435028

  2. A Delphi Study of Additive Manufacturing Applicability for United States Air Force Civil Engineer Contingency Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    This simple process is the basis for most consumer-grade desktop AM machines, commonly known as 3D printers (Pham & Gault, 1998:1270). Material...as a single purchase to decrease initial capital costs. Once the 3D printers are purchased and delivered, the selected bases can begin training...for several Questions if you would liKe to explain or elaborate on your answers. Additional information •out 3D printers and UTCs is provided as an

  3. The human myelin basic protein gene is included within a 179-kilobase transcription unit: Expression in the immune and central nervous systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pribyl, T.M.; Campagnoni, C.W.; Kampf, K.; Kashima, T.; Handley, V.W.; Campagnoni, A.T. ); McMahon, J. )

    1993-11-15

    Two human Golli (for gene expressed in the oligodendrocyte lineage)-MBP (for myelin basic protein) cDNAs have been isolated from a human oligodendroglioma cell line. Analysis of these cDNAs has enabled the authors to determine the entire structure of the human Golli-MBP gene. The Golli-MBP gene, which encompasses the MBP transcription unit, is [approx] 179 kb in length and consists of 10 exons, seven of which constitute the MBP gene. The human Golli-MBP gene contains two transcription start sites, each of which gives rise to a family of alternatively spliced transcipts. At least two Golli-MBP transcripts, containing the first three exons of the gene and one or more MBP exons, are produced from the first transcription start site. The second family of transcripts contains only MBP exons and produces the well-known MBPs. In humans, RNA blot analysis revealed that Golli-MBP transcripts were expressed in fetal thymus, spleen, and human B-cell and macrophage cell lines, as well as in fetal spinal cord. These findings clearly link the expression of exons encoding the autoimmunogen/encephalitogen MBP in the central nervous system to cells and tissues of the immune system through normal expression of the Golli-MBP gene. They also establish that this genetic locus, which includes the MBP gene, is conserved among species, providing further evidence that the MBP transcription unit is an integral part of the Golli transcription unit and suggest that this structural arrangement is important for the genetic function and/or regulation of these genes.

  4. Assessment of the climate commitments and additional mitigation policies of the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenblatt, Jeffery B.; Wei, Max

    2016-12-01

    Current intended nationally determined contributions (INDCs) are insufficient to meet the Paris Agreement goal of limiting temperature change to between 1.5 and 2.0 °C above pre-industrial levels, so the effectiveness of existing INDCs will be crucial to further progress. Here we assess the likely range of US greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in 2025 and whether the US’s INDC can be met, on the basis of updated historical and projected estimates. We group US INDC policies into three categories reflecting potential future policies, and model 17 policies across these categories. With all modelled policies included, the upper end of the uncertainty range overlaps with the 2025 INDC target, but the required reductions are not achieved using reference values. Even if all modelled policies are implemented, additional GHG reduction is probably required; we discuss several potential policies.

  5. Multi-unit floating alginate system: effect of additives on ciprofloxacin release.

    PubMed

    Srinatha, A; Pandit, Jayanta K

    2008-09-01

    In an attempt to fabricate floating beads of ciprofloxacin, drugloaded alginate beads were prepared by simultaneous external and internal gelation. The effect of blending of alginate with gellan, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, starch, and chitosan on the bead properties were evaluated. Beads were spherical with incorporation efficiency in the range of 52.81 +/- 2.64 to 78.95 +/- 1.92%. Beads exhibited buoyancy over a period of 7-24 hr based on the formulation variables. In vitro release of ciprofloxacin from the alginate beads in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) (0.1 N HCl, pH 1.2), was influenced significantly (p < 0.001) by the properties and concentration of additives. Among the polymers incorporated into alginate beads. Hydroxy propyl methylcellulose (HPMC) provided an extended release over 7 hr. The drug release predominately followed Higuchi's square root model.

  6. Addition and correction: the NF-kappa B-like DNA binding activity observed in Dictyostelium nuclear extracts is due to the GBF transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Traincard, F; Ponte, E; Pun, J; Coukell, B; Veron, M

    2001-10-01

    We have previously reported that a NF-kappa B transduction pathway was likely to be present in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. This conclusion was based on several observations, including the detection of developmentally regulated DNA binding proteins in Dictyostelium nuclear extracts that bound to bona fide kappa B sequences. We have now performed additional experiments which demonstrate that the protein responsible for this NF-kappa B-like DNA binding activity is the Dictyostelium GBF (G box regulatory element binding factor) transcription factor. This result, along with the fact that no sequence with significant similarity to components of the mammalian NF-kappa B pathway can be found in Dictyostelium genome, now almost entirely sequenced, led us to reconsider our previous conclusion on the occurrence of a NF-kappa B signal transduction pathway in Dictyostelium.

  7. A historical review of additives and modifiers used in paving asphalt refining processes in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mundt, Diane J; Adams, Robert C; Marano, Kristin M

    2009-11-01

    The U.S. asphalt paving industry has evolved over time to meet various performance specifications for liquid petroleum asphalt binder (known as bitumen outside the United States). Additives to liquid petroleum asphalt produced in the refinery may affect exposures to workers in the hot mix paving industry. This investigation documented the changes in the composition and distribution of the liquid petroleum asphalt products produced from petroleum refining in the United States since World War II. This assessment was accomplished by reviewing documents and interviewing individual experts in the industry to identify current and historical practices. Individuals from 18 facilities were surveyed; the number of facilities reporting use of any material within a particular class ranged from none to more than half the respondents. Materials such as products of the process stream, polymers, elastomers, and anti-strip compounds have been added to liquid petroleum asphalt in the United States over the past 50 years, but modification has not been generally consistent by geography or time. Modifications made to liquid petroleum asphalt were made generally to improve performance and were dictated by state specifications.

  8. The Responses of Arabidopsis Early Light-Induced Protein2 to Ultraviolet B, High Light, and Cold Stress Are Regulated by a Transcriptional Regulatory Unit Composed of Two Elements1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hayami, Natsuki; Sakai, Yusaku; Kimura, Mitsuhiro; Saito, Tatsunori; Tokizawa, Mutsutomo; Iuchi, Satoshi; Kurihara, Yukio; Matsui, Minami; Nomoto, Mika; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu Y.

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Early Light-Induced Protein (ELIP) is thought to act as a photoprotectant, reducing the damaging effects of high light (HL). Expression of ELIP2 is activated by multiple environmental stresses related to photoinhibition. We have identified putative regulatory elements in an ELIP2 promoter using an octamer-based frequency comparison method, analyzed the role of these elements using synthetic promoters, and revealed a key transcriptional regulatory unit for ultraviolet B (UV-B) radiation, HL, and cold stress responses. The unit is composed of two elements, designated as Elements A (TACACACC) and B (GGCCACGCCA), and shows functionality only when paired. Our genome-wide correlation analysis between possession of these elements in the promoter region and expression profiles in response to UV-B, HL, and cold suggests that Element B receives and integrates these multiple stress signals. In vitro protein-DNA binding assays revealed that LONG HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5), a basic domain-Leucine zipper transcription factor, directly binds to Element B. In addition, mutant analysis of HY5 showed partial involvement in the UV-B and HL responses but not in the cold stress response. These results suggest that signals for UV-B, HL, and cold stress join at Element B, which recognizes the signals of multiple transcription factors, including HY5. PMID:26175515

  9. Effective dose of dental CBCT—a meta analysis of published data and additional data for nine CBCT units

    PubMed Central

    Timothy, R; Walker, C; Hunter, R; Benavides, E; Samuelson, D B; Scheske, M J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This article analyses dose measurement and effective dose estimation of dental CBCT examinations. Challenges to accurate calculation of dose are discussed and the use of dose–height product (DHP) as an alternative to dose–area product (DAP) is explored. Methods: The English literature on effective dose was reviewed. Data from these studies together with additional data for nine CBCT units were analysed. Descriptive statistics, ANOVA and paired analysis are used to characterize the data. Results: PubMed and EMBASE searches yielded 519 and 743 publications, respectively, which were reduced to 20 following review. Reported adult effective doses for any protocol ranged from 46 to 1073 µSv for large fields of view (FOVs), 9–560 µSv for medium FOVs and 5–652 µSv for small FOVs. Child effective doses from any protocol ranged from 13 to 769 µSv for large or medium FOVs and 7–521 µSv for small FOVs. Effective doses from standard or default exposure protocols were available for 167 adult and 52 child exposures. Mean adult effective doses grouped by FOV size were 212 µSv (large), 177 µSv (medium) and 84 µSv (small). Mean child doses were 175 µSv (combined large and medium) and 103 µSv (small). Large differences were seen between different CBCT units. Additional low-dose and high-definition protocols available for many units extend the range of doses. DHP was found to reduce average absolute error for calculation of dose by 45% in comparison with DAP. Conclusions: Large exposure ranges make CBCT doses difficult to generalize. Use of DHP as a metric for estimating effective dose warrants further investigation. PMID:25224586

  10. The PRR11-SKA2 Bidirectional Transcription Unit Is Negatively Regulated by p53 through NF-Y in Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yitao; Weng, Huali; Zhang, Ying; Long, Yinjiang; Li, Yi; Niu, Yulong; Song, Fangzhou; Bu, Youquan

    2017-03-01

    We previously identified proline-rich protein 11 (PRR11) as a novel cancer-related gene that is implicated in the regulation of cell cycle and tumorigenesis. Our recent study demonstrated that PRR11 and its adjacent gene, kinetochore associated 2 (SKA2), constitute a classic head-to-head gene pair that is coordinately regulated by nuclear factor Y (NF-Y). In the present study, we further show that the PRR11-SKA2 bidirectional transcription unit is an indirect target of the tumor suppressor p53. A luciferase reporter assay revealed that overexpression of wild type p53, but not mutant p53, significantly represses the basal activity and NF-Y mediated transactivation of the PRR11-SKA2 bidirectional promoter. Deletion and mutation analysis of the PRR11-SKA2 promoter revealed that p53-mediated PRR11-SKA2 repression is dependent on the presence of functional NF-Y binding sites. Furthermore, a co-immunoprecipitation assay revealed that p53 associates with NF-Y in lung cancer cells, and a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that p53 represses PRR11-SKA2 transcription by reducing the binding amount of NF-Y in the PRR11-SKA2 promoter region. Consistently, the ability of p53 to downregulate PRR11-SKA2 transcription was significantly attenuated upon siRNA-mediated depletion of nuclear factor Y subunit beta (NF-YB). Notably, lung cancer patients with lower expression of either PRR11 or SKA2 along with wild type p53 exhibited the best overall survival compared with others with p53 mutation and/or higher expression of either PRR11 or SKA2. Taken together, our results demonstrate that p53 negatively regulates the expression of the PRR11-SKA2 bidirectional transcription unit through NF-Y, suggesting that the inability to repress the PRR11-SKA2 bidirectional transcription unit after loss of p53 might contribute to tumorigenesis.

  11. Transcriptional activation by the acidic domain of Vmw65 requires the integrity of the domain and involves additional determinants distinct from those necessary for TFIIB binding.

    PubMed

    Walker, S; Greaves, R; O'Hare, P

    1993-09-01

    In this work we have examined the requirements for activity of the acidic domain of Vmw65 (VP16) by deletion and site-directed mutagenesis of the region in the context of GAL4 fusion proteins. The results indicate that the present interpretation of what actually constitutes the activation domain is not correct. We demonstrate, using a promoter with one target site which is efficiently activated by the wild-type (wt) fusion protein, that amino acids distal to residue 453 are critical for activity. Truncation of the domain or substitution of residues in the distal region almost completely abrogate activity. However, inactivating mutations within the distal region are complemented by using a promoter containing multiple target sites. Moreover, duplication of the proximal region, but not the distal region, restores the ability to activate a promoter with a single target site. These results indicate some distinct qualitative difference between the proximal and distal regions. We have also examined the binding of nuclear proteins to the wt domain and to a variant with the distal region inactivated by mutation. The lack of activity of this variant is not explained by a lack of binding of TFIIB, a protein previously reported to be the likely target of the acidic domain. Therefore some additional function is involved in transcriptional activation by the acid domain, and determinants distinct from those involved in TFIIB binding are required for this function. Analysis of the total protein profiles binding to the wt and mutant domains has demonstrated the selective binding to the wt domain of a 135-kDa polypeptide, which is therefore a candidate component involved in this additional function. This is the first report to provide evidence for the proposal of a multiplicity of interactions within the acidic domain, by uncoupling requirements for one function from those for another.

  12. Analysis of strand-specific RNA-seq data using machine learning reveals the structures of transcription units in Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Chou, Wen-Chi; Ma, Qin; Yang, Shihui; Cao, Sha; Klingeman, Dawn M; Brown, Steven D; Xu, Ying

    2015-05-26

    Identification of transcription units (TUs) encoded in a bacterial genome is essential to elucidation of transcriptional regulation of the organism. To gain a detailed understanding of the dynamically composed TU structures, we have used four strand-specific RNA-seq (ssRNA-seq) datasets collected under two experimental conditions to derive the genomic TU organization of Clostridium thermocellum using a machine-learning approach. Our method accurately predicted the genomic boundaries of individual TUs based on two sets of parameters measuring the RNA-seq expression patterns across the genome: expression-level continuity and variance. A total of 2590 distinct TUs are predicted based on the four RNA-seq datasets. Among the predicted TUs, 44% have multiple genes. We assessed our prediction method on an independent set of RNA-seq data with longer reads. The evaluation confirmed the high quality of the predicted TUs. Functional enrichment analyses on a selected subset of the predicted TUs revealed interesting biology. To demonstrate the generality of the prediction method, we have also applied the method to RNA-seq data collected on Escherichia coli and achieved high prediction accuracies. The TU prediction program named SeqTU is publicly available at https://code.google.com/p/seqtu/. We expect that the predicted TUs can serve as the baseline information for studying transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation in C. thermocellum and other bacteria.

  13. Analysis of strand-specific RNA-seq data using machine learning reveals the structures of transcription units in Clostridium thermocellum

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Wen-Chi; Ma, Qin; Yang, Shihui; Cao, Sha; Klingeman, Dawn M.; Brown, Steven D.; Xu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Identification of transcription units (TUs) encoded in a bacterial genome is essential to elucidation of transcriptional regulation of the organism. To gain a detailed understanding of the dynamically composed TU structures, we have used four strand-specific RNA-seq (ssRNA-seq) datasets collected under two experimental conditions to derive the genomic TU organization of Clostridium thermocellum using a machine-learning approach. Our method accurately predicted the genomic boundaries of individual TUs based on two sets of parameters measuring the RNA-seq expression patterns across the genome: expression-level continuity and variance. A total of 2590 distinct TUs are predicted based on the four RNA-seq datasets. Among the predicted TUs, 44% have multiple genes. We assessed our prediction method on an independent set of RNA-seq data with longer reads. The evaluation confirmed the high quality of the predicted TUs. Functional enrichment analyses on a selected subset of the predicted TUs revealed interesting biology. To demonstrate the generality of the prediction method, we have also applied the method to RNA-seq data collected on Escherichia coli and achieved high prediction accuracies. The TU prediction program named SeqTU is publicly available at https://code.google.com/p/seqtu/. We expect that the predicted TUs can serve as the baseline information for studying transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation in C. thermocellum and other bacteria. PMID:25765651

  14. Analysis of Strand-Specific RNA-Seq Data Using Machine Learning Reveals the Structures of Transcription Units in Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Wen-Chi; Ma, Qin; Yang, Shihui; Cao, Sha; Klingeman, Dawn M.; Brown, Steven D.; Xu, Ying

    2015-03-12

    The identification of transcription units (TUs) encoded in a bacterial genome is essential to elucidation of transcriptional regulation of the organism. To gain a detailed understanding of the dynamically composed TU structures, we have used four strand-specific RNA-seq (ssRNA-seq) datasets collected under two experimental conditions to derive the genomic TU organization of Clostridium thermocellum using a machine-learning approach. Our method accurately predicted the genomic boundaries of individual TUs based on two sets of parameters measuring the RNA-seq expression patterns across the genome: expression-level continuity and variance. A total of 2590 distinct TUs are predicted based on the four RNA-seq datasets. Moreover, among the predicted TUs, 44% have multiple genes. We assessed our prediction method on an independent set of RNA-seq data with longer reads. The evaluation confirmed the high quality of the predicted TUs. Functional enrichment analyses on a selected subset of the predicted TUs revealed interesting biology. To demonstrate the generality of the prediction method, we have also applied the method to RNA-seq data collected on Escherichia coli and achieved high prediction accuracies. The TU prediction program named SeqTU is publicly available athttps://code.google.com/p/seqtu/. We expect that the predicted TUs can serve as the baseline information for studying transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation in C. thermocellum and other bacteria.

  15. Analysis of Strand-Specific RNA-Seq Data Using Machine Learning Reveals the Structures of Transcription Units in Clostridium thermocellum

    DOE PAGES

    Chou, Wen-Chi; Ma, Qin; Yang, Shihui; ...

    2015-03-12

    The identification of transcription units (TUs) encoded in a bacterial genome is essential to elucidation of transcriptional regulation of the organism. To gain a detailed understanding of the dynamically composed TU structures, we have used four strand-specific RNA-seq (ssRNA-seq) datasets collected under two experimental conditions to derive the genomic TU organization of Clostridium thermocellum using a machine-learning approach. Our method accurately predicted the genomic boundaries of individual TUs based on two sets of parameters measuring the RNA-seq expression patterns across the genome: expression-level continuity and variance. A total of 2590 distinct TUs are predicted based on the four RNA-seq datasets.more » Moreover, among the predicted TUs, 44% have multiple genes. We assessed our prediction method on an independent set of RNA-seq data with longer reads. The evaluation confirmed the high quality of the predicted TUs. Functional enrichment analyses on a selected subset of the predicted TUs revealed interesting biology. To demonstrate the generality of the prediction method, we have also applied the method to RNA-seq data collected on Escherichia coli and achieved high prediction accuracies. The TU prediction program named SeqTU is publicly available athttps://code.google.com/p/seqtu/. We expect that the predicted TUs can serve as the baseline information for studying transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation in C. thermocellum and other bacteria.« less

  16. In Arabidopsis thaliana distinct alleles encoding mitochondrial RNA PROCESSING FACTOR 4 support the generation of additional 5' termini of ccmB transcripts.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Katrin; Jonietz, Christian; Schleicher, Sarah; des Francs-Small, Catherine Colas; Small, Ian; Binder, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    In plant mitochondria, the 5' ends of many transcripts are generated post-transcriptionally. We show that the pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein RNA PROCESSING FACTOR 4 (RPF4) supports the generation of extra 5' ends of ccmB transcripts in Landsberg erecta (Ler) and a number of other Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes. RPF4 was identified in Ler applying a forward genetic approach supported by complementation studies of ecotype Columbia (Col), which generates the Ler-type extra ccmB 5' termini only after the introduction of the RPF4 allele from Ler. Studies with chimeric RPF4 proteins composed of various parts of the RPF4 proteins from Ler and Col identified differences in the N-terminal and central PPR motifs that explain ecotype-specific variations in ccmB processing. These results fit well with binding site predictions in ccmB transcripts based on the known determinants of nucleotide base recognition by PPR motifs.

  17. Identification of the transcriptional unit, structural organization, and promoter sequence of the human sex-determining region Y (SRY) gene, using a reverse genetic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Hua Su; Lau, Y.F.C. )

    1993-01-01

    Using a simple strategy involving cosmid-mediated gene transfer, cDNA library construction, and molecular characterization techniques, the authors have determined the transcriptional unit, structural organization, and promoter sequence of the human sex-determining region Y (SRY) gene, the putative testis-determining factor (TDF) gene on the human Y chromosome. By this approach, a recombinant cosmid harboring the human SRY sequence was isolated and transfected to appropriate tissue-cultured cells. Recombinant cDNA clones were isolated from a cDNA library constructed from poly (A) + RNA of the transfected cells. Comparative studies between the respective cDNAs and the genomic cosmid have provided information regarding the organization of the SRY gene and its mRNAs. The results indicate that the human SRY gene is an intronless gene, produces transcripts of 1.1 kb, and possesses promoter activities in the transfected cells at approximately 310 bp of its upstream sequences. 57 refs., 5 figs.

  18. The PRR11-SKA2 Bidirectional Transcription Unit Is Negatively Regulated by p53 through NF-Y in Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yitao; Weng, Huali; Zhang, Ying; Long, Yinjiang; Li, Yi; Niu, Yulong; Song, Fangzhou; Bu, Youquan

    2017-01-01

    We previously identified proline-rich protein 11 (PRR11) as a novel cancer-related gene that is implicated in the regulation of cell cycle and tumorigenesis. Our recent study demonstrated that PRR11 and its adjacent gene, kinetochore associated 2 (SKA2), constitute a classic head-to-head gene pair that is coordinately regulated by nuclear factor Y (NF-Y). In the present study, we further show that the PRR11-SKA2 bidirectional transcription unit is an indirect target of the tumor suppressor p53. A luciferase reporter assay revealed that overexpression of wild type p53, but not mutant p53, significantly represses the basal activity and NF-Y mediated transactivation of the PRR11-SKA2 bidirectional promoter. Deletion and mutation analysis of the PRR11-SKA2 promoter revealed that p53-mediated PRR11-SKA2 repression is dependent on the presence of functional NF-Y binding sites. Furthermore, a co-immunoprecipitation assay revealed that p53 associates with NF-Y in lung cancer cells, and a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that p53 represses PRR11-SKA2 transcription by reducing the binding amount of NF-Y in the PRR11-SKA2 promoter region. Consistently, the ability of p53 to downregulate PRR11-SKA2 transcription was significantly attenuated upon siRNA-mediated depletion of nuclear factor Y subunit beta (NF-YB). Notably, lung cancer patients with lower expression of either PRR11 or SKA2 along with wild type p53 exhibited the best overall survival compared with others with p53 mutation and/or higher expression of either PRR11 or SKA2. Taken together, our results demonstrate that p53 negatively regulates the expression of the PRR11-SKA2 bidirectional transcription unit through NF-Y, suggesting that the inability to repress the PRR11-SKA2 bidirectional transcription unit after loss of p53 might contribute to tumorigenesis. PMID:28257042

  19. Assignment of Weight-Based Antibody Units for Seven Additional Serotypes to a Human Pneumococcal Standard Reference Serum, 007sp.

    PubMed

    Goldblatt, D; Tan, C Y; Burbidge, P; McElhiney, S; McLaughlin, L; Tucker, R; Rauh, M; Sidhu, M; Giardina, P C

    2015-11-01

    The pneumococcal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) reference standard serum, lot 89SF, has been in use since 1990 and was replaced in 2013 with a new reference standard, 007sp, that is projected to be available for the next 25 years. 007sp was generated under an FDA-approved clinical protocol; 278 adult volunteers were immunized with the 23-valent unconjugated polysaccharide vaccine Pneumovax II, and a unit of blood was obtained twice from each immunized subject within 120 days following immunization. Pooled serum was prepared from the plasma of 262 subjects, filled at 6 ml per vial, and lyophilized. Five independent laboratories participated in bridging the serotype-specific IgG assignments for 89SF to the new reference standard, 007sp, to establish equivalent reference values for 13 pneumococcal capsular serotypes (1,3, 4, 5, 6A, 6B, 7F, 9V, 14, 18C, 19A, 19F, and 23F) by using the WHO reference ELISA. In a second study involving three laboratories, a similar protocol was used to assign weight-based IgG concentrations in micrograms per ml to 007sp of seven serotypes (8, 10A, 11A, 12F, 15B, 22F, and 33F) also present in the 23-valent pneumococcal unconjugated polysaccharide vaccine. In addition, the IgG assignments for a 12-member WHO quality control (QC) serum panel were also extended to cover these seven serotypes. Agreement was excellent, with a concordance correlation coefficient (r(c)) of >0.996 when each laboratory was compared to the assigned values for the 12 WHO QC serum samples. There are four remaining pneumococcal serotypes (2, 9N, 17F, and 20) found in Pneumovax II for which IgG assignments exist for 89SF and remain to be bridged.

  20. Prominent use of distal 5′ transcription start sites and discovery of a large number of additional exons in ENCODE regions

    PubMed Central

    Denoeud, France; Kapranov, Philipp; Ucla, Catherine; Frankish, Adam; Castelo, Robert; Drenkow, Jorg; Lagarde, Julien; Alioto, Tyler; Manzano, Caroline; Chrast, Jacqueline; Dike, Sujit; Wyss, Carine; Henrichsen, Charlotte N.; Holroyd, Nancy; Dickson, Mark C.; Taylor, Ruth; Hance, Zahra; Foissac, Sylvain; Myers, Richard M.; Rogers, Jane; Hubbard, Tim; Harrow, Jennifer; Guigó, Roderic; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Reymond, Alexandre

    2007-01-01

    This report presents systematic empirical annotation of transcript products from 399 annotated protein-coding loci across the 1% of the human genome targeted by the Encyclopedia of DNA elements (ENCODE) pilot project using a combination of 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and high-density resolution tiling arrays. We identified previously unannotated and often tissue- or cell-line-specific transcribed fragments (RACEfrags), both 5′ distal to the annotated 5′ terminus and internal to the annotated gene bounds for the vast majority (81.5%) of the tested genes. Half of the distal RACEfrags span large segments of genomic sequences away from the main portion of the coding transcript and often overlap with the upstream-annotated gene(s). Notably, at least 20% of the resultant novel transcripts have changes in their open reading frames (ORFs), most of them fusing ORFs of adjacent transcripts. A significant fraction of distal RACEfrags show expression levels comparable to those of known exons of the same locus, suggesting that they are not part of very minority splice forms. These results have significant implications concerning (1) our current understanding of the architecture of protein-coding genes; (2) our views on locations of regulatory regions in the genome; and (3) the interpretation of sequence polymorphisms mapping to regions hitherto considered to be “noncoding,” ultimately relating to the identification of disease-related sequence alterations. PMID:17567994

  1. Full-Length Isoform Sequencing Reveals Novel Transcripts and Substantial Transcriptional Overlaps in a Herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Tombácz, Dóra; Csabai, Zsolt; Oláh, Péter; Balázs, Zsolt; Likó, István; Zsigmond, Laura; Sharon, Donald; Snyder, Michael; Boldogkői, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Whole transcriptome studies have become essential for understanding the complexity of genetic regulation. However, the conventionally applied short-read sequencing platforms cannot be used to reliably distinguish between many transcript isoforms. The Pacific Biosciences (PacBio) RS II platform is capable of reading long nucleic acid stretches in a single sequencing run. The pseudorabies virus (PRV) is an excellent system to study herpesvirus gene expression and potential interactions between the transcriptional units. In this work, non-amplified and amplified isoform sequencing protocols were used to characterize the poly(A+) fraction of the lytic transcriptome of PRV, with the aim of a complete transcriptional annotation of the viral genes. The analyses revealed a previously unrecognized complexity of the PRV transcriptome including the discovery of novel protein-coding and non-coding genes, novel mono- and polycistronic transcription units, as well as extensive transcriptional overlaps between neighboring and distal genes. This study identified non-coding transcripts overlapping all three replication origins of the PRV, which might play a role in the control of DNA synthesis. We additionally established the relative expression levels of gene products. Our investigations revealed that the whole PRV genome is utilized for transcription, including both DNA strands in all coding and intergenic regions. The genome-wide occurrence of transcript overlaps suggests a crosstalk between genes through a network formed by interacting transcriptional machineries with a potential function in the control of gene expression. PMID:27685795

  2. Addition of transcription activator-like effector binding sites to a pathogen strain-specific rice bacterial blight resistance gene makes it effective against additional strains and against bacterial leaf streak.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Aaron W; Doyle, Erin L; Bogdanove, Adam J

    2012-09-01

    Xanthomonas transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors promote disease in plants by binding to and activating host susceptibility genes. Plants counter with TAL effector-activated executor resistance genes, which cause host cell death and block disease progression. We asked whether the functional specificity of an executor gene could be broadened by adding different TAL effector binding elements (EBEs) to it. We added six EBEs to the rice Xa27 gene, which confers resistance to strains of the bacterial blight pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) that deliver the TAL effector AvrXa27. The EBEs correspond to three other effectors from Xoo strain PXO99(A) and three from strain BLS256 of the bacterial leaf streak pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc). Stable integration into rice produced healthy lines exhibiting gene activation by each TAL effector, and resistance to PXO99(A) , a PXO99(A) derivative lacking AvrXa27, and BLS256, as well as two other Xoo and 10 Xoc strains virulent toward wildtype Xa27 plants. Transcripts initiated primarily at a common site. Sequences in the EBEs were found to occur nonrandomly in rice promoters, suggesting an overlap with endogenous regulatory sequences. Thus, executor gene specificity can be broadened by adding EBEs, but caution is warranted because of the possible coincident introduction of endogenous regulatory elements.

  3. Identification of the transcriptional unit, structural organization, and promoter sequence of the human sex-determining region Y (SRY) gene, using a reverse genetic approach.

    PubMed Central

    Su, H; Lau, Y F

    1993-01-01

    Using a simple strategy involving cosmid-mediated gene transfer, cDNA library construction, and molecular characterization techniques, we have determined the transcriptional unit, structural organization, and promoter sequence of the human sex-determining region Y (SRY) gene, the putative testis-determining factor (TDF) gene on the human Y chromosome. By this approach, a recombinant cosmid harboring the human SRY sequence was isolated and transfected to appropriate tissue-cultured cells. Recombinant cDNA clones were isolated from a cDNA library constructed from poly (A) + RNA of the transfected cells. Comparative studies between the respective cDNAs and the genomic cosmid have provided information regarding the organization of the SRY gene and its mRNAs. The results indicate that the human SRY gene is an intronless gene, produces transcripts of 1.1 kb, and possesses promoter activities in the transfected cells at approximately 310 bp of its upstream sequences. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8434602

  4. The Streptomyces venezuelae pikAV gene contains a transcription unit essential for expression of enzymes involved in glycosylation of narbonolide and 10-deoxymethynolide.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; Roberts, J B; Xue, Y; Sherman, D H; Reynolds, K A

    2001-01-24

    In Streptomyces venezuelae, four polyketide synthase (PKS) polypeptides encoded by pikAI-pikAIV are used to generate 10 and 12-membered macrocyclic structures, narbonolide and 10-deoxymethynolide. Sequence analysis suggests these genes are translationally coupled with downstream genes, pikAV (encoding a type II thioesterase), desVIII-desVI (encoding enzymes responsible for production of the final glycosylated products pikromycin, narbomycin, methymycin and neomethymycin) and desR (a resistance gene). Type II thioesterases have been suggested to have an editing function in polyketide biosynthesis and deletion of the corresponding genes often leads to decreased levels of polyketide production. Surprisingly an in-frame deletion of 687 bp of the 843 bp pikAV ORF led to a strain SC1022 that produced normal yields of polyketide products, but only in the aglycone form. Plasmid-based expression of the desVIII-VI and desR in the SC1022 strain completely restored production of glycosylated products, despite the absence of a functional pikAV gene product. Under these conditions the PikAV TEII therefore does not play an important role in polyketide biosynthesis, and its function remains an enigma. These observations also demonstrate that the region of pikAV DNA deleted in strain SC1022 contains a transcription unit essential for expression of the des genes. A sequence alignment of PikAV with members of the highly conserved type II thioesterases revealed a short divergent region at the carboxy terminus, suggesting a region of pikAV that might contain such a transcription unit. DNA containing this region of pikAV was shown to be able to increase plasmid-based expression of both crotonyl CoA reductase gene (ccr) and the erythromycin resistance gene (ermE) in S. venezuelae.

  5. The Arabidopsis bHLH Transcription Factors MYC3 and MYC4 Are Targets of JAZ Repressors and Act Additively with MYC2 in the Activation of Jasmonate Responses[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Calvo, Patricia; Chini, Andrea; Fernández-Barbero, Gemma; Chico, José-Manuel; Gimenez-Ibanez, Selena; Geerinck, Jan; Eeckhout, Dominique; Schweizer, Fabian; Godoy, Marta; Franco-Zorrilla, José Manuel; Pauwels, Laurens; Witters, Erwin; Puga, María Isabel; Paz-Ares, Javier; Goossens, Alain; Reymond, Philippe; De Jaeger, Geert; Solano, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) trigger an important transcriptional reprogramming of plant cells to modulate both basal development and stress responses. In spite of the importance of transcriptional regulation, only one transcription factor (TF), the Arabidopsis thaliana basic helix-loop-helix MYC2, has been described so far as a direct target of JAZ repressors. By means of yeast two-hybrid screening and tandem affinity purification strategies, we identified two previously unknown targets of JAZ repressors, the TFs MYC3 and MYC4, phylogenetically closely related to MYC2. We show that MYC3 and MYC4 interact in vitro and in vivo with JAZ repressors and also form homo- and heterodimers with MYC2 and among themselves. They both are nuclear proteins that bind DNA with sequence specificity similar to that of MYC2. Loss-of-function mutations in any of these two TFs impair full responsiveness to JA and enhance the JA insensitivity of myc2 mutants. Moreover, the triple mutant myc2 myc3 myc4 is as impaired as coi1-1 in the activation of several, but not all, JA-mediated responses such as the defense against bacterial pathogens and insect herbivory. Our results show that MYC3 and MYC4 are activators of JA-regulated programs that act additively with MYC2 to regulate specifically different subsets of the JA-dependent transcriptional response. PMID:21335373

  6. Expression of the nir and nor genes for denitrification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa requires a novel CRP/FNR-related transcriptional regulator, DNR, in addition to ANR.

    PubMed

    Arai, H; Igarashi, Y; Kodama, T

    1995-08-28

    A gene, designated dnr, was identified in the vicinity of the structural genes for nitrite reductase (nirS) and nitric oxide reductase (norCB), and the gene for activation of the reductases (nirQ) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It encodes a protein of 227 amino acids homologous with the CRP/FNR-family transcriptional regulators. Promoter activities for nirS, nirQ and norCB were considerably reduced in the dnr mutant as well as in the mutant of anr, the other fnr-like regulatory gene from P. aeruginosa. This is the first finding that two CRP/FNR-related regulators are involved in denitrification in one strain.

  7. Computer Model of Biopolymer Crystal Growth and Aggregation by Addition of Macromolecular Units — a Comparative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siódmiak, J.; Gadomski, A.

    We discuss the results of a computer simulation of the biopolymer crystal growth and aggregation based on the 2D lattice Monte Carlo technique and the HP approximation of the biopolymers. As a modeled molecule (growth unit) we comparatively consider the previously studied non-mutant lysozyme protein, Protein Data Bank (PDB) ID: 193L, which forms, under a certain set of thermodynamic-kinetic conditions, the tetragonal crystals, and an amyloidogenic variant of the lysozyme, PDB ID: 1LYY, which is known as fibril-yielding and prone-to-aggregation agent. In our model, the site-dependent attachment, detachment and migration processes are involved. The probability of growth unit motion, attachment and detachment to/from the crystal surface are assumed to be proportional to the orientational factor representing the anisotropy of the molecule. Working within a two-dimensional representation of the truly three-dimensional process, we also argue that the crystal grows in a spiral way, whereby one or more screw dislocations on the crystal surface give rise to a terrace. We interpret the obtained results in terms of known models of crystal growth and aggregation such as B-C-F (Burton-Cabrera-Frank) dislocation driven growth and M-S (Mullins-Sekerka) instability concept, with stochastic aspects supplementing the latter. We discuss the conditions under which crystals vs non-crystalline protein aggregates appear, and how the process depends upon difference in chemical structure of the protein molecule seen as the main building block of the elementary crystal cell.

  8. Studies on D-A-π-A structured porphyrin sensitizers with different additional electron-withdrawing unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Futai; Wang, Xuexiang; Zhao, Yanming; Yang, Guang; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Bao; Feng, Yaqing

    2016-11-01

    The introduction of an additional acceptor to a typical donor-π bridge-acceptor (D-π-A) type porphyrin sensitizer results in a D-A-π-A featured porphyrin. Two porphyrins containing an additional acceptor with different electron-withdrawing abilities such as 2,3-diphenylquinoxaline (DPQ) for LP-11 and 2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (BTD) for LP-12 between the porphyrin core and the anchoring group have been synthesized for use as sensitizers in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Compared to LP-11, LP-12 with the stronger electron-withdrawing additional acceptor BTD possesses better light harvesting properties with regard to red-shifted Q-band absorption and a broader IPCE spectrum, resulting in a greater short circuit photocurrent density (Jsc) output. Interestingly, the steric hindrance of the DPQ group is favorable for suppressing dye aggregation, leading to a larger open-circuit voltage (Voc) value for LP-11-based cell. However, the loss in Voc of LP-12 is overcompensated by an improvement in Jsc. The optimized cell based on LP-12 achieves the better performance with a Jsc of 15.51 mA cm-2, a Voc of 674 mV, a fill factor (FF) of 0.7 and an overall power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.37% under standard AM 1.5 G irradiation. The findings provide a guidance for the future molecular design of highly efficient porphyrin sensitizers for use in DSCs.

  9. A Quasi-Experimental Study of Two Selected Units of the Industrial Arts Curriculum Project Materials to Determine the Measurable Additive Effects of a Unit on Design in Manfacturing Technology upon a Similar Unit on Design in Construction Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuwik, Paul David

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether exposing junior high school students to a unit on design in construction technology and to a unit on design in manufacturing technology significantly affects their achievement on a test measuring "Technological Principles of Design" when compared to a group of junior high school students exposed…

  10. Cis-transcriptional variation in maize inbred lines B73 and Mo17 leads to additive expression patterns in the F1 hybrid.

    PubMed

    Stupar, Robert M; Springer, Nathan M

    2006-08-01

    Microarray analysis of gene expression patterns in immature ear, seedling, and embryo tissues from the maize inbred lines B73 and Mo17 identified numerous genes with variable expression. Some genes had detectable expression in only one of the two inbreds; most of these genes were detected in the genomic DNA of both inbreds, indicating that the expression differences are likely caused by differential regulation rather than by differences in gene content. Gene expression was also monitored in the reciprocal F1 hybrids B73xMo17 and Mo17xB73. The reciprocal F1 hybrid lines did not display parental effects on gene expression levels. Approximately 80% of the differentially expressed genes displayed additive expression patterns in the hybrids relative to the inbred parents. The approximately 20% of genes that display nonadditive expression patterns tend to be expressed at levels within the parental range, with minimal evidence for novel expression levels greater than the high parent or less than the low parent. Analysis of allele-specific expression patterns in the hybrid suggested that intraspecific variation in gene expression levels is largely attributable to cis-regulatory variation in maize. Collectively, our data suggest that allelic cis-regulatory variation between B73 and Mo17 dictates maintenance of inbred allelic expression levels in the F1 hybrid, resulting in additive expression patterns.

  11. The role of proximal-enhancer elements in the glucocorticoid regulation of carbamoylphosphate synthetase gene transcription from the upstream response unit.

    PubMed

    Schoneveld, Onard J L M; Gaemers, Ingrid C; Hoogenkamp, Maarten; Lamers, Wouter H

    2005-11-01

    As part of the urea cycle, carbamoylphosphate synthetase (CPS) converts toxic ammonia resulting from amino-acid catabolism into urea. Liver-specific and glucocorticoid-dependent expression of the gene involves a distal enhancer, a promoter-proximal enhancer, and the minimal promoter itself. When challenged with glucocorticoids, the glucocorticoid-responsive unit (GRU) in the distal enhancer of the carbamoylphosphate-synthetase gene can only activate gene expression if, in addition to the minimal promoter, the proximal enhancer is present. Here, we identify and characterise two elements in the proximal CPS enhancer that are involved in glucocorticoid-dependent gene activation mediated by the GRU. A purine-rich stretch forming a so-called GAGA-box and a glucocorticoid-response element (GRE) are both crucial for the efficacy of the GRU and appear to constitute a promoter-proximal response unit that activates the promoter. The glucocorticoid response of the CPS gene is, therefore, dependent on the combined action of a distal and a promoter-proximal response unit.

  12. Data regarding hydraulic fracturing distributions and treatment fluids, additives, proppants, and water volumes applied to wells drilled in the United States from 1947 through 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gallegos, Tanya J.; Varela, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive, published, and publicly available data regarding the extent, location, and character of hydraulic fracturing in the United States are scarce. The objective of this data series is to publish data related to hydraulic fracturing in the public domain. The spreadsheets released with this data series contain derivative datasets aggregated temporally and spatially from the commercial and proprietary IHS database of U.S. oil and gas production and well data (IHS Energy, 2011). These datasets, served in 21 spreadsheets in Microsoft Excel (.xlsx) format, outline the geographical distributions of hydraulic fracturing treatments and associated wells (including well drill-hole directions) as well as water volumes, proppants, treatment fluids, and additives used in hydraulic fracturing treatments in the United States from 1947 through 2010. This report also describes the data—extraction/aggregation processing steps, field names and descriptions, field types and sources. An associated scientific investigation report (Gallegos and Varela, 2014) provides a detailed analysis of the data presented in this data series and comparisons of the data and trends to the literature.

  13. In silico screening of the chicken genome for overlaps between genomic regions: microRNA genes, coding and non-coding transcriptional units, QTL, and genetic variations.

    PubMed

    Zorc, Minja; Kunej, Tanja

    2016-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of non-coding RNAs involved in posttranscriptional regulation of target genes. Regulation requires complementarity between target mRNA and the mature miRNA seed region, responsible for their recognition and binding. It has been estimated that each miRNA targets approximately 200 genes, and genetic variability of miRNA genes has been reported to affect phenotypic variability and disease susceptibility in humans, livestock species, and model organisms. Polymorphisms in miRNA genes could therefore represent biomarkers for phenotypic traits in livestock animals. In our previous study, we collected polymorphisms within miRNA genes in chicken. In the present study, we identified miRNA-related genomic overlaps to prioritize genomic regions of interest for further functional studies and biomarker discovery. Overlapping genomic regions in chicken were analyzed using the following bioinformatics tools and databases: miRNA SNiPer, Ensembl, miRBase, NCBI Blast, and QTLdb. Out of 740 known pre-miRNA genes, 263 (35.5 %) contain polymorphisms; among them, 35 contain more than three polymorphisms The most polymorphic miRNA genes in chicken are gga-miR-6662, containing 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the pre-miRNA region, including five consecutive SNPs, and gga-miR-6688, containing ten polymorphisms including three consecutive polymorphisms. Several miRNA-related genomic hotspots have been revealed in chicken genome; polymorphic miRNA genes are located within protein-coding and/or non-coding transcription units and quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with production traits. The present study includes the first description of an exonic miRNA in a chicken genome, an overlap between the miRNA gene and the exon of the protein-coding gene (gga-miR-6578/HADHB), and the first report of a missense polymorphism located within a mature miRNA seed region. Identified miRNA-related genomic hotspots in chicken can serve researchers as a

  14. Focus on Refugees. Transcript.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandel, Sarah; And Others

    This is the transcript of the "Focus on Refugees," proqram conducted by the Overseas Development Council. Remarks from the following participants are included: (1) Sarah Brandel, Associate Fellow at the Overseas Development Council; (2) Gary Perkins, Chief of Mission of the Washington Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees…

  15. Vespucci: a system for building annotated databases of nascent transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Karmel A.; Kaikkonen, Minna U.; Gaasterland, Terry; Glass, Christopher K.

    2014-01-01

    Global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) is a recent addition to the series of high-throughput sequencing methods that enables new insights into transcriptional dynamics within a cell. However, GRO-sequencing presents new algorithmic challenges, as existing analysis platforms for ChIP-seq and RNA-seq do not address the unique problem of identifying transcriptional units de novo from short reads located all across the genome. Here, we present a novel algorithm for de novo transcript identification from GRO-sequencing data, along with a system that determines transcript regions, stores them in a relational database and associates them with known reference annotations. We use this method to analyze GRO-sequencing data from primary mouse macrophages and derive novel quantitative insights into the extent and characteristics of non-coding transcription in mammalian cells. In doing so, we demonstrate that Vespucci expands existing annotations for mRNAs and lincRNAs by defining the primary transcript beyond the polyadenylation site. In addition, Vespucci generates assemblies for un-annotated non-coding RNAs such as those transcribed from enhancer-like elements. Vespucci thereby provides a robust system for defining, storing and analyzing diverse classes of primary RNA transcripts that are of increasing biological interest. PMID:24304890

  16. The great repression: chromatin and cryptic transcription.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Bianca P; Fischer, Tamás

    2013-01-01

    The eukaryotic chromatin structure is essential in correctly defining transcription units. Impairing this structure can activate cryptic promoters, and lead to the accumulation of aberrant RNA transcripts. Here we discuss critical pathways that are responsible for the repression of cryptic transcription and the maintenance of genome integrity.

  17. Production of the 2400 kb Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene transcript; transcription time and cotranscriptional splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, C.N.; Worton, R.G.

    1994-09-01

    The largest known gene in any organism is the human DMD gene which has 79 exons that span 2400 kb. The extreme nature of the DMD gene raises questions concerning the time required for transcription and whether splicing begins before transcription is complete. DMD gene transcription is induced as cultured human myoblasts differentiate to form multinucleated myotubes, providing a system for studying the kinetics of transcription and splicing. Using quantitative RT-PCR, transcript accumulation was monitored from four different regions within the gene following induction of expression. By comparing the accumulation of transcripts from the 5{prime} and 3{prime} ends of the gene we have shown that approximately 12 hours are required to transcribe 1770 kb of the gene, extrapolating to a time of 16 hours for the transcription unit expressed in muscle. Comparison of accumulation profiles for spliced and total transcript demonstrated that transcripts are spliced at the 5{prime} end before transcription is complete, providing strong evidence for cotranscriptional splicing of DMD gene transcripts. Finally, the rate of transcript accumulation was reduced at the 3{prime} end of the gene relative to the 5{prime} end, perhaps due to premature termination of transcription complexes as they traverse this enormous transcription unit. The lag between transcription initiation and the appearance of complete transcripts could be important in limiting transcript production in dividing cells and to the timing of mRNA appearance in differentiating muscle.

  18. Transcription and cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, P. M.; Goding, C. R.

    1991-01-01

    The normal growth, development and function of an organism requires precise and co-ordinated control of gene expression. A major part of this control is exerted by regulating messenger RNA (mRNA) production and involves complex interactions between an array of transcriptionally active proteins and specific regulatory DNA sequences. The combination of such proteins and DNA sequences is specific for given gene or group of genes in a particular cell type and the proteins regulating the same gene may vary between cell types. In addition the expression or activity of these regulatory proteins may be modified depending on the state of differentiation of a cell or in response to an external stimulus. Thus, the differentiation of embryonic cells into diverse tissues is achieved and the mature structure and function of the organism is maintained. This review focusses on the role of perturbations of these transcriptional controls in neoplasia. Deregulation of transcription may result in the failure to express genes responsible for cellular differentiation, or alternatively, in the transcription of genes involved in cell division, through the inappropriate expression or activation of positively acting transcription factors and nuclear oncogenes. Whether the biochemical abnormalities that lead to the disordered growth and differentiation of a malignant tumour affect cell surface receptors, membrane or cytoplasmic signalling proteins or nuclear transcription factors, the end result is the inappropriate expression of some genes and failure to express others. Current research is starting to elucidate which of the elements of this complicated system are important in neoplasia. PMID:1645561

  19. Rare CBFB-MYH11 fusion transcripts in AML with inv(16)/t(16;16) are associated with therapy-related AML M4eo, atypical cytomorphology, atypical immunophenotype, atypical additional chromosomal rearrangements and low white blood cell count: a study on 162 patients.

    PubMed

    Schnittger, S; Bacher, U; Haferlach, C; Kern, W; Haferlach, T

    2007-04-01

    The spectrum of CBFB-MYH11 fusion transcripts in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) M4eo with inv(16)/t(16;16) is heterogeneous. Approximately 85% show type A CBFB-MYH11 fusion transcripts. In addition, more than 10 different fusion transcripts have been reported. The prognostic impact and biological background of rare fusion transcripts remain open. In this study, a molecular characterization of CBFB-MYH11 transcripts in 162 patients with CBFB-MYH11 positive AML at diagnosis was performed. In total, 128 patients (79.0%) showed the fusion transcript type A, whereas nine different rare CBFB-MYH11 fusion genes were detected in 34 cases (21.0%). Rare fusion transcripts were found more frequently in therapy-related AML (P=0.0106). Numerical gains of the chromosomes 8, 21 and 22 were more frequently associated with type A (28.3%) than with rare fusions (12.9%) (P=0.012). Median white blood cell (WBC) count was higher in type A (35.4 G/l; range=1.1-279 G/l) than in cases with rare types (7.8 G/l; range=0.8-148.0 G/l) (P<0.0001). Rare fusion transcripts were correlated with an atypical cytomorphology not primarily suggestive for the FAB subtype M4eo (P=0.0203). Immunophenotype revealed lower CD2, CD13, CD33 and CD90 levels than in type A fusion cases (P=0.036, 0.002, 0.029 and 0.045, respectively). However, the type of fusion was not an independent prognostic parameter.

  20. Assessment of potential additions to conventional oil and gas resources in discovered fields of the United States from reserve growth, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey estimated volumes of technically recoverable, conventional petroleum resources that have the potential to be added to reserves from reserve growth in 70 discovered oil and gas accumulations of the United States, excluding Federal offshore areas. The mean estimated volumes are 32 billion barrels of crude oil, 291 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 10 billion barrels of natural gas liquids.

  1. β-Arrestin1/miR-326 Transcription Unit Is Epigenetically Regulated in Neural Stem Cells Where It Controls Stemness and Growth Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Begalli, Federica; Abballe, Luana; Catanzaro, Giuseppina; Vacca, Alessandra; Napolitano, Maddalena; Tafani, Marco; Giangaspero, Felice; Locatelli, Franco

    2017-01-01

    Cell development is regulated by a complex network of mRNA-encoded proteins and microRNAs, all funnelling onto the modulation of self-renewal or differentiation genes. How intragenic microRNAs and their host genes are transcriptionally coregulated and their functional relationships for the control of neural stem cells (NSCs) are poorly understood. We propose here the intragenic miR-326 and its host gene β-arrestin1 as novel players whose epigenetic silencing maintains stemness in normal cerebellar stem cells. Such a regulation is mediated by CpG islands methylation of the common promoter. Epigenetic derepression of β-arrestin1/miR-326 by differentiation signals or demethylating agents leads to suppression of stemness features and cell growth and promotes cell differentiation. β-Arrestin1 inhibits cell proliferation by enhancing the nuclear expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27. Therefore, we propose a new mechanism for the control of cerebellar NSCs where a coordinated epigenetic mechanism finely regulates β-arrestin1/miR-326 expression and consequently NSCs stemness and cell growth. PMID:28298929

  2. Assessment of potential additions to conventional oil and gas resources of the world (outside the United States) from reserve growth, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klett, Timothy R.; Cook, Troy A.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Attanasi, E.D.; Freeman, Phil A.; Ryder, Robert T.; Gautier, Donald L.; Verma, Mahendra K.; Le, Phuong A.; Schenk, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey estimated volumes of technically recoverable, conventional petroleum resources resulting from reserve growth for discovered fields outside the United States that have reported in-place oil and gas volumes of 500 million barrels of oil equivalent or greater. The mean volumes were estimated at 665 billion barrels of crude oil, 1,429 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 16 billion barrels of natural gas liquids. These volumes constitute a significant portion of the world's oil and gas resources.

  3. The addition of decision support into computerized physician order entry reduces red blood cell transfusion resource utilization in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Fernández Pérez, Evans R; Winters, Jeffrey L; Gajic, Ognjen

    2007-07-01

    Computerized physician order entry (CPOE) has the potential for cost containment in critically ill patients through practice standardization and elimination of unnecessary interventions. Previous study demonstrated the beneficial short-term effect of adding a decision support for red blood cell (RBC) transfusion into the hospital CPOE. We evaluated the effect of such intervention on RBC resource utilization during the two-year study period. From the institutional APACHE III database we identified 2,200 patients with anemia, but no active bleeding on admission: 1,100 during a year before and 1,100 during a year after the intervention. The mean number of RBC transfusions per patient decreased from 1.5 +/- 1.9 units to 1.3 +/- 1.8 units after the intervention (P = 0.045). RBC transfusion cost decreased from $616,442 to $556,226 after the intervention. Hospital length of stay and adjusted hospital mortality did not differ before and after protocol implementation. In conclusion, the implementation of an evidenced-based decision support system through a CPOE can decrease RBC transfusion resource utilization in critically ill patients.

  4. Construction of a Transcription Map for Papillomaviruses using RACE, RNase Protection, and Primer Extension Assays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohong; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2016-02-08

    Papillomaviruses are a family of small, non-enveloped DNA tumor viruses. Knowing a complete transcription map of each papillomavirus genome can provide guidance for various papillomavirus studies. This unit provides detailed protocols to construct a transcription map of human papillomavirus type 18. The same approach can be easily adapted to other transcription map studies of any other papillomavirus genotype due to the high degree of conservation in genome structure, organization, and gene expression among papillomaviruses. The focused methods are 5'- and 3'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), which are techniques commonly used in molecular biology to obtain full-length RNA transcript or to map a transcription start site (TSS) or an RNA polyadenylation (pA) cleavage site. Primer walking RT-PCR is a method for studying the splicing junction of RACE products. In addition, RNase protection assay and primer extension are also introduced as alternative methods in the mapping analysis.

  5. Construction of a Transcription Map for Papillomaviruses using RACE, RNAse Protection and Primer Extension Assays

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohong; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Papillomaviruses are a family of small, non-enveloped DNA tumor viruses. Knowing a complete transcription map from each papillomavirus genome can provide guidance for various papillomavirus studies. This unit provides detailed protocols to construct a transcription map of human papillomavirus type 18. The same approach can be easily adapted to other transcription map studies of any other papillomavirus genotype due to the high degree of conservation in the genome structure, organization and gene expression among papillomaviruses. The focused methods are 5’- and 3’- rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), which are the techniques commonly used in molecular biology to obtain the full length RNA transcript or to map a transcription start site (TSS) or an RNA polyadenylation (pA) cleavage site. Primer walking RT-PCR is a method for studying splicing junction of RACE products. In addition, RNase protection assay and primer extension are also introduced as alternative methods in the mapping analysis. PMID:26855281

  6. WW Domains of the Yes-Kinase-Associated-Protein (YAP) Transcriptional Regulator Behave as Independent Units with Different Binding Preferences for PPxY Motif-Containing Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias-Bexiga, Manuel; Castillo, Francisco; Cobos, Eva S.; Oka, Tsutomu; Sudol, Marius; Luque, Irene

    2015-01-01

    YAP is a WW domain-containing effector of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, and the object of heightened interest as a potent oncogene and stemness factor. YAP has two major isoforms that differ in the number of WW domains they harbor. Elucidating the degree of co-operation between these WW domains is important for a full understanding of the molecular function of YAP. We present here a detailed biophysical study of the structural stability and binding properties of the two YAP WW domains aimed at investigating the relationship between both domains in terms of structural stability and partner recognition. We have carried out a calorimetric study of the structural stability of the two YAP WW domains, both isolated and in a tandem configuration, and their interaction with a set of functionally relevant ligands derived from PTCH1 and LATS kinases. We find that the two YAP WW domains behave as independent units with different binding preferences, suggesting that the presence of the second WW domain might contribute to modulate target recognition between the two YAP isoforms. Analysis of structural models and phage-display studies indicate that electrostatic interactions play a critical role in binding specificity. Together, these results are relevant to understand of YAP function and open the door to the design of highly specific ligands of interest to delineate the functional role of each WW domain in YAP signaling. PMID:25607641

  7. Investigating transcription reinitiation through in vitro approaches.

    PubMed

    Dieci, Giorgio; Fermi, Beatrice; Bosio, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    By influencing the number of RNA molecules repeatedly synthesized from the same gene, the control of transcription reinitiation has the potential to shape the transcriptome. Transcription reinitiation mechanisms have been mainly addressed in vitro, through approaches based on both crude and reconstituted systems. These studies support the notion that transcription reinitiation and its regulation rely on dedicated networks of molecular interactions within transcription machineries. At the same time, comparison with in vivo transcription rates suggests that additional mechanisms, factors and conditions must exist in the nucleus, whose biochemical elucidation is a fascinating challenge for future in vitro transcription studies.

  8. RNA polymerase II transcription: structure and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Bushnell, David A; Kornberg, Roger D

    2013-01-01

    A minimal RNA polymerase II (pol II) transcription system comprises the polymerase and five general transcription factors (GTFs) TFIIB, -D, -E, -F, and -H. The addition of Mediator enables a response to regulatory factors. The GTFs are required for promoter recognition and the initiation of transcription. Following initiation, pol II alone is capable of RNA transcript elongation and of proofreading. Structural studies reviewed here reveal roles of GTFs in the initiation process and shed light on the transcription elongation mechanism. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: RNA Polymerase II Transcript Elongation.

  9. Extensive RNA editing of U to C in addition to C to U substitution in the rbcL transcripts of hornwort chloroplasts and the origin of RNA editing in green plants.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshinaga, K; Iinuma, H; Masuzawa, T; Uedal, K

    1996-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced a portion of chloroplast DNA from the hornwort Anthoceros formosae. A nucleotide sequence of 7556 bp contained structures similar to those of ndhK, ndhC, trnV, trnM, atpE, atpB, rbcL, trnR and accD. The arrangement of these was the same as that of other chloroplast DNA. However, two nonsense codons were located within the putative coding region of rbcL, although they were used as putative termination codons of the genes. RNA was extensively edited in the transcripts of rbcL when cDNA sequences were analyzed. The unusual nonsense codons of TGA and TAA became CGA and CAA respectively. These are examples of U to C type RNA editing, which was never been found before in chloroplast mRNA. In general, 13 Cs of genomic DNA were found as Ts in the cDNA sequence and seven Ts were found as Cs. This is the first finding of RNA editing on the transcripts of rbcL and also in bryophytes. This event had been thought to arise in land plants after the split of bryophytes. The origin of RNA editing is discussed in relation to the landing of green plants. PMID:8604330

  10. Relative impact of previous disturbance history on the likelihood of additional disturbance in the Northern United States Forest Service USFS Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Landsat archive is increasingly being used to detect trends in the occurrence of forest disturbance. Beyond information about the amount of area affected, forest managers need to know if and how disturbance regimes change. The National Forest System (NFS) has developed a comprehensive plan for carbon monitoring that requires a detailed temporal mapping of forest disturbances across 75 million hectares. A long-term annual time series that shows the timing, extent, and type of disturbance beginning in 1990 and ending in 2011 has been prepared for several USFS Regions, including the Northern Region. Our mapping starts with an automated detection of annual disturbances using a time series of historical Landsat imagery. Automated detections are meticulously inspected, corrected and labeled using various USFS ancillary datasets. The resulting maps of verified disturbance show the timing and types are fires, harvests, insect activity, disease, and abiotic (wind, drought, avalanche) damage. Also, the magnitude of each change event is modeled in terms of the proportion of canopy cover lost. The sequence of disturbances for every pixel since 1990 has been consistently mapped and is available across the entirety of NFS. Our datasets contain sufficient information to describe the frequency of stand replacement, as well as how often disturbance results in only a partial loss of canopy. This information provides empirical insight into how an initial disturbance may predispose a stand to further disturbance, and it also show a climatic signal in the occurrence of processes such as fire and insect epidemics. Thus, we have the information to model the likelihood of occurrence of certain disturbances after a given event (i.e. if we have a fire in the past what does that do to the likelihood of occurrence of insects in the future). Here, we explore if previous disturbance history is a reliable predictor of additional disturbance in the future and we present results of applying

  11. Regulatory use of computational toxicology tools and databases at the United States Food and Drug Administration's Office of Food Additive Safety.

    PubMed

    Arvidson, Kirk B; Chanderbhan, Ronald; Muldoon-Jacobs, Kristi; Mayer, Julie; Ogungbesan, Adejoke

    2010-07-01

    Over 10 years ago, the Office of Food Additive Safety (OFAS) in the FDA's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition implemented the formal use of structure-activity relationship analysis and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis in the premarket review of food-contact substances. More recently, OFAS has implemented the use of multiple QSAR software packages and has begun investigating the use of metabolism data and metabolism predictive models in our QSAR evaluations of food-contact substances. In this article, we provide an overview of the programs used in OFAS as well as a perspective on how to apply multiple QSAR tools in the review process of a new food-contact substance.

  12. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  13. Expression of wheat Na(+)/H(+) antiporter TNHXS1 and H(+)- pyrophosphatase TVP1 genes in tobacco from a bicistronic transcriptional unit improves salt tolerance.

    PubMed

    Gouiaa, Sandra; Khoudi, Habib; Leidi, Eduardo O; Pardo, Jose M; Masmoudi, Khaled

    2012-05-01

    Abiotic stress tolerance of plants is a very complex trait and involves multiple physiological and biochemical processes. Thus, the improvement of plant stress tolerance should involve pyramiding of multiple genes. In the present study, we report the construction and application of a bicistronic system, involving the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) sequence from the 5'UTR of the heat-shock protein of tobacco gene NtHSF-1, to the improvement of salt tolerance in transgenic tobacco plants. Two genes from wheat encoding two important vacuolar ion transporters, Na(+)/H(+) antiporter (TNHXS1) and H(+)-pyrophosphatase (TVP1), were linked via IRES to generate the bicistronic construct TNHXS1-IRES-TVP1. Molecular analysis of transgenic tobacco plants revealed the correct integration of the TNHXS1-IRES-TVP1construct into tobacco genome and the production of the full-length bicistronic mRNA from the 35S promoter. Ion transport analyses with tonoplast vesicles isolated from transgenic lines confirmed that single-transgenic lines TVP1cl19 and TNHXS1cl7 had greater H(+)-PPiase and Na(+)/H(+) antiport activity, respectively, than the WT. Interestingly, the co-expression of TVP1 and TNHXS1 increased both Na(+)/H(+) antiport and H(+)-PPiase activities and induced the H(+) pumping activity of the endogenous V-ATPase. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing TNHXS1-IRES-TVP1 showed a better performance than either of the single gene-transformed lines and the wild type plants when subjected to salt treatment. In addition, the TNHXS1-IRES-TVP1 transgenic plants accumulated less Na(+) and more K(+) in their leaf tissue than did the wild type and the single gene-transformed lines. These results demonstrate that IRES system, described herein, can co-ordinate the expression of two important abiotic stress-tolerance genes and that this expression system is a valuable tool for obtaining transgenic plants with improved salt tolerance.

  14. Repetitive Elements in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cattani, Amanda Malvessi; Siqueira, Franciele Maboni; Guedes, Rafael Lucas Muniz; Schrank, Irene Silveira

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation, a multiple-step process, is still poorly understood in the important pig pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae. Basic motifs like promoters and terminators have already been described, but no other cis-regulatory elements have been found. DNA repeat sequences have been shown to be an interesting potential source of cis-regulatory elements. In this work, a genome-wide search for tandem and palindromic repetitive elements was performed in the intergenic regions of all coding sequences from M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448. Computational analysis demonstrated the presence of 144 tandem repeats and 1,171 palindromic elements. The DNA repeat sequences were distributed within the 5’ upstream regions of 86% of transcriptional units of M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448. Comparative analysis between distinct repetitive sequences found in related mycoplasma genomes demonstrated different percentages of conservation among pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains. qPCR assays revealed differential expression among genes showing variable numbers of repetitive elements. In addition, repeats found in 206 genes already described to be differentially regulated under different culture conditions of M. hyopneumoniae strain 232 showed almost 80% conservation in relation to M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448 repeats. Altogether, these findings suggest a potential regulatory role of tandem and palindromic DNA repeats in the M. hyopneumoniae transcriptional profile. PMID:28005945

  15. Repetitive Elements in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Transcriptional Regulation.

    PubMed

    Cattani, Amanda Malvessi; Siqueira, Franciele Maboni; Guedes, Rafael Lucas Muniz; Schrank, Irene Silveira

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation, a multiple-step process, is still poorly understood in the important pig pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae. Basic motifs like promoters and terminators have already been described, but no other cis-regulatory elements have been found. DNA repeat sequences have been shown to be an interesting potential source of cis-regulatory elements. In this work, a genome-wide search for tandem and palindromic repetitive elements was performed in the intergenic regions of all coding sequences from M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448. Computational analysis demonstrated the presence of 144 tandem repeats and 1,171 palindromic elements. The DNA repeat sequences were distributed within the 5' upstream regions of 86% of transcriptional units of M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448. Comparative analysis between distinct repetitive sequences found in related mycoplasma genomes demonstrated different percentages of conservation among pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains. qPCR assays revealed differential expression among genes showing variable numbers of repetitive elements. In addition, repeats found in 206 genes already described to be differentially regulated under different culture conditions of M. hyopneumoniae strain 232 showed almost 80% conservation in relation to M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448 repeats. Altogether, these findings suggest a potential regulatory role of tandem and palindromic DNA repeats in the M. hyopneumoniae transcriptional profile.

  16. 39 CFR 963.16 - Transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transcript. 963.16 Section 963.16 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO VIOLATIONS OF THE PANDERING ADVERTISEMENTS STATUTE, 39 U.S.C. 3008 § 963.16 Transcript. Testimony and argument at...

  17. A unified model for yeast transcript definition.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Carl G; van Bakel, Harm; Tsui, Kyle; Li, Joyce; Morris, Quaid D; Nislow, Corey; Greenblatt, Jack F; Hughes, Timothy R

    2014-01-01

    Identifying genes in the genomic context is central to a cell's ability to interpret the genome. Yet, in general, the signals used to define eukaryotic genes are poorly described. Here, we derived simple classifiers that identify where transcription will initiate and terminate using nucleic acid sequence features detectable by the yeast cell, which we integrate into a Unified Model (UM) that models transcription as a whole. The cis-elements that denote where transcription initiates function primarily through nucleosome depletion, and, using a synthetic promoter system, we show that most of these elements are sufficient to initiate transcription in vivo. Hrp1 binding sites are the major characteristic of terminators; these binding sites are often clustered in terminator regions and can terminate transcription bidirectionally. The UM predicts global transcript structure by modeling transcription of the genome using a hidden Markov model whose emissions are the outputs of the initiation and termination classifiers. We validated the novel predictions of the UM with available RNA-seq data and tested it further by directly comparing the transcript structure predicted by the model to the transcription generated by the cell for synthetic DNA segments of random design. We show that the UM identifies transcription start sites more accurately than the initiation classifier alone, indicating that the relative arrangement of promoter and terminator elements influences their function. Our model presents a concrete description of how the cell defines transcript units, explains the existence of nongenic transcripts, and provides insight into genome evolution.

  18. A unified model for yeast transcript definition

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, Carl G.; van Bakel, Harm; Tsui, Kyle; Li, Joyce; Morris, Quaid D.; Nislow, Corey; Greenblatt, Jack F.; Hughes, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying genes in the genomic context is central to a cell's ability to interpret the genome. Yet, in general, the signals used to define eukaryotic genes are poorly described. Here, we derived simple classifiers that identify where transcription will initiate and terminate using nucleic acid sequence features detectable by the yeast cell, which we integrate into a Unified Model (UM) that models transcription as a whole. The cis-elements that denote where transcription initiates function primarily through nucleosome depletion, and, using a synthetic promoter system, we show that most of these elements are sufficient to initiate transcription in vivo. Hrp1 binding sites are the major characteristic of terminators; these binding sites are often clustered in terminator regions and can terminate transcription bidirectionally. The UM predicts global transcript structure by modeling transcription of the genome using a hidden Markov model whose emissions are the outputs of the initiation and termination classifiers. We validated the novel predictions of the UM with available RNA-seq data and tested it further by directly comparing the transcript structure predicted by the model to the transcription generated by the cell for synthetic DNA segments of random design. We show that the UM identifies transcription start sites more accurately than the initiation classifier alone, indicating that the relative arrangement of promoter and terminator elements influences their function. Our model presents a concrete description of how the cell defines transcript units, explains the existence of nongenic transcripts, and provides insight into genome evolution. PMID:24170600

  19. Independent and tight regulation of transcriptional units in Escherichia coli via the LacR/O, the TetR/O and AraC/I1-I2 regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Lutz, R; Bujard, H

    1997-03-15

    Based on parameters governing promoter activity and using regulatory elements of the lac, ara and tet operon transcription control sequences were composed which permit the regulation in Escherichia coli of several gene activities independently and quantitatively. The novel promoter PLtetO-1 allows the regulation of gene expression over an up to 5000-fold range with anhydrotetracycline (aTc) whereas with IPTG and arabinose the activity of Plac/ara-1 may be controlled 1800-fold. Escherichia coli host strains which produce defined amounts of the regulatory proteins, Lac and Tet repressor as well as AraC from chromosomally located expression units provide highly reproducible in vivo conditions. Controlling the expression of the genes encoding luciferase, the low abundance E.coli protein DnaJ and restriction endonuclease Cfr9I not only demonstrates that high levels of expression can be achieved but also suggests that under conditions of optimal repression only around one mRNA every 3rd generation is produced. This potential of quantitative control will open up new approaches in the study of gene function in vivo, in particular with low abundance regulatory gene products. The system will also provide new opportunities for the controlled expression of heterologous genes.

  20. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    ... or natural. Natural food additives include: Herbs or spices to add flavor to foods Vinegar for pickling ... Certain colors improve the appearance of foods. Many spices, as well as natural and man-made flavors, ...

  1. Trends in hydraulic fracturing distributions and treatment fluids, additives, proppants, and water volumes applied to wells drilled in the United States from 1947 through 2010: data analysis and comparison to the literature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gallegos, Tanya J.; Varela, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is presently the primary stimulation technique for oil and gas production in low-permeability, unconventional reservoirs. Comprehensive, published, and publicly available information regarding the extent, location, and character of hydraulic fracturing in the United States is scarce. This national spatial and temporal analysis of data on nearly 1 million hydraulically fractured wells and 1.8 million fracturing treatment records from 1947 through 2010 (aggregated in Data Series 868) is used to identify hydraulic fracturing trends in drilling methods and use of proppants, treatment fluids, additives, and water in the United States. These trends are compared to the literature in an effort to establish a common understanding of the differences in drilling methods, treatment fluids, and chemical additives and of how the newer technology has affected the water use volumes and areal distribution of hydraulic fracturing. Historically, Texas has had the highest number of records of hydraulic fracturing treatments and associated wells in the United States documented in the datasets described herein. Water-intensive horizontal/directional drilling has also increased from 6 percent of new hydraulically fractured wells drilled in the United States in 2000 to 42 percent of new wells drilled in 2010. Increases in horizontal drilling also coincided with the emergence of water-based “slick water” fracturing fluids. As such, the most current hydraulic fracturing materials and methods are notably different from those used in previous decades and have contributed to the development of previously inaccessible unconventional oil and gas production target areas, namely in shale and tight-sand reservoirs. Publicly available derivative datasets and locations developed from these analyses are described.

  2. Additional Crime Scenes for Projectile Motion Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullerton, Dan; Bonner, David

    2011-01-01

    Building students' ability to transfer physics fundamentals to real-world applications establishes a deeper understanding of underlying concepts while enhancing student interest. Forensic science offers a great opportunity for students to apply physics to highly engaging, real-world contexts. Integrating these opportunities into inquiry-based…

  3. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  4. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  5. Transcriptional feedback in the insulin signalling pathway modulates ageing in both Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster † †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3mb25485bClick here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Papatheodorou, Irene; Ziehm, Matthias; Thornton, Janet M.

    2013-01-01

    Several components have been previously identified, that modulate longevity in several species, including the target of rapamycin (TOR) and the Insulin/IGF-1 (IIS) signalling pathways. In order to infer paths and transcriptional feedback loops that are likely to modulate ageing, we manually built a comprehensive and computationally efficient signalling network model of the IIS and TOR pathways in worms. The core insulin transduction is signalling from the sole insulin receptor daf-2 to ultimately inhibit the translocation of the transcription factor daf-16 into the nucleus. Reduction in this core signalling is thought to increase longevity in several species. In addition to this core insulin signalling, we have also recorded in our worm model the transcription factors skn-1 and hif-1, those are also thought to modulate ageing in a daf-16 independent manner. Several paths that are likely to modulate ageing were inferred via a web-based service NetEffects, by utilising perturbed components (rheb-1, let-363, aak-2, daf-2;daf-16 and InR;foxo in worms and flies respectively) from freely available gene expression microarrays. These included “routes” from TOR pathway to transcription factors daf-16, skn-1, hif-1 and daf-16 independent paths via skn-1/hif-1. Paths that could be tested by experimental hypotheses, with respect to relative contribution to longevity, are also discussed. Direct comparison of the IIS and TOR pathways in both worm and fly suggest a remarkable similarity. While similarities in the paths that could modulate ageing in both organisms were noted, differences are also discussed. This approach can also be extended to other pathways and processes. PMID:23624434

  6. Transcriptional enhancers: Transcription, function and flexibility.

    PubMed

    Melamed, Philippa; Yosefzon, Yahav; Rudnizky, Sergei; Pnueli, Lilach

    2016-01-01

    Active transcriptional enhancers are often transcribed to eRNAs, whose changing levels mirror those of the target gene mRNA. We discuss some of the reported functions of these eRNAs and their likely diversity to allow utilization of distinct cis regulatory regions to enhance transcription in diverse developmental and cellular contexts.

  7. Transcription in archaea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyrpides, N. C.; Ouzounis, C. A.; Woese, C. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Using the sequences of all the known transcription-associated proteins from Bacteria and Eucarya (a total of 4,147), we have identified their homologous counterparts in the four complete archaeal genomes. Through extensive sequence comparisons, we establish the presence of 280 predicted transcription factors or transcription-associated proteins in the four archaeal genomes, of which 168 have homologs only in Bacteria, 51 have homologs only in Eucarya, and the remaining 61 have homologs in both phylogenetic domains. Although bacterial and eukaryotic transcription have very few factors in common, each exclusively shares a significantly greater number with the Archaea, especially the Bacteria. This last fact contrasts with the obvious close relationship between the archaeal and eukaryotic transcription mechanisms per se, and in particular, basic transcription initiation. We interpret these results to mean that the archaeal transcription system has retained more ancestral characteristics than have the transcription mechanisms in either of the other two domains.

  8. Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay Immunity Can Help Identify Human Polycistronic Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Shahaf, Guy; Shweiki, Dorit

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic polycistronic transcription units are rare and only a few examples are known, mostly being the outcome of serendipitous discovery. We claim that nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) immune structure is a common characteristic of polycistronic transcripts, and that this immunity is an emergent property derived from all functional CDSs. The human RefSeq transcriptome was computationally screened for transcripts capable of eliciting NMD, and which contain an additional ORF(s) potentially capable of rescuing the transcript from NMD. Transcripts were further analyzed implementing domain-based strategies in order to estimate the potential of the candidate ORF to encode a functional protein. Consequently, we predict the existence of forty nine novel polycistronic transcripts. Experimental verification was carried out utilizing two different types of analyses. First, five Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) datasets from published NMD-inhibition studies were used, aiming to explore whether a given mRNA is indeed insensitive to NMD. All known bicistronic transcripts and eleven out of the twelve predicted genes that were analyzed, displayed NMD insensitivity using various NMD inhibitors. For three genes, a mixed expression pattern was observed presenting both NMD sensitivity and insensitivity in different cell types. Second, we used published global translation initiation sequencing data from HEK293 cells to verify the existence of translation initiation sites in our predicted polycistronic genes. In five of our genes, the predicted rescuing uORFs are indeed identified as translation initiation sites, and in two additional genes, one of two predicted rescuing uORF is verified. These results validate our computational analysis and reinforce the possibility that NMD-immune architecture is a parameter by which polycistronic genes can be identified. Moreover, we present evidence for NMD-mediated regulation controlling the production of one or more proteins encoded in the

  9. Role for Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha in Murine Cytomegalovirus Transcriptional Reactivation in Latently Infected Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Christian O.; Seckert, Christof K.; Dreis, Doris; Reddehase, Matthias J.; Grzimek, Natascha K. A.

    2005-01-01

    Interstitial pneumonia is a major clinical manifestation of primary or recurrent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in immunocompromised recipients of a bone marrow transplant. In a murine model, lungs were identified as a prominent site of CMV latency and recurrence. Pulmonary latency of murine CMV is characterized by high viral genome burden and a low incidence of variegated immediate-early (IE) gene expression, reflecting a sporadic activity of the major IE promoters (MIEPs) and enhancer. The enhancer-flanking promoters MIEP1/3 and MIEP2 are switched on and off during latency in a ratio of ∼2:1. MIEP1/3 latency-associated activity generates the IE1 transcript of the ie1/3 transcription unit but not the alternative splicing product IE3 that encodes the essential transactivator of early gene expression. Splicing thus appeared to be an important checkpoint for maintenance of latency. In accordance with previous work of others, we show here that signaling by the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) activates IE1/3 transcription in vivo. As an addition to current knowledge, Poisson distribution analysis revealed an increased incidence of IE1/3 transcriptional events as well as a higher amount of transcripts per event. Notably, TNF-α promoted the splicing to IE3 transcripts, but transcription did not proceed to the M55/gB early gene. Moreover, the activated transcriptional state induced by TNF-α did not predispose latently infected mice to a higher incidence of virus recurrence after hematoablative treatment. In conclusion, TNF-α is an important inductor of IE gene transcriptional reactivation, whereas early genes downstream in the viral replicative cycle appear to be the rate-limiting checkpoint(s) for virus recurrence. PMID:15596827

  10. Genome-wide assembly and analysis of alternative transcripts in mouse

    PubMed Central

    Sharov, Alexei A.; Dudekula, Dawood B.; Ko, Minoru S.H.

    2005-01-01

    To build a mouse gene index with the most comprehensive coverage of alternative transcription/splicing (ATS), we developed an algorithm and a fully automated computational pipeline for transcript assembly from expressed sequences aligned to the genome. We identified 191,946 genomic loci, which included 27,497 protein-coding genes and 11,906 additional gene candidates (e.g., nonprotein-coding, but multiexon). Comparison of the resulting gene index with TIGR, UniGene, DoTS, and ESTGenes databases revealed that it had a greater number of transcripts, a greater average number of exons and introns with proper splicing sites per gene, and longer ORFs. The 27,497 protein-coding genes had 77,138 transcripts, i.e., 2.8 transcripts per gene on average. Close examination of transcripts led to a combinatorial table of 23 types of ATS units, only nine of which were previously described, i.e., 14 types of alternative splicing, seven types of alternative starts, and two types of alternative termination. The 47%, 18%, and 14% of 20,323 multiexon protein-coding genes with proper splice sites had alternative splicings, alternative starts, and alternative terminations, respectively. The gene index with the comprehensive ATS will provide a useful platform for analyzing the nature and mechanism of ATS, as well as for designing the accurate exon-based DNA microarrays. PMID:15867436

  11. Deciphering Fur transcriptional regulatory network highlights its complex role beyond iron metabolism in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; Latif, Haythem; O'Brien, Edward J; Szubin, Richard; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2014-09-15

    The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) plays a critical role in the transcriptional regulation of iron metabolism. However, the full regulatory potential of Fur remains undefined. Here we comprehensively reconstruct the Fur transcriptional regulatory network in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 in response to iron availability using genome-wide measurements. Integrative data analysis reveals that a total of 81 genes in 42 transcription units are directly regulated by three different modes of Fur regulation, including apo- and holo-Fur activation and holo-Fur repression. We show that Fur connects iron transport and utilization enzymes with negative-feedback loop pairs for iron homeostasis. In addition, direct involvement of Fur in the regulation of DNA synthesis, energy metabolism and biofilm development is found. These results show how Fur exhibits a comprehensive regulatory role affecting many fundamental cellular processes linked to iron metabolism in order to coordinate the overall response of E. coli to iron availability.

  12. rRNA transcription rate in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Gotta, S L; Miller, O L; French, S L

    1991-01-01

    The rate of in vivo transcription elongation for Escherichia coli rRNA operons was determined by electron microscopy following addition of rifampin to log-phase cultures. Direct observation of RNA polymerase positions along rRNA operons 30, 40, and 70 s after inhibition of transcription initiation yielded a transcription elongation rate of 42 nucleotides per s. Images FIG. 1 PMID:1717439

  13. Cloning of the homeotic Sex combs reduced gene in Drosophila and in situ localization of its transcripts.

    PubMed

    Kuroiwa, A; Kloter, U; Baumgartner, P; Gehring, W J

    1985-12-30

    We have extended our ;chromosomal walk' in the Antennapedia-complex (ANT-C) by isolating overlapping DNA sequences spanning the chromosomal segment between Antennapedia (Antp) and Deformed (Dfd). The transcription units, homeoboxes and M-repeats were mapped within this region. Four transcription units Antp, fushi tarazu (ftz), Sex combs reduced (Scr) and Dfd contain both a homeobox and an M repeat, whereas at least two additional transcription units, x and z, were found to lack these elements. The Scr locus was identified by deletion mapping. It consists of at least two exonic regions separated by a large intron. The homeobox is located in the 3' exon and is 82% homologous to the one in Antp. Scr encodes a major 3.9-kb RNA. A corresponding cDNA clone was used as a probe for in situ hybridization to sections of various embryonic stages. At gastrula stages Scr transcripts accumulate in the posterior head and the anterior thoracic region of the germ band. At later stages a strong accumulation of transcripts is observed in the suboesophageal and the prothoracic ganglion of the ventral nervous system.

  14. Topography of the euryarchaeal transcription initiation complex.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Michael S; Thomm, Michael; Geiduschek, E Peter

    2004-02-13

    Transcription in the Archaea is carried out by RNA polymerases and transcription factors that are highly homologous to their eukaryotic counterparts, but little is known about the structural organization of the archaeal transcription complex. To address this, transcription initiation complexes have been formed with Pyrococcus furiosus transcription factors (TBP and TFB1), RNA polymerase, and a linear DNA fragment containing a strong promoter. The arrangement of proteins from base pair -35 to +20 (relative to the transcriptional start site) has been analyzed by photochemical protein-DNA cross-linking. TBP cross-links to the TATA box and TFB1 cross-links both upstream and downstream of the TATA box, as expected, but the sites of most prominent TFB1 cross-linking are located well downstream of the TATA box, reaching as far as the start site of transcription, suggesting a role for TFB1 in initiation of transcription that extends beyond polymerase recruitment. These cross-links indicate the transcription factor orientation in the initiation complex. The pattern of cross-linking of four RNA polymerase subunits (B, A', A", and H) to the promoter suggests a path for promoter DNA relative to the RNA polymerase surface in this archaeal transcription initiation complex. In addition, an unidentified protein approximately the size of TBP cross-links to the non-transcribed DNA strand near the upstream edge of the transcription bubble. Cross-linking is specific to the polymerase-containing initiation complex and requires the gdh promoter TATA box. The location of this protein suggests that it, like TFB1, could also have a role in transcription initiation following RNA polymerase recruitment.

  15. Falling for the dark side of transcription: Nab2 fosters RNA polymerase III transcription

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, L. Maximilian; Sträßer, Katja

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT RNA polymerase III (RNAPIII) synthesizes diverse, small, non-coding RNAs with many important roles in the cellular metabolism. One of the open questions of RNAPIII transcription is whether and how additional factors are involved. Recently, Nab2 was identified as the first messenger ribonucleoprotein particle (mRNP) biogenesis factor with a function in RNAPIII transcription. PMID:27049816

  16. Antisense-mediated FLC transcriptional repression requires the P-TEFb transcription elongation factor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-Wei; Wu, Zhe; Raitskin, Oleg; Sun, Qianwen; Dean, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    The functional significance of noncoding transcripts is currently a major question in biology. We have been studying the function of a set of antisense transcripts called COOLAIR that encompass the whole transcription unit of the Arabidopsis floral repressor FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). Alternative polyadenylation of COOLAIR transcripts correlates with different FLC sense expression states. Suppressor mutagenesis aimed at understanding the importance of this sense–antisense transcriptional circuitry has identified a role for Arabidopsis cyclin-dependent kinase C (CDKC;2) in FLC repression. CDKC;2 functions in an Arabidopsis positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) complex and influences global RNA polymerase II (Pol II) Ser2 phosphorylation levels. CDKC;2 activity directly promotes COOLAIR transcription but does not affect an FLC transgene missing the COOLAIR promoter. In the endogenous gene context, however, the reduction of COOLAIR transcription by cdkc;2 disrupts a COOLAIR-mediated repression mechanism that increases FLC expression. This disruption then feeds back to indirectly increase COOLAIR expression. This tight interconnection between sense and antisense transcription, together with differential promoter sensitivity to P-TEFb, is central to quantitative regulation of this important floral repressor gene. PMID:24799695

  17. LNA units present in the (2'-OMe)-RNA strand stabilize parallel duplexes (2'-OMe)-RNA/[All-R(P)-PS]-DNA and parallel triplexes (2'-OMe)-RNA/[All-R(P)-PS]-DNA/RNA. An improved tool for the inhibition of reverse transcription.

    PubMed

    Maciaszek, Anna; Krakowiak, Agnieszka; Janicka, Magdalena; Tomaszewska-Antczak, Agnieszka; Sobczak, Milena; Mikołajczyk, Barbara; Guga, Piotr

    2015-02-28

    Homopurine phosphorothioate analogs of DNA, possessing all phosphorus atoms of RP configuration ([All-RP-PS]-DNA), when interact with appropriate complementary RNA or (2'-OMe)-RNA templates, form parallel triplexes or parallel duplexes of very high thermodynamic stability. The present results show that T-LNA or 5-Me-C-LNA units introduced into the parallel Hoogsteen-paired (2'-OMe)-RNA strands (up to four units in the oligomers of 9 or 12 nt in length) stabilize these parallel complexes. At neutral pH, dodecameric parallel duplexes have Tm values of 62-68 °C, which are by 4-10 °C higher than Tm for the reference duplex (with no LNA units present), while for the corresponding triplexes, Tm values exceeded 85 °C. For nonameric parallel duplexes, melting temperatures of 38-62 °C were found and (2'-OMe)-RNA oligomers containing 5-Me-C-LNA units stabilized the complexes more efficiently than the T-LNA containing congeners. In both series the stability of the parallel complexes increased with an increasing number of LNA units present. The same trend was observed in experiments of reverse transcription RNA→DNA (using AMV RT reverse transcriptase) where the formation of parallel triplexes (consisting of an RNA template, [All-RP-PS]-DNA nonamer and Hoogsteen-paired (2'-OMe)-RNA strands containing the LNA units) led to the efficient inhibition of the process. Under the best conditions checked (four 5-Me-C-LNA units, three-fold excess over the RNA template) the inhibition was 94% effective, compared to 71% inhibition observed in the reference system with the Hoogsteen-paired (2'-OMe)-RNA strand carrying no LNA units. This kind of complexation may "arrest" harmful RNA oligomers (e.g., viral RNA or mRNA of unwanted proteins) and, beneficially, exclude them from enzymatic processes, otherwise leading to viral or genetic diseases.

  18. Transcription Regulation in Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Gehring, Alexandra M.; Walker, Julie E.

    2016-01-01

    The known diversity of metabolic strategies and physiological adaptations of archaeal species to extreme environments is extraordinary. Accurate and responsive mechanisms to ensure that gene expression patterns match the needs of the cell necessitate regulatory strategies that control the activities and output of the archaeal transcription apparatus. Archaea are reliant on a single RNA polymerase for all transcription, and many of the known regulatory mechanisms employed for archaeal transcription mimic strategies also employed for eukaryotic and bacterial species. Novel mechanisms of transcription regulation have become apparent by increasingly sophisticated in vivo and in vitro investigations of archaeal species. This review emphasizes recent progress in understanding archaeal transcription regulatory mechanisms and highlights insights gained from studies of the influence of archaeal chromatin on transcription. PMID:27137495

  19. Transcriptional networks in plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Kenichi; Somssich, Imre E

    2015-05-01

    Next to numerous abiotic stresses, plants are constantly exposed to a variety of pathogens within their environment. Thus, their ability to survive and prosper during the course of evolution was strongly dependent on adapting efficient strategies to perceive and to respond to such potential threats. It is therefore not surprising that modern plants have a highly sophisticated immune repertoire consisting of diverse signal perception and intracellular signaling pathways. This signaling network is intricate and deeply interconnected, probably reflecting the diverse lifestyles and infection strategies used by the multitude of invading phytopathogens. Moreover it allows signal communication between developmental and defense programs thereby ensuring that plant growth and fitness are not significantly retarded. How plants integrate and prioritize the incoming signals and how this information is transduced to enable appropriate immune responses is currently a major research area. An important finding has been that pathogen-triggered cellular responses involve massive transcriptional reprogramming within the host. Additional key observations emerging from such studies are that transcription factors (TFs) are often sites of signal convergence and that signal-regulated TFs act in concert with other context-specific TFs and transcriptional co-regulators to establish sensory transcription regulatory networks required for plant immunity.

  20. Transcriptional mapping of the bacteriophage Mu DNA.

    PubMed

    Barron, C; Bade, E G

    1988-02-01

    The transcription of temperate phage Mu throughout lytic development was analysed quantitatively by hybridization of pulse-labelled RNA to full-length Mu DNA and to plasmids that define Mu DNA segments covering the whole phage genome. The transcription rate (i.e. binding data corrected for the incorporation rate of the radioactive precursor, for the size of the DNA template, and for the number of phage genomes present in the bacterium at the time of analysis) revealed three defined phases of Mu transcription: early (0 to 9 min), intermediate (between 9 and the interval 14 to 17 min) and late (from the interval 14 to 17 min onward). The analysis also revealed that the region comprising the genes involved in phage morphogenesis was organized into two independent 'late' transcription units.

  1. Control of butanol formation in Clostridium acetobutylicum by transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Thormann, Kai; Feustel, Lothar; Lorenz, Karin; Nakotte, Stephan; Dürre, Peter

    2002-04-01

    The sol operon of Clostridium acetobutylicum is the essential transcription unit for formation of the solvents butanol and acetone. The recent proposal that transcriptional regulation of this operon is controlled by the repressor Orf5/SolR (R. V. Nair, E. M. Green, D. E. Watson, G. N. Bennett, and E. T. Papoutsakis, J. Bacteriol. 181:319-330, 1999) was found to be incorrect. Instead, regulation depends on activation, most probably by the multivalent transcription factor Spo0A. The operon is transcribed from a single promoter. A second signal identified in primer extension studies results from mRNA processing and can be observed only in the natural host, not in a heterologous host. The first structural gene in the operon (adhE, encoding a bifunctional butyraldehyde/butanol dehydrogenase) is translated into two different proteins, the mature AdhE enzyme and the separate butanol dehydrogenase domain. The promoter of the sol operon is preceded by three imperfect repeats and a putative Spo0A-binding motif, which partially overlaps with repeat 3 (R3). Reporter gene analysis performed with the lacZ gene of Thermoanaerobacterium thermosulfurigenes and targeted mutations of the regulatory region revealed that the putative Spo0A-binding motif, R3, and R1 are essential for control. The data obtained also indicate that an additional activator protein is involved.

  2. Multiple functions of nucleosomes and regulatory factors in transcription.

    PubMed

    Workman, J L; Buchman, A R

    1993-03-01

    The in vivo packaging of DNA with histone proteins to form chromatin makes its transcription a difficult process. Biochemical and genetic studies are beginning to reveal mechanistic details of how transcriptional regulatory factors confront at least two hurdles created by nucleosomes, the primary structural unit of chromatin. Regulatory factors must gain access to their respective binding sites and activate the formation of transcription complexes at core promoter elements. Distinct regulatory factors may be specialized to perform these functions.

  3. Sry is a transcriptional activator.

    PubMed

    Dubin, R A; Ostrer, H

    1994-09-01

    The SRY gene functions as a genetic switch in gonadal ridge initiating testis determination. The mouse Sry and human SRY open reading frames (ORFs) share a conserved DNA-binding domain (the HMG-box) yet exhibit no additional homology outside this region. As judged by the accumulation of lacZ-SRY hybrid proteins in the nucleus, both the human and mouse SRY ORFs contain a nuclear localization signal. The mouse Sry HMG-box domain selectively binds the sequence NACAAT in vitro when challenged with a random pool of oligonucleotides and binds AACAAT with the highest affinity. When put under the control of a heterologous promotor, the mouse Sry gene activated transcription of a reporter gene containing multiple copies of the AACAAT binding site. Activation was likewise observed for a GAL4-responsive reporter gene, when the mouse Sry gene was linked to the DNA-binding domain of GAL4. Using this system, the activation function was mapped to a glutamine/histidine-rich domain. In addition, LexA-mouse Sry fusion genes activated a LexA-responsive reporter gene in yeast. In contrast, a GAL4-human SRY fusion gene did not cause transcriptional activation. These studies suggest that both the human and the mouse SRY ORFs encode nuclear, DNA-binding proteins and that the mouse Sry ORF can function as a transcriptional activator with separable DNA-binding and activator domains.

  4. Training program to prepare the U.S. DOE laboratories for the entry into force of the protocol additional to the agreement between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in the United

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Brian David; Stevens, Rebecca C; Uribe, Eva C; Sandoval, M Analisa; Valente, John N; Valente, John U; Jo, Jae H; Sellen, Joana

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, a joint team from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) consisting of specialists in training IAEA inspectors in the use of complementary access activities formulated a training program to prepare the U.S DOE laboratories for the entry into force of the U.S. Additional Protocol. Since the U.S. Additional Protocol would allow for IAEA access to the DOE laboratories under the aegis of complementary access activities, the DOE laboratories would need to prepare for such visits. The goal of the training was to ensure that the DOE laboratories would successfully host an IAEA complementary access. In doing so, the labs must be able to provide the IAEA with the information that the IAEA would need to resolve its questions about the U.S. Declaration and declared activities at the lab, and also protect certain equities, as provided under the U.S. Additional Protocol Article 1.b and c. which set forth a 'National Security Exclusion.' This 'NSE' states that the AP provisions apply within the United States 'excluding only instances where its application would result in access by the Agency to activities with direct national security significance to the United States or to location or information associated with such activities.' These activities are referred to collectively as DNSS-direct national security significance. Furthermore, the U.S. has a specific right to employ managed access, without prejudice to the right under Article 1.b, in connection with activities of DNSS. The provisions in Articles 1.b and 1.c are unique to the U.S. AP, and are additional to the more general right, under Article 7, to use managed access to protect from disclosure proprietary and/or proliferation-sensitive information, and to meet safety and security requirements, that is incorporated directly from the Model Additional Protocol. The BNL-LANL team performed training at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak

  5. Interobserver Agreement on First-Stage Conversation Analytic Transcription

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Felicia; Robinson, Jeffrey D.

    2004-01-01

    This investigation assesses interobserver agreement on conversation analytic (CA) transcription. Four professional CA transcribers spent a maximum of 3 hours transcribing 2.5 minutes of a previously unknown, naturally occurring, mundane telephone call. Researchers unitized transcripts into words, sounds, silences, inbreaths, outbreaths, and laugh…

  6. Transcription and activation under environmental stress of the complex telomeric repeats of Chironomus thummi.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Guitarte, J L; Díez, J L; Morcillo, G

    2008-01-01

    In contrast to their traditional role, telomeres seem to behave as transcriptionally active regions. RNAs complementary to the short DNA repeats characteristic of telomerase-maintained telomeres have recently been identified in various mammalian cell lines, representing a new and unexpected element in telomere architecture. Here, we report the existence of transcripts complementary to telomeric sequences characteristic of Chironomus thummi telomeres. As in other Diptera, the non-canonical telomeres of chironomids lack the simple telomerase repeats and have instead more complex repetitive sequences. Northern blots of total RNA hybridized with telomere probes and RT-PCR with telomere-specific tailed primers confirm the existence of small non-coding RNAs of around 200 bp, the size of the DNA repeated telomeric unit. Telomere transcripts are heterogeneous in length, and they appear as a ladder pattern that probably corresponds to multimers of the repeat. Moreover, telomeres are activated under conditions of environmental stress, such as heat shock, appearing highly decondensed and densely labelled with acetylated H4 histone, as well as with RNA polymerase II antibodies, both marks of transcriptional activity. Changes in the expression levels of telomeric RNA were detected after heat shock. These findings provide evidence that transcriptional activity of the repetitive telomere sequences is an evolutionarily conserved feature, not limited to telomerase telomeres. The functional significance of this non-coding RNA as a new additional element in the context of telomere biology remains to be explained.

  7. Transcriptional Profiling of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis During Infection: Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Sarah K.; Abomoelak, Bassam; Marcus, Sarah A.; Talaat, Adel M.

    2010-01-01

    Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is considered one of the biggest infectious disease killers worldwide. A significant amount of attention has been directed toward revealing genes involved in the virulence and pathogenesis of this air-born pathogen. With the advances in technologies for transcriptional profiling, several groups, including ours, took advantage of DNA microarrays to identify transcriptional units differentially regulated by M. tuberculosis within a host. The main idea behind this approach is that pathogens tend to regulate their gene expression levels depending on the host microenvironment, and preferentially express those needed for survival. Identifying this class of genes will improve our understanding of pathogenesis. In our case, we identified an in vivo expressed genomic island that was preferentially active in murine lungs during early infection, as well as groups of genes active during chronic tuberculosis. Other studies have identified additional gene groups that are active during macrophage infection and even in human lungs. Despite all of these findings, one of the lingering questions remaining was whether in vivo expressed transcripts are relevant to the virulence, pathogenesis, and persistence of the organism. The work of our group and others addressed this question by examining the contribution of in vivo expressed genes using a strategy based on gene deletions followed by animal infections. Overall, the analysis of most of the in vivo expressed genes supported a role of these genes in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis. Further, these data suggest that in vivo transcriptional profiling is a valid approach to identify genes required for bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:21738523

  8. ASTP Onboard Voice Transcription

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The transcription is presented of the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project voice communications as recorded on the command module data storage equipment. Data from this recorder are telemetered (dumped) to Space Tracking and Data Network sites for retransmission to the Johnson Space Center. The transcript is divided into three columns -- time, speaker, and text. The Greenwich mean time column consists of three two-digit numbers representing hours, minutes, and seconds (e.g., 22 34 14) for the Julian dates shown at the top of the page on which a new day begins. The speaker column indicates the source of a transmission; the text column contains the verbatim transcript of the communications.

  9. Tandem transcription termination sites in the dnaN gene of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Armengod, M E; García-Sogo, M; Pérez-Roger, I; Macián, F; Navarro-Aviñó, J P

    1991-10-15

    The dnaN gene of Escherichia coli encodes the beta-subunit of DNA polymerase III and maps between the dnaA and recF genes. We demonstrated previously that dnaN and recF constitute a transcriptional unit under control of the dnaN promoters. However, the recF gene has its own promoter region located in the middle of the dnaN structural gene. In this report, we use S1 mapping of mRNAs, transcriptional and translational fusions to the galK and lacZ genes, and in vitro mutagenesis to identify and characterize three tandem transcription termination sites responsible for transcriptional polarity in the dnaN-recF operon. These sites are located in the dnaN gene, downstream from the recF promoter region. Cumulatively, they terminate about 80% of the untranslated transcripts started at the recF promoters. As expected, they do not reduce transcription coming from the dnaN promoters unless dnaN translation was prematurely disrupted by the presence of a nonsense codon. The particular arrangement of regulatory elements (promoters and terminators) in the dnaN-recF region provides an exceptional in vivo system to confirm the latent termination site model of transcriptional polarity. In addition, our results contribute to the understanding of the complex regulation of the dnaA, dnaN, and recF genes. We propose that these three genes constitute an operon and that the terminators described in this work could be used to reduce expression of the distal genes of the operon under circumstances in which the dnaN translation happens to be slowed down.

  10. DNA supercoiling during transcription

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Michelle D.

    2017-01-01

    The twin-supercoiled-domain model describes how transcription can drive DNA supercoiling, and how DNA supercoiling, in turn plays an important role in regulating gene transcription. In vivo and in vitro experiments have disclosed many details of the complex interactions in this relationship, and recently new insights have been gained with the help of genome-wide DNA supercoiling mapping techniques and single molecule methods. This review summarizes the general mechanisms of the interplay between DNA supercoiling and transcription, considers the biological implications, and focuses on recent important discoveries and technical advances in this field. We highlight the significant impact of DNA supercoiling in transcription, but also more broadly in all processes operating on DNA.

  11. Transcriptional Control of Stem and Progenitor Potential

    PubMed Central

    Muench, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoiesis is characterized by a lifelong balance between hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal and differentiation into mature blood populations. Proper instruction of cell fate decisions requires tight homeostatic regulation of transcriptional programs through a combination of epigenetic modifications, management of cis-regulatory elements, and transcription factor activity. Recent work has focused on integrating biochemical, genetic, and evolutionary data sets to gain further insight into these regulatory components. Long noncoding RNA (lncRNA), post-translational modifications of transcription factors, and circadian rhythm add additional layers of complexity. These analyses have provided a wealth of information, much of which has been made available through public databases. Elucidating the regulatory processes that govern hematopoietic transcriptional programs is expected to provide useful insights into hematopoiesis that may be applied broadly across tissue types while enabling the discovery and implementation of therapeutics to treat human disease. PMID:26509110

  12. In vitro squelching of activated transcription by serum response factor: evidence for a common coactivator used by multiple transcriptional activators.

    PubMed Central

    Prywes, R; Zhu, H

    1992-01-01

    Low amounts of serum response factor (SRF) activate transcription in vitro from a fos promoter construct containing an SRF binding site. Using this human HeLa cell-derived in vitro transcription system, we have found that high amounts of SRF inhibited, or 'squelched', transcription from this construct. Transcription from several other promoters activated by different gene-specific factors, including CREB and the acidic activator VP16, was also inhibited by high amounts of SRF. Basal transcription, from TATA-only promoters, however, was not inhibited. These results suggest that SRF binds to a common factor(s) (termed coactivator) required for activated transcription by a diverse group of transcriptional activators. Inhibition of transcription by SRF could be blocked by a double stranded oligonucleotide containing an SRF binding site. Mutations in SRF which abolished its DNA binding activity also reduced its ability to inhibit transcription. In addition, a C-terminal truncation of SRF which reduced its ability to activate transcription also reduced SRF's ability to inhibit transcription. These results suggest that activation and inhibition of transcription may be mediated by SRF binding to the same factor and that SRF can only bind to this factor when SRF is bound to plasmid DNA. Images PMID:1531519

  13. Bacterial Transcription as a Target for Antibacterial Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cong; Yang, Xiao; Lewis, Peter J

    2016-03-01

    Transcription, the first step of gene expression, is carried out by the enzyme RNA polymerase (RNAP) and is regulated through interaction with a series of protein transcription factors. RNAP and its associated transcription factors are highly conserved across the bacterial domain and represent excellent targets for broad-spectrum antibacterial agent discovery. Despite the numerous antibiotics on the market, there are only two series currently approved that target transcription. The determination of the three-dimensional structures of RNAP and transcription complexes at high resolution over the last 15 years has led to renewed interest in targeting this essential process for antibiotic development by utilizing rational structure-based approaches. In this review, we describe the inhibition of the bacterial transcription process with respect to structural studies of RNAP, highlight recent progress toward the discovery of novel transcription inhibitors, and suggest additional potential antibacterial targets for rational drug design.

  14. Bacterial Transcription as a Target for Antibacterial Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Cong; Yang, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Transcription, the first step of gene expression, is carried out by the enzyme RNA polymerase (RNAP) and is regulated through interaction with a series of protein transcription factors. RNAP and its associated transcription factors are highly conserved across the bacterial domain and represent excellent targets for broad-spectrum antibacterial agent discovery. Despite the numerous antibiotics on the market, there are only two series currently approved that target transcription. The determination of the three-dimensional structures of RNAP and transcription complexes at high resolution over the last 15 years has led to renewed interest in targeting this essential process for antibiotic development by utilizing rational structure-based approaches. In this review, we describe the inhibition of the bacterial transcription process with respect to structural studies of RNAP, highlight recent progress toward the discovery of novel transcription inhibitors, and suggest additional potential antibacterial targets for rational drug design. PMID:26764017

  15. Coupling pre-mRNA processing to transcription on the RNA factory assembly line

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kuo-Ming; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2013-01-01

    It has been well-documented that nuclear processing of primary transcripts of RNA polymerase II occurs co-transcriptionally and is functionally coupled to transcription. Moreover, increasing evidence indicates that transcription influences pre-mRNA splicing and even several post-splicing RNA processing events. In this review, we discuss the issues of how RNA polymerase II modulates co-transcriptional RNA processing events via its carboxyl terminal domain, and the protein domains involved in coupling of transcription and RNA processing events. In addition, we describe how transcription influences the expression or stability of mRNAs through the formation of distinct mRNP complexes. Finally, we delineate emerging findings that chromatin modifications function in the regulation of RNA processing steps, especially splicing, in addition to transcription. Overall, we provide a comprehensive view that transcription could integrate different control systems, from epigenetic to post-transcriptional control, for efficient gene expression. PMID:23392244

  16. Effect of selenium deficiency on gene transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, M.J.; Burgener, K.W. )

    1991-03-11

    To investigate the general effects of dietary selenium (Se) deficiency on gene transcription, weanling male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a basal Se-deficient Torula yeast-based diet or the same diet supplemented with 0.5 ppm Se as sodium selenite for 40 days. At that time three rats in each dietary group were sacrificed. Livers were excised and divided into two portions for isolation of nuclei and for assay of cytosolic Se-glutathione peroxidase (Se-GPX) activity. Se-GPX activity was 279 {plus minus} 4 (mean {plus minus} SEM) mUnits/mg protein in Se-adequate livers, and 10 {plus minus} 2 mUnits/mg protein in Se-deficient livers. One aliquot of nuclei from each dietary group was used in a run-on transcription assay, employing {alpha}-{sup 32}P-UTP to label nascent transcripts. Equal quantities of radioactivity from these nuclei were hybridized with cDNA probes bound to nitrocellulose. Message bound to each probe was quantitated by laser densitometry of autoradiographs, and by scintillation counting of dot blotted nitrocellulose. Transcription of most genes tested, including Se-GPX, was not significantly affected by dietary Se intake. However, the amount of hybridization to a murine oncogene probe (v-fos) was increased in Se deficiency.

  17. Cell-free transcription at 95 degrees: thermostability of transcriptional components and DNA topology requirements of Pyrococcus transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Hethke, C; Bergerat, A; Hausner, W; Forterre, P; Thomm, M

    1999-01-01

    Cell-free transcription of archaeal promoters is mediated by two archaeal transcription factors, aTBP and TFB, which are orthologues of the eukaryotic transcription factors TBP and TFIIB. Using the cell-free transcription system described for the hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus by Hethke et al., the temperature limits and template topology requirements of archaeal transcription were investigated. aTBP activity was not affected after incubation for 1 hr at 100 degrees. In contrast, the half-life of RNA polymerase activity was 23 min and that of TFB activity was 3 min. The half-life of a 328-nt RNA product was 10 min at 100 degrees. Best stability of RNA was observed at pH 6, at 400 mm K-glutamate in the absence of Mg(2+) ions. Physiological concentrations of K-glutamate were found to stabilize protein components in addition, indicating that salt is an important extrinsic factor contributing to thermostability. Both RNA and proteins were stabilized by the osmolyte betaine at a concentration of 1 m. The highest activity for RNA synthesis at 95 degrees was obtained in the presence of 1 m betaine and 400 mm K-glutamate. Positively supercoiled DNA, which was found to exist in Pyrococcus cells, can be transcribed in vitro both at 70 degrees and 90 degrees. However, negatively supercoiled DNA was the preferred template at all temperatures tested. Analyses of transcripts from plasmid topoisomers harboring the glutamate dehydrogenase promoter and of transcription reactions conducted in the presence of reverse gyrase indicate that positive supercoiling of DNA inhibits transcription from this promoter. PMID:10430563

  18. Regulation of Transcript Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Belogurov, Georgiy A.; Artsimovitch, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria lack subcellular compartments and harbor a single RNA polymerase that synthesizes both structural and protein-coding RNAs, which are cotranscriptionally processed by distinct pathways. Nascent rRNAs fold into elaborate secondary structures and associate with ribosomal proteins, whereas nascent mRNAs are translated by ribosomes. During elongation, nucleic acid signals and regulatory proteins modulate concurrent RNA-processing events, instruct RNA polymerase where to pause and terminate transcription, or act as roadblocks to the moving enzyme. Communications among complexes that carry out transcription, translation, repair, and other cellular processes ensure timely execution of the gene expression program and survival under conditions of stress. This network is maintained by auxiliary proteins that act as bridges between RNA polymerase, ribosome, and repair enzymes, blurring boundaries between separate information-processing steps and making assignments of unique regulatory functions meaningless. Understanding the regulation of transcript elongation thus requires genome-wide approaches, which confirm known and reveal new regulatory connections. PMID:26132790

  19. Proofreading of misincorporated nucleotides in DNA transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voliotis, Margaritis; Cohen, Netta; Molina-París, Carmen; Liverpool, Tanniemola B.

    2012-06-01

    The accuracy of DNA transcription is crucial for the proper functioning of the cell. Although RNA polymerases demonstrate selectivity for correct nucleotides, additional active mechanisms of transcriptional error correction are required to achieve observed levels of fidelity. Recent experimental findings have shed light on a particular mechanism of transcriptional error correction involving: (i) diffusive translocation of the RNA polymerase along the DNA (backtracking) and (ii) irreversible RNA cleavage. This mechanism achieves preferential cleavage of misincorporated nucleotides by biasing the local rates of translocation. Here, we study how misincorporated nucleotides affect backtracking dynamics and how this effect determines the level of transcriptional fidelity. We consider backtracking as a diffusive process in a periodic, one-dimensional energy landscape, which at a coarse-grained level gives rise to a hopping process between neighboring local minima. We propose a model for how misincorporated nucleotides deform this energy landscape and hence affect the hopping rates. In particular, we show that this model can be used to derive both the theoretical limit on the fidelity (i.e. the minimum fraction of misincorporated nucleotides) and the actual fidelity relative to this optimum, achieved for specific combinations of the cleavage and polymerization rates. Finally, we study how external factors influencing backtracking dynamics affect transcriptional fidelity. We show that biologically relevant loads, similar to those exerted by nucleosomes or other transcriptional barriers, increase error correction.

  20. Proofreading of misincorporated nucleotides in DNA transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voliotis, Margaritis; Cohen, Netta; Molina-París, Carmen; Liverpool, Tanniemola B.

    2012-06-01

    The accuracy of DNA transcription is crucial for the proper functioning of the cell. Although RNA polymerases demonstrate selectivity for correct nucleotides, additional active mechanisms of transcriptional error correction are required to achieve observed levels of fidelity. Recent experimental findings have shed light on a particular mechanism of transcriptional error correction involving: (i) diffusive translocation of the RNA polymerase along the DNA (backtracking) and (ii) irreversible RNA cleavage. This mechanism achieves preferential cleavage of misincorporated nucleotides by biasing the local rates of translocation. Here, we study how misincorporated nucleotides affect backtracking dynamics and how this effect determines the level of transcriptional fidelity. We consider backtracking as a diffusive process in a periodic, one-dimensional energy landscape, which at a coarse-grained level gives rise to a hopping process between neighbouring local minima. We propose a model for how misincorporated nucleotides deform this energy landscape and hence affect the hopping rates. In particular, we show that this model can be used to derive both the theoretical limit on the fidelity (i.e. the minimum fraction of misincorporated nucleotides) and the actual fidelity relative to this optimum, achieved for specific combinations of the cleavage and polymerization rates. Finally, we study how external factors influencing backtracking dynamics affect transcriptional fidelity. We show that biologically relevant loads, similar to those exerted by nucleosomes or other transcriptional barriers, increase error correction.

  1. The transcriptional control of the perforin locus

    PubMed Central

    Pipkin, Matthew E.; Rao, Anjana; Lichtenheld, Mathias G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) use cytotoxic granules containing perforin and granzymes to lyse infected or malignant host cells and provide immunity to intracellular microbes and tumors. Perforin is essential for cytotoxic granule-mediated killing. Perforin expression is regulated transcriptionally and correlates tightly with the development of cells that can exhibit cytotoxic activity. Although a number of genes transcribed by T cells and NK cells have been studied, the cell-specificity of perforin gene expression makes it an ideal model system in which to clarify the transcriptional mechanisms that guide the development and activation of cytotoxic lymphocytes. In this review, we discuss what is known about perforin expression and its regulation, then elaborate on recent studies that utilized chromosome transfer and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenics to define a comprehensive set of cis-regulatory regions that control transcription of the human PRF1 gene in a near-physiological context. In addition, we compare the human and murine Prf1 loci and discuss how transcription factors known to be important for driving CTL differentiation might also directly regulate the cis-acting domains that control Prf1. Our review emphasizes how studies of PRF1/Prf1 gene transcription can illuminate not only the mechanisms of cytotoxic lymphocyte differentiation but also some basic principles of transcriptional regulation. PMID:20536555

  2. The transcription factor encyclopedia.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I; Bolotin, Eugene; Ticoll, Amy; Cheung, Warren A; Zhang, Xiao Yu Cindy; Dickman, Christopher T D; Fulton, Debra L; Lim, Jonathan S; Schnabl, Jake M; Ramos, Oscar H P; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille; de Leeuw, Charles N; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Ryffel, Gerhart U; Lam, Eric W-F; Kist, Ralf; Wilson, Miranda S C; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Brosens, Jan J; Beccari, Leonardo L; Bovolenta, Paola; Benayoun, Bérénice A; Monteiro, Lara J; Schwenen, Helma D C; Grontved, Lars; Wederell, Elizabeth; Mandrup, Susanne; Veitia, Reiner A; Chakravarthy, Harini; Hoodless, Pamela A; Mancarelli, M Michela; Torbett, Bruce E; Banham, Alison H; Reddy, Sekhar P; Cullum, Rebecca L; Liedtke, Michaela; Tschan, Mario P; Vaz, Michelle; Rizzino, Angie; Zannini, Mariastella; Frietze, Seth; Farnham, Peggy J; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Brown, Philip J; Laperrière, David; Leprince, Dominique; de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Prince, Kelly L; Putker, Marrit; del Peso, Luis; Camenisch, Gieri; Wenger, Roland H; Mikula, Michal; Rozendaal, Marieke; Mader, Sylvie; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Rhodes, Simon J; Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Olechnowicz, Sam W Z; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S; Nanan, Kyster K; Wegner, Michael; Hou, Juan; Mullen, Rachel D; Colvin, Stephanie C; Noy, Peter John; Webb, Carol F; Witek, Matthew E; Ferrell, Scott; Daniel, Juliet M; Park, Jason; Waldman, Scott A; Peet, Daniel J; Taggart, Michael; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Karrich, Julien J; Blom, Bianca; Vesuna, Farhad; O'Geen, Henriette; Sun, Yunfu; Gronostajski, Richard M; Woodcroft, Mark W; Hough, Margaret R; Chen, Edwin; Europe-Finner, G Nicholas; Karolczak-Bayatti, Magdalena; Bailey, Jarrod; Hankinson, Oliver; Raman, Venu; LeBrun, David P; Biswal, Shyam; Harvey, Christopher J; DeBruyne, Jason P; Hogenesch, John B; Hevner, Robert F; Héligon, Christophe; Luo, Xin M; Blank, Marissa Cathleen; Millen, Kathleen Joyce; Sharlin, David S; Forrest, Douglas; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zhao, Chunyan; Mishima, Yuriko; Sinha, Satrajit; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Sladek, Frances M; Bradley, Philip H; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe.

  3. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe. PMID:22458515

  4. A model for regulation of mammalian ribosomal DNA transcription. Co-ordination of initiation and termination.

    PubMed Central

    Nashimoto, M; Mishima, Y

    1988-01-01

    Based on recent experimental data about transcription initiation and termination, a model for regulation of mammalian ribosomal DNA transcription is developed using a simple kinetic scheme. In this model, the existence of the transition pathway from the terminator to the promoter increases the rate of ribosomal RNA precursor synthesis. In addition to this 'non-transcribed spacer' traverse of RNA polymerase I, the co-ordination of initiation and termination allows a rapid on/off switch transition from the minimum to the maximum rate of ribosomal RNA precursor synthesis. Furthermore, taking account of the participation of two factors in the termination event, we propose a plausible molecular mechanism for the co-ordination of initiation and termination. This co-ordination is emphasized by repetition of the terminator unit. PMID:3223915

  5. A movie of RNA polymerase II transcription.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Alan C M; Cramer, Patrick

    2012-06-22

    We provide here a molecular movie that captures key aspects of RNA polymerase II initiation and elongation. To create the movie, we combined structural snapshots of the initiation-elongation transition and of elongation, including nucleotide addition, translocation, pausing, proofreading, backtracking, arrest, reactivation, and inhibition. The movie reveals open questions about the mechanism of transcription and provides a useful teaching tool.

  6. Mapping yeast transcriptional networks.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Timothy R; de Boer, Carl G

    2013-09-01

    The term "transcriptional network" refers to the mechanism(s) that underlies coordinated expression of genes, typically involving transcription factors (TFs) binding to the promoters of multiple genes, and individual genes controlled by multiple TFs. A multitude of studies in the last two decades have aimed to map and characterize transcriptional networks in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We review the methodologies and accomplishments of these studies, as well as challenges we now face. For most yeast TFs, data have been collected on their sequence preferences, in vivo promoter occupancy, and gene expression profiles in deletion mutants. These systematic studies have led to the identification of new regulators of numerous cellular functions and shed light on the overall organization of yeast gene regulation. However, many yeast TFs appear to be inactive under standard laboratory growth conditions, and many of the available data were collected using techniques that have since been improved. Perhaps as a consequence, comprehensive and accurate mapping among TF sequence preferences, promoter binding, and gene expression remains an open challenge. We propose that the time is ripe for renewed systematic efforts toward a complete mapping of yeast transcriptional regulatory mechanisms.

  7. Transcription of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Tabak, H F; Grivell, L A; Borst, P

    1983-01-01

    While mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is the simplest DNA in nature, coding for rRNAs and tRNAs, results of DNA sequence, and transcript analysis have demonstrated that both the synthesis and processing of mitochondrial RNAs involve remarkably intricate events. At one extreme, genes in animal mtDNAs are tightly packed, both DNA strands are completely transcribed (symmetric transcription), and the appearance of specific mRNAs is entirely dependent on processing at sites signalled by the sequences of the tRNAs, which abut virtually every gene. At the other extreme, gene organization in yeast (Saccharomyces) is anything but compact, with long stretches of AT-rich DNA interspaced between coding sequences and no obvious logic to the order of genes. Transcription is asymmetric and several RNAs are initiated de novo. Nevertheless, extensive RNA processing occurs due largely to the presence of split genes. RNA splicing is complex, is controlled by both mitochondrial and nuclear genes, and in some cases is accompanied by the formation of RNAs that behave as covalently closed circles. The present article reviews current knowledge of mitochondrial transcription and RNA processing in relation to possible mechanisms for the regulation of mitochondrial gene expression.

  8. Fungal CSL transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Převorovský, Martin; Půta, František; Folk, Petr

    2007-01-01

    Background The CSL (CBF1/RBP-Jκ/Suppressor of Hairless/LAG-1) transcription factor family members are well-known components of the transmembrane receptor Notch signaling pathway, which plays a critical role in metazoan development. They function as context-dependent activators or repressors of transcription of their responsive genes, the promoters of which harbor the GTG(G/A)GAA consensus elements. Recently, several studies described Notch-independent activities of the CSL proteins. Results We have identified putative CSL genes in several fungal species, showing that this family is not confined to metazoans. We have analyzed their sequence conservation and identified the presence of well-defined domains typical of genuine CSL proteins. Furthermore, we have shown that the candidate fungal protein sequences contain highly conserved regions known to be required for sequence-specific DNA binding in their metazoan counterparts. The phylogenetic analysis of the newly identified fungal CSL proteins revealed the existence of two distinct classes, both of which are present in all the species studied. Conclusion Our findings support the evolutionary origin of the CSL transcription factor family in the last common ancestor of fungi and metazoans. We hypothesize that the ancestral CSL function involved DNA binding and Notch-independent regulation of transcription and that this function may still be shared, to a certain degree, by the present CSL family members from both fungi and metazoans. PMID:17629904

  9. Nucleotide excision repair in Trypanosoma brucei: specialization of transcription-coupled repair due to multigenic transcription

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Carlos R; Vieira-da-Rocha, João P; Mendes, Isabela Cecilia; Rajão, Matheus A; Marcello, Lucio; Bitar, Mainá; Drummond, Marcela G; Grynberg, Priscila; Oliveira, Denise A A; Marques, Catarina; Van Houten, Ben; McCulloch, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a highly conserved genome repair pathway acting on helix distorting DNA lesions. NER is divided into two subpathways: global genome NER (GG-NER), which is responsible for repair throughout genomes, and transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER), which acts on lesions that impede transcription. The extent of the Trypanosoma brucei genome that is transcribed is highly unusual, since most genes are organized in multigene transcription units, each transcribed from a single promoter. Given this transcription organization, we have addressed the importance of NER to T. brucei genome maintenance by performing RNAi against all predicted contributing factors. Our results indicate that TC-NER is the main pathway of NER repair, but only CSB, XPBz and XPG contribute. Moreover, we show that UV lesions are inefficiently repaired in T. brucei, perhaps due to preferential use of RNA polymerase translesion synthesis. RNAi of XPC and DDB was found to be lethal, and we show that these factors act in inter-strand cross-link repair. XPD and XPB appear only to act in transcription, not repair. This work indicates that the predominance of multigenic transcription in T. brucei has resulted in pronounced adaptation of NER relative to the host and may be an attractive drug target. PMID:24661334

  10. Global analysis of transcriptionally engaged yeast RNA polymerase III reveals extended tRNA transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Turowski, Tomasz W.; Leśniewska, Ewa; Delan-Forino, Clementine; Sayou, Camille; Boguta, Magdalena; Tollervey, David

    2016-01-01

    RNA polymerase III (RNAPIII) synthesizes a range of highly abundant small stable RNAs, principally pre-tRNAs. Here we report the genome-wide analysis of nascent transcripts attached to RNAPIII under permissive and restrictive growth conditions. This revealed strikingly uneven polymerase distributions across transcription units, generally with a predominant 5′ peak. This peak was higher for more heavily transcribed genes, suggesting that initiation site clearance is rate-limiting during RNAPIII transcription. Down-regulation of RNAPIII transcription under stress conditions was found to be uneven; a subset of tRNA genes showed low response to nutrient shift or loss of the major transcription regulator Maf1, suggesting potential “housekeeping” roles. Many tRNA genes were found to generate long, 3′-extended forms due to read-through of the canonical poly(U) terminators. The degree of read-through was anti-correlated with the density of U-residues in the nascent tRNA, and multiple, functional terminators can be located far downstream. The steady-state levels of 3′-extended pre-tRNA transcripts are low, apparently due to targeting by the nuclear surveillance machinery, especially the RNA binding protein Nab2, cofactors for the nuclear exosome, and the 5′-exonuclease Rat1. PMID:27206856

  11. The nature of mutations induced by replication–transcription collisions.

    PubMed

    Sankar, T Sabari; Wastuwidyaningtyas, Brigitta D; Dong, Yuexin; Lewis, Sarah A; Wang, Jue D

    2016-07-07

    The DNA replication and transcription machineries share a common DNA template and thus can collide with each other co-directionally or head-on. Replication–transcription collisions can cause replication fork arrest, premature transcription termination, DNA breaks, and recombination intermediates threatening genome integrity. Collisions may also trigger mutations, which are major contributors to genetic disease and evolution. However, the nature and mechanisms of collision-induced mutagenesis remain poorly understood. Here we reveal the genetic consequences of replication–transcription collisions in actively dividing bacteria to be two classes of mutations: duplications/deletions and base substitutions in promoters. Both signatures are highly deleterious but are distinct from the previously well-characterized base substitutions in the coding sequence. Duplications/deletions are probably caused by replication stalling events that are triggered by collisions; their distribution patterns are consistent with where the fork first encounters a transcription complex upon entering a transcription unit. Promoter substitutions result mostly from head-on collisions and frequently occur at a nucleotide that is conserved in promoters recognized by the major σ factor in bacteria. This substitution is generated via adenine deamination on the template strand in the promoter open complex, as a consequence of head-on replication perturbing transcription initiation. We conclude that replication–transcription collisions induce distinct mutation signatures by antagonizing replication and transcription, not only in coding sequences but also in gene regulatory elements.

  12. The Nature of Mutations Induced by Replication-Transcription Collisions

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, T. Sabari; Wastuwidyaningtyas, Brigitta D.; Dong, Yuexin; Lewis, Sarah A.; Wang, Jue D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The DNA replication and transcription machineries share a common DNA template and thus can collide with each other co-directionally or head-on1,2. Replication-transcription collisions can cause replication fork arrest, premature transcription termination, DNA breaks, and recombination intermediates threatening genome integrity1–10. Collisions may also trigger mutations, which are major contributors of genetic disease and evolution5,7,11. However, the nature and mechanisms of collision-induced mutagenesis remain poorly understood. Here we reveal the genetic consequence of replication-transcription collisions in actively dividing bacteria to be two classes of mutations: duplications/deletions and base substitutions in promoters. Both signatures are highly deleterious but are distinct from the well-characterized base substitutions in coding sequence. Duplications/deletions are likely caused by replication stalling events that are triggered by collisions; their distribution patterns are consistent with where the fork first encounters a transcription complex upon entering a transcription unit. Promoter substitutions result mostly from head-on collisions and frequently occur at a nucleotide conserved in promoters recognized by the major sigma factor in bacteria. This substitution is generated via adenine deamination on the template strand in the promoter open complex, as a consequence of head-on replication perturbing transcription initiation. We conclude that replication-transcription collisions induce distinct mutation signatures by antagonizing replication and transcription, not only in coding sequences but also in gene regulatory elements. PMID:27362223

  13. Requirement of gene VII in cis for the expression of downstream genes on the major transcript of figwort mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Gowda, S; Scholthof, H B; Wu, F C; Shepherd, R J

    1991-12-01

    The six major conserved genes of figwort mosaic virus (FMV), a caulimovirus, appear in tandem array on an RNA transcript that spans the entire viral genome. Gene VI, the only cistron that appears as a separate subgenomic RNA, has been reported to transactivate the expression of downstream genes of the full-length transcript. This transcript has a long 5'-leader of about 600 nucleotides followed by a small nonconserved region (gene VII), a smaller intergenic region (57 nucleotides), and the major conserved genes in a closely spaced array. In our present experiments we have constructed expression units containing the promoter for the full-length transcript followed by the 5' leader region, gene VII, and a reporter gene. These have been tested for expression with and without gene VI as a separate plasmid by electroporation into plant protoplasts. A series of these expression units containing truncated versions of the 5' leader region placed upstream of a reporter gene (CAT) showed that gene VI transactivation occurred only when gene VII sequences were present in cis between the leader region and the reporter gene. In addition, a more complete version of the FMV genome containing the reporter gene further downstream (in viral gene IV) showed CAT expression only when gene VII sequences were present in an upstream position. A similar construct failed to express CAT activity when gene VII was absent.

  14. Plant Mediator complex and its critical functions in transcription regulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Li, Ling; Qu, Li-Jia

    2016-02-01

    The Mediator complex is an important component of the eukaryotic transcriptional machinery. As an essential link between transcription factors and RNA polymerase II, the Mediator complex transduces diverse signals to genes involved in different pathways. The plant Mediator complex was recently purified and comprises conserved and specific subunits. It functions in concert with transcription factors to modulate various responses. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in understanding the plant Mediator complex and its diverse roles in plant growth, development, defense, non-coding RNA production, response to abiotic stresses, flowering, genomic stability and metabolic homeostasis. In addition, the transcription factors interacting with the Mediator complex are also highlighted.

  15. Informational Requirements for Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Patrick K.; Forder, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Transcription factors (TFs) regulate transcription by binding to specific sites in promoter regions. Information theory provides a useful mathematical framework to analyze the binding motifs associated with TFs but imposes several assumptions that limit their applicability to specific regulatory scenarios. Explicit simulations of the co-evolution of TFs and their binding motifs allow the study of the evolution of regulatory networks with a high degree of realism. In this work we analyze the impact of differential regulatory demands on the information content of TF-binding motifs by means of evolutionary simulations. We generalize a predictive index based on information theory, and we validate its applicability to regulatory scenarios in which the TF binds significantly to the genomic background. Our results show a logarithmic dependence of the evolved information content on the occupancy of target sites and indicate that TFs may actively exploit pseudo-sites to modulate their occupancy of target sites. In regulatory networks with differentially regulated targets, we observe that information content in TF-binding motifs is dictated primarily by the fraction of total probability mass that the TF assigns to its target sites, and we provide a predictive index to estimate the amount of information associated with arbitrarily complex regulatory systems. We observe that complex regulatory patterns can exert additional demands on evolved information content, but, given a total occupancy for target sites, we do not find conclusive evidence that this effect is because of the range of required binding affinities. PMID:24689750

  16. TOPLESS mediates auxin-dependent transcriptional repression during Arabidopsis embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Szemenyei, Heidi; Hannon, Mike; Long, Jeff A

    2008-03-07

    The transcriptional response to auxin is critical for root and vascular development during Arabidopsis embryogenesis. Auxin induces the degradation of AUXIN/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID (AUX/IAA) transcriptional repressors, freeing their binding partners, the AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR (ARF) proteins, which can activate transcription of auxin response genes. We show that TOPLESS (TPL) can physically interact with IAA12/BODENLOS (IAA12/BDL) through an ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR (ERF)-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif. TPL can repress transcription in vivo and is required for IAA12/BDL repressive activity. In addition, tpl-1 can suppress the patterning defects of the bdl-1 mutant. Direct interaction between TPL and ARF5/MONOPTEROS, which is regulated by IAA12/BDL, results in a loss-of-function arf5/mp phenotype. These observations show that TPL is a transcriptional co-repressor and further our understanding of how auxin regulates transcription during plant development.

  17. Switching on cilia: transcriptional networks regulating ciliogenesis.

    PubMed

    Choksi, Semil P; Lauter, Gilbert; Swoboda, Peter; Roy, Sudipto

    2014-04-01

    Cilia play many essential roles in fluid transport and cellular locomotion, and as sensory hubs for a variety of signal transduction pathways. Despite having a conserved basic morphology, cilia vary extensively in their shapes and sizes, ultrastructural details, numbers per cell, motility patterns and sensory capabilities. Emerging evidence indicates that this diversity, which is intimately linked to the different functions that cilia perform, is in large part programmed at the transcriptional level. Here, we review our understanding of the transcriptional control of ciliary biogenesis, highlighting the activities of FOXJ1 and the RFX family of transcriptional regulators. In addition, we examine how a number of signaling pathways, and lineage and cell fate determinants can induce and modulate ciliogenic programs to bring about the differentiation of distinct cilia types.

  18. Natural antisense and noncoding RNA transcripts as potential drug targets.

    PubMed

    Wahlestedt, Claes

    2006-06-01

    Information on the complexity of mammalian RNA transcription has increased greatly in the past few years. Notably, thousands of sense transcripts (conventional protein-coding genes) have antisense transcript partners, most of which are noncoding. Interestingly, a number of antisense transcripts regulate the expression of their sense partners, either in a discordant (antisense knockdown results in sense-transcript elevation) or concordant (antisense knockdown results in concomitant sense-transcript reduction) manner. Two new pharmacological strategies based on the knockdown of antisense RNA transcripts by siRNA (or another RNA targeting principle) are proposed in this review. In the case of discordant regulation, knockdown of antisense transcript elevates the expression of the conventional (sense) gene, thereby conceivably mimicking agonist-activator action. In the case of concordant regulation, knockdown of antisense transcript, or concomitant knockdown of antisense and sense transcripts, results in an additive or even synergistic reduction of the conventional gene expression. Although both strategies have been demonstrated to be valid in cell culture, it remains to be seen whether they provide advantages in other contexts.

  19. Cooperative activation of Xenopus rhodopsin transcription by paired-like transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In vertebrates, rod photoreceptor-specific gene expression is regulated by the large Maf and Pax-like transcription factors, Nrl/LNrl and Crx/Otx5. The ubiquitous occurrence of their target DNA binding sites throughout rod-specific gene promoters suggests that multiple transcription factor interactions within the promoter are functionally important. Cooperative action by these transcription factors activates rod-specific genes such as rhodopsin. However, a quantitative mechanistic explanation of transcriptional rate determinants is lacking. Results We investigated the contributions of various paired-like transcription factors and their cognate cis-elements to rhodopsin gene activation using cultured cells to quantify activity. The Xenopus rhodopsin promoter (XOP) has a bipartite structure, with ~200 bp proximal to the start site (RPP) coordinating cooperative activation by Nrl/LNrl-Crx/Otx5 and the adjacent 5300 bp upstream sequence increasing the overall expression level. The synergistic activation by Nrl/LNrl-Crx/Otx5 also occurred when XOP was stably integrated into the genome. We determined that Crx/Otx5 synergistically activated transcription independently and additively through the two Pax-like cis-elements, BAT1 and Ret4, but not through Ret1. Other Pax-like family members, Rax1 and Rax2, do not synergistically activate XOP transcription with Nrl/LNrl and/or Crx/Otx5; rather they act as co-activators via the Ret1 cis-element. Conclusions We have provided a quantitative model of cooperative transcriptional activation of the rhodopsin promoter through interaction of Crx/Otx5 with Nrl/LNrl at two paired-like cis-elements proximal to the NRE and TATA binding site. Further, we have shown that Rax genes act in cooperation with Crx/Otx5 with Nrl/LNrl as co-activators of rhodopsin transcription. PMID:24499263

  20. A compendium of nucleosome and transcript profiles reveals determinants of chromatin architecture and transcription.

    PubMed

    van Bakel, Harm; Tsui, Kyle; Gebbia, Marinella; Mnaimneh, Sanie; Hughes, Timothy R; Nislow, Corey

    2013-05-01

    Nucleosomes in all eukaryotes examined to date adopt a characteristic architecture within genes and play fundamental roles in regulating transcription, yet the identity and precise roles of many of the trans-acting factors responsible for the establishment and maintenance of this organization remain to be identified. We profiled a compendium of 50 yeast strains carrying conditional alleles or complete deletions of genes involved in transcriptional regulation, histone biology, and chromatin remodeling, as well as compounds that target transcription and histone deacetylases, to assess their respective roles in nucleosome positioning and transcription. We find that nucleosome patterning in genes is affected by many factors, including the CAF-1 complex, Spt10, and Spt21, in addition to previously reported remodeler ATPases and histone chaperones. Disruption of these factors or reductions in histone levels led genic nucleosomes to assume positions more consistent with their intrinsic sequence preferences, with pronounced and specific shifts of the +1 nucleosome relative to the transcription start site. These shifts of +1 nucleosomes appear to have functional consequences, as several affected genes in Ino80 mutants exhibited altered expression responses. Our parallel expression profiling compendium revealed extensive transcription changes in intergenic and antisense regions, most of which occur in regions with altered nucleosome occupancy and positioning. We show that the nucleosome-excluding transcription factors Reb1, Abf1, Tbf1, and Rsc3 suppress cryptic transcripts at their target promoters, while a combined analysis of nucleosome and expression profiles identified 36 novel transcripts that are normally repressed by Tup1/Cyc8. Our data confirm and extend the roles of chromatin remodelers and chaperones as major determinants of genic nucleosome positioning, and these data provide a valuable resource for future studies.

  1. A Compendium of Nucleosome and Transcript Profiles Reveals Determinants of Chromatin Architecture and Transcription

    PubMed Central

    van Bakel, Harm; Tsui, Kyle; Gebbia, Marinella; Mnaimneh, Sanie; Hughes, Timothy R.; Nislow, Corey

    2013-01-01

    Nucleosomes in all eukaryotes examined to date adopt a characteristic architecture within genes and play fundamental roles in regulating transcription, yet the identity and precise roles of many of the trans-acting factors responsible for the establishment and maintenance of this organization remain to be identified. We profiled a compendium of 50 yeast strains carrying conditional alleles or complete deletions of genes involved in transcriptional regulation, histone biology, and chromatin remodeling, as well as compounds that target transcription and histone deacetylases, to assess their respective roles in nucleosome positioning and transcription. We find that nucleosome patterning in genes is affected by many factors, including the CAF-1 complex, Spt10, and Spt21, in addition to previously reported remodeler ATPases and histone chaperones. Disruption of these factors or reductions in histone levels led genic nucleosomes to assume positions more consistent with their intrinsic sequence preferences, with pronounced and specific shifts of the +1 nucleosome relative to the transcription start site. These shifts of +1 nucleosomes appear to have functional consequences, as several affected genes in Ino80 mutants exhibited altered expression responses. Our parallel expression profiling compendium revealed extensive transcription changes in intergenic and antisense regions, most of which occur in regions with altered nucleosome occupancy and positioning. We show that the nucleosome-excluding transcription factors Reb1, Abf1, Tbf1, and Rsc3 suppress cryptic transcripts at their target promoters, while a combined analysis of nucleosome and expression profiles identified 36 novel transcripts that are normally repressed by Tup1/Cyc8. Our data confirm and extend the roles of chromatin remodelers and chaperones as major determinants of genic nucleosome positioning, and these data provide a valuable resource for future studies. PMID:23658529

  2. Machine Transcription--Practically Speaking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clippinger, Dorinda A.

    1984-01-01

    Draws transcription teaching principles from Gagne's theories about learning. Recommends 12-16 weeks of instruction, pre-transcription development of related skills, frequent feedback, and use of teaching materials that are arranged to take advantage of learning cycles. (SK)

  3. Transcription factors make a turn into migration

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The formation of the brain depends on a tightly regulated process of proliferation, neuronal fate specification and migration which eventually leads to the final architecture of the cerebral cortex. The specification of different neuronal subtypes depends on a complex developmental program mastered by several transcription factors. Besides, it was shown that the same transcription factors can subsequently control neural migration. However, the mechanisms of this regulation are still unclear. Two papers recently published by Heng et al.1 and Nóbrega-Pereira et al.2 confirm that these transcription factors are involved in controlling neural migration. In addition, these studies show that these transcription factors can control neural migration via different molecular mechanisms: Heng and coworkers show that Neurogenin 2 controls neural migration by directly regulating the expression of the small GTPase Rnd2 (a modulator of cytoskeletal dynamics); whereas Nóbrega-Pereira and colleagues demonstrate that Nkx2-1 establishes the response to guidance cues, in migrating interneurons, by directly regulating the expression of the semaphorin receptor Neuropilin 2. Taken together, these findings support the idea that transcription factors are reused during development to control neural migration and they shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation. PMID:19262164

  4. Identifying Novel Transcriptional Regulators with Circadian Expression

    PubMed Central

    Schick, Sandra; Thakurela, Sudhir; Fournier, David; Hampel, Mareike Hildegard

    2015-01-01

    Organisms adapt their physiology and behavior to the 24-h day-night cycle to which they are exposed. On a cellular level, this is regulated by intrinsic transcriptional-translational feedback loops that are important for maintaining the circadian rhythm. These loops are organized by members of the core clock network, which further regulate transcription of downstream genes, resulting in their circadian expression. Despite progress in understanding circadian gene expression, only a few players involved in circadian transcriptional regulation, including transcription factors, epigenetic regulators, and long noncoding RNAs, are known. Aiming to discover such genes, we performed a high-coverage transcriptome analysis of a circadian time course in murine fibroblast cells. In combination with a newly developed algorithm, we identified many transcription factors, epigenetic regulators, and long intergenic noncoding RNAs that are cyclically expressed. In addition, a number of these genes also showed circadian expression in mouse tissues. Furthermore, the knockdown of one such factor, Zfp28, influenced the core clock network. Mathematical modeling was able to predict putative regulator-effector interactions between the identified circadian genes and may help for investigations into the gene regulatory networks underlying circadian rhythms. PMID:26644408

  5. Promoters, transcripts, and regulatory proteins of Mungbean yellow mosaic geminivirus.

    PubMed

    Shivaprasad, P V; Akbergenov, Rashid; Trinks, Daniela; Rajeswaran, R; Veluthambi, K; Hohn, Thomas; Pooggin, Mikhail M

    2005-07-01

    Geminiviruses package circular single-stranded DNA and replicate in the nucleus via a double-stranded intermediate. This intermediate also serves as a template for bidirectional transcription by polymerase II. Here, we map promoters and transcripts and characterize regulatory proteins of Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-Vigna (MYMV), a bipartite geminivirus in the genus Begomovirus. The following new features, which might also apply to other begomoviruses, were revealed in MYMV. The leftward and rightward promoters on DNA-B share the transcription activator AC2-responsive region, which does not overlap the common region that is nearly identical in the two DNA components. The transcription unit for BC1 (movement protein) includes a conserved, leader-based intron. Besides negative-feedback regulation of its own leftward promoter on DNA-A, the replication protein AC1, in cooperation with AC2, synergistically transactivates the rightward promoter, which drives a dicistronic transcription unit for the coat protein AV1. AC2 and the replication enhancer AC3 are expressed from one dicistronic transcript driven by a strong promoter mapped within the upstream AC1 gene. Early and constitutive expression of AC2 is consistent with its essential dual function as an activator of viral transcription and a suppressor of silencing.

  6. Promoters, Transcripts, and Regulatory Proteins of Mungbean Yellow Mosaic Geminivirus†

    PubMed Central

    Shivaprasad, P. V.; Akbergenov, Rashid; Trinks, Daniela; Rajeswaran, R.; Veluthambi, K.; Hohn, Thomas; Pooggin, Mikhail M.

    2005-01-01

    Geminiviruses package circular single-stranded DNA and replicate in the nucleus via a double-stranded intermediate. This intermediate also serves as a template for bidirectional transcription by polymerase II. Here, we map promoters and transcripts and characterize regulatory proteins of Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-Vigna (MYMV), a bipartite geminivirus in the genus Begomovirus. The following new features, which might also apply to other begomoviruses, were revealed in MYMV. The leftward and rightward promoters on DNA-B share the transcription activator AC2-responsive region, which does not overlap the common region that is nearly identical in the two DNA components. The transcription unit for BC1 (movement protein) includes a conserved, leader-based intron. Besides negative-feedback regulation of its own leftward promoter on DNA-A, the replication protein AC1, in cooperation with AC2, synergistically transactivates the rightward promoter, which drives a dicistronic transcription unit for the coat protein AV1. AC2 and the replication enhancer AC3 are expressed from one dicistronic transcript driven by a strong promoter mapped within the upstream AC1 gene. Early and constitutive expression of AC2 is consistent with its essential dual function as an activator of viral transcription and a suppressor of silencing. PMID:15956560

  7. FOXA and master transcription factors recruit Mediator and Cohesin to the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Michèle; Bourriquen, Gaëlle; Lamaze, Fabien C.; Côté, Maxime C.; Fournier, Éric; Joly-Beauparlant, Charles; Caron, Vicky; Gobeil, Stéphane; Droit, Arnaud; Bilodeau, Steve

    2016-10-01

    Controlling the transcriptional program is essential to maintain the identity and the biological functions of a cell. The Mediator and Cohesin complexes have been established as central cofactors controlling the transcriptional program in normal cells. However, the distribution, recruitment and importance of these complexes in cancer cells have not been fully investigated. Here we show that FOXA and master transcription factors are part of the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells and are essential to recruit M ediator and Cohesin. Indeed, Mediator and Cohesin occupied the enhancer and promoter regions of actively transcribed genes and maintained the proliferation and colony forming potential. Through integration of publically available ChIP-Seq datasets, we predicted the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of each cancer cell. Unexpectedly, for all cells investigated, the pioneer transcription factors FOXA1 and/or FOXA2 were identified in addition to cell-specific master transcription factors. Loss of both types of transcription factors phenocopied the loss of Mediator and Cohesin. Lastly, the master and pioneer transcription factors were essential to recruit Mediator and Cohesin to regulatory regions of actively transcribed genes. Our study proposes that maintenance of the cancer cell state is dependent on recruitment of Mediator and Cohesin through FOXA and master transcription factors.

  8. FOXA and master transcription factors recruit Mediator and Cohesin to the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Michèle; Bourriquen, Gaëlle; Lamaze, Fabien C; Côté, Maxime C; Fournier, Éric; Joly-Beauparlant, Charles; Caron, Vicky; Gobeil, Stéphane; Droit, Arnaud; Bilodeau, Steve

    2016-10-14

    Controlling the transcriptional program is essential to maintain the identity and the biological functions of a cell. The Mediator and Cohesin complexes have been established as central cofactors controlling the transcriptional program in normal cells. However, the distribution, recruitment and importance of these complexes in cancer cells have not been fully investigated. Here we show that FOXA and master transcription factors are part of the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells and are essential to recruit M ediator and Cohesin. Indeed, Mediator and Cohesin occupied the enhancer and promoter regions of actively transcribed genes and maintained the proliferation and colony forming potential. Through integration of publically available ChIP-Seq datasets, we predicted the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of each cancer cell. Unexpectedly, for all cells investigated, the pioneer transcription factors FOXA1 and/or FOXA2 were identified in addition to cell-specific master transcription factors. Loss of both types of transcription factors phenocopied the loss of Mediator and Cohesin. Lastly, the master and pioneer transcription factors were essential to recruit Mediator and Cohesin to regulatory regions of actively transcribed genes. Our study proposes that maintenance of the cancer cell state is dependent on recruitment of Mediator and Cohesin through FOXA and master transcription factors.

  9. FOXA and master transcription factors recruit Mediator and Cohesin to the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Michèle; Bourriquen, Gaëlle; Lamaze, Fabien C.; Côté, Maxime C.; Fournier, Éric; Joly-Beauparlant, Charles; Caron, Vicky; Gobeil, Stéphane; Droit, Arnaud; Bilodeau, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Controlling the transcriptional program is essential to maintain the identity and the biological functions of a cell. The Mediator and Cohesin complexes have been established as central cofactors controlling the transcriptional program in normal cells. However, the distribution, recruitment and importance of these complexes in cancer cells have not been fully investigated. Here we show that FOXA and master transcription factors are part of the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells and are essential to recruit M ediator and Cohesin. Indeed, Mediator and Cohesin occupied the enhancer and promoter regions of actively transcribed genes and maintained the proliferation and colony forming potential. Through integration of publically available ChIP-Seq datasets, we predicted the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of each cancer cell. Unexpectedly, for all cells investigated, the pioneer transcription factors FOXA1 and/or FOXA2 were identified in addition to cell-specific master transcription factors. Loss of both types of transcription factors phenocopied the loss of Mediator and Cohesin. Lastly, the master and pioneer transcription factors were essential to recruit Mediator and Cohesin to regulatory regions of actively transcribed genes. Our study proposes that maintenance of the cancer cell state is dependent on recruitment of Mediator and Cohesin through FOXA and master transcription factors. PMID:27739523

  10. Direct Characterization of Transcription Elongation by RNA Polymerase I

    PubMed Central

    Ucuncuoglu, Suleyman; Engel, Krysta L.; Purohit, Prashant K.; Dunlap, David D.; Schneider, David A.

    2016-01-01

    RNA polymerase I (Pol I) transcribes ribosomal DNA and is responsible for more than 60% of transcription in a growing cell. Despite this fundamental role that directly impacts cell growth and proliferation, the kinetics of transcription by Pol I are poorly understood. This study provides direct characterization of S. Cerevisiae Pol I transcription elongation using tethered particle microscopy (TPM). Pol I was shown to elongate at an average rate of approximately 20 nt/s. However, the maximum speed observed was, in average, about 60 nt/s, comparable to the rate calculated based on the in vivo number of active genes, the cell division rate and the number of engaged polymerases observed in EM images. Addition of RNA endonucleases to the TPM elongation assays enhanced processivity. Together, these data suggest that additional transcription factors contribute to efficient and processive transcription elongation by RNA polymerase I in vivo. PMID:27455049

  11. Non-transcriptional regulatory processes shape transcriptional network dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ray, J Christian J; Tabor, Jeffrey J; Igoshin, Oleg A

    2011-10-11

    Information about the extra- or intracellular environment is often captured as biochemical signals that propagate through regulatory networks. These signals eventually drive phenotypic changes, typically by altering gene expression programmes in the cell. Reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks has given a compelling picture of bacterial physiology, but transcriptional network maps alone often fail to describe phenotypes. Cellular response dynamics are ultimately determined by interactions between transcriptional and non-transcriptional networks, with dramatic implications for physiology and evolution. Here, we provide an overview of non-transcriptional interactions that can affect the performance of natural and synthetic bacterial regulatory networks.

  12. Downstream Antisense Transcription Predicts Genomic Features That Define the Specific Chromatin Environment at Mammalian Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Lavender, Christopher A.; Hoffman, Jackson A.; Trotter, Kevin W.; Gilchrist, Daniel A.; Bennett, Brian D.; Burkholder, Adam B.; Fargo, David C.; Archer, Trevor K.

    2016-01-01

    Antisense transcription is a prevalent feature at mammalian promoters. Previous studies have primarily focused on antisense transcription initiating upstream of genes. Here, we characterize promoter-proximal antisense transcription downstream of gene transcription starts sites in human breast cancer cells, investigating the genomic context of downstream antisense transcription. We find extensive correlations between antisense transcription and features associated with the chromatin environment at gene promoters. Antisense transcription downstream of promoters is widespread, with antisense transcription initiation observed within 2 kb of 28% of gene transcription start sites. Antisense transcription initiates between nucleosomes regularly positioned downstream of these promoters. The nucleosomes between gene and downstream antisense transcription start sites carry histone modifications associated with active promoters, such as H3K4me3 and H3K27ac. This region is bound by chromatin remodeling and histone modifying complexes including SWI/SNF subunits and HDACs, suggesting that antisense transcription or resulting RNA transcripts contribute to the creation and maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. Downstream antisense transcription overlays additional regulatory features, such as transcription factor binding, DNA accessibility, and the downstream edge of promoter-associated CpG islands. These features suggest an important role for antisense transcription in the regulation of gene expression and the maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. PMID:27487356

  13. Nascent transcription affected by RNA polymerase IV in Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Erhard, Karl F; Talbot, Joy-El R B; Deans, Natalie C; McClish, Allison E; Hollick, Jay B

    2015-04-01

    All eukaryotes use three DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RNAPs) to create cellular RNAs from DNA templates. Plants have additional RNAPs related to Pol II, but their evolutionary role(s) remain largely unknown. Zea mays (maize) RNA polymerase D1 (RPD1), the largest subunit of RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV), is required for normal plant development, paramutation, transcriptional repression of certain transposable elements (TEs), and transcriptional regulation of specific alleles. Here, we define the nascent transcriptomes of rpd1 mutant and wild-type (WT) seedlings using global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) to identify the broader targets of RPD1-based regulation. Comparisons of WT and rpd1 mutant GRO-seq profiles indicate that Pol IV globally affects transcription at both transcriptional start sites and immediately downstream of polyadenylation addition sites. We found no evidence of divergent transcription from gene promoters as seen in mammalian GRO-seq profiles. Statistical comparisons identify genes and TEs whose transcription is affected by RPD1. Most examples of significant increases in genic antisense transcription appear to be initiated by 3'-proximal long terminal repeat retrotransposons. These results indicate that maize Pol IV specifies Pol II-based transcriptional regulation for specific regions of the maize genome including genes having developmental significance.

  14. eTranscripts: Reflecting Student Learning and Showcasing Unique University Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Celeste Fowles; Kallman, Reid

    2012-01-01

    How might the electronic transcript be re-envisioned to meet demands of a global society? This article presents an enhanced eTranscript that incorporates educational artifacts and official university information. Additionally, innovative transcript request options will complement admissions applications or electronic portfolios. The visionary…

  15. Negative autoregulation of c-myc transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Penn, L J; Brooks, M W; Laufer, E M; Land, H

    1990-01-01

    The introduction of activated c-myc and v-myc genes into a variety of non-established and established cells results in the suppression of endogenous c-myc expression. As measured in Rat-1 fibroblasts, the suppression occurs at the level of transcriptional initiation. Moreover, the extent of the down-regulation is proportional to the cellular concentration of c-myc protein, and the critical concentration range in which the endogenous c-myc RNA is effectively suppressed corresponds to that found in non-transformed cells. In addition, the autoregulatory mechanism is not only dependent on c-myc protein, but also requires additional trans-acting factors. These results support a role for c-myc in the regulation of cellular gene transcription and suggest that a negative feedback mechanism can act as a homeostatic regulator of c-myc expression in vivo. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2182320

  16. Additive Similarity Trees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sattath, Shmuel; Tversky, Amos

    1977-01-01

    Tree representations of similarity data are investigated. Hierarchical clustering is critically examined, and a more general procedure, called the additive tree, is presented. The additive tree representation is then compared to multidimensional scaling. (Author/JKS)

  17. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. R.; St. Clair, T. L.; Burks, H. D.; Stoakley, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been found for enhancing the melt flow of thermoplastic polyimides during processing. A high molecular weight 422 copoly(amic acid) or copolyimide was fused with approximately 0.05 to 5 pct by weight of a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive, and this melt was studied by capillary rheometry. Excellent flow and improved composite properties on graphite resulted from the addition of a PMDA-aniline additive to LARC-TPI. Solution viscosity studies imply that amic acid additives temporarily lower molecular weight and, hence, enlarge the processing window. Thus, compositions containing the additive have a lower melt viscosity for a longer time than those unmodified.

  18. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects.

  19. Theatre fleet's vital additional capacity.

    PubMed

    2012-11-01

    Vanguard Healthcare's fleet of mobile surgical facilities has been deployed to healthcare sites throughout Europe and beyond for over a decade, providing vital additional clinical capacity when existing buildings are refurbished or upgraded, in the event of flood or fire, or simply to help hospitals cater for rising demand. It is a combination of careful planning, teamwork, and the specialist expertise of Vanguard's personnel--many with a clinical background--that ensures not only each unit's successful installation, but equally its subsequent running, servicing, and maintenance, the company explains.

  20. TRANSFAC: transcriptional regulation, from patterns to profiles.

    PubMed

    Matys, V; Fricke, E; Geffers, R; Gössling, E; Haubrock, M; Hehl, R; Hornischer, K; Karas, D; Kel, A E; Kel-Margoulis, O V; Kloos, D-U; Land, S; Lewicki-Potapov, B; Michael, H; Münch, R; Reuter, I; Rotert, S; Saxel, H; Scheer, M; Thiele, S; Wingender, E

    2003-01-01

    The TRANSFAC database on eukaryotic transcriptional regulation, comprising data on transcription factors, their target genes and regulatory binding sites, has been extended and further developed, both in number of entries and in the scope and structure of the collected data. Structured fields for expression patterns have been introduced for transcription factors from human and mouse, using the CYTOMER database on anatomical structures and developmental stages. The functionality of Match, a tool for matrix-based search of transcription factor binding sites, has been enhanced. For instance, the program now comes along with a number of tissue-(or state-)specific profiles and new profiles can be created and modified with Match Profiler. The GENE table was extended and gained in importance, containing amongst others links to LocusLink, RefSeq and OMIM now. Further, (direct) links between factor and target gene on one hand and between gene and encoded factor on the other hand were introduced. The TRANSFAC public release is available at http://www.gene-regulation.com. For yeast an additional release including the latest data was made available separately as TRANSFAC Saccharomyces Module (TSM) at http://transfac.gbf.de. For CYTOMER free download versions are available at http://www.biobase.de:8080/index.html.

  1. Specificity mechanisms in the control of transcription.

    PubMed

    von Hippel, P H; Rees, W A; Rippe, K; Wilson, K S

    1996-04-16

    In this overview we analyze and illustrate the principles underlying some of the specificity mechanisms that control the initiation, elongation, and termination phases of transcription. Thermodynamic mechanisms dominate in the first steps of initiation, where promoters at various levels of activation can be considered to be in competition for a limiting supply of core RNA polymerase. In the later stages of initiation, as well as in elongation and termination, the regulatory mechanisms that control specificity are largely kinetic, involving rate competition between branching reaction pathways where the outcome depends on the rates (and equilibria) of reaction and interconversion of different forms of the transcription complex. Elongation complexes are very stable at most positions along the DNA template, meaning that only RNA chain elongation (and editing) can occur at these positions. However, the stability of transcription complexes decreases abruptly when termination sequences are encountered, and here the outcome can be easily switched between elongation and termination (RNA release) by minor changes in the relative rates of these competing processes. Cis effectors, defined as sites at which regulatory proteins bind to upstream activation loci on either the DNA or the nascent RNA, play important roles in the control of both initiation and of the elongation-termination decision. Examples, drawn from studies of phage lambda N-dependent antitermination and E. coli rho-dependent termination processes, illustrate the flexibility and additivity of regulatory components within control mechanisms in transcription that involve multiple determinants. The generality of such regulatory principles are stressed.

  2. 42 CFR 412.27 - Excluded psychiatric units: Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... psychiatric nursing services must be a registered nurse who has a master's degree in psychiatric or mental...) The staffing pattern must ensure the availability of a registered nurse 24 hours each day. There must be adequate numbers of registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and mental health workers...

  3. 42 CFR 412.27 - Excluded psychiatric units: Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... psychiatric nursing services must be a registered nurse who has a master's degree in psychiatric or mental...) The staffing pattern must ensure the availability of a registered nurse 24 hours each day. There must be adequate numbers of registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and mental health workers...

  4. 42 CFR 412.27 - Excluded psychiatric units: Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... psychiatric nursing services must be a registered nurse who has a master's degree in psychiatric or mental...) The staffing pattern must ensure the availability of a registered nurse 24 hours each day. There must be adequate numbers of registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and mental health workers...

  5. 42 CFR 412.27 - Excluded psychiatric units: Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... psychiatric nursing services must be a registered nurse who has a master's degree in psychiatric or mental...) The staffing pattern must ensure the availability of a registered nurse 24 hours each day. There must be adequate numbers of registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and mental health workers...

  6. 42 CFR 412.27 - Excluded psychiatric units: Additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... nurses, licensed practical nurses, and mental health workers to provide nursing care necessary under each... be adequate numbers of registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and mental health workers to... psychiatric nursing services must be a registered nurse who has a master's degree in psychiatric or...

  7. Concerning Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadlinger, Robert L.

    1983-01-01

    SI units come in two distinct types: fundamental (kilogram, meter) and descriptive (atom, molecule). Proper/improper uses of atom/molecule from historical cases are presented followed by a re-introduction of a light "wave (cycle)" unit and the clearly defined photon model which is deduced. Also examines omission of the fundamental unit "radon."…

  8. Rational design of inducible CRISPR guide RNAs for de novo assembly of transcriptional programs

    PubMed Central

    Ferry, Quentin R. V.; Lyutova, Radostina; Fulga, Tudor A.

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR-based transcription regulators (CRISPR-TRs) have transformed the current synthetic biology landscape by allowing specific activation or repression of any target gene. Here we report a modular and versatile framework enabling rapid implementation of inducible CRISPR-TRs in mammalian cells. This strategy relies on the design of a spacer-blocking hairpin (SBH) structure at the 5′ end of the single guide RNA (sgRNA), which abrogates the function of CRISPR-transcriptional activators. By replacing the SBH loop with ligand-controlled RNA-cleaving units, we demonstrate conditional activation of quiescent sgRNAs programmed to respond to genetically encoded or externally delivered triggers. We use this system to couple multiple synthetic and endogenous target genes with specific inducers, and assemble gene regulatory modules demonstrating parallel and orthogonal transcriptional programs. We anticipate that this ‘plug and play' approach will be a valuable addition to the synthetic biology toolkit, facilitating the understanding of natural gene circuits and the design of cell-based therapeutic strategies. PMID:28256578

  9. Rational design of inducible CRISPR guide RNAs for de novo assembly of transcriptional programs.

    PubMed

    Ferry, Quentin R V; Lyutova, Radostina; Fulga, Tudor A

    2017-03-03

    CRISPR-based transcription regulators (CRISPR-TRs) have transformed the current synthetic biology landscape by allowing specific activation or repression of any target gene. Here we report a modular and versatile framework enabling rapid implementation of inducible CRISPR-TRs in mammalian cells. This strategy relies on the design of a spacer-blocking hairpin (SBH) structure at the 5' end of the single guide RNA (sgRNA), which abrogates the function of CRISPR-transcriptional activators. By replacing the SBH loop with ligand-controlled RNA-cleaving units, we demonstrate conditional activation of quiescent sgRNAs programmed to respond to genetically encoded or externally delivered triggers. We use this system to couple multiple synthetic and endogenous target genes with specific inducers, and assemble gene regulatory modules demonstrating parallel and orthogonal transcriptional programs. We anticipate that this 'plug and play' approach will be a valuable addition to the synthetic biology toolkit, facilitating the understanding of natural gene circuits and the design of cell-based therapeutic strategies.

  10. Transcription mediated insulation and interference direct gene cluster expression switches

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tania; Brown, David; Murray, Struan C; Haenni, Simon; Halstead, James M; O'Connor, Leigh; Shipkovenska, Gergana; Steinmetz, Lars M; Mellor, Jane

    2014-01-01

    In yeast, many tandemly arranged genes show peak expression in different phases of the metabolic cycle (YMC) or in different carbon sources, indicative of regulation by a bi-modal switch, but it is not clear how these switches are controlled. Using native elongating transcript analysis (NET-seq), we show that transcription itself is a component of bi-modal switches, facilitating reciprocal expression in gene clusters. HMS2, encoding a growth-regulated transcription factor, switches between sense- or antisense-dominant states that also coordinate up- and down-regulation of transcription at neighbouring genes. Engineering HMS2 reveals alternative mono-, di- or tri-cistronic and antisense transcription units (TUs), using different promoter and terminator combinations, that underlie state-switching. Promoters or terminators are excluded from functional TUs by read-through transcriptional interference, while antisense TUs insulate downstream genes from interference. We propose that the balance of transcriptional insulation and interference at gene clusters facilitates gene expression switches during intracellular and extracellular environmental change. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03635.001 PMID:25407679

  11. The Computer Fraud and Abuse Act of 1986. Hearing before the Committee on the Judiciary, United States Senate, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session on S.2281, a Bill To Amend Title 18, United States Code, To Provide Additional Penalties for Fraud and Related Activities in Connection with Access Devices and Computers, and for Other Purposes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on the Judiciary.

    The proposed legislation--S. 2281--would amend federal laws to provide additional penalties for fraud and related activities in connection with access devices and computers. The complete text of the bill and proceedings of the hearing are included in this report. Statements and materials submitted by the following committee members and witnesses…

  12. Congruence of additive and non-additive effects on gene expression estimated from pedigree and SNP data.

    PubMed

    Powell, Joseph E; Henders, Anjali K; McRae, Allan F; Kim, Jinhee; Hemani, Gibran; Martin, Nicholas G; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Gibson, Greg; Montgomery, Grant W; Visscher, Peter M

    2013-05-01

    There is increasing evidence that heritable variation in gene expression underlies genetic variation in susceptibility to disease. Therefore, a comprehensive understanding of the similarity between relatives for transcript variation is warranted--in particular, dissection of phenotypic variation into additive and non-additive genetic factors and shared environmental effects. We conducted a gene expression study in blood samples of 862 individuals from 312 nuclear families containing MZ or DZ twin pairs using both pedigree and genotype information. From a pedigree analysis we show that the vast majority of genetic variation across 17,994 probes is additive, although non-additive genetic variation is identified for 960 transcripts. For 180 of the 960 transcripts with non-additive genetic variation, we identify expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) with dominance effects in a sample of 339 unrelated individuals and replicate 31% of these associations in an independent sample of 139 unrelated individuals. Over-dominance was detected and replicated for a trans association between rs12313805 and ETV6, located 4MB apart on chromosome 12. Surprisingly, only 17 probes exhibit significant levels of common environmental effects, suggesting that environmental and lifestyle factors common to a family do not affect expression variation for most transcripts, at least those measured in blood. Consistent with the genetic architecture of common diseases, gene expression is predominantly additive, but a minority of transcripts display non-additive effects.

  13. Supercoiling of the DNA Template during Transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Leroy F.; Wang, James C.

    1987-10-01

    Transcription of a right-handed double-helical DNA requires a relative rotation of the RNA polymerase and its nascent RNA around the DNA. We describe conditions under which the resistance to the rotational motion of the transcription ensemble around the DNA can be large. In such cases, the advancing polymerase generates positive supercoils in the DNA template ahead of it and negative supercoils behind it. Mutual annihilation of the positively and negatively supercoiled regions may be prevented by anchoring points on the DNA to a large structure, or, in the case of an unanchored plasmid, by the presence of two oppositely oriented transcription units. In prokaryotes, DNA topoisomerase I preferentially removes negative supercoils and DNA gyrase (topoisomerase II) removes positive ones. Our model thus provides an explanation for the experimentally observed high degree of negative or positive supercoiling of intracellular pBR322 DNA when DNA topoisomerase I or gyrase is respectively inhibited. We discuss the implications of our model in terms of supercoiling regulation, DNA conformational transitions, and gene regulation in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  14. Cartography of Methicillin-Resistant S. aureus Transcripts: Detection, Orientation and Temporal Expression during Growth Phase and Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Beaume, Marie; Hernandez, David; Farinelli, Laurent; Deluen, Cécile; Linder, Patrick; Gaspin, Christine; Romby, Pascale; Schrenzel, Jacques; Francois, Patrice

    2010-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is a versatile bacterial opportunist responsible for a wide spectrum of infections. The severity of these infections is highly variable and depends on multiple parameters including the genome content of the bacterium as well as the condition of the infected host. Clinically and epidemiologically, S. aureus shows a particular capacity to survive and adapt to drastic environmental changes including the presence of numerous antimicrobial agents. Mechanisms triggering this adaptation remain largely unknown despite important research efforts. Most studies evaluating gene content have so far neglected to analyze the so-called intergenic regions as well as potential antisense RNA molecules. Principal Findings Using high-throughput sequencing technology, we performed an inventory of the whole transcriptome of S. aureus strain N315. In addition to the annotated transcription units, we identified more than 195 small transcribed regions, in the chromosome and the plasmid of S. aureus strain N315. The coding strand of each transcript was identified and structural analysis enabled classification of all discovered transcripts. RNA purified at four time-points during the growth phase of the bacterium allowed us to define the temporal expression of such transcripts. A selection of 26 transcripts of interest dispersed along the intergenic regions was assessed for expression changes in the presence of various stress conditions including pH, temperature, oxidative shocks and growth in a stringent medium. Most of these transcripts showed expression patterns specific for the defined stress conditions that we tested. Conclusions These RNA molecules potentially represent important effectors of S. aureus adaptation and more generally could support some of the epidemiological characteristics of the bacterium. PMID:20505759

  15. Polylactides in additive biomanufacturing.

    PubMed

    Poh, Patrina S P; Chhaya, Mohit P; Wunner, Felix M; De-Juan-Pardo, Elena M; Schilling, Arndt F; Schantz, Jan-Thorsten; van Griensven, Martijn; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2016-12-15

    New advanced manufacturing technologies under the alias of additive biomanufacturing allow the design and fabrication of a range of products from pre-operative models, cutting guides and medical devices to scaffolds. The process of printing in 3 dimensions of cells, extracellular matrix (ECM) and biomaterials (bioinks, powders, etc.) to generate in vitro and/or in vivo tissue analogue structures has been termed bioprinting. To further advance in additive biomanufacturing, there are many aspects that we can learn from the wider additive manufacturing (AM) industry, which have progressed tremendously since its introduction into the manufacturing sector. First, this review gives an overview of additive manufacturing and both industry and academia efforts in addressing specific challenges in the AM technologies to drive toward AM-enabled industrial revolution. After which, considerations of poly(lactides) as a biomaterial in additive biomanufacturing are discussed. Challenges in wider additive biomanufacturing field are discussed in terms of (a) biomaterials; (b) computer-aided design, engineering and manufacturing; (c) AM and additive biomanufacturing printers hardware; and (d) system integration. Finally, the outlook for additive biomanufacturing was discussed.

  16. Additive Manufactured Product Integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess; Wells, Doug; James, Steve; Nichols, Charles

    2017-01-01

    NASA is providing key leadership in an international effort linking NASA and non-NASA resources to speed adoption of additive manufacturing (AM) to meet NASA's mission goals. Participants include industry, NASA's space partners, other government agencies, standards organizations and academia. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) is identified as a universal need for all aspects of additive manufacturing.

  17. Targeted gene addition into a specified location in the human genome using designed zinc finger nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Moehle, Erica A.; Rock, Jeremy M.; Lee, Ya-Li; Jouvenot, Yann; DeKelver, Russell C.; Gregory, Philip D.; Urnov, Fyodor D.; Holmes, Michael C.

    2007-01-01

    Efficient incorporation of novel DNA sequences into a specific site in the genome of living human cells remains a challenge despite its potential utility to genetic medicine, biotechnology, and basic research. We find that a precisely placed double-strand break induced by engineered zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) can stimulate integration of long DNA stretches into a predetermined genomic location, resulting in high-efficiency site-specific gene addition. Using an extrachromosomal DNA donor carrying a 12-bp tag, a 900-bp ORF, or a 1.5-kb promoter-transcription unit flanked by locus-specific homology arms, we find targeted integration frequencies of 15%, 6%, and 5%, respectively, within 72 h of treatment, and with no selection for the desired event. Importantly, we find that the integration event occurs in a homology-directed manner and leads to the accurate reconstruction of the donor-specified genotype at the endogenous chromosomal locus, and hence presumably results from synthesis-dependent strand annealing repair of the break using the donor DNA as a template. This site-specific gene addition occurs with no measurable increase in the rate of random integration. Remarkably, we also find that ZFNs can drive the addition of an 8-kb sequence carrying three distinct promoter-transcription units into an endogenous locus at a frequency of 6%, also in the absence of any selection. These data reveal the surprising versatility of the specialized polymerase machinery involved in double-strand break repair, illuminate a powerful approach to mammalian cell engineering, and open the possibility of ZFN-driven gene addition therapy for human genetic disease. PMID:17360608

  18. Specificity in ROS Signaling and Transcript Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Vaahtera, Lauri; Brosché, Mikael; Wrzaczek, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reactive oxygen species (ROS), important signaling molecules in plants, are involved in developmental control and stress adaptation. ROS production can trigger broad transcriptional changes; however, it is not clear how specificity in transcriptional regulation is achieved. Recent Advances: A large collection of public transcriptome data from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana is available for analysis. These data can be used for the analysis of biological processes that are associated with ROS signaling and for the identification of suitable transcriptional indicators. Several online tools, such as Genevestigator and Expression Angler, have simplified the task to analyze, interpret, and visualize this wealth of data. Critical Issues: The analysis of the exact transcriptional responses to ROS requires the production of specific ROS in distinct subcellular compartments with precise timing, which is experimentally difficult. Analyses are further complicated by the effect of ROS production in one subcellular location on the ROS accumulation in other compartments. In addition, even subtle differences in the method of ROS production or treatment can lead to significantly different outcomes when various stimuli are compared. Future Directions: Due to the difficulty of inducing ROS production specifically with regard to ROS type, subcellular localization, and timing, we propose that the concept of a “ROS marker gene” should be re-evaluated. We suggest guidelines for the analysis of transcriptional data in ROS signaling. The use of “ROS signatures,” which consist of a set of genes that together can show characteristic and indicative responses, should be preferred over the use of individual marker genes. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1422–1441. PMID:24180661

  19. Purification & Characterization of Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Nagore, LI; Nadeau, RJ; Guo, Q; Jadhav, YLA; Jarrett, HW; Haskins, WE

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are essential for the expression of all proteins, including those involved in human health and disease. However, TFs are resistant to proteomic characterization because they are frequently masked by more abundant proteins due to the limited dynamic range of capillary liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and protein database searching. Purification methods, particularly strategies that exploit the high affinity of TFs for DNA response elements on gene promoters, can enrich TFs prior to proteomic analysis to improve dynamic range and penetrance of the TF proteome. For example, trapping of TF complexes specific for particular response elements has been achieved by recovering the element DNA-protein complex on solid supports. Additional methods for improving dynamic range include two- and three-dimensional gel electrophoresis incorporating electrophoretic mobility shift assays and Southwestern blotting for detection. Here we review methods for TF purification and characterization. We fully expect that future investigations will apply these and other methods to illuminate this important but challenging proteome. PMID:23832591

  20. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of histone variant H2A.Z during sea urchin development.

    PubMed

    Hajdu, Mihai; Calle, Jasmine; Puno, Andrea; Haruna, Aminat; Arenas-Mena, César

    2016-12-01

    Histone variant H2A.Z promotes chromatin accessibility at transcriptional regulatory elements and is developmentally regulated in metazoans. We characterize the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of H2A.Z in the purple sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. H2A.Z depletion by antisense translation-blocking morpholino oligonucleotides during early development causes developmental collapse, in agreement with its previously demonstrated general role in transcriptional multipotency. During H2A.Z peak expression in 24-h embryos, endogenous H2A.Z 3' UTR sequences stabilize GFP mRNAs relative to those with SV40 3' UTR sequences, although the 3' UTR of H2A.Z does not determine the spatial distribution of H2A.Z transcripts during embryonic and postembryonic development. We elaborated an H2A.Z::GFP BAC reporter that reproduces embryonic H2A.Z expression. Genome-wide chromatin accessibility analysis using ATAC-seq revealed a cis-regulatory module (CRM) that, when deleted, causes a significant decline of the H2A.Z reporter expression. In addition, the mutation of a Sox transcription factor binding site motif and, more strongly, of a Myb motif cause significant decline of reporter gene expression. Our results suggest that an undetermined Myb-family transcription factor controls the transcriptional regulation of H2A.Z.

  1. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  2. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  3. Adaptation with transcriptional regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wenjia; Ma, Wenzhe; Xiong, Liyang; Zhang, Mingyue; Tang, Chao

    2017-02-01

    Biochemical adaptation is one of the basic functions that are widely implemented in biological systems for a variety of purposes such as signal sensing, stress response and homeostasis. The adaptation time scales span from milliseconds to days, involving different regulatory machineries in different processes. The adaptive networks with enzymatic regulation (ERNs) have been investigated in detail. But it remains unclear if and how other forms of regulation will impact the network topology and other features of the function. Here, we systematically studied three-node transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs), with three different types of gene regulation logics. We found that the topologies of adaptive gene regulatory networks can still be grouped into two general classes: negative feedback loop (NFBL) and incoherent feed-forward loop (IFFL), but with some distinct topological features comparing to the enzymatic networks. Specifically, an auto-activation loop on the buffer node is necessary for the NFBL class. For IFFL class, the control node can be either a proportional node or an inversely-proportional node. Furthermore, the tunability of adaptive behavior differs between TRNs and ERNs. Our findings highlight the role of regulation forms in network topology, implementation and dynamics.

  4. Adaptation with transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenjia; Ma, Wenzhe; Xiong, Liyang; Zhang, Mingyue; Tang, Chao

    2017-02-24

    Biochemical adaptation is one of the basic functions that are widely implemented in biological systems for a variety of purposes such as signal sensing, stress response and homeostasis. The adaptation time scales span from milliseconds to days, involving different regulatory machineries in different processes. The adaptive networks with enzymatic regulation (ERNs) have been investigated in detail. But it remains unclear if and how other forms of regulation will impact the network topology and other features of the function. Here, we systematically studied three-node transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs), with three different types of gene regulation logics. We found that the topologies of adaptive gene regulatory networks can still be grouped into two general classes: negative feedback loop (NFBL) and incoherent feed-forward loop (IFFL), but with some distinct topological features comparing to the enzymatic networks. Specifically, an auto-activation loop on the buffer node is necessary for the NFBL class. For IFFL class, the control node can be either a proportional node or an inversely-proportional node. Furthermore, the tunability of adaptive behavior differs between TRNs and ERNs. Our findings highlight the role of regulation forms in network topology, implementation and dynamics.

  5. Adaptation with transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wenjia; Ma, Wenzhe; Xiong, Liyang; Zhang, Mingyue; Tang, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Biochemical adaptation is one of the basic functions that are widely implemented in biological systems for a variety of purposes such as signal sensing, stress response and homeostasis. The adaptation time scales span from milliseconds to days, involving different regulatory machineries in different processes. The adaptive networks with enzymatic regulation (ERNs) have been investigated in detail. But it remains unclear if and how other forms of regulation will impact the network topology and other features of the function. Here, we systematically studied three-node transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs), with three different types of gene regulation logics. We found that the topologies of adaptive gene regulatory networks can still be grouped into two general classes: negative feedback loop (NFBL) and incoherent feed-forward loop (IFFL), but with some distinct topological features comparing to the enzymatic networks. Specifically, an auto-activation loop on the buffer node is necessary for the NFBL class. For IFFL class, the control node can be either a proportional node or an inversely-proportional node. Furthermore, the tunability of adaptive behavior differs between TRNs and ERNs. Our findings highlight the role of regulation forms in network topology, implementation and dynamics. PMID:28233824

  6. Transcriptional Targeting in Cancer Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy has been one of the most exciting areas of therapeutic research in the past decade. In this review, we discuss strategies to restrict transcription of transgenes to tumour cells. A range of promoters which are tissue-specific, tumour-specific, or inducible by exogenous agents are presented. Transcriptional targeting should prevent normal tissue toxicities associated with other cancer treatments, such as radiation and chemotherapy. In addition, the specificity of these strategies should provide improved targeting of metastatic tumours following systemic gene delivery. Rapid progress in the ability to specifically control transgenes will allow systemic gene delivery for cancer therapy to become a real possibility in the near future. PMID:12721516

  7. Prunus transcription factors: breeding perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Valmor J.; Rubio, Manuel; Trainotti, Livio; Verde, Ignazio; Bonghi, Claudio; Martínez-Gómez, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Many plant processes depend on differential gene expression, which is generally controlled by complex proteins called transcription factors (TFs). In peach, 1533 TFs have been identified, accounting for about 5.5% of the 27,852 protein-coding genes. These TFs are the reference for the rest of the Prunus species. TF studies in Prunus have been performed on the gene expression analysis of different agronomic traits, including control of the flowering process, fruit quality, and biotic and abiotic stress resistance. These studies, using quantitative RT-PCR, have mainly been performed in peach, and to a lesser extent in other species, including almond, apricot, black cherry, Fuji cherry, Japanese apricot, plum, and sour and sweet cherry. Other tools have also been used in TF studies, including cDNA-AFLP, LC-ESI-MS, RNA, and DNA blotting or mapping. More recently, new tools assayed include microarray and high-throughput DNA sequencing (DNA-Seq) and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). New functional genomics opportunities include genome resequencing and the well-known synteny among Prunus genomes and transcriptomes. These new functional studies should be applied in breeding programs in the development of molecular markers. With the genome sequences available, some strategies that have been used in model systems (such as SNP genotyping assays and genotyping-by-sequencing) may be applicable in the functional analysis of Prunus TFs as well. In addition, the knowledge of the gene functions and position in the peach reference genome of the TFs represents an additional advantage. These facts could greatly facilitate the isolation of genes via QTL (quantitative trait loci) map-based cloning in the different Prunus species, following the association of these TFs with the identified QTLs using the peach reference genome. PMID:26124770

  8. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wender, Ester H.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that food additives are causally associated with hyperkinesis and learning disabilities in children is reviewed, and available data are summarized. Available from: American Medical Association 535 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610. (JG)

  9. Smog control fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lundby, W.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described of controlling, reducing or eliminating, ozone and related smog resulting from photochemical reactions between ozone and automotive or industrial gases comprising the addition of iodine or compounds of iodine to hydrocarbon-base fuels prior to or during combustion in an amount of about 1 part iodine per 240 to 10,000,000 parts fuel, by weight, to be accomplished by: (a) the addition of these inhibitors during or after the refining or manufacturing process of liquid fuels; (b) the production of these inhibitors for addition into fuel tanks, such as automotive or industrial tanks; or (c) the addition of these inhibitors into combustion chambers of equipment utilizing solid fuels for the purpose of reducing ozone.

  10. Additional stories of microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heon-Jin

    2014-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to be major regulators of eukaryotic gene expression. Traditionally, miRNAs were thought to control highly complex signal transduction and other biological pathways by targeting coding transcripts, accounting for their important role in cellular events. Traditional miRNA biogenesis and function focused on several key enzymes that functioned in miRNA maturation and miRNA inhibitory function upon binding to 3'-untranslated region of target transcripts. However, recent studies have revealed that miRNA biosynthesis and function is complicated, with many exceptions to conventional miRNA mechanisms. In addition to those noncanonical miRNA functions, this review introduces newly discovered biogenesis and regulatory mechanisms, as well as a new class of miRNA-sized small RNA and miRNA methylation. miRNA inhibition and intercellular miRNA signaling are also discussed. Taken together, these insights extend current understanding of miRNAs.

  11. Transcriptional response of nitrifying communities to wetting of dry soil.

    PubMed

    Placella, Sarah A; Firestone, Mary K

    2013-05-01

    The first rainfall following a severe dry period provides an abrupt water potential change that is both an acute physiological stress and a defined stimulus for the reawakening of soil microbial communities. We followed the responses of indigenous communities of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, ammonia-oxidizing archaea, and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria to the addition of water to laboratory incubations of soils taken from two California annual grasslands following a typically dry Mediterranean summer. By quantifying transcripts for a subunit of bacterial and archaeal ammonia monooxygenases (amoA) and a bacterial nitrite oxidoreductase (nxrA) in soil from 15 min to 72 h after water addition, we identified transcriptional response patterns for each of these three groups of nitrifiers. An increase in quantity of bacterial amoA transcripts was detectable within 1 h of wet-up and continued until the size of the ammonium pool began to decrease, reflecting a possible role of transcription in upregulation of nitrification after drought-induced stasis. In one soil, the pulse of amoA transcription lasted for less than 24 h, demonstrating the transience of transcriptional pools and the tight coupling of transcription to the local soil environment. Analysis of 16S rRNA using a high-density microarray suggested that nitrite-oxidizing Nitrobacter spp. respond in tandem with ammonia-oxidizing bacteria while nitrite-oxidizing Nitrospina spp. and Nitrospira bacteria may not. Archaeal ammonia oxidizers may respond slightly later than bacterial ammonia oxidizers but may maintain elevated transcription longer. Despite months of desiccation-induced inactivation, we found rapid transcriptional response by all three groups of soil nitrifiers.

  12. Regulation of maternal transcript destabilization during egg activation in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Tadros, Wael; Houston, Simon A; Bashirullah, Arash; Cooperstock, Ramona L; Semotok, Jennifer L; Reed, Bruce H; Lipshitz, Howard D

    2003-01-01

    In animals, the transfer of developmental control from maternal RNAs and proteins to zygotically derived products occurs at the midblastula transition. This is accompanied by the destabilization of a subset of maternal transcripts. In Drosophila, maternal transcript destabilization occurs in the absence of fertilization and requires specific cis-acting instability elements. We show here that egg activation is necessary and sufficient to trigger transcript destabilization. We have identified 13 maternal-effect lethal loci that, when mutated, result in failure of maternal transcript degradation. All mutants identified are defective in one or more additional processes associated with egg activation. These include vitelline membrane reorganization, cortical microtubule depolymerization, translation of maternal mRNA, completion of meiosis, and chromosome condensation (the S-to-M transition) after meiosis. The least pleiotropic class of transcript destabilization mutants consists of three genes: pan gu, plutonium, and giant nuclei. These three genes regulate the S-to-M transition at the end of meiosis and are thought to be required for the maintenance of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) activity during this cell cycle transition. Consistent with a possible functional connection between this S-to-M transition and transcript destabilization, we show that in vitro-activated eggs, which exhibit aberrant postmeiotic chromosome condensation, fail to initiate transcript degradation. Several genetic tests exclude the possibility that reduction of CDK/cyclin complex activity per se is responsible for the failure to trigger transcript destabilization in these mutants. We propose that the trigger for transcript destabilization occurs coincidently with the S-to-M transition at the end of meiosis and that pan gu, plutonium, and giant nuclei regulate maternal transcript destabilization independent of their role in cell cycle regulation. PMID:12871909

  13. Transcription of Trypanosoma brucei maxicircles

    SciTech Connect

    Michelotti, E.F.; Hajduk, S.L.

    1987-05-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is a protozoan parasite which developmentally regulates mitochondrial activity. In the mammal T. brucei produces ATP entirely by glycolysis while cytochrome mediated respiration resumes in the life-stage in the midgut of the insect vector. Using quantitative S1 nuclease protection assays two types of regulation of the steady state levels of the mitochondrial transcripts were found. Transcription of cytochrome b, cytochrome oxidase, and the rRNA genes is repressed in early bloodstream developmental stages, undergoes dramatic activation in later bloodstream stages, and finally a lesser activation in the insect developmental stage. Transcription of NADH dehydrogenase genes, however, is unregulated. Mitochondrial transcripts with a 5' triphosphate terminus, representing the site of transcription initiation, were capped using guanylyl transferase. The in vitro capped RNA hybridized to only one of eight mitochondrial restriction fragments on a Southern blot, however, hybridization of Southern blots with RNA from ..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P-UTP pulsed mitochondria labelled all restriction fragments equally. These results suggest that each DNA strand has a single promoter which directs the transcription of a full-length RNA which is subsequently processed. Different mitochondrial genes, despite being expressed on the same precursor RNA molecule, are independently regulated by both transcription initiation and RNA processing.

  14. Group Sparse Additive Models

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Junming; Chen, Xi; Xing, Eric P.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the problem of sparse variable selection in nonparametric additive models, with the prior knowledge of the structure among the covariates to encourage those variables within a group to be selected jointly. Previous works either study the group sparsity in the parametric setting (e.g., group lasso), or address the problem in the nonparametric setting without exploiting the structural information (e.g., sparse additive models). In this paper, we present a new method, called group sparse additive models (GroupSpAM), which can handle group sparsity in additive models. We generalize the ℓ1/ℓ2 norm to Hilbert spaces as the sparsity-inducing penalty in GroupSpAM. Moreover, we derive a novel thresholding condition for identifying the functional sparsity at the group level, and propose an efficient block coordinate descent algorithm for constructing the estimate. We demonstrate by simulation that GroupSpAM substantially outperforms the competing methods in terms of support recovery and prediction accuracy in additive models, and also conduct a comparative experiment on a real breast cancer dataset.

  15. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  16. AthaMap, integrating transcriptional and post-transcriptional data

    PubMed Central

    Bülow, Lorenz; Engelmann, Stefan; Schindler, Martin; Hehl, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    The AthaMap database generates a map of predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) for the whole Arabidopsis thaliana genome. AthaMap has now been extended to include data on post-transcriptional regulation. A total of 403 173 genomic positions of small RNAs have been mapped in the A. thaliana genome. These identify 5772 putative post-transcriptionally regulated target genes. AthaMap tools have been modified to improve the identification of common TFBS in co-regulated genes by subtracting post-transcriptionally regulated genes from such analyses. Furthermore, AthaMap was updated to the TAIR7 genome annotation, a graphic display of gene analysis results was implemented, and the TFBS data content was increased. AthaMap is freely available at http://www.athamap.de/. PMID:18842622

  17. TRW utility demonstration unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The TRW Advanced Entrained Coal Combustor Demonstration Project consists of retrofitting Orange and Rockland (O R) Utility Corporation's Lovett Plant Unit No. 3 with four (4) slagging combustors which will allow the gas/oil unit to fire 2.5% sulfur coal. The slagging combustor process will provide NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions that meet NSPS and New York State Environmental Standards. During this report period, activity continued to address the total program funding shortfall. Ideas and responsibilities for further evaluation have been put forward to reduce the shortfall. In addition, an effort aimed at gaining additional program sponsorships, was initiated.

  18. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  19. Fused Lasso Additive Model

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Ashley; Witten, Daniela; Simon, Noah

    2016-01-01

    We consider the problem of predicting an outcome variable using p covariates that are measured on n independent observations, in a setting in which additive, flexible, and interpretable fits are desired. We propose the fused lasso additive model (FLAM), in which each additive function is estimated to be piecewise constant with a small number of adaptively-chosen knots. FLAM is the solution to a convex optimization problem, for which a simple algorithm with guaranteed convergence to a global optimum is provided. FLAM is shown to be consistent in high dimensions, and an unbiased estimator of its degrees of freedom is proposed. We evaluate the performance of FLAM in a simulation study and on two data sets. Supplemental materials are available online, and the R package flam is available on CRAN. PMID:28239246

  20. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamines containing phenylethynyl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidi none to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  1. Unit Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Robert C.; Tobiason, Fred L.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the construction of unit cells using clear plastic cubes which can be disassembled, and one inch cork balls of various colors, which can be cut in halves, quarters, or eighths, and glued on the inside face of the cube, thus simulating a unit cell. (MLH)

  2. UNIT, ALASKA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana Arts and Science Center, Baton Rouge.

    THE UNIT DESCRIBED IN THIS BOOKLET DEALS WITH THE GEOGRAPHY OF ALASKA. THE UNIT IS PRESENTED IN OUTLINE FORM. THE FIRST SECTION DEALS PRINCIPALLY WITH THE PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY OF ALASKA. DISCUSSED ARE (1) THE SIZE, (2) THE MAJOR LAND REGIONS, (3) THE MOUNTAINS, VOLCANOES, GLACIERS, AND RIVERS, (4) THE NATURAL RESOURCES, AND (5) THE CLIMATE. THE…

  3. UNIT, PETROLOGY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana Arts and Science Center, Baton Rouge.

    THIS TEACHER'S GUIDE FOR A UNIT ON PETROLOGY IS SUITABLE FOR ADAPTATION AT EITHER THE UPPER ELEMENTARY OR THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL LEVELS. THE UNIT BEGINS WITH A STORY THAT INTRODUCES VOLCANIC ACTION AND IGNEOUS ROCK FORMATION. SELECTED CONCEPTS ARE LISTED FOLLOWED BY SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES. A BIBLIOGRAPHY, FILM LIST, VOCABULARY LIST, AND QUESTION AND…

  4. Transcription regulation mechanisms of bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haiquan; Ma, Yingfang; Wang, Yitian; Yang, Haixia; Shen, Wei; Chen, Xianzhong

    2014-01-01

    Phage diversity significantly contributes to ecology and evolution of new bacterial species through horizontal gene transfer. Therefore, it is essential to understand the mechanisms underlying phage-host interactions. After initial infection, the phage utilizes the transcriptional machinery of the host to direct the expression of its own genes. This review presents a view on the transcriptional regulation mechanisms of bacteriophages, and its contribution to phage diversity and classification. Through this review, we aim to broaden the understanding of phage-host interactions while providing a reference source for researchers studying the regulation of phage transcription. PMID:25482231

  5. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Deanin, R D

    1975-01-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products. PMID:1175566

  6. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed

    Deanin, R D

    1975-06-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products.

  7. [Modulation of transcriptional regulation during bone and cartilage development and their disease].

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Riko; Hata, Kenji; Takashima, Rikako; Yoshida, Michiko; Nakamura, Eriko; Kida, Junpei; Yagi, Hiroko

    2013-11-01

    Genetic and biochemical studies have identified transcription factors critical and specific for bone and cartilage development. More recent studies revealed the molecular mechanisms how these transcription factors regulate bone and cartilage development. Especially, we appreciate recent advances in molecular function of the complex assembled by these transcription factors and epigenetic regulation of them. Aging, inflammation, biological stress, and disorder of endocrine system induce several bone and/or cartilage diseases by affecting the transcriptional and epigenetic regulation. In this review, we would like to describe the transcriptional and epigenetic regulation during developmental and pathological stages. In addition, we discuss possible application of these information in regeneration of bone and cartilage.

  8. A glyphosate-based pesticide impinges on transcription.

    PubMed

    Marc, Julie; Le Breton, Magali; Cormier, Patrick; Morales, Julia; Bellé, Robert; Mulner-Lorillon, Odile

    2005-02-15

    Widely spread chemicals used for human benefits may exert adverse effects on health or the environment, the identification of which are a major challenge. The early development of the sea urchin constitutes an appropriate model for the identification of undesirable cellular and molecular targets of pollutants. The widespread glyphosate-based pesticide affected sea urchin development by impeding the hatching process at millimolar range concentration of glyphosate. Glyphosate, the active herbicide ingredient of Roundup, by itself delayed hatching as judged from the comparable effect of different commercial glyphosate-based pesticides and from the effect of pure glyphosate addition to a threshold concentration of Roundup. The surfactant polyoxyethylene amine (POEA), the major component of commercial Roundup, was found to be highly toxic to the embryos when tested alone and therefore could contribute to the inhibition of hatching. Hatching, a landmark of early development, is a transcription-dependent process. Correlatively, the herbicide inhibited the global transcription, which follows fertilization at the 16-cell stage. Transcription inhibition was dose-dependent in the millimolar glyphosate range concentration. A 1257-bp fragment of the hatching enzyme transcript from Sphaerechinus granularis was cloned and sequenced; its transcription was delayed by 2 h in the pesticide-treated embryos. Because transcription is a fundamental basic biological process, the pesticide may be of health concern by inhalation near herbicide spraying at a concentration 25 times the adverse transcription concentration in the sprayed microdroplets.

  9. Biobased lubricant additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fully biobased lubricants are those formulated using all biobased ingredients, i.e. biobased base oils and biobased additives. Such formulations provide the maximum environmental, safety, and economic benefits expected from a biobased product. Currently, there are a number of biobased base oils that...

  10. More Than Additional Space...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CEFP Journal, 1973

    1973-01-01

    A much needed addition to the Jamestown Elementary School turned out to be more than an expansion of walls for more space. A new educational program, a limited budget, and a short time line were tackled on a team approach basis and were successfully resolved. (Author)

  11. Coordinate post-transcriptional repression of Dpp-dependent transcription factors attenuates signal range during development.

    PubMed

    Newton, Fay G; Harris, Robin E; Sutcliffe, Catherine; Ashe, Hilary L

    2015-10-01

    Precise control of the range of signalling molecule action is crucial for correct cell fate patterning during development. For example, Drosophila ovarian germline stem cells (GSCs) are maintained by exquisitely short-range BMP signalling from the niche. In the absence of BMP signalling, one GSC daughter differentiates into a cystoblast (CB) and this fate is stabilised by Brain tumour (Brat) and Pumilio (Pum)-mediated post-transcriptional repression of mRNAs, including that encoding the Dpp transducer, Mad. However, the identity of other repressed mRNAs and the mechanism of post-transcriptional repression are currently unknown. Here, we identify the Medea and schnurri mRNAs, which encode transcriptional regulators required for activation and/or repression of Dpp target genes, as additional Pum-Brat targets, suggesting that tripartite repression of the transducers is deployed to desensitise the CB to Dpp. In addition, we show that repression by Pum-Brat requires recruitment of the CCR4 and Pop2 deadenylases, with knockdown of deadenylases in vivo giving rise to ectopic GSCs. Consistent with this, Pum-Brat repression leads to poly(A) tail shortening and mRNA degradation in tissue culture cells, and we detect a reduced number of Mad and shn transcripts in the CB relative to the GSC based on single molecule mRNA quantitation. Finally, we show generality of the mechanism by demonstrating that Brat also attenuates pMad and Dpp signalling range in the early embryo. Together our data serve as a platform for understanding how post-transcriptional repression restricts interpretation of BMPs and other cell signals in order to allow robust cell fate patterning during development.

  12. Transcriptional regulation of plant phosphate transporters

    PubMed Central

    Muchhal, Umesh S.; Raghothama, K. G.

    1999-01-01

    Phosphorus is acquired by plant roots primarily via the high-affinity inorganic phosphate (Pi) transporters. The transcripts for Pi transporters are highly inducible upon Pi starvation, which also results in enhanced Pi uptake when Pi is resupplied. Using antibodies specific to one of the tomato Pi transporters (encoded by LePT1), we show that an increase in the LePT1 transcript under Pi starvation leads to a concurrent increase in the transporter protein, suggesting a transcriptional regulation for Pi acquisition. LePT1 protein accumulates rapidly in tomato roots in response to Pi starvation. The level of transporter protein accumulation depends on the Pi concentration in the medium, and it is reversible upon resupply of Pi. LePT1 protein accumulates all along the roots under Pi starvation and is localized primarily in the plasma membranes. These results clearly demonstrate that plants increase their capacity for Pi uptake during Pi starvation by synthesis of additional transporter molecules. PMID:10318976

  13. Predicting tissue specific transcription factor binding sites

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies of gene regulation often utilize genome-wide predictions of transcription factor (TF) binding sites. Most existing prediction methods are based on sequence information alone, ignoring biological contexts such as developmental stages and tissue types. Experimental methods to study in vivo binding, including ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq, can only study one transcription factor in a single cell type and under a specific condition in each experiment, and therefore cannot scale to determine the full set of regulatory interactions in mammalian transcriptional regulatory networks. Results We developed a new computational approach, PIPES, for predicting tissue-specific TF binding. PIPES integrates in vitro protein binding microarrays (PBMs), sequence conservation and tissue-specific epigenetic (DNase I hypersensitivity) information. We demonstrate that PIPES improves over existing methods on distinguishing between in vivo bound and unbound sequences using ChIP-seq data for 11 mouse TFs. In addition, our predictions are in good agreement with current knowledge of tissue-specific TF regulation. Conclusions We provide a systematic map of computationally predicted tissue-specific binding targets for 284 mouse TFs across 55 tissue/cell types. Such comprehensive resource is useful for researchers studying gene regulation. PMID:24238150

  14. Coupling transcription and alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2007-01-01

    Alternative splicing regulation not only depends on the interaction of splicing factors with splicing enhancers and silencers in the pre-mRNA, but also on the coupling between transcription and splicing. This coupling is possible because splicing is often cotranscriptional and promoter identity and occupation may affect alternative splicing. We discuss here the different mechanisms by which transcription regulates alternative splicing. These include the recruitment of splicing factors to the transcribing polymerase and "kinetic coupling", which involves changes in the rate of transcriptional elongation that in turn affect the timing in which splice sites are presented to the splicing machinery. The recruitment mechanism may depend on the particular features of the carboxyl terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, whereas kinetic coupling seems to be linked to how changes in chromatin structure and other factors affect transcription elongation.

  15. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M.; Mali, Prashant G.; Esvelt, Kevin M.

    2016-02-23

    Methods of modulating expression of a target nucleic acid in a cell are provided including introducing into the cell a first foreign nucleic acid encoding one or more RNAs complementary to DNA, wherein the DNA includes the target nucleic acid, introducing into the cell a second foreign nucleic acid encoding a nuclease-null Cas9 protein that binds to the DNA and is guided by the one or more RNAs, introducing into the cell a third foreign nucleic acid encoding a transcriptional regulator protein or domain, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein, and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain are expressed, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain co-localize to the DNA and wherein the transcriptional regulator protein or domain regulates expression of the target nucleic acid.

  16. Nucleolar localization of myc transcripts.

    PubMed Central

    Bond, V C; Wold, B

    1993-01-01

    In situ hybridization has revealed a striking subnuclear distribution of c-myc RNA transcripts. A major fraction of the sense-strand nuclear c-myc transcripts was localized to the nucleoli. myc intron 1-containing RNAs were noticeably absent from nucleoli, accumulating instead in the nucleoplasm. The localization of myc RNA to nucleoli was shown to be common to a number of diverse cell types, including primary Sertoli cells and several cell lines. Furthermore, nucleolar localization was not restricted to c-myc and N-myc and myoD transcripts also displayed this phenomenon. In contrast, gamma-actin or lactate dehydrogenase transcripts did not display nucleolar localization. These observations suggest a new role for the nucleolus in transport and/or turnover of potential mRNAs. Images PMID:7684491

  17. Viral miRNA targeting of bicistronic and polycistronic transcripts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Huang, Yufei; Jung, Jae U; Lu, Chun; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2014-08-01

    Successful viral infection entails a choreographic regulation of viral gene expression program. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes numerous miRNAs that regulate viral life cycle. However, few viral targets have been identified due to the lack of information on KSHV 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs). Recent genome-wide mapping of KSHV transcripts and 3'UTRs has revealed abundant bicistronic and polycistronic transcripts. The extended 3'UTRs of the 5' proximal genes of bicistronic and polycistronic transcripts offer additional regulatory targets. Indeed, a genome-wide screening of KSHV 3'UTRs has identified several bicistronic and polycistronic transcripts as the novel targets of viral miRNAs. Together, these works have expanded our knowledge of the unique features of KSHV gene regulation program and provided valuable resources for the research community.

  18. Viral miRNA Targeting of Bicistronic and Polycistronic Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ying; Huang, Yufei; Jung, Jae U.; Lu, Chun; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Successful viral infection entails a choreographic regulation of viral gene expression program. Kaposi’s sarcoma–associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes numerous miRNAs that regulate viral life cycle. However, few viral targets have been identified due to the lack of information on KSHV 3′ untranslated regions (3′UTRs). Recent genome-wide mapping of KSHV transcripts and 3′UTRs has revealed abundant bicistronic and polycistronic transcripts. The extended 3′UTRs of the 5′ proximal genes of bicistronic and polycistronic transcripts offer additional regulatory targets. Indeed, a genome-wide screening of KSHV 3′UTRs has identified several bicistronic and polycistronic transcripts as the novel targets of viral miRNAs. Together, these works have expanded our knowledge of the unique features of KSHV gene regulation program and provided valuable resources for the research community. PMID:24821460

  19. Untangling the brain's neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative transcriptional responses

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Karpagam; Friedman, Brad A.; Larson, Jessica L.; Lauffer, Benjamin E.; Goldstein, Leonard D.; Appling, Laurie L.; Borneo, Jovencio; Poon, Chungkee; Ho, Terence; Cai, Fang; Steiner, Pascal; van der Brug, Marcel P.; Modrusan, Zora; Kaminker, Joshua S.; Hansen, David V.

    2016-01-01

    A common approach to understanding neurodegenerative disease is comparing gene expression in diseased versus healthy tissues. We illustrate that expression profiles derived from whole tissue RNA highly reflect the degenerating tissues' altered cellular composition, not necessarily transcriptional regulation. To accurately understand transcriptional changes that accompany neuropathology, we acutely purify neurons, astrocytes and microglia from single adult mouse brains and analyse their transcriptomes by RNA sequencing. Using peripheral endotoxemia to establish the method, we reveal highly specific transcriptional responses and altered RNA processing in each cell type, with Tnfr1 required for the astrocytic response. Extending the method to an Alzheimer's disease model, we confirm that transcriptomic changes observed in whole tissue are driven primarily by cell type composition, not transcriptional regulation, and identify hundreds of cell type-specific changes undetected in whole tissue RNA. Applying similar methods to additional models and patient tissues will transform our understanding of aberrant gene expression in neurological disease. PMID:27097852

  20. The transcriptional landscape of the mammalian genome.

    PubMed

    Carninci, P; Kasukawa, T; Katayama, S; Gough, J; Frith, M C; Maeda, N; Oyama, R; Ravasi, T; Lenhard, B; Wells, C; Kodzius, R; Shimokawa, K; Bajic, V B; Brenner, S E; Batalov, S; Forrest, A R R; Zavolan, M; Davis, M J; Wilming, L G; Aidinis, V; Allen, J E; Ambesi-Impiombato, A; Apweiler, R; Aturaliya, R N; Bailey, T L; Bansal, M; Baxter, L; Beisel, K W; Bersano, T; Bono, H; Chalk, A M; Chiu, K P; Choudhary, V; Christoffels, A; Clutterbuck, D R; Crowe, M L; Dalla, E; Dalrymple, B P; de Bono, B; Della Gatta, G; di Bernardo, D; Down, T; Engstrom, P; Fagiolini, M; Faulkner, G; Fletcher, C F; Fukushima, T; Furuno, M; Futaki, S; Gariboldi, M; Georgii-Hemming, P; Gingeras, T R; Gojobori, T; Green, R E; Gustincich, S; Harbers, M; Hayashi, Y; Hensch, T K; Hirokawa, N; Hill, D; Huminiecki, L; Iacono, M; Ikeo, K; Iwama, A; Ishikawa, T; Jakt, M; Kanapin, A; Katoh, M; Kawasawa, Y; Kelso, J; Kitamura, H; Kitano, H; Kollias, G; Krishnan, S P T; Kruger, A; Kummerfeld, S K; Kurochkin, I V; Lareau, L F; Lazarevic, D; Lipovich, L; Liu, J; Liuni, S; McWilliam, S; Madan Babu, M; Madera, M; Marchionni, L; Matsuda, H; Matsuzawa, S; Miki, H; Mignone, F; Miyake, S; Morris, K; Mottagui-Tabar, S; Mulder, N; Nakano, N; Nakauchi, H; Ng, P; Nilsson, R; Nishiguchi, S; Nishikawa, S; Nori, F; Ohara, O; Okazaki, Y; Orlando, V; Pang, K C; Pavan, W J; Pavesi, G; Pesole, G; Petrovsky, N; Piazza, S; Reed, J; Reid, J F; Ring, B Z; Ringwald, M; Rost, B; Ruan, Y; Salzberg, S L; Sandelin, A; Schneider, C; Schönbach, C; Sekiguchi, K; Semple, C A M; Seno, S; Sessa, L; Sheng, Y; Shibata, Y; Shimada, H; Shimada, K; Silva, D; Sinclair, B; Sperling, S; Stupka, E; Sugiura, K; Sultana, R; Takenaka, Y; Taki, K; Tammoja, K; Tan, S L; Tang, S; Taylor, M S; Tegner, J; Teichmann, S A; Ueda, H R; van Nimwegen, E; Verardo, R; Wei, C L; Yagi, K; Yamanishi, H; Zabarovsky, E; Zhu, S; Zimmer, A; Hide, W; Bult, C; Grimmond, S M; Teasdale, R D; Liu, E T; Brusic, V; Quackenbush, J; Wahlestedt, C; Mattick, J S; Hume, D A; Kai, C; Sasaki, D; Tomaru, Y; Fukuda, S; Kanamori-Katayama, M; Suzuki, M; Aoki, J; Arakawa, T; Iida, J; Imamura, K; Itoh, M; Kato, T; Kawaji, H; Kawagashira, N; Kawashima, T; Kojima, M; Kondo, S; Konno, H; Nakano, K; Ninomiya, N; Nishio, T; Okada, M; Plessy, C; Shibata, K; Shiraki, T; Suzuki, S; Tagami, M; Waki, K; Watahiki, A; Okamura-Oho, Y; Suzuki, H; Kawai, J; Hayashizaki, Y

    2005-09-02

    This study describes comprehensive polling of transcription start and termination sites and analysis of previously unidentified full-length complementary DNAs derived from the mouse genome. We identify the 5' and 3' boundaries of 181,047 transcripts with extensive variation in transcripts arising from alternative promoter usage, splicing, and polyadenylation. There are 16,247 new mouse protein-coding transcripts, including 5154 encoding previously unidentified proteins. Genomic mapping of the transcriptome reveals transcriptional forests, with overlapping transcription on both strands, separated by deserts in which few transcripts are observed. The data provide a comprehensive platform for the comparative analysis of mammalian transcriptional regulation in differentiation and development.

  1. VIEW TO NORTHEAST OF c19441950 c19441950 POSTU.S. RADIUM ADDITION ADDITIONS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW TO NORTHEAST OF c1944-1950 c1944-1950 POST-U.S. RADIUM ADDITION ADDITIONS TO PAINT APPLICATION BUILDING (RIGHT) AND CRYSTALLIZATION LABORATORY (LEFT) - United States Radium Corporation, 422-432 Alden Street, Orange, Essex County, NJ

  2. Vinyl capped addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D. (Inventor); Malarik, Diane C. (Inventor); Delvigs, Peter (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimide resins (PMR) are generally useful where high strength and temperature capabilities are required (at temperatures up to about 700 F). Polyimide resins are particularly useful in applications such as jet engine compressor components, for example, blades, vanes, air seals, air splitters, and engine casing parts. Aromatic vinyl capped addition polyimides are obtained by reacting a diamine, an ester of tetracarboxylic acid, and an aromatic vinyl compound. Low void materials with improved oxidative stability when exposed to 700 F air may be fabricated as fiber reinforced high molecular weight capped polyimide composites. The aromatic vinyl capped polyimides are provided with a more aromatic nature and are more thermally stable than highly aliphatic, norbornenyl-type end-capped polyimides employed in PMR resins. The substitution of aromatic vinyl end-caps for norbornenyl end-caps in addition polyimides results in polymers with improved oxidative stability.

  3. Generation of a transcription map at the HSD17B locus centromeric to BRCA1 at 17q21

    SciTech Connect

    Rommens, J.M.; McArthur, J.; Allen, T.

    1995-08-10

    A detailed transcription map of the 320-kb region containing the HSD17B locus on chromosome 17 was generated. Thirty unique cDNA fragments, retrieved following the hybridization of immobilized YACs to primary pools of cDNAs prepared from RNA of mammary gland, ovary, placenta, and the Caco-2 cell line, were aligned into 10 transcription units by physical mapping and hybridization to RNAs of a series of tissues. The cDNAs were then further characterized by sequencing and used to screen mammary gland DNA libraries. Fragments corresponding to the broadly expressed {gamma}-tubulin and Ki antigen genes were identified. A full-length cDNA clone encoding a 117-amino-acid protein homologous to the rat ribosomal protein L34 was isolated. Portions of genes with restricted patterns of expression were also obtained, including the previously characterized HSD17B1. One new gene, for which a full-length cDNA was isolated, was found to have an interesting tissue-specific pattern of expression with abundant mRNA in both the colon and the testis and in the mammary carcinoma cell line BT-474. This contrasted with the barely detectable level observed in several tissues including normal mammary gland. Of the five additional transcription units identified, one showed no similarity, two showed identity to human expressed sequences, and two displayed similarity to genes of animal species by amino acid alignment. These latter cDNA clones include potential homologues of a rat nuclear tyrosine phosphatase and of a factor of Drosophila that is known to be involved in the negative regulation of transcription of segment identity genes. 44 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Electrophilic addition of astatine

    SciTech Connect

    Norseev, Yu.V.; Vasaros, L.; Nhan, D.D.; Huan, N.K.

    1988-03-01

    It has been shown for the first time that astatine is capable of undergoing addition reactions to unsaturated hydrocarbons. A new compound of astatine, viz., ethylene astatohydrin, has been obtained, and its retention numbers of squalane, Apiezon, and tricresyl phosphate have been found. The influence of various factors on the formation of ethylene astatohydrin has been studied. It has been concluded on the basis of the results obtained that the univalent cations of astatine in an acidic medium is protonated hypoastatous acid.

  5. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online.

  6. Altered enhancer transcription underlies Huntington’s disease striatal transcriptional signature

    PubMed Central

    Le Gras, Stéphanie; Keime, Céline; Anthony, Anne; Lotz, Caroline; De Longprez, Lucie; Brouillet, Emmanuel; Cassel, Jean-Christophe; Boutillier, Anne-Laurence; Merienne, Karine

    2017-01-01

    Epigenetic and transcriptional alterations are both implicated in Huntington’s disease (HD), a progressive neurodegenerative disease resulting in degeneration of striatal neurons in the brain. However, how impaired epigenetic regulation leads to transcriptional dysregulation in HD is unclear. Here, we investigated enhancer RNAs (eRNAs), a class of long non-coding RNAs transcribed from active enhancers. We found that eRNAs are expressed from many enhancers of mouse striatum and showed that a subset of those eRNAs are deregulated in HD vs control mouse striatum. Enhancer regions producing eRNAs decreased in HD mouse striatum were associated with genes involved in striatal neuron identity. Consistently, they were enriched in striatal super-enhancers. Moreover, decreased eRNA expression in HD mouse striatum correlated with down-regulation of associated genes. Additionally, a significant number of RNA Polymerase II (RNAPII) binding sites were lost within enhancers associated with decreased eRNAs in HD vs control mouse striatum. Together, this indicates that loss of RNAPII at HD mouse enhancers contributes to reduced transcription of eRNAs, resulting in down-regulation of target genes. Thus, our data support the view that eRNA dysregulation in HD striatum is a key mechanism leading to altered transcription of striatal neuron identity genes, through reduced recruitment of RNAPII at super-enhancers. PMID:28225006

  7. Chromatin-dependent transcription factor accessibility rather than nucleosome remodeling predominates during global transcriptional restructuring in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zawadzki, Karl A; Morozov, Alexandre V; Broach, James R

    2009-08-01

    Several well-studied promoters in yeast lose nucleosomes upon transcriptional activation and gain them upon repression, an observation that has prompted the model that transcriptional activation and repression requires nucleosome remodeling of regulated promoters. We have examined global nucleosome positioning before and after glucose-induced transcriptional reprogramming, a condition under which more than half of all yeast genes significantly change expression. The majority of induced and repressed genes exhibit no change in promoter nucleosome arrangement, although promoters that do undergo nucleosome remodeling tend to contain a TATA box. Rather, we found multiple examples where the pre-existing accessibility of putative transcription factor binding sites before glucose addition determined whether the corresponding gene would change expression in response to glucose addition. These results suggest that selection of appropriate transcription factor binding sites may be dictated to a large extent by nucleosome prepositioning but that regulation of expression through these sites is dictated not by nucleosome repositioning but by changes in transcription factor activity.

  8. RNA interference in the nucleus: roles for small RNAs in transcription, epigenetics and beyond.

    PubMed

    Castel, Stephane E; Martienssen, Robert A

    2013-02-01

    A growing number of functions are emerging for RNA interference (RNAi) in the nucleus, in addition to well-characterized roles in post-transcriptional gene silencing in the cytoplasm. Epigenetic modifications directed by small RNAs have been shown to cause transcriptional repression in plants, fungi and animals. Additionally, increasing evidence indicates that RNAi regulates transcription through interaction with transcriptional machinery. Nuclear small RNAs include small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) and are implicated in nuclear processes such as transposon regulation, heterochromatin formation, developmental gene regulation and genome stability.

  9. Sequence requirements for transcriptional arrest in exon 1 of the murine adenosine deaminase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Ramamurthy, V; Maa, M C; Harless, M L; Wright, D A; Kellems, R E

    1990-01-01

    We have previously shown that a transcription arrest site near the 5' end of the murine adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene is significantly involved in the regulation of ADA gene expression. To facilitate the analysis of this transcription arrest site, we have analyzed the transcription products from cloned ADA gene fragments injected into Xenopus laevis oocytes. When genomic fragments spanning the 5' end of the ADA gene were injected into oocytes, a 96-nucleotide (nt) ADA RNA was the major transcription product. The 5' end of this RNA mapped to the transcription initiation site for the ADA gene, and its 3' terminus mapped 7 nt downstream of the translation initiation codon within exon 1. A 300-base-pair fragment of genomic DNA spanning the 5' end of the ADA gene was sufficient to generate the 96-nt transcript which accounted for approximately one-half of the transcription products from injected templates. Deletion of a segment of approximately 65 base pairs, located immediately downstream of the 3' terminus of the 96-nt transcript, resulted in a substantial reduction in the synthesis of the 96-nt transcript and a corresponding increase in the production of larger transcripts. These studies show that the transcriptional apparatus of X. laevis oocytes responds to the transcription arrest site associated with exon 1 of the murine ADA gene and that oocyte injections provide a convenient functional assay for additional mechanistic studies. Images PMID:1690842

  10. Additive interaction between heterogeneous environmental ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    BACKGROUND Environmental exposures often occur in tandem; however, epidemiological research often focuses on singular exposures. Statistical interactions among broad, well-characterized environmental domains have not yet been evaluated in association with health. We address this gap by conducting a county-level cross-sectional analysis of interactions between Environmental Quality Index (EQI) domain indices on preterm birth in the Unites States from 2000-2005.METHODS: The EQI, a county-level index constructed for the 2000-2005 time period, was constructed from five domain-specific indices (air, water, land, built and sociodemographic) using principal component analyses. County-level preterm birth rates (n=3141) were estimated using live births from the National Center for Health Statistics. Linear regression was used to estimate prevalence differences (PD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) comparing worse environmental quality to the better quality for each model for a) each individual domain main effect b) the interaction contrast and c) the two main effects plus interaction effect (i.e. the “net effect”) to show departure from additive interaction for the all U.S counties. Analyses were also performed for subgroupings by four urban/rural strata. RESULTS: We found the suggestion of antagonistic interactions but no synergism, along with several purely additive (i.e., no interaction) associations. In the non-stratified model, we observed antagonistic interac

  11. Transcriptional regulation by post-transcriptional modification--role of phosphorylation in Sp1 transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Chu, Shijian

    2012-10-15

    Sp1 is a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor involved in the regulation of a large number of genes including housekeeping genes as well as actively regulated genes. Although Sp1 was discovered nearly three decades ago, its functional diversity is still not completely understood. One of the ways that make Sp1 versatile in transcriptional regulation is its post-transcriptional modification, which alters Sp1 structure in different cells and at different times. Compared to other types of modifications of the Sp1 protein, phosphorylation has been studied far more extensively. This review focuses on the inducers, pathways, enzymes, and biological effects of Sp1 phosphorylation. Recent data are beginning to reveal the biological significance and universal presence of Sp1 phosphorylation-related cell/molecular responses. Studies in this field provide a quick glance at how a simple chemical modification of a transcription factor could produce significant functional diversity of the protein.

  12. Electrosurgical unit analyzers.

    PubMed

    1998-07-01

    Electrosurgical unit (ESU) analyzers automate the testing and inspection of the output circuits and safety features of ESUs. They perform testing that would otherwise require several other pieces of equipment, as well as considerably more time and greater technician expertise. They are used largely by clinical engineering departments for routine inspection and preventive maintenance (IPM) procedures and, less often, for accident investigations and troubleshooting. In this Evaluation, we tested three ESU analyzers from three suppliers. We rated all three analyzers Acceptable and ranked them in two groupings. In ranking the units, we placed the greatest weight on ease of use for routine ESU inspections, and gave additional consideration to versatility for advanced applications such as ESU research. The unit in Group 1 was the easiest to use, especially for infrequent users. The units in Group 2 were satisfactory but require more frequent use to maintain proficiency and to avoid user errors.

  13. Post-Transcriptional Control of Chloroplast Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    del Campo, Eva M.

    2009-01-01

    Chloroplasts contain their own genome, organized as operons, which are generally transcribed as polycistronic transcriptional units. These primary transcripts are processed into smaller RNAs, which are further modified to produce functional RNAs. The RNA processing mechanisms remain largely unknown and represent an important step in the control of chloroplast gene expression. Such mechanisms include RNA cleavage of pre-existing RNAs, RNA stabilization, intron splicing, and RNA editing. Recently, several nuclear-encoded proteins that participate in diverse plastid RNA processing events have been characterised. Many of them seem to belong to the pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein family that is implicated in many crucial functions including organelle biogenesis and plant development. This review will provide an overview of current knowledge of the post-transcriptional processing in chloroplasts. PMID:19838333

  14. A comprehensive library of fluorescent transcriptional reporters for Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zaslaver, Alon; Bren, Anat; Ronen, Michal; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Kikoin, Ilya; Shavit, Seagull; Liebermeister, Wolfram; Surette, Michael G; Alon, Uri

    2006-08-01

    E. coli is widely used for systems biology research; there exists a need, however, for tools that can be used to accurately and comprehensively measure expression dynamics in individual living cells. To address this we present a library of transcriptional fusions of gfp to each of about 2,000 different promoters in E. coli K12, covering the great majority of the promoters in the organism. Each promoter fusion is expressed from a low-copy plasmid. We demonstrate that this library can be used to obtain highly accurate dynamic measurements of promoter activity on a genomic scale, in a glucose-lactose diauxic shift experiment. The library allowed detection of about 80 previously uncharacterized transcription units in E. coli, including putative internal promoters within previously known operons, such as the lac operon. This library can serve as a tool for accurate, high-resolution analysis of transcription networks in living E. coli cells.

  15. Siloxane containing addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maudgal, S.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Addition polyimide oligomers have been synthesized from bis(gamma-aminopropyl) tetramethyldisiloxane and 3, 3', 4, 4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride using a variety of latent crosslinking groups as endcappers. The prepolymers were isolated and characterized for solubility (in amide, chlorinated and ether solvents), melt flow and cure properties. The most promising systems, maleimide and acetylene terminated prepolymers, were selected for detailed study. Graphite cloth reinforced composites were prepared and properties compared with those of graphite/Kerimid 601, a commercially available bismaleimide. Mixtures of the maleimide terminated system with Kerimid 601, in varying proportions, were also studied.

  16. Platelet additive solution - electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Hiroshi; Hirayama, Junichi; Akino, Mitsuaki; Ikeda, Hisami

    2011-06-01

    Recent attention to solutions that replace most or all plasma in platelet concentrates, while maintaining satisfactory platelet function, is motivated by the potential of plasma reduction or depletion to mitigate various transfusion-related adverse events. This report considers the electrolytic composition of previously described platelet additive solutions, in order to draw general conclusions about what is required for platelet function and longevity. The optimal concentrations of Na(+) and Cl(-) are 69-115 mM. The presence of both K(+) and Mg(2+) in platelet suspension at nearly physiological concentrations (3-5mM and 1.5-3mM, respectively) is indispensable for good preservation capacity because both electrolytes are required to prevent platelet activation. In contrast to K(+) and Mg(2+), Ca(2+) may not be important because no free Ca(2+) is available in M-sol, which showed excellent platelet preservation capacity at less than 5% plasma concentration. The importance of bicarbonate (approximately 40 mM) can be recognized when the platelets are suspended in additive solution under less than 5% residual plasma concentration.

  17. Transcriptional Signatures in Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    While selective neuronal death has been an influential theme in Huntington's disease (HD), there is now a preponderance of evidence that significant neuronal dysfunction precedes frank neuronal death. The best evidence for neuronal dysfunction is the observation that gene expression is altered in HD brain, suggesting that transcriptional dysregulation is a central mechanism. Studies of altered gene expression began with careful observations of post-mortem human HD brain and subsequently were accelerated by the development of transgenic mouse models. The application of DNA microarray technology has spurred tremendous progress with respect to the altered transcriptional processes that occur in HD, through gene expression studies of both transgenic mouse models as well as cellular models of HD. Gene expression profiles are remarkably comparable across these models, bolstering the idea that transcriptional signatures reflect an essential feature of disease pathogenesis. Finally, gene expression studies have been applied to human HD, thus not only validating the approach of using model systems, but also solidifying the idea that altered transcription is a key mechanism in HD pathogenesis. In the future, gene expression profiling will be used as a readout in clinical trials aimed at correcting transcriptional dysregulation in Huntington's disease. PMID:17467140

  18. Kinetic Modelling of Transcription Elongation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Maoileidigh, Daibhid; Tadigotla, Vasisht; Sengupta, Anirvan; Epshtein, Vitaly; Ebright, Richard; Nudler, Evgeny; Ruckenstein, Andrei

    2006-03-01

    Transcription is the first step in gene expression and it is at this stage that most of genetic regulation occurs. The enzyme RNA polymerase (RNAP) walks along DNA creating an RNA transcript at a highly non-uniform rate. We discuss how many non-intuitive features of the system may be experimentally and physically motivated and present first a model, which agrees qualitatively with a host of experimental evidence. We also examine intrinsic pauses where it is thought that the RNAP will move backwards along the DNA template without changing the length of the RNA transcript. We describe a simplified kinetic scheme for the recovery of intrinsic pauses with the same degree of predictive power as our thermodynamic model (presented separately). The separation of timescales between the movement of the RNAP and global changes in the RNA secondary structure is seen to be crucial for the function of RNAP. This is essentially a model of a Brownian ratchet where RNAP executes a 1D random walk in a sequence dependent potential over a range determined by the co-transcriptional RNA fold for each transcript length

  19. Transcriptional gene silencing in humans

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Marc S.; Morris, Kevin V.

    2016-01-01

    It has been over a decade since the first observation that small non-coding RNAs can functionally modulate epigenetic states in human cells to achieve functional transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). TGS is mechanistically distinct from the RNA interference (RNAi) gene-silencing pathway. TGS can result in long-term stable epigenetic modifications to gene expression that can be passed on to daughter cells during cell division, whereas RNAi does not. Early studies of TGS have been largely overlooked, overshadowed by subsequent discoveries of small RNA-directed post-TGS and RNAi. A reappraisal of early work has been brought about by recent findings in human cells where endogenous long non-coding RNAs function to regulate the epigenome. There are distinct and common overlaps between the proteins involved in small and long non-coding RNA transcriptional regulatory mechanisms, suggesting that the early studies using small non-coding RNAs to modulate transcription were making use of a previously unrecognized endogenous mechanism of RNA-directed gene regulation. Here we review how non-coding RNA plays a role in regulation of transcription and epigenetic gene silencing in human cells by revisiting these earlier studies and the mechanistic insights gained to date. We also provide a list of mammalian genes that have been shown to be transcriptionally regulated by non-coding RNAs. Lastly, we explore how TGS may serve as the basis for development of future therapeutic agents. PMID:27060137

  20. Maximal stimulation of meiotic recombination by a yeast transcription factor requires the transcription activation domain and a DNA-binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, D T; Fan, Q; Petes, T D

    1999-01-01

    The DNA sequences located upstream of the yeast HIS4 represent a very strong meiotic recombination hotspot. Although the activity of this hotspot requires the transcription activator Rap1p, the level of HIS4 transcription is not directly related to the level of recombination. We find that the recombination-stimulating activity of Rap1p requires the transcription activation domain of the protein. We show that a hybrid protein with the Gal4p DNA-binding domain and the Rap1p activation domain can stimulate recombination in a strain in which Gal4p-binding sites are inserted upstream of HIS4. In addition, we find recombination hotspot activity associated with the Gal4p DNA-binding sites that is independent of known transcription factors. We suggest that yeast cells have two types of recombination hotspots, alpha (transcription factor dependent) and beta (transcription factor independent). PMID:10224246

  1. Additive composition, for gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Vataru, M.

    1989-01-10

    An admixture is described that comprises Diesel fuel and an additive composition added thereto which is between about 0.05 to about 2.0 percent by weight of the fuel, the composition comprising: (a) between about 0.05 and 25% relative weight parts of an organic peroxide, and (b) between about 0.1 and 25% relative weight parts of detergent selected from the component group that consists of: (i) fatty amines; (ii) ethoxylated and propoxylated derivatives of fatty amines; (iii) fatty diamines; (iv) fatty imidazlines; (v) polymeric amines and derivatives thereof; (vi) combination of one or more of the (i) through (v) components with carboxylic acid or acids having from three to forth carbon atoms, (c) from about 99.0 to about 50% by weight of a hydrocarbon solvent.

  2. Teardrop bladder: additional considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Wechsler, R.J.; Brennan, R.E.

    1982-07-01

    Nine cases of teardrop bladder (TDB) seen at excretory urography are presented. In some of these patients, the iliopsoas muscles were at the upper limit of normal in size, and additional evaluation of the perivesical structures with computed tomography (CT) was necessary. CT demonstrated only hypertrophied muscles with or without perivesical fat. The psoas muscles and pelvic width were measured in 8 patients and compared with the measurements of a control group of males without TDB. Patients with TDB had large iliopsoas muscles and narrow pelves compared with the control group. The psoas muscle width/pelvic width ratio was significantly greater (p < 0.0005) in patients with TDB than in the control group, with values of 1.04 + 0.05 and 0.82 + 0.09, respectively. It is concluded that TDB is not an uncommon normal variant in black males. Both iliopsoas muscle hypertrophy and a narrow pelvis are factors that predispose a patient to TDB.

  3. New addition curing polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frimer, Aryeh A.; Cavano, Paul

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to improve the thermal-oxidative stability (TOS) of PMR-type polymers, the use of 1,4-phenylenebis (phenylmaleic anhydride) PPMA, was evaluated. Two series of nadic end-capped addition curing polyimides were prepared by imidizing PPMA with either 4,4'-methylene dianiline or p-phenylenediamine. The first resulted in improved solubility and increased resin flow while the latter yielded a compression molded neat resin sample with a T(sub g) of 408 C, close to 70 C higher than PME-15. The performance of these materials in long term weight loss studies was below that of PMR-15, independent of post-cure conditions. These results can be rationalized in terms of the thermal lability of the pendant phenyl groups and the incomplete imidization of the sterically congested PPMA. The preparation of model compounds as well as future research directions are discussed.

  4. Perspectives on Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourell, David L.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has skyrocketed in visibility commercially and in the public sector. This article describes the development of this field from early layered manufacturing approaches of photosculpture, topography, and material deposition. Certain precursors to modern AM processes are also briefly described. The growth of the field over the last 30 years is presented. Included is the standard delineation of AM technologies into seven broad categories. The economics of AM part generation is considered, and the impacts of the economics on application sectors are described. On the basis of current trends, the future outlook will include a convergence of AM fabricators, mass-produced AM fabricators, enabling of topology optimization designs, and specialization in the AM legal arena. Long-term developments with huge impact are organ printing and volume-based printing.

  5. Sewage sludge additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Mueller, W. A.; Ingham, J. D. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The additive is for a raw sewage treatment process of the type where settling tanks are used for the purpose of permitting the suspended matter in the raw sewage to be settled as well as to permit adsorption of the dissolved contaminants in the water of the sewage. The sludge, which settles down to the bottom of the settling tank is extracted, pyrolyzed and activated to form activated carbon and ash which is mixed with the sewage prior to its introduction into the settling tank. The sludge does not provide all of the activated carbon and ash required for adequate treatment of the raw sewage. It is necessary to add carbon to the process and instead of expensive commercial carbon, coal is used to provide the carbon supplement.

  6. Transcription of Inflammatory Genes: Long Noncoding RNA and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune system must coordinate elaborate signaling pathways to turn on expression of hundreds of genes to provide protection against pathogens and resolve acute inflammation. Multiple genes within distinct functional categories are coordinately and temporally regulated by transcriptional on and off switches in response to distinct external stimuli. Three classes of transcription factors act together with transcriptional coregulators and chromatin-modifying complexes to control these programs. In addition, newer studies implicate long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) as additional regulators of these responses. LncRNAs promote, fine-tune, and restrain the inflammatory program. In this study, we provide an overview of gene regulation and the emerging importance of lncRNAs in the immune system. PMID:25250698

  7. Comparative studies of transcriptional regulation mechanisms in a group of eight gamma-proteobacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Vladimir; González, Abel D; Vasconcelos, Ana T; Huerta, Araceli M; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2005-11-18

    Experimental data on the Escherichia coli transcriptional regulation has enabled the construction of statistical models to predict new regulatory elements within its genome. Far less is known about the transcriptional regulatory elements in other gamma-proteobacteria with sequenced genomes, so it is of great interest to conduct comparative genomic studies oriented to extracting biologically relevant information about transcriptional regulation in these less studied organisms using the knowledge from E. coli. In this work, we use the information stored in the TRACTOR_DB database to conduct a comparative study on the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation in eight gamma-proteobacteria and 38 regulons. We assess the conservation of transcription factors binding specificity across all the eight genomes and show a correlation between the conservation of a regulatory site and the structure of the transcription unit it regulates. We also find a marked conservation of site-promoter distances across the eight organisms and a correspondence of the statistical significance of co-occurrence of pairs of transcription factor binding sites in the regulatory regions, which is probably related to a conserved architecture of higher-order regulatory complexes in the organisms studied. The results obtained in this study using the information on transcriptional regulation in E. coli enable us to conclude that not only transcription factor-binding sites are conserved across related species but also several of the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms previously identified in E. coli.

  8. 46 CFR 502.165 - Official transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... incremental cost of transcription above the regular copy transcription cost borne by the Commission, in... full cost of transcription being borne by the Commission. (B) In the event a request for daily copy is... of transcription over and above that borne by the Commission, i.e., the incremental cost between...

  9. 46 CFR 502.165 - Official transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... incremental cost of transcription above the regular copy transcription cost borne by the Commission, in... full cost of transcription being borne by the Commission. (B) In the event a request for daily copy is... of transcription over and above that borne by the Commission, i.e., the incremental cost between...

  10. 46 CFR 502.165 - Official transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... incremental cost of transcription above the regular copy transcription cost borne by the Commission, in... full cost of transcription being borne by the Commission. (B) In the event a request for daily copy is... of transcription over and above that borne by the Commission, i.e., the incremental cost between...

  11. 46 CFR 502.165 - Official transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... incremental cost of transcription above the regular copy transcription cost borne by the Commission, in... full cost of transcription being borne by the Commission. (B) In the event a request for daily copy is... of transcription over and above that borne by the Commission, i.e., the incremental cost between...

  12. 46 CFR 502.165 - Official transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... incremental cost of transcription above the regular copy transcription cost borne by the Commission, in... full cost of transcription being borne by the Commission. (B) In the event a request for daily copy is... of transcription over and above that borne by the Commission, i.e., the incremental cost between...

  13. Transcription and splicing: when the twain meet.

    PubMed

    Brody, Yehuda; Shav-Tal, Yaron

    2011-01-01

    Splicing can occur co-transcriptionally. What happens when the splicing reaction lags after the completed transcriptional process? We found that elongation rates are independent of ongoing splicing on the examined genes and suggest that when transcription has completed but splicing has not, the splicing machinery is retained at the site of transcription, independently of the polymerase.

  14. Pervasive transcription: detecting functional RNAs in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lybecker, Meghan; Bilusic, Ivana; Raghavan, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Pervasive, or genome-wide, transcription has been reported in all domains of life. In bacteria, most pervasive transcription occurs antisense to protein-coding transcripts, although recently a new class of pervasive RNAs was identified that originates from within annotated genes. Initially considered to be non-functional transcriptional noise, pervasive transcription is increasingly being recognized as important in regulating gene expression. The function of pervasive transcription is an extensively debated question in the field of transcriptomics and regulatory RNA biology. Here, we highlight the most recent contributions addressing the purpose of pervasive transcription in bacteria and discuss their implications.

  15. Genome wide analysis of human genes transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally regulated by the HTLV-I protein p30

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, John M; Ghorbel, Sofiane; Nicot, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    RNA transcription and the nuclear shuttling of cellular mRNA transcripts. In addition, these alterations in gene expression may play a role in cell transformation and the onset of leukemia. PMID:19602286

  16. Additive lattice kirigami.

    PubMed

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D

    2016-09-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes.

  17. Ceramics with Different Additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juanjuan; Feng, Lajun; Lei, Ali; Zhao, Kang; Yan, Aijun

    2014-09-01

    Li2CO3, MgCO3, BaCO3, and Bi2O3 dopants were introduced into CaCu3Ti4O12 (CCTO) ceramics in order to improve the dielectric properties. The CCTO ceramics were prepared by conventional solid-state reaction method. The phase structure, microstructure, and dielectric behavior were carefully investigated. The pure structure without any impurity phases can be confirmed by the x-ray diffraction patterns. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis illuminated that the grains of Ca0.90Li0.20Cu3Ti4O12 ceramics were greater than that of pure CCTO. It was important for the properties of the CCTO ceramics to study the additives in complex impedance spectroscopy. It was found that the Ca0.90Li0.20Cu3Ti4O12 ceramics had the higher permittivity (>45000), the lower dielectric loss (<0.025) than those of CCTO at 1 kHz at room temperature and good temperature stability from -30 to 75 °C.

  18. Additive lattice kirigami

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M.; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D.

    2016-01-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes. PMID:27679822

  19. Subventricular zone microglia transcriptional networks.

    PubMed

    Starossom, Sarah C; Imitola, Jaime; Wang, Yue; Cao, Li; Khoury, Samia J

    2011-07-01

    Microglia play an important role in inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system. There is evidence of microglial diversity with distinct phenotypes exhibiting either neuroprotection and repair or neurotoxicity. However the precise molecular mechanisms underlying this diversity are still unknown. Using a model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) we performed transcriptional profiling of isolated subventricular zone microglia from the acute and chronic disease phases of EAE. We found that microglia exhibit disease phase specific gene expression signatures, that correspond to unique gene ontology functions and genomic networks. Our data demonstrate for the first time, distinct transcriptional networks of microglia activation in vivo, that suggests a role as mediators of injury or repair.

  20. Chromatin and Transcription in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Rando, Oliver J.; Winston, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms by which chromatin structure controls eukaryotic transcription has been an intense area of investigation for the past 25 years. Many of the key discoveries that created the foundation for this field came from studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, including the discovery of the role of chromatin in transcriptional silencing, as well as the discovery of chromatin-remodeling factors and histone modification activities. Since that time, studies in yeast have continued to contribute in leading ways. This review article summarizes the large body of yeast studies in this field. PMID:22345607

  1. Human lung expresses unique gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase transcripts.

    PubMed Central

    Wetmore, L A; Gerard, C; Drazen, J M

    1993-01-01

    gamma-Glutamyl transpeptidase (EC 2.3.2.2, gamma GT) is a membrane-bound ectoenzyme that plays an important role in the metabolism of glutathione. It is composed of two subunits, both of which are encoded by a common mRNA. We examined the expression of gamma GT in human lung tissue by Northern blot analysis and screening a cDNA library made from human lung poly(A)+ RNA. Our results show that there are two gamma GT mRNA populations in human lung tissue. We define these as group I (2.4 kb) and group II (approximately 1.2 kb) transcripts. In the present communication, we characterize the unique lung transcript. Sequence analysis of representative clones shows that group I transcripts are virtually identical to those previously isolated from liver and placenta but possess a unique 5' untranslated region. In marked contrast, group II transcripts appear to be human-lung-specific. Group II transcripts appear on Northern blots probed with full-length or 3'-biased gamma GT cDNA. Sequence analysis of group II clones shows them to be homologous with group I clones in the region that encodes the reading frame for the light chain; however, they possess a series of unique 5' untranslated regions, which suggests that they arise from lung-specific message processing. Additionally, approximately 50% of the isolated group II clones contain 34 nt substitutions compared with the "wild-type" gamma GT transcripts. These data indicate that human lung expresses unique gamma GT transcripts of unknown function as well as the classical form. The abundant group II transcripts may encode part of a heterodimer related to gamma GT or represent processed lung-specific pseudogenes. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7689219

  2. Tat is required for efficient HIV-1 reverse transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Harrich, D; Ulich, C; García-Martínez, L F; Gaynor, R B

    1997-01-01

    The ability of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) to undergo efficient reverse transcription is dependent on a number of parameters. These include the binding of the tRNA(3)(Lys) to the HIV-1 primer binding site and the subsequent interaction with the heterodimeric reverse transcriptase. Recently, we demonstrated that TAR RNA was also necessary for efficient HIV-1 reverse transcription. Given the fact that the Tat protein is involved in the activation of HIV-1 gene expression in conjunction with TAR, we wished to determine whether Tat might also be involved in the control of HIV-1 reverse transcription. HIV-1 virions deleted in the tat gene were unable to initiate reverse transcription efficiently upon infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). This defect was not due to decreased amounts of genomic RNA, reverse transcriptase or other HIV-1 proteins which were incorporated into the virion. Following transfection of wild-type but not mutant tat genes into cell lines producing HIV-1 lacking tat, the virions produced could be complemented for defects in reverse transcription upon subsequent infection of PBMCs. In contrast, the defect in reverse transcription seen with HIV-1 lacking the tat gene could not be complemented when the target cells rather than the producer cells contained tat. Viruses lacking tat were also defective in endogenous assays of reverse transcription, although these viruses contained similar levels of reverse transcriptase. These results indicate that the Tat protein, in addition to regulating the level of gene expression, is also important for efficient HIV-1 reverse transcription. PMID:9135139

  3. Sputum is a surrogate for bronchoalveolar lavage for monitoring Mycobacterium tuberculosis transcriptional profiles in TB patients.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Benjamin J; Loxton, Andre G; Dolganov, Gregory M; Van, Tran T; Davis, J Lucian; de Jong, Bouke C; Voskuil, Martin I; Leach, Sonia M; Schoolnik, Gary K; Walzl, Gerhard; Strong, Michael; Walter, Nicholas D

    2016-09-01

    Pathogen-targeted transcriptional profiling in human sputum may elucidate the physiologic state of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) during infection and treatment. However, whether M. tuberculosis transcription in sputum recapitulates transcription in the lung is uncertain. We therefore compared M. tuberculosis transcription in human sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from 11 HIV-negative South African patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. We additionally compared these clinical samples with in vitro log phase aerobic growth and hypoxic non-replicating persistence (NRP-2). Of 2179 M. tuberculosis transcripts assayed in sputum and BAL via multiplex RT-PCR, 194 (8.9%) had a p-value <0.05, but none were significant after correction for multiple testing. Categorical enrichment analysis indicated that expression of the hypoxia-responsive DosR regulon was higher in BAL than in sputum. M. tuberculosis transcription in BAL and sputum was distinct from both aerobic growth and NRP-2, with a range of 396-1020 transcripts significantly differentially expressed after multiple testing correction. Collectively, our results indicate that M. tuberculosis transcription in sputum approximates M. tuberculosis transcription in the lung. Minor differences between M. tuberculosis transcription in BAL and sputum suggested lower oxygen concentrations or higher nitric oxide concentrations in BAL. M. tuberculosis-targeted transcriptional profiling of sputa may be a powerful tool for understanding M. tuberculosis pathogenesis and monitoring treatment responses in vivo.

  4. Body-hypomethylated human genes harbor extensive intragenic transcriptional activity and are prone to cancer-associated dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Mendizabal, Isabel; Zeng, Jia; Keller, Thomas E; Yi, Soojin V

    2017-01-23

    Genomic DNA methylation maps (methylomes) encode genetic and environmental effects as stable chemical modifications of DNA. Variations in DNA methylation, especially in regulatory regions such as promoters and enhancers, are known to affect numerous downstream processes. In contrast, most transcription units (gene bodies) in the human genome are thought to be heavily methylated. However, epigenetic reprogramming in cancer often involves gene body hypomethylation with consequences on gene expression. In this study, we focus on the relatively unexplored phenomenon that some gene bodies are devoid of DNA methylation under normal conditions. Utilizing nucleotide-resolution methylomes of diverse samples, we show that nearly 2000 human genes are commonly hypomethylated. Remarkably, these genes occupy highly specialized genomic, epigenomic, evolutionary and functional niches in our genomes. For example, hypomethylated genes tend to be short yet encode significantly more transcripts than expected based upon their lengths, include many genes involved in nucleosome and chromatin formation, and are extensively and significantly enriched for histone-tail modifications and transcription factor binding with particular relevance for cis-regulation. Furthermore, they are significantly more prone to cancer-associated hypomethylation and mutation. Consequently, gene body hypomethylation represents an additional layer of epigenetic regulatory complexity, with implications on cancer-associated epigenetic reprogramming.

  5. [Conservation Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Each of the six instructional units deals with one aspect of conservation: forests, water, rangeland, minerals (petroleum), and soil. The area of the elementary school curriculum with which each correlates is indicated. Lists of general and specific objectives are followed by suggested teaching procedures, including ideas for introducing the…

  6. [Conservation Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Instructional units deal with each aspect of conservation: forests, wildlife, rangelands, water, minerals, and soil. The area of the secondary school curriculum with which each is correlated is indicated. Lists of general and specific objectives are followed by suggested teaching procedures, including ideas for introducing the topic, questions to…

  7. Single-molecule analysis of the full transcription cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strick, Terence

    2005-03-01

    By monitoring the extension of a mechanically stretched, supercoiled DNA molecule containing a single bacterial promoter, we have been able to directly observe in real time the change in DNA extension associated with topological unwinding of ˜1 helical turn of promoter DNA by RNAP during transcription initiation. We find that this stage of transcription initiation is extremely sensitive to the torque acting on the supercoiled DNA. Upon addition of limited sets of nucleotides, changes in the polymerase/promoter interaction which are related to the process of abortive initiation can be studied in detail. Upon addition of the full set of nucleotides, the subsequent stages of transcription -- promoter escape, productive elongation and transcription termination -- can also be observed in real-time. The changes in DNA topology which occur at each of these stages have been determined, and these results provide for the first global view of the entire transcription cycle at the resolution of single molecules. Co-authors: Richard H. Ebright, Chen-Yu Liu and Andrey Revyakin, HHMI & Waksman Institute, Rutgers University.

  8. What Determines the Assembly of Transcriptional Network Motifs in Escherichia coli?

    PubMed Central

    Camas, Francisco M.; Poyatos, Juan F.

    2008-01-01

    Transcriptional networks are constituted by a collection of building blocks known as network motifs. Why do motifs appear? An adaptive model of motif emergence was recently questioned in favor of neutralist scenarios. Here, we provide a new picture of motif assembly in Escherichia coli which partially clarifies these contrasting explanations. This is based on characterizing the linkage between motifs and sensing or response specificity of their constituent transcriptional factors (TFs). We find that sensing specificity influences the distribution of autoregulation, while the tendency of a TF to establish feed-forward loops (FFLs) depends on response specificity, i.e., regulon size. Analysis of the latter pattern reveals that coregulation between large regulon-size TFs is common under a network neutral model, leading to the assembly of a great number of FFLs and bifans. In addition, neutral exclusive regulation also leads to a collection of single input modules -the fourth basic motif. On the whole, and even under the conservative neutralist scenario considered, a substantial group of regulatory structures revealed adaptive. These structures visibly function as fully-fledged working units. PMID:18987754

  9. Comparative expression analysis of transcription factor genes in the endostyle of invertebrate chordates.

    PubMed

    Hiruta, Jin; Mazet, Francoise; Yasui, Kinya; Zhang, Peijun; Ogasawara, Michio

    2005-07-01

    The endostyle of invertebrate chordates is a pharyngeal organ that is thought to be homologous with the follicular thyroid of vertebrates. Although thyroid-like features such as iodine-concentrating and peroxidase activities are located in the dorsolateral part of both ascidian and amphioxus endostyles, the structural organization and numbers of functional units are different. To estimate phylogenetic relationships of each functional zone with special reference to the evolution of the thyroid, we have investigated, in ascidian and amphioxus, the expression patterns of thyroid-related transcription factors such as TTF-2/FoxE4 and Pax2/5/8, as well as the forkhead transcription factors FoxQ1 and FoxA. Comparative gene expression analyses depicted an overall similarity between ascidians and amphioxus endostyles, while differences in expression patterns of these genes might be specifically related to the addition or elimination of a pair of glandular zones. Expressions of Ci-FoxE and BbFoxE4 suggest that the ancestral FoxE class might have been recruited for the formation of thyroid-like region in a possible common ancestor of chordates. Furthermore, coexpression of FoxE4, Pax2/5/8, and TPO in the dorsolateral part of both ascidian and amphioxus endostyles suggests that genetic basis of the thyroid function was already in place before the vertebrate lineage.

  10. Conserved pattern of antisense overlapping transcription in the homologous human ERCC-1 and yeast RAD10 DNA repair gene regions.

    PubMed Central

    van Duin, M; van Den Tol, J; Hoeijmakers, J H; Bootsma, D; Rupp, I P; Reynolds, P; Prakash, L; Prakash, S

    1989-01-01

    We report that the genes for the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD10 and human ERCC-1 DNA excision repair proteins harbor overlapping antisense transcription units in their 3' regions. Since naturally occurring antisense transcription is rare in S. cerevisiae and humans (this is the first example in human cells), our findings indicate that antisense transcription in the ERCC-1-RAD10 gene regions represents an evolutionarily conserved feature. Images PMID:2471070

  11. Transcription factor-based biosensor

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, Jeffrey A; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides for a system comprising a BmoR transcription factor, a .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase, and a pBMO promoter operatively linked to a reporter gene, wherein the pBMO promoter is capable of expression of the reporter gene with an activated form of the BmoR and the .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase.

  12. Regulating transcription traffic around DSBs.

    PubMed

    Plosky, Brian S

    2015-05-07

    If a double-strand break (DSB) occurs and either a DNA polymerase or RNA polymerase is coming along, how do we save the train? In this issue of Molecular Cell, Ui et al. (2015) describe a connection between an elongation factor and a repressive complex to prevent transcription in proximity to a DSB.

  13. Transcription factors in alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2013-01-01

    Higher plants produce a large variety of low-molecular weight secondary compounds. Among them, nitrogen-containing alkaloids are the most biologically active and are often used pharmaceutically. Whereas alkaloid chemistry has been intensively investigated, alkaloid biosynthesis, including the relevant biosynthetic enzymes, genes and their regulation, and especially transcription factors, is largely unknown, as only a limited number of plant species produce certain types of alkaloids and they are difficult to study. Recently, however, several groups have succeeded in isolating the transcription factors that are involved in the biosynthesis of several types of alkaloids, including bHLH, ERF, and WRKY. Most of them show Jasmonate (JA) responsiveness, which suggests that the JA signaling cascade plays an important role in alkaloid biosynthesis. Here, we summarize the types and functions of transcription factors that have been isolated in alkaloid biosynthesis, and characterize their similarities and differences compared to those in other secondary metabolite pathways, such as phenylpropanoid and terpenoid biosyntheses. The evolution of this biosynthetic pathway and regulatory network, as well as the application of these transcription factors to metabolic engineering, is discussed.

  14. Transcription factor repertoire of homeostatic eosinophilopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Bouffi, Carine; Kartashov, Andrey V.; Schollaert, Kaila L.; Chen, Xiaoting; Bacon, W. Clark; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Barski, Artem; Fulkerson, Patricia C.

    2015-01-01

    The production of mature eosinophils is a tightly orchestrated process with the aim to sustain normal eosinophil levels in tissues while also maintaining low numbers of these complex and sensitive cells in the blood. To identify regulators of homeostatic eosinophilopoiesis in mice, we took a global approach to identify genome-wide transcriptome and epigenome changes that occur during homeostasis at critical developmental stages, including eosinophil-lineage commitment and lineage maturation. Our analyses revealed a markedly greater number of transcriptome alterations associated with eosinophil maturation (1199 genes) than with eosinophil-lineage commitment (490 genes), highlighting the greater transcriptional investment necessary for differentiation. Eosinophil progenitors (EoPs) were noted to express high levels of granule proteins and contain granules with an ultrastructure distinct from that of mature resting eosinophils. Our analyses also delineated a 976-gene eosinophil-lineage transcriptome that included a repertoire of 56 transcription factors, many of which have never previously been associated with eosinophils. EoPs and eosinophils, but not granulocyte-monocyte progenitors (GMPs) or neutrophils, expressed Helios and Aiolos, members of the Ikaros family of transcription factors, which regulate gene expression via modulation of chromatin structure and DNA accessibility. Epigenetic studies revealed a distinct distribution of active chromatin marks between genes induced with lineage commitment and genes induced with cell maturation during eosinophil development. In addition, Aiolos and Helios binding sites were significantly enriched in genes expressed by EoPs and eosinophils with active chromatin, highlighting a potential novel role for Helios and Aiolos in regulating gene expression during eosinophil development. PMID:26268651

  15. The Werner Syndrome Protein Is Involved in RNA Polymerase II Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Balajee, Adayabalam S.; Machwe, Amrita; May, Alfred; Gray, Matthew D.; Oshima, Junko; Martin, George M.; Nehlin, Jan O.; Brosh, Robert; Orren, David K.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    1999-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a human progeroid syndrome characterized by the early onset of a large number of clinical features associated with the normal aging process. The complex molecular and cellular phenotypes of WS involve characteristic features of genomic instability and accelerated replicative senescence. The gene involved (WRN) was recently cloned, and its gene product (WRNp) was biochemically characterized as a helicase. Helicases play important roles in a variety of DNA transactions, including DNA replication, transcription, repair, and recombination. We have assessed the role of the WRN gene in transcription by analyzing the efficiency of basal transcription in WS lymphoblastoid cell lines that carry homozygous WRN mutations. Transcription was measured in permeabilized cells by [3H]UTP incorporation and in vitro by using a plasmid template containing the RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II)–dependent adenovirus major late promoter. With both of these approaches, we find that the transcription efficiency in different WS cell lines is reduced to 40–60% of the transcription in cells from normal individuals. This defect can be complemented by the addition of normal cell extracts to the chromatin of WS cells. Addition of purified wild-type WRNp but not mutated WRNp to the in vitro transcription assay markedly stimulates RNA pol II–dependent transcription carried out by nuclear extracts. A nonhelicase domain (a direct repeat of 27 amino acids) also appears to have a role in transcription enhancement, as revealed by a yeast hybrid–protein reporter assay. This is further supported by the lack of stimulation of transcription when mutant WRNp lacking this domain was added to the in vitro assay. We have thus used several approaches to show a role for WRNp in RNA pol II transcription, possibly as a transcriptional activator. A deficit in either global or regional transcription in WS cells may be a primary molecular defect responsible for the WS clinical phenotype

  16. Modeling transcriptional networks in Drosophila development at multiple scales.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Zeba; DePace, Angela H

    2011-12-01

    Quantitative models of developmental processes can provide insights at multiple scales. Ultimately, models may be particularly informative for key questions about network level behavior during development such as how does the system respond to environmental perturbation, or operate reliably in different genetic backgrounds? The transcriptional networks that pattern the Drosophila embryo have been the subject of numerous quantitative experimental studies coupled to modeling frameworks in recent years. In this review, we describe three studies that consider these networks at different levels of molecular detail and therefore result in different types of insights. We also discuss other developmental transcriptional networks operating in Drosophila, with the goal of highlighting what additional insights they may provide.

  17. A novel yeast gene, THO2, is involved in RNA pol II transcription and provides new evidence for transcriptional elongation-associated recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Piruat, J I; Aguilera, A

    1998-01-01

    We have identified two novel yeast genes, THO1 and THO2, that partially suppress the transcription defects of hpr1Delta mutants by overexpression. We show by in vivo transcriptional and recombinational analysis of tho2Delta cells that THO2 plays a role in RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II)-dependent transcription and is required for the stability of DNA repeats, as previously shown for HPR1. The tho2Delta mutation reduces the transcriptional efficiency of yeast DNA sequences down to 25% of the wild-type levels and abolishes transcription of the lacZ sequence. In addition, tho2Delta causes a strong increase in the frequency of recombination between direct repeats (>2000-fold above wild-type levels). Some DNA repeats cannot even be maintained in the cell. This hyper-recombination phenotype is dependent on transcription and is not observed in DNA repeats that are not transcribed. The higher the impairment of transcription caused by tho2Delta, the higher the frequency of recombination of a particular DNA region. The tho2Delta mutation also increases the frequency of plasmid loss. Our work not only identifies a novel yeast gene, THO2, with similar function to HPR1, but also provides new evidence for transcriptional blocks as a source of recombination. We propose that there is a set of proteins including Hpr1p and Tho2p, in the absence of which RNA pol II transcription is stalled or blocked, causing genetic instability. PMID:9707445

  18. Mechanism for the autogenous control of the crp operon: transcriptional inhibition by a divergent RNA transcript.

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, K; Freundlich, M

    1986-01-01

    Expression of the crp gene is negatively autoregulated by the complex of cyclic AMP and its receptor protein (cAMP-CRP). We find a second promoter in this region that is strongly activated in vitro and in vivo by cAMP-CRP. Transcription from this promoter is initiated 3 nucleotides upstream and on the opposite strand from the start of crp mRNA. The addition of the purified 5' segment of the divergent RNA specifically inhibits crp transcription in vitro. cAMP-CRP does not block crp expression if the new promoter is altered so that divergent RNA cannot be made. The initial nucleotides of the divergent RNA are complementary to 10 of the first 11 nucleotides of the crp mRNA. Since the next 11 nucleotides of crp mRNA are A + U-rich, and RNA hybrid between the divergent RNA and the 5' end of crp mRNA could produce a structure similar to a rho-independent terminator, leading to inhibition of crp transcription. Images PMID:2425359

  19. Transcription termination and polyadenylation in retroviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Guntaka, R V

    1993-01-01

    The provirus structure of retroviruses is bracketed by long terminal repeats (LTRs). The two LTRs (5' and 3') are identical in nucleotide sequence and organization. They contain signals for transcription initiation as well as termination and cleavage polyadenylation. As in eukaryotic pre-mRNAs, the two common signals, the polyadenylation signal, AAUAAA, or a variant AGUAAA, and the G+U-rich sequence are present in all retroviruses. However, the AAUAAA sequence is present in the U3 region in some retroviruses and in the R region in other retroviruses. As in animal cell RNAs, both AAUAAA and G+U-rich sequences apparently contribute to the 3'-end processing of retroviral RNAs. In addition, at least in a few cases examined, the sequences in the U3 region determine the efficiency of 3'-end processing. In retroviruses in which the AAUAAA is localized in the R region, the poly(A) signal in the 3' LTR but not the 5' LTR must be selectively used for the production of genomic RNA. It appears that the short distance between the 5' cap site and polyadenylation signal in the 5' LTR precludes premature termination and polyadenylation. Since 5' and 3' LTRs are identical in sequence and structural organization yet function differently, it is speculated that flanking cellular DNA sequences, chromatin structure, and binding of transcription factors may be involved in the functional divergence of 5' and 3' LTRs of retroviruses. PMID:7902524

  20. Transcriptional regulation of mammalian selenoprotein expression

    PubMed Central

    Stoytcheva, Zoia R.; Berry, Marla J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Selenoproteins contain the twenty-first amino acid, selenocysteine, and are involved in cellular defenses against oxidative damage, important metabolic and developmental pathways, and responses to environmental challenges. Elucidating the mechanisms regulating selenoprotein expression at the transcriptional level is key to understanding how these mechanisms are called into play to respond to the changing environment. Methods This review summarizes published studies on transcriptional regulation of selenoprotein genes, focused primarily on genes whose encoded protein functions are at least partially understood. This is followed by in silico analysis of predicted regulatory elements in selenoprotein genes, including those in the aforementioned category as well as the genes whose functions are not known. Results Our findings reveal regulatory pathways common to many selenoprotein genes, including several involved in stress-responses. In addition, tissue-specific regulatory factors are implicated in regulating many selenoprotein genes. Conclusions These studies provide new insights into how selenoprotein genes respond to environmental and other challenges, and the roles these proteins play in allowing cells to adapt to these changes. General Significance Elucidating the regulatory mechanisms affecting selenoprotein expression is essential for understanding their roles in human diseases, and for developing diagnostic and potential therapeutic approaches to address dysregulation of members of this gene family. PMID:19465084

  1. Assessment of hepatotoxic liabilities by transcript profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Ruepp, Stefan . E-mail: stefan.ruepp@roche.com; Boess, Franziska; Suter, Laura; Vera, Maria Cristina de; Steiner, Guido; Steele, Thomas; Weiser, Thomas; Albertini, Silvio

    2005-09-01

    Male Wistar rats were treated with various model compounds or the appropriate vehicle controls in order to create a reference database for toxicogenomics assessment of novel compounds. Hepatotoxic compounds in the database were either known hepatotoxicants or showed hepatotoxicity during preclinical testing. Histopathology and clinical chemistry data were used to anchor the transcript profiles to an established endpoint (steatosis, cholestasis, direct acting, peroxisomal proliferation or nontoxic/control). These reference data were analyzed using a supervised learning method (support vector machines, SVM) to generate classification rules. This predictive model was subsequently used to assess compounds with regard to a potential hepatotoxic liability. A steatotic and a non-hepatotoxic 5HT{sub 6} receptor antagonist compound from the same series were successfully discriminated by this toxicogenomics model. Additionally, an example is shown where a hepatotoxic liability was correctly recognized in the absence of pathological findings. In vitro experiments and a dog study confirmed the correctness of the toxicogenomics alert. Another interesting observation was that transcript profiles indicate toxicologically relevant changes at an earlier timepoint than routinely used methods. Together, these results support the useful application of toxicogenomics in raising alerts for adverse effects and generating mechanistic hypotheses that can be followed up by confirmatory experiments.

  2. From tissue mechanics to transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Janmey, Paul A.; Wells, Rebecca G.; Assoian, Richard K.; McCulloch, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in tissue stiffness are frequently associated with diseases such as cancer, fibrosis, and atherosclerosis. Several recent studies suggest that, in addition to resulting from pathology, mechanical changes may play a role akin to soluble factors in causing the progression of disease, and similar mechanical control might be essential for normal tissue development and homeostasis. Many cell types alter their structure and function in response to exogenous forces or as a function of the mechanical properties of the materials to which they adhere. This review summarizes recent progress in identifying intracellular signaling pathways, and especially transcriptional programs, that are differentially activated when cells adhere to materials with different mechanical properties or when they are subject to tension arising from external forces. Several cytoplasmic or cytoskeletal signaling pathways involving small GTPases, focal adhesion kinase and transforming growth factor beta as well as the transcriptional regulators MRTF-A, NFκB, and Yap/Taz have emerged as important mediators of mechanical signaling. PMID:23969122

  3. A global analysis of transcription reveals two modes of Spt4/5 recruitment to archaeal RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Smollett, Katherine; Blombach, Fabian; Reichelt, Robert; Thomm, Michael; Werner, Finn

    2017-03-01

    The archaeal transcription apparatus is closely related to the eukaryotic RNA polymerase (RNAP) II system, while archaeal genomes are more similar to bacteria with densely packed genes organized in operons. This makes understanding transcription in archaea vital, both in terms of molecular mechanisms and evolution. Very little is known about how archaeal cells orchestrate transcription on a systems level. We have characterized the genome-wide occupancy of the Methanocaldococcus jannaschii transcription machinery and its transcriptome. Our data reveal how the TATA and BRE promoter elements facilitate recruitment of the essential initiation factors TATA-binding protein and transcription factor B, respectively, which in turn are responsible for the loading of RNAP into the transcription units. The occupancies of RNAP and Spt4/5 strongly correlate with each other and with RNA levels. Our results show that Spt4/5 is a general elongation factor in archaea as its presence on all genes matches RNAP. Spt4/5 is recruited proximal to the transcription start site on the majority of transcription units, while on a subset of genes, including rRNA and CRISPR loci, Spt4/5 is recruited to the transcription elongation complex during early elongation within 500 base pairs of the transcription start site and akin to its bacterial homologue NusG.

  4. Establishment of a Functional Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Reverse Transcription Complex Involves the Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Bukrinskaya, Alissa; Brichacek, Beda; Mann, Angela; Stevenson, Mario

    1998-01-01

    After interaction of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virions with cell surface receptors, a series of poorly characterized events results in establishment of a viral reverse transcription complex in the host cell cytoplasm. This process is coordinated in such a way that reverse transcription is initiated shortly after formation of the viral reverse transcription complex. However, the mechanism through which virus entry and initiation of reverse transcription are coordinated and how these events are compartmentalized in the infected cell are not known. In this study, we demonstrate that viral reverse transcription complexes associate rapidly with the host cell cytoskeleton during HIV-1 infection and that reverse transcription occurs almost entirely in the cytoskeletal compartment. Interruption of actin polymerization before virus infection reduced association of viral reverse transcription complexes with the cytoskeleton. In addition, efficient reverse transcription was dependent on intact actin microfilaments. The localization of reverse transcription to actin microfilaments was mediated by the interaction of a reverse transcription complex component (gag MA) with actin but not vimentin (intermediate filaments) or tubulin (microtubules). In addition, fusion, but not endocytosis-mediated HIV-1 infectivity, was impaired when actin depolymerizing agents were added to target cells before infection but not when added after infection. These results point to a previously unsuspected role for the host cell cytoskeleton in HIV-1 entry and suggest that components of the cytoskeleton promote establishment of the reverse transcription complex in the host cell and also the process of reverse transcription within this complex. PMID:9841925

  5. Transcription factor FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network in non-small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Sang-Min; An, Joo-Hee; Kim, Chul-Hong; Kim, Jung-Woong Choi, Kyung-Hee

    2015-08-07

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-mediated death. Although various therapeutic approaches are used for lung cancer treatment, these mainly target the tumor suppressor p53 transcription factor, which is involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. However, p53-targeted therapies have limited application in lung cancer, since p53 is found to be mutated in more than half of lung cancers. In this study, we propose tumor suppressor FOXA2 as an alternative target protein for therapies against lung cancer and reveal a possible FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network by identifying new target genes and binding partners of FOXA2 by using various screening techniques. The genes encoding Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 2 (NR0B2), cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) were identified as putative target genes of FOXA2. Additionally, the proteins including highly similar to heat shock protein HSP 90-beta (HSP90A), heat shock 70 kDa protein 1A variant (HSPA1A), histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and HDAC3 were identified as novel interacting partners of FOXA2. Moreover, we showed that FOXA2-dependent promoter activation of BAX and p21 genes is significantly reduced via physical interactions between the identified binding partners and FOXA2. These results provide opportunities to understand the FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network and novel therapeutic targets to modulate this network in p53-deficient lung cancer. - Highlights: • Identification of new target genes of FOXA2. • Identifications of novel interaction proteins of FOXA2. • Construction of FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulatory network in non-small cell lung cancer.

  6. Landscape and Dynamics of Transcription Initiation in the Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Adjalley, Sophie H; Chabbert, Christophe D; Klaus, Bernd; Pelechano, Vicent; Steinmetz, Lars M

    2016-03-15

    A comprehensive map of transcription start sites (TSSs) across the highly AT-rich genome of P. falciparum would aid progress toward deciphering the molecular mechanisms that underlie the timely regulation of gene expression in this malaria parasite. Using high-throughput sequencing technologies, we generated a comprehensive atlas of transcription initiation events at single-nucleotide resolution during the parasite intra-erythrocytic developmental cycle. This detailed analysis of TSS usage enabled us to define architectural features of plasmodial promoters. We demonstrate that TSS selection and strength are constrained by local nucleotide composition. Furthermore, we provide evidence for coordinate and stage-specific TSS usage from distinct sites within the same transcription unit, thereby producing transcript isoforms, a subset of which are developmentally regulated. This work offers a framework for further investigations into the interactions between genomic sequences and regulatory factors governing the complex transcriptional program of this major human pathogen.

  7. Role of TATA-element in transcription from glucocorticoid receptor-responsive model promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Wieland, S; Schatt, M D; Rusconi, S

    1990-01-01

    Transcription activation properties of the rat glucocorticoid receptor (GR) on minimal, TATA-box containing or depleted promoters have been tested. We show that a cluster of Glucocorticoid Responsive Elements (GRE), upon activation by the GR, is sufficient to mediate abundant RNA-polymerase II transcription. We find that in absence of a bona fide TATA-element transcription initiates at a distance of 45-55bp from the activated GRE cluster with a marked preference for sequences homologous to the initiator element (Inr). Analyzing defined, bi-directional transcription units we demonstrate that the apparent reduction of specific transcription in strong, TATA-depleted promoters, is mainly due to loss of short-range promoter polarization. The implications for long-range promoter/enhancer communication mechanisms are also discussed. Images PMID:2402438

  8. Studying Gene Expression: Database Searches and Promoter Fusions to Investigate Transcriptional Regulation in Bacteria†

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Vaz, Betsy M.; Makarevitch, Irina; Stensland, Shane

    2010-01-01

    A laboratory project was designed to illustrate how to search biological databases and utilize the information provided by these resources to investigate transcriptional regulation in Escherichia coli. The students searched several databases (NCBI Genomes, RegulonDB and EcoCyc) to learn about gene function, regulation, and the organization of transcriptional units. A fluorometer and GFP promoter fusions were used to obtain fluorescence data and measure changes in transcriptional activity. The class designed and performed experiments to investigate the regulation of genes necessary for biosynthesis of amino acids and how expression is affected by environmental signals and transcriptional regulators. Assessment data showed that this activity enhanced students’ knowledge of databases, reporter genes and transcriptional regulation. PMID:23653697

  9. Principles for RNA metabolism and alternative transcription initiation within closely spaced promoters

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Pai, Athma A.; Herudek, Jan; Lubas, Michal; Meola, Nicola; Järvelin, Aino I.; Andersson, Robin; Pelechano, Vicent; Steinmetz, Lars M.; Heick Jensen, Torben; Sandelin, Albin

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian transcriptomes are complex and formed by extensive promoter activity. In addition, gene promoters are largely divergent and initiate transcription of reverse-oriented promoter upstream transcripts (PROMPTs). Although PROMPTs are commonly terminated early, influenced by polyadenylation sites, promoters often cluster so that the divergent activity of one might impact another. Here, we find that the distance between promoters strongly correlates with the expression, stability and length of their associated PROMPTs. Adjacent promoters driving divergent mRNA transcription support PROMPT formation, but due to polyadenylation site constraints, these transcripts tend to spread into the neighboring mRNA on the same strand. This mechanism to derive new alternative mRNA transcription start sites (TSSs) is also evident at closely spaced promoters supporting convergent mRNA transcription. We suggest that basic building blocks of divergently transcribed core promoter pairs, in combination with the wealth of TSSs in mammalian genomes, provides a framework with which evolution shapes transcriptomes. PMID:27455346

  10. Proteome adaptation in cell reprogramming proceeds via distinct transcriptional networks.

    PubMed

    Benevento, Marco; Tonge, Peter D; Puri, Mira C; Hussein, Samer M I; Cloonan, Nicole; Wood, David L; Grimmond, Sean M; Nagy, Andras; Munoz, Javier; Heck, Albert J R

    2014-12-10

    The ectopic expression of Oct4, Klf4, c-Myc and Sox2 (OKMS) transcription factors allows reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The reprogramming process, which involves a complex network of molecular events, is not yet fully characterized. Here we perform a quantitative mass spectrometry-based analysis to probe in-depth dynamic proteome changes during somatic cell reprogramming. Our data reveal defined waves of proteome resetting, with the first wave occurring 48 h after the activation of the reprogramming transgenes and involving specific biological processes linked to the c-Myc transcriptional network. A second wave of proteome reorganization occurs in a later stage of reprogramming, where we characterize the proteome of two distinct pluripotent cellular populations. In addition, the overlay of our proteome resource with parallel generated -omics data is explored to identify post-transcriptionally regulated proteins involved in key steps during reprogramming.

  11. Coordination of a transcriptional switch by HMGI(Y) acetylation.

    PubMed

    Munshi, N; Agalioti, T; Lomvardas, S; Merika, M; Chen, G; Thanos, D

    2001-08-10

    Dynamic control of interferon-beta (IFN-beta) gene expression requires the regulated assembly and disassembly of the enhanceosome, a higher-order nucleoprotein complex formed in response to virus infection. The enhanceosome activates transcription by recruiting the histone acetyltransferase proteins CREB binding protein (CBP) and p300/CBP-associated factors (PCAF)/GCN5, which, in addition to modifying histones, acetylate HMGI(Y), the architectural component required for enhanceosome assembly. We show that the accurate execution of the IFN-beta transcriptional switch depends on the ordered acetylation of the high-mobility group I protein HMGI(Y) by PCAF/GCN5 and CBP, which acetylate HMGI(Y) at distinct lysine residues on endogenous promoters. Whereas acetylation of HMGI(Y) by CBP at lysine-65 destabilizes the enhanceosome, acetylation of HMGI(Y) by PCAF/GCN5 at lysine-71 potentiates transcription by stabilizing the enhanceosome and preventing acetylation by CBP.

  12. Editing the epigenome: technologies for programmable transcription and epigenetic modulation.

    PubMed

    Thakore, Pratiksha I; Black, Joshua B; Hilton, Isaac B; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-02-01

    Gene regulation is a complex and tightly controlled process that defines cell identity, health and disease, and response to pharmacologic and environmental signals. Recently developed DNA-targeting platforms, including zinc finger proteins, transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) and the clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 system, have enabled the recruitment of transcriptional modulators and epigenome-modifying factors to any genomic site, leading to new insights into the function of epigenetic marks in gene expression. Additionally, custom transcriptional and epigenetic regulation is facilitating refined control over cell function and decision making. The unique properties of the CRISPR-Cas9 system have created new opportunities for high-throughput genetic screens and multiplexing targets to manipulate complex gene expression patterns. This Review summarizes recent technological developments in this area and their application to biomedical challenges. We also discuss remaining limitations and necessary future directions for this field.

  13. Nucleolus-like compartmentalization of the transcription machinery in fast-growing bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ding Jun; Mata Martin, Carmen; Sun, Zhe; Cagliero, Cedric; Zhou, Yan Ning

    2017-02-01

    We have learned a great deal about RNA polymerase (RNA Pol), transcription factors, and the transcriptional regulation mechanisms in prokaryotes for specific genes, operons, or transcriptomes. However, we have only begun to understand how the transcription machinery is three-dimensionally (3D) organized into bacterial chromosome territories to orchestrate the transcription process and to maintain harmony with the replication machinery in the cell. Much progress has been made recently in our understanding of the spatial organization of the transcription machinery in fast-growing Escherichia coli cells using state-of-the-art superresolution imaging techniques. Co-imaging of RNA polymerase (RNA Pol) with DNA and transcription elongation factors involved in ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis, and ribosome biogenesis has revealed similarities between bacteria and eukaryotes in the spatial organization of the transcription machinery for growth genes, most of which are rRNA genes. Evidence supports the notion that RNA Pol molecules are concentrated, forming foci at the clustering of rRNA operons resembling the eukaryotic nucleolus. RNA Pol foci are proposed to be active transcription factories for both rRNA genes expression and ribosome biogenesis to support maximal growth in optimal growing conditions. Thus, in fast-growing bacterial cells, RNA Pol foci mimic eukaryotic Pol I activity, and transcription factories resemble nucleolus-like compartmentation. In addition, the transcription and replication machineries are mostly segregated in space to avoid the conflict between the two major cellular functions in fast-growing cells.

  14. Sequence requirements for transcriptional arrest in exon 1 of the human adenosine deaminase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhi Chen; Kellems, R.E.; Innis, J.W. ); Sun, Minghua; Wright, D.A. )

    1991-12-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated that a transcriptional arrest site exists in exon 1 of the human adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene and that this site may play a role in ADA gene expression. Sequences involved in this process are not known precisely. To further define the template requirements for transcriptional arrest within exon 1 of the human ADA gene, various ADA templates were constructed and their abilities to confer transcriptional arrest were determined following injection into Xenopus oocytes. The exon 1 transcriptional arrest signal functioned downstream of several RNA polymerase II promoters and an RNA polymerase II promoter, implying that the transcriptional arrest site in exon 1 of the ADA gene is promoter independent. They identified a 43-bp DNA fragment which functions as a transcriptional arrest signal. Additional studies showed that the transcriptional arrest site functioned only in the naturally occurring orientation. Therefore, they have identified a 43-bp DNA fragment which functions as a transcriptional arrest signal in an orientation-dependent and promoter-independent manner. On the basis of the authors findings, they hypothesize that tissue-specific expression of the ADA gene is governed by factors that function as antiterminators to promote transcriptional readthrough of the exon 1 transcriptional arrest site.

  15. Epigenetics regulates transcription and pathogenesis in the parasite Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Pachano, Tomas; Nievas, Yesica R; Lizarraga, Ayelen; Johnson, Patricia J; Strobl-Mazzulla, Pablo H; de Miguel, Natalia

    2017-01-05

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a common sexually transmitted parasite that colonizes the human urogenital tract. Infections range from asymptomatic to highly inflammatory, depending on the host and the parasite strain. Different T. vaginalis strains vary greatly in their adherence and cytolytic capacities. These phenotypic differences might be attributed to differentially expressed genes as a consequence of extra-genetic variation, such as epigenetic modifications. In this study, we explored the role of histone acetylation in regulating gene transcription and pathogenesis in T. vaginalis. Here, we show that histone 3 lysine acetylation (H3KAc) is enriched in nucleosomes positioned around the transcription start site of active genes (BAP1 and BAP2) in a highly adherent parasite strain; compared with the low acetylation abundance in contrast to that observed in a less-adherent strain that expresses these genes at low levels. Additionally, exposition of less-adherent strain with a specific histone deacetylases inhibitor, trichostatin A, upregulated the transcription of BAP1 and BAP2 genes in concomitance with an increase in H3KAc abundance and chromatin accessibility around their transcription start sites. Moreover, we demonstrated that the binding of initiator binding protein, the transcription factor responsible for the initiation of transcription of ~75% of known T. vaginalis genes, depends on the histone acetylation state around the metazoan-like initiator to which initiator binding protein binds. Finally, we found that trichostatin A treatment increased parasite aggregation and adherence to host cells. Our data demonstrated for the first time that H3KAc is a permissive histone modification that functions to mediate both transcription and pathogenesis of the parasite T. vaginalis.

  16. Rethinking transcription coupled DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Kamarthapu, Venu; Nudler, Evgeny

    2015-04-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is an evolutionarily conserved, multistep process that can detect a wide variety of DNA lesions. Transcription coupled repair (TCR) is a subpathway of NER that repairs the transcribed DNA strand faster than the rest of the genome. RNA polymerase (RNAP) stalled at DNA lesions mediates the recruitment of NER enzymes to the damage site. In this review we focus on a newly identified bacterial TCR pathway in which the NER enzyme UvrD, in conjunction with NusA, plays a major role in initiating the repair process. We discuss the tradeoff between the new and conventional models of TCR, how and when each pathway operates to repair DNA damage, and the necessity of pervasive transcription in maintaining genome integrity.

  17. Chromatin Dynamics of Circadian Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Arnal, Lorena; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The molecular circadian clock orchestrates the daily cyclical expression of thousands of genes. Disruption of this transcriptional program leads to a variety of pathologies, including insomnia, depression and metabolic disorders. Circadian rhythms in gene expression rely on specific chromatin transitions which are ultimately coordinated by the molecular clock. As a consequence, a highly plastic and dynamic circadian epigenome can be delineated across different tissues and cell types. Intriguingly, genome topology appears to coordinate cyclic transcription at circadian interactomes, in which circadian genes are in physical contact within the cell nucleus in a time-specific manner. Moreover, the clock machinery shows functional interplays with key metabolic regulators, thereby connecting the circadian epigenome to cellular metabolism. Unraveling the molecular aspects of such interplays is likely to reveal new therapeutic strategies towards the treatment of metabolic disorders. PMID:27014564

  18. A new chapter in the transcription SAGA

    PubMed Central

    Samara, Nadine L.; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic transcriptional coactivators are multi-subunit complexes that both modify chromatin and recognize histone modifications. Until recently, structural information on these large complexes has been limited to isolated enzymatic domains or chromatin-binding motifs. This review summarizes recent structural studies of the SAGA coactivator complex that have greatly advanced our understanding of the interplay between its different subunits. The structure of the four-protein SAGA deubiquitinating module has provided a first glimpse of the larger organization of a coactivator complex, and illustrates how interdependent subunits interact with each other to form an active and functional enzyme complex. In addition, structures of the histone binding domains of ATXN7 and Sgf29 shed light on the interactions with chromatin that help recruit the SAGA complex. PMID:22014650

  19. A new chapter in the transcription SAGA

    SciTech Connect

    Samara, Nadine L.; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2012-11-05

    Eukaryotic transcriptional coactivators are multi-subunit complexes that both modify chromatin and recognize histone modifications. Until recently, structural information on these large complexes has been limited to isolated enzymatic domains or chromatin-binding motifs. This review summarizes recent structural studies of the SAGA coactivator complex that have greatly advanced our understanding of the interplay between its different subunits. The structure of the four-protein SAGA deubiquitinating module has provided a first glimpse of the larger organization of a coactivator complex, and illustrates how interdependent subunits interact with each other to form an active and functional enzyme complex. In addition, structures of the histone binding domains of ATXN7 and Sgf29 shed light on the interactions with chromatin that help recruit the SAGA complex.

  20. Drugging the Undruggable: Transcription Therapy for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chunhong; Higgins, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is often the convergence point of oncogenic signaling. It is not surprising, therefore, that aberrant gene expression is a hallmark of cancer. Transformed cells often develop a dependency on such a reprogramming highlighting the therapeutic potential of rectifying cancer-associated transcriptional abnormalities in malignant cells. Although transcription is traditionally considered as undruggable, agents have been developed that target various levels of transcriptional regulation including DNA binding by transcription factors, protein-protein interactions, and epigenetic alterations. Some of these agents have been approved for clinical use or entered clinical trials. While artificial transcription factors have been developed that can theoretically modulate expression of any given gene, the emergence of reliable reporter assays greatly facilitate the search for transcription-targeted agents. This review provides a comprehensive overview of these developments, and discusses various strategies applicable for developing transcription-targeted therapeutic agents. PMID:23147197

  1. Improved Methods for Teaching Machine Transcription.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Clara J.

    1980-01-01

    The increased use of machine transcription in business and industry demands that business educators attract and train more highly skilled machine transcriptionists. Realistic production measurement and appropriate vocabulary should be taught to link machine transcription to word processing. (Author)

  2. Inventory of Nonutility Electric Power Plants in the United States

    EIA Publications

    2003-01-01

    Final issue of this report. Provides annual aggregate statistics on generating units operated by nonutilities in the United States and the District of Columbia. Provides a 5-year outlook for generating unit additions and changes.

  3. Rolling Circle Transcription of Ribozymes Targeted to ras and mdr-1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-01

    ssDNA) to direct transcription of an tion-PCR, and recyclization were carried out to optimize active hammerhead ribozyme in E. coli cells. transcription...transcription I hammerhead ribozyme I in vitro selection and 12.5 units/ml RNase inhibitor (Promega), in a total reaction volume of 15 tk1. After a...sequence encoding a ssDNA, and splint ssDNA were ethanol-precipitated and used as hammerhead ribozyme . templates to begin the next round of in vitro

  4. Transcription termination maintains chromosome integrity.

    PubMed

    Washburn, Robert S; Gottesman, Max E

    2011-01-11

    DNA replication fork movement is impeded by collisions with transcription elongation complexes (TEC). We propose that a critical function of transcription termination factors is to prevent TEC from blocking DNA replication and inducing replication fork arrest, one consequence of which is DNA double-strand breaks. We show that inhibition of Rho-dependent transcription termination by bicyclomycin in Escherichia coli induced double-strand breaks. Cells deleted for Rho-cofactors nusA and nusG were hypersensitive to bicyclomycin, and had extensive chromosome fragmentation even in the absence of the drug. An RNA polymerase mutation that destabilizes TEC (rpoB*35) increased bicyclomycin resistance >40-fold. Double-strand break formation depended on DNA replication, and can be explained by replication fork collapse. Deleting recombination genes required for replication fork repair (recB and ruvC) increased sensitivity to bicyclomycin, as did loss of the replication fork reloading helicases rep and priA. We propose that Rho responds to a translocating replisome by releasing obstructing TEC.

  5. Linking Smads and transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Inman, Gareth J

    2005-02-15

    TGF-beta1 (transforming growth factor-beta1) is the prototypical member of a large family of pleiotropic cytokines that regulate diverse biological processes during development and adult tissue homoeostasis. TGF-beta signals via membrane bound serine/threonine kinase receptors which transmit their signals via the intracellular signalling molecules Smad2, Smad3 and Smad4. These Smads contain conserved MH1 and MH2 domains separated by a flexible linker domain. Smad2 and Smad3 act as kinase substrates for the receptors, and, following phosphorylation, they form complexes with Smad4 and translocate to the nucleus. These Smad complexes regulate gene expression and ultimately determine the biological response to TGF-beta. In this issue of the Biochemical Journal, Wang et al. have shown that, like Smad4, the linker domain of Smad3 contains a Smad transcriptional activation domain. This is capable of recruiting the p300 transcriptional co-activator and is required for Smad3-dependent transcriptional activation. This study raises interesting questions about the nature and regulation of Smad-regulated gene activation and elevates the status of the linker domain to rival that of the much-lauded MH1 and MH2 domains.

  6. Evolution of a transcriptional regulator from a transmembrane nucleoporin.

    PubMed

    Franks, Tobias M; Benner, Chris; Narvaiza, Iñigo; Marchetto, Maria C N; Young, Janet M; Malik, Harmit S; Gage, Fred H; Hetzer, Martin W

    2016-05-15

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) emerged as nuclear transport channels in eukaryotic cells ∼1.5 billion years ago. While the primary role of NPCs is to regulate nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, recent research suggests that certain NPC proteins have additionally acquired the role of affecting gene expression at the nuclear periphery and in the nucleoplasm in metazoans. Here we identify a widely expressed variant of the transmembrane nucleoporin (Nup) Pom121 (named sPom121, for "soluble Pom121") that arose by genomic rearrangement before the divergence of hominoids. sPom121 lacks the nuclear membrane-anchoring domain and thus does not localize to the NPC. Instead, sPom121 colocalizes and interacts with nucleoplasmic Nup98, a previously identified transcriptional regulator, at gene promoters to control transcription of its target genes in human cells. Interestingly, sPom121 transcripts appear independently in several mammalian species, suggesting convergent innovation of Nup-mediated transcription regulation during mammalian evolution. Our findings implicate alternate transcription initiation as a mechanism to increase the functional diversity of NPC components.

  7. Rampant polyuridylylation of plastid gene transcripts in the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunling; Morse, David

    2006-01-01

    Dinoflagellate plastid genes are believed to be encoded on small generally unigenic plasmid-like minicircles. The minicircle gene complement has reached saturation with an incomplete set of plastid genes (18) compared with typical functional plastids (60–200). While some of the missing plastid genes have recently been found in the nucleus, it is still unknown if additional genes, not located on minicircles, might also contribute to the plastid genome. Sequencing of tailed RNA showed that transcripts derived from the known minicircle genes psbA and atpB contained a homogenous 3′ polyuridine tract of 25–40 residues. This unusual modification suggested that random sequencing of a poly(dA) primed cDNA library could be used to characterize the plastid transcriptome. We have recovered only 12 different polyuridylylated transcripts from our library, all of which are encoded on minicircles in several dinoflagellate species. The correspondence of all polyuridylylated transcripts with previously described minicircle genes thus supports the dinoflagellate plastid as harbouring the smallest genome of any functional chloroplast. Interestingly, northern blots indicate that the majority of transcripts are modified, suggesting that polyuridylylation is unlikely to act as a degradation signal as do the heterogeneous poly(A)-rich extensions of transcripts in cyanobacteria and other plastids. PMID:16434702

  8. A Splicing-Dependent Transcriptional Checkpoint Associated with Prespliceosome Formation

    PubMed Central

    Chathoth, Keerthi T.; Barrass, J. David; Webb, Shaun; Beggs, Jean D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary There is good evidence for functional interactions between splicing and transcription in eukaryotes, but how and why these processes are coupled remain unknown. Prp5 protein (Prp5p) is an RNA-stimulated adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) required for prespliceosome formation in yeast. We demonstrate through in vivo RNA labeling that, in addition to a splicing defect, the prp5-1 mutation causes a defect in the transcription of intron-containing genes. We present chromatin immunoprecipitation evidence for a transcriptional elongation defect in which RNA polymerase that is phosphorylated at Ser5 of the largest subunit’s heptad repeat accumulates over introns and that this defect requires Cus2 protein. A similar accumulation of polymerase was observed when prespliceosome formation was blocked by a mutation in U2 snRNA. These results indicate the existence of a transcriptional elongation checkpoint that is associated with prespliceosome formation during cotranscriptional spliceosome assembly. We propose a role for Cus2p as a potential checkpoint factor in transcription. PMID:24560925

  9. The bile acid sensor FXR regulates insulin transcription and secretion.

    PubMed

    Renga, Barbara; Mencarelli, Andrea; Vavassori, Piero; Brancaleone, Vincenzo; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2010-03-01

    Farnesoid X Receptor plays an important role in maintaining bile acid, cholesterol homeostasis and glucose metabolism. Here we investigated whether FXR is expressed by pancreatic beta-cells and regulates insulin signaling in pancreatic beta-cell line and human islets. We found that FXR activation induces positive regulatory effects on glucose-induced insulin transcription and secretion by genomic and non-genomic activities. Genomic effects of FXR activation relay on the induction of the glucose regulated transcription factor KLF11. Indeed, results from silencing experiments of KLF11 demonstrate that this transcription factor is essential for FXR activity on glucose-induced insulin gene transcription. In addition FXR regulates insulin secretion by non-genomic effects. Thus, activation of FXR in betaTC6 cells increases Akt phosphorylation and translocation of the glucose transporter GLUT2 at plasma membrane, increasing the glucose uptake by these cells. In vivo experiments on Non Obese Diabetic (NOD) mice demonstrated that FXR activation delays development of signs of diabetes, hyperglycemia and glycosuria, by enhancing insulin secretion and by stimulating glucose uptake by the liver. These data established that an FXR-KLF11 regulated pathway has an essential role in the regulation of insulin transcription and secretion induced by glucose.

  10. Evolution of a transcriptional regulator from a transmembrane nucleoporin

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Tobias M.; Benner, Chris; Narvaiza, Iñigo; Marchetto, Maria C.N.; Young, Janet M.; Malik, Harmit S.; Gage, Fred H.; Hetzer, Martin W.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) emerged as nuclear transport channels in eukaryotic cells ∼1.5 billion years ago. While the primary role of NPCs is to regulate nucleo–cytoplasmic transport, recent research suggests that certain NPC proteins have additionally acquired the role of affecting gene expression at the nuclear periphery and in the nucleoplasm in metazoans. Here we identify a widely expressed variant of the transmembrane nucleoporin (Nup) Pom121 (named sPom121, for “soluble Pom121”) that arose by genomic rearrangement before the divergence of hominoids. sPom121 lacks the nuclear membrane-anchoring domain and thus does not localize to the NPC. Instead, sPom121 colocalizes and interacts with nucleoplasmic Nup98, a previously identified transcriptional regulator, at gene promoters to control transcription of its target genes in human cells. Interestingly, sPom121 transcripts appear independently in several mammalian species, suggesting convergent innovation of Nup-mediated transcription regulation during mammalian evolution. Our findings implicate alternate transcription initiation as a mechanism to increase the functional diversity of NPC components. PMID:27198230

  11. Most "dark matter" transcripts are associated with known genes.

    PubMed

    van Bakel, Harm; Nislow, Corey; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Hughes, Timothy R

    2010-05-18

    A series of reports over the last few years have indicated that a much larger portion of the mammalian genome is transcribed than can be accounted for by currently annotated genes, but the quantity and nature of these additional transcripts remains unclear. Here, we have used data from single- and paired-end RNA-Seq and tiling arrays to assess the quantity and composition of transcripts in PolyA+ RNA from human and mouse tissues. Relative to tiling arrays, RNA-Seq identifies many fewer transcribed regions ("seqfrags") outside known exons and ncRNAs. Most nonexonic seqfrags are in introns, raising the possibility that they are fragments of pre-mRNAs. The chromosomal locations of the majority of intergenic seqfrags in RNA-Seq data are near known genes, consistent with alternative cleavage and polyadenylation site usage, promoter- and terminator-associated transcripts, or new alternative exons; indeed, reads that bridge splice sites identified 4,544 new exons, affecting 3,554 genes. Most of the remaining seqfrags correspond to either single reads that display characteristics of random sampling from a low-level background or several thousand small transcripts (median length = 111 bp) present at higher levels, which also tend to display sequence conservation and originate from regions with open chromatin. We conclude that, while there are bona fide new intergenic transcripts, their number and abundance is generally low in comparison to known exons, and the genome is not as pervasively transcribed as previously reported.

  12. Transcriptional network of androgen receptor in prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Ken-ichi; Inoue, Satoshi

    2013-08-01

    The androgen receptor belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily and functions as a ligand-dependent transcription factor. It binds to the androgen responsive element and recruits coregulatory factors to modulate gene transcription. In addition, the androgen receptor interacts with other transcription factors, such as forkhead box A1, and other oncogenic signaling pathway molecules that bind deoxyribonucleic acid and regulate transcription. Androgen receptor signaling plays an important role in the development of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer cells proliferate in an androgen-dependent manner, and androgen receptor blockade is effective in prostate cancer therapy. However, patients often progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer with elevated androgen receptor expression and hypersensitivity to androgen. Recently, comprehensive analysis tools, such as complementary DNA microarray, chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip and chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequence, have described the androgen-mediated diverse transcriptional program and gene networks in prostate cancer. Furthermore, functional and clinical studies have shown that some of the androgen receptor-regulated genes could be prognostic markers and potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of prostate cancer, particularly castration-resistant prostate cancer. Thus, identifying androgen receptor downstream signaling events and investigating the regulation of androgen receptor activity is critical for understanding the mechanism of carcinogenesis and progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  13. Transcriptional regulators of Na,K-ATPase subunits

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiqin; Langhans, Sigrid A.

    2015-01-01

    The Na,K-ATPase classically serves as an ion pump creating an electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane that is essential for transepithelial transport, nutrient uptake and membrane potential. In addition, Na,K-ATPase also functions as a receptor, a signal transducer and a cell adhesion molecule. With such diverse roles, it is understandable that the Na,K-ATPase subunits, the catalytic α-subunit, the β-subunit and the FXYD proteins, are controlled extensively during development and to accommodate physiological needs. The spatial and temporal expression of Na,K-ATPase is partially regulated at the transcriptional level. Numerous transcription factors, hormones, growth factors, lipids, and extracellular stimuli modulate the transcription of the Na,K-ATPase subunits. Moreover, epigenetic mechanisms also contribute to the regulation of Na,K-ATPase expression. With the ever growing knowledge about diseases associated with the malfunction of Na,K-ATPase, this review aims at summarizing the best-characterized transcription regulators that modulate Na,K-ATPase subunit levels. As abnormal expression of Na,K-ATPase subunits has been observed in many carcinoma, we will also discuss transcription factors that are associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition, a crucial step in the progression of many tumors to malignant disease. PMID:26579519

  14. Mutual interdependence of splicing and transcription elongation.

    PubMed

    Brzyżek, Grzegorz; Świeżewski, Szymon

    2015-01-01

    Transcription and splicing are intrinsically linked, as splicing needs a pre-mRNA substrate to commence. The more nuanced view is that the rate of transcription contributes to splicing regulation. On the other hand there is accumulating evidence that splicing has an active role in controlling transcription elongation by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). We briefly review those mechanisms and propose a unifying model where splicing controls transcription elongation to provide an optimal timing for successive rounds of splicing.

  15. Transcriptional Regulation by Hypoxia Inducible Factors

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Joaquín M.

    2015-01-01

    The cellular response to oxygen deprivation is governed largely by a family of transcription factors known as Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIFs). This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms by which HIFs regulate the transcriptional apparatus to enable the cellular and organismal response to hypoxia. We discuss here how the various HIF polypeptides, their post-translational modifications, binding partners and transcriptional cofactors affect RNA polymerase II activity to drive context-dependent transcriptional programs during hypoxia. PMID:24099156

  16. Transcriptional analysis of exopolysaccharides biosynthesis gene clusters in Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Vastano, Valeria; Perrone, Filomena; Marasco, Rosangela; Sacco, Margherita; Muscariello, Lidia

    2016-04-01

    Exopolysaccharides (EPS) from lactic acid bacteria contribute to specific rheology and texture of fermented milk products and find applications also in non-dairy foods and in therapeutics. Recently, four clusters of genes (cps) associated with surface polysaccharide production have been identified in Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1, a probiotic and food-associated lactobacillus. These clusters are involved in cell surface architecture and probably in release and/or exposure of immunomodulating bacterial molecules. Here we show a transcriptional analysis of these clusters. Indeed, RT-PCR experiments revealed that the cps loci are organized in five operons. Moreover, by reverse transcription-qPCR analysis performed on L. plantarum WCFS1 (wild type) and WCFS1-2 (ΔccpA), we demonstrated that expression of three cps clusters is under the control of the global regulator CcpA. These results, together with the identification of putative CcpA target sequences (catabolite responsive element CRE) in the regulatory region of four out of five transcriptional units, strongly suggest for the first time a role of the master regulator CcpA in EPS gene transcription among lactobacilli.

  17. Stochastic model for gene transcription on Drosophila melanogaster embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prata, Guilherme N.; Hornos, José Eduardo M.; Ramos, Alexandre F.

    2016-02-01

    We examine immunostaining experimental data for the formation of stripe 2 of even-skipped (eve) transcripts on D. melanogaster embryos. An estimate of the factor converting immunofluorescence intensity units into molecular numbers is given. The analysis of the eve dynamics at the region of stripe 2 suggests that the promoter site of the gene has two distinct regimes: an earlier phase when it is predominantly activated until a critical time when it becomes mainly repressed. That suggests proposing a stochastic binary model for gene transcription on D. melanogaster embryos. Our model has two random variables: the transcripts number and the state of the source of mRNAs given as active or repressed. We are able to reproduce available experimental data for the average number of transcripts. An analysis of the random fluctuations on the number of eves and their consequences on the spatial precision of stripe 2 is presented. We show that the position of the anterior or posterior borders fluctuate around their average position by ˜1 % of the embryo length, which is similar to what is found experimentally. The fitting of data by such a simple model suggests that it can be useful to understand the functions of randomness during developmental processes.

  18. Transcriptional Network Growing Models Using Motif-Based Preferential Attachment.

    PubMed

    Abdelzaher, Ahmed F; Al-Musawi, Ahmad F; Ghosh, Preetam; Mayo, Michael L; Perkins, Edward J

    2015-01-01

    Understanding relationships between architectural properties of gene-regulatory networks (GRNs) has been one of the major goals in systems biology and bioinformatics, as it can provide insights into, e.g., disease dynamics and drug development. Such GRNs are characterized by their scale-free degree distributions and existence of network motifs - i.e., small-node subgraphs that occur more abundantly in GRNs than expected from chance alone. Because these transcriptional modules represent "building blocks" of complex networks and exhibit a wide range of functional and dynamical properties, they may contribute to the remarkable robustness and dynamical stability associated with the whole of GRNs. Here, we developed network-construction models to better understand this relationship, which produce randomized GRNs by using transcriptional motifs as the fundamental growth unit in contrast to other methods that construct similar networks on a node-by-node basis. Because this model produces networks with a prescribed lower bound on the number of choice transcriptional motifs (e.g., downlinks, feed-forward loops), its fidelity to the motif distributions observed in model organisms represents an improvement over existing methods, which we validated by contrasting their resultant motif and degree distributions against existing network-growth models and data from the model organism of the bacterium Escherichia coli. These models may therefore serve as novel testbeds for further elucidating relationships between the topology of transcriptional motifs and network-wide dynamical properties.

  19. Interplay between DNA supercoiling and transcription elongation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Transcription-coupled DNA supercoiling has been shown to be an important regulator of transcription that is broadly present in the cell. Here we review experimental work which shows that RNA polymerase is a powerful torsional motor that can alter DNA topology and structure, and DNA supercoiling in turn directly affects transcription elongation.

  20. 40 CFR 1610.4 - Deposition Transcripts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Deposition Transcripts. 1610.4 Section 1610.4 Protection of Environment CHEMICAL SAFETY AND HAZARD INVESTIGATION BOARD ADMINISTRATIVE INVESTIGATIONS § 1610.4 Deposition Transcripts. (a) Transcripts of depositions of witnesses compelled by...

  1. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any,...

  2. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any,...

  3. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any,...

  4. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any,...

  5. 18 CFR 1b.12 - Transcripts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transcripts. 1b.12 Section 1b.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL RULES RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1b.12 Transcripts. Transcripts, if any,...

  6. The grays of medical device color additives.

    PubMed

    Seidman, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    The United States' medical device color additive regulations are unknown to some, and confusing to many. This article reviews statutory language on color additives in the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA), as amended, including the Delaney Clause on carcinogenicity; color additive regulatory language as it relates to medical devices in Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Parts 70-82; reports on the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) likely current and historical practices in dealing with color additives in medical devices; and speculates on what may have given rise to decades of seemingly ad hoc color additives practices, which may now be difficult to reconstruct and satisfactorily modify. Also addressed is the Center for Devices and Radiological Health's (CDRH's) recent publicly-vetted approach to color additives in Section 7 of its April 2013 draft guidance, Use of International Standard ISO-10993, "Biological Evaluation of Medical Devices Part 1: Evaluation and Testing," which the author concludes is a change in the right direction, but which, at least in its current draft form, is not a fix to the CDRH's color additives dilemma. Lastly, the article suggests what the CDRH might consider in further developing a new approach to color additives. Such an approach would treat color additives as if they were any other potentially toxic group of chemicals, and could be fashioned in such a way that the CDRH could still satisfy the broad aspects of Congressional color additives mandates, and.yet be consistent with ISO 10993. In doing this, the CDRH would need to recommend a more directed use of its Quality System Regulation, 21 C.F.R. Part 820, for material and vendor qualification and validation in general; approach Congress for needed statutory changes; or make administrative changes. In order for any approach to be successful, whether it is a new twist on past practices, or an entirely new path forward, the FDA must, to the best of its

  7. Erythropoietin-mediated expression of placenta growth factor is regulated via activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and post-transcriptionally by miR-214 in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Gonsalves, Caryn S; Li, Chen; Mpollo, Marthe-Sandrine Eiymo Mwa; Pullarkat, Vinod; Malik, Punam; Tahara, Stanley M; Kalra, Vijay K

    2015-06-15

    Placental growth factor (PlGF) plays an important role in various pathological conditions and diseases such as inflammation, cancer, atherosclerosis and sickle cell disease (SCD). Abnormally high PlGF levels in SCD patients are associated with increased inflammation and pulmonary hypertension (PHT) and reactive airway disease; however, the transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms regulating PlGF expression are not well defined. Herein, we show that treatment of human erythroid cells and colony forming units with erythropoietin (EPO) increased PlGF expression. Our studies showed EPO-mediated activation of HIF-1α led to subsequent binding of HIF-1α to hypoxia response elements (HREs) within the PlGF promoter, as demonstrated by luciferase transcription reporter assays and ChIP analysis of the endogenous gene. Additionally, we showed miR-214 post-transcriptionally regulated the expression of PlGF as demonstrated by luciferase reporter assays using wild-type (wt) and mutant PlGF-3'-UTR constructs. Furthermore, synthesis of miR-214, located in an intron of DNM3 (dynamin 3), was transcriptionally regulated by transcription factors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). These results were corroborated in vivo wherein plasma from SCD patients and lung tissues from sickle mice showed an inverse correlation between PlGF and miR-214 levels. Finally, we observed that miR-214 expression could be induced by fenofibrate, a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved PPARα agonist, thus revealing a potential therapeutic approach for reduction in PlGF levels by increasing miR-214 transcription. This strategy has potential clinical implications for several pathological conditions including SCD.

  8. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of SPAST, the gene most frequently mutated in hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Henson, Brian J; Zhu, Wan; Hardaway, Kelsey; Wetzel, Jaime L; Stefan, Mihaela; Albers, Kathryn M; Nicholls, Robert D

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) comprise a group of neurodegenerative disorders that are characterized by progressive spasticity of the lower extremities, due to axonal degeneration in the corticospinal motor tracts. HSPs are genetically heterogeneous and show autosomal dominant inheritance in ∼70-80% of cases, with additional cases being recessive or X-linked. The most common type of HSP is SPG4 with mutations in the SPAST gene, encoding spastin, which occurs in 40% of dominantly inherited cases and in ∼10% of sporadic cases. Both loss-of-function and dominant-negative mutation mechanisms have been described for SPG4, suggesting that precise or stoichiometric levels of spastin are necessary for biological function. Therefore, we hypothesized that regulatory mechanisms controlling expression of SPAST are important determinants of spastin biology, and if altered, could contribute to the development and progression of the disease. To examine the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of SPAST, we used molecular phylogenetic methods to identify conserved sequences for putative transcription factor binding sites and miRNA targeting motifs in the SPAST promoter and 3'-UTR, respectively. By a variety of molecular methods, we demonstrate that SPAST transcription is positively regulated by NRF1 and SOX11. Furthermore, we show that miR-96 and miR-182 negatively regulate SPAST by effects on mRNA stability and protein level. These transcriptional and miRNA regulatory mechanisms provide new functional targets for mutation screening and therapeutic targeting in HSP.

  9. Pol I Transcription and Pre-rRNA Processing Are Coordinated in a Transcription-dependent Manner in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, K.; Gasiorowski, J. Z.; Chen, D.; Gilmore, R.; Norton, J. T.; Wang, C.; Leary, D. J.; Chan, E.K.L.; Dean, D. A.

    2007-01-01

    Pre-rRNA synthesis and processing are key steps in ribosome biogenesis. Although recent evidence in yeast suggests that these two processes are coupled, the nature of their association is unclear. In this report, we analyze the coordination between rDNA transcription and pre-rRNA processing in mammalian cells. We found that pol I transcription factor UBF interacts with pre-rRNA processing factors as analyzed by immunoprecipitations, and the association depends on active rRNA synthesis. In addition, injections of plasmids containing the human rDNA promoter and varying lengths of 18S rDNA into HeLa nuclei show that pol I transcription machinery can be recruited to rDNA promoters regardless of the product that is transcribed, whereas subgroups of pre-rRNA processing factors are recruited to plasmids only when specific pre-rRNA fragments are produced. Our observations suggest a model for sequential recruitment of pol I transcription factors and pre-rRNA processing factors to elongating pre-rRNA on an as-needed basis rather than corecruitment to sites of active transcription. PMID:17108330

  10. The murine Sry gene encodes a nuclear transcriptional activator

    SciTech Connect

    Dubin, R.A.; Ostrer, H.

    1994-09-01

    The Sry gene functions as a genetic switch in gonadal ridge initiating testis determination. The murine Sry and human SRY open reading frames (ORF) share a conserved 79 amino acid motif, the HMG-box, that binds DNA. Outside this region the two genes share no additional homology. These studies were undertaken to determine whether the Sry/SRY genes encode nuclear transcriptional regulators. As judged by the accumulation of lacZ-SRY hybrid proteins in the nucleus, both the human and murine SRY ORFs contain a nuclear localization signal. The murine Sry HMG-box selectively binds the sequence NACAAT in vitro when presented with a random pool of oligonucleotides and binds AACAAT with the highest affinity. The murine Sry ORF, when expressed in HeLa cells, activates transcription of a reporter gene containing multiple copies of the AACAAT binding site. Activation was observed for a GAL4-responsive gene when the murine Sry ORF was linked to the DNA-binding domain of GAL4. Using this system, the activation function was mapped to a C-terminal glutamine/histidine-rich domain. In addition, LexA-Sry fusion genes activated a LexA-responsive gene in yeast. In contrast, a GAL4-human SRY fusion gene did not cause transcriptional activation. These studies suggest that both the human and mouse SRY ORFs encode nuclear, DNA-binding proteins, and that the mouse Sry ORF can function as a transcriptional activator with separable DNA-binding and activator domains.

  11. Complementary quantitative proteomics reveals that transcription factor AP-4 mediates E-box-dependent complex formation for transcriptional repression of HDM2.

    PubMed

    Ku, Wei-Chi; Chiu, Sung-Kay; Chen, Yi-Ju; Huang, Hsin-Hung; Wu, Wen-Guey; Chen, Yu-Ju

    2009-09-01

    Transcription factor activating enhancer-binding protein 4 (AP-4) is a basic helix-loop-helix protein that binds to E-box elements. AP-4 has received increasing attention for its regulatory role in cell growth and development, including transcriptional repression of the human homolog of murine double minute 2 (HDM2), an important oncoprotein controlling cell growth and survival, by an unknown mechanism. Here we demonstrate that AP-4 binds to an E-box located in the HDM2-P2 promoter and represses HDM2 transcription in a p53-independent manner. Incremental truncations of AP-4 revealed that the C-terminal Gln/Pro-rich domain was essential for transcriptional repression of HDM2. To further delineate the molecular mechanism(s) of AP-4 transcriptional control and its potential implications, we used DNA-affinity purification followed by complementary quantitative proteomics, cICAT and iTRAQ labeling methods, to identify a previously unknown E-box-bound AP-4 protein complex containing 75 putative components. The two labeling methods complementarily quantified differentially AP-4-enriched proteins, including the most significant recruitment of DNA damage response proteins, followed by transcription factors, transcriptional repressors/corepressors, and histone-modifying proteins. Specific interaction of AP-4 with CCCTC binding factor, stimulatory protein 1, and histone deacetylase 1 (an AP-4 corepressor) was validated using AP-4 truncation mutants. Importantly, inclusion of trichostatin A did not alleviate AP-4-mediated repression of HDM2 transcription, suggesting a previously unidentified histone deacetylase-independent repression mechanism. In contrast, the complementary quantitative proteomics study suggested that transcription repression occurs via coordination of AP-4 with other transcription factors, histone methyltransferases, and/or a nucleosome remodeling SWI.SNF complex. In addition to previously known functions of AP-4, our data suggest that AP-4 participates in a

  12. Contributions of in vitro transcription to the understanding of human RNA polymerase III transcription.

    PubMed

    Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Durrieu-Gaillard, Stéphanie; El Ayoubi, Leyla; Parrot, Camila; Teichmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Human RNA polymerase III transcribes small untranslated RNAs that contribute to the regulation of essential cellular processes, including transcription, RNA processing and translation. Analysis of this transcription system by in vitro transcription techniques has largely contributed to the discovery of its transcription factors and to the understanding of the regulation of human RNA polymerase III transcription. Here we review some of the key steps that led to the identification of transcription factors and to the definition of minimal promoter sequences for human RNA polymerase III transcription.

  13. Contribution of transcription to animal early development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianbin; Davis, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    In mature gametes and during the oocyte-to-embryo transition, transcription is generally silenced and gene expression is post-transcriptionally regulated. However, we recently discovered that major transcription can occur immediately after fertilization, prior to pronuclear fusion, and in the first cell division of the oocyte-to-embryo transition in the nematode Ascaris suum. We postulate that the balance between transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation during the oocyte-to-embryo transition may largely be determined by cell cycle length and thus the time available for the genome to be transcribed.

  14. Switch Transcripts in Immunoglobulin Class Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Matthias; Jung, Steffen; Radbruch, Andreas

    1995-03-01

    B cells can exchange gene segments for the constant region of the immunoglobulin heavy chain, altering the class and effector function of the antibodies that they produce. Class switching is directed to distinct classes by cytokines, which induce transcription of the targeted DNA sequences. These transcripts are processed, resulting in spliced "switch" transcripts. Switch recombination can be directed to immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) by the heterologous human metallothionein II_A promoter in mutant mice. Induction of the structurally conserved, spliced switch transcripts is sufficient to target switch recombination to IgG1, whereas transcription alone is not.

  15. Human Mitochondrial Transcription Initiation Complexes Have Similar Topology on the Light and Heavy Strand Promoters.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Yaroslav I; Temiakov, Dmitry

    2016-06-24

    Transcription is a highly regulated process in all domains of life. In human mitochondria, transcription of the circular genome involves only two promoters, called light strand promoter (LSP) and heavy strand promoter (HSP), located in the opposite DNA strands. Initiation of transcription occurs upon sequential assembly of an initiation complex that includes mitochondrial RNA polymerase (mtRNAP) and the initiation factors mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and TFB2M. It has been recently suggested that the transcription initiation factor TFAM binds to HSP and LSP in opposite directions, implying that the mechanisms of transcription initiation are drastically dissimilar at these promoters. In contrast, we found that binding of TFAM to HSP and the subsequent recruitment of mtRNAP results in a pre-initiation complex that is remarkably similar in topology and properties to that formed at the LSP promoter. Our data suggest that assembly of the pre-initiation complexes on LSP and HSP brings these transcription units in close proximity, providing an opportunity for regulatory proteins to simultaneously control transcription initiation in both mtDNA strands.

  16. Regulating RNA polymerase pausing and transcription elongation in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Min, Irene M; Waterfall, Joshua J; Core, Leighton J; Munroe, Robert J; Schimenti, John; Lis, John T

    2011-04-01

    Transitions between pluripotent stem cells and differentiated cells are executed by key transcription regulators. Comparative measurements of RNA polymerase distribution over the genome's primary transcription units in different cell states can identify the genes and steps in the transcription cycle that are regulated during such transitions. To identify the complete transcriptional profiles of RNA polymerases with high sensitivity and resolution, as well as the critical regulated steps upon which regulatory factors act, we used genome-wide nuclear run-on (GRO-seq) to map the density and orientation of transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerases in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). In both cell types, progression of a promoter-proximal, paused RNA polymerase II (Pol II) into productive elongation is a rate-limiting step in transcription of ∼40% of mRNA-encoding genes. Importantly, quantitative comparisons between cell types reveal that transcription is controlled frequently at paused Pol II's entry into elongation. Furthermore, "bivalent" ESC genes (exhibiting both active and repressive histone modifications) bound by Polycomb group complexes PRC1 (Polycomb-repressive complex 1) and PRC2 show dramatically reduced levels of paused Pol II at promoters relative to an average gene. In contrast, bivalent promoters bound by only PRC2 allow Pol II pausing, but it is confined to extremely 5' proximal regions. Altogether, these findings identify rate-limiting targets for transcription regulation during cell differentiation.

  17. Involvement of in situ conformation of ribosomal genes and selective distribution of upstream binding factor in rRNA transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Junéra, H R; Masson, C; Géraud, G; Suja, J; Hernandez-Verdun, D

    1997-01-01

    The distribution of the ribosomal genes (rDNA) and the upstream binding factor (UBF), correlatively with their RNA transcripts, was investigated in G1, S-phase, and G2. rDNA was distributed in nucleoli, with alternate sites of clustered and dispersed genes. UBF was found associated with some but not all clustered genes and proportionally more with dispersed genes. It was distributed in several foci that were more numerous and heterogeneous in size during G2 than G1. We suggest that UBF associated with rDNA during S-phase because its nucleolar amount increased during that time and remained stable in G2. 5,6-Dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole treatment indicated a similar amount of UBF per transcription unit, and consequently heterogeneous size of the UBF foci can represent a variable number of transcription units per foci. Direct visualization of the transcripts demonstrated that only part of UBF is associated with active transcription and that rDNA distribution varied with transcription. We propose that in the same rDNA locus three types of configuration coexist that are correlated with gene activity: 1) clustered genes without UBF; 2) clustered genes with UBF, of which some are associated with transcription; and 3) dispersed genes with UBF and transcription. These results support the hypothesis that rDNA transcription involved several steps of regulation acting successively and locally in the same locus to promote the repressed clustered genes to become actively transcribed dispersed genes. Images PMID:9017602

  18. Isolation and characterization of transcription fidelity mutants.

    PubMed

    Strathern, Jeffrey N; Jin, Ding Jun; Court, Donald L; Kashlev, Mikhail

    2012-07-01

    Accurate transcription is an essential step in maintaining genetic information. Error-prone transcription has been proposed to contribute to cancer, aging, adaptive mutagenesis, and mutagenic evolution of retroviruses and retrotransposons. The mechanisms controlling transcription fidelity and the biological consequences of transcription errors are poorly understood. Because of the transient nature of mRNAs and the lack of reliable experimental systems, the identification and characterization of defects that increase transcription errors have been particularly challenging. In this review we describe novel genetic screens for the isolation of fidelity mutants in both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli RNA polymerases. We obtained and characterized two distinct classes of mutants altering NTP misincorporation and transcription slippage both in vivo and in vitro. Our study not only validates the genetic schemes for the isolation of RNA polymerase mutants that alter fidelity, but also sheds light on the mechanism of transcription accuracy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chromatin in time and space.

  19. Mammalian transcription-coupled excision repair.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Wim; Fousteri, Maria

    2013-08-01

    Transcriptional arrest caused by DNA damage is detrimental for cells and organisms as it impinges on gene expression and thereby on cell growth and survival. To alleviate transcriptional arrest, cells trigger a transcription-dependent genome surveillance pathway, termed transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) that ensures rapid removal of such transcription-impeding DNA lesions and prevents persistent stalling of transcription. Defective TC-NER is causatively linked to Cockayne syndrome, a rare severe genetic disorder with multisystem abnormalities that results in patients' death in early adulthood. Here we review recent data on how damage-arrested transcription is actively coupled to TC-NER in mammals and discuss new emerging models concerning the role of TC-NER-specific factors in this process.

  20. Effects of elongation delay in transcription dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan; Jin, Huiqin; Yang, Zhuoqin; Lei, Jinzhi

    2014-12-01

    In the transcription process, elongation delay is induced by the movement of RNA polymerases (RNAP) along the DNA sequence, and can result in changes in the transcription dynamics. This paper studies the transcription dynamics that involved the elongation delay and effects of cell division and DNA replication. The stochastic process of gene expression is modeled with delay chemical master equation with periodic coefficients, and is studied numerically through the stochastic simulation algorithm with delay. We show that the average transcription level approaches to a periodic dynamics over cell cycles at homeostasis, and the elongation delay can reduce the transcription level and increase the transcription noise. Moreover, the transcription elongation can induce bimodal distribution of mRNA levels that can be measured by the techniques of flow cytometry.

  1. Transcriptional Memory in the Drosophila Embryo.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Teresa; Esposito, Emilia; Mancini, Laure; Ng, Sam; Lucas, Tanguy; Coppey, Mathieu; Dostatni, Nathalie; Walczak, Aleksandra M; Levine, Michael; Lagha, Mounia

    2016-01-25

    Transmission of active transcriptional states from mother to daughter cells has the potential to foster precision in the gene expression programs underlying development. Such transcriptional memory has been specifically proposed to promote rapid reactivation of complex gene expression profiles after successive mitoses in Drosophila development [1]. By monitoring transcription in living Drosophila embryos, we provide the first evidence for transcriptional memory in animal development. We specifically monitored the activities of stochastically expressed transgenes in order to distinguish active and inactive mother cells and the behaviors of their daughter nuclei after mitosis. Quantitative analyses reveal that there is a 4-fold higher probability for rapid reactivation after mitosis when the mother experienced transcription. Moreover, memory nuclei activate transcription twice as fast as neighboring inactive mothers, thus leading to augmented levels of gene expression. We propose that transcriptional memory is a mechanism of precision, which helps coordinate gene activity during embryogenesis.

  2. What do you mean by transcription rate?: the conceptual difference between nascent transcription rate and mRNA synthesis rate is essential for the proper understanding of transcriptomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ortín, José E; Medina, Daniel A; Chávez, Sebastián; Moreno, Joaquín

    2013-12-01

    mRNA synthesis in all organisms is performed by RNA polymerases, which work as nanomachines on DNA templates. The rate at which their product is made is an important parameter in gene expression. Transcription rate encompasses two related, yet different, concepts: the nascent transcription rate, which measures the in situ mRNA production by RNA polymerase, and the rate of synthesis of mature mRNA, which measures the contribution of transcription to the mRNA concentration. Both parameters are useful for molecular biologists, but they are not interchangeable and they are expressed in different units. It is important to distinguish when and where each one should be used. We propose that for functional genomics the use of nascent transcription rates should be restricted to the evaluation of the transcriptional process itself, whereas mature mRNA synthesis rates should be employed to address the transcriptional input to mRNA concentration balance leading to variation of gene expression.

  3. Transcriptional networks in leaf senescence.

    PubMed

    Schippers, Jos H M

    2015-10-01

    Plant senescence is a natural phenomenon known for the appearance of beautiful autumn colors and the ripening of cereals in the field. Senescence is a controlled process that plants utilize to remobilize nutrients from source leaves to developing tissues. While during the past decades, molecular components underlying the onset of senescence have been intensively studied, knowledge remains scarce on the age-dependent mechanisms that control the onset of senescence. Recent advances have uncovered transcriptional networks regulating the competence to senesce. Here, gene regulatory networks acting as internal timing mechanisms for the onset of senescence are highlighted, illustrating that early and late leaf developmental phases are highly connected.

  4. Targeting Transcription Factors in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwat, Anand S.; Vakoc, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are commonly deregulated in the pathogenesis of human cancer and are a major class of cancer cell dependencies. Consequently, targeting of TFs can be highly effective in treating particular malignancies, as highlighted by the clinical efficacy of agents that target nuclear hormone receptors. In this review we discuss recent advances in our understanding of TFs as drug targets in oncology, with an emphasis on the emerging chemical approaches to modulate TF function. The remarkable diversity and potency of TFs as drivers of cell transformation justifies a continued pursuit of TFs as therapeutic targets for drug discovery. PMID:26645049

  5. Transcriptional analysis of apple fruit proanthocyanidin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Henry-Kirk, Rebecca A.

    2012-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) are products of the flavonoid pathway, which also leads to the production of anthocyanins and flavonols. Many flavonoids have antioxidant properties and may have beneficial effects for human health. PAs are found in the seeds and fruits of many plants. In apple fruit (Malus × domestica Borkh.), the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway is most active in the skin, with the flavan-3-ols, catechin, and epicatechin acting as the initiating units for the synthesis of PA polymers. This study examined the genes involved in the production of PAs in three apple cultivars: two heritage apple cultivars, Hetlina and Devonshire Quarrenden, and a commercial cultivar, Royal Gala. HPLC analysis shows that tree-ripe fruit from Hetlina and Devonshire Quarrenden had a higher phenolic content than Royal Gala. Epicatechin and catechin biosynthesis is under the control of the biosynthetic enzymes anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR1), respectively. Counter-intuitively, real-time quantitative PCR analysis showed that the expression levels of Royal Gala LAR1 and ANR were significantly higher than those of both Devonshire Quarrenden and Hetlina. This suggests that a compensatory feedback mechanism may be active, whereby low concentrations of PAs may induce higher expression of gene transcripts. Further investigation is required into the regulation of these key enzymes in apple. Abbreviations:ANOVAanalysis of varianceANRanthocyanidin reductaseDADdiode array detectorDAFBdays after full bloomDFRdihydroflavonol reductaseLARleucoanthocyanidin reductaseLC-MSliquid chromatography/mass spectrometryPAproanthocyanidinqPCRreal-time quantitative PCR PMID:22859681

  6. RNA-binding proteins involved in post-transcriptional regulation in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Van Assche, Elke; Van Puyvelde, Sandra; Vanderleyden, Jos; Steenackers, Hans P.

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation is a very important mechanism to control gene expression in changing environments. In the past decade, a lot of interest has been directed toward the role of small RNAs (sRNAs) in bacterial post-transcriptional regulation. However, sRNAs are not the only molecules controlling gene expression at this level, RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play an important role as well. CsrA and Hfq are the two best studied bacterial proteins of this type, but recently, additional proteins involved in post-transcriptional control have been identified. This review focuses on the general working mechanisms of post-transcriptionally active RBPs, which include (i) adaptation of the susceptibility of mRNAs and sRNAs to RNases, (ii) modulating the accessibility of the ribosome binding site of mRNAs, (iii) recruiting and assisting in the interaction of mRNAs with other molecules and (iv) regulating transcription terminator/antiterminator formation, and gives an overview of both the well-studied and the newly identified proteins that are involved in post-transcriptional regulatory processes. Additionally, the post-transcriptional mechanisms by which the expression or the activity of these proteins is regulated, are described. For many of the newly identified proteins, however, mechanistic questions remain. Most likely, more post-transcriptionally active proteins will be identified in the future. PMID:25784899

  7. Live imaging of nascent RNA dynamics reveals distinct types of transcriptional pulse regulation

    PubMed Central

    Muramoto, Tetsuya; Cannon, Danielle; Gierliński, Marek; Corrigan, Adam; Barton, Geoffrey J.; Chubb, Jonathan R.

    2012-01-01

    Transcription of genes can be discontinuous, occurring in pulses or bursts. It is not clear how properties of transcriptional pulses vary between different genes. We compared the pulsing of five housekeeping and five developmentally induced genes by direct imaging of single gene transcriptional events in individual living Dictyostelium cells. Each gene displayed its own transcriptional signature, differing in probability of firing and pulse duration, frequency, and intensity. In contrast to the prevailing view from both prokaryotes and eukaryotes that transcription displays binary behavior, strongly expressed housekeeping genes altered the magnitude of their transcriptional pulses during development. These nonbinary “tunable” responses may be better suited than stochastic switch behavior for housekeeping functions. Analysis of RNA synthesis kinetics using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching implied modulation of housekeeping-gene pulse strength occurs at the level of transcription initiation rather than elongation. In addition, disparities between single cell and population measures of transcript production suggested differences in RNA stability between gene classes. Analysis of stability using RNAseq revealed no major global differences in stability between developmental and housekeeping transcripts, although strongly induced RNAs showed unusually rapid decay, indicating tight regulation of expression. PMID:22529358

  8. Live imaging of nascent RNA dynamics reveals distinct types of transcriptional pulse regulation.

    PubMed

    Muramoto, Tetsuya; Cannon, Danielle; Gierlinski, Marek; Corrigan, Adam; Barton, Geoffrey J; Chubb, Jonathan R

    2012-05-08

    Transcription of genes can be discontinuous, occurring in pulses or bursts. It is not clear how properties of transcriptional pulses vary between different genes. We compared the pulsing of five housekeeping and five developmentally induced genes by direct imaging of single gene transcriptional events in individual living Dictyostelium cells. Each gene displayed its own transcriptional signature, differing in probability of firing and pulse duration, frequency, and intensity. In contrast to the prevailing view from both prokaryotes and eukaryotes that transcription displays binary behavior, strongly expressed housekeeping genes altered the magnitude of their transcriptional pulses during development. These nonbinary "tunable" responses may be better suited than stochastic switch behavior for housekeeping functions. Analysis of RNA synthesis kinetics using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching implied modulation of housekeeping-gene pulse strength occurs at the level of transcription initiation rather than elongation. In addition, disparities between single cell and population measures of transcript production suggested differences in RNA stability between gene classes. Analysis of stability using RNAseq revealed no major global differences in stability between developmental and housekeeping transcripts, although strongly induced RNAs showed unusually rapid decay, indicating tight regulation of expression.

  9. Transcription-associated recombination is dependent on replication in Mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Gottipati, Ponnari; Cassel, Tobias N; Savolainen, Linda; Helleday, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Transcription can enhance recombination; this is a ubiquitous phenomenon from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes. However, the mechanism of transcription-associated recombination in mammalian cells is poorly understood. Here we have developed a construct with a recombination substrate in which levels of recombination can be studied in the presence or absence of transcription. We observed a direct enhancement in recombination when transcription levels through the substrate were increased. This increase in homologous recombination following transcription is locus specific, since homologous recombination at the unrelated hprt gene is unaffected. In addition, we have shown that transcription-associated recombination involves both short-tract and long-tract gene conversions in mammalian cells, which are different from double-strand-break-induced recombination events caused by endonucleases. Transcription fails to enhance recombination in cells that are not in the S phase of the cell cycle. Furthermore, inhibition of transcription suppresses induction of recombination at stalled replication forks, suggesting that recombination may be involved in bypassing transcription during replication.

  10. Splicing and transcription differ between spore and intracellular life stages in the parasitic microsporidia.

    PubMed

    Gill, Erin E; Lee, Renny C H; Corradi, Nicolas; Grisdale, Cameron J; Limpright, Valerie O; Keeling, Patrick J; Fast, Naomi M

    2010-07-01

    Microsporidia are a diverse group of highly derived fungal relatives that are intracellular parasites of many animals. Both transcription and introns have been shown to be unusual in microsporidia: The complete genome of the human parasite Encephalitozoon cuniculi has only a few very short introns, and two distantly related microsporidian spores have been shown to harbor transcripts encoding several genes that overlap on different strands. However, microsporidia alternate between two life stages: the intracellular proliferative stage and the extracellular and largely metabolically dormant infectious spore. To date, most studies have focused on the spore. Here, we have compared transcription profiles for a number of genes from both life stages of microsporidia and found major differences in both the prevalence of overlapping transcription and splicing. Specifically, spore transcripts in E. cuniculi have longer 5' untranslated regions, overlap more frequently with upstream genes, and have a significantly higher number of transcription initiation sites compared with intracellular transcripts from the same species. In addition, we demonstrate that splicing occurs exclusively in the intracellular stage and not in spore messenger RNAs (mRNAs) in both E. cuniculi and the distantly related Antonospora locustae. These differences between the microsporidian life stages raise questions about the functional importance of transcripts in the spore. We hypothesize that at least some transcripts in spores are a product of the cell's transition into a dormant state and that these unusual mRNAs could play a structural role rather than an informational one.

  11. Termination unit

    DOEpatents

    Traeholt, Chresten; Willen, Dag; Roden, Mark; Tolbert, Jerry C.; Lindsay, David; Fisher, Paul W.; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann

    2016-05-03

    Cable end section comprises end-parts of N electrical phases/neutral, and a thermally-insulation envelope comprising cooling fluid. The end-parts each comprises a conductor and are arranged with phase 1 innermost, N outermost surrounded by the neutral, electrical insulation being between phases and N and neutral. The end-parts comprise contacting surfaces located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section. A termination unit has an insulating envelope connected to a cryostat, special parts at both ends comprising an adapter piece at the cable interface and a closing end-piece terminating the envelope in the end-section. The special parts houses an inlet and/or outlet for cooling fluid. The space between an inner wall of the envelope and a central opening of the cable is filled with cooling fluid. The special part at the end connecting to the cryostat houses an inlet or outlet, splitting cooling flow into cable annular flow and termination annular flow.

  12. Regenerable biocide delivery unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, Gerald V.; Jolly, Clifford D.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1991-01-01

    The Microbial Check Valve (MCV) is used on the Space Shuttle to impart an iodine residual to the drinking water to maintain microbial control. Approximately twenty MCV locations have been identified in the Space Station Freedom design, each with a 90-day life. This translates to 2400 replacement units in 30 years of operation. An in situ regeneration concept has been demonstrated that will reduce this replacement requirement to less than 300 units based on data to date. A totally automated system will result in significant savings in crew time, resupply requirements, and replacement costs. An additional feature of the device is the ability to provide a concentrated biocide source (200 mg/liter of I2) that can be used to superiodinate systems routinely or after a microbial upset.

  13. Auxin and ethylene induce flavonol accumulation through distinct transcriptional networks.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Daniel R; Ramirez, Melissa V; Miller, Nathan D; Vallabhaneni, Prashanthi; Ray, W Keith; Helm, Richard F; Winkel, Brenda S J; Muday, Gloria K

    2011-05-01

    Auxin and ethylene are key regulators of plant growth and development, and thus the transcriptional networks that mediate responses to these hormones have been the subject of intense research. This study dissected the hormonal cross talk regulating the synthesis of flavonols and examined their impact on root growth and development. We analyzed the effects of auxin and an ethylene precursor on roots of wild-type and hormone-insensitive Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants at the transcript, protein, and metabolite levels at high spatial and temporal resolution. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) differentially increased flavonol pathway transcripts and flavonol accumulation, altering the relative abundance of quercetin and kaempferol. The IAA, but not ACC, response is lost in the transport inhibitor response1 (tir1) auxin receptor mutant, while ACC responses, but not IAA responses, are lost in ethylene insensitive2 (ein2) and ethylene resistant1 (etr1) ethylene signaling mutants. A kinetic analysis identified increases in transcripts encoding the transcriptional regulators MYB12, Transparent Testa Glabra1, and Production of Anthocyanin Pigment after hormone treatments, which preceded increases in transcripts encoding flavonoid biosynthetic enzymes. In addition, myb12 mutants were insensitive to the effects of auxin and ethylene on flavonol metabolism. The equivalent phenotypes for transparent testa4 (tt4), which makes no flavonols, and tt7, which makes kaempferol but not quercetin, showed that quercetin derivatives are the inhibitors of basipetal root auxin transport, gravitropism, and elongation growth. Collectively, these experiments demonstrate that auxin and ethylene regulate flavonol biosynthesis through distinct signaling networks involving TIR1 and EIN2/ETR1, respectively, both of which converge on MYB12. This study also provides new evidence that quercetin is the flavonol that modulates basipetal auxin transport.

  14. 10 CFR 9.108 - Certification, transcripts, recordings and minutes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...). Copies of such transcript, or minutes, or a transcription of such recording disclosing the identity of... transcription as provided in § 9.14. The Secretary shall maintain a complete verbatim copy of the transcript,...

  15. Gene transcription and electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    Our overall aim is to obtain sufficient information to allow us to ultimately determine whether ELF EM field exposure is an initiating factor in neoplastic transformation and/or if exposure can mimic characteristics of the second-step counterpart in neoplastic disease. This aim is based on our previous findings that levels of some transcripts are increased in cells exposed to EM fields. While the research is basic in nature, the ramifications have bearing on the general safety of exposure to EM fields in industrial and everyday life. A large array of diverse biological effects are reported to occur as the result of exposure to elf EM fields, suggesting that the cell response to EM fields is at a basic level, presumably initiated by molecular and/or biophysical events at the cell membrane. The hypothesized route is a signal transduction pathway involving membrane calcium fluxes. Information flow resulting from signal transduction can mediate the induction of regulatory factors in the cell, and directly affect how transcription is regulated.

  16. Multichannel electrochemical microbial detection unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.; Young, R. N.; Boykin, E. H.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes the design and capabilities of a compact multichannel electrochemical unit devised to detect and automatically indicate detection time length of bacteria. By connecting this unit to a strip-chart recorder, a permanent record is obtained of the end points and growth curves for each of eight channels. The experimental setup utilizing the multichannel unit consists of a test tube (25 by 150 mm) containing a combination redox electrode plus 18 ml of lauryl tryptose broth and positioned in a 35-C water bath. Leads from the electrodes are connected to the multichannel unit, which in turn is connected to a strip-chart recorder. After addition of 2.0 ml of inoculum to the test tubes, depression of the push-button starter activates the electronics, timer, and indicator light for each channel. The multichannel unit is employed to test tenfold dilutions of various members of the Enterobacteriaceae group, and a typical dose-response curve is presented.

  17. How Safe Are Color Additives?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates How Safe are Color Additives? Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Consumer Updates RSS Feed Download PDF (380 K) Color additives give the red tint to your fruit ...

  18. Detergent Additive for Lubricating Oils,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The Russian patent pertains to a method of producing additives for lubricating oils . A method is known for producing an antiwear additive for... lubricating oils by processing phenols with phosphorus oxychloride, phosphoric acid esters are obtained. In order to give the additive detergent properties

  19. DBD: a transcription factor prediction database.

    PubMed

    Kummerfeld, Sarah K; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2006-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression influences almost all biological processes in an organism; sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factors are critical to this control. For most genomes, the repertoire of transcription factors is only partially known. Hitherto transcription factor identification has been largely based on genome annotation pipelines that use pairwise sequence comparisons, which detect only those factors similar to known genes, or on functional classification schemes that amalgamate many types of proteins into the category of 'transcription factor'. Using a novel transcription factor identification method, the DBD transcription factor database fills this void, providing genome-wide transcription factor predictions for organisms from across the tree of life. The prediction method behind DBD identifies sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factors through homology using profile hidden Markov models (HMMs) of domains. Thus, it is limited to factors that are homologus to those HMMs. The collection of HMMs is taken from two existing databases (Pfam and SUPERFAMILY), and is limited to models that exclusively detect transcription factors that specifically recognize DNA sequences. It does not include basal transcription factors or chromatin-associated proteins, for instance. Based on comparison with experimentally verified annotation, the prediction procedure is between 95% and 99% accurate. Between one quarter and one-half of our genome-wide predicted transcription factors represent previously uncharacterized proteins. The DBD (www.transcriptionfactor.org) consists of predicted transcription factor repertoires for 150 completely sequenced genomes, their domain assignments and the hand curated list of DNA-binding domain HMMs. Users can browse, search or download the predictions by genome, domain family or sequence identifier, view families of transcription factors based on domain architecture and receive predictions for a protein sequence.

  20. Human transcription factor USF stimulates transcription through the initiator elements of the HIV-1 and the Ad-ML promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Du, H; Roy, A L; Roeder, R G

    1993-01-01

    Earlier in vitro studies identified USF as a cellular factor which activates the adenovirus major late (Ad-ML) promoter by binding to an E-box motif located at position -60 with respect to the cap site. Purified USF contains 44 and 43 kDa polypeptides, and the latter was found (by cDNA cloning) to be a helix-loop-helix protein. In this report, we demonstrate a 25-to 30-fold stimulation of transcription via an upstream binding site by ectopic expression of the 43 kDa form of USF (USF43) in transient transfection assays. More recent data have also revealed alternate interactions of USF43 at pyrimidine-rich (consensus YYAYTCYY) initiator (Inr) elements present in a variety of core promoters. In agreement with this observation, we show here that USF43 can recognize the initiator elements of the HIV-1 promoter, as well as those in the Ad-ML promoter, and that ectopic expression of USF43 can stimulate markedly the corresponding core promoters (TATA and initiator elements) when analyzed in transient co-transfection assays. Mutations in either Inr 1 or Inr 2 reduced the USF43-dependent transcription activity in vivo. In addition, in vitro transcription assays showed that mutations in either or both of the Inr 1 and Inr 2 sequences of the HIV-1 and Ad-ML promoters could affect transcription efficiency, but not the position of the transcriptional start site. These results indicate that USF43 can stimulate transcription through initiator elements in two viral promoters, although the exact mechanism and physiological significance of this effect remain unclear. Images PMID:8440240

  1. Mitotic Transcriptional Activation: Clearance of Actively Engaged Pol II via Transcriptional Elongation Control in Mitosis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Kaiwei; Woodfin, Ashley R; Slaughter, Brian D; Unruh, Jay R; Box, Andrew C; Rickels, Ryan A; Gao, Xin; Haug, Jeffrey S; Jaspersen, Sue L; Shilatifard, Ali

    2015-11-05

    Although it is established that some general transcription factors are inactivated at mitosis, many details of mitotic transcription inhibition (MTI) and its underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We have identified mitotic transcriptional activation (MTA) as a key regulatory step to control transcription in mitosis for genes with transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to activate and transcribe until the end of the gene to clear Pol II from mitotic chromatin, followed by global impairment of transcription reinitiation through MTI. Global nascent RNA sequencing and RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrate the existence of transcriptionally engaged Pol II in early mitosis. Both genetic and chemical inhibition of P-TEFb in mitosis lead to delays in the progression of cell division. Together, our study reveals a mechanism for MTA and MTI whereby transcriptionally engaged Pol II can progress into productive elongation and finish transcription to allow proper cellular division.

  2. Incorporation of additives into polymers

    DOEpatents

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Yates, Matthew Z.

    2003-07-29

    There has been invented a method for incorporating additives into polymers comprising: (a) forming an aqueous or alcohol-based colloidal system of the polymer; (b) emulsifying the colloidal system with a compressed fluid; and (c) contacting the colloidal polymer with the additive in the presence of the compressed fluid. The colloidal polymer can be contacted with the additive by having the additive in the compressed fluid used for emulsification or by adding the additive to the colloidal system before or after emulsification with the compressed fluid. The invention process can be carried out either as a batch process or as a continuous on-line process.

  3. Additive manufacturing of optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Andreas; Rank, Manuel; Maillard, Philippe; Suckow, Anne; Bauckhage, Yannick; Rößler, Patrick; Lang, Johannes; Shariff, Fatin; Pekrul, Sven

    2016-08-01

    The development of additive manufacturing methods has enlarged rapidly in recent years. Thereby, the work mainly focuses on the realization of mechanical components, but the additive manufacturing technology offers a high potential in the field of optics as well. Owing to new design possibilities, completely new solutions are possible. This article briefly reviews and compares the most important additive manufacturing methods for polymer optics. Additionally, it points out the characteristics of additive manufactured polymer optics. Thereby, surface quality is of crucial importance. In order to improve it, appropriate post-processing steps are necessary (e.g. robot polishing or coating), which will be discussed. An essential part of this paper deals with various additive manufactured optical components and their use, especially in optical systems for shape metrology (e.g. borehole sensor, tilt sensor, freeform surface sensor, fisheye lens). The examples should demonstrate the potentials and limitations of optical components produced by additive manufacturing.

  4. Toxic Hazards Research Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macewen, J. D.; Vernot, E. H.

    1971-01-01

    The activities of the Toxic Hazards Research Unit (THRU) for the period of June 1970 through May 1971 reviewed. Modification of the animal exposure facilities primarily for improved human safety but also for experimental integrity and continuity are discussed. Acute toxicity experiments were conducted on hydrogen fluoride (HF), hydrogen chloride (HCl), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) both singly and in combination with carbon dioxide (CO). Additional acute toxicity experiments were conducted on oxygen difluoride (OF2) and chlorine pentafluoride (ClF5). Subacute toxicity studies were conducted on methylisobutylketone and dichloromethane (methylene dichloride). The interim results of further chronic toxicity experiments on monomethylhydrazine (MMH) are also described.

  5. Catching transcriptional regulation by thermostatistical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Till D.; Cheong, Alex; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2012-08-01

    Gene expression is frequently regulated by multiple transcription factors (TFs). Thermostatistical methods allow for a quantitative description of interactions between TFs, RNA polymerase and DNA, and their impact on the transcription rates. We illustrate three different scales of the thermostatistical approach: the microscale of TF molecules, the mesoscale of promoter energy levels and the macroscale of transcriptionally active and inactive cells in a cell population. We demonstrate versatility of combinatorial transcriptional activation by exemplifying logic functions, such as AND and OR gates. We discuss a metric for cell-to-cell transcriptional activation variability known as Fermi entropy. Suitability of thermostatistical modeling is illustrated by describing the experimental data on transcriptional induction of NFκB and the c-Fos protein.

  6. INSIGHTS FROM GENOMIC PROFILING OF TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS

    PubMed Central

    Farnham, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    A crucial question in the field of gene regulation is whether the location at which a transcription factor binds influences its effectiveness or the mechanism by which it regulates transcription. Comprehensive transcription factor binding maps are needed to address these issues, and genome-wide mapping is now possible thanks to the technological advances of ChIP-chip and ChIP-Seq. This review discusses how recent genomic profiling of transcription factors gives insight into how binding specificity is achieved and what features of chromatin influence the ability of transcription factors to interact with the genome, and also suggests future experiments to further our understanding of the causes and consequences of transcription factor-genome interactions. PMID:19668247

  7. Transcriptional control of plant defence responses.

    PubMed

    Buscaill, Pierre; Rivas, Susana

    2014-08-01

    Mounting of efficient plant defence responses depends on the ability to trigger a rapid defence reaction after recognition of the invading microbe. Activation of plant resistance is achieved by modulation of the activity of multiple transcriptional regulators, both DNA-binding transcription factors and their regulatory proteins, that are able to reprogram transcription in the plant cell towards the activation of defence signalling. Here we provide an overview of recent developments on the transcriptional control of plant defence responses and discuss defence-related hormone signalling, the role of WRKY transcription factors during the regulation of plant responses to pathogens, nuclear functions of plant immune receptor proteins, as well as varied ways by which microbial effectors subvert plant transcriptional reprogramming to promote disease.

  8. Widespread Inducible Transcription Downstream of Human Genes

    PubMed Central

    Vilborg, Anna; Passarelli, Maria C.; Yario, Therese A.; Tycowski, Kazimierz T.; Steitz, Joan A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Pervasive transcription of the human genome generates RNAs whose mode of formation and functions are largely uncharacterized. Here, we combine RNA-Seq with detailed mechanistic studies to describe a transcript type derived from protein-coding genes. The resulting RNAs, which we call DoGs for downstream of gene containing transcripts, possess long non-coding regions (often >45 kb) and remain chromatin bound. DoGs are inducible by osmotic stress through an IP3 receptor signaling-dependent pathway, indicating active regulation. DoG levels are increased by decreased termination of the upstream transcript, a previously undescribed mechanism for rapid transcript induction. Relative depletion of polyA signals in DoG regions correlates with increased levels of DoGs after osmotic stress. We detect DoG transcription in several human cell lines and provide evidence for thousands of DoGs genome-wide. PMID:26190259

  9. Mechanisms of mutational robustness in transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Joshua L.; Wagner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Robustness is the invariance of a phenotype in the face of environmental or genetic change. The phenotypes produced by transcriptional regulatory circuits are gene expression patterns that are to some extent robust to mutations. Here we review several causes of this robustness. They include robustness of individual transcription factor binding sites, homotypic clusters of such sites, redundant enhancers, transcription factors, redundant transcription factors, and the wiring of transcriptional regulatory circuits. Such robustness can either be an adaptation by itself, a byproduct of other adaptations, or the result of biophysical principles and non-adaptive forces of genome evolution. The potential consequences of such robustness include complex regulatory network topologies that arise through neutral evolution, as well as cryptic variation, i.e., genotypic divergence without phenotypic divergence. On the longest evolutionary timescales, the robustness of transcriptional regulation has helped shape life as we know it, by facilitating evolutionary innovations that helped organisms such as flowering plants and vertebrates diversify. PMID:26579194

  10. Systematic genetic analysis of transcription factors to map the fission yeast transcription-regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Chua, Gordon

    2013-12-01

    Mapping transcriptional-regulatory networks requires the identification of target genes, binding specificities and signalling pathways of transcription factors. However, the characterization of each transcription factor sufficiently for deciphering such networks remains laborious. The recent availability of overexpression and deletion strains for almost all of the transcription factor genes in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe provides a valuable resource to better investigate transcription factors using systematic genetics. In the present paper, I review and discuss the utility of these strain collections combined with transcriptome profiling and genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation to identify the target genes of transcription factors.

  11. Transcription in Archaea: in vitro transcription assays for mjRNAP.

    PubMed

    Smollett, Katherine; Blombach, Fabian; Werner, Finn

    2015-01-01

    The fully recombinant Methanocaldococcus jannaschii RNA polymerase allows for a detailed dissection of the different stages of the transcription. In the previous chapter, we discussed how to purify the different components of the M. jannaschii transcription system, the RNA polymerase subunits, and general transcription factors and how to assemble a functional M. jannaschii enzyme. Standard in vitro transcription assays can be used to examine the different stages of transcription. In this chapter, we describe how some of these assays have been optimized for M. jannaschii RNA polymerase, which transcribes at much higher temperatures than many other transcription complexes.

  12. The transcription factor FOXM1 is a cellular target of the natural product thiostrepton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, Nagaratna S.; Sanders, Deborah A.; Rodriguez, Raphaël; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2011-09-01

    Transcription factors are proteins that bind specifically to defined DNA sequences to promote gene expression. Targeting transcription factors with small molecules to modulate the expression of certain genes has been notoriously difficult to achieve. The natural product thiostrepton is known to reduce the transcriptional activity of FOXM1, a transcription factor involved in tumorigenesis and cancer progression. Herein we demonstrate that thiostrepton interacts directly with FOXM1 protein in the human breast cancer cells MCF-7. Biophysical analyses of the thiostrepton-FOXM1 interaction provide additional insights on the molecular mode of action of thiostrepton. In cellular experiments, we show that thiostrepton can inhibit the binding of FOXM1 to genomic target sites. These findings illustrate the potential druggability of transcription factors and provide a molecular basis for targeting the FOXM1 family with small molecules.

  13. The active site of RNA polymerase II participates in transcript cleavage within arrested ternary complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, M D; Izban, M G; Luse, D S

    1994-01-01

    RNA polymerase II may become arrested during transcript elongation, in which case the ternary complex remains intact but further RNA synthesis is blocked. To relieve arrest, the nascent transcript must be cleaved from the 3' end. RNAs of 7-17 nt are liberated and transcription continues from the newly exposed 3' end. Factor SII increases elongation efficiency by strongly stimulating the transcript cleavage reaction. We show here that arrest relief can also occur by the addition of pyrophosphate. This generates the same set of cleavage products as factor SII, but the fragments produced with pyrophosphate have 5'-triphosphate termini. Thus, the active site of RNA polymerase II, in the presence of pyrophosphate, appears to be capable of cleaving phosphodiester linkages as far as 17 nt upstream of the original site of polymerization, leaving the ternary complex intact and transcriptionally active. Images PMID:8058756

  14. Adenovirus DNA template for late transcription is not a replicative intermediate.

    PubMed Central

    Brison, O; Kédinger, C; Chambon, P

    1979-01-01

    The relationship between adenovirus replication and late transcription has been investigated using viral replication and transcription complexes isolated from infected HeLa cell nuclei. These two types of complexes extracted from adenovirus type 2-infected cell nuclei did not sediment at the same rate on sucrose gradients. Viral replicative intermediates were quantitatively precipitated by immunoglobulins raised against purified 72,000-dalton DNA-binding protein, whereas viral transcription complexes remained in the supernatant. These results show that late transcription does not occur on active replication complexes or on 72,000-dalton DNA-binding protein-containing replicative intermediates inactive in DNA synthesis. Additional evidence is presented indicating that it is very unlikely that replicative intermediates lacking the 72,000-dalton DNA-binding protein could be the template for late transcription. PMID:232191

  15. Thematic Science Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Jean M.; Cliatt, Mary Jo Puckett

    1990-01-01

    Described are four interdisciplinary units entitled "A Very Fishy Unit,""Building Healthy Bodies Unit,""Hands-On Plants Units," and "Butterflies Spell Beauty Unit." Each unit contains science activities, skills and concepts covered, and activities that cover other disciplines. (KR)

  16. TRANSFAC and its module TRANSCompel: transcriptional gene regulation in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Matys, V; Kel-Margoulis, O V; Fricke, E; Liebich, I; Land, S; Barre-Dirrie, A; Reuter, I; Chekmenev, D; Krull, M; Hornischer, K; Voss, N; Stegmaier, P; Lewicki-Potapov, B; Saxel, H; Kel, A E; Wingender, E

    2006-01-01

    The TRANSFAC database on transcription factors, their binding sites, nucleotide distribution matrices and regulated genes as well as the complementing database TRANSCompel on composite elements have been further enhanced on various levels. A new web interface with different search options and integrated versions of Match and Patch provides increased functionality for TRANSFAC. The list of databases which are linked to the common GENE table of TRANSFAC and TRANSCompel has been extended by: Ensembl, UniGene, EntrezGene, HumanPSD and TRANSPRO. Standard gene names from HGNC, MGI and RGD, are included for human, mouse and rat genes, respectively. With the help of InterProScan, Pfam, SMART and PROSITE domains are assigned automatically to the protein sequences of the transcription factors. TRANSCompel contains now, in addition to the COMPEL table, a separate table for detailed information on the experimental EVIDENCE on which the composite elements are based. Finally, for TRANSFAC, in respect of data growth, in particular the gain of Drosophila transcription factor binding sites (by courtesy of the Drosophila DNase I footprint database) and of Arabidopsis factors (by courtesy of DATF, Database of Arabidopsis Transcription Factors) has to be stressed. The here described public releases, TRANSFAC 7.0 and TRANSCompel 7.0, are accessible under http://www.gene-regulation.com/pub/databases.html.

  17. TFClass: an expandable hierarchical classification of human transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Wingender, Edgar; Schoeps, Torsten; Dönitz, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    TFClass (http://tfclass.bioinf.med.uni-goettingen.de/) provides a comprehensive classification of human transcription factors based on their DNA-binding domains. Transcription factors constitute a large functional family of proteins directly regulating the activity of genes. Most of them are sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins, thus reading out the information encoded in cis-regulatory DNA elements of promoters, enhancers and other regulatory regions of a genome. TFClass is a database that classifies human transcription factors by a six-level classification schema, four of which are abstractions according to different criteria, while the fifth level represents TF genes and the sixth individual gene products. Altogether, nine superclasses have been identified, comprising 40 classes and 111 families. Counted by genes, 1558 human TFs have been classified so far or >2900 different TFs when including their isoforms generated by alternative splicing or protein processing events. With this classification, we hope to provide a basis for deciphering protein–DNA recognition codes; moreover, it can be used for constructing expanded transcriptional networks by inferring additional TF-target gene relations. PMID:23180794

  18. The RNA polymerase flow model of gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Edri, Shlomit; Gazit, Eran; Cohen, Eyal; Tuller, Tamir

    2014-02-01

    Gene expression is a fundamental cellular process by which proteins are synthesized based on the information coded in the genes. The two major steps of this process are the transcription of the DNA segment corresponding to a gene to mRNA molecules and the translation of the mRNA molecules to proteins by the ribosome. Thus, understanding, modeling and engineering the different stages of this process have both important biotechnological applications and contributions to basic life science. In previous studies we have introduced the Homogenous Ribosome Flow Model (HRFM) and demonstrated its advantages in analyses of the translation process. In this study we introduce the RNA Polymerase Flow Model (RPFM), a non trivial extension of the HRFM, which also includes a backward flow and can be used for modeling transcription and maybe other similar processes. We compare the HRFM and the RPFM in the three regimes of the transcription process: rate limiting initiation, rate limiting elongation and rate limiting termination via a simulative and analytical analysis. In addition, based on experimental data, we show that RPFM is a better choice for modeling transcription process.

  19. Moonlighting transcriptional activation function of a fungal sulfur metabolism enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Levati, Elisabetta; Sartini, Sara; Bolchi, Angelo; Ottonello, Simone; Montanini, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Moonlighting proteins, including metabolic enzymes acting as transcription factors (TF), are present in a variety of organisms but have not been described in higher fungi so far. In a previous genome-wide analysis of the TF repertoire of the plant-symbiotic fungus Tuber melanosporum, we identified various enzymes, including the sulfur-assimilation enzyme phosphoadenosine-phosphosulfate reductase (PAPS-red), as potential transcriptional activators. A functional analysis performed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, now demonstrates that a specific variant of this enzyme, PAPS-red A, localizes to the nucleus and is capable of transcriptional activation. TF moonlighting, which is not present in the other enzyme variant (PAPS-red B) encoded by the T. melanosporum genome, relies on a transplantable C-terminal polypeptide containing an alternating hydrophobic/hydrophilic amino acid motif. A similar moonlighting activity was demonstrated for six additional proteins, suggesting that multitasking is a relatively frequent event. PAPS-red A is sulfur-state-responsive and highly expressed, especially in fruitbodies, and likely acts as a recruiter of transcription components involved in S-metabolism gene network activation. PAPS-red B, instead, is expressed at low levels and localizes to a highly methylated and silenced region of the genome, hinting at an evolutionary mechanism based on gene duplication, followed by epigenetic silencing of this non-moonlighting gene variant. PMID:27121330

  20. Inhibition of cell proliferation by the Mad1 transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed Central

    Roussel, M F; Ashmun, R A; Sherr, C J; Eisenman, R N; Ayer, D E

    1996-01-01

    Mad1 is a basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper protein that is induced upon differentiation of a number of distinct cell types. Mad1 dimerizes with Max and recognizes the same DNA sequences as do Myc:Max dimers. However, Mad1 and Myc appear to have opposing functions. Myc:Max heterodimers activate transcription while Mad:Max heterodimers repress transcription from the same promoter. In addition Mad1 has been shown to block the oncogenic activity of Myc. Here we show that ectopic expression of Mad1 inhibits the proliferative response of 3T3 cells to signaling through the colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) receptor. The ability of over-expressed Myc and cyclin D1 to complement the mutant CSF-1 receptor Y809F (containing a Y-to-F mutation at position 809) is also inhibited by Mad1. Cell cycle analysis of proliferating 3T3 cells transfected with Mad1 demonstrates a significant decrease in the fraction of cells in the S and G2/M phases and a concomitant increase in the fraction of G1 phase cells, indicating that Mad1 negatively influences cell cycle progression from the G1 to the S phase. Mutations in Mad1 which inhibit its activity as a transcription repressor also result in loss of Mad1 cell cycle inhibitory activity. Thus, the ability of Mad1 to inhibit cell cycle progression is tightly coupled to its function as a transcriptional repressor. PMID:8649388

  1. Balanced Branching in Transcription Termination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, K. J.; Laughlin, R. B.; Liang, S.

    2000-01-01

    The theory of stochastic transcription termination based on free-energy competition requires two or more reaction rates to be delicately balanced over a wide range of physical conditions. A large body of work on glasses and large molecules suggests that this should be impossible in such a large system in the absence of a new organizing principle of matter. We review the experimental literature of termination and find no evidence for such a principle but many troubling inconsistencies, most notably anomalous memory effects. These suggest that term ination has a deterministic component and may conceivably be not stochastic at all. We find that a key experiment by Wilson and von Hippel allegedly refuting deterministic termination was an incorrectly analyzed regulatory effect of Mg(2+) binding.

  2. Balanced Branching in Transcription Termination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, K. J.; Laughlin, R. B.; Liang, S.

    2001-01-01

    The theory of stochastic transcription termination based on free-energy competition requires two or more reaction rates to be delicately balanced over a wide range of physical conditions. A large body of work on glasses and large molecules suggests that this should be impossible in such a large system in the absence of a new organizing principle of matter. We review the experimental literature of termination and find no evidence for such a principle but many troubling inconsistencies, most notably anomalous memory effects. These suggest that termination has a deterministic component and may conceivably be not stochastic at all. We find that a key experiment by Wilson and von Hippel allegedly refuting deterministic termination was an incorrectly analyzed regulatory effect of Mg(2+) binding.

  3. Transcriptional Regulation and Macrophage Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hume, David A; Summers, Kim M; Rehli, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are professional phagocytes that occupy specific niches in every tissue of the body. Their survival, proliferation, and differentiation are controlled by signals from the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor (CSF-1R) and its two ligands, CSF-1 and interleukin-34. In this review, we address the developmental and transcriptional relationships between hematopoietic progenitor cells, blood monocytes, and tissue macrophages as well as the distinctions from dendritic cells. A huge repertoire of receptors allows monocytes, tissue-resident macrophages, or pathology-associated macrophages to adapt to specific microenvironments. These processes create a broad spectrum of macrophages with different functions and individual effector capacities. The production of large transcriptomic data sets in mouse, human, and other species provides new insights into the mechanisms that underlie macrophage functional plasticity.

  4. Transcriptional regulation of cuticle biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Borisjuk, Nikolai; Hrmova, Maria; Lopato, Sergiy

    2014-01-01

    Plant cuticle is the hydrophobic protection layer that covers aerial plant organs and plays a pivotal role during plant development and interactions of plants with the environment. The mechanical structure and chemical composition of cuticle lipids and other secondary metabolites vary considerably between plant species, and in response to environmental stimuli and stresses. As the cuticle plays an important role in responses of plants to major abiotic stresses such as drought and high salinity, close attention has been paid to molecular processes underlying the stress-induced biosynthesis of cuticle components. This review addresses the genetic networks responsible for cuticle formation and in particular highlights the role of transcription factors that regulate cuticle formation in response to abiotic stresses.

  5. Learning, memory, and transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Michael V; Alemi, Lily; Harum, Karen H

    2003-03-01

    Cognitive disorders in children have traditionally been described in terms of clinical phenotypes or syndromes, chromosomal lesions, metabolic disorders, or neuropathology. Relatively little is known about how these disorders affect the chemical reactions involved in learning and memory. Experiments in fruit flies, snails, and mice have revealed some highly conserved pathways that are involved in learning, memory, and synaptic plasticity, which is the primary substrate for memory storage. These can be divided into short-term memory storage through local changes in synapses, and long-term storage mediated by activation of transcription to translate new proteins that modify synaptic function. This review summarizes evidence that disruptions in these pathways are involved in human cognitive disorders, including neurofibromatosis type I, Coffin-Lowry syndrome, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, Rett syndrome, tuberous sclerosis-2, Down syndrome, X-linked alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation, cretinism, Huntington disease, and lead poisoning.

  6. Systematic Clustering of Transcription Start Site Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaobei; Valen, Eivind; Parker, Brian J.; Sandelin, Albin

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide, high-throughput methods for transcription start site (TSS) detection have shown that most promoters have an array of neighboring TSSs where some are used more than others, forming a distribution of initiation propensities. TSS distributions (TSSDs) vary widely between promoters and earlier studies have shown that the TSSDs have biological implications in both regulation and function. However, no systematic study has been made to explore how many types of TSSDs and by extension core promoters exist and to understand which biological features distinguish them. In this study, we developed a new non-parametric dissimilarity measure and clustering approach to explore the similarities and stabilities of clusters of TSSDs. Previous studies have used arbitrary thresholds to arrive at two general classes: broad and sharp. We demonstrated that in addition to the previous broad/sharp dichotomy an additional category of promoters exists. Unlike typical TATA-driven sharp TSSDs where the TSS position can vary a few nucleotides, in this category virtually all TSSs originate from the same genomic position. These promoters lack epigenetic signatures of typical mRNA promoters and a substantial subset of them are mapping upstream of ribosomal protein pseudogenes. We present evidence that these are likely mapping errors, which have confounded earlier analyses, due to the high similarity of ribosomal gene promoters in combination with known G addition bias in the CAGE libraries. Thus, previous two-class separations of promoter based on TSS distributions are motivated, but the ultra-sharp TSS distributions will confound downstream analyses if not removed. PMID:21887249

  7. Physical and functional domains of the herpes simplex virus transcriptional regulatory protein ICP4.

    PubMed Central

    DeLuca, N A; Schaffer, P A

    1988-01-01

    A characteristic common to DNA animal viruses is the expression early in infection of viral proteins that act in trans to regulate subsequent RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription of the remainder of the viral genome. The predominant transcriptional regulatory protein specified by herpes simplex virus type 1 is the immediate-early protein ICP4. ICP4 is a complex multifunctional protein required for the activation of many herpes simplex virus type 1 transcriptional units and for repression of its own transcription. In the present study we have introduced nonsense and deletion mutations into both genome copies of the ICP4 gene such that the resulting mutants express only defined subsets of the primary ICP4 amino acid sequence. The partial peptides retain activities and physical properties of the intact ICP4 molecule, permitting one to attribute individual activities and properties to defined amino acid sequences. Images PMID:2828668

  8. "In an Aeroplane, Yes, in an Aeroplane": Within-Unit Repetitions in Classroom Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Richard Watson

    2005-01-01

    This paper looks at the functions of repetition of lexical items which fall within a single T-unit. Examining data from a foundation English course at a Thai university, transcripts of eliciting transactions from 12 lessons were divided into T-units. Within-unit repetitions were identified and categorized. Categories of repetition found, in order…

  9. Fox transcription factors: from development to disease.

    PubMed

    Golson, Maria L; Kaestner, Klaus H

    2016-12-15

    Forkhead box (Fox) transcription factors are evolutionarily conserved in organisms ranging from yeast to humans. They regulate diverse biological processes both during development and throughout adult life. Mutations in many Fox genes are associated with human disease and, as such, various animal models have been generated to study the function of these transcription factors in mechanistic detail. In many cases, the absence of even a single Fox transcription factor is lethal. In this Primer, we provide an overview of the Fox family, highlighting several key Fox transcription factor families that are important for mammalian development.

  10. Swinger RNAs with sharp switches between regular transcription and transcription systematically exchanging ribonucleotides: Case studies.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2015-09-01

    During RNA transcription, DNA nucleotides A,C,G, T are usually matched by ribonucleotides A, C, G and U. However occasionally, this rule does not apply: transcript-DNA homologies are detectable only assuming systematic exchanges between ribonucleotides. Nine symmetric (X ↔ Y, e.g. A ↔ C) and fourteen asymmetric (X ↔ Y ↔ Z, e.g. A ↔ C ↔ G) exchanges exist, called swinger transcriptions. Putatively, polymerases occasionally stabilize in unspecified swinger conformations, possibly similar to transient conformations causing punctual misinsertions. This predicts chimeric transcripts, part regular, part swinger-transformed, reflecting polymerases switching to swinger polymerization conformation(s). Four chimeric Genbank transcripts (three from human mitochondrion and one murine cytosolic) are described here: (a) the 5' and 3' extremities reflect regular polymerization, the intervening sequence exchanges systematically between ribonucleotides (swinger rule G ↔ U, transcript (1), with sharp switches between regular and swinger sequences; (b) the 5' half is 'normal', the 3' half systematically exchanges ribonucleotides (swinger rule C ↔ G, transcript (2), with an intercalated sequence lacking homology; (c) the 3' extremity fits A ↔ G exchanges (10% of transcript length), the 5' half follows regular transcription; the intervening region seems a mix of regular and A ↔ G transcriptions (transcript 3); (d) murine cytosolic transcript 4 switches to A ↔ U + C ↔ G, and is fused with A ↔ U + C ↔ G swinger transformed precursor rRNA. In (c), each concomitant transcript 5' and 3' extremities match opposite genome strands. Transcripts 3 and 4 combine transcript fusions with partial swinger transcriptions. Occasional (usually sharp) switches between regular and swinger transcriptions reveal greater coding potential than detected until now, suggest stable polymerase swinger conformations.

  11. Pairwise comparisons of ten porcine tissues identify differential transcriptional regulation at the gene, isoform, promoter and transcription start site level

    SciTech Connect

    Farajzadeh, Leila; Hornshøj, Henrik; Momeni, Jamal; Thomsen, Bo; Larsen, Knud; Hedegaard, Jakob; Bendixen, Christian; Madsen, Lone Bruhn

    2013-08-23

    Highlights: •Transcriptome sequencing yielded 223 mill porcine RNA-seq reads, and 59,000 transcribed locations. •Establishment of unique transcription profiles for ten porcine tissues including four brain tissues. •Comparison of transcription profiles at gene, isoform, promoter and transcription start site level. •Highlights a high level of regulation of neuro-related genes at both gene, isoform, and TSS level. •Our results emphasize the pig as a valuable animal model with respect to human biological issues. -- Abstract: The transcriptome is the absolute set of transcripts in a tissue or cell at the time of sampling. In this study RNA-Seq is employed to enable the differential analysis of the transcriptome profile for ten porcine tissues in order to evaluate differences between the tissues at the gene and isoform expression level, together with an analysis of variation in transcription start sites, promoter usage, and splicing. Totally, 223 million RNA fragments were sequenced leading to the identification of 59,930 transcribed gene locations and 290,936 transcript variants using Cufflinks with similarity to approximately 13,899 annotated human genes. Pairwise analysis of tissues for differential expression at the gene level showed that the smallest differences were between tissues originating from the porcine brain. Interestingly, the relative level of differential expression at the isoform level did generally not vary between tissue contrasts. Furthermore, analysis of differential promoter usage between tissues, revealed a proportionally higher variation between cerebellum (CBE) versus frontal cortex and cerebellum versus hypothalamus (HYP) than in the remaining comparisons. In addition, the comparison of differential transcription start sites showed that the number of these sites is generally increased in comparisons including hypothalamus in contrast to other pairwise assessments. A comprehensive analysis of one of the tissue contrasts, i

  12. Development, Evaluation, and Standardization of a Real-Time TaqMan Reverse Transcription-PCR Assay for Quantification of Hepatitis A Virus in Clinical and Shellfish Samples

    PubMed Central

    Costafreda, M. Isabel; Bosch, Albert; Pintó, Rosa M.

    2006-01-01

    A standardized real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) assay has been developed for an accurate estimation of the number of genome copies of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in clinical and shellfish samples. Real-time procedures were based on the amplification of a fragment of the highly conserved 5′ noncoding region and detection through an internal fluorescent probe, including TaqMan and beacon chemistries, in one- and two-step RT-PCR formats. The best performance in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility was achieved by a one-step TaqMan RT-PCR, with a sensitivity enabling the detection of 0.05 infectious unit and 10 copies of a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) synthetic transcript. Standard reagents, such as a mengovirus strain and an ssRNA transcript, were employed as controls of nucleic acid extraction and RT-PCR, respectively. The test proved to be highly specific after a broad panel of enteric viruses was tested. Sequence alignment of target regions of the primers and probe proved them to be adequate for the quantification of all HAV genotypes. In addition, a quasispecies analysis of the mutant spectrum indicated that these regions are not prone to variability, thus confirming their robustness. PMID:16751488

  13. Enantioselective Michael addition of water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Resch, Verena; Otten, Linda G; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-02-09

    The enantioselective Michael addition using water as both nucleophile and solvent has to date proved beyond the ability of synthetic chemists. Herein, the direct, enantioselective Michael addition of water in water to prepare important β-hydroxy carbonyl compounds using whole cells of Rhodococcus strains is described. Good yields and excellent enantioselectivities were achieved with this method. Deuterium labeling studies demonstrate that a Michael hydratase catalyzes the water addition exclusively with anti-stereochemistry.

  14. Enantioselective Michael Addition of Water

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Resch, Verena; Otten, Linda G; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The enantioselective Michael addition using water as both nucleophile and solvent has to date proved beyond the ability of synthetic chemists. Herein, the direct, enantioselective Michael addition of water in water to prepare important β-hydroxy carbonyl compounds using whole cells of Rhodococcus strains is described. Good yields and excellent enantioselectivities were achieved with this method. Deuterium labeling studies demonstrate that a Michael hydratase catalyzes the water addition exclusively with anti-stereochemistry. PMID:25529526

  15. Novel layers of RNA polymerase III control affecting tRNA gene transcription in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Leśniewska, Ewa

    2017-01-01

    RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcribes a limited set of short genes in eukaryotes producing abundant small RNAs, mostly tRNA. The originally defined yeast Pol III transcriptome appears to be expanding owing to the application of new methods. Also, several factors required for assembly and nuclear import of Pol III complex have been identified recently. Models of Pol III based on cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of distinct Pol III conformations reveal unique features distinguishing Pol III from other polymerases. Novel concepts concerning Pol III functioning involve recruitment of general Pol III-specific transcription factors and distinctive mechanisms of transcription initiation, elongation and termination. Despite the short length of Pol III transcription units, mapping of transcriptionally active Pol III with nucleotide resolution has revealed strikingly uneven polymerase distribution along all genes. This may be related, at least in part, to the transcription factors bound at the internal promoter regions. Pol III uses also a specific negative regulator, Maf1, which binds to polymerase under stress conditions; however, a subset of Pol III genes is not controlled by Maf1. Among other RNA polymerases, Pol III machinery represents unique features related to a short transcript length and high transcription efficiency. PMID:28228471

  16. A Transcript Finishing Initiative for Closing Gaps in the Human Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Sogayar, Mari Cleide; Camargo, Anamaria A.

    2004-01-01

    We report the results of a transcript finishing initiative, undertaken for the purpose of identifying and characterizing novel human transcripts, in which RT-PCR was used to bridge gaps between paired EST clusters, mapped against the genomic sequence. Each pair of EST clusters selected for experimental validation was designated a transcript finishing unit (TFU). A total of 489 TFUs were selected for validation, and an overall efficiency of 43.1% was achieved. We generated a total of 59,975 bp of transcribed sequences organized into 432 exons, contributing to the definition of the structure of 211 human transcripts. The structure of several transcripts reported here was confirmed during the course of this project, through the generation of their corresponding full-length cDNA sequences. Nevertheless, for 21% of the validated TFUs, a full-length cDNA sequence is not yet available in public databases, and the structure of 69.2% of these TFUs was not correctly predicted by computer programs. The TF strategy provides a significant contribution to the definition of the complete catalog of human genes and transcripts, because it appears to be particularly useful for identification of low abundance transcripts expressed in a restricted set of tissues as well as for the delineation of gene boundaries and alternatively spliced isoforms. PMID:15197164

  17. Novel layers of RNA polymerase III control affecting tRNA gene transcription in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Leśniewska, Ewa; Boguta, Magdalena

    2017-02-01

    RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcribes a limited set of short genes in eukaryotes producing abundant small RNAs, mostly tRNA. The originally defined yeast Pol III transcriptome appears to be expanding owing to the application of new methods. Also, several factors required for assembly and nuclear import of Pol III complex have been identified recently. Models of Pol III based on cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of distinct Pol III conformations reveal unique features distinguishing Pol III from other polymerases. Novel concepts concerning Pol III functioning involve recruitment of general Pol III-specific transcription factors and distinctive mechanisms of transcription initiation, elongation and termination. Despite the short length of Pol III transcription units, mapping of transcriptionally active Pol III with nucleotide resolution has revealed strikingly uneven polymerase distribution along all genes. This may be related, at least in part, to the transcription factors bound at the internal promoter regions. Pol III uses also a specific negative regulator, Maf1, which binds to polymerase under stress conditions; however, a subset of Pol III genes is not controlled by Maf1. Among other RNA polymerases, Pol III machinery represents unique features related to a short transcript length and high transcription efficiency.

  18. Observation of the Machine Transcription Process in the Word Processing Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Rose Ann; Remp, Ann Marie

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe machine transcription in measurable terms for volume of keyboarding, materials handling, error correction, referencing activities, unit operation, and proofreading tasks. Descriptive statistics from the observation of 23 word processor operators are given. The observation device and its implications for…

  19. Transcription Factor Binding Site Positioning in Yeast: Proximal Promoter Motifs Characterize TATA-Less Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Erb, Ionas; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The availability of sequence specificities for a substantial fraction of yeast's transcription factors and comparative genomic algorithms for binding site prediction has made it possible to comprehensively annotate transcription factor binding sites genome-wide. Here we use such a genome-wide annotation for comprehensively studying promoter architecture in yeast, focusing on the distribution of transcription factor binding sites relative to transcription start sites, and the architecture of TATA and TATA-less promoters. For most transcription factors, binding sites are positioned further upstream and vary over a wider range in TATA promoters than in TATA-less promoters. In contrast, a group of ‘proximal promoter motifs’ (GAT1/GLN3/DAL80, FKH1/2, PBF1/2, RPN4, NDT80, and ROX1) occur preferentially in TATA-less promoters and show a strong preference for binding close to the transcription start site in these promoters. We provide evidence that suggests that pre-initiation complexes are recruited at TATA sites in TATA promoters and at the sites of the other proximal promoter motifs in TATA-less promoters. TATA-less promoters can generally be classified by the proximal promoter motif they contain, with different classes of TATA-less promoters showing different patterns of transcription factor binding site positioning and nucleosome coverage. These observations suggest that different modes of regulation of transcription initiation may be operating in the different promoter classes. In addition we show that, across all promoter classes, there is a close match between nucleosome free regions and regions of highest transcription factor binding site density. This close agreement between transcription factor binding site density and nucleosome depletion suggests a direct and general competition between transcription factors and nucleosomes for binding to promoters. PMID:21931670

  20. Selective inhibition of RNA polymerase I transcription as a potential approach to treat African trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Kerry, Louise E.; Pegg, Elaine E.; Cameron, Donald P.; Budzak, James; Poortinga, Gretchen; Hannan, Katherine M.; Hannan, Ross D.

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei relies on an essential Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG) coat for survival in the mammalian bloodstream. High VSG expression within an expression site body (ESB) is mediated by RNA polymerase I (Pol I), which in other eukaryotes exclusively transcribes ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA). As T. brucei is reliant on Pol I for VSG transcription, we investigated Pol I transcription inhibitors for selective anti-trypanosomal activity. The Pol I inhibitors quarfloxin (CX-3543), CX-5461, and BMH-21 are currently under investigation for treating cancer, as rapidly dividing cancer cells are particularly dependent on high levels of Pol I transcription compared with nontransformed cells. In T. brucei all three Pol I inhibitors have IC50 concentrations for cell proliferation in the nanomolar range: quarfloxin (155 nM), CX-5461 (279 nM) or BMH-21 (134 nM) compared with IC50 concentrations in the MCF10A human breast epithelial cell line (4.44 μM, 6.89 μM or 460 nM, respectively). T. brucei was therefore 29-fold more sensitive to quarfloxin, 25-fold more sensitive to CX-5461 and 3.4-fold more sensitive to BMH-21. Cell death in T. brucei was due to rapid inhibition of Pol I transcription, as within 15 minutes treatment with the inhibitors rRNA precursor transcript was reduced 97-98% and VSG precursor transcript 91-94%. Incubation with Pol I transcription inhibitors also resulted in disintegration of the ESB as well as the nucleolus subnuclear structures, within one hour. Rapid ESB loss following the block in Pol I transcription argues that the ESB is a Pol I transcription nucleated structure, similar to the nucleolus. In addition to providing insight into Pol I transcription and ES control, Pol I transcription inhibitors potentially also provide new approaches to treat trypanosomiasis. PMID:28263991

  1. Selective inhibition of RNA polymerase I transcription as a potential approach to treat African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Kerry, Louise E; Pegg, Elaine E; Cameron, Donald P; Budzak, James; Poortinga, Gretchen; Hannan, Kate; Hannan, Ross D; Rudenko, Gloria

    2017-03-06

    Trypanosoma brucei relies on an essential Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG) coat for survival in the mammalian bloodstream. High VSG expression within an expression site body (ESB) is mediated by RNA polymerase I (Pol I), which in other eukaryotes exclusively transcribes ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA). As T. brucei is reliant on Pol I for VSG transcription, we investigated Pol I transcription inhibitors for selective anti-trypanosomal activity. The Pol I inhibitors quarfloxin (CX-3543), CX-5461, and BMH-21 are currently under investigation for treating cancer, as rapidly dividing cancer cells are particularly dependent on high levels of Pol I transcription compared with nontransformed cells. In T. brucei all three Pol I inhibitors have IC50 concentrations for cell proliferation in the nanomolar range: quarfloxin (155 nM), CX-5461 (279 nM) or BMH-21 (134 nM) compared with IC50 concentrations in the MCF10A human breast epithelial cell line (4.44 μM, 6.89 μM or 460 nM, respectively). T. brucei was therefore 29-fold more sensitive to quarfloxin, 25-fold more sensitive to CX-5461 and 3.4-fold more sensitive to BMH-21. Cell death in T. brucei was due to rapid inhibition of Pol I transcription, as within 15 minutes treatment with the inhibitors rRNA precursor transcript was reduced 97-98% and VSG precursor transcript 91-94%. Incubation with Pol I transcription inhibitors also resulted in disintegration of the ESB as well as the nucleolus subnuclear structures, within one hour. Rapid ESB loss following the block in Pol I transcription argues that the ESB is a Pol I transcription nucleated structure, similar to the nucleolus. In addition to providing insight into Pol I transcription and ES control, Pol I transcription inhibitors potentially also provide new approaches to treat trypanosomiasis.

  2. Transcription factor binding site positioning in yeast: proximal promoter motifs characterize TATA-less promoters.

    PubMed

    Erb, Ionas; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The availability of sequence specificities for a substantial fraction of yeast's transcription factors and comparative genomic algorithms for binding site prediction has made it possible to comprehensively annotate transcription factor binding sites genome-wide. Here we use such a genome-wide annotation for comprehensively studying promoter architecture in yeast, focusing on the distribution of transcription factor binding sites relative to transcription start sites, and the architecture of TATA and TATA-less promoters. For most transcription factors, binding sites are positioned further upstream and vary over a wider range in TATA promoters than in TATA-less promoters. In contrast, a group of 6 'proximal promoter motifs' (GAT1/GLN3/DAL80, FKH1/2, PBF1/2, RPN4, NDT80, and ROX1) occur preferentially in TATA-less promoters and show a strong preference for binding close to the transcription start site in these promoters. We provide evidence that suggests that pre-initiation complexes are recruited at TATA sites in TATA promoters and at the sites of the other proximal promoter motifs in TATA-less promoters. TATA-less promoters can generally be classified by the proximal promoter motif they contain, with different classes of TATA-less promoters showing different patterns of transcription factor binding site positioning and nucleosome coverage. These observations suggest that different modes of regulation of transcription initiation may be operating in the different promoter classes. In addition we show that, across all promoter classes, there is a close match between nucleosome free regions and regions of highest transcription factor binding site density. This close agreement between transcription factor binding site density and nucleosome depletion suggests a direct and general competition between transcription factors and nucleosomes for binding to promoters.

  3. Characterization of transcription within sdr region of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Sitkiewicz, Izabela; Babiak, Ireneusz; Hryniewicz, Waleria

    2011-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen responsible for various infections in humans and animals. It causes localized and systemic infections, such as abscesses, impetigo, cellulitis, sepsis, endocarditis, bone infections, and meningitis. S. aureus virulence factors responsible for the initial contact with host cells (MSCRAMMs-microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules) include three Sdr proteins. The presence of particular sdr genes is correlated with putative tissue specificity. The transcriptional organization of the sdr region remains unclear. We tested expression of the sdrC, sdrD, or sdrE genes in various in vitro conditions, as well as after contact with human blood. In this work, we present data suggesting a separation of the sdr region into three transcriptional units, based on their differential reactions to the environment. Differential reaction of the sdrD transcript to environmental conditions and blood suggests dissimilar functions of the sdr genes. SdrE has been previously proposed to play role in bone infections, whilst our results can indicate that sdrD plays a role in the interactions between the pathogen and human immune system, serum or specifically reacts to nutrients/other factors present in human blood.

  4. Murine leukemia virus uses TREX components for efficient nuclear export of unspliced viral transcripts.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Toshie; Tonne, Jason M; Ikeda, Yasuhiro

    2014-03-10

    Previously we reported that nuclear export of both unspliced and spliced murine leukemia virus (MLV) transcripts depends on the nuclear export factor (NXF1) pathway. Although the mRNA export complex TREX, which contains Aly/REF, UAP56, and the THO complex, is involved in the NXF1-mediated nuclear export of cellular mRNAs, its contribution to the export of MLV mRNA transcripts remains poorly understood. Here, we studied the involvement of TREX components in the export of MLV transcripts. Depletion of UAP56, but not Aly/REF, reduced the level of both unspliced and spliced viral transcripts in the cytoplasm. Interestingly, depletion of THO components, including THOC5 and THOC7, affected only unspliced viral transcripts in the cytoplasm. Moreover, the RNA immunoprecipitation assay showed that only the unspliced viral transcript interacted with THOC5. These results imply that MLV requires UAP56, THOC5 and THOC7, in addition to NXF1, for nuclear export of viral transcripts. Given that naturally intronless mRNAs, but not bulk mRNAs, require THOC5 for nuclear export, it is plausible that THOC5 plays a key role in the export of unspliced MLV transcripts.

  5. Protein kinase NII and the regulation of rDNA transcription in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Belenguer, P; Baldin, V; Mathieu, C; Prats, H; Bensaid, M; Bouche, G; Amalric, F

    1989-01-01

    Transcription of ribosomal RNA genes is generally accepted to correlate with cell growth. Using primary cultures of adult bovine aortic endothelial (ABAE) cells, we have shown that transcription of rDNA in confluent cells falls to 5% of the transcription level in growing cells. Protein kinase NII appears to be a limiting factor to promote rDNA transcription in isolated nuclei of confluent cells. Protein kinase NII was detected by immunocytochemistry in the cytoplasm, nuclei and nucleoli of growing cells while it was no longer present in nucleoli of confluent cells. The kinase activity, in isolated nuclei, was estimated by endogenous phosphorylation of a specific substrate, nucleolin. A 10% residual activity was present in confluent cell nuclei compared to growing cell nuclei. Concomitantly, the transcription 'in vitro' of rDNA in the corresponding nuclei was also highly reduced (by 85%). Addition of exogenous protein kinase NII to confluent cell nuclei induced a strong increase in the phosphorylation of specific proteins including nucleolin. In parallel, the transcription of rDNA was increased by a factor of 5, to nearly the level observed in nuclei prepared from growing cells. These data suggest that, in confluent cells, factors necessary for rDNA transcription machinery are present but inactive in the nucleolus and that the phosphorylation of one or several of these factors (nucleolin, topoisomerase I,...) by protein kinase NII is a key event in the regulation of rDNA transcription. Images PMID:2780290

  6. Snf1-Dependent Transcription Confers Glucose-Induced Decay upon the mRNA Product

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Katherine A.; Dombek, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the switch from respiratory metabolism to fermentation causes rapid decay of transcripts encoding proteins uniquely required for aerobic metabolism. Snf1, the yeast ortholog of AMP-activated protein kinase, has been implicated in this process because inhibiting Snf1 mimics the addition of glucose. In this study, we show that the SNF1-dependent ADH2 promoter, or just the major transcription factor binding site, is sufficient to confer glucose-induced mRNA decay upon heterologous transcripts. SNF1-independent expression from the ADH2 promoter prevented glucose-induced mRNA decay without altering the start site of transcription. SNF1-dependent transcripts are enriched for the binding motif of the RNA binding protein Vts1, an important mediator of mRNA decay and mRNA repression whose expression is correlated with decreased abundance of SNF1-dependent transcripts during the yeast metabolic cycle. However, deletion of VTS1 did not slow the rate of glucose-induced mRNA decay. ADH2 mRNA rapidly dissociated from polysomes after glucose repletion, and sequences bound by RNA binding proteins were enriched in the transcripts from repressed cells. Inhibiting the protein kinase A pathway did not affect glucose-induced decay of ADH2 mRNA. Our results suggest that Snf1 may influence mRNA stability by altering the recruitment activity of the transcription factor Adr1. PMID:26667037

  7. Dexamethasone Enhances 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Effects by Increasing Vitamin D Receptor Transcription*

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, Alejandro A.; Deeb, Kristin K.; Pike, J. Wesley; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.

    2011-01-01

    Calcitriol, the active form of vitamin D, in combination with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex) has been shown to increase the antitumor effects of calcitriol in squamous cell carcinoma. In this study we found that pretreatment with Dex potentiates calcitriol effects by inhibiting cell growth and increasing vitamin D receptor (VDR) and VDR-mediated transcription. Treatment with actinomycin D inhibits Vdr mRNA synthesis, indicating that Dex regulates VDR expression at transcriptional level. Real time PCR shows that treatment with Dex increases Vdr transcripts in a time- and a dose-dependent manner, indicating that Dex directly regulates expression of Vdr. RU486, an inhibitor of glucocorticoids, inhibits Dex-induced Vdr expression. In addition, the silencing of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) abolishes the induction of Vdr by Dex, indicating that Dex increases Vdr transcripts in a GR-dependent manner. A fragment located 5.2 kb upstream of Vdr transcription start site containing two putative glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) was evaluated using a luciferase-based reporter assay. Treatment with 100 nm Dex induces transcription of luciferase driven by the fragment. Deletion of the GRE distal to transcription start site was sufficient to abolish Dex induction of luciferase. Also, chromatin immunoprecipitation reveals recruitment of GR to distal GRE with Dex treatment. We conclude that Dex increases VDR and vitamin D effects by increasing Vdr de novo transcription in a GR-dependent manner. PMID:21868377

  8. A novel transcriptional element in circular DNA monomers of the duck hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed Central

    Beckel-Mitchener, A; Summers, J

    1997-01-01

    We report the presence of two elements, pet and net, that are required for proper transcription of the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV). These regions were previously identified by using plasmid clones of the virus in transient expression assays (M. Huang and J. Summers, J. Virol. 68:1564-1572, 1994). In this study, we further analyzed these regions by using in vitro-synthesized circular DHBV DNA monomers to mimic the authentic transcriptional template. We observed that pet was required for pregenome transcription from circular viral monomers, and in the absence of pet-dependent transcription, expression of the viral envelope genes was increased. We found that deletion of net in circularized DNA monomers led to the production of abnormally long transcripts due to a failure to form 3' ends during transcription. In addition, we report the presence of a net-like region in the mammalian hepadnavirus woodchuck hepatitis virus. These results are consistent with a model that net is a region involved in transcription termination and that in DHBV, pet is required for transcription complexes to read through this region during the first pass through net. PMID:9311882

  9. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step…

  10. Additive Effects on Asymmetric Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Liang; Sun, Wangsheng; Yang, Dongxu; Li, Guofeng; Wang, Rui

    2016-03-23

    This review highlights a number of additives that can be used to make asymmetric reactions perfect. Without changing other reaction conditions, simply adding additives can lead to improved asymmetric catalysis, such as reduced reaction time, improved yield, or/and increased selectivity.

  11. Trypanosoma brucei: Enrichment by UV of intergenic transcripts from the variable surface glycoprotein gene expression site

    SciTech Connect

    Coquelet, H.; Tebabi, P.; Pays, A.; Steinert, M.; Pays, E. )

    1989-09-01

    The expression site for the variable surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene AnTat 1.3A of Trypanosoma brucei is 45 kilobases long and encompasses seven expression site-associated genes (ESAGs). After UV irradiation, several large transcripts from the putative promoter region were strongly enriched. We report that one such major transcript starts near the poly(A) addition site of the first gene (ESAG 7), spans the intergenic region, and extends to the poly(A) addition site of the second gene (ESAG 6), thus bypassing the normal 3' splice site of the ESAG 6 mRNA. Since this transcript is spliced, we conclude that UV irradiation does not inhibit splicing but stabilizes unstable processing products. This demonstrates that at least some intergenic regions of the VSG gene expression site are continuously transcribed in accordance with a polycistronic transcription model.

  12. Selective suppression of antisense transcription by Set2-mediated H3K36 methylation

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Swaminathan; Li, Hua; Gogol, Madelaine M.; Workman, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of a regular chromatin structure over the coding regions of genes occurs co-transcriptionally via the ‘chromatin resetting' pathway. One of the central players in this pathway is the histone methyltransferase Set2. Here we show that the loss of Set2 in yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, results in transcription initiation of antisense RNAs embedded within body of protein-coding genes. These RNAs are distinct from the previously identified non-coding RNAs and cover 11% of the yeast genome. These RNA species have been named Set2-repressed antisense transcripts (SRATs) since the co-transcriptional addition of the H3K36 methyl mark by Set2 over their start sites results in their suppression. Interestingly, loss of chromatin resetting factor Set2 or the subsequent production of SRATs does not affect the abundance of the sense transcripts. This difference in transcriptional outcomes of overlapping transcripts due to a strand-independent addition of H3K36 methylation is a key regulatory feature of interleaved transcriptomes. PMID:27892455

  13. Selective suppression of antisense transcription by Set2-mediated H3K36 methylation.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Swaminathan; Li, Hua; Gogol, Madelaine M; Workman, Jerry L

    2016-11-28

    Maintenance of a regular chromatin structure over the coding regions of genes occurs co-transcriptionally via the 'chromatin resetting' pathway. One of the central players in this pathway is the histone methyltransferase Set2. Here we show that the loss of Set2 in yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, results in transcription initiation of antisense RNAs embedded within body of protein-coding genes. These RNAs are distinct from the previously identified non-coding RNAs and cover 11% of the yeast genome. These RNA species have been named Set2-repressed antisense transcripts (SRATs) since the co-transcriptional addition of the H3K36 methyl mark by Set2 over their start sites results in their suppression. Interestingly, loss of chromatin resetting factor Set2 or the subsequent production of SRATs does not affect the abundance of the sense transcripts. This difference in transcriptional outcomes of overlapping transcripts due to a strand-independent addition of H3K36 methylation is a key regulatory feature of interleaved transcriptomes.

  14. Recruitment of Transcription Complexes to Enhancers and the Role of Enhancer Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Stees, Jared S.; Varn, Fred; Huang, Suming; Strouboulis, John; Bungert, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Enhancer elements regulate the tissue- and developmental-stage-specific expression of genes. Recent estimates suggest that there are more than 50,000 enhancers in mammalian cells. At least a subset of enhancers has been shown to recruit RNA polymerase II transcription complexes and to generate enhancer transcripts. Here, we provide an overview of enhancer function and discuss how transcription of enhancers or enhancer-generated transcripts could contribute to the regulation of gene expression during development and differentiation. PMID:23919179

  15. cyclicAMP and glucocorticoid responsiveness of the rat carbamoylphosphate synthetase gene requires the interplay of upstream regulatory units.

    PubMed

    Schoneveld, Onard J L M; Hoogenkamp, Maarten; Stallen, Jan M; Gaemers, Ingrid C; Lamers, Wouter H

    2007-05-01

    Many genes involved in metabolic processes are regulated by glucocorticoids and/or cyclicAMP. The hepatic expression of the urea cycle enzyme carbamoylphosphate-synthetase-I gene (CPS) is regulated at the transcriptional level by both factors. Here, we report that the 5' half of the distal enhancer is necessary and sufficient for full cyclicAMP responsiveness. The cyclicAMP-responsive element (CRE), and FoxA- and C/EBP-binding sites are indispensible for cyclicAMP responsiveness, indicating that these elements make up a cyclicAMP-responsive unit (CRU). In addition to this CRU, the CPS regulatory regions contain two glucocorticoid-response elements (GRE): one in the 3' region of the distal enhancer and one in the proximal enhancer. In presence of the cyclicAMP-responsive region in the distal enhancer, only one of the GREs is required for glucocorticoid-inducible CPS expression, with both GREs acting in an additive fashion to fully confer the inducing effect of glucocorticoids. In contrast, the simultaneous presence of both GREs is required in the absence of the cyclicAMP-responsive region. In this configuration, the distal GRE fully depends on its neighbouring FoxA and C/EBP REs for activity and is, therefore, a glucocorticoid-responsive unit. In conclusion, we show here that the CPS CRU is a bifunctional unit that elicits the cyclicAMP response and, in addition, functions as a glucocorticoid accessory unit to establish a glucocorticoid response from otherwise silent proximal or distal GRUs. Therefore, cyclicAMP and glucocorticoid pathways can induce CPS transcription via overlapping sets of response elements.

  16. Dual roles of lineage restricted transcription factors: the case of MITF in melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Levy, Carmit; Fisher, David E

    2011-01-01

    Microphthalmia-associated Transcription Factor, MITF, is a master regulator of melanocyte development, differentiation, migration, and survival.(1) A broad collection of studies have indicated that MITF directly regulates the transcription of genes involved in pigmentation, which are selective to the melanocyte lineage. In addition, MITF controls expression of genes which are expressed in multiple cell lineages, and may also play differential roles in activating vs. maintaining gene expression patterns. In this Point of View article, we discuss lineage restricted transcription factor activation of both tissue-specific and ubiquitously expressed genes using melanocytes and MITF as a model system that may eventually provide insights into such processes in multiple cell lineages.

  17. Sequence-specific thermodynamic properties of nucleic acids influence both transcriptional pausing and backtracking in yeast

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    RNA Polymerase II pauses and backtracks during transcription, with many consequences for gene expression and cellular physiology. Here, we show that the energy required to melt double-stranded nucleic acids in the transcription bubble predicts pausing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae far more accurately than nucleosome roadblocks do. In addition, the same energy difference also determines when the RNA polymerase backtracks instead of continuing to move forward. This data-driven model corroborates—in a genome wide and quantitative manner—previous evidence that sequence-dependent thermodynamic features of nucleic acids influence both transcriptional pausing and backtracking. PMID:28301878

  18. Transcriptional response to hypoxia in the aquatic fungus Blastocladiella emersonii.

    PubMed

    Camilo, César M; Gomes, Suely L

    2010-06-01

    Global gene expression analysis was carried out with Blastocladiella emersonii cells subjected to oxygen deprivation (hypoxia) using cDNA microarrays. In experiments of gradual hypoxia (gradual decrease in dissolved oxygen) and direct hypoxia (direct decrease in dissolved oxygen), about 650 differentially expressed genes were observed. A total of 534 genes were affected directly or indirectly by oxygen availability, as they showed recovery to normal expression levels or a tendency to recover when cells were reoxygenated. In addition to modulating many genes with no putative assigned function, B. emersonii cells respond to hypoxia by readjusting the expression levels of genes responsible for energy production and consumption. At least transcriptionally, this fungus seems to favor anaerobic metabolism through the upregulation of genes encoding glycolytic enzymes and lactate dehydrogenase and the downregulation of most genes coding for tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes. Furthermore, genes involved in energy-costly processes, like protein synthesis, amino acid biosynthesis, protein folding, and transport, had their expression profiles predominantly downregulated during oxygen deprivation, indicating an energy-saving effort. Data also revealed similarities between the transcriptional profiles of cells under hypoxia and under iron(II) deprivation, suggesting that Fe(2+) ion could have a role in oxygen sensing and/or response to hypoxia in B. emersonii. Additionally, treatment of fungal cells prior to hypoxia with the antibiotic geldanamycin, which negatively affects the stability of mammalian hypoxia transcription factor HIF-1alpha, caused a significant decrease in the levels of certain upregulated hypoxic genes.

  19. Angiotensin II-regulated transcription regulatory genes in adrenal steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Romero, Damian G; Gomez-Sanchez, Elise P; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E

    2010-11-29

    Transcription regulatory genes are crucial modulators of cell physiology and metabolism whose intracellular levels are tightly controlled in response to extracellular stimuli. We previously reported a set of 29 transcription regulatory genes modulated by angiotensin II in H295R human adrenocortical cells and their roles in regulating the expression of the last and unique enzymes of the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid biosynthetic pathways, 11β-hydroxylase and aldosterone synthase, respectively, using gene expression reporter assays. To study the effect of this set of transcription regulatory genes on adrenal steroidogenesis, H295R cells were transfected by high-efficiency nucleofection and aldosterone and cortisol were measured in cell culture supernatants under basal and angiotensin II-stimulated conditions. BCL11B, BHLHB2, CITED2, ELL2, HMGA1, MAFF, NFIL3, PER1, SERTAD1, and VDR significantly stimulated aldosterone secretion, while EGR1, FOSB, and ZFP295 decreased aldosterone secretion. BTG2, HMGA1, MITF, NR4A1, and ZFP295 significantly increased cortisol secretion, while BCL11B, NFIL3, PER1, and SIX2 decreased cortisol secretion. We also report the effect of some of these regulators on the expression of endogenous aldosterone synthase and 11β-hydroxylase under basal and angiotensin II-stimulated conditions. In summary, this study reports for the first time the effects of a set of angiotensin II-modulated transcription regulatory genes on aldosterone and cortisol secretion and the expression levels of the last and unique enzymes of the mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid biosynthetic pathways. Abnormal regulation of mineralocorticoid or glucocorticoid secretion is involved in several pathophysiological conditions. These transcription regulatory genes may be involved in adrenal steroidogenesis pathologies; thus they merit additional study as potential candidates for therapeutic intervention.

  20. Transcript RNA supports precise repair of its own DNA gene.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Havva; Meers, Chance; Storici, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    The transfer of genetic information from RNA to DNA is considered an extraordinary process in molecular biology. Despite the fact that cells transcribe abundant amount of RNA with a wide range of functions, it has been difficult to uncover whether RNA can serve as a template for DNA repair and recombination. An increasing number of experimental evidences suggest a direct role of RNA in DNA modification. Recently, we demonstrated that endogenous transcript RNA can serve as a template to repair a DNA double-strand break (DSB), the most harmful DNA lesion, not only indirectly via formation of a DNA copy (cDNA) intermediate, but also directly in a homology driven mechanism in budding yeast. These results point out that the transfer of genetic information from RNA to DNA is more general than previously thought. We found that transcript RNA is more efficient in repairing a DSB in its own DNA (in cis) than in a homologous but ectopic locus (in trans). Here, we summarize current knowledge about the process of RNA-driven DNA repair and recombination, and provide further data in support of our model of DSB repair by transcript RNA in cis. We show that a DSB is precisely repaired predominately by transcript RNA and not by residual cDNA in conditions in which formation of cDNA by reverse transcription is inhibited. Additionally, we demonstrate that defects in ribonuclease (RNase) H stimulate precise DSB repair by homologous RNA or cDNA sequence, and not by homologous DNA sequence carried on a plasmid. These results highlight an antagonistic role of RNase H in RNA-DNA recombination. Ultimately, we discuss several questions that should be addressed to better understand mechanisms and implications of RNA-templated DNA repair and recombination.

  1. Sequential Logic Model Deciphers Dynamic Transcriptional Control of Gene Expressions

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Zhen Xuan; Wong, Sum Thai; Arjunan, Satya Nanda Vel; Piras, Vincent; Tomita, Masaru; Selvarajoo, Kumar; Giuliani, Alessandro; Tsuchiya, Masa

    2007-01-01

    Background Cellular signaling involves a sequence of events from ligand binding to membrane receptors through transcription factors activation and the induction of mRNA expression. The transcriptional-regulatory system plays a pivotal role in the control of gene expression. A novel computational approach to the study of gene regulation circuits is presented here. Methodology Based on the concept of finite state machine, which provides a discrete view of gene regulation, a novel sequential logic model (SLM) is developed to decipher control mechanisms of dynamic transcriptional regulation of gene expressions. The SLM technique is also used to systematically analyze the dynamic function of transcriptional inputs, the dependency and cooperativity, such as synergy effect, among the binding sites with respect to when, how much and how fast the gene of interest is expressed. Principal Findings SLM is verified by a set of well studied expression data on endo16 of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (sea urchin) during the embryonic midgut development. A dynamic regulatory mechanism for endo16 expression controlled by three binding sites, UI, R and Otx is identified and demonstrated to be consistent with experimental findings. Furthermore, we show that during transition from specification to differentiation in wild type endo16 expression profile, SLM reveals three binary activities are not sufficient to explain the transcriptional regulation of endo16 expression and additional activities of binding sites are required. Further analyses suggest detailed mechanism of R switch activity where indirect dependency occurs in between UI activity and R switch during specification to differentiation stage. Conclusions/Significance The sequential logic formalism allows for a simplification of regulation network dynamics going from a continuous to a discrete representation of gene activation in time. In effect our SLM is non-parametric and model-independent, yet providing rich biological

  2. Sensitive Detection of Viral Transcripts in Human Tumor Transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Schelhorn, Sven-Eric; Fischer, Matthias; Tolosi, Laura; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Pfister, Herbert; Lengauer, Thomas; Berthold, Frank

    2013-01-01

    In excess of % of human cancer incidents have a viral cofactor. Epidemiological studies of idiopathic human cancers indicate that additional tumor viruses remain to be discovered. Recent advances in sequencing technology have enabled systematic screenings of human tumor transcriptomes for viral transcripts. However, technical problems such as low abundances of viral transcripts in large volumes of sequencing data, viral sequence divergence, and homology between viral and human factors significantly confound identification of tumor viruses. We have developed a novel computational approach for detecting viral transcripts in human cancers that takes the aforementioned confounding factors into account and is applicable to a wide variety of viruses and tumors. We apply the approach to conducting the first systematic search for viruses in neuroblastoma, the most common cancer in infancy. The diverse clinical progression of this disease as well as related epidemiological and virological findings are highly suggestive of a pathogenic cofactor. However, a viral etiology of neuroblastoma is currently contested. We mapped transcriptomes of neuroblastoma as well as positive and negative controls to the human and all known viral genomes in order to detect both known and unknown viruses. Analysis of controls, comparisons with related methods, and statistical estimates demonstrate the high sensitivity of our approach. Detailed investigation of putative viral transcripts within neuroblastoma samples did not provide evidence for the existence of any known human viruses. Likewise, de-novo assembly and analysis of chimeric transcripts did not result in expression signatures associated with novel human pathogens. While confounding factors such as sample dilution or viral clearance in progressed tumors may mask viral cofactors in the data, in principle, this is rendered less likely by the high sensitivity of our approach and the number of biological replicates analyzed. Therefore, our

  3. Transcriptional interference by RNA polymerase pausing and dislodgement of transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Adam C; Egan, J Barry; Shearwin, Keith E

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptional interference is the in cis suppression of one transcriptional process by another. Mathematical modeling shows that promoter occlusion by elongating RNA polymerases cannot produce strong interference. Interference may instead be generated by (1) dislodgement of slow-to-assemble pre-initiation complexes and transcription factors and (2) prolonged occlusion by paused RNA polymerases.

  4. Transcription-coupled changes to chromatin underpin gene silencing by transcriptional interference.

    PubMed

    Ard, Ryan; Allshire, Robin C

    2016-12-15

    Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) transcription into a downstream promoter frequently results in transcriptional interference. However, the mechanism of this repression is not fully understood. We recently showed that drug tolerance in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is controlled by lncRNA transcription upstream of the tgp1(+) permease gene. Here we demonstrate that transcriptional interference of tgp1(+) involves several transcription-coupled chromatin changes mediated by conserved elongation factors Set2, Clr6CII, Spt6 and FACT. These factors are known to travel with RNAPII and establish repressive chromatin in order to limit aberrant transcription initiation from cryptic promoters present in gene bodies. We therefore conclude that conserved RNAPII-associated mechanisms exist to both suppress intragenic cryptic promoters during genic transcription and to repress gene promoters by transcriptional interference. Our analyses also demonstrate that key mechanistic features of transcriptional interference are shared between S. pombe and the highly divergent budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Thus, transcriptional interference is an ancient, conserved mechanism for tightly controlling gene expression. Our mechanistic insights allowed us to predict and validate a second example of transcriptional interference involving the S. pombe pho1(+) gene. Given that eukaryotic genomes are pervasively transcribed, transcriptional interference likely represents a more general feature of gene regulation than is currently appreciated.

  5. Mechanisms of transcription factor evolution in Metazoa

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Jonathan F.; Zimmer, Fabian; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptions factors (TFs) are pivotal for the regulation of virtually all cellular processes, including growth and development. Expansions of TF families are causally linked to increases in organismal complexity. Here we study the evolutionary dynamics, genetic causes and functional implications of the five largest metazoan TF families. We find that family expansions dominate across the whole metazoan tree; however, some branches experience exceptional family-specific accelerated expansions. Additionally, we find that such expansions are often predated by modular domain rearrangements, which spur the expansion of a new sub-family by separating it from the rest of the TF family in terms of protein–protein interactions. This separation allows for radical shifts in the functional spectrum of a duplicated TF. We also find functional differentiation inside TF sub-families as changes in expression specificity. Furthermore, accelerated family expansions are facilitated by repeats of sequence motifs such as C2H2 zinc fingers. We quantify whole genome duplications and single gene duplications as sources of TF family expansions, implying that some, but not all, TF duplicates are preferentially retained. We conclude that trans-regulatory changes (domain rearrangements) are instrumental for fundamental functional innovations, that cis-regulatory changes (affecting expression) accomplish wide-spread fine tuning and both jointly contribute to the functional diversification of TFs. PMID:27288445

  6. Comparative Analysis of Transcription Factors Families across Fungal Tree of Life

    SciTech Connect

    Salamov, Asaf; Grigoriev, Igor

    2015-03-19

    Transcription factors (TFs) are proteins that regulate the transcription of genes, by binding to specific DNA sequences. Based on literature (Shelest, 2008; Weirauch and Hughes,2011) collected and manually curated list of DBD Pfam domains (in total 62 DBD domains) We looked for distribution of TFs in 395 fungal genomes plus additionally in plant genomes (Phytozome), prokaryotes(IMG), some animals/metazoans and protists genomes

  7. Exploiting Transcriptions of Identical Subject Content Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harfitt, Gary James

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a strategy employed on a teacher training course in Hong Kong involving the use of lesson transcriptions. Transcriptions from two course participants' English lessons were used to arouse greater classroom language awareness and promote reflection in one of the teachers, who was initially very reluctant to accept comments and…

  8. Transcripts, like Shadows on a Wall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duranti, Alessandro

    2006-01-01

    Over the last 50 years the process of producing transcripts of all kinds of interactions has become an important practice for researchers in a wide range of disciplines. Only rarely, however, has transcription been analyzed as a cultural practice. It is here argued that it is precisely the lack of understanding of what is involved in transcribing…

  9. Examining Transcription: A Theory-Laden Methodology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapadat, Judith C.; Lindsay, Anne C.

    Transcription is an integral process in the qualitative analysis of language data, and is widely employed in basic and applied research across a number of disciplines and in professional practice fields. Yet methodological and theoretical issues associated with the transcription process have received scant attention in the research literature. The…

  10. 39 CFR 959.21 - Transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... therefor. (b) Changes in the official transcript may be made only when they involve errors affecting substance, and then only in the manner herein provided. No physical changes shall be made in or upon the... corrections to be made in the transcript with prompt notice to the parties of the proceeding. Any...

  11. 39 CFR 959.21 - Transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... therefor. (b) Changes in the official transcript may be made only when they involve errors affecting substance, and then only in the manner herein provided. No physical changes shall be made in or upon the... corrections to be made in the transcript with prompt notice to the parties of the proceeding. Any...

  12. 39 CFR 957.19 - Transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... librarian of the Postal Service or the Recorder. (b) Changes in the official transcript may be made only when they involve errors affecting substance and then only in the manner herein provided. No physical changes shall be made in or upon the official transcript, or copies thereof, which have been filed...

  13. 39 CFR 959.21 - Transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... therefor. (b) Changes in the official transcript may be made only when they involve errors affecting substance, and then only in the manner herein provided. No physical changes shall be made in or upon the... corrections to be made in the transcript with prompt notice to the parties of the proceeding. Any...

  14. 39 CFR 957.19 - Transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... librarian of the Postal Service or the Recorder. (b) Changes in the official transcript may be made only when they involve errors affecting substance and then only in the manner herein provided. No physical changes shall be made in or upon the official transcript, or copies thereof, which have been filed...

  15. 39 CFR 957.19 - Transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... librarian of the Postal Service or the Recorder. (b) Changes in the official transcript may be made only when they involve errors affecting substance and then only in the manner herein provided. No physical changes shall be made in or upon the official transcript, or copies thereof, which have been filed...

  16. 39 CFR 959.21 - Transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... therefor. (b) Changes in the official transcript may be made only when they involve errors affecting substance, and then only in the manner herein provided. No physical changes shall be made in or upon the... corrections to be made in the transcript with prompt notice to the parties of the proceeding. Any...

  17. 39 CFR 959.21 - Transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... therefor. (b) Changes in the official transcript may be made only when they involve errors affecting substance, and then only in the manner herein provided. No physical changes shall be made in or upon the... corrections to be made in the transcript with prompt notice to the parties of the proceeding. Any...

  18. 39 CFR 957.19 - Transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... librarian of the Postal Service or the Recorder. (b) Changes in the official transcript may be made only when they involve errors affecting substance and then only in the manner herein provided. No physical changes shall be made in or upon the official transcript, or copies thereof, which have been filed...

  19. 39 CFR 957.19 - Transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... librarian of the Postal Service or the Recorder. (b) Changes in the official transcript may be made only when they involve errors affecting substance and then only in the manner herein provided. No physical changes shall be made in or upon the official transcript, or copies thereof, which have been filed...

  20. DNA dynamically directs its own transcription initiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, K. O.; Kalosakas, G.; Bishop, A. R.; Choi, C. H.; Usheva, A.

    2004-01-01

    Initiation of DNA gene transcription requires a transient opening in the double helix at the transcriptional start site. It is generally assumed that the location of this 'transcriptional bubble' is determined by sequence-specific protein binding, and that the energy required for unwinding the double helix comes from torsional strain. Physical twisting should cause DNA to open consistently in weakly bonded A/T rich stretches, however, simple base-pairing energetics alone can not account for the variety of observed transcriptional start sites. Applying the Peyrard-Bishop nonlinear cooperativity model to DNA, we are able to predict that thermally-induced DNA bubbles, similar in size to transcription bubbles, form at specific locations on DNA promoters. These predicted openings agree remarkably well with experiment, and that they correlate exactly with known transcription start sites and important regulatory sites on three different promoters. We propose that the sequence-specific location of the transcriptional start site is predetermined by the inherent opening patterns of specific DNA sequences. As DNA bubble formation is independent of protein binding, it appears that DNA is not only a passive carrier of information, but its dynamics plays an important role in directing the transcription and regulation of the genes it contains.