Science.gov

Sample records for additional user input

  1. Intelligent Graph Layout Using Many Users' Input.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiaoru; Che, Limei; Hu, Yifan; Zhang, Xin

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a new strategy for graph drawing utilizing layouts of many sub-graphs supplied by a large group of people in a crowd sourcing manner. We developed an algorithm based on Laplacian constrained distance embedding to merge subgraphs submitted by different users, while attempting to maintain the topological information of the individual input layouts. To facilitate collection of layouts from many people, a light-weight interactive system has been designed to enable convenient dynamic viewing, modification and traversing between layouts. Compared with other existing graph layout algorithms, our approach can achieve more aesthetic and meaningful layouts with high user preference. PMID:26357179

  2. Improving depth maps with limited user input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandewalle, Patrick; Klein Gunnewiek, René; Varekamp, Chris

    2010-02-01

    A vastly growing number of productions from the entertainment industry are aiming at 3D movie theaters. These productions use a two-view format, primarily intended for eye-wear assisted viewing in a well defined environment. To get this 3D content into the home environment, where a large variety of 3D viewing conditions exists (e.g. different display sizes, display types, viewing distances), we need a flexible 3D format that can adjust the depth effect. This can be provided by the image plus depth format, in which a video frame is enriched with depth information for all pixels in the video frame. This format can be extended with additional layers, such as an occlusion layer or a transparency layer. The occlusion layer contains information on the data that is behind objects, and is also referred to as occluded video. The transparency layer, on the other hand, contains information on the opacity of the foreground layer. This allows rendering of semi-transparencies such as haze, smoke, windows, etc., as well as transitions from foreground to background. These additional layers are only beneficial if the quality of the depth information is high. High quality depth information can currently only be achieved with user assistance. In this paper, we discuss an interactive method for depth map enhancement that allows adjustments during the propagation over time. Furthermore, we will elaborate on the automatic generation of the transparency layer, using the depth maps generated with an interactive depth map generation tool.

  3. INGEN: A COBRA-NC input generator user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, C.L.; Dodge, R.E.

    1986-12-01

    The INGEN (INput GENerator) computer program has been developed as a preprocessor to simplify input generation for the COBRA-NC computer program. INGEN uses several empirical correlations and geometric assumptions to simplify the data input requirements for the COBRA-NC computer code. The simplified input scheme is obtained at the expense of much flexibility provided by COBRA-NC. For more complex problems requiring additional flexibility however, INGEN may be used to provide a skeletal input file to which the more detailed input may be added. This report describes the input requirements for INGEN and describes the algorithms and correlations used to generate the COBRA-NC input. 9 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Gaze and Feet as Additional Input Modalities for Interacting with Geospatial Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çöltekin, A.; Hempel, J.; Brychtova, A.; Giannopoulos, I.; Stellmach, S.; Dachselt, R.

    2016-06-01

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are complex software environments and we often work with multiple tasks and multiple displays when we work with GIS. However, user input is still limited to mouse and keyboard in most workplace settings. In this project, we demonstrate how the use of gaze and feet as additional input modalities can overcome time-consuming and annoying mode switches between frequently performed tasks. In an iterative design process, we developed gaze- and foot-based methods for zooming and panning of map visualizations. We first collected appropriate gestures in a preliminary user study with a small group of experts, and designed two interaction concepts based on their input. After the implementation, we evaluated the two concepts comparatively in another user study to identify strengths and shortcomings in both. We found that continuous foot input combined with implicit gaze input is promising for supportive tasks.

  5. INDES User's guide multistep input design with nonlinear rotorcraft modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The INDES computer program, a multistep input design program used as part of a data processing technique for rotorcraft systems identification, is described. Flight test inputs base on INDES improve the accuracy of parameter estimates. The input design algorithm, program input, and program output are presented.

  6. Program for User-Friendly Management of Input and Output Data Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimeck, Gerhard

    2003-01-01

    A computer program manages large, hierarchical sets of input and output (I/O) parameters (typically, sequences of alphanumeric data) involved in computational simulations in a variety of technological disciplines. This program represents sets of parameters as structures coded in object-oriented but otherwise standard American National Standards Institute C language. Each structure contains a group of I/O parameters that make sense as a unit in the simulation program with which this program is used. The addition of options and/or elements to sets of parameters amounts to the addition of new elements to data structures. By association of child data generated in response to a particular user input, a hierarchical ordering of input parameters can be achieved. Associated with child data structures are the creation and description mechanisms within the parent data structures. Child data structures can spawn further child data structures. In this program, the creation and representation of a sequence of data structures is effected by one line of code that looks for children of a sequence of structures until there are no more children to be found. A linked list of structures is created dynamically and is completely represented in the data structures themselves. Such hierarchical data presentation can guide users through otherwise complex setup procedures and it can be integrated within a variety of graphical representations.

  7. User's manual for master: Modeling of aerodynamic surfaces by 3-dimensional explicit representation. [input to three dimensional computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, S. G.

    1983-01-01

    A system of computer programs was developed to model general three dimensional surfaces. Surfaces are modeled as sets of parametric bicubic patches. There are also capabilities to transform coordinates, to compute mesh/surface intersection normals, and to format input data for a transonic potential flow analysis. A graphical display of surface models and intersection normals is available. There are additional capabilities to regulate point spacing on input curves and to compute surface/surface intersection curves. Input and output data formats are described; detailed suggestions are given for user input. Instructions for execution are given, and examples are shown.

  8. Computer Program and User Documentation Medical Data Input System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J.

    1971-01-01

    Several levels of documentation are presented for the program module of the NASA medical directorate minicomputer storage and retrieval system. The biomedical information system overview gives reasons for the development of the minicomputer storage and retrieval system. It briefly describes all of the program modules which constitute the system. A technical discussion oriented to the programmer is given. Each subroutine is described in enough detail to permit in-depth understanding of the routines and to facilitate program modifications. The program utilization section may be used as a users guide.

  9. RELAP5/MOD3 code manual: User`s guide and input requirements. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The RELAP5 code has been developed for best estimate transient simulation of light water reactor coolant systems during postulated accidents. The code models the coupled behavior of the reactor coolant system and the core for loss-of-coolant accidents, and operational transients, such as anticipated transient without scram, loss of offsite power, loss of feedwater, and loss of flow. A generic modeling approach is used that permits simulating a variety of thermal hydraulic systems. Control system and secondary system components are included to permit modeling of plant controls, turbines, condensers, and secondary feedwater systems. Volume II contains detailed instructions for code application and input data preparation.

  10. 40 CFR 97.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... heat input data. 97.76 Section 97.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Monitoring and Reporting § 97.76 Additional requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of... a flow system shall also monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the...

  11. 40 CFR 97.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... heat input data. 97.76 Section 97.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Monitoring and Reporting § 97.76 Additional requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of... a flow system shall also monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the...

  12. 40 CFR 97.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... heat input data. 97.76 Section 97.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Monitoring and Reporting § 97.76 Additional requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of... a flow system shall also monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the...

  13. 40 CFR 97.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... heat input data. 97.76 Section 97.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Monitoring and Reporting § 97.76 Additional requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of... a flow system shall also monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the...

  14. Applicability of the "Emotiv EEG Neuroheadset" as a user-friendly input interface.

    PubMed

    Boutani, Hidenori; Ohsuga, Mieko

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to develop an input interface by using the P3 component of visual event-related potentials (ERPs). When using electroencephalography (EEG) in daily applications, coping with ocular-motor artifacts and ensuring that the equipment is user-friendly are both important. To address the first issue, we applied a previously proposed method that applies an unmixing matrix to acquire independent components (ICs) obtained from another dataset. For the second issue, we introduced a 14-channel EEG commercial headset called the "Emotiv EEG Neuroheadset". An advantage of the Emotiv headset is that users can put it on by themselves within 1 min without any specific skills. However, only a few studies have investigated whether EEG and ERP signals are accurately measured by Emotiv. Additionally, no electrodes of the Emotiv headset are located over the centroparietal area of the head where P3 components are reported to show large amplitudes. Therefore, we first demonstrated that the P3 components obtained by the headset and by commercial plate electrodes and a multipurpose bioelectric amplifier during an oddball task were comparable. Next, we confirmed that eye-blink and ocular movement components could be decomposed by independent component analysis (ICA) using the 14-channel signals measured by the headset. We also demonstrated that artifacts could be removed with an unmixing matrix, as long as the matrix was obtained from the same person, even if they were measured on different days. Finally, we confirmed that the fluctuation of the sampling frequency of the Emotiv headset was not a major problem. PMID:24109945

  15. The 1991 version of the plume impingement computer program. Volume 2: User's input guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bender, Robert L.; Somers, Richard E.; Prendergast, Maurice J.; Clayton, Joseph P.; Smith, Sheldon D.

    1991-01-01

    The Plume Impingement Program (PLIMP) is a computer code used to predict impact pressures, forces, moments, heating rates, and contamination on surfaces due to direct impingement flowfields. Typically, it has been used to analyze the effects of rocket exhaust plumes on nearby structures from ground level to the vacuum of space. The program normally uses flowfields generated by the MOC, RAMP2, SPF/2, or SFPGEN computer programs. It is capable of analyzing gaseous and gas/particle flows. A number of simple subshapes are available to model the surfaces of any structure. The original PLIMP program has been modified many times of the last 20 years. The theoretical bases for the referenced major changes, and additional undocumented changes and enhancements since 1988 are summarized in volume 1 of this report. This volume is the User's Input Guide and should be substituted for all previous guides when running the latest version of the program. This version can operate on VAX and UNIX machines with NCAR graphics ability.

  16. SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD 3.1 code manual: User`s guide and input manual. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Coryell, E.W.; Johnsen, E.C.; Allison, C.M.

    1995-06-01

    The SCDAP/RELAP5 code has been developed for best estimate transient simulation of light water reactor coolant systems during a severe accident. The code models the coupled behavior of the reactor coolant system, core, fission product released during a severe accident transient as well as large and small break loss of coolant accidents, operational transients such as anticipated transient without SCRAM, loss of offsite power, loss of feedwater, and loss of flow. A generic modeling approach is used that permits as much of a particular system to be modeled as necessary. Control system and secondary system components are included to permit modeling of plant controls, turbines, condensers, and secondary feedwater conditioning systems. This volume provides guidelines to code users based upon lessons learned during the developmental assessment process. A description of problem control and the installation process is included. Appendix a contains the description of the input requirements.

  17. ATLAS, an integrated structural analysis and design system. Volume 3: User's manual, input and execution data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreisbach, R. L. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    The input data and execution control statements for the ATLAS integrated structural analysis and design system are described. It is operational on the Control Data Corporation (CDC) 6600/CYBER computers in a batch mode or in a time-shared mode via interactive graphic or text terminals. ATLAS is a modular system of computer codes with common executive and data base management components. The system provides an extensive set of general-purpose technical programs with analytical capabilities including stiffness, stress, loads, mass, substructuring, strength design, unsteady aerodynamics, vibration, and flutter analyses. The sequence and mode of execution of selected program modules are controlled via a common user-oriented language.

  18. Silicon-organic hybrid slot waveguide based three-input multicasted optical hexadecimal addition/subtraction

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Chengcheng; Wang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    By exploiting multiple non-degenerate four-wave mixing in a silicon-organic hybrid slot waveguide and 16-ary phase-shift keying signals, we propose and simulate three-input (A, B, C) multicasted 40-Gbaud (160-Gbit/s) optical hexadecimal addition/subtraction (A + B − C, A + C − B, B + C − A, A + B + C, A − B − C, B − A − C). The error vector magnitude (EVM) and dynamic range of signal power are analyzed to evaluate the performance of optical hexadecimal addition/subtraction. PMID:25502618

  19. 77 FR 73310 - Technical Amendment to List of User Fee Airports: Addition of Bozeman Yellowstone International...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ... Airports: Addition of Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport, Belgrade, MT AGENCY: U.S. Customs and... user fee airports to reflect the recent user fee airport designation for Bozeman Yellowstone... approving the designation of user fee status for Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport was signed...

  20. User's guide for MAGIC-Meteorologic and hydrologic genscn (generate scenarios) input converter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ortel, Terry W.; Martin, Angel, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Meteorologic and hydrologic data used in watershed modeling studies are collected by various agencies and organizations, and stored in various formats. Data may be in a raw, un-processed format with little or no quality control, or may be checked for validity before being made available. Flood-simulation systems require data in near real-time so that adequate flood warnings can be made. Additionally, forecasted data are needed to operate flood-control structures to potentially mitigate flood damages. Because real-time data are of a provisional nature, missing data may need to be estimated for use in floodsimulation systems. The Meteorologic and Hydrologic GenScn (Generate Scenarios) Input Converter (MAGIC) can be used to convert data from selected formats into the Hydrologic Simulation System-Fortran hourly-observations format for input to a Watershed Data Management database, for use in hydrologic modeling studies. MAGIC also can reformat the data to the Full Equations model time-series format, for use in hydraulic modeling studies. Examples of the application of MAGIC for use in the flood-simulation system for Salt Creek in northeastern Illinois are presented in this report.

  1. Antagonistic control of a dual-input mammalian gene switch by food additives

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Mingqi; Ye, Haifeng; Hamri, Ghislaine Charpin-El; Fussenegger, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biology has significantly advanced the design of mammalian trigger-inducible transgene-control devices that are able to programme complex cellular behaviour. Fruit-based benzoate derivatives licensed as food additives, such as flavours (e.g. vanillate) and preservatives (e.g. benzoate), are a particularly attractive class of trigger compounds for orthogonal mammalian transgene control devices because of their innocuousness, physiological compatibility and simple oral administration. Capitalizing on the genetic componentry of the soil bacterium Comamonas testosteroni, which has evolved to catabolize a variety of aromatic compounds, we have designed different mammalian gene expression systems that could be induced and repressed by the food additives benzoate and vanillate. When implanting designer cells engineered for gene switch-driven expression of the human placental secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) into mice, blood SEAP levels of treated animals directly correlated with a benzoate-enriched drinking programme. Additionally, the benzoate-/vanillate-responsive device was compatible with other transgene control systems and could be assembled into higher-order control networks providing expression dynamics reminiscent of a lap-timing stopwatch. Designer gene switches using licensed food additives as trigger compounds to achieve antagonistic dual-input expression profiles and provide novel control topologies and regulation dynamics may advance future gene- and cell-based therapies. PMID:25030908

  2. Modeling the cardiovascular system using a nonlinear additive autoregressive model with exogenous input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedl, M.; Suhrbier, A.; Malberg, H.; Penzel, T.; Bretthauer, G.; Kurths, J.; Wessel, N.

    2008-07-01

    The parameters of heart rate variability and blood pressure variability have proved to be useful analytical tools in cardiovascular physics and medicine. Model-based analysis of these variabilities additionally leads to new prognostic information about mechanisms behind regulations in the cardiovascular system. In this paper, we analyze the complex interaction between heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and respiration by nonparametric fitted nonlinear additive autoregressive models with external inputs. Therefore, we consider measurements of healthy persons and patients suffering from obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), with and without hypertension. It is shown that the proposed nonlinear models are capable of describing short-term fluctuations in heart rate as well as systolic blood pressure significantly better than similar linear ones, which confirms the assumption of nonlinear controlled heart rate and blood pressure. Furthermore, the comparison of the nonlinear and linear approaches reveals that the heart rate and blood pressure variability in healthy subjects is caused by a higher level of noise as well as nonlinearity than in patients suffering from OSAS. The residue analysis points at a further source of heart rate and blood pressure variability in healthy subjects, in addition to heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and respiration. Comparison of the nonlinear models within and among the different groups of subjects suggests the ability to discriminate the cohorts that could lead to a stratification of hypertension risk in OSAS patients.

  3. 40 CFR 96.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data for allocations purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... heat input data for allocations purposes. 96.76 Section 96.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... to provide heat input data for allocations purposes. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that elects... also monitor and report heat input at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of...

  4. 40 CFR 96.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data for allocations purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... heat input data for allocations purposes. 96.76 Section 96.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... to provide heat input data for allocations purposes. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that elects... also monitor and report heat input at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of...

  5. 40 CFR 96.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data for allocations purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... heat input data for allocations purposes. 96.76 Section 96.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... to provide heat input data for allocations purposes. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that elects... also monitor and report heat input at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of...

  6. 40 CFR 96.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data for allocations purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... heat input data for allocations purposes. 96.76 Section 96.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... to provide heat input data for allocations purposes. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that elects... also monitor and report heat input at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of...

  7. 40 CFR 96.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data for allocations purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... heat input data for allocations purposes. 96.76 Section 96.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... to provide heat input data for allocations purposes. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that elects... also monitor and report heat input at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of...

  8. RATFOR: user's guide. [Preprocessor allowing structured control statements and free form input

    SciTech Connect

    Wampler, B. E.

    1980-06-01

    RATFOR is a preprocessor for Fortran that allows the programmer to use structured control statements and free form input. This manual describes a version of RATFOR developed at Sandia National Laboratories that has a number of enhancements over the original version developed at Bell Laboratories.

  9. The GRIN-Global Information Management System – A Preview and Opportunity for Public User Input

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The GRIN-Global Information Management System, under development for the past two years, will provide the world's crop genebanks and plant genetic resource (PGR) users with a powerful, flexible, easy-to-use PGR information management system. Developed jointly by the USDA Agricultural Research Servi...

  10. Multimodal user input to supervisory control systems - Voice-augmented keyboard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Christine M.; Forren, Michelle G.

    1987-01-01

    The use of a voice-augmented keyboard input modality is evaluated in a supervisory control application. An implementation of voice recognition technology in supervisory control is proposed: voice is used to request display pages, while the keyboard is used to input system reconfiguration commands. Twenty participants controlled GT-MSOCC, a high-fidelity simulation of the operator interface to a NASA ground control system, via a workstation equipped with either a single keyboard or a voice-augmented keyboard. Experimental results showed that in all cases where significant performance differences occurred, performance with the voice-augmented keyboard modality was inferior to and had greater variance than the keyboard-only modality. These results suggest that current moderately priced voice recognition systems are an inappropriate human-computer interaction technology in supervisory control systems.

  11. Enhancing a taxonomy for health information technology: an exploratory study of user input towards folksonomy.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Brian E; McGowan, Julie J

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality has created a public website to disseminate critical information regarding its health information technology initiative. The website is maintained by AHRQ's Natiomal Resource Center (NRC) for Health Information Technology. In the latest continuous quality improvement project, the NRC used the site's search logs to extract user-generated search phrases. The phrases were then compared to the site's controlled vocabulary with respect to language, grammar, and search precision. Results of the comparison demonstrate that search log data can be a cost-effective way to improve controlled vocabularies as well as information retrieval. User-entered search phrases were found to also share many similarities with folksonomy tags. PMID:20841845

  12. A Sensitivity Study of Liric Algorithm to User-defined Input Parameters, Using Selected Cases from Thessaloniki's Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filioglou, M.; Balis, D.; Siomos, N.; Poupkou, A.; Dimopoulos, S.; Chaikovsky, A.

    2016-06-01

    A targeted sensitivity study of the LIRIC algorithm was considered necessary to estimate the uncertainty introduced to the volume concentration profiles, due to the arbitrary selection of user-defined input parameters. For this purpose three different tests were performed using Thessaloniki's Lidar data. Overall, tests in the selection of the regularization parameters, an upper and a lower limit test were performed. The different sensitivity tests were applied on two cases with different predominant aerosol types, a dust episode and a typical urban case.

  13. 40 CFR 97.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS... a NOX Budget unit that monitors and reports NOX mass emissions using a NOX concentration system and a flow system shall also monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the...

  14. User manual for IOSYM: an input-oriented simulation language for continuous systems

    SciTech Connect

    Polito, J.

    1981-03-01

    IOSYM is an extension of the GASP IV simulation language. It permits systems which are sequences of continuous processes to be modeled graphically. Normally the system can be described by data input only. The language permits stochastic sequencing and termination criteria for processes and allows crossing conditions for ending operations that are more general than GASP IV. Extensive capability exists for conditional branching and logical modification of the network. IOSYM has been used to model the cost of geothermal drilling where the various costly processes of drilling are represented by IOSYM operations. The language is much more general, however, since it retains most of GASP IV's discrete event capabilities and permits easy modeling of continuous processes.

  15. Applying User Input to the Design and Testing of an Electronic Behavioral Health Information System for Wraparound Care Coordination

    PubMed Central

    Bruns, Eric J.; Hyde, Kelly L.; Sather, April; Hook, Alyssa; Lyon, Aaron R.

    2015-01-01

    Health information technology (HIT) and care coordination for individuals with complex needs are high priorities for quality improvement in health care. However, there is little empirical guidance about how best to design electronic health record systems and related technologies to facilitate implementation of care coordination models in behavioral health, or how best to apply user input to the design and testing process. In this paper, we describe an iterative development process that incorporated user/stakeholder perspectives at multiple points and resulted in an electronic behavioral health information system (EBHIS) specific to the wraparound care coordination model for youth with serious emotional and behavioral disorders. First, we review foundational HIT research on how EBHIS can enhance efficiency and outcomes of wraparound that was used to inform development. After describing the rationale for and functions of a prototype EBHIS for wraparound, we describe methods and results for a series of six small studies that informed system development across four phases of effort – predevelopment, development, initial user testing, and commercialization – and discuss how these results informed system design and refinement. Finally, we present next steps, challenges to dissemination, and guidance for others aiming to develop specialized behavioral health HIT. The research team's experiences reinforce the opportunity presented by EBHIS to improve care coordination for populations with complex needs, while also pointing to a litany of barriers and challenges to be overcome to implement such technologies. PMID:26060099

  16. Applying User Input to the Design and Testing of an Electronic Behavioral Health Information System for Wraparound Care Coordination.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Eric J; Hyde, Kelly L; Sather, April; Hook, Alyssa N; Lyon, Aaron R

    2016-05-01

    Health information technology (HIT) and care coordination for individuals with complex needs are high priorities for quality improvement in health care. However, there is little empirical guidance about how best to design electronic health record systems and related technologies to facilitate implementation of care coordination models in behavioral health, or how best to apply user input to the design and testing process. In this paper, we describe an iterative development process that incorporated user/stakeholder perspectives at multiple points and resulted in an electronic behavioral health information system (EBHIS) specific to the wraparound care coordination model for youth with serious emotional and behavioral disorders. First, we review foundational HIT research on how EBHIS can enhance efficiency and outcomes of wraparound that was used to inform development. After describing the rationale for and functions of a prototype EBHIS for wraparound, we describe methods and results for a series of six small studies that informed system development across four phases of effort-predevelopment, development, initial user testing, and commercialization-and discuss how these results informed system design and refinement. Finally, we present next steps, challenges to dissemination, and guidance for others aiming to develop specialized behavioral health HIT. The research team's experiences reinforce the opportunity presented by EBHIS to improve care coordination for populations with complex needs, while also pointing to a litany of barriers and challenges to be overcome to implement such technologies. PMID:26060099

  17. Atmospheric transport and deposition, an additional input pathway for triazine herbicides to surface waters

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, D.C.G.; Rawn, D.F.

    1996-10-01

    Although surface runoff from treated fields is regarded as the major route of entry of triazine herbicides to surface waters, other pathways such as deposition via precipitation, gas absorption and dryfall may also be important. Triazine herbicides have been detected in precipitation but there has been only a very limited amount of work on gas phase and aerosols. To examine the importance of atmospheric inputs concentrations of atrazine, cyanazine and terbuthylazine in gas phase/aerosols, precipitation, and surface waters were determined (along with other herbicides) using selected ion GC-MS. Atrazine was detected at low ng/L concentrations in surface waters (<0.04-5.3 ng/L) and precipitation (0.1-53 ng/L), and at 0.02-0.1 ng/m{sup 3} in air. Cyanazine and terbuthylazine were detected in air and infrequently in water. Highest atrazine concentrations in air were found during June each year on both gas phase and particles. Concentrations of atrazine in surface waters at both locations increased during June, even in the absence of precipitation or overland flow, presumably due to inputs from dryfall and to gas areas and boreal forest lakes due to transport and deposition. Ecological risk assessment of triazines, especially for pristine aquatic environments should include consideration of this atmospheric pathway.

  18. Upgrade to MODFLOW-GUI; addition of MODPATH, ZONEBDGT, and additional MODFLOW packages to the U.S. Geological Survey MODFLOW-96 Graphical-User Interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winston, R.B.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes enhancements to a Graphical-User Interface (GUI) for MODFLOW-96, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) modular, three-dimensional, finitedifference ground-water flow model, and MOC3D, the USGS three-dimensional, method-ofcharacteristics solute-transport model. The GUI is a plug-in extension (PIE) for the commercial program Argus ONEe. The GUI has been modified to support MODPATH (a particle tracking post-processing package for MODFLOW), ZONEBDGT (a computer program for calculating subregional water budgets), and the Stream, Horizontal-Flow Barrier, and Flow and Head Boundary packages in MODFLOW. Context-sensitive help has been added to make the GUI easier to use and to understand. In large part, the help consists of quotations from the relevant sections of this report and its predecessors. The revised interface includes automatic creation of geospatial information layers required for the added programs and packages, and menus and dialog boxes for input of parameters for simulation control. The GUI creates formatted ASCII files that can be read by MODFLOW-96, MOC3D, MODPATH, and ZONEBDGT. All four programs can be executed within the Argus ONEe application (Argus Interware, Inc., 1997). Spatial results of MODFLOW-96, MOC3D, and MODPATH can be visualized within Argus ONEe. Results from ZONEBDGT can be visualized in an independent program that can also be used to view budget data from MODFLOW, MOC3D, and SUTRA. Another independent program extracts hydrographs of head or drawdown at individual cells from formatted MODFLOW head and drawdown files. A web-based tutorial on the use of MODFLOW with Argus ONE has also been updated. The internal structure of the GUI has been modified to make it possible for advanced users to easily customize the GUI. Two additional, independent PIE?s were developed to allow users to edit the positions of nodes and to facilitate exporting the grid geometry to external programs.

  19. 40 CFR 60.4176 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Compliance Times for Coal-Fired Electric Steam Generating Units Monitoring and Reporting § 60.4176 Additional... mass emissions using a Hg concentration monitoring system and a flow monitoring system shall...

  20. 40 CFR 60.4176 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Compliance Times for Coal-Fired Electric Steam Generating Units Monitoring and Reporting § 60.4176 Additional... mass emissions using a Hg concentration monitoring system and a flow monitoring system shall...

  1. Physician-directed software design: the role of utilization statistics and user input in enhancing HELP results review capabilities.

    PubMed Central

    Michael, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    The M.D. Rounds Report program was developed and implemented in June of 1992 as an adjunct to the HELP System at Rex Hospital. The program facilitates rapid access to information on allergies and current medications, laboratory results, radiology reports and therapist notes for a list of patients without physicians having to make additional menu or submenu selections. In planning for an upgrade of the program, utilization statistics and user feedback provided valuable information in terms of frequency of access, features used and unused, and the value of the program as a reporting tool in comparison to other online results reporting applications. A brief description of the functionality of the M.D. Rounds Report, evaluation of the program audit trail and user feedback, planned enhancements to the program, and a discussion of the prototyping and monitoring experience and the impact on future physician subsystem development will be presented. PMID:8130443

  2. 76 FR 31823 - Technical Amendment to List of User Fee Airports: Addition of Dallas Love Field Municipal Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ... Airports: Addition of Dallas Love Field Municipal Airport, Dallas, TX AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border... revising the list of user fee airports to reflect the recent user fee airport designation for Dallas Love... of user fee status for Dallas Love Field Municipal Airport. This document updates the list of...

  3. Capital Requirements Estimating Model (CREMOD) for electric utilities. Volume III. User's manual appendices: program and input data listings. [For each year up to 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, D E; Gammon, J; Shaw, M L

    1980-01-01

    This volume, Vol. 3, is an extension of Vol. 2, User's Manual, containing listings of the computer program and input data for the model in two appendices. It serves the user as a reference guide to the computer model. This documentation complies with the Interim Model Document Standards issued by the Office of Analysis, Oversight, and Access of the Energy Information Administration in December 1978.

  4. User's manual for the NASA Lewis ice accretion/heat transfer prediction code with electrothermal deicer input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masiulaniec, Konstanty C.; Wright, William B.

    1994-01-01

    A version of LEWICE has been developed that incorporates a recently developed electrothermal deicer code, developed at the University of Toledo by William B. Wright. This was accomplished, in essence, by replacing a subroutine in LEWICE, called EBAL, which balanced the energies at the ice surface, with a subroutine called UTICE. UTICE performs this same energy balance, as well as handles all the time-timperature transients below the ice surface, for all of the layers of a composite blade as well as the ice layer itself. This new addition is set up in such a fashion that a user may specify any number of heaters, any heater chordwise length, and any heater gap desired. The heaters may be fired in unison, or they may be cycled with periods independent of each other. The heater intensity may also be varied. In addition, the user may specify any number of layers and thicknesses depthwise into the blade. Thus, the new addition has maximum flexibility in modeling virtually any electrothermal deicer installed into any airfoil. It should be noted that the model simulates both shedding and runback. With the runback capability, it can simulate the anti-icing mode of heater performance, as well as detect icing downstream of the heaters due to runback in unprotected portions of the airfoil. This version of LEWICE can be run in three modes. In mode 1, no conduction heat transfer is modeled (which would be equivalent to the original version of LEWICE). In mode 2, all heat transfer is considered due to conduction but no heaters are firing. In mode 3, conduction heat transfer where the heaters are engaged is modeled, with subsequent ice shedding. When run in the first mode, there is virtually identical agreement with the original version of LEWICE in the prediction of accreted ice shapes. The code may be run in the second mode to determine the effects of conduction on the ice accretion process.

  5. Soil Microbe Active Community Composition and Capability of Responding to Litter Addition after 12 Years of No Inputs

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Elizabeth; Yarwood, Rockie; Lajtha, Kate; Myrold, David

    2013-01-01

    One explanation given for the high microbial diversity found in soils is that they contain a large inactive biomass that is able to persist in soils for long periods of time. This persistent microbial fraction may help to buffer the functionality of the soil community during times of low nutrients by providing a reservoir of specialized functions that can be reactivated when conditions improve. A study was designed to test the hypothesis: in soils lacking fresh root or detrital inputs, microbial community composition may persist relatively unchanged. Upon addition of new inputs, this community will be stimulated to grow and break down litter similarly to control soils. Soils from two of the Detrital Input and Removal Treatments (DIRT) at the H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest, the no-input and control treatment plots, were used in a microcosm experiment where Douglas-fir needles were added to soils. After 3 and 151 days of incubation, soil microbial DNA and RNA was extracted and characterized using quantitative PCR (qPCR) and 454 pyrosequencing. The abundance of 16S and 28S gene copies and RNA copies did not vary with soil type or amendment; however, treatment differences were observed in the abundance of archaeal ammonia-oxidizing amoA gene abundance. Analysis of ∼110,000 bacterial sequences showed a significant change in the active (RNA-based) community between day 3 and day 151, but microbial composition was similar between soil types. These results show that even after 12 years of plant litter exclusion, the legacy of community composition was well buffered against a dramatic disturbance. PMID:23263952

  6. User's manual for a parameter identification technique. [with options for model simulation for fixed input forcing functions and identification from wind tunnel and flight measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanning, G.

    1975-01-01

    A digital computer program written in FORTRAN is presented that implements the system identification theory for deterministic systems using input-output measurements. The user supplies programs simulating the mathematical model of the physical plant whose parameters are to be identified. The user may choose any one of three options. The first option allows for a complete model simulation for fixed input forcing functions. The second option identifies up to 36 parameters of the model from wind tunnel or flight measurements. The third option performs a sensitivity analysis for up to 36 parameters. The use of each option is illustrated with an example using input-output measurements for a helicopter rotor tested in a wind tunnel.

  7. Addition of flexible body option to the TOLA computer program. Part 2: User and programmer documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, J. W.; Benda, B. J.

    1975-01-01

    User and programmer oriented documentation for the flexible body option of the Takeoff and Landing Analysis (TOLA) computer program are provided. The user information provides sufficient knowledge of the development and use of the option to enable the engineering user to successfully operate the modified program and understand the results. The programmer's information describes the option structure and logic enabling a programmer to make major revisions to this part of the TOLA computer program.

  8. Building a Career in English: Users of English as an Additional Language in Academia in the Arabian Gulf

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckingham, Louisa

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates how a group of 30 multilingual academics, all users of English as an additional language (EAL) working at a private university in Oman, acquired discourse community membership in their disciplines through publishing in English, and the strategies they use to sustain the level of literacy needed to disseminate their research…

  9. HiRel: Hybrid Automated Reliability Predictor (HARP) integrated reliability tool system, (version 7.0). Volume 3: HARP Graphics Oriented (GO) input user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bavuso, Salvatore J.; Rothmann, Elizabeth; Mittal, Nitin; Koppen, Sandra Howell

    1994-01-01

    The Hybrid Automated Reliability Predictor (HARP) integrated Reliability (HiRel) tool system for reliability/availability prediction offers a toolbox of integrated reliability/availability programs that can be used to customize the user's application in a workstation or nonworkstation environment. HiRel consists of interactive graphical input/output programs and four reliability/availability modeling engines that provide analytical and simulative solutions to a wide host of highly reliable fault-tolerant system architectures and is also applicable to electronic systems in general. The tool system was designed at the outset to be compatible with most computing platforms and operating systems, and some programs have been beta tested within the aerospace community for over 8 years. This document is a user's guide for the HiRel graphical preprocessor Graphics Oriented (GO) program. GO is a graphical user interface for the HARP engine that enables the drawing of reliability/availability models on a monitor. A mouse is used to select fault tree gates or Markov graphical symbols from a menu for drawing.

  10. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  11. 78 FR 41291 - Additions to the List of Validated End-Users in the People's Republic of China: Samsung China...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-10

    ...In this rule, the Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) amends the Export Administration Regulations to add two end-users in the People's Republic of China to the list of Validated End-Users (VEU). Specifically, BIS amends Supplement No. 7 to part 748 of the EAR to add Samsung China Semiconductor Co. Ltd. (Samsung China) and Advanced Micro-Fabrication Equipment, Inc., China (AMEC) as VEUs.......

  12. Solar information user priority study

    SciTech Connect

    Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.

    1980-05-01

    This report identifies for each solar technology those members or potential members of the solar community who, either currently or in the future, will require solar information. In addition, it rates each user's relative need for information within the next three years. This information will be used as input for subsequent studies that will identify specific user needs information. These studies, in turn, will be the basis for information product and data base development for the Solar Energy Information Data Bank (SEIDB). In addition, they will be input for the Technical Information Dissemination (TID) Program.

  13. User's guide to HELIOS: A computer program for modeling the optical behavior of reflecting solar concentrators. Part 1: Introduction and code input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittitoe, C. N.; Biggs, F.

    1981-08-01

    HELIOS is a flexible computer code for evaluating designs for central receiver, parabolic dish, and other reflecting solar energy collector systems, for safety calculations on the threat to personnel and to the facility itself, for determination of how various input parameters alter the power collected, for design trade offs, and for heliostat evaluations. Input variables include atmospheric transmission effects, reflector shape and surface errors, suntracking errors, focusing and alignment strategies, receiver design, placement positions of the tower and mirrors, and time of day and day of the year for the calculation. Complete input instructions and a description of the code structure are given.

  14. Format( )MEDIC( )Input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, K.

    1994-09-01

    This document is a description of a computer program called Format( )MEDIC( )Input. The purpose of this program is to allow the user to quickly reformat wind velocity data in the Model Evaluation Database (MEDb) into a reasonable 'first cut' set of MEDIC input files (MEDIC.nml, StnLoc.Met, and Observ.Met). The user is cautioned that these resulting input files must be reviewed for correctness and completeness. This program will not format MEDb data into a Problem Station Library or Problem Metdata File. A description of how the program reformats the data is provided, along with a description of the required and optional user input and a description of the resulting output files. A description of the MEDb is not provided here but can be found in the RAS Division Model Evaluation Database Description document.

  15. 75 FR 25763 - Addition to the List of Validated End-Users: Advanced Micro Devices China, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-10

    ... August 13, 2009 (74 FR 41325 (August 14, 2009), has continued the EAR in effect under the International... FR 33646) by creating a new authorization for ``validated end-users'' located in eligible.... 13026, 61 FR 58767, 3 CFR, 1996 Comp., p. 228; E.O. 13222, 66 FR 44025, 3 CFR, 2001 Comp., p....

  16. 75 FR 62462 - Additions to the List of Validated End-Users in the People's Republic of China: Hynix...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... 19, 2007 (72 FR 33646) by creating a new authorization for ``validated end-users'' located in... the Notice of August 12, 2010 (75 FR 50681 (August 16, 2010), has continued the EAR in effect under... (71 FR 38313, July 2, 2006 and 72 FR 33646, June 19, 2007). Given the similarities between...

  17. Structural tailoring of advanced turboprops (STAT): User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, K. W.

    1991-01-01

    This user's manual describes the Structural Tailoring of Advanced Turboprops program. It contains instructions to prepare the input for optimization, blade geometry and analysis, geometry generation, and finite element program control. In addition, a sample input file is provided as well as a section describing special applications (i.e., non-standard input).

  18. The SYSGEN user package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    The user documentation of the SYSGEN model and its links with other simulations is described. The SYSGEN is a production costing and reliability model of electric utility systems. Hydroelectric, storage, and time dependent generating units are modeled in addition to conventional generating plants. Input variables, modeling options, output variables, and reports formats are explained. SYSGEN also can be run interactively by using a program called FEPS (Front End Program for SYSGEN). A format for SYSGEN input variables which is designed for use with FEPS is presented.

  19. 76 FR 24035 - Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-29

    ... legislation would be required for FDA to establish and collect user fees for generic drugs, and FDA is... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting; Request for Comments... gather additional stakeholder input on the development of a generic drug user fee program. A user...

  20. 76 FR 44014 - Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-22

    ... required for FDA to establish and collect user fees for generic drugs, and FDA has been engaged in... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting; Request for Comments... gather additional stakeholder input on the development of a generic drug user fee program. A user...

  1. Web-Based Self-Assessment Health Tools: Who Are the Users and What Is the Impact of Missing Input Information?

    PubMed Central

    Cobain, Mark R; Newson, Rachel S

    2014-01-01

    Background Web-based health applications, such as self-assessment tools, can aid in the early detection and prevention of diseases. However, there are concerns as to whether such tools actually reach users with elevated disease risk (where prevention efforts are still viable), and whether inaccurate or missing information on risk factors may lead to incorrect evaluations. Objective This study aimed to evaluate (1) evaluate whether a Web-based cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk communication tool (Heart Age tool) was reaching users at risk of developing CVD, (2) the impact of awareness of total cholesterol (TC), HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), and systolic blood pressure (SBP) values on the risk estimates, and (3) the key predictors of awareness and reporting of physiological risk factors. Methods Heart Age is a tool available via a free open access website. Data from 2,744,091 first-time users aged 21-80 years with no prior heart disease were collected from 13 countries in 2009-2011. Users self-reported demographic and CVD risk factor information. Based on these data, an individual’s 10-year CVD risk was calculated according to Framingham CVD risk models and translated into a Heart Age. This is the age for which the individual’s reported CVD risk would be considered “normal”. Depending on the availability of known TC, HDL-C, and SBP values, different algorithms were applied. The impact of awareness of TC, HDL-C, and SBP values on Heart Age was determined using a subsample that had complete risk factor information. Results Heart Age users (N=2,744,091) were mostly in their 20s (22.76%) and 40s (23.99%), female (56.03%), had multiple (mean 2.9, SD 1.4) risk factors, and a Heart Age exceeding their chronological age (mean 4.00, SD 6.43 years). The proportion of users unaware of their TC, HDL-C, or SBP values was high (77.47%, 93.03%, and 46.55% respectively). Lacking awareness of physiological risk factor values led to overestimation of Heart Age by an average 2

  2. Drug Use, Personality and Partner Violence: A Model of Separate, Additive, Contributions in an Active Drug User Sample

    PubMed Central

    Jaffe, Adi; Pedersen, William C.; Fisher, Dennis G.; Reynolds, Grace L.; Hershberger, Scott L.; Reise, Steve; Bentler, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Drug use is considered a main contributing factor to crime and violence. This research examined the evidence regarding the relationship between drug abuse and the occurrence of intimate partner violence. Current drug using men were assessed on aggression related personality variables, their drug use, and the occurrence of violence in their close relationships. A latent aggression factor and recent amphetamine use were the only variables found to be significantly associated with violence. No other drug use variables were found to be associated with violence by the participant and the overall drug use factor was not found to be associated with violence or aggressive personality. The widely accepted notion that increased substance use directly leads to increases in violent behavior was only partially supported, at least within this drug using population. The assessment of aggressive personality, rather than of drug use, is suggested for correctional as well as clinical settings in which drug users are prevalent when determining susceptibility to violence. PMID:21165162

  3. Toward a Regional MOD16: Addition of a High-resolution Precipitation Input and a Simple Soil Moisture Component to the MOD16 Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seirer, J.; Running, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    MOD16 is a Penman-Monteith based remote sensing model developed to assess spatial patterns of terrestrial evapotranspiration (ET) across the entire globe. Due to the lack of a satisfactory global precipitation dataset, MOD16 was originally forced to rely on vapor pressure deficit as water stress input. As high resolution precipitation datasets are becoming available, the logic of MOD16 has been revisited to include a daily 4-km gridded precipitation input and a simple soil moisture model. Estimates yielded by the new model, titled "regional MOD16", have been validated against several flux towers in the north central climate region of the United States. Results show that adding a precipitation input and a simple soil moisture model can improve the modeled estimates across multiple biomes and elevation gradients.

  4. STEALTH: a Lagrange explicit finite difference code for solids, structural, and thermohydraulic analysis. Volume 1B: user's manual - input instructions. Computer code manual. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, R.

    1981-11-01

    A useful computer simulation method based on the explicit finite difference technique can be used to address transient dynamic situations associated with nuclear reactor design and analysis. This volume is divided into two parts. Part A contains the theoretical background (physical and numerical) and the numerical equations for the STEALTH 1D, 2D, and 3D computer codes. Part B contains input instructions for all three codes. The STEALTH codes are based entirely on the published technology of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California, and Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  5. 78 FR 54752 - Addition and Revision to the List of Validated End-Users in the People's Republic of China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... items *Intel 78 FR [INSERT PAGE Semiconductor authorized for the Semiconductor NUMBER], 9-6-13. (Dalian... final rule published on June 19, 2007 (72 FR 33646) to create Authorization VEU. Addition to the List of..., 2001 Comp., p. 783 (2002)), as amended by Executive Order 13637 of March 8, 2013, 78 FR 16129 (March...

  6. NASCAP user's manual, 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassidy, J. J., III

    1978-01-01

    NASCAP simulates the charging process for a complex object in either tenuous plasma (geosynchronous orbit) or ground test (electron gun source) environment. Program control words, the structure of user input files, and various user options available are described in this computer programmer's user manual.

  7. COSMIC/NASTRAN Free-field Input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, G. C.

    1984-01-01

    A user's guide to the COSMIC/NASTRAN free field input for the Bulk Data section of the NASTRAN program is proposed. The free field input is designed to be user friendly and the user is not forced out of the computer system due to input errors. It is easy to use, with only a few simple rules to follow. A stand alone version of the COSMIC/NASTRAN free field input is also available. The use of free field input is illustrated by a number of examples.

  8. User`s manual, version 1.00 for Monteburns, version 3.01

    SciTech Connect

    Poston, D.I.; Trellue, H.R.

    1998-06-01

    Monteburns is a fully automated tool that links the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the radioactive decay and burnup code ORIGEN2. Monteburns produces a large number of criticality and burnup results based on various material feed/removal specifications, power(s), and time intervals. The program processes input from the user that specifies the system geometry, initial material compositions, feed/removal specifications, and other code-specific parameters. Various results from MCNP, ORIGEN2, and other calculations are then output successively as the code runs. The principle function of monteburns is to transfer one-group cross section and flux values from MCNP to ORIGEN2, and then transfer the resulting material compositions (after irradiation and/or decay) from ORIGEN2 back to MCNP in a repeated, cyclic fashion. The basic requirement of the code is that the user have a working MCNP input file and other input parameters; all interaction with ORIGEN2 and other calculations are performed by monteburns. This report serves as a user`s manual for monteburns. It describes how the code functions, what input the user must provide, the calculations performed by the code, and it presents the format required for input files, as well as samples of these files. Monteburns is still in a developmental stage; thus, additions and/or changes may be made over time, and the user`s manual will change as well. This is the first version of the user`s manual (valid for monteburns version 3.01); users should contact the authors to inquire if a more recent version is available.

  9. CHARMM-GUI Input Generator for NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM Simulations Using the CHARMM36 Additive Force Field

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jumin; Cheng, Xi; Swails, Jason M.; Yeom, Min Sun; Eastman, Peter K.; Lemkul, Justin A.; Wei, Shuai; Buckner, Joshua; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Qi, Yifei; Jo, Sunhwan; Pande, Vijay S.; Case, David A.; Brooks, Charles L.; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Klauda, Jeffery B.; Im, Wonpil

    2015-11-12

    Here we report that proper treatment of nonbonded interactions is essential for the accuracy of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, especially in studies of lipid bilayers. The use of the CHARMM36 force field (C36 FF) in different MD simulation programs can result in disagreements with published simulations performed with CHARMM due to differences in the protocols used to treat the long-range and 1-4 nonbonded interactions. In this study, we systematically test the use of the C36 lipid FF in NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM. A wide range of Lennard-Jones (LJ) cutoff schemes and integrator algorithms were tested to find the optimal simulation protocol to best match bilayer properties of six lipids with varying acyl chain saturation and head groups. MD simulations of a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer were used to obtain the optimal protocol for each program. MD simulations with all programs were found to reasonably match the DPPC bilayer properties (surface area per lipid, chain order parameters, and area compressibility modulus) obtained using the standard protocol used in CHARMM as well as from experiments. The optimal simulation protocol was then applied to the other five lipid simulations and resulted in excellent agreement between results from most simulation programs as well as with experimental data. AMBER compared least favorably with the expected membrane properties, which appears to be due to its use of the hard-truncation in the LJ potential versus a force-based switching function used to smooth the LJ potential as it approaches the cutoff distance. The optimal simulation protocol for each program has been implemented in CHARMM-GUI. This protocol is expected to be applicable to the remainder of the additive C36 FF including the proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and small molecules.

  10. CHARMM-GUI Input Generator for NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM Simulations Using the CHARMM36 Additive Force Field

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Proper treatment of nonbonded interactions is essential for the accuracy of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, especially in studies of lipid bilayers. The use of the CHARMM36 force field (C36 FF) in different MD simulation programs can result in disagreements with published simulations performed with CHARMM due to differences in the protocols used to treat the long-range and 1-4 nonbonded interactions. In this study, we systematically test the use of the C36 lipid FF in NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM. A wide range of Lennard-Jones (LJ) cutoff schemes and integrator algorithms were tested to find the optimal simulation protocol to best match bilayer properties of six lipids with varying acyl chain saturation and head groups. MD simulations of a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer were used to obtain the optimal protocol for each program. MD simulations with all programs were found to reasonably match the DPPC bilayer properties (surface area per lipid, chain order parameters, and area compressibility modulus) obtained using the standard protocol used in CHARMM as well as from experiments. The optimal simulation protocol was then applied to the other five lipid simulations and resulted in excellent agreement between results from most simulation programs as well as with experimental data. AMBER compared least favorably with the expected membrane properties, which appears to be due to its use of the hard-truncation in the LJ potential versus a force-based switching function used to smooth the LJ potential as it approaches the cutoff distance. The optimal simulation protocol for each program has been implemented in CHARMM-GUI. This protocol is expected to be applicable to the remainder of the additive C36 FF including the proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and small molecules. PMID:26631602

  11. CHARMM-GUI Input Generator for NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM Simulations Using the CHARMM36 Additive Force Field

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lee, Jumin; Cheng, Xi; Swails, Jason M.; Yeom, Min Sun; Eastman, Peter K.; Lemkul, Justin A.; Wei, Shuai; Buckner, Joshua; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Qi, Yifei; et al

    2015-11-12

    Here we report that proper treatment of nonbonded interactions is essential for the accuracy of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, especially in studies of lipid bilayers. The use of the CHARMM36 force field (C36 FF) in different MD simulation programs can result in disagreements with published simulations performed with CHARMM due to differences in the protocols used to treat the long-range and 1-4 nonbonded interactions. In this study, we systematically test the use of the C36 lipid FF in NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM. A wide range of Lennard-Jones (LJ) cutoff schemes and integrator algorithms were tested to find themore » optimal simulation protocol to best match bilayer properties of six lipids with varying acyl chain saturation and head groups. MD simulations of a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer were used to obtain the optimal protocol for each program. MD simulations with all programs were found to reasonably match the DPPC bilayer properties (surface area per lipid, chain order parameters, and area compressibility modulus) obtained using the standard protocol used in CHARMM as well as from experiments. The optimal simulation protocol was then applied to the other five lipid simulations and resulted in excellent agreement between results from most simulation programs as well as with experimental data. AMBER compared least favorably with the expected membrane properties, which appears to be due to its use of the hard-truncation in the LJ potential versus a force-based switching function used to smooth the LJ potential as it approaches the cutoff distance. The optimal simulation protocol for each program has been implemented in CHARMM-GUI. This protocol is expected to be applicable to the remainder of the additive C36 FF including the proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and small molecules.« less

  12. SD-4060OCPLT4 program, user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazer, J.

    1973-01-01

    A brief description of the Orbit Comparison Plot (OCPLT4) program is presented, along with user information and a source program listing. In addition to correcting several errors that existed in the original program, this program incorporates the following new features: (1) For any satellite whose observations are processed by the Definitive Orbit Determination System (DODS), the orbital uncertainty estimates (OUE) can be obtained via appropriate card input with no major modification to the program. (2) All satellite-related information (e.g., plotter scales, cutoff limits, plotting frequencies) is user controlled via card input. (3) Not all components of OUE must be obtained. The user has the option of obtaining only the radial component if there is no need for the other two components. (4) The altitude and time graph formats are controlled by the user and are not stored for specific satellites.

  13. Systems and methods for reconfiguring input devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, Jeff (Inventor); De Mers, Robert E. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A system includes an input device having first and second input members configured to be activated by a user. The input device is configured to generate activation signals associated with activation of the first and second input members, and each of the first and second input members are associated with an input function. A processor is coupled to the input device and configured to receive the activation signals. A memory coupled to the processor, and includes a reconfiguration module configured to store the input functions assigned to the first and second input members and, upon execution of the processor, to reconfigure the input functions assigned to the input members when the first input member is inoperable.

  14. CHEMFORM user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoreen, A.; Toran, L.

    1996-01-01

    CHEMFORM is a DOS-based program which converts geochemical data files into the format read by the U.S. Geological Survey family of models: WATEQ4F, PHREEQE, or NETPATH. These geochemical models require data formatted in a particular order, which typically does not match data storage. CHEMFORM converts geochemical data that are stored in an ASCII file to input files that can be read by these models, without being re-entered by hand. The data may be in any order and format in the original file, as long as they are separated by blanks. The location of each data element in the input file is entered in CHEMFORM. Any required data that are not present in your file may also be entered. The positions of the data in the input file are saved to be used as defaults for the next run. CHEMFORM runs in two modes. In the first mode, it will read one input file and write one output file. The input file may contain data on multiple lines, and the user will specify both line number and position of each item in CHEMFORM. This mode facilitates the conversion of the input from one model to the format needed by another model. In the second mode, the CHEMFORM input files contains more than one water analysis. All the geochemical data for a given sample are stored on one line, and CHEMFORM writes an output file for each line. This mode is useful when many samples are available for a site in the same format (different monitoring points or samples taken at different times from one monitoring point).

  15. LTCP 2D Graphical User Interface. Application Description and User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, Robert; Navaz, Homayun K.

    1996-01-01

    A graphical user interface (GUI) written for NASA's LTCP (Liquid Thrust Chamber Performance) 2 dimensional computational fluid dynamic code is described. The GUI is written in C++ for a desktop personal computer running under a Microsoft Windows operating environment. Through the use of common and familiar dialog boxes, features, and tools, the user can easily and quickly create and modify input files for the LTCP code. In addition, old input files used with the LTCP code can be opened and modified using the GUI. The application is written in C++ for a desktop personal computer running under a Microsoft Windows operating environment. The program and its capabilities are presented, followed by a detailed description of each menu selection and the method of creating an input file for LTCP. A cross reference is included to help experienced users quickly find the variables which commonly need changes. Finally, the system requirements and installation instructions are provided.

  16. Development of a User Interface for a Regression Analysis Software Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, Norbert Manfred; Volden, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    An easy-to -use user interface was implemented in a highly automated regression analysis tool. The user interface was developed from the start to run on computers that use the Windows, Macintosh, Linux, or UNIX operating system. Many user interface features were specifically designed such that a novice or inexperienced user can apply the regression analysis tool with confidence. Therefore, the user interface s design minimizes interactive input from the user. In addition, reasonable default combinations are assigned to those analysis settings that influence the outcome of the regression analysis. These default combinations will lead to a successful regression analysis result for most experimental data sets. The user interface comes in two versions. The text user interface version is used for the ongoing development of the regression analysis tool. The official release of the regression analysis tool, on the other hand, has a graphical user interface that is more efficient to use. This graphical user interface displays all input file names, output file names, and analysis settings for a specific software application mode on a single screen which makes it easier to generate reliable analysis results and to perform input parameter studies. An object-oriented approach was used for the development of the graphical user interface. This choice keeps future software maintenance costs to a reasonable limit. Examples of both the text user interface and graphical user interface are discussed in order to illustrate the user interface s overall design approach.

  17. ACARA user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalnaker, Dale K.

    1993-01-01

    ACARA (Availability, Cost, and Resource Allocation) is a computer program which analyzes system availability, lifecycle cost (LCC), and resupply scheduling using Monte Carlo analysis to simulate component failure and replacement. This manual was written to: (1) explain how to prepare and enter input data for use in ACARA; (2) explain the user interface, menus, input screens, and input tables; (3) explain the algorithms used in the program; and (4) explain each table and chart in the output.

  18. Analog Input Data Acquisition Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    DAQ Master Software allows users to easily set up a system to monitor up to five analog input channels and save the data after acquisition. This program was written in LabVIEW 8.0, and requires the LabVIEW runtime engine 8.0 to run the executable.

  19. RADTRAN 5 user guide.

    SciTech Connect

    Kanipe, Frances L.; Neuhauser, Karen Sieglinde

    2003-07-01

    This User Guide for the RADTRAN 5 computer code for transportation risk analysis describes basic risk concepts and provides the user with step-by-step directions for creating input files by means of either the RADDOG input file generator software or a text editor. It also contains information on how to interpret RADTRAN 5 output, how to obtain and use several types of important input data, and how to select appropriate analysis methods. Appendices include a glossary of terms, a listing of error messages, data-plotting information, images of RADDOG screens, and a table of all data in the internal radionuclide library.

  20. Analysis of Stochastic Response of Neural Networks with Stochastic Input

    1996-10-10

    Software permits the user to extend capability of his/her neural network to include probablistic characteristics of input parameter. User inputs topology and weights associated with neural network along with distributional characteristics of input parameters. Network response is provided via a cumulative density function of network response variable.

  1. Minimum Hamiltonian ascent trajectory evaluation (MASTRE) program (update to automatic flight trajectory design, performance prediction, and vehicle sizing for support of shuttle and shuttle derived vehicles) users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, J. T.; Borchers, William R.

    1993-01-01

    Documentation for the User Interface Program for the Minimum Hamiltonian Ascent Trajectory Evaluation (MASTRE) is provided. The User Interface Program is a separate software package designed to ease the user input requirements when using the MASTRE Trajectory Program. This document supplements documentation on the MASTRE Program that consists of the MASTRE Engineering Manual and the MASTRE Programmers Guide. The User Interface Program provides a series of menus and tables using the VAX Screen Management Guideline (SMG) software. These menus and tables allow the user to modify the MASTRE Program input without the need for learning the various program dependent mnemonics. In addition, the User Interface Program allows the user to modify and/or review additional input Namelist and data files, to build and review command files, to formulate and calculate mass properties related data, and to have a plotting capability.

  2. SVX4 User's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Christofek, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hoff, J.; Kreiger, B.; Rapidis, P.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Utes, M.; Weber, M.; Yarema, R.; Zimmerman, T.; /Fermilab

    2005-06-01

    We present and describe the operation of the SVX4 chip. The SVX4 is a custom 128-channel analog to digital converter chip used by D0 and CDF in Run IIb to read out their respective silicon strip detectors. Each channel consists of an integrator (Front-End device, or FE) and a digitize/readout section (Back-End device, or BE). The input to each channel is sampled and temporarily stored in its own storage capacitor. Upon receiving a trigger signal, the relevant pipeline cell is reserved. Subsequent signals cause reserved cells to be digitized by a 128 parallel channel Wilkinson type 8-bit ADC, and then readout in byte-serial mode with optional zero suppression (sparsification). Salient features include (1) operation in either D0 mode or CDF mode (CDF mode features ''dead timeless operation'' or continued acquisition during digitization and readout) with an additional mixed mode of operation, (2) adjustable, loadable control parameters, including the integrator bandwidth and ADC polarity (only one input charge polarity will be used for Run IIb, but this feature remains for diagnostic purposes), (3) sparsified readout with nearest neighbor logic, (4) built-in charge injection with the ability for external voltage overriding for testing and calibration, and (5) a channel mask that is used for either charge injection or for masking of channels with excessive DC current input during chip operation. This document is meant to familiarize the user with the functionality of the SVX4 and goes on to include specifications, pin outs, timings and electrical information. Additional information on the SVX4 can be found in Ref [1].

  3. Latin hypercube sampling (program user's guide). [LHC, in FORTRAN

    SciTech Connect

    Iman, R.L.; Davenport, J.M.; Zeigler, D.K.

    1980-01-01

    This document is designed for users of the program developed at Sandia Laboratories by the authors to generate Latin hypercube samples. Latin hypercube sampling is a recently developed sampling technique for generating input vectors into computer models for purposes of sensitivity analysis studies. In addition to providing a cost-effective and reliable sampling scheme, the Latin hypercube sampling technique also provides the user with the flexibility efficiently to study effects of distributional assumptions on key input variables without rerunning the computer model. 5 figures, 2 tables.

  4. Flight dynamics analysis and simulation of heavy lift airships. Volume 3: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmen, R. D.; Tischler, M. B.

    1982-01-01

    The User's Manual provides the basic information necessary to run the programs. This includes descriptions of the various data files necessary for the program, the various outputs from the program and the options available to the user when executing the program. Additional data file information is contained in the three appendices to the manual. These appendices list all input variables and their permissible values, an example listing of these variables, and all output variables available to the user.

  5. Serial Input Output

    SciTech Connect

    Waite, Anthony; /SLAC

    2011-09-07

    Serial Input/Output (SIO) is designed to be a long term storage format of a sophistication somewhere between simple ASCII files and the techniques provided by inter alia Objectivity and Root. The former tend to be low density, information lossy (floating point numbers lose precision) and inflexible. The latter require abstract descriptions of the data with all that that implies in terms of extra complexity. The basic building blocks of SIO are streams, records and blocks. Streams provide the connections between the program and files. The user can define an arbitrary list of streams as required. A given stream must be opened for either reading or writing. SIO does not support read/write streams. If a stream is closed during the execution of a program, it can be reopened in either read or write mode to the same or a different file. Records represent a coherent grouping of data. Records consist of a collection of blocks (see next paragraph). The user can define a variety of records (headers, events, error logs, etc.) and request that any of them be written to any stream. When SIO reads a file, it first decodes the record name and if that record has been defined and unpacking has been requested for it, SIO proceeds to unpack the blocks. Blocks are user provided objects which do the real work of reading/writing the data. The user is responsible for writing the code for these blocks and for identifying these blocks to SIO at run time. To write a collection of blocks, the user must first connect them to a record. The record can then be written to a stream as described above. Note that the same block can be connected to many different records. When SIO reads a record, it scans through the blocks written and calls the corresponding block object (if it has been defined) to decode it. Undefined blocks are skipped. Each of these categories (streams, records and blocks) have some characteristics in common. Every stream, record and block has a name with the condition that each

  6. Advanced software development workstation project ACCESS user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    ACCESS is a knowledge based software information system designed to assist the user in modifying retrieved software to satisfy user specifications. A user's guide is presented for the knowledge engineer who wishes to create for ACCESS a knowledge base consisting of representations of objects in some software system. This knowledge is accessible to an end user who wishes to use the catalogued software objects to create a new application program or an input stream for an existing system. The application specific portion of an ACCESS knowledge base consists of a taxonomy of object classes, as well as instances of these classes. All objects in the knowledge base are stored in an associative memory. ACCESS provides a standard interface for the end user to browse and modify objects. In addition, the interface can be customized by the addition of application specific data entry forms and by specification of display order for the taxonomy and object attributes. These customization options are described.

  7. PALP -- a user manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Andreas P.; Knapp, Johanna; Scheidegger, Emanuel; Skarke, Harald; Walliser, Nils-Ole

    2013-10-01

    This article provides a complete user's guide to version 2.1 of the toric geometry package PALP by Maximilian Kreuzer and others. In particular, previously undocumented applications such as the program Nef.X are discussed in detail. New features of PALP 2.1 include an extension of the program mori.x which can now compute Mori cones and intersection rings of arbitrary dimension and can also take specific triangulations of reflexive polytopes as input. Furthermore, the program nef.x is enhanced by an option that allows the user to enter reflexive Gorenstein cones as input. The present documentation is complemented by a Wiki which is available online.

  8. Salinas - User's Notes

    SciTech Connect

    ALVIN,KENNETH F.; BHARDWAJ,MANOJ K.; DRIESSEN,BRIAN; REESE,GARTH M.; SEGALMAN,DANIEL J.

    1999-11-01

    Salinas provides a massively parallel implementation of structural dynamics finite element analysis, required for high fidelity, validated models used in modal, vibration, static and shock analysis of weapons systems. This document provides a users guide to the input for Salinas. Details of input specifications for the different solution types, output options, element types and parameters are included. The appendices contain detailed examples, and instructions for running the software on parallel platforms.

  9. SERV user`s guide. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, M.D.; Bakhsh, H.; Lee, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    The Sizing of Energy Recovery Ventilator (SERV) software described in this manual is intended to size an energy recovery ventilator in new and existing single-family residences, based on ASHRAE guidelines for the rate at which outdoor air is to be delivered to an indoor space to ensure acceptable air quality. The user is asked to select a city that has climatic conditions most representative of the house under consideration. Other inputs required from the user include: (1) house leakiness and terrain sheltering factors; (2) estimated annual house energy costs; (3) number, capacity and weekly operation hours for vented exhaust fans; and (4) HVAC system COP/efficiency values. Default values (which the user can override) are provided for most input parameters, and help screens are provided to assist the user in determining appropriate input values. The program estimates the average air infiltration rates for summer and winter, and combines these calculations with estimates of ventilation due to intermittent use of exhaust fans in determining the baseline ventilation rate. An energy recovery ventilator is sized to provide any supplemental ventilation necessary to satisfy air change requirements imposed by ASHRAE Standard 62-1989 (Ventilation for Acceptable Air Quality). The program then calculates (1) the annual energy and associated cost for providing the supplemental ventilation, and (2) the relative impact of the added ventilation on indoor concentrations of four pollutants--carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, formaldehyde and radon.

  10. An analysis for high speed propeller-nacelle aerodynamic performance prediction. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolf, T. Alan; Anderson, Olof L.; Edwards, David E.; Landgrebe, Anton J.

    1988-01-01

    A user's manual for the computer program developed for the prediction of propeller-nacelle aerodynamic performance reported in, An Analysis for High Speed Propeller-Nacelle Aerodynamic Performance Prediction: Volume 1 -- Theory and Application, is presented. The manual describes the computer program mode of operation requirements, input structure, input data requirements and the program output. In addition, it provides the user with documentation of the internal program structure and the software used in the computer program as it relates to the theory presented in Volume 1. Sample input data setups are provided along with selected printout of the program output for one of the sample setups.

  11. BLOCKAGE 2.5 user`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, D.V.; Brideau, J.; Shaffer, C.; Souto, F.; Bernahl, W.

    1996-12-01

    The BLOCKAGE 2.5 code described in this User`s Manual was developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as a tool to evaluate licensee compliance with NRC Bulletin 96-03, ``Potential Plugging of Emergency Core Cooling Suction Strainers by Debris in Boiling Water Reactors.`` As such, BLOCKAGE 2.5 provides a generalized framework into which a user can input plant-specific and insulation-specific data for performing analyses in accordance with Regulatory Guide 1.82, Rev. 2. This user`s manual describes the capabilities of BLOCKAGE 2.5 along with a description of the graphics user`s interface provided for data entry. Each input/output dialog is described in detail along with special considerations related to developing and executing BLOCKAGE. Also, several sample problems are provided such that user can easily modify them to suit a particular plant of interest. The models used in BLOCKAGE 2.5 and their validation are presented in the accompanying NUREG/CR-6371. The BLOCKAGE models were designed to be parametric in nature, allowing the user flexibility to examine the impact of several modeling assumptions and to conduct sensitivity analyses. As a result, BLOCKAGE 2.5 results are known to be very sensitive to the user provided input. It is therefore strongly recommended that users become thoroughly familiar with BLOCKAGE models and their limitations as described in NUREG/CR-6224.

  12. Hypermnesia using auditory input.

    PubMed

    Allen, J

    1992-07-01

    The author investigated whether hypermnesia would occur with auditory input. In addition, the author examined the effects of subjects' knowledge that they would later be asked to recall the stimuli. Two groups of 26 subjects each were given three successive recall trials after they listened to an audiotape of 59 high-imagery nouns. The subjects in the uninformed group were not told that they would later be asked to remember the words; those in the informed group were. Hypermnesia was evident, but only in the uninformed group. PMID:1447564

  13. Evidence of Shared Genome-Wide Additive Genetic Effects on Interpersonal Trauma Exposure and Generalized Vulnerability to Drug Dependence in a Population of Substance Users.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Rohan H C; Nugent, Nicole R; Brick, Leslie A; Bidwell, Cinnamon L; McGeary, John E; Keller, Matthew C; Knopik, Valerie S

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to traumatic experiences is associated with an increased risk for drug dependence and poorer response to substance abuse treatment (Claus & Kindleberger, 2002; Jaycox, Ebener, Damesek, & Becker, 2004). Despite this evidence, the reasons for the observed associations of trauma and the general tendency to be dependent upon drugs of abuse remain unclear. Data (N = 2,596) from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment were used to analyze (a) the degree to which commonly occurring single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; minor allele frequency > 1%) in the human genome explains exposure to interpersonal traumatic experiences, and (b) the extent to which additive genetic effects on trauma are shared with additive genetic effects on drug dependence. Our results suggested moderate additive genetic influences on interpersonal trauma, h(2) SNP-Interpersonal = .47, 95% confidence interval (CI) [.10, .85], that are partially shared with additive genetic effects on generalized vulnerability to drug dependence, h(2) SNP-DD = .36, 95% CI [.11, .61]; rG-SNP = .49, 95% CI [.02, .96]. Although the design/technique does not exclude the possibility that substance abuse causally increases risk for traumatic experiences (or vice versa), these findings raise the possibility that commonly occurring SNPs influence both the general tendency towards drug dependence and interpersonal trauma. PMID:27214850

  14. The Chaco user`s guide. Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.

    1993-11-01

    Graph partitioning is a fundamental problem in many scientific settings. This document describes the capabilities and operation of Chaco, a software package designed to partition graphs. Chaco allows for recursive application of any of several different methods for finding small edge separators in weighted graphs. These methods include inertial, spectral, Kernighan-Lin and multilevel methods in addition to several simpler strategies. Each of these methods can be used to partition the graph into two, four or eight pieces at each level of recursion. In addition, the Kernighan-Lin method can be used to improve partitions generated by any of the other methods. Brief descriptions of these methods are provided, along with references to relevant literature. The user interface, input/output formats and appropriate settings for a variety of code parameters are discussed in detail, and some suggestions on algorithm selection are offered.

  15. Flight Test Validation of Optimal Input Design and Comparison to Conventional Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    1997-01-01

    A technique for designing optimal inputs for aerodynamic parameter estimation was flight tested on the F-18 High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV). Model parameter accuracies calculated from flight test data were compared on an equal basis for optimal input designs and conventional inputs at the same flight condition. In spite of errors in the a priori input design models and distortions of the input form by the feedback control system, the optimal inputs increased estimated parameter accuracies compared to conventional 3-2-1-1 and doublet inputs. In addition, the tests using optimal input designs demonstrated enhanced design flexibility, allowing the optimal input design technique to use a larger input amplitude to achieve further increases in estimated parameter accuracy without departing from the desired flight test condition. This work validated the analysis used to develop the optimal input designs, and demonstrated the feasibility and practical utility of the optimal input design technique.

  16. A user`s guide for the STARTER computer program. Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, R.L.; Petrie, L.M.; Landers, N.F.

    1991-12-01

    The STARTER computer code is used to prepare a starting source distribution for the criticality computer code, KENO V.a. The input description and theoretical basis of the STARTER code are described in this user`s guide.

  17. TIA Software User's Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Syed, Hazari I.

    1995-01-01

    This user's manual describes the installation and operation of TIA, the Thermal-Imaging acquisition and processing Application, developed by the Nondestructive Evaluation Sciences Branch at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. TIA is a user friendly graphical interface application for the Macintosh 2 and higher series computers. The software has been developed to interface with the Perceptics/Westinghouse Pixelpipe(TM) and PixelStore(TM) NuBus cards and the GW Instruments MacADIOS(TM) input-output (I/O) card for the Macintosh for imaging thermal data. The software is also capable of performing generic image-processing functions.

  18. User's manual for MacPASCO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, S. H.; Davis, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    A user's manual is presented for MacPASCO, which is an interactive, graphic, preprocessor for panel design. MacPASCO creates input for PASCO, an existing computer code for structural analysis and sizing of longitudinally stiffened composite panels. MacPASCO provides a graphical user interface which simplifies the specification of panel geometry and reduces user input errors. The user draws the initial structural geometry and reduces user input errors. The user draws the initial structural geometry on the computer screen, then uses a combination of graphic and text inputs to: refine the structural geometry; specify information required for analysis such as panel load and boundary conditions; and define design variables and constraints for minimum mass optimization. Only the use of MacPASCO is described, since the use of PASCO has been documented elsewhere.

  19. A user's manual for Electromagnetic Surface Patch (ESP) code. Version 2: Polygonal plates and wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, E. H.; Alexandropoulos, P.

    1983-09-01

    This report serves as a user's manual for the Electromagnetic Surface Patch (ESP) Code. This code is a method of moments solution for interconnections of thin wires and polygonal plates. The code can compute currents, input impedance, efficiency, mutual coupling, and far-zone radiation and scattering patterns. In addition to describing the code input and output, the use of the code is illustrated by simple examples. Subroutine descriptions are also given.

  20. Opportunistic tangible user interfaces for augmented reality.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Steven; Feiner, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Opportunistic Controls are a class of user interaction techniques that we have developed for augmented reality (AR) applications to support gesturing on, and receiving feedback from, otherwise unused affordances already present in the domain environment. By leveraging characteristics of these affordances to provide passive haptics that ease gesture input, Opportunistic Controls simplify gesture recognition, and provide tangible feedback to the user. In this approach, 3D widgets are tightly coupled with affordances to provide visual feedback and hints about the functionality of the control. For example, a set of buttons can be mapped to existing tactile features on domain objects. We describe examples of Opportunistic Controls that we have designed and implemented using optical marker tracking, combined with appearance-based gesture recognition. We present the results of two user studies. In the first, participants performed a simulated maintenance inspection of an aircraft engine using a set of virtual buttons implemented both as Opportunistic Controls and using simpler passive haptics. Opportunistic Controls allowed participants to complete their tasks significantly faster and were preferred over the baseline technique. In the second, participants proposed and demonstrated user interfaces incorporating Opportunistic Controls for two domains, allowing us to gain additional insights into how user interfaces featuring Opportunistic Controls might be designed. PMID:19910657

  1. Modular Manufacturing Simulator: Users Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Modular Manufacturing Simulator (MMS) has been developed for the beginning user of computer simulations. Consequently, the MMS cannot model complex systems that require branching and convergence logic. Once a user becomes more proficient in computer simulation and wants to add more complexity, the user is encouraged to use one of the many available commercial simulation systems. The (MMS) is based on the SSE5 that was developed in the early 1990's by the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH). A recent survey by MSFC indicated that the simulator has been a major contributor to the economic impact of the MSFC technology transfer program. Many manufacturers have requested additional features for the SSE5. Consequently, the following features have been added to the MMS that are not available in the SSE5: runs under Windows, print option for both input parameters and output statistics, operator can be fixed at a station or assigned to a group of stations, operator movement based on time limit, part limit, or work-in-process (WIP) limit at next station. The movement options for a moveable operators are: go to station with largest WIP, rabbit chase where operator moves in circular sequence between stations, and push/pull where operator moves back and forth between stations. This user's manual contains the necessary information for installing the MMS on a PC, a description of the various MMS commands, and the solutions to a number of sample problems using the MMS. Also included in the beginning of this report is a brief discussion of technology transfer.

  2. A Voice and Mouse Input Interface for 3D Virtual Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David L.; Bryson, Steve T.

    2003-01-01

    There have been many successful stories on how 3D input devices can be fully integrated into an immersive virtual environment. Electromagnetic trackers, optical trackers, gloves, and flying mice are just some of these input devices. Though we can use existing 3D input devices that are commonly used for VR applications, there are several factors that prevent us from choosing these input devices for our applications. One main factor is that most of these tracking devices are not suitable for prolonged use due to human fatigue associated with using them. A second factor is that many of them would occupy additional office space. Another factor is that many of the 3D input devices are expensive due to the unusual hardware that are required. For our VR applications, we want a user interface that would work naturally with standard equipment. In this paper, we demonstrate applications or our proposed muitimodal interface using a 3D dome display. We also show that effective data analysis can be achieved while the scientists view their data rendered inside the dome display and perform user interactions simply using the mouse and voice input. Though the sphere coordinate grid seems to be ideal for interaction using a 3D dome display, we can also use other non-spherical grids as well.

  3. User Registration in EOSDIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, K. J.; Mitchell, A. E.

    2009-12-01

    Throughout the lifetime of EOSDIS the topic of user registration has received varied attention. Initially, for example, users ordering data from the Earth Science Data Gateway were required to register for delivery of media orders, to check order status and save profile information for future interactions. As EOSDIS embraced evolution of its data systems, the mostly centralized search and order system was replaced with a more diverse set of interfaces allowing (mostly) anonymous online access to data, tools and services. The changes to EOSDIS were embraced by users but the anonymous nature of the interaction made it more difficult to characterize users, capture metrics and provide customized services that benefit users. Additionally, new tools and interfaces have been developed without a centralized registration system. Currently a patchwork of independent registration systems exists throughout EOSDIS for ordering data and interacting with online tools and services. Each requires a separate username and password that must be managed by users. A consolidation of registration systems presents an opportunity to improve not only the user experience through tool customization and simplification of password management, but the understanding of users. This work discusses the options for implementing a common user registration for the EOSDIS, anticipated benefits and pitfalls.

  4. GRSAC Users Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, S.J.; Nypaver, D.J.

    1999-02-01

    An interactive workstation-based simulation code (GRSAC) for studying postulated severe accidents in gas-cooled reactors has been developed to accommodate user-generated input with ''smart front-end'' checking. Code features includes on- and off-line plotting, on-line help and documentation, and an automated sensitivity study option. The code and its predecessors have been validated using comparisons with a variety of experimental data and similar codes. GRSAC model features include a three-dimensional representation of the core thermal hydraulics, and optional ATWS (anticipated transients without scram) capabilities. The user manual includes a detailed description of the code features, and includes four case studies which guide the user through four different examples of the major uses of GRSAC: an accident case; an initial conditions setup and run; a sensitivity study; and the setup of a new reactor model.

  5. GEOS-5 Chemistry Transport Model User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouatchou, J.; Molod, A.; Nielsen, J. E.; Auer, B.; Putman, W.; Clune, T.

    2015-01-01

    The Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) General Circulation Model (GCM) makes use of the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF) to enable model configurations with many functions. One of the options of the GEOS-5 GCM is the GEOS-5 Chemistry Transport Model (GEOS-5 CTM), which is an offline simulation of chemistry and constituent transport driven by a specified meteorology and other model output fields. This document describes the basic components of the GEOS-5 CTM, and is a user's guide on to how to obtain and run simulations on the NCCS Discover platform. In addition, we provide information on how to change the model configuration input files to meet users' needs.

  6. User`s guide to ESME v. 8.1

    SciTech Connect

    MacLachlan, J.

    1993-08-26

    ESME is a computer program to calculate the evolution of a distribution of particles in energy and azimuth as it is acted upon by the radio frequency system of a proton synchrotron. It provides for the modeling of multiple rf systems, feedback control, space charge, and many of the effects of longitudinal coupling impedance. The capabilities of the program are described, and the requirements for input data are specified in sufficient detail to permit significant calculations by an uninitiated user. The program is currently at version 8.1 and extensively modified since the previous user documentation. Changes since the 7.xx versions include a new command and associated parameters for mapping phase space flow lines, new names for a few parameters, and a few new parameters for old commands. Special attention has been given to features relating to calculation of the collective potential and the generation of phase space trajectories including its effects. The VAX-based code management convention has been modified slightly to permit pre-compile options to be used in the include files as well as the program source files. The biggest change from v. 8.0 to v. 8.1 is the addition of code for HIGZ-based graphics; the new code and that using DI3000/GRAFMAKER are alternatives selectable at compilation. Other changes relate to improved control of smoothing options in the calculation of collective potential, fourier spectra, and mountain range plots.

  7. Talking Speech Input.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berliss-Vincent, Jane; Whitford, Gigi

    2002-01-01

    This article presents both the factors involved in successful speech input use and the potential barriers that may suggest that other access technologies could be more appropriate for a given individual. Speech input options that are available are reviewed and strategies for optimizing use of speech recognition technology are discussed. (Contains…

  8. MDS MIC Catalog Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Vowell, C. W.; Smith, Byron; Darcy, Jeannette

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the inputs to the MDS Medical Information Communique (MIC) catalog. The purpose of the group is to provide input for updating the MDS MIC Catalog and to request that MMOP assign Action Item to other working groups and FSs to support the MITWG Process for developing MIC-DDs.

  9. High input impedance amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard L.

    1995-01-01

    High input impedance amplifiers are provided which reduce the input impedance solely to a capacitive reactance, or, in a somewhat more complex design, provide an extremely high essentially infinite, capacitive reactance. In one embodiment, where the input impedance is reduced in essence, to solely a capacitive reactance, an operational amplifier in a follower configuration is driven at its non-inverting input and a resistor with a predetermined magnitude is connected between the inverting and non-inverting inputs. A second embodiment eliminates the capacitance from the input by adding a second stage to the first embodiment. The second stage is a second operational amplifier in a non-inverting gain-stage configuration where the output of the first follower stage drives the non-inverting input of the second stage and the output of the second stage is fed back to the non-inverting input of the first stage through a capacitor of a predetermined magnitude. These amplifiers, while generally useful, are very useful as sensor buffer amplifiers that may eliminate significant sources of error.

  10. User computer system pilot project

    SciTech Connect

    Eimutis, E.C.

    1989-09-06

    The User Computer System (UCS) is a general purpose unclassified, nonproduction system for Mound users. The UCS pilot project was successfully completed, and the system currently has more than 250 users. Over 100 tables were installed on the UCS for use by subscribers, including tables containing data on employees, budgets, and purchasing. In addition, a UCS training course was developed and implemented.

  11. CARE 3 user-friendly interface user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martensen, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    CARE 3 predicts the unreliability of highly reliable reconfigurable fault-tolerant systems that include redundant computers or computer systems. CARE3MENU is a user-friendly interface used to create an input for the CARE 3 program. The CARE3MENU interface has been designed to minimize user input errors. Although a CARE3MENU session may be successfully completed and all parameters may be within specified limits or ranges, the CARE 3 program is not guaranteed to produce meaningful results if the user incorrectly interprets the CARE 3 stochastic model. The CARE3MENU User Guide provides complete information on how to create a CARE 3 model with the interface. The CARE3MENU interface runs under the VAX/VMS operating system.

  12. User`s manual for GILDA: An infinite lattice diffusion theory calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Le, T.T.

    1991-11-01

    GILDA is a static two-dimensional diffusion theory code that performs either buckling (B{sup 2}) or k-effective (k{sub eff}) calculations for an infinite hexagonal lattice which is constructed by repeating identical seven-cell zones (one cell is one or seven identical homogenized hexes). GILDA was written by J. W. Stewart in 1973. This user`s manual is intended to provide all of the information necessary to set up and execute a GILDA calculation and to interpret the output results. It is assumed that the user is familiar with the computer (VAX/VMS or IBM/MVS) and the JOSHUA system database on which the code is implemented. Users who are not familiar with the JOSHUA database are advised to consult additional references to understand the structure of JOSHUA records and data sets before turning to section 4 of this manual. Sections 2 and 3 of this manual serve as a theory document in which the basic diffusion theory and the numerical approximations behind the code are described. Section 4 describes the functions of the program`s subroutines. Section 5 describes the input data and tutors the user how to set up a problem. Section 6 describes the output results and the error messages which may be encountered during execution. Users who only wish to learn how to run the code without understanding the theory can start from section 4 and use sections 2 and 3 as references. Finally, the VAX/VMS and the IBM execution command files together with sample input records are provided in the appendices at the end of this manual.

  13. Development and New Directions for the RELAP5-3D Graphical Users Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Mesina, George Lee

    2001-09-01

    The direction of development for the RELAP5 Graphical User Interfaces (RGUI) has been extended. In addition to existing plans for displaying all aspects of RELAP5 calculations, the plan now includes plans to display the calculations of a variety of codes including SCDAP, RETRAN and FLUENT. Recent work has included such extensions along with the previously planned and user-requested improvements and extensions. Visualization of heat-structures has been added. Adaptations were made for another computer program, SCDAP-3D, including plant core views. An input model builder for generating RELAP5-3D input files was partially implemented. All these are reported. Plans for future work are also summarized. These include an input processor that transfers steady-state conditions into an input file.

  14. VOLTTRON: User Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Lutes, Robert G.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Akyol, Bora A.; Tenney, Nathan D.; Haack, Jereme N.; Monson, Kyle E.; Carpenter, Brandon J.

    2014-04-24

    This document is a user guide for the deployment of the Transactional Network platform and agent/application development within the VOLTTRON. The intent of this user guide is to provide a description of the functionality of the Transactional Network Platform. This document describes how to deploy the platform, including installation, use, guidance, and limitations. It also describes how additional features can be added to enhance its current functionality.

  15. Sierra Structural Dynamics User's Notes

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, Garth M.

    2015-10-19

    Sierra/SD provides a massively parallel implementation of structural dynamics finite element analysis, required for high fidelity, validated models used in modal, vibration, static and shock analysis of weapons systems. This document provides a users guide to the input for Sierra/SD. Details of input specifications for the different solution types, output options, element types and parameters are included. The appendices contain detailed examples, and instructions for running the software on parallel platforms.

  16. User Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamnejad, Vahraz; Cramer, Paul

    1990-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) impact of frequency change of user and spacecraft antenna gain and size; (2) basic personal terminal antennas (impact of 20/30 GHz frequency separation; parametric studies - gain, size, weight; gain and figure of merit (G/T); design data for selected antenna concepts; critical technologies and development goals; and recommendations); and (3) user antenna radiation safety concerns.

  17. Silog: Speech Input Logon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grau, Sergio; Allen, Tony; Sherkat, Nasser

    Silog is a biometrie authentication system that extends the conventional PC logon process using voice verification. Users enter their ID and password using a conventional Windows logon procedure but then the biometrie authentication stage makes a Voice over IP (VoIP) call to a VoiceXML (VXML) server. User interaction with this speech-enabled component then allows the user's voice characteristics to be extracted as part of a simple user/system spoken dialogue. If the captured voice characteristics match those of a previously registered voice profile, then network access is granted. If no match is possible, then a potential unauthorised system access has been detected and the logon process is aborted.

  18. Coastal Operational Oceanography: understanding user needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, J.; Lopez, J.; Jerez, F.; Hermosilla, F.; Espino, M.

    2012-04-01

    Within the framework of the 7th Framework European project FIELD_AC, SIMO and the LIM/UPC have undertaken a study about the operational oceanography requirements of a selected group of specific end-users in four different European coastal regions, namely Hamburg, Liverpool, Barcelona and Venice. The activities of all the target organisations are related to coastal issues, varying from aquaculture to marinas and port management, Water Framework Directive implementation, renewable energies and flooding alerts. Information has been compiled using a specific questionnaire that has been distributed to all potential users, in addition to workshops held in the four mentioned regions. A total number of 25 questionnaires have been collected in all the locations from a variety of users. Results have been analysed depending on the location but also considering the type of organisation. Information about the spatial and temporal resolution requirements, variables needed, locations to be considered, frequency of data delivery and formats requirements have been gathered. This input from the end-users is being used both in the FIELD_AC modelling set up and also in the development of an application to visualise the results. Regarding the latter, all the modelling results and observational data will be handled using a THREDDS catalogue linked to a web-based GIS application.

  19. MCRT user's guide and documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, K.J.; Wolery, T.J.; Bourcier, W.L.; Delany, J.M.; Moore, R.M.; Clinnick, M.L.; Lundeen, S.R.

    1988-04-14

    MCRT is a FORTRAN computer program used to generate computer files containing thermodynamic data for chemical reactions involving solids, gases, and aqueous species. The MCRT code uses basic thermodynamic and reaction stoichiometry information stored in data and input files to produce an output file containing a grid describing the temperature dependence of equilibrium constants of mineral hydrolysis reactions and aqueous dissociation reactions. These reaction properties comprise a critical portion of the thermodynamic data needed by the geochemical modeling codes in the EQ3/6* software package. The set of files used to store the thermodynamic data for the aqueous, solid, and gaseous species and associated FORTRAN data base manipulation codes are also described in this user's manual. However, the data base structure and use of the data manipulation programs are described only in enough detail to illustrate their relationship to the operation of the MCRT code. This user's guide is designed to acquaint a new user with the MCRT program and its associated data files, and to assist in the use of the code and its various options. The data base processing codes MDAP and DARP are briefly described and several sample runs of the programs are included to illustrate the options available. In addition, the structure of the MCRT code, the coding conventions used in the EQ3/6 package, and the methods used in MCRT to extrapolate thermodynamic data to elevated temperatures are described. Appendices contain descriptions of the important variables defined in MCRT and a glossary of subroutines called by MCRT, along with their purposes. 6 figs.

  20. Signal Prediction With Input Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Chen, Ya-Chin

    1999-01-01

    A novel coding technique is presented for signal prediction with applications including speech coding, system identification, and estimation of input excitation. The approach is based on the blind equalization method for speech signal processing in conjunction with the geometric subspace projection theory to formulate the basic prediction equation. The speech-coding problem is often divided into two parts, a linear prediction model and excitation input. The parameter coefficients of the linear predictor and the input excitation are solved simultaneously and recursively by a conventional recursive least-squares algorithm. The excitation input is computed by coding all possible outcomes into a binary codebook. The coefficients of the linear predictor and excitation, and the index of the codebook can then be used to represent the signal. In addition, a variable-frame concept is proposed to block the same excitation signal in sequence in order to reduce the storage size and increase the transmission rate. The results of this work can be easily extended to the problem of disturbance identification. The basic principles are outlined in this report and differences from other existing methods are discussed. Simulations are included to demonstrate the proposed method.

  1. ESCHER: An interactive mesh-generating editor for preparing finite-element input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakes, W. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    ESCHER is an interactive mesh generation and editing program designed to help the user create a finite-element mesh, create additional input for finite-element analysis, including initial conditions, boundary conditions, and slidelines, and generate a NEUTRAL FILE that can be postprocessed for input into several finite-element codes, including ADINA, ADINAT, DYNA, NIKE, TSAAS, and ABUQUS. Two important ESCHER capabilities, interactive geometry creation and mesh archival storge are described in detail. Also described is the interactive command language and the use of interactive graphics. The archival storage and restart file is a modular, entity-based mesh data file. Modules of this file correspond to separate editing modes in the mesh editor, with data definition syntax preserved between the interactive commands and the archival storage file. Because ESCHER was expected to be highly interactive, extensive user documentation was provided in the form of an interactive HELP package.

  2. User and technical documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The program LIBRATE calculates velocities for trajectories from low earth orbit (LEO) to four of the five libration points (L2, L3, L4, and L5), and from low lunar orbit (LLO) to libration points L1 and L2. The flight to be analyzed departs from a circular orbit of any altitude and inclination about the Earth or Moon and finishes in a circular orbit about the Earth at the desired libration point within a specified flight time. This program produces a matrix of the delta V's needed to complete the desired flight. The user specifies the departure orbit, and the maximum flight time. A matrix is then developed with 10 inclinations, ranging from 0 to 90 degrees, forming the columns, and 19 possible flight times, ranging from the flight time (input) to 36 hours less than the input value, in decrements of 2 hours, forming the rows. This matrix is presented in three different reports including the total delta V's, and both of the delta V components discussed. The input required from the user to define the flight is discussed. The contents of the three reports that are produced as outputs are also described. The instructions are also included which are needed to execute the program.

  3. Six axis force feedback input device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohm, Timothy (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a low friction, low inertia, six-axis force feedback input device comprising an arm with double-jointed, tendon-driven revolute joints, a decoupled tendon-driven wrist, and a base with encoders and motors. The input device functions as a master robot manipulator of a microsurgical teleoperated robot system including a slave robot manipulator coupled to an amplifier chassis, which is coupled to a control chassis, which is coupled to a workstation with a graphical user interface. The amplifier chassis is coupled to the motors of the master robot manipulator and the control chassis is coupled to the encoders of the master robot manipulator. A force feedback can be applied to the input device and can be generated from the slave robot to enable a user to operate the slave robot via the input device without physically viewing the slave robot. Also, the force feedback can be generated from the workstation to represent fictitious forces to constrain the input device's control of the slave robot to be within imaginary predetermined boundaries.

  4. Clearly defined design input is key to product development.

    PubMed

    Pelnik, Tammy M

    2006-01-01

    Robust Design Input is critical to the cost-effective and timely development of safe and effective medical devices. By ensuring that the Design Input considers both technical performance characteristics and safety, the designer can proceed with confidence that the finished device will address the full complement of required functionality, user needs, and intended uses. PMID:16544789

  5. Input Decimated Ensembles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Kagan; Oza, Nikunj C.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Using an ensemble of classifiers instead of a single classifier has been shown to improve generalization performance in many pattern recognition problems. However, the extent of such improvement depends greatly on the amount of correlation among the errors of the base classifiers. Therefore, reducing those correlations while keeping the classifiers' performance levels high is an important area of research. In this article, we explore input decimation (ID), a method which selects feature subsets for their ability to discriminate among the classes and uses them to decouple the base classifiers. We provide a summary of the theoretical benefits of correlation reduction, along with results of our method on two underwater sonar data sets, three benchmarks from the Probenl/UCI repositories, and two synthetic data sets. The results indicate that input decimated ensembles (IDEs) outperform ensembles whose base classifiers use all the input features; randomly selected subsets of features; and features created using principal components analysis, on a wide range of domains.

  6. Input on NIH Toolbox inclusion criteria

    PubMed Central

    Victorson, David; Debb, Scott M.; Gershon, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The NIH Toolbox is intended to be responsive to the needs of investigators evaluating neurologic and behavioral function in diverse settings. Early phases of the project involved gathering information and input from potential end users. Methods: Information was collected through literature and instrument database reviews, requests for information, consensus meetings, and expert interviews and integrated into the NIH Toolbox development process in an iterative manner. Results: Criteria for instrument inclusion, subdomains to be assessed, and preferences regarding instrument cost and length were obtained. Existing measures suitable for inclusion in the NIH Toolbox and areas requiring new measure development were identified. Conclusion: The NIH Toolbox was developed with explicit input from potential end users regarding many of its key features. PMID:23479548

  7. ASSIST user manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sally C.; Boerschlein, David P.

    1995-01-01

    Semi-Markov models can be used to analyze the reliability of virtually any fault-tolerant system. However, the process of delineating all the states and transitions in a complex system model can be devastatingly tedious and error prone. The Abstract Semi-Markov Specification Interface to the SURE Tool (ASSIST) computer program allows the user to describe the semi-Markov model in a high-level language. Instead of listing the individual model states, the user specifies the rules governing the behavior of the system, and these are used to generate the model automatically. A few statements in the abstract language can describe a very large, complex model. Because no assumptions are made about the system being modeled, ASSIST can be used to generate models describing the behavior of any system. The ASSIST program and its input language are described and illustrated by examples.

  8. RELAP-7 User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hongbin; Zhao, Haihua; Zou, Ling; Andrs, David; Berry, Ray Alden; Martineau, Richard Charles

    2014-12-01

    The document contains a user's guide on how to run the RELAP-7 code. The RELAP-7 code is the next generation nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory. RELAP-7 will become the main reactor systems simulation toolkit for the LWRS (Light Water Reactor Sustainability) program’s RISMC (Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization) effort and the next generation tool in the RELAP reactor safety/systems analysis application series. RELAP-7 is written with object oriented programming language C++. A number of example problems and their associated input files are presented in this document to guide users to run the RELAP-7 code starting with simple pipe problems to problems with increasing complexity.

  9. SHAFT79 user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.; Schroeder, R.C.

    1980-03-01

    SHAFT79 (Simultaneous Heat And Fluid Transport) is an integrated finite difference program for computing two-phase non-isothermal flow in porous media. The principal application for which SHAFT79 is designed is in geothermal reservoir simulation. SHAFT79 solves the same equations as an earlier version, called SHAFT78, but uses much more efficient mathematical and numerical methods. The present SHAFT79 user's manual gives a brief account of equations and numerical methods and then describes in detail how to set up input decks for running the program. The application of SHAFT79 is illustrated by means of a few sample problems. (MHR)

  10. User and technical documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The program LP1 calculates outbound and return trajectories between low earth orbit (LEO) and libration point no. 1 (L1). Libration points (LP) are defined as locations in space that orbit the Earth such that they are always stationary with respect to the Earth-Moon line. L1 is located behind the Moon such that the pull of the Earth and Moon together just cancel the centrifugal acceleration associated with the libration point's orbit. The input required from the user to define the flight is described. The contents of the six reports produced as outputs are presented. Also included are the instructions needed to execute the program.

  11. TOTAL user manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sally C.; Boerschlein, David P.

    1994-01-01

    Semi-Markov models can be used to analyze the reliability of virtually any fault-tolerant system. However, the process of delineating all of the states and transitions in the model of a complex system can be devastatingly tedious and error-prone. Even with tools such as the Abstract Semi-Markov Specification Interface to the SURE Tool (ASSIST), the user must describe a system by specifying the rules governing the behavior of the system in order to generate the model. With the Table Oriented Translator to the ASSIST Language (TOTAL), the user can specify the components of a typical system and their attributes in the form of a table. The conditions that lead to system failure are also listed in a tabular form. The user can also abstractly specify dependencies with causes and effects. The level of information required is appropriate for system designers with little or no background in the details of reliability calculations. A menu-driven interface guides the user through the system description process, and the program updates the tables as new information is entered. The TOTAL program automatically generates an ASSIST input description to match the system description.

  12. User's Guide for the Updated EST/BEST Software System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Ashwin

    2003-01-01

    This User's Guide describes the structure of the IPACS input file that reflects the modularity of each module. The structured format helps the user locate specific input data and manually enter or edit it. The IPACS input file can have any user-specified filename, but must have a DAT extension. The input file may consist of up to six input data blocks; the data blocks must be separated by delimiters beginning with the $ character. If multiple sections are desired, they must be arranged in the order listed.

  13. FAST User Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Clucas, Jean; McCabe, R. Kevin; Plessel, Todd; Potter, R.; Cooper, D. M. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The Flow Analysis Software Toolkit, FAST, is a software environment for visualizing data. FAST is a collection of separate programs (modules) that run simultaneously and allow the user to examine the results of numerical and experimental simulations. The user can load data files, perform calculations on the data, visualize the results of these calculations, construct scenes of 3D graphical objects, and plot, animate and record the scenes. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) visualization is the primary intended use of FAST, but FAST can also assist in the analysis of other types of data. FAST combines the capabilities of such programs as PLOT3D, RIP, SURF, and GAS into one environment with modules that share data. Sharing data between modules eliminates the drudgery of transferring data between programs. All the modules in the FAST environment have a consistent, highly interactive graphical user interface. Most commands are entered by pointing and'clicking. The modular construction of FAST makes it flexible and extensible. The environment can be custom configured and new modules can be developed and added as needed. The following modules have been developed for FAST: VIEWER, FILE IO, CALCULATOR, SURFER, TOPOLOGY, PLOTTER, TITLER, TRACER, ARCGRAPH, GQ, SURFERU, SHOTET, and ISOLEVU. A utility is also included to make the inclusion of user defined modules in the FAST environment easy. The VIEWER module is the central control for the FAST environment. From VIEWER, the user can-change object attributes, interactively position objects in three-dimensional space, define and save scenes, create animations, spawn new FAST modules, add additional view windows, and save and execute command scripts. The FAST User Guide uses text and FAST MAPS (graphical representations of the entire user interface) to guide the user through the use of FAST. Chapters include: Maps, Overview, Tips, Getting Started Tutorial, a separate chapter for each module, file formats, and system

  14. The NASTRAN User's Manual (Level 15)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, C. W. (Editor)

    1972-01-01

    The User's manual for the NASA Structural Analysis (NASTRAN) program is presented. The manual contains all information needed to solve problems with NASTRAN. The volume is instructional and encyclopedic. The manual includes instruction in structural modeling techniques, instruction in input preparation, and information to assist the interpretation of the output. Descriptions of all input data cards, restart procedures, and diagnostic messages are developed.

  15. DAKOTA JAGUAR 2.1 user's Manual.

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Brian M.; Lefantzi, Sophia; Chan, Ethan; Ruthruff, Joseph R.

    2011-06-01

    JAGUAR (JAva GUi for Applied Research) is a Java software tool providing an advanced text editor and graphical user interface (GUI) to manipulate DAKOTA (Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications) input specifications. This document focuses on the features necessary for a user to use JAGUAR.

  16. Nonequilibrium air radiation (Nequair) program: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.

    1985-01-01

    A supplement to the data relating to the calculation of nonequilibrium radiation in flight regimes of aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles contains the listings of the computer code NEQAIR (Nonequilibrium Air Radiation), its primary input data, and explanation of the user-supplied input variables. The user-supplied input variables are the thermodynamic variables of air at a given point, i.e., number densities of various chemical species, translational temperatures of heavy particles and electrons, and vibrational temperature. These thermodynamic variables do not necessarily have to be in thermodynamic equilibrium. The code calculates emission and absorption characteristics of air under these given conditions.

  17. PEGASUS User's Guide. 5.1c

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suhs, Norman E.; Dietz, William E.; Rogers, Stuart E.; Nash, Steven M.; Onufer, Jeffrey T.

    2000-01-01

    PEGASUS 5.1 is the latest version of the PEGASUS series of mesh interpolation codes. It is a fully three-dimensional code. The main purpose for the development of this latest version was to significantly decrease the number of user inputs required and to allow for easier operation of the code. This guide is to be used with the user's manual for version 4 of PEGASUS. A basic description of methods used in both versions is described in the Version 4 manual. A complete list of all user inputs used in version 5.1 is given in this guide.

  18. AMBER User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J.L.; Fawley, W.

    2000-11-08

    AMBER is a Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code which models the evolution of a representative slice of a relativistic electron beam in a linear accelerator. The beam is modeled as a steady flow and therefore no electromagnetic waves: all the fields (external and self-fields) are electrostatic and magnetostatic fields (for a complete description, see chapter 5). The possible elements describing the accelerator lattice are solenoids, accelerating gaps, pipes and apertures. Several kinds of beam distribution can be loaded: KV, gaussian, semi-gaussian, etc. Alternatively, the user can reconstruct (or load) a distribution from the output of another codefile, for example, an interface generating the beam distribution from output produced from EGUN or LSP codes is available as an option. This documentation first describes in detail the input files needed to run AMBER and the procedure to start the executable. The possible data files and graphical output are explained in the two following chapters. The last chapter describes the physics model and numerical techniques used. An example of input files and the result obtained with these inputs are also given in the Appendix.

  19. Involving users in the design cycle for parallel tools second period September 1, 1994--January 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Pancake, C.M.

    1995-01-31

    Parallel programmers do not use software tools, in spite fact that parallel development is a difficult and time-consuming task that could benefit from tool support. It has become increasingly clear that the simple availability of elegant, powerful software tools employing the latest technology is not enough. Usability is the real key to success; users simply do not adopt tools that fail to respond to their needs. Research in the area of usability engineering indicates that five design principles can have significant impact on parallel tool usability: tools must be based on demonstrable user requirements; actively involve users throughout tool design; minimize tool complexity to reduce the learning curve support the tool across multiple machine platforms to amortize the user`s investment employ iterative refinement techniques to improve tool usability. Those principles served as the starting point for a Parallel Tools Consortium project to develop a tool that will help users determine the final state of a program that crashes or is terminated forcibly. Carried out over a period of ten months, the project involved the collaboration of tool researchers, and implementors, and users. This report describes how user-centered design techniques were applied to ensure that the tool would provide simple, intuitive support for the programmer`s task. Users were recruited for the project working group so that they could have direct input to design decisions, even in the earliest sets of user trials. Additional feedback was acquired from a broader user base, in three distinct phases. These were spaced out over a period of six months so that feedback could be analyzed, then applied to refine the tool before the next trial. In some cases, user input kept us from investing substantial effort in features that would not have been used or appreciated. In others, feedback showed us where our conceptions of usefulness did not quite align with those of the user community.

  20. PARFUME User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Kurt Hamman

    2010-09-01

    PARFUME, a fuel performance analysis and modeling code, is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for evaluating gas reactor coated particle fuel assemblies for prismatic, pebble bed, and plate type fuel geometries. The code is an integrated mechanistic analysis tool that evaluates the thermal, mechanical, and physico-chemical behavior of coated fuel particles (TRISO) and the probability for fuel failure given the particle-to-particle statistical variations in physical dimensions and material properties that arise during the fuel fabrication process. Using a robust finite difference numerical scheme, PARFUME is capable of performing steady state and transient heat transfer and fission product diffusion analyses for the fuel. Written in FORTRAN 90, PARFUME is easy to read, maintain, and modify. Currently, PARFUME is supported only on MS Windows platforms. This document represents the initial version of the PARFUME User Guide, a supplement to the PARFUME Theory and Model Basis Report which describes the theoretical aspects of the code. User information is provided including: 1) code development, 2) capabilities and limitations, 3) installation and execution, 4) user input and output, 5) sample problems, and 6) error messages. In the near future, the INL plans to release a fully benchmarked and validated beta version of PARFUME.

  1. Input distributions for VISA

    SciTech Connect

    Liebetrau, A.M.

    1983-10-01

    Work is underway at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to improve the probabilistic analysis used to model pressurized thermal shock (PTS) incidents in reactor pressure vessels, and, further, to incorporate these improvements into the existing Vessel Integrity Simulation Analysis (VISA) code. Two topics related to work on input distributions in VISA are discussed in this paper. The first involves the treatment of flaw size distributions and the second concerns errors in the parameters in the (Guthrie) equation which is used to compute ..delta..RT/sub NDT/, the shift in reference temperature for nil ductility transition.

  2. XINPUT: a program to edit "DOSRZ" input files.

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, M H; Lehmann, J; Rosenow, U F

    1999-05-01

    The DOSRZ user code, which is part of the EGS4 standard distribution, is widely used in medical physics for the calculation of dose deposition in cylindrical geometries. The code provides the use of advanced Monte-Carlo techniques (PRESTA) and variance reduction methods. In the case of complex cylinder geometries the input of coordinates and radii is not only tedious but also prone to a high error rate. Coordinates are to be stated in absolute numbers. A change of one number, e.g., the slab thickness, requires the change of all subsequent numbers. Furthermore, parameters are only stated as numbers with no indication of their meaning. Obviously, there is a need for a user interface to facilitate the input for DOSRZ and to largely reduce the possibility for errors. We, therefore, wrote a graphical user interface (GUI) consisting of an input mask, a coordinate input interpreter, and a two-dimensional and/or pseudo-three-dimensional display section. The GUI is based on the scripting language Tcl/Tk, which runs under various platforms such as UNIX (LINUX), w95, and WIN NT. It consists of a main window which provides common-style menus and buttons to navigate through the edit dialog boxes. The most important tools are the region input, which enables the user to create the simulation geometry, and the graphics section where the scaled output can be displayed. Different media are shown in different colors which are user defined. Furthermore, the program contains some tools to reduce the probability of an erroneous input in the EGS4 input file. Since Tcl/Tk is a modern scripting language, it offers advanced tools to create the GUI and to "glue" different applications to it. XINPUT may also be considered as a model program for the development of a more general interface to other input areas of the EGS4 simulation code. PMID:10360538

  3. Hanford inventory program user`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkelman, K.C.

    1994-09-12

    Provides users with instructions and information about accessing and operating the Hanford Inventory Program (HIP) system. The Hanford Inventory Program is an integrated control system that provides a single source for the management and control of equipment, parts, and material warehoused by Westinghouse Hanford Company in various site-wide locations. The inventory is comprised of spare parts and equipment, shop stock, special tools, essential materials, and convenience storage items. The HIP replaced the following systems; ACA, ASP, PICS, FSP, WSR, STP, and RBO. In addition, HIP manages the catalog maintenance function for the General Supplies inventory stocked in the 1164 building and managed by WIMS.

  4. MRDAP User/Developer Documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua Cogliati; Michael Milvich

    2009-09-01

    The Multi-Reactor Design and Analysis Platform (MRDAP) is designed to simplify the creation, transfer and processing of data between computational codes. MRDAP accomplishes these objectives with three parts: 1. allows each integrated code, through a plugin, to specify the required input for execution and the required output needed, 2. creates an interface for execution and data transfer, 3. enables the creation of Graphical User Interfaces (GUI) to assist with input preparation and data visualization. Ultimately, the main motivation of this work is to enable analysts (who perform reactor physics calculations routinely), by providing a tool that increases efficiency and minimizes the potential for errors or failed executions.

  5. Network user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    McGrady, P.W.

    1994-12-01

    NETWORK is a FORTRAN code used to model process flow systems in the gaseous diffusion plants at Portsmouth, Ohio and Paducah, Kentucky, operated by the United States Enrichment Corporation. It can handle a wide range of components and several different types of controllers. NETWORK can be run in either a steady-state mode or a transient mode. In the transient mode many different types of perturbations may be modeled. It is currently being used to model taking a cell off-stream in a gaseous diffusion plant. A brief description of the code is given, and process equipment models and input data are discussed.

  6. ETPRE User`s Manual Version 3.00

    SciTech Connect

    Roginski, R.J.

    1994-05-01

    ETPRE is a preprocessor for the Event Progression Analysis Code EVNTRE. It reads an input file of event definitions and writes the lengthy EVNTRE code input files. ETPRE`s advantage is that it eliminates the error-prone task of manually creating or revising these files since their formats are quite elaborate. The user-friendly format of ETPRE differs from the EVNTRE code format in that questions, branch references, and other event tree components are defined symbolically instead of numerically. When ETPRE is executed, these symbols are converted to their numeric equivalents and written to the output files using formats defined in the EVNTRE Reference Manual. Revisions to event tree models are simplified by allowing the user to edit the symbolic format and rerun the preprocessor, since questions, branch references, and other symbols are automatically resequenced to their new values with each execution. ETPRE and EVNTRE have both been incorporated into the SETAC event tree analysis package.

  7. RADTRAN 4: User guide. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhauser, K S; Kanipe, F L

    1992-01-01

    RADTRAN 4 is used to evaluate radiological consequences of incident-free transportation, as well as the radiological risks from vehicular accidents occurring during transportation. This User Guide is Volume 3 in a series of four volume of the documentation of the RADTRAN 4 computer code for transportation risk analysis. The other three volumes are Volume 1, the Executive Summary; Volume 2, the Technical Manual; and Volume 4, the Programmer`s Manual. The theoretical and calculational basis for the operations performed by RADTRAN 4 are discussed in Volume 2. Throughout this User Guide the reader will be referred to Volume 2 for detailed discussions of certain RADTRAN features. This User Guide supersedes the document ``RADTRAN III`` by Madsen et al. (1983). This RADTRAN 4 User Guide specifies and describes the required data, control inputs, input sequences, user options, program limitations, and other activities necessary for execution of the RADTRAN 4 computer code.

  8. Arctic science input wanted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Arctic Research and Policy Act (Eos, June 26, 1984, p. 412) was signed into law by President Ronald Reagan this past July. One of its objectives is to develop a 5-year research plan for the Arctic. A request for input to this plan is being issued this week to nearly 500 people in science, engineering, and industry.To promote Arctic research and to recommend research policy in the Arctic, the new law establishes a five-member Arctic Research Commission, to be appointed by the President, and establishes an Interagency Arctic Research Policy Committee, to be composed of representatives from nearly a dozen agencies having interests in the region. The commission will make policy recommendations, and the interagency committee will implement those recommendations. The National Science Foundation (NSF) has been designated as the lead agency of the interagency committee.

  9. NIDR (New Input Deck Reader) V2.0 2

    2010-03-31

    NIDR (New Input Deck Reader) is a facility for processing block-structured input to large programs. NIDR was written to simplify maintenance of DAKOTA (a program for uncertainty quantification and optimization), to provide better error checking of input and to allow use of aliases in the input. While written to support DAKOTA input conventions, NIDR itself is independent of DAKOTA and can be used in many kinds of programs. The initial version of NIDR was copyrightedmore » in 2008. We have since extended NIDR to support a graphical user interface called Jaguar for DAKOTA. In the Review and Approval process for an updated paper on NIDR, the Classification Approver states that a new copyright assertion should be performed.processing input to programs. NIDR is not primarily for military applications.« less

  10. NIDR (New Input Deck Reader) V2.0 2

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, David

    2010-03-31

    NIDR (New Input Deck Reader) is a facility for processing block-structured input to large programs. NIDR was written to simplify maintenance of DAKOTA (a program for uncertainty quantification and optimization), to provide better error checking of input and to allow use of aliases in the input. While written to support DAKOTA input conventions, NIDR itself is independent of DAKOTA and can be used in many kinds of programs. The initial version of NIDR was copyrighted in 2008. We have since extended NIDR to support a graphical user interface called Jaguar for DAKOTA. In the Review and Approval process for an updated paper on NIDR, the Classification Approver states that a new copyright assertion should be performed.processing input to programs. NIDR is not primarily for military applications.

  11. XBox Input -Version 1.0

    2012-10-03

    Contains class for connecting to the Xbox 360 controller, displaying the user inputs {buttons, triggers, analog sticks), and controlling the rumble motors. Also contains classes for converting the raw Xbox 360 controller inputs into meaningful commands for the following objects: • Robot arms - Provides joint control and several tool control schemes • UGV's - Provides translational and rotational commands for "skid-steer" vehicles • Pan-tilt units - Provides several modes of control including velocity, position,more » and point-tracking • Head-mounted displays (HMO)- Controls the viewpoint of a HMO • Umbra frames - Controls the position andorientation of an Umbra posrot object • Umbra graphics window - Provides several modes of control for the Umbra OSG window viewpoint including free-fly, cursor-focused, and object following.« less

  12. Multimodal interfaces with voice and gesture input

    SciTech Connect

    Milota, A.D.; Blattner, M.M.

    1995-07-20

    The modalities of speech and gesture have different strengths and weaknesses, but combined they create synergy where each modality corrects the weaknesses of the other. We believe that a multimodal system such a one interwining speech and gesture must start from a different foundation than ones which are based solely on pen input. In order to provide a basis for the design of a speech and gesture system, we have examined the research in other disciplines such as anthropology and linguistics. The result of this investigation was a taxonomy that gave us material for the incorporation of gestures whose meanings are largely transparent to the users. This study describes the taxonomy and gives examples of applications to pen input systems.

  13. XBox Input -Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2012-10-03

    Contains class for connecting to the Xbox 360 controller, displaying the user inputs {buttons, triggers, analog sticks), and controlling the rumble motors. Also contains classes for converting the raw Xbox 360 controller inputs into meaningful commands for the following objects: • Robot arms - Provides joint control and several tool control schemes • UGV's - Provides translational and rotational commands for "skid-steer" vehicles • Pan-tilt units - Provides several modes of control including velocity, position, and point-tracking • Head-mounted displays (HMO)- Controls the viewpoint of a HMO • Umbra frames - Controls the position andorientation of an Umbra posrot object • Umbra graphics window - Provides several modes of control for the Umbra OSG window viewpoint including free-fly, cursor-focused, and object following.

  14. Input Multiplicities in Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koppel, Lowell B.

    1983-01-01

    Describes research investigating potential effect of input multiplicity on multivariable chemical process control systems. Several simple processes are shown to exhibit the possibility of theoretical developments on input multiplicity and closely related phenomena are discussed. (JN)

  15. Modeling and generating input processes

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    This tutorial paper provides information relevant to the selection and generation of stochastic inputs to simulation studies. The primary area considered is multivariate but much of the philosophy at least is relevant to univariate inputs as well. 14 refs.

  16. An on-line system for hand-printed input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, T. G.; Bebb, J.

    1971-01-01

    The capability of graphic input/output systems is described. Topics considered are a character recognizer and dictionary building program, an initial flow chart element input program, and a system entitled The Assistant Mathematician, which uses ordinary mathematics to specify numeric computation. All three parts are necessary to allow a user to carry on a mathematical dialogue with the computer in the language and notation of his discipline or problem domain.

  17. PREVIMER : Meteorological inputs and outputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravenel, H.; Lecornu, F.; Kerléguer, L.

    2009-09-01

    PREVIMER is a pre-operational system aiming to provide a wide range of users, from private individuals to professionals, with short-term forecasts about the coastal environment along the French coastlines bordering the English Channel, the Atlantic Ocean, and the Mediterranean Sea. Observation data and digital modelling tools first provide 48-hour (probably 96-hour by summer 2009) forecasts of sea states, currents, sea water levels and temperatures. The follow-up of an increasing number of biological parameters will, in time, complete this overview of coastal environment. Working in partnership with the French Naval Hydrographic and Oceanographic Service (Service Hydrographique et Océanographique de la Marine, SHOM), the French National Weather Service (Météo-France), the French public science and technology research institute (Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, IRD), the European Institute of Marine Studies (Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer, IUEM) and many others, IFREMER (the French public institute fo marine research) is supplying the technologies needed to ensure this pertinent information, available daily on Internet at http://www.previmer.org, and stored at the Operational Coastal Oceanographic Data Centre. Since 2006, PREVIMER publishes the results of demonstrators assigned to limited geographic areas and to specific applications. This system remains experimental. The following topics are covered : Hydrodynamic circulation, sea states, follow-up of passive tracers, conservative or non-conservative (specifically of microbiological origin), biogeochemical state, primary production. Lastly, PREVIMER provides researchers and R&D departments with modelling tools and access to the database, in which the observation data and the modelling results are stored, to undertake environmental studies on new sites. The communication will focus on meteorological inputs to and outputs from PREVIMER. It will draw the lessons from almost 3 years during

  18. User interface for ground-water modeling: Arcview extension

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tsou, M.-S.; Whittemore, D.O.

    2001-01-01

    Numerical simulation for ground-water modeling often involves handling large input and output data sets. A geographic information system (GIS) provides an integrated platform to manage, analyze, and display disparate data and can greatly facilitate modeling efforts in data compilation, model calibration, and display of model parameters and results. Furthermore, GIS can be used to generate information for decision making through spatial overlay and processing of model results. Arc View is the most widely used Windows-based GIS software that provides a robust user-friendly interface to facilitate data handling and display. An extension is an add-on program to Arc View that provides additional specialized functions. An Arc View interface for the ground-water flow and transport models MODFLOW and MT3D was built as an extension for facilitating modeling. The extension includes preprocessing of spatially distributed (point, line, and polygon) data for model input and postprocessing of model output. An object database is used for linking user dialogs and model input files. The Arc View interface utilizes the capabilities of the 3D Analyst extension. Models can be automatically calibrated through the Arc View interface by external linking to such programs as PEST. The efficient pre- and postprocessing capabilities and calibration link were demonstrated for ground-water modeling in southwest Kansas.

  19. User's guide for the REBUS-3 fuel cycle analysis capability

    SciTech Connect

    Toppel, B.J.

    1983-03-01

    REBUS-3 is a system of programs designed for the fuel-cycle analysis of fast reactors. This new capability is an extension and refinement of the REBUS-3 code system and complies with the standard code practices and interface dataset specifications of the Committee on Computer Code Coordination (CCCC). The new code is hence divorced from the earlier ARC System. In addition, the coding has been designed to enhance code exportability. Major new capabilities not available in the REBUS-2 code system include a search on burn cycle time to achieve a specified value for the multiplication constant at the end of the burn step; a general non-repetitive fuel-management capability including temporary out-of-core fuel storage, loading of fresh fuel, and subsequent retrieval and reloading of fuel; significantly expanded user input checking; expanded output edits; provision of prestored burnup chains to simplify user input; option of fixed-or free-field BCD input formats; and, choice of finite difference, nodal or spatial flux-synthesis neutronics in one-, two-, or three-dimensions.

  20. The expert surgical assistant. An intelligent virtual environment with multimodal input.

    PubMed

    Billinghurst, M; Savage, J; Oppenheimer, P; Edmond, C

    1996-01-01

    Virtual Reality has made computer interfaces more intuitive but not more intelligent. This paper shows how an expert system can be coupled with multimodal input in a virtual environment to provide an intelligent simulation tool or surgical assistant. This is accomplished in three steps. First, voice and gestural input is interpreted and represented in a common semantic form. Second, a rule-based expert system is used to infer context and user actions from this semantic representation. Finally, the inferred user actions are matched against steps in a surgical procedure to monitor the user's progress and provide automatic feedback. In addition, the system can respond immediately to multimodal commands for navigational assistance and/or identification of critical anatomical structures. To show how these methods are used we present a prototype sinus surgery interface. The approach described here may easily be extended to a wide variety of medical and non-medical training applications by making simple changes to the expert system database and virtual environment models. Successful implementation of an expert system in both simulated and real surgery has enormous potential for the surgeon both in training and clinical practice. PMID:10172851

  1. User's manual for GILDA: An infinite lattice diffusion theory calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Le, T.T.

    1991-11-01

    GILDA is a static two-dimensional diffusion theory code that performs either buckling (B[sup 2]) or k-effective (k[sub eff]) calculations for an infinite hexagonal lattice which is constructed by repeating identical seven-cell zones (one cell is one or seven identical homogenized hexes). GILDA was written by J. W. Stewart in 1973. This user's manual is intended to provide all of the information necessary to set up and execute a GILDA calculation and to interpret the output results. It is assumed that the user is familiar with the computer (VAX/VMS or IBM/MVS) and the JOSHUA system database on which the code is implemented. Users who are not familiar with the JOSHUA database are advised to consult additional references to understand the structure of JOSHUA records and data sets before turning to section 4 of this manual. Sections 2 and 3 of this manual serve as a theory document in which the basic diffusion theory and the numerical approximations behind the code are described. Section 4 describes the functions of the program's subroutines. Section 5 describes the input data and tutors the user how to set up a problem. Section 6 describes the output results and the error messages which may be encountered during execution. Users who only wish to learn how to run the code without understanding the theory can start from section 4 and use sections 2 and 3 as references. Finally, the VAX/VMS and the IBM execution command files together with sample input records are provided in the appendices at the end of this manual.

  2. User interface enhancement report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badler, N. I.; Gangel, J.; Shields, G.; Fala, G.

    1985-01-01

    The existing user interfaces to TEMPUS, Plaid, and other systems in the OSDS are fundamentally based on only two modes of communication: alphanumeric commands or data input and grapical interaction. The latter are especially suited to the types of interaction necessary for creating workstation objects with BUILD and with performing body positioning in TEMPUS. Looking toward the future application of TEMPUS, however, the long-term goals of OSDS will include the analysis of extensive tasks in space involving one or more individuals working in concert over a period of time. In this context, the TEMPUS body positioning capability, though extremely useful in creating and validating a small number of particular body positions, will become somewhat tedious to use. The macro facility helps somewhat, since frequently used positions may be easily applied by executing a stored macro. The difference between body positioning and task execution, though subtle, is important. In the case of task execution, the important information at the user's level is what actions are to be performed rather than how the actions are performed. Viewed slightly differently, the what is constant over a set of individuals though the how may vary.

  3. The LATDYN user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housner, J. M.; Mcgowan, P. E.; Abrahamson, A. L.; Powell, M. G.

    1986-01-01

    The LATDYN User's Manual presents the capabilities and instructions for the LATDYN (Large Angle Transient DYNamics) computer program. The LATDYN program is a tool for analyzing the controlled or uncontrolled dynamic transient behavior of interconnected deformable multi-body systems which can undergo large angular motions of each body relative other bodies. The program accommodates large structural deformation as well as large rigid body rotations and is applicable, but not limited to, the following areas: (1) development of large flexible space structures; (2) slewing of large space structure components; (3) mechanisms with rigid or elastic components; and (4) robotic manipulations of beam members. Presently the program is limited to two dimensional problems, but in many cases, three dimensional problems can be exactly or approximately reduced to two dimensions. The program uses convected finite elements to affect the large angular motions involved in the analysis. General geometry is permitted. Detailed user input and output specifications are provided and discussed with example runstreams. To date, LATDYN has been configured for CDC/NOS and DEC VAX/VMS machines. All coding is in ANSII-77 FORTRAN. Detailed instructions regarding interfaces with particular computer operating systems and file structures are provided.

  4. 3DGRAPE/AL User's Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorenson, Reese L.; Alter, Stephen J.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a users' manual for a new three-dimensional structured multiple-block volume g generator called 3DGRAPE/AL. It is a significantly improved version of the previously-released a widely-distributed programs 3DGRAPE and 3DMAGGS. It generates volume grids by iteratively solving the Poisson Equations in three-dimensions. The right-hand-side terms are designed so that user-specific; grid cell heights and user-specified grid cell skewness near boundary surfaces result automatically, with little user intervention. The code is written in Fortran-77, and can be installed with or without a simple graphical user interface which allows the user to watch as the grid is generated. An introduction describing the improvements over the antecedent 3DGRAPE code is presented first. Then follows a chapter on the basic grid generator program itself, and comments on installing it. The input is then described in detail. After that is a description of the Graphical User Interface. Five example cases are shown next, with plots of the results. Following that is a chapter on two input filters which allow use of input data generated elsewhere. Last is a treatment of the theory embodied in the code.

  5. Input filter compensation for switching regulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelkar, S. S.; Lee, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    A novel input filter compensation scheme for a buck regulator that eliminates the interaction between the input filter output impedance and the regulator control loop is presented. The scheme is implemented using a feedforward loop that senses the input filter state variables and uses this information to modulate the duty cycle signal. The feedforward design process presented is seen to be straightforward and the feedforward easy to implement. Extensive experimental data supported by analytical results show that significant performance improvement is achieved with the use of feedforward in the following performance categories: loop stability, audiosusceptibility, output impedance and transient response. The use of feedforward results in isolating the switching regulator from its power source thus eliminating all interaction between the regulator and equipment upstream. In addition the use of feedforward removes some of the input filter design constraints and makes the input filter design process simpler thus making it possible to optimize the input filter. The concept of feedforward compensation can also be extended to other types of switching regulators.

  6. TAILSIM Users Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiltner, Dale W.

    2000-01-01

    The TAILSIM program uses a 4th order Runge-Kutta method to integrate the standard aircraft equations-of-motion (EOM). The EOM determine three translational and three rotational accelerations about the aircraft's body axis reference system. The forces and moments that drive the EOM are determined from aerodynamic coefficients, dynamic derivatives, and control inputs. Values for these terms are determined from linear interpolation of tables that are a function of parameters such as angle-of-attack and surface deflections. Buildup equations combine these terms and dimensionalize them to generate the driving total forces and moments. Features that make TAILSIM applicable to studies of tailplane stall include modeling of the reversible control System, modeling of the pilot performing a load factor and/or airspeed command task, and modeling of vertical gusts. The reversible control system dynamics can be described as two hinged masses connected by a spring. resulting in a fifth order system. The pilot model is a standard form of lead-lag with a time delay applied to an integrated pitch rate and/or airspeed error feedback. The time delay is implemented by a Pade approximation, while the commanded pitch rate is determined by a commanded load factor. Vertical gust inputs include a single 1-cosine gust and a continuous NASA Dryden gust model. These dynamic models. coupled with the use of a nonlinear database, allow the tailplane stall characteristics, elevator response, and resulting aircraft response, to be modeled. A useful output capability of the TAILSIM program is the ability to display multiple post-run plot pages to allow a quick assessment of the time history response. There are 16 plot pages currently available to the user. Each plot page displays 9 parameters. Each parameter can also be displayed individually. on a one plot-per-page format. For a more refined display of the results the program can also create files of tabulated data. which can then be used by other

  7. Advanced Materials Laboratory User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orndoff, Evelyne

    2012-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the Advanced Materials Laboratory. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  8. Input Range Testing for the General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Steven P.

    2007-01-01

    This document contains a test plan for testing input values to the General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT). The plan includes four primary types of information, which rigorously define all tests that should be performed to validate that GMAT will accept allowable inputs and deny disallowed inputs. The first is a complete list of all allowed object fields in GMAT. The second type of information, is test input to be attempted for each field. The third type of information is allowable input values for all objects fields in GMAT. The final piece of information is how GMAT should respond to both valid and invalid information. It is VERY important to note that the tests below must be performed for both the Graphical User Interface and the script!! The examples are illustrated using a scripting perspective, because it is simpler to write up. However, the test must be performed for both interfaces to GMAT.

  9. SDR input power estimation algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briones, J. C.; Nappier, J. M.

    The General Dynamics (GD) S-Band software defined radio (SDR) in the Space Communications and Navigation (SCAN) Testbed on the International Space Station (ISS) provides experimenters an opportunity to develop and demonstrate experimental waveforms in space. The SDR has an analog and a digital automatic gain control (AGC) and the response of the AGCs to changes in SDR input power and temperature was characterized prior to the launch and installation of the SCAN Testbed on the ISS. The AGCs were used to estimate the SDR input power and SNR of the received signal and the characterization results showed a nonlinear response to SDR input power and temperature. In order to estimate the SDR input from the AGCs, three algorithms were developed and implemented on the ground software of the SCAN Testbed. The algorithms include a linear straight line estimator, which used the digital AGC and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a narrower section of the SDR input power range. There is a linear adaptive filter algorithm that uses both AGCs and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a wide input power range. Finally, an algorithm that uses neural networks was designed to estimate the input power over a wide range. This paper describes the algorithms in detail and their associated performance in estimating the SDR input power.

  10. SDR Input Power Estimation Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nappier, Jennifer M.; Briones, Janette C.

    2013-01-01

    The General Dynamics (GD) S-Band software defined radio (SDR) in the Space Communications and Navigation (SCAN) Testbed on the International Space Station (ISS) provides experimenters an opportunity to develop and demonstrate experimental waveforms in space. The SDR has an analog and a digital automatic gain control (AGC) and the response of the AGCs to changes in SDR input power and temperature was characterized prior to the launch and installation of the SCAN Testbed on the ISS. The AGCs were used to estimate the SDR input power and SNR of the received signal and the characterization results showed a nonlinear response to SDR input power and temperature. In order to estimate the SDR input from the AGCs, three algorithms were developed and implemented on the ground software of the SCAN Testbed. The algorithms include a linear straight line estimator, which used the digital AGC and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a narrower section of the SDR input power range. There is a linear adaptive filter algorithm that uses both AGCs and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a wide input power range. Finally, an algorithm that uses neural networks was designed to estimate the input power over a wide range. This paper describes the algorithms in detail and their associated performance in estimating the SDR input power.

  11. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    Food additives are substances that become part of a food product when they are added during the processing or making of that food. "Direct" food additives are often added during processing to: Add nutrients ...

  12. An update of input instructions to TEMOD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The theory and operation of a FORTRAN 4 computer code, designated as TEMOD, used to calcuate tubular thermoelectric generator performance is described in WANL-TME-1906. The original version of TEMOD was developed in 1969. A description is given of additions to the mathematical model and an update of the input instructions to the code. Although the basic mathematical model described in WANL-TME-1906 has remained unchanged, a substantial number of input/output options were added to allow completion of module performance parametrics as required in support of the compact thermoelectric converter system technology program.

  13. Input generator for Denton 3-dimensional turbomachine-blade-row analysis code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.; Wood, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    A users manual is presented for a computer program that prepares the bulk of the input data set required for the Denton three dimensional turbomachine blade row analysis code. The Denton input is generated from a minimum of geometry and flow variable information by using cubic spline curve fitting procedures. The features of the program are discussed. The input is described and special instructions are included to assist in its preparation. Sample input and output are included.

  14. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  15. Electronic Systems Test Laboratory (ESTL) User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ESTL. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  16. Radiant Heat Test Facility (RHTF): User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelPapa, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the RHTF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non- NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  17. Vibration and Acoustic Test Facility (VATF): User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fantasia, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the VATF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  18. Audio Development Laboratory (ADL) User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romero, Andy

    2012-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ADL. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  19. Antenna Test Facility (ATF): User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ATF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  20. Chamber B Thermal/Vacuum Chamber: User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montz, Mike E.

    2012-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of Chamber B. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  1. Structures Test Laboratory (STL). User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zipay, John J.

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the STL. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  2. The input optics of Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, D. B.; Arain, M. A.; Ciani, G.; Feldbaum, D.; Fulda, P.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, R.; Heintze, M.; Martin, R. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Williams, L. F.; Mueller, G.; Quetschke, V.; Korth, W. Z.; Reitze, D. H.; Derosa, R. T.; Effler, A.; Kokeyama, K.; Frolov, V. V.; Mullavey, A.; Poeld, J.

    2016-03-01

    The Input Optics (IO) of advanced LIGO will be described. The IO consists of all the optics between the laser and the power recycling mirror. The scope of the IO includes the following hardware: phase modulators, power control, input mode cleaner, an in-vacuum Faraday isolator, and mode matching telescopes. The IO group has developed and characterized RTP-based phase modulators capable of operation at 180 W cw input power. In addition, the Faraday isolator is compensated for depolarization and thermal lensing effects up to the same power and is capable of achieving greater than 40 dB isolation. This research has been supported by the NSF through Grants PHY-1205512 and PHY-1505598. LIGO-G1600067.

  3. Trajectory Based Behavior Analysis for User Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pao, Hsing-Kuo; Lin, Hong-Yi; Chen, Kuan-Ta; Fadlil, Junaidillah

    Many of our activities on computer need a verification step for authorized access. The goal of verification is to tell apart the true account owner from intruders. We propose a general approach for user verification based on user trajectory inputs. The approach is labor-free for users and is likely to avoid the possible copy or simulation from other non-authorized users or even automatic programs like bots. Our study focuses on finding the hidden patterns embedded in the trajectories produced by account users. We employ a Markov chain model with Gaussian distribution in its transitions to describe the behavior in the trajectory. To distinguish between two trajectories, we propose a novel dissimilarity measure combined with a manifold learnt tuning for catching the pairwise relationship. Based on the pairwise relationship, we plug-in any effective classification or clustering methods for the detection of unauthorized access. The method can also be applied for the task of recognition, predicting the trajectory type without pre-defined identity. Given a trajectory input, the results show that the proposed method can accurately verify the user identity, or suggest whom owns the trajectory if the input identity is not provided.

  4. A new synthesis for terrestrial nitrogen inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlton, B. Z.; Morford, S. L.

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen (N) inputs sustain many different aspects of local soil processes, their services, and their interactions with the broader Earth system. We present a new synthesis for terrestrial N inputs that explicitly considers both rock and atmospheric sources of N. We review evidence for state-factor regulation over biological fixation, deposition, and rock-weathering inputs from local to global scales and in transient vs. steady-state landscapes. Our investigation highlights strong organism and topographic (relief) controls over all three N input pathways, with the anthropogenic factor clearly important in rising N deposition rates. In addition, the climate, parent material, and time factors are shown to influence patterns of fixation and rock-weathering inputs of N in diverse soil systems. Data reanalysis suggests that weathering of N-rich parent material could resolve several known cases of "missing N inputs" in ecosystems, and demonstrates how the inclusion of rock N sources into modern concepts can lead to a richer understanding of spatial and temporal patterns of ecosystem N availability. For example, explicit consideration of rock N inputs into classic pedogenic models (e.g., the Walker and Syers model) yields a fundamentally different expectation from the standard case: weathering of N-rich parent material could enhance N availability and facilitate terrestrial succession in developmentally young sites even in the absence of N-fixing organisms. We conclude that a state-factor framework for N complements our growing understanding multiple-source controls on phosphorus and cation availability in Earth's soil, but with significant exceptions given the lack of an N fixation analogue in all other biogeochemical cycles. Rather, non-symmetrical feedbacks among input pathways in which high N inputs via deposition or rock-weathering sources have the potential to reduce biological fixation rates mark N as fundamentally different from other nutrients. The new synthesis

  5. TOOKUIL: A case study in user interface development for safety code application

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, D.L.; Harkins, C.K.; Hoole, J.G.; Peebles, R.C.; Smith, R.J.

    1996-11-01

    Traditionally, there has been a very high learning curve associated with using nuclear power plant (NPP) analysis codes. Even for seasoned plant analysts and engineers, the process of building or modifying an input model for present day NPP analysis codes is tedious, error prone, and time consuming. Current cost constraints and performance demands place an additional burden on today`s safety analysis community. Advances in graphical user interface (GUI) technology have been applied to obtain significant productivity and quality assurance improvements for the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) input model development. KAPL Inc. has developed an X Windows-based graphical user interface named TOOKUIL which supports the design and analysis process, acting as a preprocessor, runtime editor, help system, and post processor for TRAC. This paper summarizes the objectives of the project, the GUI development process and experiences, and the resulting end product, TOOKUIL.

  6. RGUI 1.0, New Graphical User Interface for RELAP5-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Mesina, George Lee; Galbraith, James Andrew

    1999-04-01

    With the advent of three-dimensional modeling in nuclear safety analysis codes, the need has arisen for a new display methodology. Currently, analysts either sort through voluminous numerical displays of data at points in a region, or view color coded interpretations of the data on a two-dimensional rendition of the plant. RGUI 1.0 provides 3D capability for displaying data. The 3D isometric hydrodynamic image is built automatically from the input deck without additional input from the user. Standard view change features allow the user to focus on only the important data. Familiar features that are standard to the nuclear industry, such as run, interact, and monitor, are included. RGUI 1.0 reduces the difficulty of analyzing complex three dimensional plants.

  7. RGUI 1.0, New Graphical User Interface for RELAP5-3D

    SciTech Connect

    G. L. Mesina; J. Galbraith

    1999-04-01

    With the advent of three-dimensional modeling in nuclear safety analysis codes, the need has arisen for a new display methodology. Currently, analysts either sort through voluminous numerical displays of data at points in a region, or view color coded interpretations of the data on a two-dimensional rendition of the plant. RGUI 1.0 provides 3D capability for displaying data. The 3D isometric hydrodynamic image is built automatically from the input deck without additional input from the user. Standard view change features allow the user to focus on only the important data. Familiar features that are standard to the nuclear industry, such as run, interact, and monitor, are included. RGUI 1.0 reduces the difficulty of analyzing complex three-dimensional plants.

  8. Scheduler software for tracking and data relay satellite system loading analysis: User manual and programmer guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craft, R.; Dunn, C.; Mccord, J.; Simeone, L.

    1980-01-01

    A user guide and programmer documentation is provided for a system of PRIME 400 minicomputer programs. The system was designed to support loading analyses on the Tracking Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). The system is a scheduler for various types of data relays (including tape recorder dumps and real time relays) from orbiting payloads to the TDRSS. Several model options are available to statistically generate data relay requirements. TDRSS time lines (representing resources available for scheduling) and payload/TDRSS acquisition and loss of sight time lines are input to the scheduler from disk. Tabulated output from the interactive system includes a summary of the scheduler activities over time intervals specified by the user and overall summary of scheduler input and output information. A history file, which records every event generated by the scheduler, is written to disk to allow further scheduling on remaining resources and to provide data for graphic displays or additional statistical analysis.

  9. TOOKUIL: A case study in user interface development for safety code application

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, D.L.; Harkins, C.K.; Hoole, J.G.

    1997-07-01

    Traditionally, there has been a very high learning curve associated with using nuclear power plant (NPP) analysis codes. Even for seasoned plant analysts and engineers, the process of building or modifying an input model for present day NPP analysis codes is tedious, error prone, and time consuming. Current cost constraints and performance demands place an additional burden on today`s safety analysis community. Advances in graphical user interface (GUI) technology have been applied to obtain significant productivity and quality assurance improvements for the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) input model development. KAPL Inc. has developed an X Windows-based graphical user interface named TOOKUIL which supports the design and analysis process, acting as a preprocessor, runtime editor, help system, and post processor for TRAC. This paper summarizes the objectives of the project, the GUI development process and experiences, and the resulting end product, TOOKUIL.

  10. Evaluating change in user error when using ruggedized handheld devices.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Angela Brooke; Strawderman, Lesley; Burch, Reuben

    2015-11-01

    The increasing number of handheld mobile devices used today and the increasing dependency on them in the workplace makes understanding how users interact with these devices critical. This study seeks to understand how user error changes based on user age as well as input content type on ruggedized handheld devices. Participants completed data entry tasks of word and character input on two different devices, a physical keypad and touchscreen device. The number of errors and types of error, corrected and permanent were collected for each participant. Based on results on the study, touchscreen devices proved to be the optimal ruggedized handheld device to minimize user error. PMID:26154226

  11. REL - English Bulk Data Input.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigelow, Richard Henry

    A bulk data input processor which is available for the Rapidly Extensible Language (REL) English versions is described. In REL English versions, statements that declare names of data items and their interrelationships normally are lines from a terminal or cards in a batch input stream. These statements provide a convenient means of declaring some…

  12. User instructions for the CIDER Dose Code

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, P.W.; Lessor, K.S.; Ouderkirk, S.J.

    1994-05-01

    This document provides user instructions for the CIDER (Calculation of Individual Doses from Environmental Radionuclides) computer code. The CIDER code computes estimates of annual doses estimated for both reference individuals with a known residence and food consumption history. This document also provides user instructions for four utility codes used to build input data libraries for CIDER. These utility codes are ENVFAC (environmental factors), FOOFAC (food factors), LIFFAC (lifestyle factors), and ORGFAC (organ factors). Finally, this document provides user instructions for the EXPAND utility code. The EXPAND code processes a result file from CIDER and extracts a summary of the dose information for reporting or plotting purposes.

  13. Trajectory analysis and optimization system (TAOS) user`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Salguero, D.E.

    1995-12-01

    The Trajectory Analysis and Optimization System (TAOS) is software that simulates point--mass trajectories for multiple vehicles. It expands upon the capabilities of the Trajectory Simulation and Analysis program (TAP) developed previously at Sandia National Laboratories. TAOS is designed to be a comprehensive analysis tool capable of analyzing nearly any type of three degree-of-freedom, point-mass trajectory. Trajectories are broken into segments, and within each segment, guidance rules provided by the user control how the trajectory is computed. Parametric optimization provides a powerful method for satisfying mission-planning constraints. Althrough TAOS is not interactive, its input and output files have been designed for ease of use. When compared to TAP, the capability to analyze trajectories for more than one vehicle is the primary enhancement, although numerous other small improvements have been made. This report documents the methods used in TAOS as well as the input and output file formats.

  14. Peak experiences of psilocybin users and non-users.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Christina; Lyke, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Maslow (1970) defined peak experiences as the most wonderful experiences of a person's life, which may include a sense of awe, well-being, or transcendence. Furthermore, recent research has suggested that psilocybin can produce experiences subjectively rated as uniquely meaningful and significant (Griffiths et al. 2006). It is therefore possible that psilocybin may facilitate or change the nature of peak experiences in users compared to non-users. This study was designed to compare the peak experiences of psilocybin users and non-users, to evaluate the frequency of peak experiences while under the influence of psilocybin, and to assess the perceived degree of alteration of consciousness during these experiences. Participants were recruited through convenience and snowball sampling from undergraduate classes and at a musical event. Participants were divided into three groups, those who reported a peak experience while under the influence of psilocybin (psilocybin peak experience: PPE), participants who had used psilocybin but reported their peak experiences did not occur while they were under the influence of psilocybin (non-psilocybin peak experience: NPPE), and participants who had never used psilocybin (non-user: NU). A total of 101 participants were asked to think about their peak experiences and complete a measure evaluating the degree of alteration of consciousness during that experience. Results indicated that 47% of psilocybin users reported their peak experience occurred while using psilocybin. In addition, there were significant differences among the three groups on all dimensions of alteration of consciousness. Future research is necessary to identify factors that influence the peak experiences of psilocybin users in naturalistic settings and contribute to the different characteristics of peak experiences of psilocybin users and non-users. PMID:23909006

  15. A user's guide for the STARTER computer program

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, R.L.; Petrie, L.M.; Landers, N.F.

    1991-12-01

    The STARTER computer code is used to prepare a starting source distribution for the criticality computer code, KENO V.a. The input description and theoretical basis of the STARTER code are described in this user's guide.

  16. Dairy Analytics and Nutrient Analysis (DANA) Prototype System User Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Sam Alessi; Dennis Keiser

    2012-10-01

    This document is a user manual for the Dairy Analytics and Nutrient Analysis (DANA) model. DANA provides an analysis of dairy anaerobic digestion technology and allows users to calculate biogas production, co-product valuation, capital costs, expenses, revenue and financial metrics, for user customizable scenarios, dairy and digester types. The model provides results for three anaerobic digester types; Covered Lagoons, Modified Plug Flow, and Complete Mix, and three main energy production technologies; electricity generation, renewable natural gas generation, and compressed natural gas generation. Additional options include different dairy types, bedding types, backend treatment type as well as numerous production, and economic parameters. DANA’s goal is to extend the National Market Value of Anaerobic Digester Products analysis (informa economics, 2012; Innovation Center, 2011) to include a greater and more flexible set of regional digester scenarios and to provide a modular framework for creation of a tool to support farmer and investor needs. Users can set up scenarios from combinations of existing parameters or add new parameters, run the model and view a variety of reports, charts and tables that are automatically produced and delivered over the web interface. DANA is based in the INL’s analysis architecture entitled Generalized Environment for Modeling Systems (GEMS) , which offers extensive collaboration, analysis, and integration opportunities and greatly speeds the ability construct highly scalable web delivered user-oriented decision tools. DANA’s approach uses server-based data processing and web-based user interfaces, rather a client-based spreadsheet approach. This offers a number of benefits over the client-based approach. Server processing and storage can scale up to handle a very large number of scenarios, so that analysis of county, even field level, across the whole U.S., can be performed. Server based databases allow dairy and digester

  17. Adagio 4.14 users guide.

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Benjamin Whiting

    2009-10-01

    This document is a user's guide for the code Adagio. Adagio is a three-dimensional, implicit solid mechanics code with a versatile element library, nonlinear material models, and capabilities for modeling large deformation and contact. Adagio is a parallel code, and its nonlinear solver and contact capabilities enable scalable solutions of large problems. It is built on the SIERRA Framework [1, 2]. SIERRA provides a data management framework in a parallel computing environment that allows the addition of capabilities in a modular fashion. The Adagio 4.14 User's Guide provides information about the functionality in Adagio and the command structure required to access this functionality in a user input file. This document is divided into chapters based primarily on functionality. For example, the command structure related to the use of various element types is grouped in one chapter; descriptions of material models are grouped in another chapter. The input and usage of Adagio is similar to that of the code Presto [3]. Presto, like Adagio, is a solid mechanics code built on the SIERRA Framework. The primary difference between the two codes is that Presto uses explicit time integration for transient dynamics analysis, whereas Adagio is an implicit code. Because of the similarities in input and usage between Adagio and Presto, the user's guides for the two codes are structured in the same manner and share common material. (Once you have mastered the input structure for one code, it will be easy to master the syntax structure for the other code.) To maintain the commonality between the two user's guides, we have used a variety of techniques. For example, references to Presto may be found in the Adagio user's guide and vice versa, and the chapter order across the two guides is the same. On the other hand, each of the two user's guides is expressly tailored to the features of the specific code and documents the particular functionality for that code. For example, though

  18. Food additives.

    PubMed

    Berglund, F

    1978-01-01

    The use of additives to food fulfils many purposes, as shown by the index issued by the Codex Committee on Food Additives: Acids, bases and salts; Preservatives, Antioxidants and antioxidant synergists; Anticaking agents; Colours; Emulfifiers; Thickening agents; Flour-treatment agents; Extraction solvents; Carrier solvents; Flavours (synthetic); Flavour enhancers; Non-nutritive sweeteners; Processing aids; Enzyme preparations. Many additives occur naturally in foods, but this does not exclude toxicity at higher levels. Some food additives are nutrients, or even essential nutritents, e.g. NaCl. Examples are known of food additives causing toxicity in man even when used according to regulations, e.g. cobalt in beer. In other instances, poisoning has been due to carry-over, e.g. by nitrate in cheese whey - when used for artificial feed for infants. Poisonings also occur as the result of the permitted substance being added at too high levels, by accident or carelessness, e.g. nitrite in fish. Finally, there are examples of hypersensitivity to food additives, e.g. to tartrazine and other food colours. The toxicological evaluation, based on animal feeding studies, may be complicated by impurities, e.g. orthotoluene-sulfonamide in saccharin; by transformation or disappearance of the additive in food processing in storage, e.g. bisulfite in raisins; by reaction products with food constituents, e.g. formation of ethylurethane from diethyl pyrocarbonate; by metabolic transformation products, e.g. formation in the gut of cyclohexylamine from cyclamate. Metabolic end products may differ in experimental animals and in man: guanylic acid and inosinic acid are metabolized to allantoin in the rat but to uric acid in man. The magnitude of the safety margin in man of the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) is not identical to the "safety factor" used when calculating the ADI. The symptoms of Chinese Restaurant Syndrome, although not hazardous, furthermore illustrate that the whole ADI

  19. Presto 4.18 user's guide.

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Benjamin Whiting

    2010-09-01

    Presto is a Lagrangian, three-dimensional explicit, transient dynamics code that is used to analyze solids subjected to large, suddenly applied loads. The code is designed for a parallel computing environment and for problems with large deformations, nonlinear material behavior, and contact. Presto also has a versatile element library that incorporates both continuum elements and structural elements. This user's guide describes the input for Presto that gives users access to all the current functionality in the code. The environment in which Presto is built allows it to be coupled with other engineering analysis codes. Using a concept called scope, the input structure reflects the fact that Presto can be used in a coupled environment. The user's guide describes how scope is implemented from the outermost to the innermost scopes. Within a given scope, the descriptions of input commands are grouped based on functionality of the code. For example, all material input command lines are described in a chapter of the user's guide for all the material models that can be used in Presto.

  20. Tip vortex computer code SRATIP. User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R.; Lin, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    This User's Guide applies to the three dimensional viscous flow forward marching analysis, PEPSIG, as used for the calculation of the helicopter tip vortex flow field. The guide presents a discussion of the program flow and subroutines, as well as a list of sample input and output.

  1. Presto 2.9 user's guide.

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Joseph

    2008-05-01

    Presto is a Lagrangian, three-dimensional explicit, transient dynamics code that is used to analyze solids subjected to large, suddenly applied loads. The code is designed for a parallel computing environment and for problems with large deformations, nonlinear material behavior, and contact. Presto also has a versatile element library that incorporates both continuum elements and structural elements. This user's guide describes the input for Presto that gives users access to all the current functionality in the code. The environment in which Presto is built allows it to be coupled with other engineering analysis codes. Using a concept called scope, the input structure reflects the fact that Presto can be used in a coupled environment. The user's guide describes how scope is implemented from the outermost to the innermost scopes. Within a given scope, the descriptions of input commands are grouped based on functionality of the code. For example, all material input command lines are described in a chapter of the user's guide for all the material models that can be used in Presto.

  2. DAKOTA JAGUAR 3.0 user's manual.

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Brian M.; Bauman, Lara E; Chan, Ethan; Lefantzi, Sophia; Ruthruff, Joseph R.

    2013-05-01

    JAGUAR (JAva GUi for Applied Research) is a Java software tool providing an advanced text editor and graphical user interface (GUI) to manipulate DAKOTA (Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications) input specifications. This document focuses on the features necessary to use JAGUAR.

  3. TADS: A CFD-based turbomachinery and analysis design system with GUI. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, R. A.; Topp, D. A.; Delaney, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was the development of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based turbomachinery airfoil analysis and design system, controlled by a graphical user interface (GUI). The computer codes resulting from this effort are referred to as the Turbomachinery Analysis and Design System (TADS). This document is intended to serve as a user's manual for the computer programs which comprise the TADS system. TADS couples a throughflow solver (ADPAC) with a quasi-3D blade-to-blade solver (RVCQ3D) in an interactive package. Throughflow analysis capability was developed in ADPAC through the addition of blade force and blockage terms to the governing equations. A GUI was developed to simplify user input and automate the many tasks required to perform turbomachinery analysis and design. The coupling of various programs was done in a way that alternative solvers or grid generators could be easily incorporated into the TADS framework.

  4. LCS Users Manual

    SciTech Connect

    A.J. Redd; D.W. Ignat

    1998-02-01

    The Lower Hybrid Simulation Code (LSC) is a computational model of lower hybrid current drive in the presence of an electric field. Details of geometry, plasma profiles, and circuit equations are treated. Two-dimensional velocity space effects are approximated in a one-dimensional Fokker-Planck treatment. The LSC was originally written to be a module for lower hybrid current drive called by the Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC), which is a numerical model of an axisymmetric tokamak plasma and the associated control systems. The TSC simulates the time evolution of a free boundary plasma by solving the MHD equations on a rectangular computational grid. The MHD equations are coupled to the external circuits (representing poloidal field coils) through the boundary conditions. The code includes provisions for modeling the control system, external heating, and fusion heating. The LSC module can also be called by the TRANSP code. TRANSP represents the plasma with an axisymmetric, fixed-boundary model and focuses on calculation of plasma transport to determine transport coefficients from data on power inputs and parameters reached. This manual covers the basic material needed to use the LSC. If run in conjunction with TSC, the "TSC Users Manual" should be consulted. If run in conjunction with TRANSP, on-line documentation will be helpful. A theoretical background of the governing equations and numerical methods is given. Information on obtaining, compiling, and running the code is also provided.

  5. The Radiological Safety Analysis Computer Program (RSAC-5) user`s manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, D.R.

    1994-02-01

    The Radiological Safety Analysis Computer Program (RSAC-5) calculates the consequences of the release of radionuclides to the atmosphere. Using a personal computer, a user can generate a fission product inventory from either reactor operating history or nuclear criticalities. RSAC-5 models the effects of high-efficiency particulate air filters or other cleanup systems and calculates decay and ingrowth during transport through processes, facilities, and the environment. Doses are calculated through the inhalation, immersion, ground surface, and ingestion pathways. RSAC+, a menu-driven companion program to RSAC-5, assists users in creating and running RSAC-5 input files. This user`s manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for RSAC-5 and RSAC+. Instructions, screens, and examples are provided to guide the user through the functions provided by RSAC-5 and RSAC+. These programs are designed for users who are familiar with radiological dose assessment methods.

  6. Franklin: User Experiences

    SciTech Connect

    National Energy Research Supercomputing Center; He, Yun; Kramer, William T.C.; Carter, Jonathan; Cardo, Nicholas

    2008-05-07

    The newest workhorse of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center is a Cray XT4 with 9,736 dual core nodes. This paper summarizes Franklin user experiences from friendly early user period to production period. Selected successful user stories along with top issues affecting user experiences are presented.

  7. The User Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    User experience (UX) is about arranging the elements of a product or service to optimize how people will interact with it. In this article, the author talks about the importance of user experience and discusses the design of user experiences in libraries. He first looks at what UX is. Then he describes three kinds of user experience design: (1)…

  8. User's Manual for the Object User Interface (OUI): An Environmental Resource Modeling Framework

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markstrom, Steven L.; Koczot, Kathryn M.

    2008-01-01

    The Object User Interface is a computer application that provides a framework for coupling environmental-resource models and for managing associated temporal and spatial data. The Object User Interface is designed to be easily extensible to incorporate models and data interfaces defined by the user. Additionally, the Object User Interface is highly configurable through the use of a user-modifiable, text-based control file that is written in the eXtensible Markup Language. The Object User Interface user's manual provides (1) installation instructions, (2) an overview of the graphical user interface, (3) a description of the software tools, (4) a project example, and (5) specifications for user configuration and extension.

  9. Nonlinear input-output systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, L. R.; Luksic, Mladen; Su, Renjeng

    1987-01-01

    Necessary and sufficient conditions that the nonlinear system dot-x = f(x) + ug(x) and y = h(x) be locally feedback equivalent to the controllable linear system dot-xi = A xi + bv and y = C xi having linear output are found. Only the single input and single output case is considered, however, the results generalize to multi-input and multi-output systems.

  10. Anomalous neuronal responses to fluctuated inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosaka, Ryosuke; Sakai, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    The irregular firing of a cortical neuron is thought to result from a highly fluctuating drive that is generated by the balance of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. A previous study reported anomalous responses of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron to the fluctuated inputs where an irregularity of spike trains is inversely proportional to an input irregularity. In the current study, we investigated the origin of these anomalous responses with the Hindmarsh-Rose neuron model, map-based models, and a simple mixture of interspike interval distributions. First, we specified the parameter regions for the bifurcations in the Hindmarsh-Rose model, and we confirmed that the model reproduced the anomalous responses in the dynamics of the saddle-node and subcritical Hopf bifurcations. For both bifurcations, the Hindmarsh-Rose model shows bistability in the resting state and the repetitive firing state, which indicated that the bistability was the origin of the anomalous input-output relationship. Similarly, the map-based model that contained bistability reproduced the anomalous responses, while the model without bistability did not. These results were supported by additional findings that the anomalous responses were reproduced by mimicking the bistable firing with a mixture of two different interspike interval distributions. Decorrelation of spike trains is important for neural information processing. For such spike train decorrelation, irregular firing is key. Our results indicated that irregular firing can emerge from fluctuating drives, even weak ones, under conditions involving bistability. The anomalous responses, therefore, contribute to efficient processing in the brain.

  11. Anomalous neuronal responses to fluctuated inputs.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, Ryosuke; Sakai, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    The irregular firing of a cortical neuron is thought to result from a highly fluctuating drive that is generated by the balance of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. A previous study reported anomalous responses of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron to the fluctuated inputs where an irregularity of spike trains is inversely proportional to an input irregularity. In the current study, we investigated the origin of these anomalous responses with the Hindmarsh-Rose neuron model, map-based models, and a simple mixture of interspike interval distributions. First, we specified the parameter regions for the bifurcations in the Hindmarsh-Rose model, and we confirmed that the model reproduced the anomalous responses in the dynamics of the saddle-node and subcritical Hopf bifurcations. For both bifurcations, the Hindmarsh-Rose model shows bistability in the resting state and the repetitive firing state, which indicated that the bistability was the origin of the anomalous input-output relationship. Similarly, the map-based model that contained bistability reproduced the anomalous responses, while the model without bistability did not. These results were supported by additional findings that the anomalous responses were reproduced by mimicking the bistable firing with a mixture of two different interspike interval distributions. Decorrelation of spike trains is important for neural information processing. For such spike train decorrelation, irregular firing is key. Our results indicated that irregular firing can emerge from fluctuating drives, even weak ones, under conditions involving bistability. The anomalous responses, therefore, contribute to efficient processing in the brain. PMID:26565270

  12. Disposal Unit Source Term (DUST) data input guide

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.M.

    1993-05-01

    Performance assessment of a low-level waste (LLW) disposal facility begins with an estimation of the rate at which radionuclides migrate out of the facility (i.e., the source term). The focus of this work is to develop a methodology for calculating the source term. In general, the source term is influenced by the radionuclide inventory, the wasteforms and containers used to dispose of the inventory, and the physical processes that lead to release from the facility (fluid flow, container degradation, wasteform leaching, and radionuclide transport). The computer code DUST (Disposal Unit Source Term) has been developed to model these processes. This document presents the models used to calculate release from a disposal facility, verification of the model, and instructions on the use of the DUST code. In addition to DUST, a preprocessor, DUSTIN, which helps the code user create input decks for DUST and a post-processor, GRAFXT, which takes selected output files and plots them on the computer terminal have been written. Use of these codes is also described.

  13. Aortic Input Impedance during Nitroprusside Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Pepine, Carl J.; Nichols, W. W.; Curry, R. C.; Conti, C. Richard

    1979-01-01

    Beneficial effects of nitroprusside infusion in heart failure are purportedly a result of decreased afterload through “impedance” reduction. To study the effect of nitroprusside on vascular factors that determine the total load opposing left ventricular ejection, the total aortic input impedance spectrum was examined in 12 patients with heart failure (cardiac index <2.0 liters/min per m2 and left ventricular end diastolic pressure >20 mm Hg). This input impedance spectrum expresses both mean flow (resistance) and pulsatile flow (compliance and wave reflections) components of vascular load. Aortic root blood flow velocity and pressure were recorded continuously with a catheter-tip electromagnetic velocity probe in addition to left ventricular pressure. Small doses of nitroprusside (9-19 μg/min) altered the total aortic input impedance spectrum as significant (P < 0.05) reductions in both mean and pulsatile components were observed within 60-90 s. With these acute changes in vascular load, left ventricular end diastolic pressure declined (44%) and stroke volume increased (20%, both P < 0.05). Larger nitroprusside doses (20-38 μg/min) caused additional alteration in the aortic input impedance spectrum with further reduction in left ventricular end diastolic pressure and increase in stroke volume but no additional changes in the impedance spectrum or stroke volume occurred with 39-77 μg/min. Improved ventricular function persisted when aortic pressure was restored to control values with simultaneous phenylephrine infusion in three patients. These data indicate that nitroprusside acutely alters both the mean and pulsatile components of vascular load to effect improvement in ventricular function in patients with heart failure. The evidence presented suggests that it may be possible to reduce vascular load and improve ventricular function independent of aortic pressure reduction. PMID:457874

  14. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  15. Phosphazene additives

    SciTech Connect

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  16. User's Guide for the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation (C-MAPSS): Version 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yuan; Frederick, Dean K.; DeCastro, Jonathan A.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Chan, William W.

    2012-01-01

    This report is a Users Guide for version 2 of the NASA-developed Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation (C-MAPSS) software, which is a transient simulation of a large commercial turbofan engine (up to 90,000-lb thrust) with a realistic engine control system. The software supports easy access to health, control, and engine parameters through a graphical user interface (GUI). C-MAPSS v.2 has some enhancements over the original, including three actuators rather than one, the addition of actuator and sensor dynamics, and an improved controller, while retaining or improving on the convenience and user-friendliness of the original. C-MAPSS v.2 provides the user with a graphical turbofan engine simulation environment in which advanced algorithms can be implemented and tested. C-MAPSS can run user-specified transient simulations, and it can generate state-space linear models of the nonlinear engine model at an operating point. The code has a number of GUI screens that allow point-and-click operation, and have editable fields for user-specified input. The software includes an atmospheric model which allows simulation of engine operation at altitudes from sea level to 40,000 ft, Mach numbers from 0 to 0.90, and ambient temperatures from -60 to 103 F. The package also includes a power-management system that allows the engine to be operated over a wide range of thrust levels throughout the full range of flight conditions.

  17. POSA: a user-driven, interactive multiple protein structure alignment server

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhanwen; Natarajan, Padmaja; Ye, Yuzhen; Hrabe, Thomas; Godzik, Adam

    2014-01-01

    POSA (Partial Order Structure Alignment), available at http://posa.godziklab.org, is a server for multiple protein structure alignment introduced in 2005 (Ye,Y. and Godzik,A. (2005) Multiple flexible structure alignment using partial order graphs. Bioinformatics, 21, 2362–2369). It is free and open to all users, and there is no login requirement, albeit there is an option to register and store results in individual, password-protected directories. In the updated POSA server described here, we introduce two significant improvements. First is an interface allowing the user to provide additional information by defining segments that anchor the alignment in one or more input structures. This interface allows users to take advantage of their intuition and biological insights to improve the alignment and guide it toward a biologically relevant solution. The second improvement is an interactive visualization with options that allow the user to view all superposed structures in one window (a typical solution for visualizing results of multiple structure alignments) or view them individually in a series of synchronized windows with extensive, user-controlled visualization options. The user can rotate structure(s) in any of the windows and study similarities or differences between structures clearly visible in individual windows. PMID:24838569

  18. System optimization of gasdynamic lasers, computer program user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otten, L. J., III; Saunders, R. C., III; Morris, S. J.

    1978-01-01

    The user's manual for a computer program that performs system optimization of gasdynamic lasers is provided. Detailed input/output formats are CDC 7600/6600 computers using a dialect of FORTRAN. Sample input/output data are provided to verify correct program operation along with a program listing.

  19. Shawnee flue gas desulfurization computer model users manual

    SciTech Connect

    Sudhoff, F.A.; Torstrick, R.L.

    1985-03-01

    In conjunction with the US Enviromental Protection Agency sponsored Shawnee test program, Bechtel National, Inc., and the Tennessee Valley Authority jointly developed a computer model capable of projecting preliminary design and economics for lime- and limestone-scrubbing flue gas desulfurization systems. The model is capable of projecting relative economics for spray tower, turbulent contact absorber, and venturi-spray tower scrubbing options. It may be used to project the effect on system design and economics of variations in required SO/sub 2/ removal, scrubber operating parameters (gas velocity, liquid-to-gas (L/G) ration, alkali stoichiometry, liquor hold time in slurry recirculation tanks), reheat temperature, and scrubber bypass. It may also be used to evaluate alternative waste disposal methods or additives (MgO or adipic acid) on costs for the selected process. Although the model is not intended to project the economics of an individual system to a high degree of accuracy, it allows prospective users to quickly project comparative design and costs for limestone and lime case variations on a common design and cost basis. The users manual provides a general descripton of the Shawnee FGD computer model and detailed instructions for its use. It describes and explains the user-supplied input data which are required such as boiler size, coal characteristics, and SO/sub 2/ removal requirments. Output includes a material balance, equipment list, and detailed capital investment and annual revenue requirements. The users manual provides information concerning the use of the overall model as well as sample runs to serve as a guide to prospective users in identifying applications. The FORTRAN-based model is maintained by TVA, from whom copies or individual runs are available. 25 refs., 3 figs., 36 tabs.

  20. Linking Library Users: A Culture Change in Librarianship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenig, Michael E. D.

    1990-01-01

    Discussion of library information systems focuses on the idea of including user-supplied data (USD) in libraries' automated catalogs. Hypertext is mentioned, the information explosion and the ability to selectively retrieve information is considered, and the value of user input in evaluating the relevance of material is discussed. (12 references)…

  1. USER'S GUIDE FOR THE PHOTOCHEMICAL BOX MODEL (PBM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The User's Guide for the Photochemical Box Model (PBM) attempts to describe the structure and operation of the model and its preprocessors as well as provide the potential user with guidance in setting up input data. The PBM is a simple stationary single-cell model with a variabl...

  2. Adagio 4.16 users guide.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-05-01

    Adagio is a three-dimensional, implicit solid mechanics code with a versatile element library, nonlinear material models, and capabilities for modeling large deformation and contact. Adagio is a parallel code, and its nonlinear solver and contact capabilities enable scalable solutions of large problems. It is built on the SIERRA Framework [1, 2]. SIERRA provides a data management framework in a parallel computing environment that allows the addition of capabilities in a modular fashion. The Adagio 4.16 User's Guide provides information about the functionality in Adagio and the command structure required to access this functionality in a user input file. This document is divided into chapters based primarily on functionality. For example, the command structure related to the use of various element types is grouped in one chapter; descriptions of material models are grouped in another chapter. The input and usage of Adagio is similar to that of the code Presto [3]. Presto, like Adagio, is a solid mechanics code built on the SIERRA Framework. The primary difference between the two codes is that Presto uses explicit time integration for transient dynamics analysis, whereas Adagio is an implicit code. Because of the similarities in input and usage between Adagio and Presto, the user's guides for the two codes are structured in the same manner and share common material. (Once you have mastered the input structure for one code, it will be easy to master the syntax structure for the other code.) To maintain the commonality between the two user's guides, we have used a variety of techniques. For example, references to Presto may be found in the Adagio user's guide and vice versa, and the chapter order across the two guides is the same. On the other hand, each of the two user's guides is expressly tailored to the features of the specific code and documents the particular functionality for that code. For example, though both Presto and Adagio have contact functionality, the

  3. Presto 4.14 users guide.

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Benjamin Whiting

    2009-10-01

    Presto is a three-dimensional transient dynamics code with a versatile element library, nonlinear material models, large deformation capabilities, and contact. It is built on the SIERRA Framework [1, 2]. SIERRA provides a data management framework in a parallel computing environment that allows the addition of capabilities in a modular fashion. Contact capabilities are parallel and scalable. The Presto 4.14 User's Guide provides information about the functionality in Presto and the command structure required to access this functionality in a user input file. This document is divided into chapters based primarily on functionality. For example, the command structure related to the use of various element types is grouped in one chapter; descriptions of material models are grouped in another chapter. The input and usage of Presto is similar to that of the code Adagio [3]. Adagio is a three-dimensional quasi-static code with a versatile element library, nonlinear material models, large deformation capabilities, and contact. Adagio, like Presto, is built on the SIERRA Framework [1]. Contact capabilities for Adagio are also parallel and scalable. A significant feature of Adagio is that it offers a multilevel, nonlinear iterative solver. Because of the similarities in input and usage between Presto and Adagio, the user's guides for the two codes are structured in the same manner and share common material. (Once you have mastered the input structure for one code, it will be easy to master the syntax structure for the other code.) To maintain the commonality between the two user's guides, we have used a variety of techniques. For example, references to Adagio may be found in the Presto user's guide and vice versa, and the chapter order across the two guides is the same. On the other hand, each of the two user's guides is expressly tailored to the features of the specific code and documents the particular functionality for that code. For example, though both Presto and Adagio

  4. Presto 4.16 users guide.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-05-01

    Presto is a three-dimensional transient dynamics code with a versatile element library, nonlinear material models, large deformation capabilities, and contact. It is built on the SIERRA Framework [1, 2]. SIERRA provides a data management framework in a parallel computing environment that allows the addition of capabilities in a modular fashion. Contact capabilities are parallel and scalable. The Presto 4.16 User's Guide provides information about the functionality in Presto and the command structure required to access this functionality in a user input file. This document is divided into chapters based primarily on functionality. For example, the command structure related to the use of various element types is grouped in one chapter; descriptions of material models are grouped in another chapter. The input and usage of Presto is similar to that of the code Adagio [3]. Adagio is a three-dimensional quasi-static code with a versatile element library, nonlinear material models, large deformation capabilities, and contact. Adagio, like Presto, is built on the SIERRA Framework [1]. Contact capabilities for Adagio are also parallel and scalable. A significant feature of Adagio is that it offers a multilevel, nonlinear iterative solver. Because of the similarities in input and usage between Presto and Adagio, the user's guides for the two codes are structured in the same manner and share common material. (Once you have mastered the input structure for one code, it will be easy to master the syntax structure for the other code.) To maintain the commonality between the two user's guides, we have used a variety of techniques. For example, references to Adagio may be found in the Presto user's guide and vice versa, and the chapter order across the two guides is the same. On the other hand, each of the two user's guides is expressly tailored to the features of the specific code and documents the particular functionality for that code. For example, though both Presto and Adagio

  5. STS ancillary equipment study. User reference book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plough, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    A record of what is currently known about STS ancillary equipment is presented in this user-oriented design so that a potential user may evaluate whether he could use the described ancillary equipment or if he would need to design and fabricate a payload-unique item. References that the user can use to obtain additional details and requirements to aid in his evaluation and decision are included.

  6. Circadian light-input pathways in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Taishi; Hermann-Luibl, Christiane; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Light is the most important environmental cue to entrain the circadian clock in most animals. In the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, the light entrainment mechanisms of the clock have been well-studied. The Drosophila brain contains approximately 150 neurons that rhythmically express circadian clock genes. These neurons are called "clock neurons" and control behavioral activity rhythms. Many clock neurons express the Cryptochrome (CRY) protein, which is sensitive to UV and blue light, and thus enables clock neurons deep in the brain to directly perceive light. In addition to the CRY protein, external photoreceptors in the Drosophila eyes play an important role in circadian light-input pathways. Recent studies have provided new insights into the mechanisms that integrate these light inputs into the circadian network of the brain. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge on the light entrainment pathways in the Drosophila circadian clock. PMID:27066180

  7. User's Manual for LEWICE Version 3.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, William

    2008-01-01

    A research project is underway at NASA Glenn to produce a computer code which can accurately predict ice growth under a wide range of meteorological conditions for any aircraft surface. This report will present a description of the code inputs and outputs from version 3.2 of this software, which is called LEWICE. This version differs from release 2.0 due to the addition of advanced thermal analysis capabilities for de-icing and anti-icing applications using electrothermal heaters or bleed air applications, the addition of automated Navier-Stokes analysis, an empirical model for supercooled large droplets (SLD) and a pneumatic boot option. An extensive effort was also undertaken to compare the results against the database of electrothermal results which have been generated in the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) as was performed for the validation effort for version 2.0. This report will primarily describe the features of the software related to the use of the program. Appendix A has been included to list some of the inner workings of the software or the physical models used. This information is also available in the form of several unpublished documents internal to NASA. This report is intended as a replacement for all previous user manuals of LEWICE. In addition to describing the changes and improvements made for this version, information from previous manuals may be duplicated so that the user will not need to consult previous manuals to use this software.

  8. Input Type and Parameter Resetting: Is Naturalistic Input Necessary?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Jason; Iverson, Michael

    2007-01-01

    It has been argued that extended exposure to naturalistic input provides L2 learners with more of an opportunity to converge of target morphosyntactic competence as compared to classroom-only environments, given that the former provide more positive evidence of less salient linguistic properties than the latter (e.g., Isabelli 2004). Implicitly,…

  9. Pollution Prevention Successes Database (P2SDb) user guide

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    When Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments (P2OAs) were launched at the Hanford Site during the summer of 1994, the first comment received from those using them expressed the desire for a method to report assessments electronically. As a temporary measure, macros were developed for use on word processing systems, but a more formal database was obviously needed. Additionally, increased DOE and Washington state reporting requirements for pollution prevention suggested that a database system would streamline the reporting process. The Pollution Prevention Group of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) contracted with the Data Automation Engineering Department from ICF Kaiser Hanford Company (ICFKH) to develop the system. The scope was to develop a database that will track P2OAs conducted by the facilities and contractors at the Hanford Site. It will also track pollution prevention accomplishments that are not the result of P2OAs and document a portion of the Process Waste Assessments conducted in the past. To accommodate the above criteria, yet complete the system in a timely manner, the Pollution Prevention Successes Database (P2SDb) is being implemented in three phases. The first phase will automate the worksheets to provide both input and output of the data associated with the worksheets. The second phase will automate standard summary reports and ad hoc reports. The third phase will provide automated searching of the database to facilitate the sharing of pollution prevention experiences among various users. This User`s Guide addresses only the Phase 1 system.

  10. SN_GUI: a graphical user interface for snowpack modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spreitzhofer, G.; Fierz, C.; Lehning, M.

    2004-10-01

    SNOWPACK is a physical snow cover model. The model not only serves as a valuable research tool, but also runs operationally on a network of high Alpine automatic weather and snow measurement sites. In order to facilitate the operation of SNOWPACK and the interpretation of the results obtained by this model, a user-friendly graphical user interface for snowpack modeling, named SN_GUI, was created. This Java-based and thus platform-independent tool can be operated in two modes, one designed to fulfill the requirements of avalanche warning services (e.g. by providing information about critical layers within the snowpack that are closely related to the avalanche activity), and the other one offering a variety of additional options satisfying the needs of researchers. The user of SN_GUI is graphically guided through the entire process of creating snow cover simulations. The starting point is the efficient creation of input parameter files for SNOWPACK, followed by the launching of SNOWPACK with a variety of parameter settings. Finally, after the successful termination of the run, a number of interactive display options may be used to visualize the model output. Among these are vertical profiles and time profiles for many parameters. Besides other features, SN_GUI allows the use of various color, time and coordinate scales, and the comparison of measured and observed parameters.

  11. GXQ program user`s guide. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hey, B.E.

    1995-05-10

    This report documents the program user`s guide of a general purpose atmospheric dispersion code named GXQ. GXQ is an IBM Compatible microcomputer based program for calculating atmospheric dispersion coefficients using Hanford site specific joint frequency data. It uses the Gaussian straight line model to calculate either an atmospheric dispersion coefficient (X/Q{prime}) or a maximum normalized air concentration (X/Q). Several options are available to the user which alter the standard Gaussian model to allow for plume depletion, building wake, plume meander, sector averaging, gravitational settling and plume rise. Additional options control handling of the joint frequency data and output. Combinations of the above allow calculation of X/Q{prime} in accordance with Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.145.

  12. Radcalc for Windows, User`s Manual. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J.R.

    1995-09-27

    Radcalc for Windows is a user-friendly menu-driven Windows-compatible software program with applications in the transportation of radioactive materials. It calculates the radiolytic generation of hydrogen gas in the matrix of low-level and high-level radioactive waste using NRC-accepted methodology. It computes the quantity of a radionuclide and its associated products for a given period of time. In addition, the code categorizes shipment quantities as radioactive, Type A or Type B, limited quantity, low specific activity, highway route controlled, and fissile excepted using DOT definitions and methodologies, as outlined in 49 CFR Subchapter C. The code has undergone extensive testing and validation. Volume I is a User`s Guide, and Volume II is the Technical Manual for Radcalc for Windows.

  13. TOUGH2 User's Guide Version 2

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Moridis, G.J.

    1999-11-01

    TOUGH2 is a numerical simulator for nonisothermal flows of multicomponent, multiphase fluids in one, two, and three-dimensional porous and fractured media. The chief applications for which TOUGH2 is designed are in geothermal reservoir engineering, nuclear waste disposal, environmental assessment and remediation, and unsaturated and saturated zone hydrology. TOUGH2 was first released to the public in 1991; the 1991 code was updated in 1994 when a set of preconditioned conjugate gradient solvers was added to allow a more efficient solution of large problems. The current Version 2.0 features several new fluid property modules and offers enhanced process modeling capabilities, such as coupled reservoir-wellbore flow, precipitation and dissolution effects, and multiphase diffusion. Numerous improvements in previously released modules have been made and new user features have been added, such as enhanced linear equation solvers, and writing of graphics files. The T2VOC module for three-phase flows of water, air and a volatile organic chemical (VOC), and the T2DM module for hydrodynamic dispersion in 2-D flow systems have been integrated into the overall structure of the code and are included in the Version 2.0 package. Data inputs are upwardly compatible with the previous version. Coding changes were generally kept to a minimum, and were only made as needed to achieve the additional functionalities desired. TOUGH2 is written in standard FORTRAN77 and can be run on any platform, such as workstations, PCs, Macintosh, mainframe and supercomputers, for which appropriate FORTRAN compilers are available. This report is a self-contained guide to application of TOUGH2 to subsurface flow problems. It gives a technical description of the TOUGH2 code, including a discussion of the physical processes modeled, and the mathematical and numerical methods used. Illustrative sample problems are presented along with detailed instructions for preparing input data.

  14. Input Files and Procedures for Analysis of SMA Hybrid Composite Beams in MSC.Nastran and ABAQUS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Patel, Hemant D.

    2005-01-01

    A thermoelastic constitutive model for shape memory alloys (SMAs) and SMA hybrid composites (SMAHCs) was recently implemented in the commercial codes MSC.Nastran and ABAQUS. The model is implemented and supported within the core of the commercial codes, so no user subroutines or external calculations are necessary. The model and resulting structural analysis has been previously demonstrated and experimentally verified for thermoelastic, vibration and acoustic, and structural shape control applications. The commercial implementations are described in related documents cited in the references, where various results are also shown that validate the commercial implementations relative to a research code. This paper is a companion to those documents in that it provides additional detail on the actual input files and solution procedures and serves as a repository for ASCII text versions of the input files necessary for duplication of the available results.

  15. User's manual for three-dimensional analysis of propeller flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaussee, D. S.; Kutler, P.

    1983-01-01

    A detailed operating manual is presented for the prop-fan computer code (in addition to supporting programs) recently developed by Kutler, Chaussee, Sorenson, and Pulliam while at the NASA'S Ames Research Center. This code solves the inviscid Euler equations using an implicit numerical procedure developed by Beam and Warming of Ames. A description of the underlying theory, numerical techniques, and boundary conditions with equations, formulas, and methods for the mesh generation program (MGP), three dimensional prop-fan flow field program (3DPFP), and data reduction program (DRP) is provided, together with complete operating instructions. In addition, a programmer's manual is also provided to assist the user interested in modifying the codes. Included in the programmer's manual for each program is a description of the input and output variables, flow charts, program listings, sample input and output data, and operating hints.

  16. Graphical User Interface Color Display Animation Interaction Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Snider, Dale M.; Wagnet, Kurt L.; Grush, William H.; Jones, Kenneth R.

    1999-10-05

    The Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA) is a highly flexible graphical user interface for displaying the results of a calculation, typically generated by RELAP5 or other code. This display consists of one or more picture, called masks, that mimic the host code input. This mask can be animated to display user-specified code output information mapped as colors, dials, moving arrows, etc., on the mask. The user can also interact with the control systems of the host input file as the execution progresses, thereby controlling aspects of the calculation. The Computer Visual System (CVS) creates, edits, and animates the the masks for use in the NPA.

  17. Compiling and using input-output frameworks through collaborative virtual laboratories.

    PubMed

    Lenzen, Manfred; Geschke, Arne; Wiedmann, Thomas; Lane, Joe; Anderson, Neal; Baynes, Timothy; Boland, John; Daniels, Peter; Dey, Christopher; Fry, Jacob; Hadjikakou, Michalis; Kenway, Steven; Malik, Arunima; Moran, Daniel; Murray, Joy; Nettleton, Stuart; Poruschi, Lavinia; Reynolds, Christian; Rowley, Hazel; Ugon, Julien; Webb, Dean; West, James

    2014-07-01

    Compiling, deploying and utilising large-scale databases that integrate environmental and economic data have traditionally been labour- and cost-intensive processes, hindered by the large amount of disparate and misaligned data that must be collected and harmonised. The Australian Industrial Ecology Virtual Laboratory (IELab) is a novel, collaborative approach to compiling large-scale environmentally extended multi-region input-output (MRIO) models. The utility of the IELab product is greatly enhanced by avoiding the need to lock in an MRIO structure at the time the MRIO system is developed. The IELab advances the idea of the "mother-daughter" construction principle, whereby a regionally and sectorally very detailed "mother" table is set up, from which "daughter" tables are derived to suit specific research questions. By introducing a third tier - the "root classification" - IELab users are able to define their own mother-MRIO configuration, at no additional cost in terms of data handling. Customised mother-MRIOs can then be built, which maximise disaggregation in aspects that are useful to a family of research questions. The second innovation in the IELab system is to provide a highly automated collaborative research platform in a cloud-computing environment, greatly expediting workflows and making these computational benefits accessible to all users. Combining these two aspects realises many benefits. The collaborative nature of the IELab development project allows significant savings in resources. Timely deployment is possible by coupling automation procedures with the comprehensive input from multiple teams. User-defined MRIO tables, coupled with high performance computing, mean that MRIO analysis will be useful and accessible for a great many more research applications than would otherwise be possible. By ensuring that a common set of analytical tools such as for hybrid life-cycle assessment is adopted, the IELab will facilitate the harmonisation of fragmented

  18. Java-based Graphical User Interface for MAVERIC-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seo, Suk Jai

    2005-01-01

    A computer program entitled "Marshall Aerospace Vehicle Representation in C II, (MAVERIC-II)" is a vehicle flight simulation program written primarily in the C programming language. It is written by James W. McCarter at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center. The goal of the MAVERIC-II development effort is to provide a simulation tool that facilitates the rapid development of high-fidelity flight simulations for launch, orbital, and reentry vehicles of any user-defined configuration for all phases of flight. MAVERIC-II has been found invaluable in performing flight simulations for various Space Transportation Systems. The flexibility provided by MAVERIC-II has allowed several different launch vehicles, including the Saturn V, a Space Launch Initiative Two-Stage-to-Orbit concept and a Shuttle-derived launch vehicle, to be simulated during ascent and portions of on-orbit flight in an extremely efficient manner. It was found that MAVERIC-II provided the high fidelity vehicle and flight environment models as well as the program modularity to allow efficient integration, modification and testing of advanced guidance and control algorithms. In addition to serving as an analysis tool for techno logy development, many researchers have found MAVERIC-II to be an efficient, powerful analysis tool that evaluates guidance, navigation, and control designs, vehicle robustness, and requirements. MAVERIC-II is currently designed to execute in a UNIX environment. The input to the program is composed of three segments: 1) the vehicle models such as propulsion, aerodynamics, and guidance, navigation, and control 2) the environment models such as atmosphere and gravity, and 3) a simulation framework which is responsible for executing the vehicle and environment models and propagating the vehicle s states forward in time and handling user input/output. MAVERIC users prepare data files for the above models and run the simulation program. They can see the output on screen and/or store in

  19. User interface for a tele-operated robotic hand system

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Anthony L

    2015-03-24

    Disclosed here is a user interface for a robotic hand. The user interface anchors a user's palm in a relatively stationary position and determines various angles of interest necessary for a user's finger to achieve a specific fingertip location. The user interface additionally conducts a calibration procedure to determine the user's applicable physiological dimensions. The user interface uses the applicable physiological dimensions and the specific fingertip location, and treats the user's finger as a two link three degree-of-freedom serial linkage in order to determine the angles of interest. The user interface communicates the angles of interest to a gripping-type end effector which closely mimics the range of motion and proportions of a human hand. The user interface requires minimal contact with the operator and provides distinct advantages in terms of available dexterity, work space flexibility, and adaptability to different users.

  20. Atmoshperic Science User Forum

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-02-26

    article title:  Atmospheric Science User Forum     View Larger Image ... ASDC is pleased to announce the release of the Atmospheric Science User Forum. The purpose of this forum is to improve user service, quality, and efficiency of NASA atmospheric science data by providing a quick and easy way to facilitate scientific ...

  1. TMAP7 User Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2008-12-01

    The TMAP Code was written at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory by Brad Merrill and James Jones in the late 1980s as a tool for safety analysis of systems involving tritium. Since then it was upgraded to TMAP4 and has been used in numerous applications including experiments supporting fusion safety, predictions for advanced systems such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), and estimates involving tritium production technologies. Its further upgrade to TMAP2000 and now to TMAP7 was accomplished in response to several needs. TMAP and TMAP4 had the capacity to deal with only a single trap for diffusing gaseous species in solid structures. TMAP7 includes up to three separate traps and up to 10 diffusing species. The original code had difficulty dealing with heteronuclear molecule formation such as HD and DT under solution-law dependent diffusion boundary conditions. That difficulty has been overcome. TMAP7 automatically generates heteronuclear molecular partial pressures when solubilities and partial pressures of the homonuclear molecular species are provided for law-dependent diffusion boundary conditions. A further sophistication is the addition of non-diffusing surface species. Atoms such as oxygen or nitrogen or formation and decay or combination of hydroxyl radicals on metal surfaces are sometimes important in reactions with diffusing hydrogen isotopes but do not themselves diffuse appreciably in the material. TMAP7 will accommodate up to 30 such surface species, allowing the user to specify relationships between those surface concentrations and partial pressures of gaseous species above the surfaces or to form them dynamically by combining diffusion species or other surface species. Additionally, TMAP7 allows the user to include a surface binding energy and an adsorption barrier energy. The code includes asymmetrical diffusion between the surface sites and regular diffusion sites in the bulk. All of the

  2. The advanced LIGO input optics.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Chris L; Arain, Muzammil A; Ciani, Giacomo; DeRosa, Ryan T; Effler, Anamaria; Feldbaum, David; Frolov, Valery V; Fulda, Paul; Gleason, Joseph; Heintze, Matthew; Kawabe, Keita; King, Eleanor J; Kokeyama, Keiko; Korth, William Z; Martin, Rodica M; Mullavey, Adam; Peold, Jan; Quetschke, Volker; Reitze, David H; Tanner, David B; Vorvick, Cheryl; Williams, Luke F; Mueller, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are nearing their design sensitivity and should begin taking meaningful astrophysical data in the fall of 2015. These resonant optical interferometers will have unprecedented sensitivity to the strains caused by passing gravitational waves. The input optics play a significant part in allowing these devices to reach such sensitivities. Residing between the pre-stabilized laser and the main interferometer, the input optics subsystem is tasked with preparing the laser beam for interferometry at the sub-attometer level while operating at continuous wave input power levels ranging from 100 mW to 150 W. These extreme operating conditions required every major component to be custom designed. These designs draw heavily on the experience and understanding gained during the operation of Initial LIGO and Enhanced LIGO. In this article, we report on how the components of the input optics were designed to meet their stringent requirements and present measurements showing how well they have lived up to their design. PMID:26827334

  3. The advanced LIGO input optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Chris L.; Arain, Muzammil A.; Ciani, Giacomo; DeRosa, Ryan. T.; Effler, Anamaria; Feldbaum, David; Frolov, Valery V.; Fulda, Paul; Gleason, Joseph; Heintze, Matthew; Kawabe, Keita; King, Eleanor J.; Kokeyama, Keiko; Korth, William Z.; Martin, Rodica M.; Mullavey, Adam; Peold, Jan; Quetschke, Volker; Reitze, David H.; Tanner, David B.; Vorvick, Cheryl; Williams, Luke F.; Mueller, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are nearing their design sensitivity and should begin taking meaningful astrophysical data in the fall of 2015. These resonant optical interferometers will have unprecedented sensitivity to the strains caused by passing gravitational waves. The input optics play a significant part in allowing these devices to reach such sensitivities. Residing between the pre-stabilized laser and the main interferometer, the input optics subsystem is tasked with preparing the laser beam for interferometry at the sub-attometer level while operating at continuous wave input power levels ranging from 100 mW to 150 W. These extreme operating conditions required every major component to be custom designed. These designs draw heavily on the experience and understanding gained during the operation of Initial LIGO and Enhanced LIGO. In this article, we report on how the components of the input optics were designed to meet their stringent requirements and present measurements showing how well they have lived up to their design.

  4. World Input-Output Network

    PubMed Central

    Cerina, Federica; Zhu, Zhen; Chessa, Alessandro; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO) tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION) and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries. PMID:26222389

  5. Regional Hospital Input Price Indexes

    PubMed Central

    Freeland, Mark S.; Schendler, Carol Ellen; Anderson, Gerard

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the development of regional hospital input price indexes that is consistent with the general methodology used for the National Hospital Input Price Index. The feasibility of developing regional indexes was investigated because individuals inquired whether different regions experienced different rates of increase in hospital input prices. The regional indexes incorporate variations in cost-share weights (the amount an expense category contributes to total spending) associated with hospital type and location, and variations in the rate of input price increases for various regions. We found that between 1972 and 1979 none of the regional price indexes increased at average annual rates significantly different from the national rate. For the more recent period 1977 through 1979, the increase in one Census Region was significantly below the national rate. Further analyses indicated that variations in cost-share weights for various types of hospitals produced no substantial variations in the regional price indexes relative to the national index. We consider these findings preliminary because of limitations in the availability of current, relevant, and reliable data, especially for local area wage rate increases. PMID:10309557

  6. World Input-Output Network.

    PubMed

    Cerina, Federica; Zhu, Zhen; Chessa, Alessandro; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO) tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION) and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries. PMID:26222389

  7. Input/output interface module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozyazici, E. M.

    1980-01-01

    Module detects level changes in any of its 16 inputs, transfers changes to its outputs, and generates interrupts when changes are detected. Up to four changes-in-state per line are stored for later retrieval by controlling computer. Using standard TTL logic, module fits 19-inch rack-mounted console.

  8. Input/output error analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, E. T.

    1977-01-01

    Program aids in equipment assessment. Independent assembly-language utility program is designed to operate under level 27 or 31 of EXEC 8 Operating System. It scans user-selected portions of system log file, whether located on tape or mass storage, and searches for and processes 1/0 error (type 6) entries.

  9. DOSFAC2 user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.L.; Chanin, D.

    1997-12-01

    This document describes the DOSFAC2 code, which is used for generating dose-to-source conversion factors for the MACCS2 code. DOSFAC2 is a revised and updated version of the DOSFAC code that was distributed with version 1.5.11 of the MACCS code. included are (1) an overview and background of DOSFAC2, (2) a summary of two new functional capabilities, and (3) a user`s guide. 20 refs., 5 tabs.

  10. Welfare support-equipment for character input with head tilting and breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, Nobuaki; Yamada, Kou; Matsui, Toshikazu; Itoh, Isao

    2005-12-01

    This paper describes support-equipment of operating a personal computer for users who have an obstacle on the regions of upper limb. The user wears a head set device with an angle sensor, and holds a plastic pipe connected to a pressure sensor in his or her mouth. Tilting his or her head and breathing are used for mouse cursor operation and characters input. Considering user's body conditions, the voluntary angle range of head tilting and strength of breathing are memorized to the controller beforehand, and obtained information is reflected for operations without fatigue. The character display board is used to indicate the Japanese characters and input options such as Back Space or Enter. Tilting motions change the indicated character and breathing actions can select and input the illuminated functions on the character display board. In test trial, it is confirmed that Japanese characters including Kanji and Katakana can be input with head tilting and breathing, instead of a general keyboard.

  11. Incorporating uncertainty in RADTRAN 6.0 input files.

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, Matthew L.; Weiner, Ruth F.; Heames, Terence John

    2010-02-01

    Uncertainty may be introduced into RADTRAN analyses by distributing input parameters. The MELCOR Uncertainty Engine (Gauntt and Erickson, 2004) has been adapted for use in RADTRAN to determine the parameter shape and minimum and maximum of the distribution, to sample on the distribution, and to create an appropriate RADTRAN batch file. Coupling input parameters is not possible in this initial application. It is recommended that the analyst be very familiar with RADTRAN and able to edit or create a RADTRAN input file using a text editor before implementing the RADTRAN Uncertainty Analysis Module. Installation of the MELCOR Uncertainty Engine is required for incorporation of uncertainty into RADTRAN. Gauntt and Erickson (2004) provides installation instructions as well as a description and user guide for the uncertainty engine.

  12. A Web Browsing System by Eye-gaze Input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Kiyohiko; Owada, Kosuke; Ohi, Shoichi; Ohyama, Minoru

    We have developed an eye-gaze input system for people with severe physical disabilities, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. This system utilizes a personal computer and a home video camera to detect eye-gaze under natural light. The system detects both vertical and horizontal eye-gaze by simple image analysis, and does not require special image processing units or sensors. We also developed the platform for eye-gaze input based on our system. In this paper, we propose a new web browsing system for physically disabled computer users as an application of the platform for eye-gaze input. The proposed web browsing system uses a method of direct indicator selection. The method categorizes indicators by their function. These indicators are hierarchized relations; users can select the felicitous function by switching indicators group. This system also analyzes the location of selectable object on web page, such as hyperlink, radio button, edit box, etc. This system stores the locations of these objects, in other words, the mouse cursor skips to the object of candidate input. Therefore it enables web browsing at a faster pace.

  13. Information filtering via collaborative user clustering modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chu-Xu; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Yu, Lu; Liu, Chuang; Liu, Hao; Yan, Xiao-Yong

    2014-02-01

    The past few years have witnessed the great success of recommender systems, which can significantly help users to find out personalized items for them from the information era. One of the widest applied recommendation methods is the Matrix Factorization (MF). However, most of the researches on this topic have focused on mining the direct relationships between users and items. In this paper, we optimize the standard MF by integrating the user clustering regularization term. Our model considers not only the user-item rating information but also the user information. In addition, we compared the proposed model with three typical other methods: User-Mean (UM), Item-Mean (IM) and standard MF. Experimental results on two real-world datasets, MovieLens 1M and MovieLens 100k, show that our method performs better than other three methods in the accuracy of recommendation.

  14. TMAP7 User Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2006-09-01

    The TMAP Code was written at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory by Brad Merrill and James Jones in the late 1980s as a tool for safety analysis of systems involving tritium. Since then it has been upgraded to TMAP4 and has been used in numerous applications including experiments supporting fusion safety, predictions for advanced systems such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), and estimates involving tritium production technologies. Its further upgrade to TMAP2000 and now to TMAP7 was accomplished in response to several needs. TMAP and TMAP4 had the capacity to deal with only a single trap for diffusing gaseous species in solid structures. TMAP7 includes up to three separate traps and up to 10 diffusing species. The original code had difficulty dealing with heteronuclear molecule formation such as HD and DT. That has been removed. Under pre-specified boundary enclosure conditions and solution-law dependent diffusion boundary conditions, such as Sieverts' law, TMAP7 automatically generates heteronuclear molecular partial pressures when solubilities and partial pressures of the homonuclear molecular species are provided for law-dependent diffusion boundary conditions. A further sophistication is the addition of non-diffusing surface species. Atoms such as oxygen or nitrogen or formation and decay or combination of hydroxyl radicals on metal surfaces are sometimes important in reactions with diffusing hydrogen isotopes but do not themselves diffuse appreciably in the material. TMAP7 will accommodate up to 30 such surface species, allowing the user to specify relationships between those surface concentrations and partial pressures of gaseous species above the surfaces or to form them dynamically by combining diffusion species or other surface species. Additionally, TMAP7 allows the user to include a surface binding energy and an adsorption barrier energy. The code includes asymmetrical diffusion between the surface

  15. Continuous user authentication using temporal information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niinuma, Koichiro; Jain, Anil K.

    2010-04-01

    Conventional computer systems authenticate users only at the initial log-in session, which can be the cause of a critical security flaw. To resolve this problem, systems need continuous user authentication methods that continuously monitor and authenticate users based on some biometric trait(s). We propose a new method for continuous user authentication based on a Webcam that monitors a logged in user's face and color of clothing. Our method can authenticate users regardless of their posture in front of the workstation (laptop or PC). Previous methods for continuous user authentication cannot authenticate users without biometric observation. To alleviate this requirement, our method uses color information of users' clothing as an enrollment template in addition to their face information. The system cannot pre-register the clothing color information because this information is not permanent. To deal with the problem, our system automatically registers this information every time the user logs in and then fuses it with the conventional (password) identification system. We report preliminary authentication results and future enhancements to the proposed system.

  16. User guide to the Burner Engineering Research Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Fornaciari, N.; Schefer, R.; Paul, P.; Lubeck, C.; Sanford, R.; Claytor, L.

    1994-11-01

    The Burner Engineering Research Laboratory (BERL) was established with the purpose of providing a facility where manufacturers and researchers can study industrial natural gas burners using conventional and laser-based diagnostics. To achieve this goal, an octagonal furnace enclosure with variable boundary conditions and optical access that can accommodate burners with firing rates up to 2.5 MMBtu per hour was built. In addition to conventional diagnostic capabilities like input/output measurements, exhaust gas monitoring, suction pyrometry and in-furnace gas sampling, laser-based diagnostics available at BERL include planar Mie scattering, laser Doppler velocimetry and laser-induced fluorescence. This paper gives an overview of the operation of BERL and a description of the diagnostic capabilities and an estimate of the time required to complete each diagnostic for the potential user who is considering submitting a proposal.

  17. Supplement to wellbore models GWELL, GWNACL, and HOLA User`s Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Hadgu, T.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1992-09-01

    A study was made on improving the applicability and ease of usage of the wellbore simulators HOLA, GWELL and GWNACL (Bjornsson, 1987; Aunzo et al., 1991). The study concentrated mainly on the usage of Option 2 (please refer to the User`s Guide; Aunzo et al., 1991) and modeling flow of superheated steam when using these computer codes. Amendments were made to the simulators to allow implementation of a variety of input data. A wide range of input data was used to test the modifications to the codes. The study did not attempt to modify or improve the physics or formulations which were used in the models. It showed that a careful check of the input data is required. This report addresses these two areas of interest: usage of Option 2, and simulation of wellbore flow of superheated steam.

  18. Sentinel-3 Surface Topography Mission (STM) User Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira Loddo, Carolina; Scharroo, Remko; Wilson, Hilary; Bonekamp, Hans

    2015-04-01

    The Sentinel-3 Surface Topography Mission (STM) is a key component of the Copernicus Sentinel-3 mission, set to revolutionise operational oceanography with a suite of advanced surface topography data products over ocean and sea sea-ice. In addition the STM will collect data over all earth surfaces providing improved monitoring of River and Lake stage heights and inputs to the development of Digital Elevation Models. Sentinel-3 will be the first Earth Observation mission to provide 100% SAR altimetry coverage and LRM will be maintained as a backup operating mode. In order to fully exploit the SAR capability, and validating the algorithms evolution, lower level data products (L1A, L1B and L1B-S) will be made available to the users, in addition to the level 2 products. This poster provides an overview of the S-3 STM data products that will be generated operationally within the Sentinel-3 Payload Data Ground Segment by the Instrument Processing Facilities (IPFs), and disseminated to the users.

  19. Analytical modeling of operating characteristics of premixing-prevaporizing fuel-air mixing passages. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, O. L.; Chiappetta, L. M.; Edwards, D. E.; Mcvey, J. B.

    1982-01-01

    A user's manual describing the operation of three computer codes (ADD code, PTRAK code, and VAPDIF code) is presented. The general features of the computer codes, the input/output formats, run streams, and sample input cases are described.

  20. National Hospital Input Price Index

    PubMed Central

    Freeland, Mark S.; Anderson, Gerard; Schendler, Carol Ellen

    1979-01-01

    The national community hospital input price index presented here isolates the effects of prices of goods and services required to produce hospital care and measures the average percent change in prices for a fixed market basket of hospital inputs. Using the methodology described in this article, weights for various expenditure categories were estimated and proxy price variables associated with each were selected. The index is calculated for the historical period 1970 through 1978 and forecast for 1979 through 1981. During the historical period, the input price index increased an average of 8.0 percent a year, compared with an average rate of increase of 6.6 percent for overall consumer prices. For the period 1979 through 1981, the average annual increase is forecast at between 8.5 and 9.0 percent. Using the index to deflate growth in expenses, the level of real growth in expenditures per inpatient day (net service intensity growth) averaged 4.5 percent per year with considerable annual variation related to government and hospital industry policies. PMID:10309052

  1. ITOUGH2 user`s guide version 2.2

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, S.

    1993-08-01

    ITOUGH2 is a program to estimate hydrogeologic model parameters for the numerical simulator TOUGH2. TOUGH2 was developed by Karsten Pruess at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for simulating non-isothermal flows of multicomponent, multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media. ITOUGH2 solves the inverse problem by automatic model calibration based on an indirect approach, in which some function of the difference between observed and model-predicted system response and appropriately weighted prior information about the parameters is minimized using standard optimization techniques. ITOUGH2 also provides a detailed error analysis of the estimated parameter set, and employs some procedures to study error propagation for prediction runs. This report includes a review of the inverse modeling theory, and a detailed description of the program architecture, input language, and the various user features provided by ITOUGH2. A sample problem is given to illustrate code application.

  2. User's guide to ESME v. 7. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, S.; MacLachlan, J.

    1990-02-26

    ESME is a computer program to calculate the evolution of a distribution of particles in energy and azimuth as it is acted upon by the radiofrequency system of a proton synchrotron. It provides for the modeling of multiple rf systems, feedback control, spacecharge, and many of the effects of longitudinal coupling impedance. The capabilities of the program are described, and the requirements for input data are specified in sufficient detail to permit significant calculations by an uninitiated user. The program is currently at version 7.1 and extensively modified since the previous user documentation. Fundamental enhancements make version 6 data unusable, but nearly all facilities of the earlier version have been retained and input data is similar. Also described is a VAX-based code management convention which has been established with a view to maintaining functional equivalence in versions used on different computers. 13 refs.

  3. User`s manual for the master equipment list: Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, J.D.

    1997-05-12

    This manual is intended to provide a user with enough detailed instruction to guide them through the Master Equipment List Phase 1 (MEL Phase 1) application system operations. The MEL Phase 1 application is a database system that stores Equipment Identification Number (EIN) information to support equipment tracking in the 200E and 200W Tank Farms for the Tank Waste Remediation System Division. The MEL Phase 1 application supports both the user application and administrative control functions. The user application functions include: viewing by Folder, reporting, performing queries, and editing specific data. The administrative control functions include: maintaining valid user identifications, passwords, privileges, defining drop-down lists, and review of the change log relating to EIN data entries, additions, deletions, and editing. The scope of this User`s Manual is to discuss these functions and is intended to guide users and answer questions regarding the MEL Phase 1 application.

  4. User`s and reference guide to the INEL RML/analytical radiochemistry sample tracking database version 1.00

    SciTech Connect

    Femec, D.A.

    1995-09-01

    This report discusses the sample tracking database in use at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML) and Analytical Radiochemistry. The database was designed in-house to meet the specific needs of the RML and Analytical Radiochemistry. The report consists of two parts, a user`s guide and a reference guide. The user`s guide presents some of the fundamentals needed by anyone who will be using the database via its user interface. The reference guide describes the design of both the database and the user interface. Briefly mentioned in the reference guide are the code-generating tools, CREATE-SCHEMA and BUILD-SCREEN, written to automatically generate code for the database and its user interface. The appendices contain the input files used by the these tools to create code for the sample tracking database. The output files generated by these tools are also included in the appendices.

  5. Blade loss transient dynamics analysis. Volume 3: User's manual for TETRA program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, G. R.; Gallardo, V. C.; Storace, A. S.; Sagendorph, F.

    1981-01-01

    The users manual for TETRA contains program logic, flow charts, error messages, input sheets, modeling instructions, option descriptions, input variable descriptions, and demonstration problems. The process of obtaining a NASTRAN 17.5 generated modal input file for TETRA is also described with a worked sample.

  6. Reconstruction of dynamic structural inputs in the presence of noise

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Solomon, O.M. Jr.

    1986-08-01

    This report describes a technique to reconstruct dynamic structural inputs by deconvolution of measured data. The structure to which this technique has been applied is a mild steel bar (3 in diameter and 60 in. long) with a conical nose which provides some geometric simulation of penetrating structures which are used in field test. The deconvolution technique successfully reconstructs dynamic inputs to the bar with and without additive white noise present in the measured response.

  7. 76 FR 4119 - Generic Drug User Fee; Notice of Public Meeting; Reopening of the Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-24

    ... related to a user fee for human generic drugs, and sought public input on such a program. The Agency... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Generic Drug User Fee; Notice of Public Meeting; Reopening... comment period for the notice of public meeting entitled Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting;...

  8. 75 FR 67984 - Generic Drug User Fee; Notice of Public Meeting; Reopening of the Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... related to a user fee for human generic drugs, and sought public input on such a program. The Agency... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Generic Drug User Fee; Notice of Public Meeting; Reopening... comment period for the notice of public meeting entitled Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting;...

  9. 76 FR 14028 - Generic Drug User Fee; Notice of Public Meeting; Reopening of the Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... questions related to a user fee for human generic drugs and sought public input on such a program. The... FR 47820), entitled ``Generic Drug User Fee; Public Meeting; Request for Comments.'' In that notice... a generic drug user fee program. In the last docket reopening on January 24, 2011 (76 FR 4119),...

  10. MADS Users' Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moerder, Daniel D.

    2014-01-01

    MADS (Minimization Assistant for Dynamical Systems) is a trajectory optimization code in which a user-specified performance measure is directly minimized, subject to constraints placed on a low-order discretization of user-supplied plant ordinary differential equations. This document describes the mathematical formulation of the set of trajectory optimization problems for which MADS is suitable, and describes the user interface. Usage examples are provided.

  11. User`s guide to ESME v. 8.0

    SciTech Connect

    MacLachlan, J.

    1993-03-08

    ESME is a computer program to calculate the evolution of a distribution of particles in energy and azimuth as it is acted upon by the radio frequency system of a proton synchrotron. It provides for the modeling of multiple rf systems, feedback control, space charge, and many of the effects of longitudinal coupling impedance. The capabilities of the program are described, and the requirements for input data are specified in sufficient detail to permit significant calculations by an uninitiated user. The program is currently at version 8.0 and extensively modified since the previous user documentation. Changes since the 7.xx versions include a new command and associated parameters for mapping phase space flow lines, new names for a few parameters, and a few new parameters for old commands. Special attention has been given to features relating to calculation of the collective potential and the generation of phase space trajectories including its effects. The VAX-based code management convention has been modified slightly to permit EXPAND pre-compile options to be used in the include files as well as the program source files.

  12. Manufactured Home Energy Audit user`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    The Manufactured Home Energy Audit (MHEA) is a software tool that predicts manufactured home energy consumption and recommends weatherization retrofit measures. It was developed to assist local weatherization agencies working with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Weatherization Assistance Program. Whether new or experienced, employed within or outside the Weatherization Assistance Program, all users can benefit from incorporating MHEA into their manufactured home weatherization programs. DOE anticipates that the state weatherization assistance programs that incorporate MHEA into their programs will find significant growth in the energy and cost savings achieved from manufactured home weatherization. The easy-to-use MHEA displays a colorful, graphical interface for entering simple inputs and provides understandable, usable results. The user enters information about the manufactured home construction, heating equipment, cooling equipment, and weather site. MHEA then calculates annual energy consumption using a simplified building energy analysis technique. MHEA stands apart from other building energy analysis tools in many ways. Calculations incorporated into the computer code specifically address manufactured home heating and cooling load trends. The retrofit measures evaluated by MHEA are all applicable to manufactured homes. Help messages describe common manufactured home weatherization practices as well as provide hints on how to install retrofit measures. These and other features help make MHEA easy to use when evaluating energy consumption and the effects of weatherization retrofit measures for manufactured homes.

  13. Preliminary ISIS users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, C.

    1979-01-01

    The Interactive Software Invocation (ISIS), an interactive data management system, was developed to act as a buffer between the user and host computer system. The user is provided by ISIS with a powerful system for developing software or systems in the interactive environment. The user is protected from the idiosyncracies of the host computer system by providing such a complete range of capabilities that the user should have no need for direct access to the host computer. These capabilities are divided into four areas: desk top calculator, data editor, file manager, and tool invoker.

  14. The SCALE Verified, Archived Library of Inputs and Data - VALID

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, William BJ J; Rearden, Bradley T

    2013-01-01

    The Verified, Archived Library of Inputs and Data (VALID) at ORNL contains high quality, independently reviewed models and results that improve confidence in analysis. VALID is developed and maintained according to a procedure of the SCALE quality assurance (QA) plan. This paper reviews the origins of the procedure and its intended purpose, the philosophy of the procedure, some highlights of its implementation, and the future of the procedure and associated VALID library. The original focus of the procedure was the generation of high-quality models that could be archived at ORNL and applied to many studies. The review process associated with model generation minimized the chances of errors in these archived models. Subsequently, the scope of the library and procedure was expanded to provide high quality, reviewed sensitivity data files for deployment through the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (IHECSBE). Sensitivity data files for approximately 400 such models are currently available. The VALID procedure and library continue fulfilling these multiple roles. The VALID procedure is based on the quality assurance principles of ISO 9001 and nuclear safety analysis. Some of these key concepts include: independent generation and review of information, generation and review by qualified individuals, use of appropriate references for design data and documentation, and retrievability of the models, results, and documentation associated with entries in the library. Some highlights of the detailed procedure are discussed to provide background on its implementation and to indicate limitations of data extracted from VALID for use by the broader community. Specifically, external users of data generated within VALID must take responsibility for ensuring that the files are used within the QA framework of their organization and that use is appropriate. The future plans for the VALID library include expansion to include additional

  15. Effects of congruent and incongruent visual cues on speech perception and brain activity in cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Song, Jae-Jin; Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Kang, Hyejin; Lee, Dong Soo; Chang, Sun O; Oh, Seung Ha

    2015-03-01

    While deafness-induced plasticity has been investigated in the visual and auditory domains, not much is known about language processing in audiovisual multimodal environments for patients with restored hearing via cochlear implant (CI) devices. Here, we examined the effect of agreeing or conflicting visual inputs on auditory processing in deaf patients equipped with degraded artificial hearing. Ten post-lingually deafened CI users with good performance, along with matched control subjects, underwent H 2 (15) O-positron emission tomography scans while carrying out a behavioral task requiring the extraction of speech information from unimodal auditory stimuli, bimodal audiovisual congruent stimuli, and incongruent stimuli. Regardless of congruency, the control subjects demonstrated activation of the auditory and visual sensory cortices, as well as the superior temporal sulcus, the classical multisensory integration area, indicating a bottom-up multisensory processing strategy. Compared to CI users, the control subjects exhibited activation of the right ventral premotor-supramarginal pathway. In contrast, CI users activated primarily the visual cortices more in the congruent audiovisual condition than in the null condition. In addition, compared to controls, CI users displayed an activation focus in the right amygdala for congruent audiovisual stimuli. The most notable difference between the two groups was an activation focus in the left inferior frontal gyrus in CI users confronted with incongruent audiovisual stimuli, suggesting top-down cognitive modulation for audiovisual conflict. Correlation analysis revealed that good speech performance was positively correlated with right amygdala activity for the congruent condition, but negatively correlated with bilateral visual cortices regardless of congruency. Taken together these results suggest that for multimodal inputs, cochlear implant users are more vision-reliant when processing congruent stimuli and are disturbed

  16. User Manual for the PROTEUS Mesh Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Micheal A.; Shemon, Emily R.

    2015-06-01

    This report describes the various mesh tools that are provided with the PROTEUS code giving both descriptions of the input and output. In many cases the examples are provided with a regression test of the mesh tools. The most important mesh tools for any user to consider using are the MT_MeshToMesh.x and the MT_RadialLattice.x codes. The former allows the conversion between most mesh types handled by PROTEUS while the second allows the merging of multiple (assembly) meshes into a radial structured grid. Note that the mesh generation process is recursive in nature and that each input specific for a given mesh tool (such as .axial or .merge) can be used as “mesh” input for any of the mesh tools discussed in this manual.

  17. MIRADS-2 user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    An on-line data storage and retrieval system which allows the user to extract and process information from stored data bases is described. The capabilities of the system are provided by a general purpose computer program containing several functional modules. The modules contained in MIRADS are briefly described along with user terminal operation procedures and MIRADS commands.

  18. LANES 1 Users' Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, J.

    1985-01-01

    This document is intended for users of the Local Area Network Extensible Simulator, version I. This simulator models the performance of a Fiber Optic network under a variety of loading conditions and network characteristics. The options available to the user for defining the network conditions are described in this document. Computer hardware and software requirements are also defined.

  19. User Working Group Charter

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-04-29

    ... of the ASDC user interface, development of the Information Management System (IMS), and ASDC user conferences requirements for and ... formal activity and status reports to ASDC and EOSDIS management as appropriate.  UWG members are expected to attend the UWG ...

  20. KDYNA user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Levatin, J.A.L.; Attia, A.V.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1990-09-28

    This report is a complete user's manual for KDYNA, the Earth Sciences version of DYNA2D. Because most features of DYNA2D have been retained in KDYNA much of this manual is identical to the DYNA2D user's manual.

  1. NASTRAN: Users' experiences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on NASA Structural Analysis (NASTRAN) to analyze the experiences of users of the program are presented. The subjects discussed include the following: (1) statics and buckling, (2) vibrations and dynamics, (3) substructing, (4) new capability, (5) user's experience, and (6) system experience. Specific applications of NASTRAN to spacecraft, aircraft, nuclear power plants, and materials tests are reported.

  2. User's Guide for SKETCH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgley, David R., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    A user's guide for the computer program SKETCH is presented on this disk. SKETCH solves a popular problem in computer graphics-the removal of hidden lines from images of solid objects. Examples and illustrations are included in the guide. Also included is the SKETCH program, so a user can incorporate the information into a particular software system.

  3. Input-anticipating critical reservoirs show power law forgetting of unexpected input events.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Norbert Michael

    2015-05-01

    Usually reservoir computing shows an exponential memory decay. This letter investigates under which circumstances echo state networks can show a power law forgetting. That means traces of earlier events can be found in the reservoir for very long time spans. Such a setting requires critical connectivity exactly at the limit of what is permissible according to the echo state condition. However, for general matrices, the limit cannot be determined exactly from theory. In addition, the behavior of the network is strongly influenced by the input flow. Results are presented that use certain types of restricted recurrent connectivity and anticipation learning with regard to the input, where power law forgetting can indeed be achieved. PMID:25774542

  4. The PANTHER User Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Coram, Jamie L.; Morrow, James D.; Perkins, David Nikolaus

    2015-09-01

    This document describes the PANTHER R&D Application, a proof-of-concept user interface application developed under the PANTHER Grand Challenge LDRD. The purpose of the application is to explore interaction models for graph analytics, drive algorithmic improvements from an end-user point of view, and support demonstration of PANTHER technologies to potential customers. The R&D Application implements a graph-centric interaction model that exposes analysts to the algorithms contained within the GeoGraphy graph analytics library. Users define geospatial-temporal semantic graph queries by constructing search templates based on nodes, edges, and the constraints among them. Users then analyze the results of the queries using both geo-spatial and temporal visualizations. Development of this application has made user experience an explicit driver for project and algorithmic level decisions that will affect how analysts one day make use of PANTHER technologies.

  5. Applying Cognitive Psychology to User Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrani, Sabeen; Durrani, Qaiser S.

    This paper explores some key aspects of cognitive psychology that may be mapped onto user interfaces. Major focus in existing user interface guidelines is on consistency, simplicity, feedback, system messages, display issues, navigation, colors, graphics, visibility and error prevention [8-10]. These guidelines are effective indesigning user interfaces. However, these guidelines do not handle the issues that may arise due to the innate structure of human brain and human limitations. For example, where to place graphics on the screen so that user can easily process them and what kind of background should be given on the screen according to the limitation of human motor system. In this paper we have collected some available guidelines from the area of cognitive psychology [1, 5, 7]. In addition, we have extracted few guidelines from theories and studies of cognitive psychology [3, 11] which may be mapped to user interfaces.

  6. Specialized Environmental Chamber Test Complex: User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montz, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the Specialized Environmental Test Complex. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  7. TMAP4 User`s Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Longhurst, G.R.; Holland, D.F.; Jones, J.L.; Merrill, B.J.

    1992-06-12

    The Tritium Migration Analysis Program, Version 4 (TMAP4) has been developed by the Fusion Safety Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) as a safety analysis code, mainly to analyze tritium retention and loss in fusion reactor structures and systems during normal operation and accident conditions. TMAP4 incorporates one-dimensional thermal- and mass-diffusive transport and trapping calculations through structures and zero dimensional fluid transport between enclosures and across the interface between enclosures and structures. A key feature is the ability to input problem definition parameters as constants, interpolation tables, or FORTRAN equations. The code is specifically intended for use under a DOS operating system on PC-type mini-computers, but it has also been run successfully on workstations and mainframe computer systems. Use of the equation-input feature requires access to a FORTRAN-77 compiler and a linker program.

  8. MFIX documentation: User`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Syamlal, M.

    1994-11-01

    MFIX (Multiphase Flow with Interphase exchanges) is a general-purpose hydro-dynamic model for describing chemical reactions and heat transfer in dense or dilute fluid-solids flows, which typically occur in energy conversion and chemical processing reactors. MFIX calculations give time-dependent information on pressure, temperature, composition, and velocity distributions in the reactors. The theoretical basis of the calculations is described in the MFIX Theory Guide. This report, which is the MFIX User`s Manual, gives an overview of the numerical technique, and describes how to install the MFIX code and post-processing codes, set up data files and run MFIX, graphically analyze MFIX results, and retrieve data from the output files. Two tutorial problems that highlight various features of MFIX are also discussed.

  9. User`s guide to MIDAS

    SciTech Connect

    Tisue, S.A.; Williams, N.B.; Huber, C.C.; Chun, K.C.

    1995-12-01

    Welcome to the MIDAS User`s Guide. This document describes the goals of the Munitions Items Disposition Action System (MIDAS) program and documents the MIDAS software. The main text first describes the equipment and software you need to run MIDAS and tells how to install and start it. It lists the contents of the database and explains how it is organized. Finally, it tells how to perform various functions, such as locating, entering, viewing, deleting, changing, transferring, and printing both textual and graphical data. Images of the actual computer screens accompany these explanations and guidelines. Appendix A contains a glossary of names for the various abbreviations, codes, and chemicals; Appendix B is a list of modem names; Appendix C provides a database dictionary and rules for entering data; and Appendix D describes procedures for troubleshooting problems associated with connecting to the MIDAS server and using MIDAS.

  10. Ground motion input in seismic evaluation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sewell, R.T.; Wu, S.C.

    1996-07-01

    This report documents research pertaining to conservatism and variability in seismic risk estimates. Specifically, it examines whether or not artificial motions produce unrealistic evaluation demands, i.e., demands significantly inconsistent with those expected from real earthquake motions. To study these issues, two types of artificial motions are considered: (a) motions with smooth response spectra, and (b) motions with realistic variations in spectral amplitude across vibration frequency. For both types of artificial motion, time histories are generated to match target spectral shapes. For comparison, empirical motions representative of those that might result from strong earthquakes in the Eastern U.S. are also considered. The study findings suggest that artificial motions resulting from typical simulation approaches (aimed at matching a given target spectrum) are generally adequate and appropriate in representing the peak-response demands that may be induced in linear structures and equipment responding to real earthquake motions. Also, given similar input Fourier energies at high-frequencies, levels of input Fourier energy at low frequencies observed for artificial motions are substantially similar to those levels noted in real earthquake motions. In addition, the study reveals specific problems resulting from the application of Western U.S. type motions for seismic evaluation of Eastern U.S. nuclear power plants.

  11. Input Shaping to Reduce Solar Array Structural Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael J.; Tolson, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    Structural vibrations induced by actuators can be minimized using input shaping. Input shaping is a feedforward method in which actuator commands are convolved with shaping functions to yield a shaped set of commands. These commands are designed to perform the maneuver while minimizing the residual structural vibration. In this report, input shaping is extended to stepper motor actuators. As a demonstration, an input-shaping technique based on pole-zero cancellation was used to modify the Solar Array Drive Assembly (SADA) actuator commands for the Lewis satellite. A series of impulses were calculated as the ideal SADA output for vibration control. These impulses were then discretized for use by the SADA stepper motor actuator and simulated actuator outputs were used to calculate the structural response. The effectiveness of input shaping is limited by the accuracy of the knowledge of the modal frequencies. Assuming perfect knowledge resulted in significant vibration reduction. Errors of 10% in the modal frequencies caused notably higher levels of vibration. Controller robustness was improved by incorporating additional zeros in the shaping function. The additional zeros did not require increased performance from the actuator. Despite the identification errors, the resulting feedforward controller reduced residual vibrations to the level of the exactly modeled input shaper and well below the baseline cases. These results could be easily applied to many other vibration-sensitive applications involving stepper motor actuators.

  12. Quality user support: Supporting quality users

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, T.C.

    1994-12-31

    During the past decade, fundamental changes have occurred in technical computing in the oil industry. Technical computing systems have moved from local, fragmented quantity, to global, integrated, quality. The compute power available to the average geoscientist at his desktop has grown exponentially. Technical computing applications have increased in integration and complexity. At the same time, there has been a significant change in the work force due to the pressures of restructuring, and the increased focus on international opportunities. The profile of the user of technical computing resources has changed. Users are generally more mature, knowledgeable, and team oriented than their predecessors. In the 1990s, computer literacy is a requirement. This paper describes the steps taken by Oryx Energy Company to address the problems and opportunities created by the explosive growth in computing power and needs, coupled with the contraction of the business. A successful user support strategy will be described. Characteristics of the program include: (1) Client driven support; (2) Empowerment of highly skilled professionals to fill the support role; (3) Routine and ongoing modification to the support plan; (4) Utilization of the support assignment to create highly trained advocates on the line; (5) Integration of the support role to the reservoir management team. Results of the plan include a highly trained work force, stakeholder teams that include support personnel, and global support from a centralized support organization.

  13. Aztec user`s guide. Version 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, S.A.; Shadid, J.N.; Tuminaro, R.S.

    1995-10-01

    Aztec is an iterative library that greatly simplifies the parallelization process when solving the linear systems of equations Ax = b where A is a user supplied n x n sparse matrix, b is a user supplied vector of length n and x is a vector of length n to be computed. Aztec is intended as a software tool for users who want to avoid cumbersome parallel programming details but who have large sparse linear systems which require an efficiently utilized parallel processing system. A collection of data transformation tools are provided that allow for easy creation of distributed sparse unstructured matrices for parallel solution. Once the distributed matrix is created, computation can be performed on any of the parallel machines running Aztec: nCUBE 2, IBM SP2 and Intel Paragon, MPI platforms as well as standard serial and vector platforms. Aztec includes a number of Krylov iterative methods such as conjugate gradient (CG), generalized minimum residual (GMRES) and stabilized biconjugate gradient (BICGSTAB) to solve systems of equations. These Krylov methods are used in conjunction with various preconditioners such as polynomial or domain decomposition methods using LU or incomplete LU factorizations within subdomains. Although the matrix A can be general, the package has been designed for matrices arising from the approximation of partial differential equations (PDEs). In particular, the Aztec package is oriented toward systems arising from PDE applications.

  14. User's manual for the HYPGEN hyperbolic grid generator and the HGUI graphical user interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.; Chiu, Ing-Tsau; Buning, Pieter G.

    1993-01-01

    The HYPGEN program is used to generate a 3-D volume grid over a user-supplied single-block surface grid. This is accomplished by solving the 3-D hyperbolic grid generation equations consisting of two orthogonality relations and one cell volume constraint. In this user manual, the required input files and parameters and output files are described. Guidelines on how to select the input parameters are given. Illustrated examples are provided showing a variety of topologies and geometries that can be treated. HYPGEN can be used in stand-alone mode as a batch program or it can be called from within a graphical user interface HGUI that runs on Silicon Graphics workstations. This user manual provides a description of the menus, buttons, sliders, and typein fields in HGUI for users to enter the parameters needed to run HYPGEN. Instructions are given on how to configure the interface to allow HYPGEN to run either locally or on a faster remote machine through the use of shell scripts on UNIX operating systems. The volume grid generated is copied back to the local machine for visualization using a built-in hook to PLOT3D.

  15. User friendly far front ends

    SciTech Connect

    Zagel, J.R.; Chapman, L.J.

    1987-10-01

    For years controls group hardware designers have designed microprocessor systems to accomplish specific functions such as refrigeration control. These systems often require years of software effort. The backlog of requests for even simple additions or modifications to software in embedded controllers has become overwhelming. We discuss the requirements of ''far forward'' controllers. Can we build a system that is modular enough to be configurable for specific applications without sacrificing performance. The hardware and software framework must be complete enough to isolate the end user from the peculiarities of bit and byte manipulation, but still allow system specifics to be implanted by the user. It is time to provide embedded controller systems as easy to use as workstation consoles.

  16. Emphasis/Nevada STDEM : user's guide : version 1.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, David Bruce; Coats, Rebecca Sue; Pasik, Michael Francis

    2005-04-01

    STDEM is the structured mesh time-domain electromagnetic and plasma physics component of Emphasis/Nevada. This report provides a guide on using STDEM. Emphasis, the electromagnetic physics analysis system, is a suite of codes for the simulation of electromagnetic and plasma physics phenomena. The time-dependent components of Emphasis have been implemented using the Nevada framework [1]. The notation Emphasis/Nevada is used to highlight this relationship and/or distinguish the time-dependent components of Emphasis. In theory the underlying framework should have little influence on the user's interaction with the application. In practice the framework tends to be more invasive as it provides key services such as input parsing and defines fundamental concepts and terminology. While the framework offers many technological advancements from a software development point of view, from a user's perspective the key benefits of the underlying framework are the common interface for all framework physics modules as well as the ability to perform coupled physics simulations. STDEM is the structured time-domain electromagnetic and plasma physics component of Emphasis/Nevada. STDEM provides for the full-wave solution to Maxwell's equations on multi-block three-dimensional structured grids using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithms. Additionally STDEM provides for the fully relativistic, self-consistent simulation of charged particles using particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithms.

  17. The Development of a Noncontact Letter Input Interface “Fingual” Using Magnetic Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Taishi; Miyazaki, Fumio; Nishikawa, Atsushi

    We have newly developed a noncontact letter input interface called “Fingual”. Fingual uses a glove mounted with inexpensive and small magnetic sensors. Using the glove, users can input letters to form the finger alphabets, a kind of sign language. The proposed method uses some dataset which consists of magnetic field and the corresponding letter information. In this paper, we show two recognition methods using the dataset. First method uses Euclidean norm, and second one additionally uses Gaussian function as a weighting function. Then we conducted verification experiments for the recognition rate of each method in two situations. One of the situations is that subjects used their own dataset; the other is that they used another person's dataset. As a result, the proposed method could recognize letters with a high rate in both situations, even though it is better to use their own dataset than to use another person's dataset. Though Fingual needs to collect magnetic dataset for each letter in advance, its feature is the ability to recognize letters without the complicated calculations such as inverse problems. This paper shows results of the recognition experiments, and shows the utility of the proposed system “Fingual”.

  18. Automated Estimating System (AES), Standard Value Update Program, user`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, R.K.; Holder, D.A.

    1994-08-01

    This manual contains instructions for operating the Standard Value Update Program. This program is operated and controlled by selected individuals in the Estimating and Scheduling Engineering Department of the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Engineering Division. It is used to control and standardized input into the Automated Estimating System (AES) Estimating program, a person computer-based software package designed to aid in the creation, updating, and reporting of project cost estimates. The AES Estimating program is documented in a separate user`s manual.

  19. Integrated Fuel-Coolant Interaction (IFCI 6.0) code. User`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, F.J.; Young, M.F.

    1994-04-01

    The integrated Fuel-Coolant interaction (IFCI) computer code is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) problem at large scale using a two-dimensional, four-field hydrodynamic framework and physically based models. IFCI will be capable of treating all major FCI processes in an integrated manner. This document is a product of the effort to generate a stand-alone version of IFCI, IFCI 6.0. The User`s Manual describes in detail the hydrodynamic method and physical models used in IFCI 6.0. Appendix A is an input manual, provided for the creation of working decks.

  20. Canadian MSAT field trial program user requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, Allister

    1990-01-01

    A wide range of mobile satellite service offerings will be available in late 1993 with the launch of Canada's first satellite devoted almost exclusively to mobile and transportable services. During the last seven years, the Dept. of Communications has been meeting with potential MSAT users in government and the private sector as part of a $20M Communications Trials Program. User trials will be conducted using leased capacity as well as capacity on Canada's MSAT satellite. User requirements are discussed which were identified under the Communications Trials Program. Land, marine, aeronautical, and fixed applications are described from the perspective of the end users. Emphasis is placed on field trials being accomplished using leased capacity such as the marine data trial being implemented by Ultimateast Data Communications, trials using transportable briefcase terminals and additional field trials being considered for implementation with the TMI Mobile Data Service. The pre-MSAT trials that will be conducted using leased capacity are only a limited sample of the overall end user requirements that have been identified to date. Additional end user applications are discussed, along with a summary of user benefits.

  1. Radiological Toolbox User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Eckerman, KF

    2004-07-01

    A toolbox of radiological data has been assembled to provide users access to the physical, chemical, anatomical, physiological and mathematical data relevant to the radiation protection of workers and member of the public. The software runs on a PC and provides users, through a single graphical interface, quick access to contemporary data and the means to extract these data for further computations and analysis. The numerical data, for the most part, are stored within databases in SI units. However, the user can display and extract values using non-SI units. This is the first release of the toolbox which was developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  2. APEX user`s guide - (Argonne production, expansion, and exchange model for electrical systems), version 3.0

    SciTech Connect

    VanKuiken, J.C.; Veselka, T.D.; Guziel, K.A.; Blodgett, D.W.; Hamilton, S.; Kavicky, J.A.; Koritarov, V.S.; North, M.J.; Novickas, A.A.; Paprockas, K.R.

    1994-11-01

    This report describes operating procedures and background documentation for the Argonne Production, Expansion, and Exchange Model for Electrical Systems (APEX). This modeling system was developed to provide the U.S. Department of Energy, Division of Fossil Energy, Office of Coal and Electricity with in-house capabilities for addressing policy options that affect electrical utilities. To meet this objective, Argonne National Laboratory developed a menu-driven programming package that enables the user to develop and conduct simulations of production costs, system reliability, spot market network flows, and optimal system capacity expansion. The APEX system consists of three basic simulation components, supported by various databases and data management software. The components include (1) the investigation of Costs and Reliability in Utility Systems (ICARUS) model, (2) the Spot Market Network (SMN) model, and (3) the Production and Capacity Expansion (PACE) model. The ICARUS model provides generating-unit-level production-cost and reliability simulations with explicit recognition of planned and unplanned outages. The SMN model addresses optimal network flows with recognition of marginal costs, wheeling charges, and transmission constraints. The PACE model determines long-term (e.g., longer than 10 years) capacity expansion schedules on the basis of candidate expansion technologies and load growth estimates. In addition, the Automated Data Assembly Package (ADAP) and case management features simplify user-input requirements. The ADAP, ICARUS, and SMN modules are described in detail. The PACE module is expected to be addressed in a future publication.

  3. VOLTTRON 3.0: User Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Lutes, Robert G.; Haack, Jereme N.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Monson, Kyle E.; Akyol, Bora A.; Carpenter, Brandon J.

    2015-11-30

    This document is a user guide for the deployment of the transactional network platform and agent/application development within VOLTTRON. The intent of this user guide is to provide a description of the functionality of the transactional network platform. This document describes how to deploy the platform, including installation, use, guidance, and limitations. It also describes how additional features can be added to enhance its current functionality.

  4. VOLTTRON 2.0: User Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Lutes, Robert G.; Haack, Jereme N.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Monson, Kyle E.; Akyol, Bora A.; Carpenter, Brandon J.; Tenney, Nathan D.

    2014-11-30

    This document is a user guide for the deployment of the transactional network platform and agent/application development within VOLTTRON. The intent of this user guide is to provide a description of the functionality of the transactional network platform. This document describes how to deploy the platform, including installation, use, guidance, and limitations. It also describes how additional features can be added to enhance its current functionality.

  5. RadCat 2.0 User Guide.

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, Douglas.; Weiner, Ruth F.; Mills, George Scott; Hamp, Steve C.; O'Donnell, Brandon, M.; Orcutt, David J.; Heames, Terence J.; Hinojosa, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    This document provides a detailed discussion and a guide for the use of the RadCat 2.0 Graphical User Interface input file generator for the RADTRAN 5.5 code. The differences between RadCat 2.0 and RadCat 1.0 can be attributed to the differences between RADTRAN 5 and RADTRAN 5.5 as well as clarification for some of the input parameters. 3

  6. Network Control Center User Planning System (NCC UPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dealy, Brian

    1991-01-01

    NCC UPS is presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: UPS overview; NCC UPS role; major NCC UPS functional requirements; interactive user access levels; UPS interfaces; interactive user subsystem; interface navigation; scheduling screen hierarchy; interactive scheduling input panels; autogenerated schedule request panel; schedule data tabular display panel; schedule data graphic display panel; graphic scheduling aid design; and schedule data graphic display.

  7. Repositioning Recitation Input in College English Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Qing

    2009-01-01

    This paper tries to discuss how recitation input helps overcome the negative influences on the basis of second language acquisition theory and confirms the important role that recitation input plays in improving college students' oral and written English.

  8. Section 4. The GIS Weasel User's Manual

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Viger, Roland J.; Leavesley, George H.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The GIS Weasel was designed to aid in the preparation of spatial information for input to lumped and distributed parameter hydrologic or other environmental models. The GIS Weasel provides geographic information system (GIS) tools to help create maps of geographic features relevant to a user's model and to generate parameters from those maps. The operation of the GIS Weasel does not require the user to be a GIS expert, only that the user have an understanding of the spatial information requirements of the environmental simulation model being used. The GIS Weasel software system uses a GIS-based graphical user interface (GUI), the C programming language, and external scripting languages. The software will run on any computing platform where ArcInfo Workstation (version 8.0.2 or later) and the GRID extension are accessible. The user controls the processing of the GIS Weasel by interacting with menus, maps, and tables. The purpose of this document is to describe the operation of the software. This document is not intended to describe the usage of this software in support of any particular environmental simulation model. Such guides are published separately.

  9. PHRQINPT, an interactive computer program for constructing input data sets to the geochemical simulation program PHREEQE

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, G.W.; Plummer, L.N.

    1983-01-01

    PHRQINPT is a FORTRAN 77 program which facilitates formulation of the input data file to PHREEQE (Parkhurst, Thorstenson, and Plummer, 1980). PHRQINPT runs interactively and contains many features to help the user construct the input data set. This report describes these features and gives instructions on the use and implementation of PHRQINPT. A listing of the program and the two accompanying data sets are given in the attachments, along with two examples. (USGS)

  10. Atmospheric Reentry Materials and Structures Evaluation Facility (ARMSEF). User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ARMSEF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  11. Six-Degree-of-Freedom Dynamic Test System (SDTS) User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, LeBarian

    2012-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the SDTS. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non- NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  12. Interactive Office user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Edward E.; Lowers, Benjamin; Nabors, Terri L.

    1990-01-01

    Given here is a user's manual for Interactive Office (IO), an executive office tool for organization and planning, written specifically for Macintosh. IO is a paperless management tool to automate a related group of individuals into one productive system.

  13. ARM User Survey Report

    SciTech Connect

    Roeder, LR

    2010-06-22

    The objective of this survey was to obtain user feedback to, among other things, determine how to organize the exponentially growing data within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, and identify users’ preferred data analysis system. The survey findings appear to have met this objective, having received approximately 300 responses that give insight into the type of work users perform, usage of the data, percentage of data analysis users might perform on an ARM-hosted computing resource, downloading volume level where users begin having reservations, opinion about usage if given more powerful computing resources (including ability to manipulate data), types of tools that would be most beneficial to them, preferred programming language and data analysis system, level of importance for certain types of capabilities, and finally, level of interest in participating in a code-sharing community.

  14. Bevalac user's handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    This report is a users manual on the Bevalac accelerator facility. This paper discuses: general information; the Bevalac and its operation; major facilities and experimental areas; and experimental equipment.

  15. NOAA Climate Users Engagement Using Training Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeyeva, M. M.; Verdin, J. P.; Jones, J.; Pulwarty, R. S.

    2009-12-01

    NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) Climate Services Training Program was initiated in 2001. The training original target audience was NOAA NWS regional and local climate services workforce. As a result of eight-year-long development of the training program, NWS offers two training courses and about 25 online distance learning modules covering various climate topics: climate data and observations, climate variability and change, NWS national and local climate products, their tools, skill, and interpretation. Leveraging climate information and expertise available at all NOAA line offices and partners allows delivery of the most relevant, advanced knowledge and is a very critical aspect of the training program. In 2009 the training program launched a pilot project that expanded the training opportunities for specific user groups. The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) requested a training course with emphasis on Climate, Drought and Remote Sensing for their water resources managers, hydrologists, and engineering staff. The National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) co-sponsored the project. Developing the course NOAA, NIDIS, and DWR staff worked together testing different approaches in order to identify the most appropriate balance between gaps in the target audience climate knowledge and technical level needed for the information communication and delivery. The two-day course was offered in June 2009 for 35 trainees with classroom recording for further dissemination of the training materials in form of online audio-visual presentations (webcasts). The training event brought together NOAA staff and partners from U.S. Geological Survey, the Western Regional Climate Center, NASA, academia, and DWR staff and provided a valuable opportunity for curriculum development and expertise exchange. The course final discussion engaged participants in process of identifying additional climate products and services needed for regional and sector specific

  16. ULDA user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Charleen; Driessen, Cornelius; Pasian, Fabio

    1989-01-01

    The Uniform Low Dispersion Archive (ULDA) is a software system which, in one sitting, allows one to obtain copies on one's personal computer of those International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) low dispersion spectra that are of interest to the user. Overviews and use instructions are given for two programs, one to search for and select spectra, and the other to convert those spectra into a form suitable for the user's image processing system.

  17. Structural/aerodynamic Blade Analyzer (SAB) User's Guide, Version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morel, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    The structural/aerodynamic blade (SAB) analyzer provides an automated tool for the static-deflection analysis of turbomachinery blades with aerodynamic and rotational loads. A structural code calculates a deflected blade shape using aerodynamic loads input. An aerodynamic solver computes aerodynamic loads using deflected blade shape input. The two programs are iterated automatically until deflections converge. Currently, SAB version 1.0 is interfaced with MSC/NASTRAN to perform the structural analysis and PROP3D to perform the aerodynamic analysis. This document serves as a guide for the operation of the SAB system with specific emphasis on its use at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). This guide consists of six chapters: an introduction which gives a summary of SAB; SAB's methodology, component files, links, and interfaces; input/output file structure; setup and execution of the SAB files on the Cray computers; hints and tips to advise the user; and an example problem demonstrating the SAB process. In addition, four appendices are presented to define the different computer programs used within the SAB analyzer and describe the required input decks.

  18. Effects of Auditory Input in Individuation Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Christopher W.; Sloutsky, Vladimir M.

    2008-01-01

    Under many conditions auditory input interferes with visual processing, especially early in development. These interference effects are often more pronounced when the auditory input is unfamiliar than when the auditory input is familiar (e.g. human speech, pre-familiarized sounds, etc.). The current study extends this research by examining how…

  19. Input filter compensation for switching regulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, F. C.

    1984-01-01

    Problems caused by input filter interaction and conventional input filter design techniques are discussed. The concept of feedforward control is modeled with an input filter and a buck regulator. Experimental measurement and comparison to the analytical predictions is carried out. Transient response and the use of a feedforward loop to stabilize the regulator system is described. Other possible applications for feedforward control are included.

  20. Textual Enhancement of Input: Issues and Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, ZhaoHong; Park, Eun Sung; Combs, Charles

    2008-01-01

    The input enhancement hypothesis proposed by Sharwood Smith (1991, 1993) has stimulated considerable research over the last 15 years. This article reviews the research on textual enhancement of input (TE), an area where the majority of input enhancement studies have aggregated. Methodological idiosyncrasies are the norm of this body of research.…

  1. Input Devices for Young Handicapped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Karen

    The versatility of the computer can be expanded considerably for young handicapped children by using input devices other than the typewriter-style keyboard. Input devices appropriate for young children can be classified into four categories: alternative keyboards, contact switches, speech input devices, and cursor control devices. Described are…

  2. Metadata: A user`s view

    SciTech Connect

    Bretherton, F.P.; Singley, P.T.

    1994-12-31

    An analysis is presented of the uses of metadata from four aspects of database operations: (1) search, query, retrieval, (2) ingest, quality control, processing, (3) application to application transfer; (4) storage, archive. Typical degrees of database functionality ranging from simple file retrieval to interdisciplinary global query with metadatabase-user dialog and involving many distributed autonomous databases, are ranked in approximate order of increasing sophistication of the required knowledge representation. An architecture is outlined for implementing such functionality in many different disciplinary domains utilizing a variety of off the shelf database management subsystems and processor software, each specialized to a different abstract data model.

  3. Performance Analysis of Motion-Sensor Behavior for User Authentication on Smartphones.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chao; Yu, Tianwen; Yuan, Sheng; Li, Yunpeng; Guan, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    The growing trend of using smartphones as personal computing platforms to access and store private information has stressed the demand for secure and usable authentication mechanisms. This paper investigates the feasibility and applicability of using motion-sensor behavior data for user authentication on smartphones. For each sample of the passcode, sensory data from motion sensors are analyzed to extract descriptive and intensive features for accurate and fine-grained characterization of users' passcode-input actions. One-class learning methods are applied to the feature space for performing user authentication. Analyses are conducted using data from 48 participants with 129,621 passcode samples across various operational scenarios and different types of smartphones. Extensive experiments are included to examine the efficacy of the proposed approach, which achieves a false-rejection rate of 6.85% and a false-acceptance rate of 5.01%. Additional experiments on usability with respect to passcode length, sensitivity with respect to training sample size, scalability with respect to number of users, and flexibility with respect to screen size were provided to further explore the effectiveness and practicability. The results suggest that sensory data could provide useful authentication information, and this level of performance approaches sufficiency for two-factor authentication on smartphones. Our dataset is publicly available to facilitate future research. PMID:27005626

  4. User's manual: Computer-aided design programs for inductor-energy-storage dc-to-dc electronic power converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, S.

    1977-01-01

    Detailed instructions on the use of two computer-aided-design programs for designing the energy storage inductor for single winding and two winding dc to dc converters are provided. Step by step procedures are given to illustrate the formatting of user input data. The procedures are illustrated by eight sample design problems which include the user input and the computer program output.

  5. FMG, RENUM, LINEL, ELLFMG, ELLP and DIMES: Chain of programs for calculating and analyzing fluid flow through two-dimensional fracture networks: Users manuals and listings

    SciTech Connect

    Billaux, D.; Peterson, J.; Bodea, S.; Long, J.

    1989-09-30

    The purpose of this report is to provide the user with sufficient information to run the programs FMG, RENUM, LINEL, and ELLFMG. A previous report explained the theory and the design of these programs, so that by using the two reports, a thorough understanding of the codes is possible. This report should familiarize the user with program options and modes of operation, input variables, input and output files. Information not strictly needed to run the programs, but useful in understanding their internal structure is provided in appendices. The appendices cover program variables and arrays, subroutine outlines, a short description of each subroutine, and finally listings of codes. The additional information on FMG, RENUM, LINEL, and ELLFMG is in Appendices A, C, E, G respectively, and the listings are in Appendices B, D, F, and H.

  6. CIRCE2/DEKGEN2: A software package for facilitated optical analysis of 3-D distributed solar energy concentrators. Theory and user manual

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, V.J.

    1994-03-01

    CIRCE2 is a computer code for modeling the optical performance of three-dimensional dish-type solar energy concentrators. Statistical methods are used to evaluate the directional distribution of reflected rays from any given point on the concentrator. Given concentrator and receiver geometries, sunshape (angular distribution of incident rays from the sun), and concentrator imperfections such as surface roughness and random deviation in slope, the code predicts the flux distribution and total power incident upon the target. Great freedom exists in the variety of concentrator and receiver configurations that can be modeled. Additionally, provisions for shading and receiver aperturing are included.- DEKGEN2 is a preprocessor designed to facilitate input of geometry, error distributions, and sun models. This manual describes the optical model, user inputs, code outputs, and operation of the software package. A user tutorial is included in which several collectors are built and analyzed in step-by-step examples.

  7. Optimized Configurable Architectures for Scalable Soft-Input Soft-Output MIMO Detectors With 256-QAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, Mohammad M.; Jalloul, Louay M. A.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents an optimized low-complexity and high-throughput multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) signal detector core for detecting spatially-multiplexed data streams. The core architecture supports various layer configurations up to 4, while achieving near-optimal performance, as well as configurable modulation constellations up to 256-QAM on each layer. The core is capable of operating as a soft-input soft-output log-likelihood ratio (LLR) MIMO detector which can be used in the context of iterative detection and decoding. High area-efficiency is achieved via algorithmic and architectural optimizations performed at two levels. First, distance computations and slicing operations for an optimal 2-layer maximum a posteriori (MAP) MIMO detector are optimized to eliminate the use of multipliers and reduce the overhead of slicing in the presence of soft-input LLRs. We show that distances can be easily computed using elementary addition operations, while optimal slicing is done via efficient comparisons with soft decision boundaries, resulting in a simple feed-forward pipelined architecture. Second, to support more layers, an efficient channel decomposition scheme is presented that reduces the detection of multiple layers into multiple 2-layer detection subproblems, which map onto the 2-layer core with a slight modification using a distance accumulation stage and a post-LLR processing stage. Various architectures are accordingly developed to achieve a desired detection throughput and run-time reconfigurability by time-multiplexing of one or more component cores. The proposed core is applied as well to design an optimal multi-user MIMO detector for LTE. The core occupies an area of 1.58MGE and achieves a throughput of 733 Mbps for 256-QAM when synthesized in 90 nm CMOS.

  8. Heating 7.2 user`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, K.W.

    1993-02-01

    HEATING is a general-purpose conduction heat transfer program written in Fortran 77. HEATING can solve steady-state and/or transient heat conduction problems in one-, two-, or three-dimensional Cartesian, cylindrical, or spherical coordinates. A model may include multiple materials, and the thermal conductivity, density, and specific heat of each material may be both time- and temperature-dependent. The thermal conductivity may also be anisotropic. Materials may undergo change of phase. Thermal properties of materials may be input or may be extracted from a material properties library. Heat-generation rates may be dependent on time, temperature, and position, and boundary temperatures may be time- and position-dependent. The boundary conditions, which may be surface-to-environment or surface-to-surface, may be specified temperatures or any combination of prescribed heat flux, forced convection, natural convection, and radiation. The boundary condition parameters may be time- and/or temperature-dependent. General gray-body radiation problems may be modeled with user-defined factors for radiant exchange. The mesh spacing may be variable along each axis. HEATING uses a runtime memory allocation scheme to avoid having to recompile to match memory requirements for each specific problem. HEATING utilizes free-form input. Three steady-state solution techniques are available: point-successive-overrelaxation iterative method with extrapolation, direct-solution, and conjugate gradient. Transient problems may be solved using any one of several finite-difference schemes: Crank-Nicolson implicit, Classical Implicit Procedure (CIP), Classical Explicit Procedure (CEP), or Levy explicit method. The solution of the system of equations arising from the implicit techniques is accomplished by point-successive-overrelaxation iteration and includes procedures to estimate the optimum acceleration parameter.

  9. Parallel community climate model: Description and user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, J.B.; Flanery, R.E.; Semeraro, B.D.; Worley, P.H.

    1996-07-15

    This report gives an overview of a parallel version of the NCAR Community Climate Model, CCM2, implemented for MIMD massively parallel computers using a message-passing programming paradigm. The parallel implementation was developed on an Intel iPSC/860 with 128 processors and on the Intel Delta with 512 processors, and the initial target platform for the production version of the code is the Intel Paragon with 2048 processors. Because the implementation uses a standard, portable message-passing libraries, the code has been easily ported to other multiprocessors supporting a message-passing programming paradigm. The parallelization strategy used is to decompose the problem domain into geographical patches and assign each processor the computation associated with a distinct subset of the patches. With this decomposition, the physics calculations involve only grid points and data local to a processor and are performed in parallel. Using parallel algorithms developed for the semi-Lagrangian transport, the fast Fourier transform and the Legendre transform, both physics and dynamics are computed in parallel with minimal data movement and modest change to the original CCM2 source code. Sequential or parallel history tapes are written and input files (in history tape format) are read sequentially by the parallel code to promote compatibility with production use of the model on other computer systems. A validation exercise has been performed with the parallel code and is detailed along with some performance numbers on the Intel Paragon and the IBM SP2. A discussion of reproducibility of results is included. A user`s guide for the PCCM2 version 2.1 on the various parallel machines completes the report. Procedures for compilation, setup and execution are given. A discussion of code internals is included for those who may wish to modify and use the program in their own research.

  10. User's guide to SFTRAN/1100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, W. F.; Fessler, T. E.

    1978-01-01

    Extensions and improvements were made to SFTRAN, a structured programming language. This language was implemented as a precompiler that translates from SFTRAN to FORTRAN. It was available to batch and conversational users of the UNIVAC 1100 computer system. The SFTRAN language and its use are described. In addition, conversational time-sharing system command subroutines were implemented that eliminated the complications of dealing with extra files and processing steps that the use of a precompiler would otherwise require. These command subroutines are reported, and their use is illustrated by examples.

  11. IDSE Version 1 User's Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, Richard

    1988-01-01

    The integrated development support environment (IDSE) is a suite of integrated software tools that provide intelligent support for information modelling. These tools assist in function, information, and process modeling. Additional tools exist to assist in gathering and analyzing information to be modeled. This is a user's guide to application of the IDSE. Sections covering the requirements and design of each of the tools are presented. There are currently three integrated computer aided manufacturing definition (IDEF) modeling methodologies: IDEF0, IDEF1, and IDEF2. Also, four appendices exist to describe hardware and software requirements, installation procedures, and basic hardware usage.

  12. Turn customer input into innovation.

    PubMed

    Ulwick, Anthony W

    2002-01-01

    It's difficult to find a company these days that doesn't strive to be customer-driven. Too bad, then, that most companies go about the process of listening to customers all wrong--so wrong, in fact, that they undermine innovation and, ultimately, the bottom line. What usually happens is this: Companies ask their customers what they want. Customers offer solutions in the form of products or services. Companies then deliver these tangibles, and customers just don't buy. The reason is simple--customers aren't expert or informed enough to come up with solutions. That's what your R&D team is for. Rather, customers should be asked only for outcomes--what they want a new product or service to do for them. The form the solutions take should be up to you, and you alone. Using Cordis Corporation as an example, this article describes, in fine detail, a series of effective steps for capturing, analyzing, and utilizing customer input. First come indepth interviews, in which a moderator works with customers to deconstruct a process or activity in order to unearth "desired outcomes." Addressing participants' comments one at a time, the moderator rephrases them to be both unambiguous and measurable. Once the interviews are complete, researchers then compile a comprehensive list of outcomes that participants rank in order of importance and degree to which they are satisfied by existing products. Finally, using a simple mathematical formula called the "opportunity calculation," researchers can learn the relative attractiveness of key opportunity areas. These data can be used to uncover opportunities for product development, to properly segment markets, and to conduct competitive analysis. PMID:12964470

  13. User's manual for rocket combustor interactive design (ROCCID) and analysis computer program. Volume 1: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muss, J. A.; Nguyen, T. V.; Johnson, C. W.

    1991-01-01

    The user's manual for the rocket combustor interactive design (ROCCID) computer program is presented. The program, written in Fortran 77, provides a standardized methodology using state of the art codes and procedures for the analysis of a liquid rocket engine combustor's steady state combustion performance and combustion stability. The ROCCID is currently capable of analyzing mixed element injector patterns containing impinging like doublet or unlike triplet, showerhead, shear coaxial, and swirl coaxial elements as long as only one element type exists in each injector core, baffle, or barrier zone. Real propellant properties of oxygen, hydrogen, methane, propane, and RP-1 are included in ROCCID. The properties of other propellants can easily be added. The analysis model in ROCCID can account for the influence of acoustic cavities, helmholtz resonators, and radial thrust chamber baffles on combustion stability. ROCCID also contains the logic to interactively create a combustor design which meets input performance and stability goals. A preliminary design results from the application of historical correlations to the input design requirements. The steady state performance and combustion stability of this design is evaluated using the analysis models, and ROCCID guides the user as to the design changes required to satisfy the user's performance and stability goals, including the design of stability aids. Output from ROCCID includes a formatted input file for the standardized JANNAF engine performance prediction procedure.

  14. Crack/cocaine users show more family problems than other substance users

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Helena Ferreira; Benzano, Daniela; Pechansky, Flavio; Kessler, Felix Henrique Paim

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate family problems among crack/cocaine users compared with alcohol and other substance users. METHODS: A cross-sectional multi-center study selected 741 current adult substance users from outpatient and inpatient Brazilian specialized clinics. Subjects were evaluated with the sixth version of the Addiction Severity Index, and 293 crack users were compared with 126 cocaine snorters and 322 alcohol and other drug users. RESULTS: Cocaine users showed more family problems when compared with other drug users, with no significant difference between routes of administration. These problems included arguing (crack 66.5%, powder cocaine 63.3%, other drugs 50.3%, p = 0.004), having trouble getting along with partners (61.5%×64.6%×48.7%, p = 0.013), and the need for additional childcare services in order to attend treatment (13.3%×10.3%×5.1%, p = 0.002). Additionally, the majority of crack/cocaine users had spent time with relatives in the last month (84.6%×86.5%×76.6%, p = 0.011). CONCLUSIONS: Brazilian treatment programs should enhance family treatment strategies, and childcare services need to be included. PMID:25029583

  15. Additive attacks on speaker recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrokh Baroughi, Alireza; Craver, Scott

    2014-02-01

    Speaker recognition is used to identify a speaker's voice from among a group of known speakers. A common method of speaker recognition is a classification based on cepstral coefficients of the speaker's voice, using a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) to model each speaker. In this paper we try to fool a speaker recognition system using additive noise such that an intruder is recognized as a target user. Our attack uses a mixture selected from a target user's GMM model, inverting the cepstral transformation to produce noise samples. In our 5 speaker data base, we achieve an attack success rate of 50% with a noise signal at 10dB SNR, and 95% by increasing noise power to 0dB SNR. The importance of this attack is its simplicity and flexibility: it can be employed in real time with no processing of an attacker's voice, and little computation is needed at the moment of detection, allowing the attack to be performed by a small portable device. For any target user, knowing that user's model or voice sample is sufficient to compute the attack signal, and it is enough that the intruder plays it while he/she is uttering to be classiffed as the victim.

  16. Physiologically Modulating Videogames or Simulations which use Motion-Sensing Input Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, Alan T. (Inventor); Stephens, Chad L. (Inventor); Blanson, Nina Marie (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    New types of controllers allow players to make inputs to a video game or simulation by moving the entire controller itself. This capability is typically accomplished using a wireless input device having accelerometers, gyroscopes, and an infrared LED tracking camera. The present invention exploits these wireless motion-sensing technologies to modulate the player's movement inputs to the videogame based upon physiological signals. Such biofeedback-modulated video games train valuable mental skills beyond eye-hand coordination. These psychophysiological training technologies enhance personal improvement, not just the diversion, of the user.

  17. Effects of control inputs on the estimation of stability and control parameters of a light airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannaday, R. L.; Suit, W. T.

    1977-01-01

    The maximum likelihood parameter estimation technique was used to determine the values of stability and control derivatives from flight test data for a low-wing, single-engine, light airplane. Several input forms were used during the tests to investigate the consistency of parameter estimates as it relates to inputs. These consistencies were compared by using the ensemble variance and estimated Cramer-Rao lower bound. In addition, the relationship between inputs and parameter correlations was investigated. Results from the stabilator inputs are inconclusive but the sequence of rudder input followed by aileron input or aileron followed by rudder gave more consistent estimates than did rudder or ailerons individually. Also, square-wave inputs appeared to provide slightly improved consistency in the parameter estimates when compared to sine-wave inputs.

  18. Heating 7. 2 user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, K.W.

    1993-02-01

    HEATING is a general-purpose conduction heat transfer program written in Fortran 77. HEATING can solve steady-state and/or transient heat conduction problems in one-, two-, or three-dimensional Cartesian, cylindrical, or spherical coordinates. A model may include multiple materials, and the thermal conductivity, density, and specific heat of each material may be both time- and temperature-dependent. The thermal conductivity may also be anisotropic. Materials may undergo change of phase. Thermal properties of materials may be input or may be extracted from a material properties library. Heat-generation rates may be dependent on time, temperature, and position, and boundary temperatures may be time- and position-dependent. The boundary conditions, which may be surface-to-environment or surface-to-surface, may be specified temperatures or any combination of prescribed heat flux, forced convection, natural convection, and radiation. The boundary condition parameters may be time- and/or temperature-dependent. General gray-body radiation problems may be modeled with user-defined factors for radiant exchange. The mesh spacing may be variable along each axis. HEATING uses a runtime memory allocation scheme to avoid having to recompile to match memory requirements for each specific problem. HEATING utilizes free-form input. Three steady-state solution techniques are available: point-successive-overrelaxation iterative method with extrapolation, direct-solution, and conjugate gradient. Transient problems may be solved using any one of several finite-difference schemes: Crank-Nicolson implicit, Classical Implicit Procedure (CIP), Classical Explicit Procedure (CEP), or Levy explicit method. The solution of the system of equations arising from the implicit techniques is accomplished by point-successive-overrelaxation iteration and includes procedures to estimate the optimum acceleration parameter.

  19. HEATING 7. 1 user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, K.W.

    1991-07-01

    HEATING is a FORTRAN program designed to solve steady-state and/or transient heat conduction problems in one-, two-, or three- dimensional Cartesian, cylindrical, or spherical coordinates. A model may include multiple materials, and the thermal conductivity, density, and specific heat of each material may be both time- and temperature-dependent. The thermal conductivity may be anisotropic. Materials may undergo change of phase. Thermal properties of materials may be input or may be extracted from a material properties library. Heating generation rates may be dependent on time, temperature, and position, and boundary temperatures may be time- and position-dependent. The boundary conditions, which may be surface-to-boundary or surface-to-surface, may be specified temperatures or any combination of prescribed heat flux, forced convection, natural convection, and radiation. The boundary condition parameters may be time- and/or temperature-dependent. General graybody radiation problems may be modeled with user-defined factors for radiant exchange. The mesh spacing may be variable along each axis. HEATING is variably dimensioned and utilizes free-form input. Three steady-state solution techniques are available: point-successive-overrelaxation iterative method with extrapolation, direct-solution (for one-dimensional or two-dimensional problems), and conjugate gradient. Transient problems may be solved using one of several finite-difference schemes: Crank-Nicolson implicit, Classical Implicit Procedure (CIP), Classical Explicit Procedure (CEP), or Levy explicit method (which for some circumstances allows a time step greater than the CEP stability criterion). The solution of the system of equations arising from the implicit techniques is accomplished by point-successive-overrelaxation iteration and includes procedures to estimate the optimum acceleration parameter.

  20. T2VOC user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Falta, R.W.; Pruess, K.; Finsterle, S.; Battistelli, A.

    1995-03-01

    T2VOC is a numerical simulator for three-phase, three-component, non-isothermal flow of water, air, and a volatile organic compound (VOC) in multidimensional heterogeneous porous media. Developed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, T2VOC is an extension of the TOUGH2 general-purpose simulation program. This report is a self-contained guide to application of T2VOC to subsurface contamination problems involving nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). It gives a technical description of the T2VOC code, including a discussion of the physical processes modeled, and the mathematical and numerical methods used. Detailed instructions for preparing input data are presented along with several illustrative sample problems.

  1. User`s manual for BINIAC: A computer code to translate APET bins

    SciTech Connect

    Gough, S.T.

    1994-03-01

    This report serves as the user`s manual for the FORTRAN code BINIAC. BINIAC is a utility code designed to format the output from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Accident Progression Event Tree (APET) methodology. BINIAC inputs the accident progression bins from the APET methodology, converts the frequency from occurrences per hour to occurrences per year, sorts the progression bins, and converts the individual dimension character codes into facility attributes. Without the use of BINIAC, this process would be done manually at great time expense. BINIAC was written under the quality assurance control of IQ34 QAP IV-1, revision 0, section 4.1.4. Configuration control is established through the use of a proprietor and a cognizant users list.

  2. TWEAT `95: User`s documentation update

    SciTech Connect

    Robertus, B.; Lambert, R.

    1996-03-01

    This report is designed to be a supplement to TWEAT`94 (PVTD-C94-05.01K Rev.1). It is intended to describe the primary features of the Ternary Waste Envelope Assessment Tool software package that have been added in FY`95 and how to use them. It contains only minimal duplication of information found in TWEAT`94 even though all features of TWEAT`94 will still be available. Emphasis on this Update is the binary plotting capability and the OWL Import modifications. Like it`s predecessors, this manual does not provide instructions for modifying the program code itself. The user of TWEAT`95 is expected to be familiar with the basic concepts and operation of the TWEAT software as discussed in TWEAT`94. Software and hardware requirements have not changed since TWEAT`94. TWEAT has now been tested using Macintosh System software versions 6.05 through 7.5.

  3. Participatory Design, User Involvement and Health IT Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kushniruk, Andre; Nøhr, Christian

    2016-01-01

    End user involvement and input into the design and evaluation of information systems has been recognized as being a critical success factor in the adoption of information systems. Nowhere is this need more critical than in the design of health information systems. Consistent with evidence from the general software engineering literature, the degree of user input into design of complex systems has been identified as one of the most important factors in the success or failure of complex information systems. The participatory approach goes beyond user-centered design and co-operative design approaches to include end users as more active participants in design ideas and decision making. Proponents of participatory approaches argue for greater end user participation in both design and evaluative processes. Evidence regarding the effectiveness of increased user involvement in design is explored in this contribution in the context of health IT. The contribution will discuss several approaches to including users in design and evaluation. Challenges in IT evaluation during participatory design will be described and explored along with several case studies. PMID:27198099

  4. Predicting user click behaviour in search engine advertisements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daryaie Zanjani, Mohammad; Khadivi, Shahram

    2015-10-01

    According to the specific requirements and interests of users, search engines select and display advertisements that match user needs and have higher probability of attracting users' attention based on their previous search history. New objects such as user, advertisement or query cause a deterioration of precision in targeted advertising due to their lack of history. This article surveys this challenge. In the case of new objects, we first extract similar observed objects to the new object and then we use their history as the history of new object. Similarity between objects is measured based on correlation, which is a relation between user and advertisement when the advertisement is displayed to the user. This method is used for all objects, so it has helped us to accurately select relevant advertisements for users' queries. In our proposed model, we assume that similar users behave in a similar manner. We find that users with few queries are similar to new users. We will show that correlation between users and advertisements' keywords is high. Thus, users who pay attention to advertisements' keywords, click similar advertisements. In addition, users who pay attention to specific brand names might have similar behaviours too.

  5. How to engage end-users in smart energy behaviour?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valkering, Pieter; Laes, Erik; Kessels, Kris; Uyterlinde, Matthijs; Straver, Koen

    2014-12-01

    End users will play a crucial role in up-coming smart grids that aim to link end-users and energy providers in a better balanced and more efficient electricity system. Within this context, this paper aims to deliver a coherent view on current good practice in end-user engagement in smart grid projects. It draws from a recent review of theoretical insights from sustainable consumption behaviour, social marketing and innovation systems and empirical insights from recent smart grid projects to create an inventory of common motivators, enablers and barriers of behavioural change, and the end-user engagement principles that can be derived from that. We conclude with identifying current research challenges as input for a research agenda on end-user engagement in smart grids.

  6. Anaerobic digestion analysis model: User`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, M.; Landucci, R.

    1994-08-01

    The Anaerobic Digestion Analysis Model (ADAM) has been developed to assist investigators in performing preliminary economic analyses of anaerobic digestion processes. The model, which runs under Microsoft Excel{trademark}, is capable of estimating the economic performance of several different waste digestion process configurations that are defined by the user through a series of option selections. The model can be used to predict required feedstock tipping fees, product selling prices, utility rates, and raw material unit costs. The model is intended to be used as a tool to perform preliminary economic estimates that could be used to carry out simple screening analyses. The model`s current parameters are based on engineering judgments and are not reflective of any existing process; therefore, they should be carefully evaluated and modified if necessary to reflect the process under consideration. The accuracy and level of uncertainty of the estimated capital investment and operating costs are dependent on the accuracy and level of uncertainty of the model`s input parameters. The underlying methodology is capable of producing results accurate to within {+-} 30% of actual costs.

  7. Evaluating User Participation and User Influence in an Enterprise System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Martin D.

    2010-01-01

    Does user influence have an impact on the data quality of an information systems development project? What decision making should users have? How can users effectively be engaged in the process? What is success? User participation is considered to be a critical success factor for Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) projects, yet there is little…

  8. CARE 3 User's Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A user's workshop for CARE 3, a reliability assessment tool designed and developed especially for the evaluation of high reliability fault tolerant digital systems, was held at NASA Langley Research Center on October 6 to 7, 1987. The main purpose of the workshop was to assess the evolutionary status of CARE 3. The activities of the workshop are documented and papers are included by user's of CARE 3 and NASA. Features and limitations of CARE 3 and comparisons to other tools are presented. The conclusions to a workshop questionaire are also discussed.

  9. MERBoard User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimble, Jay; Shab, Ted; Vera, Alonso; Gaswiller, Rich; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An important goal of MERBoard is to allow users to quickly and easily share information. The front-end interface is physically a large plasma computer display with a touch screen, allowing multiple people to interact shoulder-to-shoulder or in a small meeting area. The software system allows people to interactively create digital whiteboards, browse the web, give presentations and connect to personal computers (for example, to run applications not on the MERBoard computer itself). There are four major integrated applications: a browser; a remote connection to another computer (VNC); a digital whiteboard; and a digital space (MERSpace), which is a digital repository for each individual user.

  10. AC-DC converter with an improved input current waveform

    SciTech Connect

    Yuvarajan, S.; Weng, D.F.; Chen, M.S.

    1995-12-31

    The paper proposes a new control scheme for an ac-dc converter that will reduce the total harmonic distortion in the input current while operating at an improved power factor. The circuit uses a diode rectifier whose output is varied by a boost regulator with a second-harmonic injected PWM. An approximate analysis shows that the addition of a second harmonic component in the PWM helps to reduce the third harmonic in the input current. The design parameters are obtained using digital simulation. The results obtained on an experimental converter are compared with the ones obtained from a conventional scheme.

  11. Missile Datcom. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukelich, Steven R.; Stoy, Stan L.; Moore, Marvin E.

    1988-12-01

    The computer code is capable of addressing a wide variety of conventional missile designs. For the purposes of this document, a conventional missile is one which is comprised of the following: an axisymmetric or elliptically-shaped body, one to four fin sets located along the body between the nose and base. Each fin set can be comprised of one to eight identical panels attached around the body at a common longitudinal position, and an airbreathing propulsion system. To minimize the quantity of input data required, commonly used values for many inputs are assumed as defaults. However, all program defaults can be over-ridden by the user in order to more accurately model the configuration of interest.

  12. AVPUC: automatic video production with user customization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bin; Nahrstedt, Klara

    2005-01-01

    Nowadays, multiple video cameras are employed for live broadcast and recording of almost all major social events, and all these camera streams have to be aggregated and rendered into one video program for audiences. While this content composition process aims at presenting the most interesting perspective of an event, it leads to the problem of how to fully customize the finally composed video program to different audience interests without requiring too much input from the audience. The goal of this work is to solve this problem by proposing the Automatic Video Production with User Customization (AVPUC) system that separates the video stream interestingness comparison from video program rendering to provide space for maximized customization. Human-controlled video selection and automatic video evaluation are combined to support video content customization and reduce redundant audience inputs. Preliminary evaluation results confirm that AVPUC"s capturing-evaluation-render model for video production improves audiences" satisfaction for customized multi-perspective viewing of social events.

  13. AVPUC: automatic video production with user customization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bin; Nahrstedt, Klara

    2004-12-01

    Nowadays, multiple video cameras are employed for live broadcast and recording of almost all major social events, and all these camera streams have to be aggregated and rendered into one video program for audiences. While this content composition process aims at presenting the most interesting perspective of an event, it leads to the problem of how to fully customize the finally composed video program to different audience interests without requiring too much input from the audience. The goal of this work is to solve this problem by proposing the Automatic Video Production with User Customization (AVPUC) system that separates the video stream interestingness comparison from video program rendering to provide space for maximized customization. Human-controlled video selection and automatic video evaluation are combined to support video content customization and reduce redundant audience inputs. Preliminary evaluation results confirm that AVPUC"s capturing-evaluation-render model for video production improves audiences" satisfaction for customized multi-perspective viewing of social events.

  14. LARCRIM user's guide, version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, John S.; Heaphy, William J.

    1993-01-01

    LARCRIM is a relational database management system (RDBMS) which performs the conventional duties of an RDBMS with the added feature that it can store attributes which consist of arrays or matrices. This makes it particularly valuable for scientific data management. It is accessible as a stand-alone system and through an application program interface. The stand-alone system may be executed in two modes: menu or command. The menu mode prompts the user for the input required to create, update, and/or query the database. The command mode requires the direct input of LARCRIM commands. Although LARCRIM is an update of an old database family, its performance on modern computers is quite satisfactory. LARCRIM is written in FORTRAN 77 and runs under the UNIX operating system. Versions have been released for the following computers: SUN (3 & 4), Convex, IRIS, Hewlett-Packard, CRAY 2 & Y-MP.

  15. Airborne antenna radiation pattern code user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnside, Walter D.; Kim, Jacob J.; Grandchamp, Brett; Rojas, Roberto G.; Law, Philip

    1985-01-01

    The use of a newly developed computer code to analyze the radiation patterns of antennas mounted on a ellipsoid and in the presence of a set of finite flat plates is described. It is shown how the code allows the user to simulate a wide variety of complex electromagnetic radiation problems using the ellipsoid/plates model. The code has the capacity of calculating radiation patterns around an arbitrary conical cut specified by the user. The organization of the code, definition of input and output data, and numerous practical examples are also presented. The analysis is based on the Uniform Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (UTD), and most of the computed patterns are compared with experimental results to show the accuracy of this solution.

  16. Online Library Users--The Library Comes of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, Pauline A.; Arret, Linda

    1985-01-01

    Discussion of Library of Congress's efforts to meet challenge of designing and improving its online catalog system LOCIS (consists of SCORPIO and MUMS systems) includes sample searches and results of user surveys (access points in online catalog searches and response to input search statements resulting in no retrievals). (5 references) (EJS)

  17. GEMPAK5 user's guide, version 5.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desjardins, Mary L.; Brill, Keith F.; Schotz, Steven S.

    1991-01-01

    GEMPAK is a general meteorological software package used to analyze and display conventional meteorological data as well as satellite derived parameters. The User's Guide describes the GEMPAK5 programs and input parameters and details the algorithms used for the meteorological computations.

  18. Solid rocket booster performance evaluation model. Volume 2: Users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    This users manual for the solid rocket booster performance evaluation model (SRB-II) contains descriptions of the model, the program options, the required program inputs, the program output format and the program error messages. SRB-II is written in FORTRAN and is operational on both the IBM 370/155 and the MSFC UNIVAC 1108 computers.

  19. Concept Formation Skills in Long-Term Cochlear Implant Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellanos, Irina; Kronenberger, William G.; Beer, Jessica; Colson, Bethany G.; Henning, Shirley C.; Ditmars, Allison; Pisoni, David B.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated if a period of auditory sensory deprivation followed by degraded auditory input and related language delays affects visual concept formation skills in long-term prelingually deaf cochlear implant (CI) users. We also examined if concept formation skills are mediated or moderated by other neurocognitive domains (i.e.,…

  20. A User-Driven Annotation Framework for Scientific Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Qinglan

    2013-01-01

    Annotations play an increasingly crucial role in scientific exploration and discovery, as the amount of data and the level of collaboration among scientists increases. There are many systems today focusing on annotation management, querying, and propagation. Although all such systems are implemented to take user input (i.e., the annotations…

  1. PREMIXED ONE-DIMENSIONAL FLAME (PROF) CODE USER'S MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a user's manual that describes the problems that can be treated by the Premixed One-dimensional Flame (PROF) code. It also describes the mathematical models and solution procedures applied to these problems. Complete input instructions and a description of output ar...

  2. Computer program documentation: CYBER to Univac binary conversion user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, E. W.

    1980-01-01

    A user's guide for a computer program which will convert SINDA temperature history data from CDC (Cyber) binary format to UNIVAC 1100 binary format is presented. The various options available, the required input, the optional output, file assignments, and the restrictions of the program are discussed.

  3. Science Library User Survey Report, University of California, Santa Cruz.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Wei

    A survey of 136 science faculty, graduate, and undergraduate students, and focus group interviews, provided perceptions and input to be used to rethink the science library's organizational structure and services. Users felt the following to be important library services: consulting the Melvyl databases; borrowing books; interlibrary loan services;…

  4. Synthetic environment employing a craft for providing user perspective reference

    DOEpatents

    Maples, Creve; Peterson, Craig A.

    1997-10-21

    A multi-dimensional user oriented synthetic environment system allows application programs to be programmed and accessed with input/output device independent, generic functional commands which are a distillation of the actual functions performed by any application program. A shared memory structure allows the translation of device specific commands to device independent, generic functional commands. Complete flexibility of the mapping of synthetic environment data to the user is thereby allowed. Accordingly, synthetic environment data may be provided to the user on parallel user information processing channels allowing the subcognitive mind to act as a filter, eliminating irrelevant information and allowing the processing of increase amounts of data by the user. The user is further provided with a craft surrounding the user within the synthetic environment, which craft, imparts important visual referential an motion parallax cues, enabling the user to better appreciate distances and directions within the synthetic environment. Display of this craft in close proximity to the user's point of perspective may be accomplished without substantially degrading the image resolution of the displayed portions of the synthetic environment.

  5. User engineering: A new look at system engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, Larry L.

    1987-10-01

    User Engineering is a new System Engineering perspective responsible for defining and maintaining the user view of the system. Its elements are a process to guide the project and customer, a multidisciplinary team including hard and soft sciences, rapid prototyping tools to build user interfaces quickly and modify them frequently at low cost, and a prototyping center for involving users and designers in an iterative way. The main consideration is reducing the risk that the end user will not or cannot effectively use the system. The process begins with user analysis to produce cognitive and work style models, and task analysis to produce user work functions and scenarios. These become major drivers of the human computer interface design which is presented and reviewed as an interactive prototype by users. Feedback is rapid and productive, and user effectiveness can be measured and observed before the system is built and fielded. Requirements are derived via the prototype and baselined early to serve as an input to the architecture and software design.

  6. User engineering: A new look at system engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, Larry L.

    1987-01-01

    User Engineering is a new System Engineering perspective responsible for defining and maintaining the user view of the system. Its elements are a process to guide the project and customer, a multidisciplinary team including hard and soft sciences, rapid prototyping tools to build user interfaces quickly and modify them frequently at low cost, and a prototyping center for involving users and designers in an iterative way. The main consideration is reducing the risk that the end user will not or cannot effectively use the system. The process begins with user analysis to produce cognitive and work style models, and task analysis to produce user work functions and scenarios. These become major drivers of the human computer interface design which is presented and reviewed as an interactive prototype by users. Feedback is rapid and productive, and user effectiveness can be measured and observed before the system is built and fielded. Requirements are derived via the prototype and baselined early to serve as an input to the architecture and software design.

  7. The Input-Interface of Webcam Applied in 3D Virtual Reality Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Huey-Min; Cheng, Wen-Lin

    2009-01-01

    Our research explores a virtual reality application based on Web camera (Webcam) input-interface. The interface can replace with the mouse to control direction intention of a user by the method of frame difference. We divide a frame into nine grids from Webcam and make use of the background registration to compute the moving object. In order to…

  8. IG/OG program for generating and displaying NASTRAN input and output data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishima, R.; Myojin, A.

    1978-01-01

    A software system was provided for structural analysis fields using NASTRAN. The HITAC users in Japan can use IG/OG (input generator/output generator) program for NASTRAN. The IG/OG saves time required to make a structure analysis for interpreting NASTRAN results.

  9. A Glove for Tapping and Discrete 1D/2D Input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sam A.; Smith, Andy; Bahram, Sina; SaintAmant, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a glove with which users enter input by tapping fingertips with the thumb or by rubbing the thumb over the palmar surfaces of the middle and index fingers. The glove has been informally tested as the controller for two semi-autonomous robots in a a 3D simulation environment. A preliminary evaluation of the glove s performance is presented.

  10. MINIVER upgrade for the AVID system. Volume 2: LANMIN input guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, C. D.; Schmitz, C. P.

    1983-01-01

    In order to effectively incorporate MINIVER into the AVID system, several changes to MINIVER were made. The thermal conduction options in MINIVER were removed and a new Explicit Interactive Thermal Structures (EXITS) code was developed. Many upgrades to the MINIVER code were made and a new Langley version of MINIVER called LANMIN was created. A user input guide for LANMIN is provided.

  11. Solar irradiance short wave radiation users guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinolich, Paul; Arnone, Robert A.

    1995-05-01

    Solar irradiance for short wave radiation (400-700 nm) at the sea surface can be calculated using inputs obtained from satellite systems and model estimates. The short wave solar irradiance is important for estimating the surface heating that occurs in the near surface and estimating the available irradiance for biological growth in the upper ocean. The variability of the solar irradiance is believed to have significant influence on the global carbon cycle. This users guide provides an understanding of the models and operational procedures for using the software and understanding the results.

  12. Solar energy storage researchers information user study

    SciTech Connect

    Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

    1981-03-01

    The results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on solar energy storage are described. In the current study only high-priority groups were examined. Results from 2 groups of researchers are analyzed: DOE-Funded Researchers and Non-DOE-Funded Researchers. The data will be used as input to the determination of information products and services the Solar Energy Research Institute, the Solar Energy Information Data Bank Network, and the entire information outreach community should be preparing and disseminating.

  13. Input filter compensation for switching regulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, F. C.; Kelkar, S. S.

    1982-01-01

    The problems caused by the interaction between the input filter, output filter, and the control loop are discussed. The input filter design is made more complicated because of the need to avoid performance degradation and also stay within the weight and loss limitations. Conventional input filter design techniques are then dicussed. The concept of pole zero cancellation is reviewed; this concept is the basis for an approach to control the peaking of the output impedance of the input filter and thus mitigate some of the problems caused by the input filter. The proposed approach for control of the peaking of the output impedance of the input filter is to use a feedforward loop working in conjunction with feedback loops, thus forming a total state control scheme. The design of the feedforward loop for a buck regulator is described. A possible implementation of the feedforward loop design is suggested.

  14. Input estimation from measured structural response

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Dustin; Cross, Elizabeth; Silva, Ramon A; Farrar, Charles R; Bement, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This report will focus on the estimation of unmeasured dynamic inputs to a structure given a numerical model of the structure and measured response acquired at discrete locations. While the estimation of inputs has not received as much attention historically as state estimation, there are many applications where an improved understanding of the immeasurable input to a structure is vital (e.g. validating temporally varying and spatially-varying load models for large structures such as buildings and ships). In this paper, the introduction contains a brief summary of previous input estimation studies. Next, an adjoint-based optimization method is used to estimate dynamic inputs to two experimental structures. The technique is evaluated in simulation and with experimental data both on a cantilever beam and on a three-story frame structure. The performance and limitations of the adjoint-based input estimation technique are discussed.

  15. Extended parametric representation of compressor fans and turbines. Volume 1: CMGEN user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Converse, G. L.; Giffin, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    A modeling technique for fans, boosters, and compressors has been developed which will enable the user to obtain consistent and rapid off-design performance from design point input. The fans and compressors are assumed to be multi-stage machines incorporating front variable stators. The boosters are assumed to be fixed geometry machines. The modeling technique has been incorporated into time sharing program to facilitate its use. Because this report contains a description of the input output data, values of typical inputs, and examples cases, it is suitable as a user's manual. This report is the first of a three volume set describing the parametric representation of compressors, fans, and turbines. The titles of the three volumes are as follows: (1) Volume 1 CMGEN USER's Manual (Parametric Compressor Generator); (2) Volume 2 PART USER's Manual (parametric Turbine); (3) Volume 3 MODFAN USER's Manual (Parametric Modulating Flow Fan).

  16. Traj_opt User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, David A.

    2005-01-01

    Trajectory optimization program Traj_opt was developed at Ames Research Center to help assess the potential benefits of ultrahigh temperature ceramic materials applied to reusable space vehicles with sharp noses and wing leading edges. Traj_opt loosely couples the Ames three-degrees-of-freedom trajectory package Traj (see NASA-TM-2004-212847) with the SNOPT optimization package (Stanford University Technical Report SOL 98-1). Traj_opt version January 22, 2003 is covered by this user guide. The program has been applied extensively to entry and ascent abort trajectory calculations for sharp and blunt crew transfer vehicles. The main optimization variables are control points for the angle of attack and bank angle time histories. No propulsion options are provided, but numerous objective functions may be specified and the nonlinear constraints implemented include a distributed surface heating constraint capability. Aero-capture calculations are also treated with an option to minimize orbital eccentricity at apoapsis. Traj_opt runs efficiently on a single processor, using forward or central differences for the gradient calculations. Results may be displayed conveniently with Gnuplot scripts. Control files recommended for five standard reentry and ascent abort trajectories are included along with detailed descriptions of the inputs and outputs.

  17. NASA Lewis steady-state heat pipe code users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tower, Leonard K.; Baker, Karl W.; Marks, Timothy S.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA Lewis heat pipe code was developed to predict the performance of heat pipes in the steady state. The code can be used as a design tool on a personal computer or with a suitable calling routine, as a subroutine for a mainframe radiator code. A variety of wick structures, including a user input option, can be used. Heat pipes with multiple evaporators, condensers, and adiabatic sections in series and with wick structures that differ among sections can be modeled. Several working fluids can be chosen, including potassium, sodium, and lithium, for which monomer-dimer equilibrium is considered. The code incorporates a vapor flow algorithm that treats compressibility and axially varying heat input. This code facilitates the determination of heat pipe operating temperatures and heat pipe limits that may be encountered at the specified heat input and environment temperature. Data are input to the computer through a user-interactive input subroutine. Output, such as liquid and vapor pressures and temperatures, is printed at equally spaced axial positions along the pipe as determined by the user.

  18. NLEdit: A generic graphical user interface for Fortran programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curlett, Brian P.

    1994-01-01

    NLEdit is a generic graphical user interface for the preprocessing of Fortran namelist input files. The interface consists of a menu system, a message window, a help system, and data entry forms. A form is generated for each namelist. The form has an input field for each namelist variable along with a one-line description of that variable. Detailed help information, default values, and minimum and maximum allowable values can all be displayed via menu picks. Inputs are processed through a scientific calculator program that allows complex equations to be used instead of simple numeric inputs. A custom user interface is generated simply by entering information about the namelist input variables into an ASCII file. There is no need to learn a new graphics system or programming language. NLEdit can be used as a stand-alone program or as part of a larger graphical user interface. Although NLEdit is intended for files using namelist format, it can be easily modified to handle other file formats.

  19. NASA Lewis steady-state heat pipe code users manual

    SciTech Connect

    Tower, L.K.; Baker, K.W.; Marks, T.S.

    1992-06-01

    The NASA Lewis heat pipe code has been developed to predict the performance of heat pipes in the steady state. The code can be used as a design tool on a personal computer or, with a suitable calling routine, as a subroutine for a mainframe radiator code. A variety of wick structures, including a user input option, can be used. Heat pipes with multiple evaporators, condensers, and adiabatic sections in series and with wick structures that differ among sections can be modeled. Several working fluids can be chosen, including potassium, sodium, and lithium, for which the monomer-dimer equilibrium is considered. The code incorporates a vapor flow algorithm that treats compressibility and axially varying heat input. This code facilitates the determination of heat pipe operating temperatures and heat pipe limits that may be encountered at the specified heat input and environment temperature. Data are input to the computer through a user-interactive input subroutine. Output, such as liquid and vapor pressures and temperatures, is printed at equally spaced axial positions along the pipe as determined by the user.

  20. Perspectives on User Satisfaction Surveys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Rowena

    2001-01-01

    Discusses academic libraries, digital environments, increasing competition, the relationship between service quality and user satisfaction, and user surveys. Describes the SERVQUAL model that measures service quality and user satisfaction in academic libraries; considers gaps between user expectations and managers' perceptions of user…

  1. User's guide to resin infusion simulation program in the FORTRAN language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weideman, Mark H.; Hammond, Vince H.; Loos, Alfred C.

    1992-01-01

    RTMCL is a user friendly computer code which simulates the manufacture of fabric composites by the resin infusion process. The computer code is based on the process simulation model described in reference 1. Included in the user's guide is a detailed step by step description of how to run the program and enter and modify the input data set. Sample input and output files are included along with an explanation of the results. Finally, a complete listing of the program is provided.

  2. GLISP User's Manual. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Gordon S., Jr.

    GLISP is a LISP-based language which provides high-level language features not found in ordinary LISP. The GLISP language is implemented by means of a compiler which accepts GLISP as input and produces ordinary LISP as output. This output can be further compiled to machine code by the LISP compiler. GLISP is available for several LISP dialects,…

  3. DJANAL user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, E. R.

    1976-01-01

    The DJANAL (DisJunct ANALyzer) Program provides a means for the LSI designer to format output from the Mask Analysis Program (MAP) for input to the FETLOG (FETSIM/LOGSIM) processor. This document presents a brief description of the operation of DJANAL and provides comprehensive instruction for its use.

  4. SAFIRE user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Glasgow, B.B.; Meier, W.R.

    1987-01-12

    Analytical models for scaling the cost and performance of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) electric-power plants have been developed and incorporated into the SAFIRE code. SAFIRE denotes systems analysis for ICF reactor economics. This volume, Volume 2, describes the subroutines, COMMON blocks, file handling, and input and output variables of the code. (WRF)

  5. NETPAD User Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Declerck, Luc; Craven, Timothy C.

    NETPAD is a microcomputer-based system, implemented on a Commodore PET 2001-8, by which a human indexer can input, retrieve, and edit information in order to produce a variety of permuted index displays. The basic unit of the NETPAD system is a subnetwork (a description of a single document) containing a set of concept nodes (author, title, date,…

  6. User Oriented Product Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkin, Marvin C.; Wingard, Joseph

    While the educational product development field has expanded tremendously over the last 15 years, there is a paucity of conveniently assembled and readily interpretable information that would enable users to make accurate and informed evaluations of different, but comparable, instructional products. Minimum types of validation data which should be…

  7. User Requirements, April 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Berkeley. Dept. of Physical Planning and Construction.

    In July 1964, the University of California Board of Regents authorized the project now known as URBS-The University Residential Building System Project. The initial stage in the development of the building system was the determination of the user requirements for the building type in question. This report is the result of investigation undertaken…

  8. EREP users handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Revised Skylab spacecraft, experiments, and mission planning information is presented for the Earth Resources Experiment Package (EREP) users. The major hardware elements and the medical, scientific, engineering, technology and earth resources experiments are described. Ground truth measurements and EREP data handling procedures are discussed. The mission profile, flight planning, crew activities, and aircraft support are also outlined.

  9. User Authentication. SPEC Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plum, Terry, Comp.; Bleiler, Richard, Comp.

    2001-01-01

    This SPEC (Systems and Procedures Exchange Center) Kit presents the results of a survey of Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member libraries designed to examine the systems research libraries use to authenticate and authorize the users of their online networked information resources. A total of 52 of 121 ARL member libraries responded to…

  10. Empowering the User.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Terrence J.; Mechley, Victor P.

    With respect to the college's information systems, there were three major challenges facing Ohio's Cincinnati Technical College (CTC) in 1991. The expanding use of personal computers (PC's) and non-integrated systems often duplicated efforts and data on CTC's existing computer systems, users were demanding more access to data and more integration…

  11. User Centric Policy Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheek, Gorrell P.

    2013-01-01

    Internet use, in general, and online social networking sites, in particular, are experiencing tremendous growth with hundreds of millions of active users. As a result, there is a tremendous amount of privacy information and content online. Protecting this information is a challenge. Access control policy composition is complex, laborious and…

  12. Power User Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfister, Robin; McMahon, Joe

    2006-01-01

    Power User Interface 5.0 (PUI) is a system of middleware, written for expert users in the Earth-science community, PUI enables expedited ordering of data granules on the basis of specific granule-identifying information that the users already know or can assemble. PUI also enables expert users to perform quick searches for orderablegranule information for use in preparing orders. PUI 5.0 is available in two versions (note: PUI 6.0 has command-line mode only): a Web-based application program and a UNIX command-line- mode client program. Both versions include modules that perform data-granule-ordering functions in conjunction with external systems. The Web-based version works with Earth Observing System Clearing House (ECHO) metadata catalog and order-entry services and with an open-source order-service broker server component, called the Mercury Shopping Cart, that is provided separately by Oak Ridge National Laboratory through the Department of Energy. The command-line version works with the ECHO metadata and order-entry process service. Both versions of PUI ultimately use ECHO to process an order to be sent to a data provider. Ordered data are provided through means outside the PUI software system.

  13. Input apparatus for dynamic signature verification systems

    DOEpatents

    EerNisse, Errol P.; Land, Cecil E.; Snelling, Jay B.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to signature verification input apparatus comprising a writing instrument and platen containing piezoelectric transducers which generate signals in response to writing pressures.

  14. Rapid Airplane Parametric Input Design (RAPID)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    RAPID is a methodology and software system to define a class of airplane configurations and directly evaluate surface grids, volume grids, and grid sensitivity on and about the configurations. A distinguishing characteristic which separates RAPID from other airplane surface modellers is that the output grids and grid sensitivity are directly applicable in CFD analysis. A small set of design parameters and grid control parameters govern the process which is incorporated into interactive software for 'real time' visual analysis and into batch software for the application of optimization technology. The computed surface grids and volume grids are suitable for a wide range of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. The general airplane configuration has wing, fuselage, horizontal tail, and vertical tail components. The double-delta wing and tail components are manifested by solving a fourth order partial differential equation (PDE) subject to Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The design parameters are incorporated into the boundary conditions and therefore govern the shapes of the surfaces. The PDE solution yields a smooth transition between boundaries. Surface grids suitable for CFD calculation are created by establishing an H-type topology about the configuration and incorporating grid spacing functions in the PDE equation for the lifting components and the fuselage definition equations. User specified grid parameters govern the location and degree of grid concentration. A two-block volume grid about a configuration is calculated using the Control Point Form (CPF) technique. The interactive software, which runs on Silicon Graphics IRIS workstations, allows design parameters to be continuously varied and the resulting surface grid to be observed in real time. The batch software computes both the surface and volume grids and also computes the sensitivity of the output grid with respect to the input design parameters by applying the precompiler tool

  15. Input shaped control of 3-dimensional maneuvers of flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, T.; Vadali, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper deals with the control of three dimensional rotational maneuvers of flexible spacecraft. A spacecraft with a spherical hub and six symmetric appendages is considered here as a model. The appendages are long and flexible leading to low frequency vibration under any control action. To provide a comprehensive treatment of input shaped controllers, both open loop and closed loop controllers are considered. The minimum-time bang-bang and the near-minimum-time controller, used in conjunction with the shaped input technique are studied. In addition, a combination of a Liapunov controller with the shaped input control technique is proposed to take advantage of the simple feedback control strategy and augment it with a technique that can eliminate the vibratory motion of the flexible appendages more efficiently.

  16. Dynamic Input Conductances Shape Neuronal Spiking1,2

    PubMed Central

    Franci, Alessio; Dethier, Julie; Sepulchre, Rodolphe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Assessing the role of biophysical parameter variations in neuronal activity is critical to the understanding of modulation, robustness, and homeostasis of neuronal signalling. The paper proposes that this question can be addressed through the analysis of dynamic input conductances. Those voltage-dependent curves aggregate the concomitant activity of all ion channels in distinct timescales. They are shown to shape the current−voltage dynamical relationships that determine neuronal spiking. We propose an experimental protocol to measure dynamic input conductances in neurons. In addition, we provide a computational method to extract dynamic input conductances from arbitrary conductance-based models and to analyze their sensitivity to arbitrary parameters. We illustrate the relevance of the proposed approach for modulation, compensation, and robustness studies in a published neuron model based on data of the stomatogastric ganglion of the crab Cancer borealis. PMID:26464969

  17. FTMAP: extended protein mapping with user-selected probe molecules

    PubMed Central

    Ngan, Chi Ho; Bohnuud, Tanggis; Mottarella, Scott E.; Beglov, Dmitri; Villar, Elizabeth A.; Hall, David R.; Kozakov, Dima; Vajda, Sandor

    2012-01-01

    Binding hot spots, protein sites with high-binding affinity, can be identified using X-ray crystallography or NMR by screening libraries of small organic molecules that tend to cluster at such regions. FTMAP, a direct computational analog of the experimental screening approaches, globally samples the surface of a target protein using small organic molecules as probes, finds favorable positions, clusters the conformations and ranks the clusters on the basis of the average energy. The regions that bind several probe clusters predict the binding hot spots, in good agreement with experimental results. Small molecules discovered by fragment-based approaches to drug design also bind at the hot spot regions. To identify such molecules and their most likely bound positions, we extend the functionality of FTMAP (http://ftmap.bu.edu/param) to accept any small molecule as an additional probe. In its updated form, FTMAP identifies the hot spots based on a standard set of probes, and for each additional probe shows representative structures of nearby low energy clusters. This approach helps to predict bound poses of the user-selected molecules, detects if a compound is not likely to bind in the hot spot region, and provides input for the design of larger ligands. PMID:22589414

  18. Stigma towards Marijuana Users and Heroin Users.

    PubMed

    Brown, Seth A

    2015-01-01

    Despite high levels of stigmatizing attitudes and behaviors toward individuals with substance use problems, there is surprisingly limited research on understanding the contributors to such high levels. College students with no history of marijuana or heroin use (N=250) completed self-report measures to examine the level of substance use stigma towards individuals using two illicit substances (marijuana and heroin) and the contribution of three perceiver characteristics (sex, previous contact with substance users, and five beliefs about substance use) to three dimensions of stigma (social distance, negative emotions, and forcing treatment). Greater levels of internalized stigma were noted towards individuals who use heroin (versus marijuana). For marijuana use, those who had less previous contact and higher endorsement of certain beliefs (rarity, severity, and less controllability) were associated with greater stigmatizing attitudes. For heroin use, the associations were weak or non-existent. The findings strengthen the argument that substance use stigma needs to be examined and perhaps addressed substance by substance, rather than as a group. Further, contact interventions may be a particularly effective strategy for altering substance use stigma. PMID:26148124

  19. NASA Glenn Steady-State Heat Pipe Code Users Manual, DOS Input. Version 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tower, Leonard K.

    2000-01-01

    The heat pipe code LERCHP has been revised, corrected, and extended. New features include provisions for pipes with curvature and bends in "G" fields. Heat pipe limits are examined in detail and limit envelopes are shown for some sodium and lithium-filled heat pipes. Refluxing heat pipes and gas-loaded or variable conductance heat pipes were not considered.

  20. MINIVER upgrade for the AVID system. Volume 3: EXITS user's and input guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pond, J. E.; Schmitz, C. P.

    1983-01-01

    The successful design of thermal protection systems for vehicles operating in atmosphere and near-space environments requires accurate analyses of heating rate and temperature histories encountered along a trajectory. For preliminary design calculations, however, the requirement for accuracy must be tempered by the need for speed and versatility in computational tools used to determine thermal environments and structural thermal response. The MINIVER program was found to provide the proper balance between versatility, speed and accuracy for an aerothermal prediction tool. The advancement in computer aided design concepts at Langley Research Center (LaRC) in the past few years has made it desirable to incorporate the MINIVER program into the LaRC Advanced Vehicle Integrated Design, AVID, system. In order to effectively incorporate MINIVER into the AVID system, several changes to MINIVER were made. The thermal conduction options in MINIVER were removed and a new Explicit Interactive Thermal Structures (EXITS) code was developed. Many upgrades to the MINIVER code were made and a new Langley version of MINIVER called LANMIN was created.

  1. Materials and Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratoriers: User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaschl, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    The Materials and Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratory process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users. The Materials and Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratory Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non- NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware developers. It is intended to assist their project engineering personnel in materials analysis planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the analysis process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, products, and inputs necessary to define scope of analysis, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  2. Graphical User Interface Color Display Animation Interaction Tool

    1999-10-05

    The Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA) is a highly flexible graphical user interface for displaying the results of a calculation, typically generated by RELAP5 or other code. This display consists of one or more picture, called masks, that mimic the host code input. This mask can be animated to display user-specified code output information mapped as colors, dials, moving arrows, etc., on the mask. The user can also interact with the control systems of the hostmore » input file as the execution progresses, thereby controlling aspects of the calculation. The Computer Visual System (CVS) creates, edits, and animates the the masks for use in the NPA.« less

  3. User`s guide and documentation manual for ``PC-Gel`` simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Ming-Ming; Gao, Hong W.

    1993-10-01

    PC-GEL is a three-dimensional, three-phase (oil, water, and gas) permeability modification simulator developed by incorporating an in-situ gelation model into a black oil simulator (BOAST) for personal computer application. The features included in the simulator are: transport of each chemical species of the polymer/crosslinker system in porous media, gelation reaction kinetics of the polymer with crosslinking agents, rheology of the polymer and gel, inaccessible pore volume to macromolecules, adsorption of chemical species on rock surfaces, retention of gel on the rock matrix, and permeability reduction caused by the adsorption of polymer and gel. The in-situ gelation model and simulator were validated against data reported in the literature. The simulator PC-GEL is useful for simulating and optimizing any combination of primary production, waterflooding, polymer flooding, and permeability modification treatments. A general background of permeability modification using crosslinked polymer gels is given in Section I and the governing equations, mechanisms, and numerical solutions of PC-GEL are given in Section II. Steps for preparing an input data file with reservoir and gel-chemical transport data, and recurrent data are described in Sections III and IV, respectively. Example data inputs are enclosed after explanations of each input line to help the user prepare data files. Major items of the output files are reviewed in Section V. Finally, three sample problems for running PC-GEL are described in Section VI, and input files and part of the output files of these problems are listed in the appendices. For the user`s reference a copy of the source code of PC-GEL computer program is attached in Appendix A.

  4. An improved biometrics-based remote user authentication scheme with user anonymity.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Khurram; Kumari, Saru

    2013-01-01

    The authors review the biometrics-based user authentication scheme proposed by An in 2012. The authors show that there exist loopholes in the scheme which are detrimental for its security. Therefore the authors propose an improved scheme eradicating the flaws of An's scheme. Then a detailed security analysis of the proposed scheme is presented followed by its efficiency comparison. The proposed scheme not only withstands security problems found in An's scheme but also provides some extra features with mere addition of only two hash operations. The proposed scheme allows user to freely change his password and also provides user anonymity with untraceability. PMID:24350272

  5. Practical input optimization for aircraft parameter estimation experiments. Ph.D. Thesis, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    1993-01-01

    The object of this research was to develop an algorithm for the design of practical, optimal flight test inputs for aircraft parameter estimation experiments. A general, single pass technique was developed which allows global optimization of the flight test input design for parameter estimation using the principles of dynamic programming with the input forms limited to square waves only. Provision was made for practical constraints on the input, including amplitude constraints, control system dynamics, and selected input frequency range exclusions. In addition, the input design was accomplished while imposing output amplitude constraints required by model validity and considerations of safety during the flight test. The algorithm has multiple input design capability, with optional inclusion of a constraint that only one control move at a time, so that a human pilot can implement the inputs. It is shown that the technique can be used to design experiments for estimation of open loop model parameters from closed loop flight test data. The report includes a new formulation of the optimal input design problem, a description of a new approach to the solution, and a summary of the characteristics of the algorithm, followed by three example applications of the new technique which demonstrate the quality and expanded capabilities of the input designs produced by the new technique. In all cases, the new input design approach showed significant improvement over previous input design methods in terms of achievable parameter accuracies.

  6. Nitrogen input effectiveness on carbon sequestration in rainfed cropping system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novara, Agata; Gristina, Luciano; Poma, Ignazio

    2016-04-01

    The combined effect of total N and C/N ratio had a large influence on the decomposition rate and consequently on potential soil organic carbon sequestration. The aim of the work was to evaluate Carbon sequestration potentiality under three mineral N fertilization levels in interaction with two cropping systems characterized by addition of N input due to leguminous species in the rotation. The study was carried out in the semiarid Mediterranean environment in a 18years long-term experiment. Is well know that in the semiarid environment the excess of N fertilization reduces biomass yield and the consequent C input. On the contrary, both N and C input determine high difference in C/N input ratio and faster organic matter mineralization. Results showed no influence of N fertilization on SOC sequestration and a reduction of SOC stock due to crop rotation due to lower C input. Crop residue quality of durum wheat-pea crop rotation characterized by a faster decomposition rate could explain the lower ability of crop rotation to sequester C in the semiarid environment.

  7. Robust image retrieval from noisy inputs using lattice associative memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urcid, Gonzalo; Nieves-V., José Angel; García-A., Anmi; Valdiviezo-N., Juan Carlos

    2009-02-01

    Lattice associative memories also known as morphological associative memories are fully connected feedforward neural networks with no hidden layers, whose computation at each node is carried out with lattice algebra operations. These networks are a relatively recent development in the field of associative memories that has proven to be an alternative way to work with sets of pattern pairs for which the storage and retrieval stages use minimax algebra. Different associative memory models have been proposed to cope with the problem of pattern recall under input degradations, such as occlusions or random noise, where input patterns can be composed of binary or real valued entries. In comparison to these and other artificial neural network memories, lattice algebra based memories display better performance for storage and recall capability; however, the computational techniques devised to achieve that purpose require additional processing or provide partial success when inputs are presented with undetermined noise levels. Robust retrieval capability of an associative memory model is usually expressed by a high percentage of perfect recalls from non-perfect input. The procedure described here uses noise masking defined by simple lattice operations together with appropriate metrics, such as the normalized mean squared error or signal to noise ratio, to boost the recall performance of either the min or max lattice auto-associative memories. Using a single lattice associative memory, illustrative examples are given that demonstrate the enhanced retrieval of correct gray-scale image associations from inputs corrupted with random noise.

  8. Circuit-level input integration in bacterial gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Espinar, Lorena; Dies, Marta; Cagatay, Tolga; Süel, Gürol M; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2013-04-23

    Gene regulatory circuits can receive multiple simultaneous inputs, which can enter the system through different locations. It is thus necessary to establish how these genetic circuits integrate multiple inputs as a function of their relative entry points. Here, we use the dynamic circuit regulating competence for DNA uptake in Bacillus subtilis as a model system to investigate this issue. Specifically, we map the response of single cells in vivo to a combination of (i) a chemical signal controlling the constitutive expression of key competence genes, and (ii) a genetic perturbation in the form of copy number variation of one of these genes, which mimics the level of stress signals sensed by the bacteria. Quantitative time-lapse fluorescence microscopy shows that a variety of dynamical behaviors can be reached by the combination of the two inputs. Additionally, the integration depends strongly on the relative locations where the two perturbations enter the circuit. Specifically, when the two inputs act upon different circuit elements, their integration generates novel dynamical behavior, whereas inputs affecting the same element do not. An in silico bidimensional bifurcation analysis of a mathematical model of the circuit offers good quantitative agreement with the experimental observations, and sheds light on the dynamical mechanisms leading to the different integrated responses exhibited by the gene regulatory circuit. PMID:23572583

  9. Statistical Signal Analysis for Systems with Interferenced Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, R. M.; Mielnicka-Pate, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    A new approach is introduced, based on statistical signal analysis, which overcomes the error due to input signal interference. The model analyzed is given. The input signals u sub 1 (t) and u sub 2 (t) are assumed to be unknown. The measurable signals x sub 1 (t) and x sub 2 (t) are interferened according to the frequency response functions, H sub 12 (f) and H sub 21 (f). The goal of the analysis was to evaluate the power output due to each input, u sub 1 (t) and u sub 2 (t), for the case where both are applied to the same time. In addition, all frequency response functions are calculated. The interferenced system is described by a set of five equations with six unknown functions. An IBM XT Personal Computer, which was interfaced with the FFT, was used to solve the set of equations. The software was tested on an electrical two-input, one-output system. The results were excellent. The research presented includes the analysis of the acoustic radiation from a rectangular plate with two force inputs and the sound pressure as an output signal.

  10. Remote sensing inputs to water demand modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, J. E.; Jensen, J. R.; Tinney, L. R.; Rector, M.

    1975-01-01

    In an attempt to determine the ability of remote sensing techniques to economically generate data required by water demand models, the Geography Remote Sensing Unit, in conjunction with the Kern County Water Agency of California, developed an analysis model. As a result it was determined that agricultural cropland inventories utilizing both high altitude photography and LANDSAT imagery can be conducted cost effectively. In addition, by using average irrigation application rates in conjunction with cropland data, estimates of agricultural water demand can be generated. However, more accurate estimates are possible if crop type, acreage, and crop specific application rates are employed. An analysis of the effect of saline-alkali soils on water demand in the study area is also examined. Finally, reference is made to the detection and delineation of water tables that are perched near the surface by semi-permeable clay layers. Soil salinity prediction, automated crop identification on a by-field basis, and a potential input to the determination of zones of equal benefit taxation are briefly touched upon.

  11. Enabling User to User Interactions in Web Lectures with History-Aware User Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketterl, Markus; Mertens, Robert; Wiesen, Christoph; Vornberger, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present a user interface for web lectures for engaging with other users while working with video based learning content. The application allows its users to ask questions about the content and to get answers from those users that currently online are more familiar with it. The filtering is based on the…

  12. The missing graphical user interface for genomics.

    PubMed

    Schatz, Michael C

    2010-01-01

    The Galaxy package empowers regular users to perform rich DNA sequence analysis through a much-needed and user-friendly graphical web interface. See research article http://genomebiology.com/2010/11/8/R86 RESEARCH HIGHLIGHT: With the advent of affordable and high-throughput DNA sequencing, sequencing is becoming an essential component in nearly every genetics lab. These data are being generated to probe sequence variations, to understand transcribed, regulated or methylated DNA elements, and to explore a host of other biological features across the tree of life and across a range of environments and conditions. Given this deluge of data, novices and experts alike are facing the daunting challenge of trying to analyze the raw sequence data computationally. With so many tools available and so many assays to analyze, how can one be expected to stay current with the state of the art? How can one be expected to learn to use each tool and construct robust end-to-end analysis pipelines, all while ensuring that input formats, command-line options, sequence databases and program libraries are set correctly? Finally, once the analysis is complete, how does one ensure the results are reproducible and transparent for others to scrutinize and study?In an article published in Genome Biology, Jeremy Goecks, Anton Nekrutenko, James Taylor and the rest of the Galaxy Team (Goecks et al. 1) make a great advance towards resolving these critical questions with the latest update to their Galaxy Project. The ambitious goal of Galaxy is to empower regular users to carry out their own computational analysis without having to be an expert in computational biology or computer science. Galaxy adds a desperately needed graphical user interface to genomics research, making data analysis universally accessible in a web browser, and freeing users from the minutiae of archaic command-line parameters, data formats and scripting languages. Data inputs and computational steps are selected from

  13. Orion: a commissioned user facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treadwell, P. A.; Allan, P.; Cann, N.; Danson, C.; Duffield, S.; Elsmere, S.; Edwards, R.; Egan, D.; Girling, M.; Gumbrell, E.; Harvey, E.; Hill, M.; Hillier, D.; Hoarty, D.; Hobbs, L.; Hopps, N.; Hussey, D.; Oades, K.; James, S.; Norman, M.; Palmer, J.; Parker, S.; Winter, D.; Bett, T.

    2013-05-01

    The Orion Laser Facility at AWE in the UK consists of ten nanosecond beamlines and two sub-picosecond beamlines. The nanosecond beamlines each nominally deliver 500 J at 351 nm in a 1 ns square temporal profile, but can also deliver a user-definable temporal profile with durations between 0.1 ns and 5 ns. The sub-picosecond beamlines each nominally deliver 500 J at 1053 nm in a 500 fs pulse, with a peak irradiance of greater than 1021 W/cm2. One of the sub-picosecond beamlines can also be frequency-converted to deliver 100 J at 527 nm in a 500 fs pulse, although this is at half the aperture of the 1053 nm beam. Commissioning of all twelve beamlines has been completed, including the 527 nm sub-picosecond option. An overview of the design of the Orion beamlines will be presented, along with a summary of the commissioning and subsequent performance data. The design of Orion was underwritten by running various computer simulations of the beamlines. Work is now underway to validate these simulations against real system data, with the aim of creating predictive models of beamline performance. These predictive models will enable the user's experimental requirements to be critically assessed ahead of time, and will ultimately be used to determine key system settings and parameters. The facility is now conducting high energy density physics experiments. A capability experiment has already been conducted that demonstrates that Orion can generate plasmas at several million Kelvin and several times solid density. From March 2013 15% of the facility operating time will be given over to external academic users in addition to collaborative experiments with AWE scientists.

  14. EDP Applications to Musical Bibliography: Input Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Donald C.

    1972-01-01

    The application of Electronic Data Processing (EDP) has been a boon in the analysis and bibliographic control of music. However, an extra step of encoding must be undertaken for input of music. The best hope to facilitate musical input is the development of an Optical Character Recognition (OCR) music-reading machine. (29 references) (Author/NH)

  15. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the...

  16. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.907 Section 3430.907 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND..., requests for input and/or Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from...

  17. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.907 Section 3430.907 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the following...

  18. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.907 Section 3430.907 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the following...

  19. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the...

  20. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.907 Section 3430.907 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the following...

  1. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the...

  2. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the...

  3. Computing Functions by Approximating the Input

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Mayer

    2012-01-01

    In computing real-valued functions, it is ordinarily assumed that the input to the function is known, and it is the output that we need to approximate. In this work, we take the opposite approach: we show how to compute the values of some transcendental functions by approximating the input to these functions, and obtaining exact answers for their…

  4. Managing Input during Assistive Technology Product Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Young Mi

    2011-01-01

    Many different sources of input are available to assistive technology innovators during the course of designing products. However, there is little information on which ones may be most effective or how they may be efficiently utilized within the design process. The aim of this project was to compare how three types of input--from simulation tools,…

  5. 39 CFR 3020.92 - Public input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Public input. 3020.92 Section 3020.92 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL PRODUCT LISTS Requests Initiated by the Postal Service to Change the Mail Classification Schedule § 3020.92 Public input. The Commission shall publish...

  6. Greenhouse gas footprinting for small businesses--the use of input-output data.

    PubMed

    Berners-Lee, M; Howard, D C; Moss, J; Kaivanto, K; Scott, W A

    2011-02-01

    To mitigate anthropogenic climate change greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) must be reduced; their major source is man's use of energy. A key way to manage emissions is for the energy consumer to understand their impact and the consequences of changing their activities. This paper addresses the challenge of delivering relevant, practical and reliable greenhouse gas 'footprint' information for small and medium sized businesses. The tool we describe is capable of ascribing parts of the total footprint to specific actions to which the business can relate and is sensitive enough to reflect the consequences of change. It provides a comprehensive description of all emissions for each business and sets them in the context of local, national and global statistics. It includes the GHG costs of all goods and services irrespective of their origin and without double accounting. We describe the development and use of the tool, which draws upon both national input-output data and process-based life cycle analysis techniques; a hybrid model. The use of national data sets the output in context and makes the results consistent with national and global targets, while the life cycle techniques provide a means of reflecting the dynamics of actions. The model is described in some detail along with a rationale and a short discussion of validity. As the tool is designed for small commercial users, we have taken care to combine rigour with practicality; parameterising from readily available client data whilst being clear about uncertainties. As an additional incentive, we also report on the potential costs or savings of switching activities. For users to benefit from the tool, they need to understand the output and know how much confidence they should place in the results. We not only describe an application of non-parametric statistics to generate confidence intervals, but also offer users the option of and guidance on adjusting figures to examine the sensitivity of the model to its

  7. Fresh carbon input differentially impacts soil carbon decomposition across natural and managed systems.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhongkui; Wang, Enli; Smith, Chris

    2015-10-01

    The amount of fresh carbon input into soil is experiencing substantial changes under global change. It is unclear what will be the consequences of such input changes on native soil carbon decomposition across ecosystems. By synthesizing data from 143 experimental comparisons, we show that, on average, fresh carbon input stimulates soil carbon decomposition by 14%. The response was lower in forest soils (1%) compared with soils from other ecosystems (> 24%), and higher following inputs of plant residue-like substrates (31%) compared to root exudate-like substrates (9%). The responses decrease with the baseline soil carbon decomposition rate under no additional carbon input, but increase with the fresh carbon input rate. The rates of these changes vary significantly across ecosystems and with the carbon substrates being added. These findings can be applied to provide robust estimates of soil carbon balance across ecosystems under changing aboveground and belowground inputs as consequence of climate and land management changes. PMID:26649400

  8. Statistical identification of effective input variables. [SCREEN

    SciTech Connect

    Vaurio, J.K.

    1982-09-01

    A statistical sensitivity analysis procedure has been developed for ranking the input data of large computer codes in the order of sensitivity-importance. The method is economical for large codes with many input variables, since it uses a relatively small number of computer runs. No prior judgemental elimination of input variables is needed. The sceening method is based on stagewise correlation and extensive regression analysis of output values calculated with selected input value combinations. The regression process deals with multivariate nonlinear functions, and statistical tests are also available for identifying input variables that contribute to threshold effects, i.e., discontinuities in the output variables. A computer code SCREEN has been developed for implementing the screening techniques. The efficiency has been demonstrated by several examples and applied to a fast reactor safety analysis code (Venus-II). However, the methods and the coding are general and not limited to such applications.

  9. Challenges in Cultivating EOSDIS User Survey Participation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boquist, C. L.; Sofinowski, E. J.; Walter, S.

    2011-12-01

    Since 2004 NASA has surveyed users of its Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) to determine user satisfaction with its services. The surveys have been conducted by CFI Group under contract with the Federal Consulting Group, Executive Agent in government for the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI). The purpose of these annual surveys is to help EOSDIS and the data centers assess current status and improve future services. The survey questions include demographic and experiential questions in addition to the ACSI and EOSDIS specific rating questions. In addition to customer satisfaction, analysis of each year's results has provided insight into the survey process. Although specific questions have been added, modified, or deleted to reflect changes to the EOSDIS system and processes, the model rating questions have remained the same to ensure consistency for evaluating cross year trends. Working with the CFI Group, we have refined the invitation and questions to increase clarity and address the different ways diverse groups of users access services at EOSDIS data centers. We present challenges in preparing a single set of questions that go to users with backgrounds in many Earth science disciplines. These users may have contacted any of the 12 EOSDIS data centers for information or may have accessed data or data products from many kinds of aircraft and satellite instruments. We discuss lessons learned in preparing the invitation and survey questions and the steps taken to make the survey easier to complete and to encourage increased participation.

  10. LOGSIM user's manual. [Logic Simulation Program for computer aided design of logic circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. L.; Taylor, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    The user's manual for the LOGSIM Program is presented. All program options are explained and a detailed definition of the format of each input card is given. LOGSIM Program operations, and the preparation of LOGSIM input data are discused along with data card formats, postprocessor data cards, and output interpretation.

  11. TMAP4 User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Longhurst, G.R.; Holland, D.F.; Jones, J.L.; Merrill, B.J.

    1992-06-12

    The Tritium Migration Analysis Program, Version 4 (TMAP4) has been developed by the Fusion Safety Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) as a safety analysis code, mainly to analyze tritium retention and loss in fusion reactor structures and systems during normal operation and accident conditions. TMAP4 incorporates one-dimensional thermal- and mass-diffusive transport and trapping calculations through structures and zero dimensional fluid transport between enclosures and across the interface between enclosures and structures. A key feature is the ability to input problem definition parameters as constants, interpolation tables, or FORTRAN equations. The code is specifically intended for use under a DOS operating system on PC-type mini-computers, but it has also been run successfully on workstations and mainframe computer systems. Use of the equation-input feature requires access to a FORTRAN-77 compiler and a linker program.

  12. 77 FR 10480 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Survey of Hawaii Resident Resource Users...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... Hawaii Resident Resource Users' Knowledge, Attitudes and Perceptions of Coral Reefs in Two Hawaii... purpose of this survey is to identify resident users' knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions regarding..., and perceptions will supplement broader public input into the conservation planning processes at...

  13. INDUSTRIAL COMBUSTION EMISSIONS (ICE) MODEL, VERSION 6.0. USER'S MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a user's manual for the Industrial Combustion Emissions (ICE) model. It summarizes user options and software characteristics, and describes both the input data files and procedures for operating the model. It discusses proper formatting of files and creation of job ...

  14. Spherical roller bearing analysis. SKF computer program SPHERBEAN. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleckner, R. J.; Dyba, G. J.

    1980-01-01

    The user's guide for the SPHERBEAN computer program for prediction of the thermomechanical performance characteristics of high speed lubricated double row spherical roller bearings is presented. The material presented is structured to guide the user in the practical and correct implementation of SPHERBEAN. Input and output, guidelines for program use, and sample executions are detailed.

  15. User's manual for the Automated Paneling Technique (APT) and the Wing Body Aerodynamic Technique (WABAT) programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studwell, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    User instructions for the Tektronix Graphics Package of the Automated Paneling Technique (APT) and the Wing and Body Aerodynamic Technique (WABAT) Programs are provided. Responses to plot package messages which the user must make to activate plot package operations and options are described. Modifications to the APT and WABAT input run streams, to affect the graphic interface, are also covered.

  16. Outside users payload model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The outside users payload model which is a continuation of documents and replaces and supersedes the July 1984 edition is presented. The time period covered by this model is 1985 through 2000. The following sections are included: (1) definition of the scope of the model; (2) discussion of the methodology used; (3) overview of total demand; (4) summary of the estimated market segmentation by launch vehicle; (5) summary of the estimated market segmentation by user type; (6) details of the STS market forecast; (7) summary of transponder trends; (8) model overview by mission category; and (9) detailed mission models. All known non-NASA, non-DOD reimbursable payloads forecast to be flown by non-Soviet-block countries are included in this model with the exception of Spacelab payloads and small self contained payloads. Certain DOD-sponsored or cosponsored payloads are included if they are reimbursable launches.

  17. CSTEM User Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartle, M.; McKnight, R. L.

    2000-01-01

    This manual is a combination of a user manual, theory manual, and programmer manual. The reader is assumed to have some previous exposure to the finite element method. This manual is written with the idea that the CSTEM (Coupled Structural Thermal Electromagnetic-Computer Code) user needs to have a basic understanding of what the code is actually doing in order to properly use the code. For that reason, the underlying theory and methods used in the code are described to a basic level of detail. The manual gives an overview of the CSTEM code: how the code came into existence, a basic description of what the code does, and the order in which it happens (a flowchart). Appendices provide a listing and very brief description of every file used by the CSTEM code, including the type of file it is, what routine regularly accesses the file, and what routine opens the file, as well as special features included in CSTEM.

  18. Trilinos users guide.

    SciTech Connect

    Willenbring, James M.; Heroux, Michael Allen

    2003-08-01

    The Trilinos Project is an effort to facilitate the design, development, integration and ongoing support of mathematical software libraries. A new software capability is introduced into Trilinos as a package. A Trilinos package is an integral unit usually developed by a small team of experts in a particular algorithms area such as algebraic preconditioners, nonlinear solvers, etc. The Trilinos Users Guide is a resource for new and existing Trilinos users. Topics covered include how to configure and build Trilinos, what is required to integrate an existing package into Trilinos and examples of how those requirements can be met, as well as what tools and services are available to Trilinos packages. Also discussed are some common practices that are followed by many Trilinos package developers. Finally, a snapshot of current Trilinos packages and their interoperability status is provided, along with a list of supported computer platforms.

  19. Some computer graphical user interfaces in radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chow, James C L

    2016-01-01

    In this review, five graphical user interfaces (GUIs) used in radiation therapy practices and researches are introduced. They are: (1) the treatment time calculator, superficial X-ray treatment time calculator (SUPCALC) used in the superficial X-ray radiation therapy; (2) the monitor unit calculator, electron monitor unit calculator (EMUC) used in the electron radiation therapy; (3) the multileaf collimator machine file creator, sliding window intensity modulated radiotherapy (SWIMRT) used in generating fluence map for research and quality assurance in intensity modulated radiation therapy; (4) the treatment planning system, DOSCTP used in the calculation of 3D dose distribution using Monte Carlo simulation; and (5) the monitor unit calculator, photon beam monitor unit calculator (PMUC) used in photon beam radiation therapy. One common issue of these GUIs is that all user-friendly interfaces are linked to complex formulas and algorithms based on various theories, which do not have to be understood and noted by the user. In that case, user only needs to input the required information with help from graphical elements in order to produce desired results. SUPCALC is a superficial radiation treatment time calculator using the GUI technique to provide a convenient way for radiation therapist to calculate the treatment time, and keep a record for the skin cancer patient. EMUC is an electron monitor unit calculator for electron radiation therapy. Instead of doing hand calculation according to pre-determined dosimetric tables, clinical user needs only to input the required drawing of electron field in computer graphical file format, prescription dose, and beam parameters to EMUC to calculate the required monitor unit for the electron beam treatment. EMUC is based on a semi-experimental theory of sector-integration algorithm. SWIMRT is a multileaf collimator machine file creator to generate a fluence map produced by a medical linear accelerator. This machine file controls

  20. Some computer graphical user interfaces in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Chow, James C L

    2016-03-28

    In this review, five graphical user interfaces (GUIs) used in radiation therapy practices and researches are introduced. They are: (1) the treatment time calculator, superficial X-ray treatment time calculator (SUPCALC) used in the superficial X-ray radiation therapy; (2) the monitor unit calculator, electron monitor unit calculator (EMUC) used in the electron radiation therapy; (3) the multileaf collimator machine file creator, sliding window intensity modulated radiotherapy (SWIMRT) used in generating fluence map for research and quality assurance in intensity modulated radiation therapy; (4) the treatment planning system, DOSCTP used in the calculation of 3D dose distribution using Monte Carlo simulation; and (5) the monitor unit calculator, photon beam monitor unit calculator (PMUC) used in photon beam radiation therapy. One common issue of these GUIs is that all user-friendly interfaces are linked to complex formulas and algorithms based on various theories, which do not have to be understood and noted by the user. In that case, user only needs to input the required information with help from graphical elements in order to produce desired results. SUPCALC is a superficial radiation treatment time calculator using the GUI technique to provide a convenient way for radiation therapist to calculate the treatment time, and keep a record for the skin cancer patient. EMUC is an electron monitor unit calculator for electron radiation therapy. Instead of doing hand calculation according to pre-determined dosimetric tables, clinical user needs only to input the required drawing of electron field in computer graphical file format, prescription dose, and beam parameters to EMUC to calculate the required monitor unit for the electron beam treatment. EMUC is based on a semi-experimental theory of sector-integration algorithm. SWIMRT is a multileaf collimator machine file creator to generate a fluence map produced by a medical linear accelerator. This machine file controls

  1. Magnetic tape user guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, A. B.; Lee, L. L.

    1985-01-01

    This User Guide provides a general introduction to the structure, use, and handling of magnetic tapes at Langley Research Center (LaRC). The topics covered are tape terminology, physical characteristics, error prevention and detection, and creating, using, and maintaining tapes. Supplementary documentation is referenced where it might be helpful. The documentation is included for the tape utility programs, BLOCK, UNBLOCK, and TAPEDMP, which are available at the Central Scientific Computing Complex at LaRC.

  2. IAC user manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.; Beste, D. L.; Gregg, J.

    1984-01-01

    The User Manual for the Integrated Analysis Capability (IAC) Level 1 system is presented. The IAC system currently supports the thermal, structures, controls and system dynamics technologies, and its development is influenced by the requirements for design/analysis of large space systems. The system has many features which make it applicable to general problems in engineering, and to management of data and software. Information includes basic IAC operation, executive commands, modules, solution paths, data organization and storage, IAC utilities, and module implementation.

  3. PISCES 2 users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, Terrence W.

    1987-01-01

    PISCES 2 is a programming environment and set of extensions to Fortran 77 for parallel programming. It is intended to provide a basis for writing programs for scientific and engineering applications on parallel computers in a way that is relatively independent of the particular details of the underlying computer architecture. This user's manual provides a complete description of the PISCES 2 system as it is currently implemented on the 20 processor Flexible FLEX/32 at NASA Langley Research Center.

  4. Health status of ayahuasca users.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Paulo Cesar Ribeiro; Mizumoto, Suely; Bogenschutz, Michael P; Strassman, Rick J

    2012-01-01

    Ayahuasca is a psychedelic brew originally used for magico-religious purposes by Amerindian populations of the western Amazon Basin. Throughout the last four decades, the use of ayahuasca spread towards major cities in all regions of Brazil and abroad. This trend has raised concerns that regular use of this N,N-dimethyltryptamine- and harmala-alkaloid-containing tea may lead to mental and physical health problems associated typically with drug abuse. To further elucidate the mental and physical health of ayahuasca users, we conducted a literature search in the international medical PubMed database. Inclusion criteria were evaluation of any related effect of ayahuasca use that occurred after the resolution of acute effects of the brew. Fifteen publications were related to emotional, cognitive, and physical health of ayahuasca users. The accumulated data suggest that ayahuasca use is safe and may even be, under certain conditions, beneficial. However, methodological bias of the reviewed studies might have contributed to the preponderance of beneficial effects and to the few adverse effects reported. The data up to now do not appear to allow for definitive conclusions to be drawn on the effects of ayahuasca use on mental and physical health, but some studies point in the direction of beneficial effects. Additional studies are suggested to provide further clarification. PMID:22761152

  5. Can Simulation Credibility Be Improved Using Sensitivity Analysis to Understand Input Data Effects on Model Outcome?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Jerry G.; Young, M.; Goodenow, Debra A.; Keenan, A.; Walton, M.; Boley, L.

    2015-01-01

    Model and simulation (MS) credibility is defined as, the quality to elicit belief or trust in MS results. NASA-STD-7009 [1] delineates eight components (Verification, Validation, Input Pedigree, Results Uncertainty, Results Robustness, Use History, MS Management, People Qualifications) that address quantifying model credibility, and provides guidance to the model developers, analysts, and end users for assessing the MS credibility. Of the eight characteristics, input pedigree, or the quality of the data used to develop model input parameters, governing functions, or initial conditions, can vary significantly. These data quality differences have varying consequences across the range of MS application. NASA-STD-7009 requires that the lowest input data quality be used to represent the entire set of input data when scoring the input pedigree credibility of the model. This requirement provides a conservative assessment of model inputs, and maximizes the communication of the potential level of risk of using model outputs. Unfortunately, in practice, this may result in overly pessimistic communication of the MS output, undermining the credibility of simulation predictions to decision makers. This presentation proposes an alternative assessment mechanism, utilizing results parameter robustness, also known as model input sensitivity, to improve the credibility scoring process for specific simulations.

  6. AVRAM user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    McGrady, P.W.

    1988-02-01

    This document details the use of the reliability code for the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) project. This code was designed by Tom Anklam and John Harris. In late 1984 Patrick McGrady and Elena Koontz of C and TD/TA were assigned the task of improving the code and converting it for use on the DEC-10 system. In early 1986, Patric McGrady converted it to the CRAY. The AVRAM code is divided into distinct parts (often referred to as programs in this document). There is a COSMOS file that controls the execution of the FORTRAN code and controls the naming of output datasets and the deletion of temporary datasets created by the code. The FORTRAN code consists of a main program as a driver and of three main subroutines: EDIT, PARAM, and AVRAM. The EDIT program allows the user to create a new user defined system or add to an existing system or to change certain parameters. The PARAM program allows the user to alter system parameters and to select options such as economics run, criticality analysis or sensitivity studies. The AVRAM program does a reliability analysis of the system.

  7. Staradmin -- Starlink User Database Maintainer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fish, Adrian

    The subject of this SSN is a utility called STARADMIN. This utility allows the system administrator to build and maintain a Starlink User Database (UDB). The principal source of information for each user is a text file, named after their username. The content of each file is a list consisting of one keyword followed by the relevant user data per line. These user database files reside in a single directory. The STARADMIN program is used to manipulate these user data files and automatically generate user summary lists.

  8. Measuring Input Thresholds on an Existing Board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuperman, Igor; Gutrich, Daniel G.; Berkun, Andrew C.

    2011-01-01

    A critical PECL (positive emitter-coupled logic) interface to Xilinx interface needed to be changed on an existing flight board. The new Xilinx input interface used a CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) type of input, and the driver could meet its thresholds typically, but not in worst-case, according to the data sheet. The previous interface had been based on comparison with an external reference, but the CMOS input is based on comparison with an internal divider from the power supply. A way to measure what the exact input threshold was for this device for 64 inputs on a flight board was needed. The measurement technique allowed an accurate measurement of the voltage required to switch a Xilinx input from high to low for each of the 64 lines, while only probing two of them. Directly driving an external voltage was considered too risky, and tests done on any other unit could not be used to qualify the flight board. The two lines directly probed gave an absolute voltage threshold calibration, while data collected on the remaining 62 lines without probing gave relative measurements that could be used to identify any outliers. The PECL interface was forced to a long-period square wave by driving a saturated square wave into the ADC (analog to digital converter). The active pull-down circuit was turned off, causing each line to rise rapidly and fall slowly according to the input s weak pull-down circuitry. The fall time shows up as a change in the pulse width of the signal ready by the Xilinx. This change in pulse width is a function of capacitance, pulldown current, and input threshold. Capacitance was known from the different trace lengths, plus a gate input capacitance, which is the same for all inputs. The pull-down current is the same for all inputs including the two that are probed directly. The data was combined, and the Excel solver tool was used to find input thresholds for the 62 lines. This was repeated over different supply voltages and

  9. RAVEN User Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Mandelli, Diego; Rabiti, Cristian; Cogliati, Joshua Joseph; Kinoshita, Robert Arthur; Alfonsi, Andrea; Sen, Ramazan Sonat

    2015-10-01

    RAVEN is a generic software framework to perform parametric and probabilistic analysis based on the response of complex system codes. The initial development was aimed to provide dynamic risk analysis capabilities to the Thermo-Hydraulic code RELAP-7, currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Although the initial goal has been fully accomplished, RAVEN is now a multi-purpose probabilistic and uncertainty quantification platform, capable to agnostically communicate with any system code. This agnosticism includes providing Application Programming Interfaces (APIs). These APIs are used to allow RAVEN to interact with any code as long as all the parameters that need to be perturbed are accessible by inputs files or via python interfaces. RAVEN is capable of investigating the system response, and investigating the input space using Monte Carlo, Grid, or Latin Hyper Cube sampling schemes, but its strength is focused toward system feature discovery, such as limit surfaces, separating regions of the input space leading to system failure, using dynamic supervised learning techniques. The development of RAVEN has started in 2012, when, within the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program, the need to provide a modern risk evaluation framework became stronger. RAVEN principal assignment is to provide the necessary software and algorithms in order to employ the concept developed by the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) program. RISMC is one of the pathways defined within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program. In the RISMC approach, the goal is not just the individuation of the frequency of an event potentially leading to a system failure, but the closeness (or not) to key safety-related events. Hence, the approach is interested in identifying and increasing the safety margins related to those events. A safety margin is a numerical value quantifying the probability that a safety metric (e.g. for

  10. Wake Vortex Inverse Model User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, David; Delisi, Donald

    2008-01-01

    NorthWest Research Associates (NWRA) has developed an inverse model for inverting landing aircraft vortex data. The data used for the inversion are the time evolution of the lateral transport position and vertical position of both the port and starboard vortices. The inverse model performs iterative forward model runs using various estimates of vortex parameters, vertical crosswind profiles, and vortex circulation as a function of wake age. Forward model predictions of lateral transport and altitude are then compared with the observed data. Differences between the data and model predictions guide the choice of vortex parameter values, crosswind profile and circulation evolution in the next iteration. Iterations are performed until a user-defined criterion is satisfied. Currently, the inverse model is set to stop when the improvement in the rms deviation between the data and model predictions is less than 1 percent for two consecutive iterations. The forward model used in this inverse model is a modified version of the Shear-APA model. A detailed description of this forward model, the inverse model, and its validation are presented in a different report (Lai, Mellman, Robins, and Delisi, 2007). This document is a User's Guide for the Wake Vortex Inverse Model. Section 2 presents an overview of the inverse model program. Execution of the inverse model is described in Section 3. When executing the inverse model, a user is requested to provide the name of an input file which contains the inverse model parameters, the various datasets, and directories needed for the inversion. A detailed description of the list of parameters in the inversion input file is presented in Section 4. A user has an option to save the inversion results of each lidar track in a mat-file (a condensed data file in Matlab format). These saved mat-files can be used for post-inversion analysis. A description of the contents of the saved files is given in Section 5. An example of an inversion input

  11. Users manual for updated computer code for axial-flow compressor conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, Arthur J.

    1992-01-01

    An existing computer code that determines the flow path for an axial-flow compressor either for a given number of stages or for a given overall pressure ratio was modified for use in air-breathing engine conceptual design studies. This code uses a rapid approximate design methodology that is based on isentropic simple radial equilibrium. Calculations are performed at constant-span-fraction locations from tip to hub. Energy addition per stage is controlled by specifying the maximum allowable values for several aerodynamic design parameters. New modeling was introduced to the code to overcome perceived limitations. Specific changes included variable rather than constant tip radius, flow path inclination added to the continuity equation, input of mass flow rate directly rather than indirectly as inlet axial velocity, solution for the exact value of overall pressure ratio rather than for any value that met or exceeded it, and internal computation of efficiency rather than the use of input values. The modified code was shown to be capable of computing efficiencies that are compatible with those of five multistage compressors and one fan that were tested experimentally. This report serves as a users manual for the revised code, Compressor Spanline Analysis (CSPAN). The modeling modifications, including two internal loss correlations, are presented. Program input and output are described. A sample case for a multistage compressor is included.

  12. Performance Analysis of Motion-Sensor Behavior for User Authentication on Smartphones

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chao; Yu, Tianwen; Yuan, Sheng; Li, Yunpeng; Guan, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    The growing trend of using smartphones as personal computing platforms to access and store private information has stressed the demand for secure and usable authentication mechanisms. This paper investigates the feasibility and applicability of using motion-sensor behavior data for user authentication on smartphones. For each sample of the passcode, sensory data from motion sensors are analyzed to extract descriptive and intensive features for accurate and fine-grained characterization of users’ passcode-input actions. One-class learning methods are applied to the feature space for performing user authentication. Analyses are conducted using data from 48 participants with 129,621 passcode samples across various operational scenarios and different types of smartphones. Extensive experiments are included to examine the efficacy of the proposed approach, which achieves a false-rejection rate of 6.85% and a false-acceptance rate of 5.01%. Additional experiments on usability with respect to passcode length, sensitivity with respect to training sample size, scalability with respect to number of users, and flexibility with respect to screen size were provided to further explore the effectiveness and practicability. The results suggest that sensory data could provide useful authentication information, and this level of performance approaches sufficiency for two-factor authentication on smartphones. Our dataset is publicly available to facilitate future research. PMID:27005626

  13. The HEASARC graphical user interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, N.; Barrett, P.; Jacobs, P.; Oneel, B.

    1992-01-01

    An OSF/Motif-based graphical user interface has been developed to facilitate the use of the database and data analysis software packages available from the High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC). It can also be used as an interface to other, similar, routines. A small number of tables are constructed to specify the possible commands and command parameters for a given set of analysis routines. These tables can be modified by a designer to affect the appearance of the interface screens. They can also be dynamically changed in response to parameter adjustments made while the underlying program is running. Additionally, a communication protocol has been designed so that the interface can operate locally or across a network. It is intended that this software be able to run on a variety of workstations and X terminals.

  14. User-Centered Indexing for Adaptive Information Access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, James R.; Mathe, Nathalie

    1996-01-01

    We are focusing on information access tasks characterized by large volume of hypermedia connected technical documents, a need for rapid and effective access to familiar information, and long-term interaction with evolving information. The problem for technical users is to build and maintain a personalized task-oriented model of the information to quickly access relevant information. We propose a solution which provides user-centered adaptive information retrieval and navigation. This solution supports users in customizing information access over time. It is complementary to information discovery methods which provide access to new information, since it lets users customize future access to previously found information. It relies on a technique, called Adaptive Relevance Network, which creates and maintains a complex indexing structure to represent personal user's information access maps organized by concepts. This technique is integrated within the Adaptive HyperMan system, which helps NASA Space Shuttle flight controllers organize and access large amount of information. It allows users to select and mark any part of a document as interesting, and to index that part with user-defined concepts. Users can then do subsequent retrieval of marked portions of documents. This functionality allows users to define and access personal collections of information, which are dynamically computed. The system also supports collaborative review by letting users share group access maps. The adaptive relevance network provides long-term adaptation based both on usage and on explicit user input. The indexing structure is dynamic and evolves over time. Leading and generalization support flexible retrieval of information under similar concepts. The network is geared towards more recent information access, and automatically manages its size in order to maintain rapid access when scaling up to large hypermedia space. We present results of simulated learning experiments.

  15. Managing End User Computing for Users with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Services Administration, Washington, DC. Clearinghouse on Computer Accommodation.

    This handbook presents guidelines to assist federal Information Resources Managers in applying computer and related information technology to accommodate users with disabilities. It discusses managing the end user environment, assessing accommodation requirements, and providing end user tools and support. The major portion of the document consists…

  16. A novel feedforward compensation canceling input filter-regulator interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelkar, S. S.; Lee, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    The interaction between the input and the control loop of switching regulators often results in deterimental effects, such as loop instability, degradation of transient response, and audiosusceptibility, etc. The concept of pole-zero cancelation is employed to mitigate some of these detrimental effects and is implemented using a novel feedforward loop, in addition to existing feedback loops of a buck regulator. Experimental results are presented which show excellent correlation with theory.

  17. Optical input impedance of nanostrip antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ivan; Du, Ya-ping

    2012-05-01

    We conduct an investigation into optical nanoantennas in the form of a strip dipole made from aluminum. With the finite-difference time domain simulation both optical input impedance and radiation efficiency of nanostrip antennas are addressed. An equivalent circuit is presented as well for the nanostrip antennas at optical resonances. The optical input resistance can be adjusted by varying the geometric parameters of antenna strips. By changing both strip area and strip length simultaneously, optical input resistance can be adjusted for matching impedance with an external feeding or loading circuit. It is found that the optical radiation efficiency does not change significantly when the size of a nanostrip antenna varies moderately.

  18. Wireless, relative-motion computer input device

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.; Rosenbury, Erwin T.

    2004-05-18

    The present invention provides a system for controlling a computer display in a workspace using an input unit/output unit. A train of EM waves are sent out to flood the workspace. EM waves are reflected from the input unit/output unit. A relative distance moved information signal is created using the EM waves that are reflected from the input unit/output unit. Algorithms are used to convert the relative distance moved information signal to a display signal. The computer display is controlled in response to the display signal.

  19. The Linguistic Landscape as an Additional Source of Input in Second Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cenoz, Jasone; Gorter, Durk

    2008-01-01

    In this article we explore the role that the linguistic landscape, in the sense of all the written language in the public space, can have in second language acquisition (SLA). The linguistic landscape has symbolic and informative functions and it is multimodal, because it combines visual and printed texts, and multilingual, because it uses several…

  20. An investigation of the performance of novel chorded keyboards in combination with pointing input devices.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wen-Zhou; Wu, Fong-Gong

    2015-01-01

    Rapid advances in computing power have driven the development of smaller and lighter technology products, with novel input devices constantly being produced in response to new user behaviors and usage contexts. The aim of this research was to investigate the feasibility of operating chorded keyboard control modules in concert with pointing devices such as styluses and mice. We compared combinations of two novel chorded keyboards with different pointing devices in hopes of finding a better combination for future electronic products. Twelve participants were recruited for simulation testing, and paired sample t testing was conducted to determine whether input and error rates for the novel keyboards were improved significantly over those of traditional input methods. The most efficient input device combination tested was the combination of a novel cross-shaped key keyboard and a stylus, suggesting the high potential for use of this combination with future mobile IT products. PMID:25064640

  1. Dashboard Visualization for Diverse User Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, A.; Marini, L.; Minsker, B.

    2008-12-01

    As environmental research begins to intersect further with public policy, a diverse community of both technical and non-technical users is becoming engaged in the process of scientific analysis. These new communities of users, broadly defined as stakeholders, necessitate scientific visualizations consisting of simplified key indicators of environmental status, with the ability to delve into the indicators more deeply if desired. In order to indicate environmental status, a component of change should be integrated, suggesting automatically updating indicators - essentially a real-time visualization. Another key component is that the information be available at-a-glance, with minimal interaction between the visualization and the stakeholder. Lastly, these visualizations need to be readily accessible to stakeholders with diverse levels of software expertise. A new dashboard visualization is introduced which aims to fulfill these requirements of this newly broadened research community. This dashboard consists of four distinct views which show real-time and historical data for an entire environmental system, coupled with methods for filtering the information for extreme values or particular locations. The dashboard accepts input based on the Really Simple Syndication (RSS) standard and standard text files. This input is generated utilizing a custom library for analysis and querying of the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science (CUAHSI) Web services. The input generation components are automated through the use of Cyberintegrator, developed at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA). The efficacy of this visualization is demonstrated for the WATERS Network testbed in Corpus Christi Bay, Texas, an environmental system which experiences seasonal hypoxia.

  2. H2A Production Model, Version 2 User Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, D.; Ramsden, T.; Zuboy, J.

    2008-09-01

    The H2A Production Model analyzes the technical and economic aspects of central and forecourt hydrogen production technologies. Using a standard discounted cash flow rate of return methodology, it determines the minimum hydrogen selling price, including a specified after-tax internal rate of return from the production technology. Users have the option of accepting default technology input values--such as capital costs, operating costs, and capacity factor--from established H2A production technology cases or entering custom values. Users can also modify the model's financial inputs. This new version of the H2A Production Model features enhanced usability and functionality. Input fields are consolidated and simplified. New capabilities include performing sensitivity analyses and scaling analyses to various plant sizes. This User Guide helps users already familiar with the basic tenets of H2A hydrogen production cost analysis get started using the new version of the model. It introduces the basic elements of the model then describes the function and use of each of its worksheets.

  3. ModelMuse - A Graphical User Interface for MODFLOW-2005 and PHAST

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winston, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    ModelMuse is a graphical user interface (GUI) for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) models MODFLOW-2005 and PHAST. This software package provides a GUI for creating the flow and transport input file for PHAST and the input files for MODFLOW-2005. In ModelMuse, the spatial data for the model is independent of the grid, and the temporal data is independent of the stress periods. Being able to input these data independently allows the user to redefine the spatial and temporal discretization at will. This report describes the basic concepts required to work with ModelMuse. These basic concepts include the model grid, data sets, formulas, objects, the method used to assign values to data sets, and model features. The ModelMuse main window has a top, front, and side view of the model that can be used for editing the model, and a 3-D view of the model that can be used to display properties of the model. ModelMuse has tools to generate and edit the model grid. It also has a variety of interpolation methods and geographic functions that can be used to help define the spatial variability of the model. ModelMuse can be used to execute both MODFLOW-2005 and PHAST and can also display the results of MODFLOW-2005 models. An example of using ModelMuse with MODFLOW-2005 is included in this report. Several additional examples are described in the help system for ModelMuse, which can be accessed from the Help menu.

  4. Self-Organization with Additional Learning Based on Category Mapping and Its Application to Dynamic News Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyota, Tetsuya; Nobuhara, Hajime

    The Internet news are texts which involve from various fields, therefore, when a text data that will show a rapid increase of the number of dimensions of feature vectors of Self-Organizing Map (SOM) is added, these results cannot be reflected to learning. Furthermore, it is difficult for users to recognize the learning results because SOM can not produce any label information by each cluster. In order to solve these problems, we propose SOM with additional learning and dimensional by category mapping which is based on the category structure of Wikipedia. In this method, input vector is generated from each text and the corresponding Wikipedia categories extracted from Wikipedia articles. Input vectors are formed in the common category taking the hierarchical structure of Wikipedia category into consideration. By using the proposed method, the problem of reconfiguration of vector elements caused by dynamic changes in the text can be solved. Moreover, information loss in newly obtained index term can be prevented.

  5. Virtual Beach 3: user's guide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cyterski, Mike; Brooks, Wesley; Galvin, Mike; Wolfe, Kurt; Carvin, Rebecca; Roddick, Tonia; Fienen, Mike; Corsi, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Virtual Beach version 3 (VB3) is a decision support tool that constructs site-specific statistical models to predict fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentrations at recreational beaches. VB3 is primarily designed for beach managers responsible for making decisions regarding beach closures or the issuance of swimming advisories due to pathogen contamination. However, researchers, scientists, engineers, and students interested in studying relationships between water quality indicators and ambient environmental conditions will find VB3 useful. VB3 reads input data from a text file or Excel document, assists the user in preparing the data for analysis, enables automated model selection using a wide array of possible model evaluation criteria, and provides predictions using a chosen model parameterized with new data. With an integrated mapping component to determine the geographic orientation of the beach, the software can automatically decompose wind/current/wave speed and magnitude information into along-shore and onshore/offshore components for use in subsequent analyses. Data can be examined using simple scatter plots to evaluate relationships between the response and independent variables (IVs). VB3 can produce interaction terms between the primary IVs, and it can also test an array of transformations to maximize the linearity of the relationship The software includes search routines for finding the "best" models from an array of possible choices. Automated censoring of statistical models with highly correlated IVs occurs during the selection process. Models can be constructed either using previously collected data or forecasted environmental information. VB3 has residual diagnostics for regression models, including automated outlier identification and removal using DFFITs or Cook's Distances.

  6. Advanced information processing system: Input/output system services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masotto, Tom; Alger, Linda

    1989-01-01

    The functional requirements and detailed specifications for the Input/Output (I/O) Systems Services of the Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) are discussed. The introductory section is provided to outline the overall architecture and functional requirements of the AIPS system. Section 1.1 gives a brief overview of the AIPS architecture as well as a detailed description of the AIPS fault tolerant network architecture, while section 1.2 provides an introduction to the AIPS systems software. Sections 2 and 3 describe the functional requirements and design and detailed specifications of the I/O User Interface and Communications Management modules of the I/O System Services, respectively. Section 4 illustrates the use of the I/O System Services, while Section 5 concludes with a summary of results and suggestions for future work in this area.

  7. Handling Input and Output for COAMPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzpatrick, Patrick; Tran, Nam; Li, Yongzuo; Anantharaj, Valentine

    2007-01-01

    Two suites of software have been developed to handle the input and output of the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Prediction System (COAMPS), which is a regional atmospheric model developed by the Navy for simulating and predicting weather. Typically, the initial and boundary conditions for COAMPS are provided by a flat-file representation of the Navy s global model. Additional algorithms are needed for running the COAMPS software using global models. One of the present suites satisfies this need for running COAMPS using the Global Forecast System (GFS) model of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The first step in running COAMPS downloading of GFS data from an Internet file-transfer-protocol (FTP) server computer of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) is performed by one of the programs (SSC-00273) in this suite. The GFS data, which are in gridded binary (GRIB) format, are then changed to a COAMPS-compatible format by another program in the suite (SSC-00278). Once a forecast is complete, still another program in the suite (SSC-00274) sends the output data to a different server computer. The second suite of software (SSC- 00275) addresses the need to ingest up-to-date land-use-and-land-cover (LULC) data into COAMPS for use in specifying typical climatological values of such surface parameters as albedo, aerodynamic roughness, and ground wetness. This suite includes (1) a program to process LULC data derived from observations by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments aboard NASA s Terra and Aqua satellites, (2) programs to derive new climatological parameters for the 17-land-use-category MODIS data; and (3) a modified version of a FORTRAN subroutine to be used by COAMPS. The MODIS data files are processed to reformat them into a compressed American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) format used by COAMPS for efficient processing.

  8. User data dissemination concepts for earth resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, R.; Scott, M.; Mitchell, C.; Torbett, A.

    1976-01-01

    Domestic data dissemination networks for earth-resources data in the 1985-1995 time frame were evaluated. The following topics were addressed: (1) earth-resources data sources and expected data volumes, (2) future user demand in terms of data volume and timeliness, (3) space-to-space and earth point-to-point transmission link requirements and implementation, (4) preprocessing requirements and implementation, (5) network costs, and (6) technological development to support this implementation. This study was parametric in that the data input (supply) was varied by a factor of about fifteen while the user request (demand) was varied by a factor of about nineteen. Correspondingly, the time from observation to delivery to the user was varied. This parametric evaluation was performed by a computer simulation that was based on network alternatives and resulted in preliminary transmission and preprocessing requirements. The earth-resource data sources considered were: shuttle sorties, synchronous satellites (e.g., SEOS), aircraft, and satellites in polar orbits.

  9. Frequency dependent precompensation for dominance in a four input/output theme problem model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schafer, R. M.; Sain, M. K.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reports on additional experience in applying the CARDIAD methodology to design of dynamical input compensation to achieve column dominance for linear multivariable models of realistic turbine engine simulations. In particular, the approach has been extended to models having four inputs and four outputs, and successful compensations have been achieved with an investment of about thirty minutes desk time.

  10. Hydrologic database user`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Champman, J.B.; Gray, K.J.; Thompson, C.B.

    1993-09-01

    The Hydrologic Database is an electronic filing cabinet containing water-related data for the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The purpose of the database is to enhance research on hydrologic issues at the NTS by providing efficient access to information gathered by a variety of scientists. Data are often generated for specific projects and are reported to DOE in the context of specific project goals. The originators of the database recognized that much of this information has a general value that transcends project-specific requirements. Allowing researchers access to information generated by a wide variety of projects can prevent needless duplication of data-gathering efforts and can augment new data collection and interpretation. In addition, collecting this information in the database ensures that the results are not lost at the end of discrete projects as long as the database is actively maintained. This document is a guide to using the database.

  11. User friendly joystick

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eklund, Wayne D.; Kerley, James J.

    1992-05-01

    A joystick control device having a lower U-shaped bracket, an upper U-shaped bracket, a handle attached to the upper U-shaped bracket, with the upper U-shaped bracket connected to the lower U-shaped bracket by a compliant joint allowing six degrees of freedom for the joystick. The compliant joint consists of at least one cable segment affixed between the lower U-shaped bracket and the upper U-shaped bracket. At least one input device is located between the lower U-shaped bracket and the upper U-shaped bracket.

  12. STMVOC User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Falta, R.W.; Pruess, K.

    1991-06-01

    This report contains instructions for using the STMVOC numerical simulator. This code, which was developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is an extension of the TOUGH geothermal code for use in problems involving subsurface contamination by nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). The code is used for modeling the nonisothermal transport of air, water, and an organic chemical in three fluid phases. A discussion of the physical processes included in the simulator is given along with a brief outline of the mathematical formulation. A detailed guide to preparing the STMVOC input file with several illustrative examples is provided. 22 refs., 27 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. TOUGH User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.

    1987-08-01

    This document contains a technical description of the TOUGH computer program, which was developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for simulating the coupled transport of water, vapor, air and heat in porous and fractured media. The physical processes taken into account in TOUGH are discussed, and the governing equations actually solved by the simulator are stated in full detail. A brief overview is given of the mathematical and numerical methods, and the code architecture. The report provides detailed instructions for preparing input decks. Code applications are illustrated by means of six sample problems.

  14. Prism users guide.

    SciTech Connect

    Weirs, V. Gregory

    2012-03-01

    Prism is a ParaView plugin that simultaneously displays simulation data and material model data. This document describes its capabilities and how to use them. A demonstration of Prism is given in the first section. The second section contains more detailed notes on less obvious behavior. The third and fourth sections are specifically for Alegra and CTH users. They tell how to generate the simulation data and SESAME files and how to handle aspects of Prism use particular to each of these codes.

  15. User Program Performance Monitor

    1983-09-30

    PROGLOOK makes it possible to monitor the execution of virtually any OS/MVT or OS/VS2 Release 1.6 load module. The main reason for using PROGLOOK is to find out which portions of a code use most of the CPU time so that those parts of the program can be rewritten to reduce CPU time. For large production programs, users have typically found it possible to reduce CPU time by 10 to 30 percent without changing themore » program''s function.« less

  16. User interface concerns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redhed, D. D.

    1978-01-01

    Three possible goals for the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility (NASF) are: (1) a computational fluid dynamics (as opposed to aerodynamics) algorithm development tool; (2) a specialized research laboratory facility for nearly intractable aerodynamics problems that industry encounters; and (3) a facility for industry to use in its normal aerodynamics design work that requires high computing rates. The central system issue for industry use of such a computer is the quality of the user interface as implemented in some kind of a front end to the vector processor.

  17. XTV users guide

    SciTech Connect

    Dearing, J.F.; Johns, R.C.

    1996-09-01

    XTV is an X-Windows based Graphical User Interface for viewing results of Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) calculations. It provides static and animated color mapped visualizations of both thermal-hydraulic and heat conduction components in a TRAC model of a nuclear power plant, as well as both on-screen and hard copy two-dimensional plot capabilities. XTV is the successor to TRAP, the former TRAC postprocessor using the proprietary DISSPLA graphics library. This manual describes Version 2.0, which requires TRAC version 5.4.20 or later for full visualization capabilities.

  18. XMGR5 users manual

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.R.; Fisher, J.E.

    1997-03-01

    ACE/gr is XY plotting tool for workstations or X-terminals using X. A few of its features are: User defined scaling, tick marks, labels, symbols, line styles, colors. Batch mode for unattended plotting. Read and write parameters used during a session. Polynomial regression, splines, running averages, DFT/FFT, cross/auto-correlation. Hardcopy support for PostScript, HP-GL, and FrameMaker.mif format. While ACE/gr has a convenient point-and-click interface, most parameter settings and operations are available through a command line interface (found in Files/Commands).

  19. EQ3NR: a computer program for geochemical aqueous speciation-solubility calculations. User`s guide and documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Wolery, T.J.

    1983-04-18

    EQ3NR is a geochemical aqueous speciation-solubility FORTRAN program developed for application with the EQ3/6 software package. The program models the thermodynamic state of an aqueous solution by using a modified Newton-Raphson algorithm to calculate the distribution of aqueous species such as simple ions, ion-pairs, and aqueous complexes. Input to EQ3NR primarily consists of data derived from total analytical concentrations of dissolved components and can also include pH, alkalinity, electrical balance, phase equilibrium (solubility) constraints, and a default value for either Eh, pe, or the logarithm of oxygen fugacity. The program evaluates the degree of disequilibrium for various reactions and computes either the saturation index (SI = log Q/K) or thermodynamic affinity (A = -2.303 RT log Q/K) for minerals. Individual values of Eh, pe, equilibrium oxygen fugacity, and Ah (redox affinity, a new parameter) are computed for aqueous redox couples. Differences in these values define the degree of aqueous redox disequilibrium. EQ3NR can be used alone. It must be used to initialize a reaction-path calculation by EQ6, its companion program. EQ3NR reads a secondary data file, DATAl, created from a primary data file, DATA0, by the data base preprocessor, EQTL. The temperature range for the thermodynamic data in the file is 0 to 300{sup 0}C. Addition or deletion of species or changes in associated thermodynamic data are made by changing only the file. Changes are not made to either EQ3NR or EQTL. Modification or substitution of equilibrium constant values can be selected on the EQ3NR INPUT file by the user at run time. EQ3NR and EQTL were developed for the FTN and CFT FORTRAN languages on the CDC 7600 and Cray-1 computers. Special FORTRAN conventions have been implemented for ease of portability to IBM, UNIVAC, and VAX computers.

  20. Scaling of global input-output networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Sai; Qi, Zhengling; Qu, Shen; Zhu, Ji; Chiu, Anthony S. F.; Jia, Xiaoping; Xu, Ming

    2016-06-01

    Examining scaling patterns of networks can help understand how structural features relate to the behavior of the networks. Input-output networks consist of industries as nodes and inter-industrial exchanges of products as links. Previous studies consider limited measures for node strengths and link weights, and also ignore the impact of dataset choice. We consider a comprehensive set of indicators in this study that are important in economic analysis, and also examine the impact of dataset choice, by studying input-output networks in individual countries and the entire world. Results show that Burr, Log-Logistic, Log-normal, and Weibull distributions can better describe scaling patterns of global input-output networks. We also find that dataset choice has limited impacts on the observed scaling patterns. Our findings can help examine the quality of economic statistics, estimate missing data in economic statistics, and identify key nodes and links in input-output networks to support economic policymaking.

  1. Distributed user services for supercomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sowizral, Henry A.

    1989-01-01

    User-service operations at supercomputer facilities are examined. The question is whether a single, possibly distributed, user-services organization could be shared by NASA's supercomputer sites in support of a diverse, geographically dispersed, user community. A possible structure for such an organization is identified as well as some of the technologies needed in operating such an organization.

  2. Multiple-input experimental modal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allemang, R. J.; Brown, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    The development of experimental modal analysis techniques is reviewed. System and excitation assumptions are discussed. The methods examined include the forced normal mode excitation method, the frequency response function method, the damped complex exponential response method, the Ibrahim time domain approach, the polyreference approach, and mathematical input-output model methods. The current trend toward multiple input utilization in the estimation of system parameters is noted.

  3. A user-system interface agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakim, Nagi T.; Srivastava, Sadanand; Bousaidi, Mehdi; Goh, Gin-Hua

    1995-01-01

    Agent-based technologies answer to several challenges posed by additional information processing requirements in today's computing environments. In particular, (1) users desire interaction with computing devices in a mode which is similar to that used between people, (2) the efficiency and successful completion of information processing tasks often require a high-level of expertise in complex and multiple domains, (3) information processing tasks often require handling of large volumes of data and, therefore, continuous and endless processing activities. The concept of an agent is an attempt to address these new challenges by introducing information processing environments in which (1) users can communicate with a system in a natural way, (2) an agent is a specialist and a self-learner and, therefore, it qualifies to be trusted to perform tasks independent of the human user, and (3) an agent is an entity that is continuously active performing tasks that are either delegated to it or self-imposed. The work described in this paper focuses on the development of an interface agent for users of a complex information processing environment (IPE). This activity is part of an on-going effort to build a model for developing agent-based information systems. Such systems will be highly applicable to environments which require a high degree of automation, such as, flight control operations and/or processing of large volumes of data in complex domains, such as the EOSDIS environment and other multidisciplinary, scientific data systems. The concept of an agent as an information processing entity is fully described with emphasis on characteristics of special interest to the User-System Interface Agent (USIA). Issues such as agent 'existence' and 'qualification' are discussed in this paper. Based on a definition of an agent and its main characteristics, we propose an architecture for the development of interface agents for users of an IPE that is agent-oriented and whose resources

  4. Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator : users' guide, version 2.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, Robert John; Waters, Lon J.; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Fixel, Deborah A.; Russo, Thomas V.; Keiter, Eric Richard; Hutchinson, Scott Alan; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Wix, Steven D.

    2004-06-01

    These input formats include standard analytical models, behavioral models look-up Parallel Electronic Simulator is designed to support a variety of device model inputs. tables, and mesh-level PDE device models. Combined with this flexible interface is an architectural design that greatly simplifies the addition of circuit models. One of the most important feature of Xyce is in providing a platform for computational research and development aimed specifically at the needs of the Laboratory. With Xyce, Sandia now has an 'in-house' capability with which both new electrical (e.g., device model development) and algorithmic (e.g., faster time-integration methods) research and development can be performed. Ultimately, these capabilities are migrated to end users.

  5. Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator - User's Guide, Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    HUTCHINSON, SCOTT A; KEITER, ERIC R.; HOEKSTRA, ROBERT J.; WATERS, LON J.; RUSSO, THOMAS V.; RANKIN, ERIC LAMONT; WIX, STEVEN D.

    2002-11-01

    This manual describes the use of the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator code for simulating electrical circuits at a variety of abstraction levels. The Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator has been written to support,in a rigorous manner, the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. As such, the development has focused on improving the capability over the current state-of-the-art in the following areas: (1) Capability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale parallel computing platforms (up to thousands of processors). Note that this includes support for most popular parallel and serial computers. (2) Improved performance for all numerical kernels (e.g., time integrator, nonlinear and linear solvers) through state-of-the-art algorithms and novel techniques. (3) A client-server or multi-tiered operating model wherein the numerical kernel can operate independently of the graphical user interface (GUI). (4) Object-oriented code design and implementation using modern coding-practices that ensure that the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator will be maintainable and extensible far into the future. The code is a parallel code in the most general sense of the phrase--a message passing parallel implementation--which allows it to run efficiently on the widest possible number of computing platforms. These include serial, shared-memory and distributed-memory parallel as well as heterogeneous platforms. Furthermore, careful attention has been paid to the specific nature of circuit-simulation problems to ensure that optimal parallel efficiency is achieved even as the number of processors grows. Another feature required by designers is the ability to add device models, many specific to the needs of Sandia, to the code. To this end, the device package in the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator is designed to support a variety of device model inputs. These input formats include standard analytical models, behavioral models

  6. Signal delay and input synchronization in passive dendritic structures.

    PubMed

    Agmon-Snir, H; Segev, I

    1993-11-01

    1. A novel approach for analyzing transients in passive structures called "the method of moments" is introduced. It provides, as a special case, an analytic method for calculating the time delay and speed of propagation of electrical signals in any passive dendritic tree without the need for numerical simulations. 2. Total dendritic delay (TD) between two points (y, x) is defined as the difference between the centroid (the center of gravity) of the transient current input, I, at point y[tI(y)] and the centroid of the transient voltage response, V, at point x [tV(x)]. The TD measured at the input points is nonzero and is called the local delay (LD). Propagation delay, PD(y, x), is then defined as TD(y, x)--LD(y) whereas the net dendritic delay, NDD(y, 0), of an input point, y, is defined as TD(y, 0) - LD(0), where 0 is the target point, typically the soma. The signal velocity at a point x0 in the tree, theta(x0), is defined as [1/(dtv(x)/dx)[x = x0. 3. With the use of these definitions, several properties of dendritic delay exist. First, the delay between any two points in a given tree is independent of the properties (shape and duration) of the transient current input. Second, the velocity of the signal at any given point (y) in a given direction from (y) does not depend on the morphology of the tree "behind" the signal, and of the input location. Third, TD(y, x) = TD(x, y), for any two points, x, y. 4. Two additional properties are useful for efficiently calculating delays in arbitrary passive trees. 1) The subtrees connected at the ends of any dendritic segment can each be functionally lumped into an equivalent isopotential R-C compartment. 2) The local delay at any given point (y) in a tree is the mean of the local delays of the separate structures (subtrees) connected at y, weighted by the relative input conductance of the corresponding subtrees. 5. Because the definitions for delays utilize difference between centroids, the local delay and the total delay can

  7. Input/output system for multiprocessors

    SciTech Connect

    Bernick, D.L.; Chan, K.K.; Chan, W.M.; Dan, Y.F.; Hoang, D.M.; Hussain, Z.; Iswandhi, G.I.; Korpi, J.E.; Sanner, M.W.; Zwangerman, J.A.

    1989-04-11

    A device controller is described, comprising: a first port-input/output controller coupled to a first input/output channel bus; and a second port-input/output controlled coupled to a second input/output channel bus; each of the first and second port-input/output controllers having: a first ownership latch means for granting shared ownership of the device controller to a first host processor to provide a first data path on a first I/O channel through the first port I/O controller between the first host processor and any peripheral, and at least a second ownership latch means operative independently of the first ownership latch means for granting shared ownership of the device controller to a second host processor independently of the first port input/output controller to provide a second data path on a second I/O channel through the second port I/O controller between the second host processor and any peripheral devices coupled to the device controller.

  8. Significance of Input Correlations in Striatal Function

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Man Yi; Aertsen, Ad; Kumar, Arvind

    2011-01-01

    The striatum is the main input station of the basal ganglia and is strongly associated with motor and cognitive functions. Anatomical evidence suggests that individual striatal neurons are unlikely to share their inputs from the cortex. Using a biologically realistic large-scale network model of striatum and cortico-striatal projections, we provide a functional interpretation of the special anatomical structure of these projections. Specifically, we show that weak pairwise correlation within the pool of inputs to individual striatal neurons enhances the saliency of signal representation in the striatum. By contrast, correlations among the input pools of different striatal neurons render the signal representation less distinct from background activity. We suggest that for the network architecture of the striatum, there is a preferred cortico-striatal input configuration for optimal signal representation. It is further enhanced by the low-rate asynchronous background activity in striatum, supported by the balance between feedforward and feedback inhibitions in the striatal network. Thus, an appropriate combination of rates and correlations in the striatal input sets the stage for action selection presumably implemented in the basal ganglia. PMID:22125480

  9. Influential input classification in probabilistic multimedia models

    SciTech Connect

    Maddalena, Randy L.; McKone, Thomas E.; Hsieh, Dennis P.H.; Geng, Shu

    1999-05-01

    Monte Carlo analysis is a statistical simulation method that is often used to assess and quantify the outcome variance in complex environmental fate and effects models. Total outcome variance of these models is a function of (1) the uncertainty and/or variability associated with each model input and (2) the sensitivity of the model outcome to changes in the inputs. To propagate variance through a model using Monte Carlo techniques, each variable must be assigned a probability distribution. The validity of these distributions directly influences the accuracy and reliability of the model outcome. To efficiently allocate resources for constructing distributions one should first identify the most influential set of variables in the model. Although existing sensitivity and uncertainty analysis methods can provide a relative ranking of the importance of model inputs, they fail to identify the minimum set of stochastic inputs necessary to sufficiently characterize the outcome variance. In this paper, we describe and demonstrate a novel sensitivity/uncertainty analysis method for assessing the importance of each variable in a multimedia environmental fate model. Our analyses show that for a given scenario, a relatively small number of input variables influence the central tendency of the model and an even smaller set determines the shape of the outcome distribution. For each input, the level of influence depends on the scenario under consideration. This information is useful for developing site specific models and improving our understanding of the processes that have the greatest influence on the variance in outcomes from multimedia models.

  10. High Input Voltage, Silicon Carbide Power Processing Unit Performance Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Karin E.; Pinero, Luis R.; Scheidegger, Robert J.; Aulisio, Michael V.; Gonzalez, Marcelo C.; Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2015-01-01

    A silicon carbide brassboard power processing unit has been developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The power processing unit operates from two sources: a nominal 300 Volt high voltage input bus and a nominal 28 Volt low voltage input bus. The design of the power processing unit includes four low voltage, low power auxiliary supplies, and two parallel 7.5 kilowatt (kW) discharge power supplies that are capable of providing up to 15 kilowatts of total power at 300 to 500 Volts (V) to the thruster. Additionally, the unit contains a housekeeping supply, high voltage input filter, low voltage input filter, and master control board, such that the complete brassboard unit is capable of operating a 12.5 kilowatt Hall effect thruster. The performance of the unit was characterized under both ambient and thermal vacuum test conditions, and the results demonstrate exceptional performance with full power efficiencies exceeding 97%. The unit was also tested with a 12.5kW Hall effect thruster to verify compatibility and output filter specifications. With space-qualified silicon carbide or similar high voltage, high efficiency power devices, this would provide a design solution to address the need for high power electric propulsion systems.

  11. High Input Voltage, Silicon Carbide Power Processing Unit Performance Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Karin E.; Pinero, Luis R.; Scheidegger, Robert J.; Aulisio, Michael V.; Gonzalez, Marcelo C.; Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2015-01-01

    A silicon carbide brassboard power processing unit has been developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The power processing unit operates from two sources - a nominal 300-Volt high voltage input bus and a nominal 28-Volt low voltage input bus. The design of the power processing unit includes four low voltage, low power supplies that provide power to the thruster auxiliary supplies, and two parallel 7.5 kilowatt power supplies that are capable of providing up to 15 kilowatts of total power at 300-Volts to 500-Volts to the thruster discharge supply. Additionally, the unit contains a housekeeping supply, high voltage input filter, low voltage input filter, and master control board, such that the complete brassboard unit is capable of operating a 12.5 kilowatt Hall Effect Thruster. The performance of unit was characterized under both ambient and thermal vacuum test conditions, and the results demonstrate the exceptional performance with full power efficiencies exceeding 97. With a space-qualified silicon carbide or similar high voltage, high efficiency power device, this design could evolve into a flight design for future missions that require high power electric propulsion systems.

  12. The GLAS Science Algorithm Software (GSAS) User's Guide Version 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jeffrey E.

    2013-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) is the primary instrument for the ICESat (Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite) laser altimetry mission. ICESat was the benchmark Earth Observing System (EOS) mission for measuring ice sheet mass balance, cloud and aerosol heights, as well as land topography and vegetation characteristics. From 2003 to 2009, the ICESat mission provided multi-year elevation data needed to determine ice sheet mass balance as well as cloud property information, especially for stratospheric clouds common over polar areas. It also provided topography and vegetation data around the globe, in addition to the polar-specific coverage over the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets.This document is the final version of the GLAS Science Algorithm Software Users Guide document. It contains the instructions to install the GLAS Science Algorithm Software (GSAS) in the production environment that was used to create the standard data products. It also describes the usage of each GSAS program in that environment with their required inputs and outputs. Included are a number of utility programs that are used to create ancillary data files that are used in the processing but generally are not distributed to the public as data products. Of importance is the values for the large number of constants used in the GSAS algorithm during processing are provided in an appendix.

  13. Text entry on handheld computers by older users.

    PubMed

    Wright, P; Bartram, C; Rogers, N; Emslie, H; Evans, J; Wilson, B; Belt, S

    2000-06-01

    Small pocket computers offer great potential in workplaces where mobility is needed to collect data or access reference information while carrying out tasks such as maintenance or customer support. This paper reports on three studies examining the hypothesis that data entry by older workers is easier when the pocket computer has a physical keyboard, albeit a small one, rather than a touch-screen keyboard. Using a counter-balanced, within-subjects design the accuracy and speed with which adults over 55 years of age could make or modify short text entries was measured for both kinds of pocket computer. The keyboard computer was the Hewlett Packard 360LX (HP), but the touch-screen computers varied across studies (experiment 1: Apple Newton and PalmPilot; experiment 2: Philips Nino; experiment 3: Casio E10). All studies showed significant decrements in accuracy and speed when entering text via the touch-screen. Across studies, most participants preferred using the HP's small physical keyboard. Even after additional practice with the touch screen (experiments 2 and 3) many entries still contained errors. Experiment 3 showed that younger people were faster but not more accurate than older people at using the touch-screen keyboard. It is concluded that satisfactory text entry on palm-size computers awaits improvements to the touch-screen keyboard or alternative input methods such as handwriting or voice. Interface developments that assist older people typically benefit younger users too. PMID:10902881

  14. UAL USER GUIDE.

    SciTech Connect

    MALITSKY,N.; TALMAN,R.

    2003-01-09

    The Unified Accelerator Libraries (UAL) provide a modularized environment for applying diverse accelerator simulation codes. Development of UAL is strongly prejudiced toward1 importing existing codes rather than developing new ones. This guide provides instructions for using this environment. This includes instructions for acquiring and building the codes, then for launching and interpreting some of the examples included with the distribution. In some cases the examples are general enough to be applied to different accelerators by mimicking input files and input parameters. The intention is to provide just enough computer language discussion (C++ and Perl) to support the use and understanding of the examples and to help the reader gain a general understanding of the overall architecture. Otherwise the manual is ''documentation by example.'' Except for an appendix concerning maps, discussion of physics is limited to comments accompanying the numerous code examples. Importation of codes into UAL is an ongoing enterprise and when a code is said to have been Imported it does not necessarily mean that all features are supported. Other than this, the original documentation remains applicable (and is not duplicated here.)

  15. Electronic Commerce user manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-10

    This User Manual supports the Electronic Commerce Standard System. The Electronic Commerce Standard System is being developed for the Department of Defense of the Technology Information Systems Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy. The Electronic Commerce Standard System, or EC as it is known, provides the capability for organizations to conduct business electronically instead of through paper transactions. Electronic Commerce and Computer Aided Acquisition and Logistics Support, are two major projects under the DoD`s Corporate Information Management program, whose objective is to make DoD business transactions faster and less costly by using computer networks instead of paper forms and postage. EC runs on computers that use the UNIX operating system and provides a standard set of applications and tools that are bound together by a common command and menu system. These applications and tools may vary according to the requirements of the customer or location and may be customized to meet the specific needs of an organization. Local applications can be integrated into the menu system under the Special Databases & Applications option on the EC main menu. These local applications will be documented in the appendices of this manual. This integration capability provides users with a common environment of standard and customized applications.

  16. Electronic Commerce user manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-10

    This User Manual supports the Electronic Commerce Standard System. The Electronic Commerce Standard System is being developed for the Department of Defense of the Technology Information Systems Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy. The Electronic Commerce Standard System, or EC as it is known, provides the capability for organizations to conduct business electronically instead of through paper transactions. Electronic Commerce and Computer Aided Acquisition and Logistics Support, are two major projects under the DoD's Corporate Information Management program, whose objective is to make DoD business transactions faster and less costly by using computer networks instead of paper forms and postage. EC runs on computers that use the UNIX operating system and provides a standard set of applications and tools that are bound together by a common command and menu system. These applications and tools may vary according to the requirements of the customer or location and may be customized to meet the specific needs of an organization. Local applications can be integrated into the menu system under the Special Databases Applications option on the EC main menu. These local applications will be documented in the appendices of this manual. This integration capability provides users with a common environment of standard and customized applications.

  17. TRLAN User Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kesheng; Simon, H.

    1999-03-09

    TRLAN is a program designed to find a small number of extreme eigenvalues and their corresponding eigenvectors of a real symmetric matrix. Denote the matrix as A, the eigenvalue as {lambda}, and the corresponding eigenvector as x, they are defined by the following equation, Ax = {lambda}x. There are a number of different implementations of the Lanczos algorithm available. Why another one? Our main motivation is to develop a specialized version that only target the case where one wants both eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a large real symmetric eigenvalue problems that can not use the shift-and-invert scheme. In this case the standard non-restarted Lanczos algorithm requires one to store a large number of Lanczos vectors which can cause storage problem and make each iteration of the method very expensive. The underlying algorithm of TRLAN is a dynamic thick-restart Lanczos algorithm. Like all restarted methods, the user can choose how many vectors can be generated at once. Typically, th e user chooses a moderate size so that all Lanczos vectors can be stored in core. This allows the restarted methods to execute efficiently. This implementation of the thick-restart Lanczos method also uses the latest restarting technique, it is very effective in reducing the time required to compute a desired solutions compared to similar restarted Lanczos schemes, e.g., ARPACK.

  18. Photovoltaics information user study

    SciTech Connect

    Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marie, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

    1980-10-01

    The results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on photovoltaics (PV) are described. These results, part of a larger study on many different solar technologies, identify types of information each group needed and the best ways to get information to each group. The report is 1 of 10 discussing study results. The overall study provides baseline data about information needs in the solar community. It covers these technological areas: photovoltaics, passive solar heating and cooling, active solar heating and cooling, biomass energy, solar thermal electric power, solar industrial and agricultural process heat, wind energy, ocean energy, and advanced energy storage. An earlier study identified the information user groups in the solar community and the priority (to accelerate solar energy commercialization) of getting information to each group. In the current study only high-priority groups were examined. Results from seven PV groups respondents are analyzed in this report: DOE-Funded Researchers, Non-DOE-Funded Researchers, Researchers Working for Manufacturers, Representatives of Other Manufacturers, Representatives of Utilities, Electric Power Engineers, and Educators.

  19. ARDS User Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David P.

    2001-01-01

    Personal computers (PCs) are now used extensively for engineering analysis. their capability exceeds that of mainframe computers of only a few years ago. Programs originally written for mainframes have been ported to PCs to make their use easier. One of these programs is ARDS (Analysis of Rotor Dynamic Systems) which was developed at Arizona State University (ASU) by Nelson et al. to quickly and accurately analyze rotor steady state and transient response using the method of component mode synthesis. The original ARDS program was ported to the PC in 1995. Several extensions were made at ASU to increase the capability of mainframe ARDS. These extensions have also been incorporated into the PC version of ARDS. Each mainframe extension had its own user manual generally covering only that extension. Thus to exploit the full capability of ARDS required a large set of user manuals. Moreover, necessary changes and enhancements for PC ARDS were undocumented. The present document is intended to remedy those problems by combining all pertinent information needed for the use of PC ARDS into one volume.

  20. PPC user`s manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.A.; Barrett, K.A.; Braddy, D.

    1993-01-04

    The Portable Process Control library (PPC) is a set of routines to execute and communicate with other processes in environments which permit such operations. The goal is to establish an easy to use interface which can be implemented on a wide variety of platforms. The standard C library I/O interface was taken as a model. In this view, processes are treated as much like files as is possible. In particular, a process is opened and closed as is a file and that means that it is forked by the parent to start with and killed at the end. While a process is open it may be written to and read from with PPC functions which are analogous to the standard C I/O functions fprintf and fgets. In addition, there are functions to monitor the status of the child processes. These do not have precise analogs to file routines, but since the basic interface has been established by the open/close and read/write routines, these have obvious usages.