Science.gov

Sample records for additional www sites

  1. WWW: Neuroscience Web Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    The human brain contains an estimated 100 billion neurons, and browsing the Web, one might be led to believe that there's a Web site for every one of those cells. It's no surprise that there are lots of Web sites concerning the nervous system. After all, the human brain is toward the top of nearly everyone's list of favorite organs and of…

  2. Inside an environmental data archive WWW site

    SciTech Connect

    Grubb, J.W.; Jennings, S.V.; Yow, T.G.; Smith, A.W.

    1997-03-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC), which is associated with NASA`s Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS), provides access to tabular and imagery datasets used in ecological and environmental research. Because of its large and diverse data holdings, twin challenges for the ORNL DAAC are to help users find data of interest from the hundreds of thousands of files available at the DAAC without overwhelming them and to manage such a large collection of data. Therefore, the ORNL DAAC has developed a number of World Wide Web (WWW) tools such as the Biogeochemical Information Ordering Management Environment (BIOME), a WWW search and order system, as well as WWW-based data management and configuration control tools. This paper describes the specialized attributes incorporated into these systems that allow for easy access to and management of the data.

  3. Educational WWW sites on a CD-ROM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, J. S.; Whitlock, L. A.

    1996-12-01

    The High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) has developed two educational World Wide Web sites. The High-Energy Astrophysics Learning Center provides information about X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy for middle school to college readers. It also includes a "Teacher's Corner" with lesson plans using actual satellite data, as well as other educator resources. The second site, StarChild, is a general astronomy and space exploration site geared for elementary schools. From the start, our intention was to achieve high visibility with teachers and students. However, given the significant number of users and institutions which do not have high-speed (or any!) WWW access, we knew that another way to distribute the information to our target audience would be required. Our solution has been to create a CD-ROM version of our sites which will be freely distributed to the educational community. There were several factors which have governed the creation of the CD-ROM, e.g. the need for platform independence. These issues, and our solutions to them, are presented.

  4. WWW.cell Biology Education: Evolution Web Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Dennis

    2005-01-01

    The debate over teaching evolution has once again reached a fever pitch in the United States. Earnest nineteenth-century clashes between scientific and religious worldviews have given way to the politically charged arguments of creation science and now intelligent design. The Web site of the National Center for Science Education (NCSE;…

  5. NASA Parts Selection List (NPSL) WWW Site http://nepp.nasa.gov/npsl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brusse, Jay

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Parts Selection List (NPSL) is an on-line resource for electronic parts selection tailored for use by spaceflight projects. The NPSL provides a list of commonly used electronic parts that have a history of satisfactory use in spaceflight applications. The objective of this www site is to provide NASA projects, contractors, university experimenters, et al with an easy to use resource that provides a baseline of electronic parts from which designers are encouraged to select. The NPSL is an ongoing resource produced by Code 562 in support of the NASA HQ funded NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program. The NPSL is produced as an electronic format deliverable made available via the referenced www site administered by Code 562. The NPSL does not provide information pertaining to patented or proprietary information. All of the information contained in the NPSL is available through various other public domain resources such as US Military procurement specifications for electronic parts, NASA GSFC's Preferred Parts List (PPL-21), and NASA's Standard Parts List (MIL-STD975).

  6. Design Guidelines for Teaching about Design Guidelines for Educational WWW Sites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collis, Betty; Winnips, Koos

    This paper describes how the authors use a mixture of World Wide Web (WWW)-based functionalities and new didactics to teach educational technology students at the University of Twente (Netherlands) about the design of WWW-based learning environments. Topics discussed include: (1) the content of courses about the design of educational WWW…

  7. Designing for Differences: Cultural Issues in the Design of WWW-based Course-support Sites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collis, Betty

    1999-01-01

    Examines factors affecting the cultural appropriateness of Web-based course-support sites. Identifies a strategy for accommodating different values of these factors in Web-based course-support systems, based on a set of 10 design guidelines. Describes and evaluates the TeleTOP Method from the University of Twente (The Netherlands) to illustrate…

  8. Commercial WWW Site Appeal: How Does It Affect Online Food and Drink Consumers' Purchasing Behavior?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Gregory K.; Manning, Barbara J.

    1998-01-01

    Reports on an online survey of consumer attitudes toward online storefronts marketing barbecue sauce, cheese, olive oil, potato chips, and other specialty food products. The relationship between consumer attitudes toward Web sites and the likelihood of purchase, as well as demographic factors related to online food and drink buying, are described.…

  9. Active and Passive Supplier Assessment Program (ASAP & PSAP) WWW Sites http://nepp.nasa.gov/imd/asap http://nepp.nasa.gov/imd/psap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brusse, Jay

    2000-01-01

    The Active and Passive Supplier Assessment Programs (ASAP and PSAP) WWW Sites provide general information to the electronic parts community regarding the availability of electronic parts. They also provide information to NASA regarding modifications to commonly used procurement specifications and test methods. The ASAP and PSAP www sites are ongoing resources produced by Code 562 in support of the NASA HQ funded NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program. These WWW sites do not provide information pertaining to patented or proprietary information. All of the information contained in these www sites is available through various other public domain resources such as US Military Qualified Producers Listings (QPLs) and Qualified Manufacturer Listings (QMLs) and industry working groups such as the Electronics Industry Alliance (EIA) and the Space Parts Working Group (SPWG).

  10. The International Association for Mathematical Geology WWW/FTP site: an analysis of the first five years and some thoughts for the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunsky, E. C.

    2000-07-01

    The International Association for Mathematical Geology (IAMG) has been operating an Internet site since 1994. The site was initially started as an FTP service for computer program code published in Computers & Geosciences followed by the establishment of a WWW site. The establishment of the FTP site required consideration for operating system support and data archive standards support. The implementation of the WWW site enabled the IAMG to provide information and services for all Internet users. Analysis of the access logs for both the FTP and WWW services have shown that there has been a steady increase in access to the programs and IAMG information. Long-term archival issues include dealing with programs available only in binary (executable) form and long-term support of compression formats (i.e. zip, tar). As computer programming environments become increasingly sophisticated the journal is faced with the challenge of insuring that the computer program code is useful to geoscientists. The Internet programming environment is becoming increasingly popular as a means of creating program code that is independent of user platform type and also allows programmers to maintain control over the use and development of their code on one site. As this type of environment develops the IAMG FTP site has started to create URL links to the program source sites. Computers viruses are an issue which requires the attention of all IAMG users. The Computers & Geosciences Silver CD project has been started which will contain all program code (raster or ASCII text) form for volumes 1-25. Future services on the IAMG web site will include a searchable membership database, list servers for special interest groups within the IAMG and constant updating of useful services and links to the IAMG membership.

  11. H2O2-dependent substrate oxidation by an engineered diiron site in a bacterial hemerythrin† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Information on materials, instrumentation, experimental details and additional data on preparation of proteins, crystal structure analysis, resonance Raman and FTIR spectroscopy, reaction of reduced I119H with O2, consumption of H2O2, and oxidation reactions of guaiacol and 1,4-cyclohexadiene. The atomic coordinates and structure factors (PDB code 3WHN) have been deposited into the Protein Data Bank, http://www.rcsb.org/. See DOI: 10.1039/c3cc48108e Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Yasunori; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Takano, Yu; Hirota, Shun; Kurtz, Donald M.; Shiro, Yoshitsugu

    2014-01-01

    The O2-binding carboxylate-bridged diiron site in DcrH-Hr was engineered in an effort to perform the H2O2-dependent oxidation of external substrates. A His residue was introduced near the diiron site in place of a conserved residue, Ile119. The I119H variant promotes the oxidation of guaiacol and 1,4-cyclohexadiene upon addition of H2O2. PMID:24400317

  12. Thanks to 70 years of Inter American Statistical cooperation, the world’s largest integrated census microdata dissemination site www.ipums.org/international

    PubMed Central

    McCAA, ROBERT

    2014-01-01

    Seventy years of Inter American Statistical cooperation, symbolized by the 70th anniversary of Estadística, made possible the construction of IPUMS-International, the world’s largest integrated census microdata dissemination site, www.ipums.org/international. Currently, the site offers access to 238 samples totaling over 540 million person records representing 74 countries. The Americas, which account for only about one-seventh of the world’s population, amount to over one-third (36%) of the person records in the IPUMS-International database. Likewise, 35% of the citations in the IPUMS-International bibliography are for studies focused on Latin America, with about half of these analyzing a single Latin American country. This article discusses salient features of the IPUMS integration methods and system. National Statistical Institutes that have not yet entrusted 2010 census microdata to the initiative are invited to do so. Researchers and teachers are invited to use the data freely in analysis and teaching. Setenta años de cooperación estadística inter-Americana, simbolizada por el 70 aniversario de la revista Estadística, han hecho posible la construcción de IPUMS-internacional, la base en línea de microdatos censales harmonizados más grande del mundo, www.ipums.org/international. Actualmente, IPUMS proporciona acceso a 238 muestras con más de 540 millones de registros individuales de 74 países. Las Américas, que albergan una séptima parte de la población mundial, representan más de un tercio (36%) de todos los registros individuales en la base de datos IPUMS-internacional. Asimismo, el 35% de todas las referencias en la bibliografía de IPUMS son de estudios realizados sobre América Latina, la mitad de éstas basadas en un sólo país de la región. Este artículo presenta las principales características del sistema de integración y difusión de datos de IPUMS. Los Institutos Nacionales de Estadísticas que todavía no ha entregado la muestra

  13. Thanks to 70 years of Inter American Statistical cooperation, the world's largest integrated census microdata dissemination site www.ipums.org/international.

    PubMed

    McCAA, Robert

    2013-06-01

    Seventy years of Inter American Statistical cooperation, symbolized by the 70(th) anniversary of Estadística, made possible the construction of IPUMS-International, the world's largest integrated census microdata dissemination site, www.ipums.org/international. Currently, the site offers access to 238 samples totaling over 540 million person records representing 74 countries. The Americas, which account for only about one-seventh of the world's population, amount to over one-third (36%) of the person records in the IPUMS-International database. Likewise, 35% of the citations in the IPUMS-International bibliography are for studies focused on Latin America, with about half of these analyzing a single Latin American country. This article discusses salient features of the IPUMS integration methods and system. National Statistical Institutes that have not yet entrusted 2010 census microdata to the initiative are invited to do so. Researchers and teachers are invited to use the data freely in analysis and teaching. Setenta años de cooperación estadística inter-Americana, simbolizada por el 70 aniversario de la revista Estadística, han hecho posible la construcción de IPUMS-internacional, la base en línea de microdatos censales harmonizados más grande del mundo, www.ipums.org/international. Actualmente, IPUMS proporciona acceso a 238 muestras con más de 540 millones de registros individuales de 74 países. Las Américas, que albergan una séptima parte de la población mundial, representan más de un tercio (36%) de todos los registros individuales en la base de datos IPUMS-internacional. Asimismo, el 35% de todas las referencias en la bibliografía de IPUMS son de estudios realizados sobre América Latina, la mitad de éstas basadas en un sólo país de la región. Este artículo presenta las principales características del sistema de integración y difusión de datos de IPUMS. Los Institutos Nacionales de Estadísticas que todavía no ha entregado la muestra

  14. User profiling in WWW network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kekez, Michal; Gluszek, Adam; Rudzinski, Filip

    2005-02-01

    In this paper we present application of several theoretical tools to a problem of generation of WWW user pofile. First, we present the idea of user profiling and the problem of classification using decision rules. The user profile consists of rules concerning time of day, amount of pages that were browsed and presumable time spent on browsing pages in one WWW host. This profile can be used for planning of advertisement on WWW sites. In the next section, we shortly describe selected tools for generation of decision rules that were used to create user profile. We have chosen two tools -- CART and C4.5 that are examples of decision tree algorithms. We also present the process of data mining. The following section of this paper presents the discussion of results.

  15. Comparing Commercial WWW Browsers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notess, Greg R.

    1995-01-01

    Four commercial World Wide Web browsers are evaluated for features such as handling of WWW protocols and different URLs: FTP, Telnet, Gopher and WAIS, and e-mail and news; bookmark capabilities; navigation features; file management; and security support. (JKP)

  16. Build a WWW Homepage for Your School!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chrobak, Kimberly

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the use of World Wide Web (WWW) Homepage for school information. Topics include school sites; installation of a WWW browser; file tags; sites for beginner's guides to the language (HTML); two Usenet discussion groups; and a sample lesson plan including objective, procedure, and evaluation. (AEF)

  17. WWW to DICOM interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevera, George J.; Feingold, Eric R.; Horii, Steven C.

    1996-05-01

    In this paper we discuss the implementation and use of a WWW interface to a DICOM PACS that allows users to select, move, and display images that are currently available in the PACS and to view their corresponding radiology reports. This system allows our users to query the archive from any workstation (such as Unix, DOS, and Mac) that supports a WWW browser. To use this system, the user first runs a WWW browser such as Mosaic, Netscape, or Lynx and specifies a URL on one of our Unix workstations. This URL refers to an HTML file that contains a query form. This query form contains a number of fields such as patient name and medical record number. The user may specify any or all fields as well as wildcards in fields such as the name field. Once the form is completed, the user presses a button to submit the request. The HTML form submits the query to a C program that executes on the Unix server. This program accepts as input the form field values that the user specified. This program then communicates with the archive via DICOM requests to determine those patients that match the search criteria. The user may then choose a patient which in turn causes the studies for this patient to be displayed. Finally, the user may select a study which causes those images to be retrieved from the archive and displayed via the Web browser. The result of this system is an easy to use interface to a DICOM PACS with the option to query and move images from the PACS. In summary, a system that integrates the ease of use of WWW browsers with a DICOM PACS is discussed. We are currently incorporating information from our RIS as well. This allows us to obtain extensive patient demographics, exam information, and textual radiological reports and associate this information with information from the PACS.

  18. www.studentthink.molecularbiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morvillo, Nancy; Schmidt, Matthew; Carlson, Albert

    2000-01-01

    Describes a microbiology exercise that is designed to expose students to the world wide web. Introduces a molecular biology quiz site and National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). Provides a list of molecular biology sites on the Internet. (YDS)

  19. Zoology www guide.

    PubMed

    Bosch, T C

    2001-01-01

    In almost every branch of zoology the internet is now a vital place for posting up-to-date status reports on all kind of animal groups and research areas. Many websites not only provide the latest on taxonomy, ecology and distribution, but also include valuable background information and details of experimental procedures as well as discussion forums. For the zoologist the online world seems to hold everything from acarology to otoliths. To show what impressive things can be done in communicating and facilitating research in zoology, given a little initiative and perseverance, we will introduce websites that find fresh ways to approach their subjects and that may, in some way or another, inspire zoologists. Readers are welcome to join in this process for future editions of Zoology www guides and should send their website suggestions to tbosch@zoologie.uni-kiel.de. In this issue the focus is on molluscs.

  20. Site Preference of Ternary Alloying Additions to AuTi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Mosca, Hugo O.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2006-01-01

    Atomistic modeling of the site substitution behavior of several alloying additions, namely. Na, Mg, Al, Si. Sc, V, Cr, Mn. Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Y, Zr. Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Cd, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt in B2 TiAu is reported. The 30 elements can be grouped according to their absolute preference for a specific site, regardless of concentration, or preference for available sites in the deficient sublattice. Results of large scale simulations are also presented, distinguishing between additions that remain in solution from those that precipitate a second phase.

  1. 20. Photographic copy of an asconstructed site plan for additions ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Photographic copy of an as-constructed site plan for additions to North Base: Job No. A(8-1), Military Construction, Materiel Command Flight Test Base, Muroc, California; Additional Construction, Location Plan, Sheet No. 2, October 1943. Reproduced from the holdings of the National Archives, Pacific Southwest Region - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, North Base Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  2. 19. Photographic copy of an asconstructed site plan for additions ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Photographic copy of an as-constructed site plan for additions to North Base: Job No. Muroc A(511), Military Construction, Third District Region, San Bernardino, California; Muroc Bombing Range, Muroc Lake, Calif; Additional Temporary Construction, Materiel Center Flight Test Base, Location Grading & Paving Plan, Sheet No. 1 of 21, March 1943. Reproduced from the holdings of the National Archives, Pacific Southwest Region - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, North Base Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  3. 18. Photographic copy of site plan for additions to North ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photographic copy of site plan for additions to North Base: Job No. Muroc A(511), Military Construction, Third District Region, San Bernardino, California; Muroc Bombing Range, Muroc Lake, Calif; Additional Temporary Construction, Materiel Center Flight Test Base, Location Plan, February 1943. Reproduced from the holdings of the National Archives, Pacific Southwest Region - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, North Base Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  4. Zoology www guide.

    PubMed

    Bosch, T C

    2001-01-01

    As in the previous issue of Zoology, we introduce here web sites which are of interest for zoologists. Readers are welcome to make website suggestions for future editions of Zoology and should contact tbosch@zoologie.uni-kiel.de. In this issue the focus is on amphibians and reptiles.

  5. Using WWW in SRRC Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. S.

    1997-05-01

    The SRRC (Synchrotron Radiation Research Center - in Taiwan) control system was originally implemented in DEC VMS and DEC OSF/1 UNIX systems. Other computer system in SRRC (e.g. SUN, SGI, and IBM PC ...) were not able to connect to the control system. On sequently a hardware and OS independent system is required. The SRRC light source WWW site (http://www-icg.srrc.gov.tw) is built for this propose. With a IBM comptable PC (Pentium-133) runing Microsoft WindowsNT 3.51 and Microsoft IIS 1.0, it supports an easy way to build a WWW server. The program connected to SRRC control system is written with JAVA language, using JAVA applets to support runtime interactive ablitity.Using WWW browser(such as Netscape Navagator 3.0 or Microsoft Explorer 3.0), it is possible to monitor and control every storage ring device. This paper will describe the detail of the hardware and softwarestructures.

  6. Site Occupancy of Ternary Additions to B2 Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Amador, Carlos

    2002-01-01

    In this broad-based survey study, the substitutional site preference of ternary alloying additions to B2 compounds (stable at room temperature and 50/50 composition) is determined using the Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) method for alloys. The method is applied to Ni, Al, Ti, Cr, Cu, Co, Fe, Ta, Hf, Mo, Nb, W, V and Ru additions to NiAl, FeAl, CoAl, CoFe, CoHf, CoTi, FeTi, RuAl, RuSi, RuHf, RuTi, and RuZr. The results are compared, when available, to experimental data and other theoretical results.

  7. MX Siting Investigation. Mineral Resources Survey, Seven Additional Valleys, Nevada/Utah Siting Area. Volume IV.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-23

    8217 AD-AI13 146 ERTEC WESTERN INC. LONG BEACH CA F/6 B/7 MX SITING INVESTIGATION. MINERAL RESOURCES SURVEY, SEVEN AGOITI--ETC(U) UNCLASSIFIED E-TR...50 MINERAL RESOURCES SURVEY SEVEN ADDITIONAL VALLEYS NEVADA/UTAH SITING AREA VOLUME IV 4Prepared for: U. S. Department of the Air Force Ballistic...VALLEY MINERAL RESOURCES SURVEfV STUDY AREA OXJNOARY SEPT. 26, 1960 I MX SITING INVESTIGATION 27 FEDC t97 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE I ik 320’- 36 37 4

  8. An additional substrate binding site in a bacterial phenylalanine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Ronau, Judith A; Paul, Lake N; Fuchs, Julian E; Corn, Isaac R; Wagner, Kyle T; Liedl, Klaus R; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M; Das, Chittaranjan

    2013-09-01

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) is a non-heme iron enzyme that catalyzes oxidation of phenylalanine to tyrosine, a reaction that must be kept under tight regulatory control. Mammalian PAH has a regulatory domain in which binding of the substrate leads to allosteric activation of the enzyme. However, the existence of PAH regulation in evolutionarily distant organisms, for example some bacteria in which it occurs, has so far been underappreciated. In an attempt to crystallographically characterize substrate binding by PAH from Chromobacterium violaceum, a single-domain monomeric enzyme, electron density for phenylalanine was observed at a distal site 15.7 Å from the active site. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments revealed a dissociation constant of 24 ± 1.1 μM for phenylalanine. Under the same conditions, ITC revealed no detectable binding for alanine, tyrosine, or isoleucine, indicating the distal site may be selective for phenylalanine. Point mutations of amino acid residues in the distal site that contact phenylalanine (F258A, Y155A, T254A) led to impaired binding, consistent with the presence of distal site binding in solution. Although kinetic analysis revealed that the distal site mutants suffer discernible loss of their catalytic activity, X-ray crystallographic analysis of Y155A and F258A, the two mutants with the most noticeable decrease in activity, revealed no discernible change in the structure of their active sites, suggesting that the effect of distal binding may result from protein dynamics in solution.

  9. Ondvrejov solar radio WWW page

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jivrivcka, Karel; Meszarosova, Hana

    Since mid 1997 the Solar Radio Astronomy Group of the Astronomical Institute in Ondvrejov has been running a new WWW page. You can find us at the address --- http://sunkl.asu.cas.cz/radio/ --- where information about our instruments, observed frequencies, as well as about our data archive is available. The home page includes four main topics: 1. Observation & Instrumentation --- here you can find information about which instruments are currently in use, observed frequencies, time resolutions etc. Presently we use for solar radio observations three dedicated instruments: RT3 -- single frequency 3 GHz receiver with 10 ms time resolution RT4 -- radio spectrograph 2.0--4.5 GHz with 100 ms time resolution RT5 -- radio spectrograph 0.8--2.0 GHz with 100 ms time resolution The observations are run daily, while the Sun is higher then 5 degrees above the horizon. Because of the tremendous amount of data, only chosen time intervals with radio events are archived. Event Archive Info: --- here you can find information about archived data (date, time interval) as well as overall images of individual events in GIF format (the image names are at the same time hyperlinks for direct loading) sorted by date and time of observation. Gallery: --- here you can find some representative examples of spectra of solar radio events, recorded by our instruments. Anonymous FTP Server: --- enables direct FTP access to our image archive. This WWW page should give you an insight, what data are available and what the events look roughly like. The uncalibrated rough data from our archive can be processed only by special programs and are not generally free. But if you are interested in a particular event from our archive, you can contact us via e-mail address: radio@asu.cas.cz This work has been supported by the Czech Academy of Sciences through grant no.A3003707.

  10. MX Siting Investigation. Mineral Resources Survey, Seven Additional Valleys, Nevada/Utah Siting Area. Volume II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-23

    AO-AI13 14𔃾 ERTEC WESTERN INC LONG BEACH CA F/6 7/4 MX SITING INVESTIGATION. MINERAL RESOURCES SURVEY, SEVEN ADDITI-ETC(U) JUN Al F04704-80-C-OGO6...DTIC-DDA-2 FORM DOCUMENT PROCESSING SHEET DTIC ocT :g 70A -- ~’ .9 ’I K ii I / "~1 - i~ / . . ..1’ ~ ~- .. ~ ~1 I E-TR-50 MINERAL RESOURCES SURVEY...144 ERTEC WESTERN INC. LONG BEACH CA F/6 7/4 MX SITING INVESTIGATION. MINERAL RESOURCES SURVEY. SEVEN AOOITI-ETCIU) JUN 81 FON7O-80-C-0006

  11. Additional guidance on worst sites and NPL caliber sites to assist in sacm implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-26

    The document is intended to assist the Regions by giving clear guidance as to what constitutes NPL caliber sites and to assist in minimizing the potential for false positive NPL packages. It also sets forth the actions needed to support the efforts to implement SACM and encourage appropriate data gathering to support NPL listing and RI/FS decisions.

  12. Environmental projects, volume 11. Environmental assessment: Addition to operations building, Mars site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    An Environmental Assessment was performed of the proposed addition to building G-86 at the Mars Site, which will provide space for new electronic equipment to consolidate the Deep Space Network (DSN) support facilities from other Goldstone Deep Space Communication Complex (GDSCC) sites at the Mars Site, and will include a fifth telemetry and command group with its associated link monitor, control processor, and operator consoles. The addition of these facilities will increase the capability of the DSN to support future sophisticated NASA spacecraft missions such as the International Solar and Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Program. The planned construction of this building addition requires an Environmental Assessment (EA) document that records the existing environmental conditions at the Mars Site, that analyzes the environmental effects that possibly could be expected from the construction and use of the new building addition, and that recommends measures to be taken to mitigate any possible deleterious environmental effects.

  13. EPA to Conduct Additional Investigations in Grenada, Miss. to Guide Cleanup of Grenada Manufacturing, LLC Site

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - Beginning Monday, April 11, 2016, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will conduct a site investigation at the former Grenada Manufacturing, LLC facility (now Grenada Stamping), followed by additional sampling in the adjacent Ea

  14. A Classroom Model for WWW Use in Modern Engineering Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barcia, Ricardo M.; Pacheco, Roberto; Paas, Leslie C.

    This paper describes the pilot project for a model of automatically generated customizable World Wide Web (WWW) sites for on-campus classes at the Graduate Department of Production and Systems Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Brazil. This project is being integrated into the department's STELA system, the first Brazilian Java and…

  15. What Does the WWW Offer Mathematics Students and Teachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knott, Ron

    1999-01-01

    Presents a brief history of the World Wide Web and explains what a WWW browser is and what it can do for math teachers and students. Compares information on the Web with book-based information and gives examples of useful Web sites for mathematics teaching and learning. (Author/WRM)

  16. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  17. On the site preferences of ternary additions to triple defect B2 intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, L.M.; Chen, S.L.; Chang, Y.A.

    1995-12-31

    Knowledge of the site preference of ternary solute additions is essential to developing an understanding of how these solutes affect the properties of B2 intermetallic compounds. A quasichemical model will be presented which is able to predict the site preferences of dilute solute additions to triple defect B2 compounds. The only parameters required are enthalpies of formation at the stoichiometric composition. General equations are developed which can be used to determine site occupations and defect concentrations for dilute as well as non-dilute solute additions. These equations use atom pair bond enthalpies as the parameters. It is found that the site preferences of dilute additions are not always in agreement with predictions based on the solubility lobes in ternary Gibbs isotherms, Predictions for dilute additions to NiAl and FeAl are compared to experimental results found in the literature. Satisfactory correlation is found between the model and the experimental results. In addition, the predictions from the model on vacancy concentrations in Fe doped NiAl are compared to recent experimental results by the authors.

  18. The New WWW: Whatever, Whenever, Wherever

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    March, Tom

    2006-01-01

    We are entering an age of instant media gratification, in which a "multimedia aura" will "accompany us wherever we go," writes Tom March. The New WWW, says March, offers us whatever we want, whenever and wherever we want it. The effect on our children may be unrealistic expectations, premature disillusionment, and unhappiness. To counterbalance…

  19. The WWW for the Students: A Theoretical Basis for Using the WWW in Foreign Language Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Joan Keck

    Discussion of the use of the World Wide Web (WWW) for teaching foreign languages (L2s) begins with an examination of the learning styles of the current population of students, shifts in approaches to learning and teaching, and the changing role for language instructors in this context. It is argued that effective use of WWW resources to teach…

  20. Novel ionic liquid with both Lewis and Brønsted acid sites for Michael addition.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoyue; Ye, Weidong; Song, Xiaohua; Ma, Wenxin; Lao, Xuejun; Shen, Runpu

    2011-01-01

    Ionic liquid with both Lewis and Brønsted acid sites has been synthesized and its catalytic activities for Michael addition were carefully studied. The novel ionic liquid was stable to water and could be used in aqueous solution. The molar ratio of the Lewis and Brønsted acid sites could be adjusted to match different reactions. The results showed that the novel ionic liquid was very efficient for Michael addition with good to excellent yields within several min. Operational simplicity, high stability to water and air, small amount used, low cost of the catalyst used, high yields, chemoselectivity, applicability to large-scale reactions and reusability are the key features of this methodology, which indicated that this novel ionic liquid also holds great potential for environmentally friendly processes.

  1. Site-Specific Tandem Knoevenagel Condensation-Michael Addition To Generate Antibody-Drug Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Kudirka, Romas A; Barfield, Robyn M; McFarland, Jesse M; Drake, Penelope M; Carlson, Adam; Bañas, Stefanie; Zmolek, Wes; Garofalo, Albert W; Rabuka, David

    2016-11-10

    Expanded ligation techniques are sorely needed to generate unique linkages for the growing field of functionally enhanced proteins. To address this need, we present a unique chemical ligation that involves the double addition of a pyrazolone moiety with an aldehyde-labeled protein. This ligation occurs via a tandem Knoevenagel condensation-Michael addition. A pyrazolone reacts with an aldehyde to generate an enone, which undergoes subsequent attack by a second pyrazolone to generate a bis-pyrazolone species. This rapid and facile ligation technique is performed under mild conditions in the absence of catalyst to generate new architectures that were previously inaccessible via conventional ligation reactions. Using this unique ligation, we generated three site-specifically labeled antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) with an average of four drugs to one antibody. The in vitro and in vivo efficacies along with pharmacokinetic data of the site-specific ADCs are reported.

  2. Dipeptide-derived nitriles containing additional electrophilic sites: potentially irreversible inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Löser, Reik; Gütschow, Michael

    2009-12-01

    Heterocyclic and open-chain dipeptide-derived nitriles have been synthesized, containing an additional electrophilic center enabling the subsequent covalent modification of the thioimidate nitrogen formed in situ at the active site of the enzyme. The inhibitory potential of these nitriles against the cysteine proteases papain and cathepsins L, S, and K was determined. The open-chain dipeptide nitriles 8 and 10 acted as moderate reversible inhibitors, but no evidence for an irreversible inhibition of these enzymes was discernable.

  3. The BeppoSAX WWW catalog browser.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giommi, P.; Antonelli, L. A.; Fiore, F.; Matteuzzi, A.; Signorile, S.

    The authors present a WWW/Netscape catalog browser that has been recently developed at the BeppoSAX Science Data Center (SDC). This tool was developed with the main aim of supporting the BeppoSAX users' community in the preparation of observation proposals and as a general tool to facilitate astronomical data analysis. The SDC WWW-browser is an on-line facility that gives access to over 130 catalogs of astronomical sources, mission logs, proposals lists and other tables related to the BeppoSAX project. The capabilities of this tool range from standard multi-catalog searches to more advanced queries such as search by object class, with cross-correlation of the resulting list with any of the available catalogs. The resulting output can be retrieved as html tables or in a variety of graphical ways.

  4. Using WWW technology in a control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billè, Fulvio; Pugliese, Roberto

    1997-02-01

    The World Wide Web (WWW) technology, based on the hyper-text principles and highly focused on the man-machine interface, is an easy and intuitive way of accessing data. By integrating Web and distributed control system technologies, operators and specialists may supervise a process without having to install any specific software and without bothering about the type of computer to use. Nearly any computer, loaded with a little piece of world-wide available software, may have access to the status variables, archive files and documentation of the controlled process. The enhanced inter-active features of the new Java technology make this scenario even more appealing. The paper describes a WWW-based control system: the Beamline Access Control System (BACS) of ELETTRA, a third generation synchrotron radiation facility.

  5. EPA Proposes Additional Water Line Connections for Groundwater Contamination at Tinkham Garage Superfund Site in Londonderry, NH

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. EPA in consultation with NHDES, is proposing additional connections to an existing water line for residents whose wells have been found to have contamination and whom live northeast section of the Tinkham Garage Superfund Site (Site).

  6. WWW media distribution via Hopwise reliable multicast

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelley, J.E.

    1994-12-01

    Repeated access to WWW pages currently makes inefficient use of available network bandwidth. A Distribution Point Model is proposed where large and relatively static sets of pages (e.g. magazines or other such media) are distributed via bulk multicast to LAN distribution points for local access. Some access control issues are discussed. Hopwise Reliable Multicast (HRM) is proposed to simplify reliable multicast of non real time bulk data between LANs. HRM uses TCP for reliability and flow control on a hop by hop basis throughout a multicast distribution tree created by today`s Internet MBone.

  7. CFD Data Sets on the WWW for Education and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Systems Division at NASA Ames Research Center has begun the development of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) data set archive on the World Wide Web (WWW) at URL http://www.nas.nasa.gov/NAS/DataSets/. Data sets are integrated with related information such as research papers, metadata, visualizations, etc. In this paper, four classes of users are identified and discussed: students, visualization developers, CFD practitioners, and management. Bandwidth and security issues are briefly reviewed and the status of the archive as of May 1995 is examined. Routine network distribution of data sets is likely to have profound implications for the conduct of science. The exact nature of these changes is subject to speculation, but the ability for anyone to examine the data, in addition to the investigator's analysis, may well play an important role in the future.

  8. 76 FR 80377 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Additional On-Site Data Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ... of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Additional On-Site Data Collection for the... HCV programs. The proposed data collection will take place through site visits to up to 30 PHAs and... the PHA. The results of the site visits will be used to identify PHAs to participate in a...

  9. CancerNet redistribution via WWW.

    PubMed Central

    Quade, G.; Püschel, N.; Far, F.

    1996-01-01

    CancerNet from the National Cancer Institute contains nearly 500 ASCII-files, updated monthly, with up-to-date information about cancer and the "Golden Standard" in tumor therapy. Perl scripts are used to convert these files to HTML-documents. A complex algorithm, using regular expression matching and extensive exception handling, detects headlines, listings and other constructs of the original ASCII-text and converts them into their HTML-counterparts. A table of contents is also created during the process. The resulting files are indexed for full-text search via WAIS. Building the complete CancerNet WWW redistribution takes less than two hours with a minimum of manual work. For 26,000 requests of information from our service per month the average costs for the worldwide delivery of one document is about 19 cents. PMID:8947697

  10. 36 CFR 6.6 - Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... within new additions to the National Park System. 6.6 Section 6.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL SITES IN UNITS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 6.6 Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System. (a) An...

  11. 36 CFR 6.6 - Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... within new additions to the National Park System. 6.6 Section 6.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL SITES IN UNITS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 6.6 Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System. (a) An...

  12. 36 CFR 6.6 - Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... within new additions to the National Park System. 6.6 Section 6.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL SITES IN UNITS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 6.6 Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System. (a) An...

  13. 36 CFR 6.6 - Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... within new additions to the National Park System. 6.6 Section 6.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL SITES IN UNITS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 6.6 Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System. (a) An...

  14. 36 CFR 6.6 - Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... within new additions to the National Park System. 6.6 Section 6.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL SITES IN UNITS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 6.6 Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System. (a) An...

  15. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide. PMID:26908655

  16. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-04-20

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide.

  17. Laparoendoscopic Single-Site Pyeloplasty Using Additional 2 mm Instruments: A Comparison with Conventional Laparoscopic Pyeloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Sung Ho; Lee, Dong-Gi; Lee, Jun Ho; Baek, Min Ki; Jeong, Byong Chang; Jeon, Seong Soo; Lee, Kyu-Sung

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Despite a recent surge in the performance of laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS), concerns remain about performing LESS pyeloplasty (LESS-P) because of the technical difficulty in suturing. We report our techniques and initial experiences with LESS-P using additional needlescopic instruments and compare the results with conventional laparoscopic pyeloplasty (CL-P). Materials and Methods Nine patients undergoing LESS-P were matched 2:1 with regard to age and side of surgery to a previous cohort of 18 patients who underwent CL-P. In both groups, the operating procedures were performed equally except for the number of access points. In the LESS-P group, we made a single 2 cm incision at the umbilicus and used a homemade port. We also used additional 2 mm needlescopic instruments at the subcostal area to facilitate suturing and the ureteral stenting. Results The preoperative characteristics were comparable in both groups. Postoperatively, no significant differences were noted between the LESS-P and CL-P cases in regard to length of stay, estimated blood loss, analgesics required, and complications. But, LESS-P was associated with a shorter operative time (252.2 vs. 309.7 minutes, p=0.044) and less pain on postoperative day one (numeric rating scale 3.7 vs. 5.6, p=0.024). The success rate was 94% with CL-P (median, 23 months) and 100% with LESS-P (median, 14 months). Conclusions Our initial experiences suggest that LESS-P is a feasible and safe procedure. The use of additional 2 mm instruments can help to overcome the difficulties associated with LESS surgery. PMID:22025957

  18. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) additional geologic site characterization studies, Bryan Mound Salt Dome, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, J.T.; Magorian, T.R.; Ahmad, S.

    1994-11-01

    This report revises the original report that was published in 1980. Some of the topics covered in the earlier report were provisional and it is now practicable to reexamine them using new or revised geotechnical data and that obtained from SPR cavern operations, which involves 16 new caverns. Revised structure maps and sections show interpretative differences as compared with the 1980 report and more definition in the dome shape and caprock structural contours, especially a major southeast-northwest trending anomalous zone. The original interpretation was of westward tilt of the dome, this revision shows a tilt to the southeast, consistent with other gravity and seismic data. This interpretation refines the evaluation of additional cavern space, by adding more salt buffer and allowing several more caverns. Additional storage space is constrained on this nearly full dome because of low-lying peripheral wetlands, but 60 MMBBL or more of additional volume could be gained in six or more new caverns. Subsidence values at Bryan Mound are among the lowest in the SPR system, averaging about 11 mm/yr (0.4 in/yr), but measurement and interpretation issues persist, as observed values are about the same as survey measurement accuracy. Periodic flooding is a continuing threat because of the coastal proximity and because peripheral portions of the site are at elevations less than 15 ft. This threat may increase slightly as future subsidence lowers the surface, but the amount is apt to be small. Caprock integrity may be affected by structural features, especially the faulting associated with anomalous zones. Injection wells have not been used extensively at Bryan Mound, but could be a practicable solution to future brine disposal needs. Environmental issues center on the areas of low elevation that are below 15 feet above mean sea level: the coastal proximity and lowland environment combined with the potential for flooding create conditions that require continuing surveillance.

  19. A WWW Database of APS POSS Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornuelle, C. S.; Aldering, G.; Sourov, A.; Humphreys, R. M.; Larsen, J.; Cabanela, J.

    1996-05-01

    We are making our digitized images from the APS scans of the red and blue first-epoch Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (POSS I) available as a WWW-accessible image database. Image requests are through the APS homepage at http://isis.spa.umn.edu, and are initially limited in field width and sky region. To create this database, images from each scanned POSS I plate are processed into a set of coordinate-referenced index and pixel files. Database management software then refers to each object's pixels within a requested sky region by plate, by sub-plate, and finally by each scanned image. These images are then assembled into a mosaic FITS format file, whose header contains astrometric and photometric information. While the current APS Catalog of the POSS I contains only matched images, the image database will include all images above the plate grain noise limit of 25 mu m in diameter. Thus for a given sky region, users will have access to both the object (star and galaxy) catalog data and to the actual pixel data. This project is sponsored by NASA ADP contract NAS5-32670.

  20. WWW Search Tools in Reference Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimmel, Stacey

    1997-01-01

    Provides an introduction to World Wide Web search tools for reference services. Discusses characteristics of search services and types of tools available, including search engines/robot-generated databases, directories, metasearch engines, and review/rating sites. (AEF)

  1. Welcome to www.ratemystudents.com

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling, William C.

    2006-01-01

    The crude, arbitrary, and usually irrelevant comments that college kids write about their teachers on ratemyprofessors.com, a popular new web site, are supposed to provide an effective indicator of what courses a student should take and which to avoid. William C. Dowling is skeptical, but he considers how helpful it might be to turn the tables…

  2. [WWW.2CHEAT.COM] Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rooks, Clay D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is an updated presentation on the subject of cheating and plagiarism via the World Wide Web. In a few hours searching the Internet, the author found even more "cheat" sites than in 1998 that offered not only all types of term and research papers, but college admission letters, reviews, case studies, even dissertations as well. Most now…

  3. Identification of a phosphorylation site in the hinge region of the human progesterone receptor and additional amino-terminal phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Knotts, T A; Orkiszewski, R S; Cook, R G; Edwards, D P; Weigel, N L

    2001-03-16

    We have previously reported the identification of seven in vivo phosphorylation sites in the amino-terminal region of the human progesterone receptor (PR). From our previous in vivo studies, it was evident that several phosphopeptides remained unidentified. In particular, we wished to determine whether human PR contains a phosphorylation site in the hinge region, as do other steroid receptors including chicken PR, human androgen receptor, and mouse estrogen receptor. Previously, problematic trypsin cleavage sites hampered our ability to detect phosphorylation sites in large incomplete tryptic peptides. Using a combination of mass spectrometry and in vitro phosphorylation, we have identified six previously unidentified phosphorylation sites in human PR. Using nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry, we have identified two new in vivo phosphorylation sites, Ser(20) and Ser(676), in baculovirus-expressed human PR. Ser(676) is analogous to the hinge site identified in other steroid receptors. Additionally, precursor ion scans identified another phosphopeptide that contains Ser(130)-Pro(131), a likely candidate for phosphorylation. In vitro phosphorylation of PR with Cdk2 has revealed five additional in vitro Cdk2 phosphorylation sites: Ser(25), Ser(213), Thr(430), Ser(554), and Ser(676). At least two of these, Ser(213) and Ser(676), are authentic in vivo sites. We confirmed the presence of the Cdk2-phosphorylated peptide containing Ser(213) in PR from in vivo labeled T47D cells, indicating that this is an in vivo site. Our combined studies indicate that most, if not all, of the Ser-Pro motifs in human PR are sites for phosphorylation. Taken together, these data indicate that the phosphorylation of PR is highly complex, with at least 14 phosphorylation sites.

  4. Pulp fiction - The volunteer concept (or how not to site additional LLRW disposal capacity)

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    Experiences of compacts and of individual states throughout the nation indicate that low-level radioactive waste disposal siting processes, based from the beginning upon the volunteer concept are fraught with problems. Most apparent among these problems is that the volunteer concept does not lead to scientifically and technically based siting endeavors. Ten years have passed since the Amendments Act of 1985, and no compact or state has been - successful in providing for new LLRW disposal capacity. That failure can be traced in part to the reliance upon the volunteer concept in siting attempts. If success is to be achieved, the future direction for LLRW management must focus on three areas: first, a comprehensive evaluation of all LLRW management options, including reduction of waste generated and on-site storage; secondly, a comprehensive evaluation of the current as well as projected waste stream, to determine the amount of disposal capacity actually needed; and, finally, sound scientifically and technically based siting processes.

  5. EPA Adds Five Hazardous Waste Sites to Superfunds National Priorities List and Proposes an Additional Seven

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON -- Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is adding five hazardous waste sites that pose risks to human health and the environment to the Superfund National Priorities List (NPL). A separate action includes a proposal to ad

  6. EPA announces additional groundwater investigation at Delaware City PVC Superfund site

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    PHILADELPHIA (Oct. 15, 2015) - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today announced a new investigation to determine the nature and extent of groundwater contamination at the Delaware City PVC Superfund site in New Castle County.

  7. Breeding site selection by coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in relation to large wood additions and factors that influence reproductive success

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Steven M.; Dunham, Jason B.; McEnroe, Jeffery R.; Lightcap, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    The fitness of female Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) with respect to breeding behavior can be partitioned into at least four fitness components: survival to reproduction, competition for breeding sites, success of egg incubation, and suitability of the local environment near breeding sites for early rearing of juveniles. We evaluated the relative influences of habitat features linked to these fitness components with respect to selection of breeding sites by coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). We also evaluated associations between breeding site selection and additions of large wood, as the latter were introduced into the study system as a means of restoring habitat conditions to benefit coho salmon. We used a model selection approach to organize specific habitat features into groupings reflecting fitness components and influences of large wood. Results of this work suggest that female coho salmon likely select breeding sites based on a wide range of habitat features linked to all four hypothesized fitness components. More specifically, model parameter estimates indicated that breeding site selection was most strongly influenced by proximity to pool-tail crests and deeper water (mean and maximum depths). Linkages between large wood and breeding site selection were less clear. Overall, our findings suggest that breeding site selection by coho salmon is influenced by a suite of fitness components in addition to the egg incubation environment, which has been the emphasis of much work in the past.

  8. Quantitative analysis of EGR proteins binding to DNA: assessing additivity in both the binding site and the protein

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiajian; Stormo, Gary D

    2005-01-01

    Background Recognition codes for protein-DNA interactions typically assume that the interacting positions contribute additively to the binding energy. While this is known to not be precisely true, an additive model over the DNA positions can be a good approximation, at least for some proteins. Much less information is available about whether the protein positions contribute additively to the interaction. Results Using EGR zinc finger proteins, we measure the binding affinity of six different variants of the protein to each of six different variants of the consensus binding site. Both the protein and binding site variants include single and double mutations that allow us to assess how well additive models can account for the data. For each protein and DNA alone we find that additive models are good approximations, but over the combined set of data there are context effects that limit their accuracy. However, a small modification to the purely additive model, with only three additional parameters, improves the fit significantly. Conclusion The additive model holds very well for every DNA site and every protein included in this study, but clear context dependence in the interactions was detected. A simple modification to the independent model provides a better fit to the complete data. PMID:16014175

  9. Effect of a-site cation deficiency and YSZ additions on sintering and properties of doped lanthanum manganite

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, J.W.; Armstrong, T.R.; Weber, W.J.

    1995-06-01

    The sintering behavior of Ca- and Sr-doped lanthanum manganite (the preferred SOFC cathode material) is highly dependent on the relative proportion of A and B site cations in the material. In general, A-site cation deficiency increases sintered density. The effect of additions of YSZ to lanthanum manganite (to expand the reactive region at the cathode/electrolyte interface and improve thermal expansion and sintering shrinkage matches) on sintering and other properties will also be reported.

  10. Site preference of ternary alloying additions to NiTi: Fe, Pt, Pd, Au, Al, Cu, Zr and Hf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Noebe, Ronald D.; Mosca, Hugo O.

    2004-01-01

    Atomistic modeling of the site substitution behavior of Pd in NiTi (J. Alloys and Comp. (2004), in press) has been extended to examine the behavior of several other alloying additions, namely, Fe, Pt, Au, Al, Cu, Zr and Hf in this important shape memory alloy. It was found that all elements, to a varying degree, displayed absolute preference for available sites in the deficient sublattice. How- ever, the energetics of the different substitutional schemes, coupled with large scale simulations indicate that the general trend in all cases is for the ternary addition to want to form stronger ordered structures with Ti.

  11. Assessing an unknown evolutionary process: effect of increasing site-specific knowledge through taxon addition.

    PubMed

    Pollock, D D; Bruno, W J

    2000-12-01

    Assessment of the evolutionary process is crucial for understanding the effect of protein structure and function on sequence evolution and for many other analyses in molecular evolution. Here, we used simulations to study how taxon sampling affects accuracy of parameter estimation and topological inference in the absence of branch length asymmetry. With maximum-likelihood analysis, we find that adding taxa dramatically improves both support for the evolutionary model and accurate assessment of its parameters when compared with increasing the sequence length. Using a method we call "doppelgänger trees," we distinguish the contributions of two sources of improved topological inference: greater knowledge about internal nodes and greater knowledge of site-specific rate parameters. Surprisingly, highly significant support for the correct general model does not lead directly to improved topological inference. Instead, substantial improvement occurs only with accurate assessment of the evolutionary process at individual sites. Although these results are based on a simplified model of the evolutionary process, they indicate that in general, assuming processes are not independent and identically distributed among sites, more extensive sampling of taxonomic biodiversity will greatly improve analytical results in many current sequence data sets with moderate sequence lengths.

  12. 77 FR 17492 - Expansion of Global Entry to Additional Airports

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Expansion of Global Entry to Additional Airports AGENCY: U.S.... This document announces the expansion of the program to include four additional airports. DATES: Global... site, http://www.globalentry.gov . Expansion of Global Entry Program to Additional Airports CBP...

  13. 15 CFR 921.33 - Boundary changes, amendments to the management plan, and addition of multiple-site components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... management plan, and addition of multiple-site components. (a) Changes in the boundary of a Reserve and major changes to the final management plan, including state laws or regulations promulgated specifically for the... management plan change. Changes in the boundary of a Reserve involving the acquisition of properties...

  14. 15 CFR 921.33 - Boundary changes, amendments to the management plan, and addition of multiple-site components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... management plan, and addition of multiple-site components. (a) Changes in the boundary of a Reserve and major changes to the final management plan, including state laws or regulations promulgated specifically for the... management plan change. Changes in the boundary of a Reserve involving the acquisition of properties...

  15. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) additional geologic site characterization studies, Bayou Choctaw salt dome, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, J.T.; Magorian, T.R.; Byrne, K.O.; Denzler, S.

    1993-09-01

    This report revises and updates the geologic site characterization report that was published in 1980. Revised structure maps and sections show interpretative differences in the dome shape and caprock structural contours, especially a major east-west trending shear zone, not mapped in the 1980 report. Excessive gas influx in Caverns 18 and 20 may be associated with this shear zone. Subsidence values at Bayou Choctaw are among the lowest in the SPR system, averaging only about 10 mm/yr but measurement and interpretation issues persist, as observed values often approximate measurement accuracy. Periodic, temporary flooding is a continuing concern because of the low site elevation (less than 10 ft), and this may intensify as future subsidence lowers the surface even further. Cavern 4 was re-sonared in 1992 and the profiles suggest that significant change has not occurred since 1980, thereby reducing the uncertainty of possible overburden collapse -- as occurred at Cavern 7 in 1954. Other potential integrity issues persist, such as the proximity of Cavern 20 to the dome edge, and the narrow web separating Caverns 15 and 17. Injection wells have been used for the disposal of brine but have been only marginally effective thus far; recompletions into more permeable lower Pleistocene gravels may be a practical way of increasing injection capacity and brinefield efficiency. Cavern storage space is limited on this already crowded dome, but 15 MMBBL could be gained by enlarging Cavern 19 and by constructing a new cavern beneath and slightly north of abandoned Cavern 13. Environmental issues center on the low site elevation: the backswamp environment combined with the potential for periodic flooding create conditions that will require continuing surveillance.

  16. Ethanol Addition for Enhancing Denitrification at the Uranium Mill Tailing Site in Monument Valley, AZ

    SciTech Connect

    Borden, A. K.; Brusseau, M. L.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; McMillan, Andrew; Akyol, N. H.; Berkompas, J.; Miao, Z.; Jordan, F.; Tick, Geoff; Waugh, W. J.; Glenn, E. P.

    2012-01-01

    Uranium mining and processing near Monument Valley, Arizona resulted in the formation of a large nitrate plume in a shallow alluvial aquifer. The results of prior field characterization studies indicate that the nitrate plume is undergoing a slow rate of attenuation via denitrification, and the results of bench-scale studies suggest that denitrification rates can potentially be increased by an order of magnitude with the addition of ethanol as a carbon substrate. The objective of the study was to investigate the potential of ethanol amendment for enhancing the natural denitrification occurring in the alluvial aquifer. Pilot tests were conducted using the single well, push-pull method and a natural-gradient test. The results showed that the concentration of nitrate decreased, while the concentration of nitrous oxide (a product of denitrification) increased. In addition, changes in aqueous concentrations of sulfate, iron, and manganese indicate the ethanol amendment effected a change in prevailing redox conditions. The results of compound-specific stable isotope analysis for nitrogen indicated that the nitrate concentration reductions were biologically mediated. Continued monitoring after completion of the pilot tests has shown that nitrate concentrations in the injection zone have remained at levels three orders of magnitude lower than the initial values, indicating that the impacts of the pilot tests have been sustained for several months.

  17. On the Role of Additional [4Fe-4S] Clusters with a Free Coordination Site in Radical-SAM Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Mulliez, Etienne; Duarte, Victor; Arragain, Simon; Fontecave, Marc; Atta, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    The canonical CysXXXCysXXCys motif is the hallmark of the Radical-SAM superfamily. This motif is responsible for the ligation of a [4Fe-4S] cluster containing a free coordination site available for SAM binding. The five enzymes MoaA, TYW1, MiaB, RimO and LipA contain in addition a second [4Fe-4S] cluster itself bound to three other cysteines and thus also displaying a potentially free coordination site. This review article summarizes recent important achievements obtained on these five enzymes with the main focus to delineate the role of this additional [4Fe-4S] cluster in catalysis. PMID:28361051

  18. Using WWW to Improve Software Development and Maintenance: Application of the Light System to Aleph Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aimar, A.; Aimar, M.; Khodabandeh, A.; Palazzi, P.; Rousseau, B.; Ruggier, M.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas Illas, P.

    Programmers who develop, use, maintain, modify software are faced with the problem of scanning and understanding large amounts of documents, ranging from source code to requirements, analysis and design diagrams, user and reference manuals, etc. This task is non trivial and time consuming, because of the number and size of documents, and the many implicit cross-references that they contain. In large distributed development teams, where software and related documents are produced at various sites, the problem can be even more severe. LIGHT, Life cycle Global HyperText, is an attempt to solve the problem using WWW technology. The basic idea is to make all the software documents, including code, available and cross-connected on the WWW. The first application of this concept to go in production is JULIA/LIGHT, a system to convert and publish on WWW the software documentation of the JULIA reconstruction program of the ALEPH experiment at CERN, European Organisation for Particle Physics, Geneva.

  19. Additional disturbances as a beneficial tool for restoration of post-mining sites: a multi-taxa approach.

    PubMed

    Řehounková, Klára; Čížek, Lukáš; Řehounek, Jiří; Šebelíková, Lenka; Tropek, Robert; Lencová, Kamila; Bogusch, Petr; Marhoul, Pavel; Máca, Jan

    2016-07-01

    Open interior sands represent a highly threatened habitat in Europe. In recent times, their associated organisms have often found secondary refuges outside their natural habitats, mainly in sand pits. We investigated the effects of different restoration approaches, i.e. spontaneous succession without additional disturbances, spontaneous succession with additional disturbances caused by recreational activities, and forestry reclamation, on the diversity and conservation values of spiders, beetles, flies, bees and wasps, orthopterans and vascular plants in a large sand pit in the Czech Republic, Central Europe. Out of 406 species recorded in total, 112 were classified as open sand specialists and 71 as threatened. The sites restored through spontaneous succession with additional disturbances hosted the largest proportion of open sand specialists and threatened species. The forestry reclamations, in contrast, hosted few such species. The sites with spontaneous succession without disturbances represent a transition between these two approaches. While restoration through spontaneous succession favours biodiversity in contrast to forestry reclamation, additional disturbances are necessary to maintain early successional habitats essential for threatened species and open sand specialists. Therefore, recreational activities seem to be an economically efficient restoration tool that will also benefit biodiversity in sand pits.

  20. 78 FR 38069 - Expansion of Global Entry to Additional Airports

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Expansion of Global Entry to Additional Airports AGENCY: U.S... airports. This document announces the expansion of the program to include eight additional designated... the Federal Register and post the information on the Web site http://www.globalentry.gov ....

  1. Asymmetric Iridium-Catalyzed C-C Coupling of Chiral Diols via Site-Selective Redox-Triggered Carbonyl Addition.

    PubMed

    Shin, Inji; Krische, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Cyclometalated π-allyliridium C,O-benzoate complexes modified by axially chiral chelating phosphine ligands display a pronounced kinetic preference for primary alcohol dehydrogenation, enabling highly site-selective redox-triggered carbonyl additions of chiral primary-secondary 1,3-diols with exceptional levels of catalyst-directed diastereoselectivity. Unlike conventional methods for carbonyl allylation, the present redox-triggered alcohol C-H functionalizations bypass the use of protecting groups, premetalated reagents, and discrete alcohol-to-aldehyde redox reactions.

  2. Asymmetric Iridium Catalyzed C-C Coupling of Chiral Diols via Site-Selective Redox-Triggered Carbonyl Addition

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Inji; Krische, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclometalated π-allyliridium C,O-benzoate complexes modified by axially chiral chelating phosphine ligands display a pronounced kinetic preference for primary alcohol dehydrogenation, enabling highly site-selective redox-triggered carbonyl additions of chiral primary-secondary 1,3-diols with exceptional levels of catalyst-directed diastereoselectivity. Unlike conventional methods for carbonyl allylation, the present redox-triggered alcohol C-H functionalizations bypass the use of protecting groups, premetalated reagents, and discrete alcohol-to-aldehyde redox reactions. PMID:26187028

  3. Hypermedia patient data retrieval and presentation through WWW.

    PubMed Central

    Tachinardi, U.; Furuie, S. S.; Bertozzo, N.; Moura, L.; Gutierrez, M. A.; Melo, C. P.

    1995-01-01

    WWW can be a helpful tool for PACS and HIS data retrieval and presentation. The use of gateways to access both text and hypermedia databases (images and video) enables fetched data to be presented in virtually any computer system. WWW browsers provide a very friendly interface and require little training to operate. This paper presents a prototype that uses a SQL gateway for accessing relational patient databases. The dataset used here include text data from reports of diagnostic procedures as well as pointers to the corresponding images. Images can be displayed by the browsers' viewers. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8563345

  4. Long-term Effects of Ethanol Addition on Denitrification At The Uranium Mill Tailing Site In Monument Valley, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, A. L.; Borden, A. K.; Brusseau, M. L.; Carroll, K. C.; Akyol, N. H.; Berkompas, J. L.; Miao, Z.; Jordan, F.; Tick, G. R.; Waugh, J.; Glenn, E. P.

    2011-12-01

    Due to mining and processing of uranium at a site near Monument Valley, AZ, an extensive nitrate plume was produced in a shallow alluvial aquifer. Two pilot tests were conducted to evaluate the addition of ethanol as a carbon substrate to enhance natural denitrification. Aqueous geochemistry was characterized based upon groundwater samples collected before and after the addition of ethanol. Compound specific stable isotope analysis was also conducted. The results of the field tests showed that the concentration of nitrate decreased, while the concentration of nitrous oxide (a product of denitrification) increased. In addition, changes in aqueous concentrations of sulfate, iron, and manganese indicated that the ethanol amendment caused a change in prevailing redox conditions. The results of compound-specific stable isotope analysis for nitrate-nitrogen indicated that the nitrate concentration reductions were biologically mediated. Denitrification rate coefficients estimated for the pilot tests were approximately 50 times larger than resident-condition (non-enhanced) values obtained from prior characterization studies conducted at the site. Using the time at which nitrate concentrations began to decline for downgradient monitoring wells, and the associated inter-well distances, rough estimates of approximately 0.1-0.17 m/day were obtained for the effective reactive-front velocity. These values are within the range of mean pore-water velocities expected for the measured hydraulic conductivities and gradient. The nitrate concentrations in the injection zone have remained at levels three orders of magnitude below the initial values for many months, indicating that the ethanol amendments had a long-term impact on the local subsurface environment.

  5. WWW Entrez: A Hypertext Retrieval Tool for Molecular Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Jonathan A.; Kans, Jonathan A.; Schuler, Gregory D.

    This article describes the World Wide Web (WWW) Entrez server which is based upon the National Center for Biotechnology Information's (NCBI) Entrez retrieval database and software. Entrez is a molecular sequence retrieval system that contains an integrated view of portions of Medline and all publicly available nucleotide and protein databases,…

  6. The WWW Cabinet of Curiosities: A Serendipitous Research Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Josie

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes that the WWW is able to be fruitfully understood as a research tool when we utilise the metaphor of the cabinet of curiosities, the wunderkammer. It unpeels some of the research attributes of the metaphor as it reveals the multiplicity of connectivity on the web that provides serendipitous interactions between unexpected…

  7. A WWW-Based Archive and Retrieval System for Multimedia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyon, J.; Sorensen, S.; Martin, M.; Kawasaki, K.; Takacs, M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the Data Distribution Laboratory (DDL) and discusses issues involved in building multimedia CD-ROMs. It describes the modeling philosophy for cataloging multimedia products and the worldwide-web (WWW)-based multimedia archive and retrieval system (Webcat) built on that model.

  8. Highly Interactive WWW Services: A New Type of Information Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanouplines, Patrick; Nieuwenhuysen, P.

    The World Wide Web is evolving from a collection of texts linked by hypertext and hypermedia toward services that operate interactively with the information user, and which offer results through use of a broad spectrum of tools. This paper presents a collection of interactive WWW services. The services are classified on the basis of the client…

  9. How To Make Discussion Forums Work on the WWW.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurer, Hermann; Rozsenich, Norbert; Sapper, Marianne

    This paper discusses the technical features necessary for a good World Wide Web (WWW) discussion forum, the fact that it should be seen as part of a more general cooperative space, and psycho-sociological aspects that are essential for success. The first section introduces the paper and lists reasons why newsgroups are generally more successful…

  10. Planetary Science Research Discoveries (PSRD) www.psrd.hawaii.edu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, L.; Taylor, J.

    2010-12-01

    NASA's Year of the Solar System is celebrating not only Solar System mission milestones but also the collective data reduction and analysis that happens here on Earth. The Cosmochemistry Program of NASA's Science Mission Directorate takes a direct approach to enhance student learning and engage the public in the latest research on meteorites, asteroids, planets, moons, and other materials in our Solar System with the website known as PSRD. The Planetary Science Research Discoveries (PSRD) website at www.psrd.hawaii.edu explores the science questions that researchers are actively pursuing about our Solar System and explains how the answers are discovered and what they mean. The site helps to convey the scientific basis for sample study to the broader scientific community and the excitement of new results in cosmochemistry to the general public. We share with our broad audience the fascinating discoveries made by cosmochemists, increasing public awareness of the value of sample-focused research in particular and of fundamental scientific research and space exploration in general. The scope of the website covers the full range of cosmochemical research and highlights the investigations of extraterrestrial materials that are used to better understand the origin of the Solar System and the processes by which planets, moons, and small bodies evolve. We relate the research to broader planetary science themes and mission results. Articles are categorized into: asteroids, comets, Earth, instruments of cosmochemistry, Jupiter system, Mars, Mars life issues, Mercury, meteorites, Moon, origins, and space weathering. PSRD articles are based on peer-reviewed, journal publications. Some PSRD articles are based on more than one published paper in order to present multiple views and outcomes of research on a topic of interest. To date, 150 PSRD articles have been based on 184 journal articles (and counting) written by some of the most active cosmochemists and planetary scientists

  11. Health information for young people where and when they most want it: a case study of www.teenagehealthfreak.org.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Ann; Macfarlane, Aidan

    2007-08-01

    The Internet is an exciting resource for providing immediately available, evidence-based, health information for young people in an age-appropriate form on a 24 hours/day, 7 days/week basis. www.teenagehealthfreak.org is a United Kingdom-based Web site designed to take advantage of this. The content of the site, which is the leading teenage health Web site on a Google search, contains both the diary of a hypochondriac 15-year-old boy and a virtual doctor's surgery. It also allows for young people to e-mail health-related questions and receive relevant answers from a health expert. Analysis of the content of these e-mails indicates the unmet health needs and concerns of young people. Future developments of the site include linking the site www.youthhealthtalk.org, a Web site that contains videotaped interviews with young people who have a variety other health concerns.

  12. Characterization of an Additional Splice Acceptor Site Introduced into CYP4B1 in Hominoidae during Evolution.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Eva M; Wiek, Constanze; Parkinson, Oliver T; Roellecke, Katharina; Freund, Marcel; Gombert, Michael; Lottmann, Nadine; Steward, Charles A; Kramm, Christof M; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Rettie, Allan E; Hanenberg, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    CYP4B1 belongs to the cytochrome P450 family 4, one of the oldest P450 families whose members have been highly conserved throughout evolution. The CYP4 monooxygenases typically oxidize fatty acids to both inactive and active lipid mediators, although the endogenous ligand(s) is largely unknown. During evolution, at the transition of great apes to humanoids, the CYP4B1 protein acquired a serine instead of a proline at the canonical position 427 in the meander region. Although this alteration impairs P450 function related to the processing of naturally occurring lung toxins, a study in transgenic mice suggested that an additional serine insertion at position 207 in human CYP4B1 can rescue the enzyme stability and activity. Here, we report that the genomic insertion of a CAG triplet at the intron 5-exon 6 boundary in human CYP4B1 introduced an additional splice acceptor site in frame. During evolution, this change occurred presumably at the stage of Hominoidae and leads to two major isoforms of the CYP4B1 enzymes of humans and great apes, either with or without a serine 207 insertion (insSer207). We further demonstrated that the CYP4B1 enzyme with insSer207 is the dominant isoform (76%) in humans. Importantly, this amino acid insertion did not affect the 4-ipomeanol metabolizing activities or stabilities of the native rabbit or human CYP4B1 enzymes, when introduced as transgenes in human primary cells and cell lines. In our 3D modeling, this functional neutrality of insSer207 is compatible with its predicted location on the exterior surface of CYP4B1 in a flexible side chain. Therefore, the Ser207 insertion does not rescue the P450 functional activity of human CYP4B1 that has been lost during evolution.

  13. Ionospheric Electron/Ion Densities Temperatures on CD-ROM and WWW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilitza, Dieter; Papitashvili, Natasha; Schar, Bill; Grebowsky, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    As part of this project a large volume of ionospheric satellite insitu data from the sixties, seventies and early eighties were made accessible online in ASCII format for public use. This includes 14 data sets from the BE-B, Alouette 2, DME-A, AE-B, ISIS-1, ISIS-2, OGO-6, DE-2, AEROS-A, AE-C, AE-D, AE-E, and Hinotori satellites. The original data existed in various machine-specific, highly compressed, binary encoding on 7-, or 9-track magnetic tapes. The data were decoded and converted to a common ASCII data format, solar and magnetic indices were added, and some quality control measures were taken. The original intent of producing CD-ROMs with these data was overtaken by the rapid development of the Internet. Most users now prefer to obtain the data directly online and greatly value WWW-interfaces to browse, plot and subset the data. Accordingly the data were made available online on the anonymous ftp site of NASA's National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) at ftp://nssdcftp.gsfc.nasa.gov/spacecraft data/ and on NSSDC's ATMOWeb (http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/atmoweb/), a WWW-interface for plotting, subsetting, and downloading the data. Several new features were implemented into ATMOWeb as part of this project including a filtering and scatter plot capability. The availability of this new database and WWW system was announced through several electronic mailer (AGU, CEDAR, IRI, etc) and through talks and posters during scientific meetings.

  14. Developing a WWW Resource Centre for Acquiring and Accessing Open Learning Materials on Research Methods (ReMOTE).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Robert; Marcella, Rita; Middleton, Iain; McConnell, Michael

    This paper reports on ReMOTE (Research Methods Online Teaching Environment), a Robert Gordon University (Scotland) project focusing on the development of a World Wide Web (WWW) site devoted to the teaching of research methods. The aim of ReMOTE is to provide an infrastructure that allows direct links to specialist sources in order to enable the…

  15. Using Newswatcher and Listservers As A Starting Point To The Use of The WWW for Teaching Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, W. P.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to indicate to colleagues the purpose and use of the Newswatcher application for news and of listservers for specialist communication. This is the way in which I was able to find out more about WWW sites, as well as that news and specialist lists are of interest in themselves. Firstly I should make clear that all the…

  16. Structural and functional analysis of the two haemoglobins of the antarctic seabird Catharacta maccormicki characterization of an additional phosphate binding site by molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    Tamburrini, M; Riccio, A; Romano, M; Giardina, B; di Prisco, G

    2000-10-01

    The amino-acid sequence and the oxygen-binding properties of the two haemoglobins of the Antarctic seabird south polar skua have been investigated. The two haemoglobins showed peculiar functional features, which were probably acquired to meet special needs in relation to the extreme environmental conditions. Both haemoglobins showed a weak alkaline Bohr effect which, during prolonged flight, may protect against sudden and uncontrolled stripping of oxygen in response to acidosis. We suggest that a weak Bohr effect in birds may reflect adaptation to extreme life conditions. The values of heat of oxygenation suggest different functional roles of the two haemoglobins. The experimental evidence suggests that both haemoglobins may bind phosphate at two distinct binding sites. In fact, analysis of the molecular models revealed that an additional phosphate binding site, formed by residues NA1alpha, G6alpha and HC3alpha, is located between the two alpha chains. This additional site may act as an entry/leaving site, thus increasing the probability of capturing phosphate and transferring it to the main binding site located between the two beta chains by means of a site-site migratory mechanism, thereby favouring the release of oxygen. It is suggested that most haemoglobins possess an additional phosphate binding site, having such a role in oxygen transport.

  17. The effect of nitrogen additions on oak foliage and herbivore communities at sites with high and low atmospheric pollution.

    PubMed

    Eatough Jones, Michele; Paine, Timothy D; Fenn, Mark E

    2008-02-01

    To evaluate plant and herbivore responses to nitrogen we conducted a fertilization study at a low and high pollution site in the mixed conifer forests surrounding Los Angeles, California. Contrary to expectations, discriminant function analysis of oak herbivore communities showed significant response to N fertilization when atmospheric deposition was high, but not when atmospheric deposition was low. We hypothesize that longer-term fertilization treatments are needed at the low pollution site before foliar N nutrition increases sufficiently to affect herbivore communities. At the high pollution site, fertilization was also associated with increased catkin production and higher densities of a byturid beetle that feeds on the catkins of oak. Leaf nitrogen and nitrate were significantly higher at the high pollution site compared to the low pollution site. Foliar nitrate concentrations were positively correlated with abundance of sucking insects, leafrollers and plutellids in all three years of the study.

  18. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of the Shoemaker-Levy 9 Impact Sites with UKIRT: CO Emission from the L Site and Additional 5-μm Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooke, T. Y.; Orton, G. S.; Crisp, D.; Friedson, A. J.; Bjoraker, G. L.

    1996-06-01

    CO emission lines in the 4.7-μm fundamental vibrational band were detected from Jupiter at the Shoemaker-Levy 9 fragment L impact site on July 20, 1994 UT, 4 to 5 hr after impact. For an atmospheric model with a single temperature for the emitting CO, which is assumed to be in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), the CO temperature is estimated to beT(CO) = 280 ± 10 K. For this case, the CO column density isN(CO) = 1.2 × 1017cm-2and the estimated mass of CO in the L site is 1.6 × 1013g, with uncertainties of a factor five. The oxygen in this mass of CO can be plausibly explained as coming from material originally in the impactor. Larger amounts of cool CO below the emitting CO could have been present, however. The possible departure of the CO vibrational level populations from LTE and the effect on abundance estimates are discussed qualitatively. Spectra of other impact sites taken at times on the order of days after impact show no detectable changes in the CO absorption lines of impact sites vs nonimpact sites.

  19. Online sea ice data platform: www.seaiceportal.de

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaus, Marcel; Asseng, Jölund; Bartsch, Annekathrin; Bräuer, Benny; Fritzsch, Bernadette; Grosfeld, Klaus; Hendricks, Stefan; Hiller, Wolfgang; Heygster, Georg; Krumpen, Thomas; Melsheimer, Christian; Ricker, Robert; Treffeisen, Renate; Weigelt, Marietta; Nicolaus, Anja; Lemke, Peter

    2016-04-01

    There is an increasing public interest in sea ice information from both Polar Regions, which requires up-to-date background information and data sets at different levels for various target groups. In order to serve this interest and need, seaiceportal.de (originally: meereisportal.de) was developed as a comprehensive German knowledge platform on sea ice and its snow cover in the Arctic and Antarctic. It was launched in April 2013. Since then, the content and selection of data sets increased and the data portal received increasing attention, also from the international science community. Meanwhile, we are providing near-real time and archive data of many key parameters of sea ice and its snow cover. The data sets result from measurements acquired by various platforms as well as numerical simulations. Satellite observations of sea ice concentration, freeboard, thickness and drift are available as gridded data sets. Sea ice and snow temperatures and thickness as well as atmospheric parameters are available from autonomous platforms (buoys). Additional ship observations, ice station measurements, and mooring time series are compiled as data collections over the last decade. In parallel, we are continuously extending our meta-data and uncertainty information for all data sets. In addition to the data portal, seaiceportal.de provides general comprehensive background information on sea ice and snow as well as expert statements on recent observations and developments. This content is mostly in German in order to complement the various existing international sites for the German speaking public. We will present the portal, its content and function, but we are also asking for direct user feedback.

  20. Nd substitution in y/ba sites in melt processed YBa2Cu3O7- δ through Nd2O3 additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varanasi, Chakrapani; Mc Ginn, Paul J.; Blackstead, Howard A.; Pulling, David B.

    1995-12-01

    YBa2Cu3O7- δ (Y123) samples with excess Nd2O3 and Y2O3 additions in the same molar ratios were melt textured in air. In the Nd-doped samples, in addition to Y ion site substitution, partial substitution into the Ba2+ sites is anticipated because of the similar ionic sizes of Nd3+ and Ba2+. The microstructure, Tc, and magnetic properties of Nd-doped samples were analyzed and compared with undoped Y123 and samples with excess Y2O3. The Nd2O3 additions lead to significant magnetization improvements, likely due to both rare earth- and Ba-site substitution by the doped Nd3+ ions, and to increases in Tc. Y2O3 additions resulted in no marked property enhancement.

  1. Insights on WWW-based geoscience teaching: Climbing the first year learning cliff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberson, Michelle N.; Johnson, Mark; Bevier, Mary Lou; Russell, J. Kelly

    1997-06-01

    In early 1995, The University of British Columbia Department of Geological Sciences (now Earth and Ocean Sciences) initiated a project that explored the effectiveness of the World Wide Web as a teaching and learning medium. Four decisions made at the onset of the project have guided the department's educational technology plan: (1) over 90% of funding recieved from educational technology grants was committed towards personnel; (2) materials developed are modular in design; (3) a data-base approach was taken to resource development; and (4) a strong commitment to student involvement in courseware development. The project comprised development of a web site for an existing core course: Geology 202, Introduction to Petrology. The web site is a gateway to course information, content, resources, exercises, and several searchable data-bases (images, petrologic definitions, and minerals in thin section). Material was developed on either an IBM or UNIX machine, ported to a UNIX platform, and is accessed using the Netscape browser. The resources consist primarily of HTML files or CGI scripts with associated text, images, sound, digital movies, and animations. Students access the web site from the departmental student computer facility, from home or a computer station in the petrology laboratory. Results of a survey of the Geol 202 students indicate that they found the majority of the resources useful, and the site is being expanded. The Geology 202 project had a "trickle-up" effect throughout the department: prior to this project, there was minimal use of Internet resources in lower-level geology courses. By the end of the 1996-1997 academic year, we anticipate that at least 17 Earth and Ocean Science courses will have a WWW site for one or all of the following uses: (1) presenting basic information; (2) accessing lecture images; (3) providing a jumping-off point for exploring related WWW sites; (4) conducting on-line exercises; and/or (5) providing a communications forum

  2. Image Clustering System on WWW using Web Texts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunayama, Wataru; Nagata, Akiko; Yachida, Masahiko

    As the internet becomes the basic resource of information, not only texts but images retrieval systems have been appeared. However, many of those supply only a list of images, so we have to seek the expecting images one by one. Although, image labeling is one of the solutions of such a problem, various words are labeled to an image if the words are extracted from only one Web page. Therefore, this paper proposes an image clustering system that labels images by words related to a search keyword. This relationships are measured by Web pages in WWW. By the experimental results, users were enabled to find the intended images more faster than the ordinal image search system.

  3. Phase Structure and Site Preference Behavior of Ternary Alloying Additions to PdTi and PtTi Shape-Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Mosca, Hugo O.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2006-01-01

    The phasc structure and concentration dependence of the lattice parameter and energy of formation of ternary Pd-'I-X and Pt-Ti-X alloys for a large number of ternary alloying additions X (X = Na, Mg, Al, Si, Sc. V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Ag, Cd, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir) are investigated with an atomistic modeling approach. In addition, a detailed description of the site preference behavior of such additions showing that the elements can be grouped according to their absolute preference for a specific site, regardless of concentration, or preference for available sites in the deficient sublattice is provided.

  4. 76 FR 64366 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection for Public Comment: Additional On-Site Data Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... HCV programs. The proposed data collection will take place through site visits to up to 30 PHAs and... study of administrative fees in the HCV program. The national study of administrative fees will include... administrative fee allocation formula for the HCV program. OMB Approval Number: Pending. Agency form...

  5. 15 CFR 921.33 - Boundary changes, amendments to the management plan, and addition of multiple-site components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Reserve, may be made only after written approval by NOAA. NOAA may require public notice, including notice... statement may be required. NOAA will place a notice in the Federal Register of any proposed changes in... made. NOAA will publish notice of the proposed new site including an invitation for comments from...

  6. Characterization and regulation of an additional actin-filament-binding site in large isoforms of the stereocilia actin-bundling protein espin.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lili; Beeler, Dina M; Bartles, James R

    2014-03-15

    The espin actin-bundling proteins, which are produced as isoforms of different sizes from a single gene, are required for the growth of hair cell stereocilia. We have characterized an additional actin-filament-binding site present in the extended amino-termini of large espin isoforms. Constitutively active in espin 2, the site increased the size of actin bundles formed in vitro and inhibited actin fluorescence recovery in microvilli. In espin 1, which has an N-terminal ankyrin repeat domain, the site was autoinhibited by binding between the ankyrin repeat domain and a peptide near the actin-binding site. Deletion of this peptide from espin 1 activated its actin-binding site. The peptide resembled tail homology domain I of myosin III, a ligand of the ankyrin repeat domain localized with espin 1 at the tip of stereocilia. A myosin III tail homology domain I peptide, but not scrambled control peptides, inhibited internal binding of the ankyrin repeat domain and released the espin 1 actin-binding site from autoinhibition. Thus, this regulation could result in local activation of the additional actin-binding site of espin 1 by myosin III in stereocilia.

  7. Places to Go: Sakai|http://www.sakaiproject.org/

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Stephen Downes continues his examination of open source learning management systems (LMSs) with a visit to Sakai's Web site. While Sakai's Web site is not particularly easy to navigate, it provides access to a large community and constellation of related online learning products and initiatives. Visitors can visit discussion forums to ask…

  8. Stardial -- an autonomous astronomical camera on the WWW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, P. R.; Thakkar, U.

    1997-05-01

    The use of an autonomous electronic camera, called ``Stardial,'' for undergraduate instruction is described. Stardial delivers images of the night sky nearly in real-time to the world wide web (www.astro.uiuc.edu/stardial/). The remote instrumentation of Stardial is robust, inexpensive, and accomodates many students asynchronously with respect to the instructor(s). The guiding philosophy of the curriculum is to provide students with authentic astronomical data so that they may learn about science by doing it themselves on the internet. Students respond favorably to the opportunity to learn from their own experiences with genuine data, complete with its irregularities and its surprises. Perhaps surprisingly, 9 of 10 self-selected student volunteers in our pilot project were female. Stardial's instrumentation is similar to that of Gaustad et al., and to that of Richmond, Droege, et al. (both at this same meeting). Stardial has benefitted from contributions from students, especially Lawrence Tan, Troy Klyber, Jim Pulokas, Jim Waldemer, and Diana Lopez, and from a number of professionals, especially G.T. Becker, Mike Newberry, John Dolby, Tom Droege, Bob Mutel, Mike Richmond, John Thorstensen, and Rick White. Stardial is funded by the University of Illinois, primarily from the office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs. We welcome participation from amateur astronomers and other educators.

  9. Webs on the Web (WOW): 3D visualization of ecological networks on the WWW for collaborative research and education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Ilmi; Williams, Rich; Levine, Eli; Yoon, Sanghyuk; Dunne, Jennifer; Martinez, Neo

    2004-06-01

    This paper describes information technology being developed to improve the quality, sophistication, accessibility, and pedagogical simplicity of ecological network data, analysis, and visualization. We present designs for a WWW demonstration/prototype web site that provides database, analysis, and visualization tools for research and education related to food web research. Our early experience with a prototype 3D ecological network visualization guides our design of a more flexible architecture design. 3D visualization algorithms include variable node and link sizes, placements according to node connectivity and tropic levels, and visualization of other node and link properties in food web data. The flexible architecture includes an XML application design, FoodWebML, and pipelining of computational components. Based on users" choices of data and visualization options, the WWW prototype site will connect to an XML database (Xindice) and return the visualization in VRML format for browsing and further interactions.

  10. Cognitive Issues in the Design and Deployment of Interactive Hypermedia: Implications for Authoring WWW Sites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebersole, Samuel

    1997-01-01

    In designing effective interactive media, cognitive psychology, human factors, psycholinguistics, semiotics, and communication theory should be considered. This article defines interactive media, considers interactive hypermedia design and the cognitive processes of designer and user, and examines the World Wide Web and Netscape Navigator, a…

  11. WWW.LCACCESS -- GLOBAL DIRECTORY OF LCI RESOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    LCAccess is a USEPA sponsored web-site intended to promote the use of Life Cycle Assessments in business decision-making by facilitating access to data sources useful in developing a life cycle inventory (LCI). While LCAccess will not itself contain data, it will be a searchable...

  12. WWW.LCACCESS - GLOBAL DIRECTORY OF LCI RESOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    LCAccess is a USEPA sponsored web-site intended to promote the use of Life Cycle Assessment in business decision-making by facilitating access to data sources useful in developing a life cycle inventory (OCI). While LCAccess will not itself contain data, it will be a searchable g...

  13. RCRA special study on waste definitions: Sites that require additional consideration prior to NPL proposal under the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act. Directive

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-03-10

    The purposes of this memo are to discuss Sections 105(g) and 125 of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA) and, to the extent now possible, to outline the scope of these provisions by providing appropriate definitions. Both of these sections require that, until the Hazard Ranking System (HRS) is revised, the Agency evaluate additional data for sites at which 'special wastes,' as defined under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), are present in significant quantities before these sites are proposed for the NPL.

  14. A prescription for the Epley maneuver: www.youtube.com?

    PubMed Central

    Burke, James F.; Skolarus, Lesli E.; Callaghan, Brian C.; Fife, Terry D.; Baloh, Robert W.; Fendrick, A. Mark

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Video-sharing Web sites are being used for information about common conditions including dizziness. The Epley maneuver (EM) is a simple and effective treatment for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) of the posterior canal. However, the maneuver is underused in routine care. In this study, we aimed to describe and analyze the available information about the EM on youtube.com. Methods: A YouTube search was performed on August 31, 2011, for videos that demonstrated the entire EM. Detailed data were abstracted from each video and corresponding Web site. Videos were rated on the accuracy of the maneuver by 2 authors, with differences resolved by adjudication. Comments posted by viewers were assessed for themes regarding video use. Results: Of the 3,319 videos identified, 33 demonstrated the EM. The total number of hits for all videos was 2,755,607. The video with the most hits (802,471) was produced by the American Academy of Neurology. Five of the videos accounted for 85% of all the hits. The maneuver demonstration was rated as accurate in 64% (21) of the videos. Themes derived from the 424 posted comments included patients self-treating with the maneuver after reviewing the videos, and providers using the videos as a prescribed treatment or for educational purposes. Conclusion: Accurate video demonstration of the Epley maneuver is available and widely viewed on YouTube. Video-sharing media may be an important way to disseminate effective interventions such as the EM. The impact of video Web sites on outcomes and costs of care is not known and warrants future study. PMID:22826542

  15. Identification of Bacteria Synthesizing Ribosomal RNA in Response to Uranium Addition During Biostimulation at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Site.

    PubMed

    McGuinness, Lora R; Wilkins, Michael J; Williams, Kenneth H; Long, Philip E; Kerkhof, Lee J

    2015-01-01

    Understanding which organisms are capable of reducing uranium at historically contaminated sites provides crucial information needed to evaluate treatment options and outcomes. One approach is determination of the bacteria which directly respond to uranium addition. In this study, uranium amendments were made to groundwater samples from a site of ongoing biostimulation with acetate. The active microbes in the planktonic phase were deduced by monitoring ribosomes production via RT-PCR. The results indicated several microorganisms were synthesizing ribosomes in proportion with uranium amendment up to 2 μM. Concentrations of U (VI) >2 μM were generally found to inhibit ribosome synthesis. Two active bacteria responding to uranium addition in the field were close relatives of Desulfobacter postgateii and Geobacter bemidjiensis. Since RNA content often increases with growth rate, our findings suggest it is possible to rapidly elucidate active bacteria responding to the addition of uranium in field samples and provides a more targeted approach to stimulate specific populations to enhance radionuclide reduction in contaminated sites.

  16. Identification of bacteria synthesizing ribosomal RNA in response to uranium addition during biostimulation at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research site

    SciTech Connect

    McGuinness, Lora R.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Kerkhof, Lee J.; Boyanov, Maxim I.

    2015-09-18

    Understanding which organisms are capable of reducing uranium at historically contaminated sites provides crucial information needed to evaluate treatment options and outcomes. One approach is determination of the bacteria which directly respond to uranium addition. In this research, uranium amendments were made to groundwater samples from a site of ongoing biostimulation with acetate. The active microbes in the planktonic phase were deduced by monitoring ribosomes production via RT-PCR. The results indicated several microorganisms were synthesizing ribosomes in proportion with uranium amendment up to 2 μM. Concentrations of U (VI) >2 μM were generally found to inhibit ribosome synthesis. Two active bacteria responding to uranium addition in the field were close relatives of Desulfobacter postgateii and Geobacter bemidjiensis. Since RNA content often increases with growth rate, our findings suggest it is possible to rapidly elucidate active bacteria responding to the addition of uranium in field samples and provides a more targeted approach to stimulate specific populations to enhance radionuclide reduction in contaminated sites.

  17. Identification of Bacteria Synthesizing Ribosomal RNA in Response to Uranium Addition During Biostimulation at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Site

    PubMed Central

    McGuinness, Lora R.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Kerkhof, Lee J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding which organisms are capable of reducing uranium at historically contaminated sites provides crucial information needed to evaluate treatment options and outcomes. One approach is determination of the bacteria which directly respond to uranium addition. In this study, uranium amendments were made to groundwater samples from a site of ongoing biostimulation with acetate. The active microbes in the planktonic phase were deduced by monitoring ribosomes production via RT-PCR. The results indicated several microorganisms were synthesizing ribosomes in proportion with uranium amendment up to 2 μM. Concentrations of U (VI) >2 μM were generally found to inhibit ribosome synthesis. Two active bacteria responding to uranium addition in the field were close relatives of Desulfobacter postgateii and Geobacter bemidjiensis. Since RNA content often increases with growth rate, our findings suggest it is possible to rapidly elucidate active bacteria responding to the addition of uranium in field samples and provides a more targeted approach to stimulate specific populations to enhance radionuclide reduction in contaminated sites. PMID:26382047

  18. Identification of bacteria synthesizing ribosomal RNA in response to uranium addition during biostimulation at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research site

    DOE PAGES

    McGuinness, Lora R.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Williams, Kenneth H.; ...

    2015-09-18

    Understanding which organisms are capable of reducing uranium at historically contaminated sites provides crucial information needed to evaluate treatment options and outcomes. One approach is determination of the bacteria which directly respond to uranium addition. In this research, uranium amendments were made to groundwater samples from a site of ongoing biostimulation with acetate. The active microbes in the planktonic phase were deduced by monitoring ribosomes production via RT-PCR. The results indicated several microorganisms were synthesizing ribosomes in proportion with uranium amendment up to 2 μM. Concentrations of U (VI) >2 μM were generally found to inhibit ribosome synthesis. Two activemore » bacteria responding to uranium addition in the field were close relatives of Desulfobacter postgateii and Geobacter bemidjiensis. Since RNA content often increases with growth rate, our findings suggest it is possible to rapidly elucidate active bacteria responding to the addition of uranium in field samples and provides a more targeted approach to stimulate specific populations to enhance radionuclide reduction in contaminated sites.« less

  19. Managing the SLD Offline on a Shoestring via WWW

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, Richard

    2003-05-07

    As a traditionally undermanned experiment, SLD has found it necessary to automate as much of its offline machinery and monitoring as possible. This includes all documentation, user education, group communication, monitoring of local and remote MC Farms, shift assignments, integrity of the code and monitoring of the analysis cluster. Additionally, monitoring of the data processing is performed on the web by remote users. They can access statistics, plots and event displays to ensure high data quality. The SLD web is designed to be an all-encompassing tool that allows maintenance of the offline system in good working order by a small group of people.

  20. Effects of nutrient and lime additions in mine site rehabilitation strategies on the accumulation of antimony and arsenic by native Australian plants.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Susan C; Leech, Calvin D; Butler, Leo; Lisle, Leanne; Ashley, Paul M; Lockwood, Peter V

    2013-10-15

    The effects of nutrient and lime additions on antimony (Sb) and arsenic (As) accumulation by native Australian and naturalised plants growing in two contaminated mine site soils (2,735 mg kg(-1) and 4,517 mg kg(-1) Sb; 826 mg kg(-1) and 1606 As mgkg(-1)) was investigated using a glasshouse pot experiment. The results indicated an increase in soil solution concentrations with nutrient addition in both soils and also with nutrient+lime addition for Sb in one soil. Metalloid concentrations in plant roots were significantly greater than concentrations in above ground plant parts. The metalloid transfer to above ground plant parts from the roots and from the soil was, however, low (ratio of leaf concentration/soil concentration≪1) for all species studied. Eucalyptus michaeliana was the most successful at colonisation with lowest metalloid transfer to above ground plant parts. Addition of nutrients and nutrients+lime to soils, in general, increased plant metalloid accumulation. Relative As accumulation was greater than that of Sb. All the plant species studied were suitable for consideration in the mine soil phytostabilisation strategies but lime additions should be limited and longer term trials also recommended.

  1. Identification of drug-binding sites on human serum albumin using affinity capillary electrophoresis and chemically modified proteins as buffer additives.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Seung; Austin, John; Hage, David S

    2002-03-01

    A technique based on affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) and chemically modified proteins was used to screen the binding sites of various drugs on human serum albumin (HSA). This involved using HSA as a buffer additive, following the site-selective modification of this protein at two residues (tryptophan 214 or tyrosine 411) located in its major binding regions. The migration times of four compounds (warfarin, ibuprofen, suprofen and flurbiprofen) were measured in the presence of normal or modified HSA. These times were then compared and the mobility shifts observed with the modified proteins were used to identify the binding regions of each injected solute on HSA. Items considered in optimizing this assay included the concentration of protein placed into the running buffer, the reagents used to modify HSA, and the use of dextran as a secondary additive to adjust protein mobility. The results of this method showed good agreement with those of previous reports. The advantages and disadvantages of this approach are examined, as well as its possible extension to other solutes.

  2. Quantum-Chemical Study of the Discrimination against dNTP in the Nucleotide Addition Reaction in the Active Site of RNA Polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Roßbach, Sven; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2017-04-11

    Eukaryotic RNA polymerase II catalyzes the transcription of DNA into mRNA very efficiently and with an extremely low error rate with regard to matching base and sugar moiety. Despite its importance, little is known about how it discriminates against 2'-deoxy NTPs during the chemical reaction. To investigate the differences in the addition reactions of ATP and dATP, we used FF-MD and QM/MM calculations within a nudged elastic band approach, which allowed us to find the energetically accessible reaction coordinates. By converging the QM size, we found that 800 QM atoms are necessary to properly describe the active site. We show how the absence of a single hydrogen bond between the enzyme and the NTP 2'-OH group leads to an increase of the reaction barrier by 16 kcal/mol and therefore conclude that Arg446 is the key residue in the discrimination process.

  3. Additive Promotion of Viral Internal Ribosome Entry Site-Mediated Translation by Far Upstream Element-Binding Protein 1 and an Enterovirus 71-Induced Cleavage Product

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chuan-Tien; Kung, Yu-An; Li, Mei-Ling; Lee, Kuo-Ming; Liu, Shih-Tung; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2016-01-01

    The 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of the enterovirus 71 (EV71) RNA genome contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) that is indispensable for viral protein translation. Due to the limited coding capacity of their RNA genomes, EV71 and other picornaviruses typically recruit host factors, known as IRES trans-acting factors (ITAFs), to mediate IRES-dependent translation. Here, we show that EV71 viral proteinase 2A is capable of cleaving far upstream element-binding protein 1 (FBP1), a positive ITAF that directly binds to the EV71 5' UTR linker region to promote viral IRES-driven translation. The cleavage occurs at the Gly-371 residue of FBP1 during the EV71 infection process, and this generates a functional cleavage product, FBP11-371. Interestingly, the cleavage product acts to promote viral IRES activity. Footprinting analysis and gel mobility shift assay results showed that FBP11-371 similarly binds to the EV71 5' UTR linker region, but at a different site from full-length FBP1; moreover, FBP1 and FBP11-371 were found to act additively to promote IRES-mediated translation and virus yield. Our findings expand the current understanding of virus-host interactions with regard to viral recruitment and modulation of ITAFs, and provide new insights into translational control during viral infection. PMID:27780225

  4. Structural-functional characterization of the cathodic haemoglobin of the conger eel Conger conger: molecular modelling study of an additional phosphate-binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini, Mariagiuseppina; Giardina, Bruno; Verde, Cinzia; Carratore, Vito; Olianas, Alessandra; Sollai, Luigi; Sanna, Maria T; Castagnola, Massimo; di Prisco, Guido

    2003-01-01

    The protein sequence data for the alpha- and beta-chains have been deposited in the SWISS-PROT and TrEMBL protein knowledgebase under the accession numbers P83479 and P83478 respectively. The Conger conger (conger eel) haemoglobin (Hb) system is made of three components, one of which, the so-called cathodic Hb, representing approx. 20% of the total pigment, has been purified and characterized from both a structural and functional point of view. Stripped Hb showed a reverse Bohr effect, high oxygen affinity and slightly low cooperativity in the absence of any effector. Addition of saturating GTP strongly influences the pH dependence of the oxygen affinity, since the reverse Bohr effect, observed under stripped conditions, is converted into a small normal Bohr effect. A further investigation of the GTP effect on oxygen affinity, carried out by fitting its titration curve, demonstrated the presence of two independent binding sites. Therefore, on the basis of the amino acid sequence of the alpha- and beta-chains, which have been determined, a computer modelling study has been performed. The data suggest that C. conger cathodic Hb may bind organic phosphates at two distinct binding sites located along the central cavity of the tetramer by hydrogen bonds and/or electrostatic interactions with amino acid residues of both chains, which have been identified. Among these residues, the two Lys-alpha(G6) (where the letter refers to the haemoglobin helix and the number to the amino acid position in the helix) appear to have a key role in the GTP movement from the external binding region to the internal central cavity of the tetrameric molecule. PMID:12646043

  5. SitesIdentify: a protein functional site prediction tool

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The rate of protein structures being deposited in the Protein Data Bank surpasses the capacity to experimentally characterise them and therefore computational methods to analyse these structures have become increasingly important. Identifying the region of the protein most likely to be involved in function is useful in order to gain information about its potential role. There are many available approaches to predict functional site, but many are not made available via a publicly-accessible application. Results Here we present a functional site prediction tool (SitesIdentify), based on combining sequence conservation information with geometry-based cleft identification, that is freely available via a web-server. We have shown that SitesIdentify compares favourably to other functional site prediction tools in a comparison of seven methods on a non-redundant set of 237 enzymes with annotated active sites. Conclusion SitesIdentify is able to produce comparable accuracy in predicting functional sites to its closest available counterpart, but in addition achieves improved accuracy for proteins with few characterised homologues. SitesIdentify is available via a webserver at http://www.manchester.ac.uk/bioinformatics/sitesidentify/ PMID:19922660

  6. Two additional carbohydrate-binding sites of beta-amylase from Bacillus cereus var. mycoides are involved in hydrolysis and raw starch-binding.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhengmao; Miyake, Hideo; Tatsumi, Maki; Nishimura, Shigenori; Nitta, Yasunori

    2004-03-01

    In the previous X-ray crystallographic study, it was found that beta-amylase from Bacillus cereus var. mycoides has three carbohydrate-binding sites aside from the active site: two (Site2 and Site3) in domain B and one (Site1) in domain C. To investigate the roles of these sites in the catalytic reaction and raw starch-binding, Site1 and Site2 were mutated. From analyses of the raw starch-binding of wild-type and mutant enzymes, it was found that Site1 contributes to the binding affinity to raw-starch more than Site2, and that the binding capacity is maintained when either Site1 or Site2 exists. The raw starch-digesting ability of this enzyme was poor. From inhibition studies by maltitol, GGX and alpha-CD for hydrolyses of maltopentaose (G5) and amylose ( (n) = 16) catalyzed by wild-type and mutant enzymes, it was found that alpha-CD is a competitive inhibitor, while, maltitol behaves as a mixed-type or competitive inhibitor depending on the chain length of the substrate and the mutant enzyme. From the analysis of the inhibition mechanism, we conclude that the bindings of maltitol and GGX to Site2 in domain B form an abortive ESI complex when amylose ( (n) = 16) is used as a substrate.

  7. Results of Additional Bioventing Respiration Testing at Sites ST61, ST71, and ST43/55 (Pumphouse III and Valve Pit 3-4)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Initial bioventing pilot tests were completed by Parsons ES at four sites at Elmendorf AFB, Alaska during the period from June 15 through July 19...F41624-92-D-8036 Order 17) to complete remediation monitoring and design and/or closure sampling, and to implement full-scale bioventing at several US Air...Force sites. The purpose of the new task order is to extend the operation of existing bioventing pilot systems, and to move forward with either site

  8. Three-year summary report of biological monitoring at the Southwest Ocean dredged-material disposal site and additional locations off Grays Harbor, Washington, 1990--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Antrim, L.D.; Shreffler, D.K.; Pearson, W.H.; Cullinan, V.I. )

    1992-12-01

    The Grays Harbor Navigation Improvement Project was initiated to improve navigation by widening and deepening the federal channel at Grays Harbor. Dredged-material disposal sites were selected after an extensive review process that included inter-agency agreements, biological surveys, other laboratory and field studies, and preparation of environmental impact statements The Southwest Site, was designated to receive materials dredged during annual maintenance dredging as well as the initial construction phase of the project. The Southwest Site was located, and the disposal operations designed, primarily to avoid impacts to Dungeness crab. The Final Environmental Impact Statement Supplement for the project incorporated a Site Monitoring Plan in which a tiered approach to disposal site monitoring was recommended. Under Tier I of the Site Monitoring Plan, Dungeness crab densities are monitored to confirm that large aggregations of newly settled Dungeness crab have not moved onto the Southwest Site. Tier 2 entails an increased sampling effort to determine whether a change in disposal operations is needed. Four epibenthic surveys using beam trawls were conducted in 1990, 1991, and 1992 at the Southwest Site and North Reference area, where high crab concentrations were found in the spring of 1985. Survey results during these three years prompted no Tier 2 activities. Epibenthic surveys were also conducted at two nearshore sites where construction of sediment berms has been proposed. This work is summarized in an appendix to this report.

  9. AlpArray-Italy: Site description and noise characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govoni, Aladino; Bonatto, Luciana; Capello, Marco; Cavaliere, Adriano; Chiarabba, Claudio; D'Alema, Ezio; Danesi, Stefania; Lovati, Sara; Margheriti, Lucia; Massa, Marco; Mazza, Salvatore; Mazzarini, Francesco; Monna, Stephen; Moretti, Milena; Nardi, Anna; Piccinini, Davide; Piromallo, Claudia; Pondrelli, Silvia; Salimbeni, Simone; Serpelloni, Enrico; Solarino, Stefano; Vallocchia, Massimiliano; Santulin, Marco; AlpArray Working Group

    2017-03-01

    Within the framework of the European collaborative research initiative AlpArray (www.alparray.ethz.ch" target="_blank">http://www.alparray.ethz.ch), the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanolgia (INGV) deployed overall 20 broad-band seismic stations in Northern Italy and on two islands in the Tyrrhenian Sea (Capraia and Montecristo) during Fall-Winter 2015. The temporary deployment (16 stations) will run for two to three years and 4 INGV National Seismic Network accelerometric sites are now equipped with additional permanent broad-band sensors. The 16 temporary stations are equipped with REF TEK 130 digitizers and Nanometrics Trillium Compact 120 s sensors, a couple have Nanometrics Trillium 120P sensors and one a Streckeisen STS2. For each site we describe the settings and discuss the noise levels, the site effects and the preliminary sensitivity analysis.

  10. Estimation of the limitations for surficial water addition above a potential high level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Fewell, M.E.; Sobolik, S.R.; Gauthier, J.H.

    1992-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is studying Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada as a potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. Site characterization includes surface-based and underground testing. Analyses have been performed to design site characterization activities with minimal impact on the ability of the site to isolate waste, and on tests performed as part of the characterization process. One activity of site characterization is the construction of an Exploratory Studies Facility, consisting of underground shafts, drifts, and ramps, and the accompanying surface pad facility and roads. The information in this report addresses the following topics: (1) a discussion of the potential effects of surface construction water on repository-performance, and on surface and underground experiments; (2) one-dimensional numerical calculations predicting the maximum allowable amount of water that may infiltrate the surface of the mountain without affecting repository performance; and (3) two-dimensional numerical calculations of the movement of that amount of surface water and how the water may affect repository performance and experiments. The results contained herein should be used with other site data and scientific/engineering judgement in determining controls on water usage at Yucca Mountain. This document contains information that has been used in preparing Appendix I of the Exploratory Studies Facility Design Requirements document for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project.

  11. [Preparation of the database and the Internet (WWW) homepage for regulations on chemicals in Japan].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, M; Morita, M; Kaminuma, T

    1999-01-01

    We prepared a database on chemical regulations in Japan. The regulations consist of "The Law concerning the Examination and Regulation of Manufacture, etc., of Chemical Substances", "Poisonous and Deleterious Substances", Control Law", "Waterworks Law", "Law for the Control of Household Products containing Harmful Substances", and Pesticide Residues in Food Sanitation Law". We also set up a World Wide Web (WWW) homepage containing an explanation of the law as well as chemical names, CAS registry numbers, and standards. The WWW pages contain lists of chemicals and the retrieval page for the database.

  12. Lessons from Afar: A Review of www.daisakuikeda.org, Official Website of Daisaku Ikeda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arauz, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Daisaku Ikeda (1928- ) is a Buddhist leader, peace builder, school founder, and poet. His own biography and lifework provide a model for how one can transform adversity into alternative opportunities for some of the most disenfranchised students. Scrutinizing Ikeda's official website (www.daisakuikeda.org) reveals an extensive collection of his…

  13. Student Publishing in a WWW Digital Library--Goals and Instructional Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bos, Nathan; And Others

    Having K-12 students create artifacts can serve several purposes within an effective science curriculum. Through World Wide Web (WWW) publishing projects, students' cognition and motivation can be improved and the "authenticity" of their work increased, relating to recent thinking about situated learning and constructivist science…

  14. Implementation and Adaptation Experiences with a WWW-Based Course Management System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Boer, Wim; Collis, Betty

    2001-01-01

    Discusses use of the World Wide Web (WWW) for course management at the University of Twente (Netherlands) and describes the TeleTOP Implementation Model that delineates the change entities that are of importance when an institution plans to implement the World Wide Web in education on a wide scale. (LRW)

  15. The WWW & OVER Project: Real-Time Distance Education and the Role of the Street Singer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colazzo, Luigi; Conte, Francesco; Molinari, Andrea

    This paper describes the state of the "WWW & Over" project to design techniques for the remote control of hypermedia teaching materials. It reviews the main features of the new version of the prototype for distance teaching, where teacher and students interact at a distance in real time on teaching materials created by the teacher. Also described…

  16. The MicroWeb Toolkit: Bringing the WWW to the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Judi R.; Cooke, John E.; Greer, Jim E.

    Computer applications that facilitate the use of the World Wide Web (WWW) within elementary and secondary education must provide support for educators to locate materials quickly and easily; they must minimize the amount of time spent waiting for files to traverse the network; and they must deal sensitively with censorship. The MicroWeb Toolkit is…

  17. How computer technologies might be used to foster professional development: a case report of www.perfusionkorea.org.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kuna

    2003-03-01

    Advances in the Internet and communication technologies have enabled many perfusion-related websites to provide detailed and reliable information to perfusionists. However, these websites are also faced with various member needs that require updating for fast, flexible responses. Despite the rapid increase in the number of these websites, little is known about the structure, performance, and effective utilization methods of such websites. This case report examines the www.perfusionkorea.org, a virtual organization that works across space and time with links strengthened by webs of communication technologies. In addition, website maintenance and resource management tasks, which are important factors for long-term survival, are discussed using the log analyzer and internet protocol tracing programs. Finally, using www.perfusionkorea.org, as a prototype of virtual organization activities, what we can expect to see more commonly in the near future, is discussed. Although we used a tremendous amount of multimedia techniques to attract members, we found that the significance of the perfusionists' website would come from active participation of members rather than a new, complicated technology or eye-catching graphics. This case report shows the synergistic effects that Korea's application of the Internet to the field of perfusion. It also suggests that new methodological strategies and approaches can be developed and tested to provide perfusionists with a direction for tomorrow's health care system.

  18. Development of a laboratory niche Web site.

    PubMed

    Dimenstein, Izak B; Dimenstein, Simon I

    2013-10-01

    This technical note presents the development of a methodological laboratory niche Web site. The "Grossing Technology in Surgical Pathology" (www.grossing-technology.com) Web site is used as an example. Although common steps in creation of most Web sites are followed, there are particular requirements for structuring the template's menu on methodological laboratory Web sites. The "nested doll principle," in which one object is placed inside another, most adequately describes the methodological approach to laboratory Web site design. Fragmentation in presenting the Web site's material highlights the discrete parts of the laboratory procedure. An optimally minimal triad of components can be recommended for the creation of a laboratory niche Web site: a main set of media, a blog, and an ancillary component (host, contact, and links). The inclusion of a blog makes the Web site a dynamic forum for professional communication. By forming links and portals, cloud computing opens opportunities for connecting a niche Web site with other Web sites and professional organizations. As an additional source of information exchange, methodological laboratory niche Web sites are destined to parallel both traditional and new forms, such as books, journals, seminars, webinars, and internal educational materials.

  19. Additional Cover/Cap Scenario Streamtube Fate and Transport Modeling for the Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, K.

    2000-10-17

    The modeling described in this report is an extension of previous fate and transport modeling for the Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground (ORWBG) Corrective Measures Study/Feasibility Study (CMS/FS). The purpose of this and the previous modeling is to provide quantitative input to the screening of remedial alternatives for the CMS/FS for this site.

  20. How to make x-ray simulation software working on WWW: a simple recipe based on seven years of experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Sergey A.

    2004-10-01

    Attaching WWW interfaces to scientific software opens new opportunities to researchers by making their results available to wide scientific community in a way complimentary to publication. We have shown that this task may be much easier than many used to think: the amount of additional code is small, the Common Gateway Interface (CGI) can be written in any language, not necessarily PERL, and the software can be interfaced on any operating system it was originally written and does not have to be ported to UNIX. This paper provides some useful recipes resulted from seven years of author's experience in developing and maintaining highly successful X-ray Web server project. All these solutions are based on free public domain software (Apache, GnuPlot, and InfoZip) and applicable for multiple computer platforms. Some practical examples are provided.

  1. Addition of transcription activator-like effector binding sites to a pathogen strain-specific rice bacterial blight resistance gene makes it effective against additional strains and against bacterial leaf streak.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Aaron W; Doyle, Erin L; Bogdanove, Adam J

    2012-09-01

    Xanthomonas transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors promote disease in plants by binding to and activating host susceptibility genes. Plants counter with TAL effector-activated executor resistance genes, which cause host cell death and block disease progression. We asked whether the functional specificity of an executor gene could be broadened by adding different TAL effector binding elements (EBEs) to it. We added six EBEs to the rice Xa27 gene, which confers resistance to strains of the bacterial blight pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) that deliver the TAL effector AvrXa27. The EBEs correspond to three other effectors from Xoo strain PXO99(A) and three from strain BLS256 of the bacterial leaf streak pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc). Stable integration into rice produced healthy lines exhibiting gene activation by each TAL effector, and resistance to PXO99(A) , a PXO99(A) derivative lacking AvrXa27, and BLS256, as well as two other Xoo and 10 Xoc strains virulent toward wildtype Xa27 plants. Transcripts initiated primarily at a common site. Sequences in the EBEs were found to occur nonrandomly in rice promoters, suggesting an overlap with endogenous regulatory sequences. Thus, executor gene specificity can be broadened by adding EBEs, but caution is warranted because of the possible coincident introduction of endogenous regulatory elements.

  2. Use of the WWW as a Collaborative Tool in a Large HEP Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, G.; Dubois, R.; Johnson, A. S.; Moss, L.; Perl, J.; Langston, M.; Weiss, E.

    As the phenomenal growth of the WWW continues it is easy to view it purely as a tool for PR and advertising, and to forget its roots as a collaborative tool for HEP research. The SLD collaboration has made extensive use of WWW in this latter role, using it to allow collaborators to sign up for shifts, to monitor physics data-taking in near real time, and as a tool to educate and inform collaborators. By their nature such tools are accessible to all collaborators wherever they are located. In this talk we will describe our current system and comment on its effectiveness, and discuss possible enhancements based on forthcoming more powerful web browsers.

  3. WWW-based continuing medical education: how do general practitioners use it?

    PubMed

    Dickmann, C; Habermeyer, E; Spitzer, K

    2000-01-01

    WWW-based Continuing Medical Education (CME) is assumed to have the potential to make up for shortcomings in traditional lifelong learning of General Practitioners (GPs). This is obvious for CME systems with accreditation and control of the individual GP's CME activities but seems less clear for non-controlled CME systems like in several European countries, e.g. Germany. This paper reports results from the evaluation of a German CME website by 59 GPs (internet experience of 20 months on average) during a 4-months period. GPs mainly learned at home after work, with 46% of the GPs visiting the website at least once per month. Self-study and information seeking accounted for 58% of the activities, while communication and interaction were used infrequently. 77% of the GPs judged less but detailed information on selected topics more important than being able to access many but broad contents. GPs mostly prefer established means of learning and communication. It is concluded that the GPs' self-directed individual learning mainly needs high-quality information and well-structured collections of existing relevant WWW resources. Communication, virtual community building and sophisticated interactivity are of little importance at present. WWW-based CME complements existing CME activities, especially regarding individual information seeking on focused problems.

  4. Improvement in the prediction of the translation initiation site through balancing methods, inclusion of acquired knowledge and addition of features to sequences of mRNA

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The accurate prediction of the initiation of translation in sequences of mRNA is an important activity for genome annotation. However, obtaining an accurate prediction is not always a simple task and can be modeled as a problem of classification between positive sequences (protein codifiers) and negative sequences (non-codifiers). The problem is highly imbalanced because each molecule of mRNA has a unique translation initiation site and various others that are not initiators. Therefore, this study focuses on the problem from the perspective of balancing classes and we present an undersampling balancing method, M-clus, which is based on clustering. The method also adds features to sequences and improves the performance of the classifier through the inclusion of knowledge obtained by the model, called InAKnow. Results Through this methodology, the measures of performance used (accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and adjusted accuracy) are greater than 93% for the Mus musculus and Rattus norvegicus organisms, and varied between 72.97% and 97.43% for the other organisms evaluated: Arabidopsis thaliana, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Homo sapiens, Nasonia vitripennis. The precision increases significantly by 39% and 22.9% for Mus musculus and Rattus norvegicus, respectively, when the knowledge obtained by the model is included. For the other organisms, the precision increases by between 37.10% and 59.49%. The inclusion of certain features during training, for example, the presence of ATG in the upstream region of the Translation Initiation Site, improves the rate of sensitivity by approximately 7%. Using the M-Clus balancing method generates a significant increase in the rate of sensitivity from 51.39% to 91.55% (Mus musculus) and from 47.45% to 88.09% (Rattus norvegicus). Conclusions In order to solve the problem of TIS prediction, the results indicate that the methodology proposed in this work is adequate, particularly when using the

  5. Net Survey--"Religious Freedom" in Modern China: Exploring WWW Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Charles A.

    2000-01-01

    Provides a survey of various Internet sites that focus on the religious practices in modern China (People's Republic of China) listing such sites as: (1) the China Daily Web site; (2) the U.S. Department of State online documents; and (3) the Web site for Human Rights in China. (CMK)

  6. Evidence of global demand for medication abortion information An analysis of www.medicationabortion.com

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Angel M.; Wynn, L. L.; Trussell, James

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The worldwide expansion of the Internet offers an important modality of disseminating medically accurate information about medication abortion. We chronicle the story of www.medicationabortion.com, an English-, Spanish-, Arabic-, and French-language website dedicated to three early abortion regimens. Methods We evaluated the website use patterns from 2005 through 2009. We also conducted a content and thematic analysis of 1,910 emails submitted during this period. Results The website experienced steady growth in use. In 2009, it received 35,000 visits each month from more than 20,000 unique visitors and was accessed by users in 208 countries and territories. More than half of all users accessed the website from a country in which abortion is legally restricted. Users from more than 40 countries sent emails with individual questions. Women often wrote in extraordinary detail about the circumstances of their pregnancies and attempts to obtain an abortion. These emails also reflect considerable demand for information about the use of misoprostol for self-induction. Conclusion The use patterns of www.medicationabortion.com indicate that there is significant demand for online information about abortion, and the findings suggest future priorities for research, collaboration, and educational outreach. PMID:24360644

  7. [Learning from regional differences: online platform: http://www.versorgungsatlas.de].

    PubMed

    Mangiapane, S

    2014-02-01

    In 2011, the Central Research Institute of Ambulatory Health Care in Germany (ZI) published the website http://www.versorgungsatlas.de, a portal that presents research results from regional health services in Germany. The Web portal provides a publicly accessible source of information and a growing number of selected analyses focusing on regional variation in health care. Each topic is presented in terms of interactive maps, tables, and diagrams and is supplemented by a paper that examines the results in detail and provides an explanation of the findings. The portal has been designed to provide a forum on which health service researchers can publish their results derived from various data sources of different institutions in Germany and can comment on results already available on http://www.versorgungsatlas.de. For health policy actors, the discussion of regional differences offers a new, previously unavailable basis for determining the region-specific treatment needs and for providing health-care management with the goal of high-quality care for each resident.

  8. The +37 kb Cebpa Enhancer Is Critical for Cebpa Myeloid Gene Expression and Contains Functional Sites that Bind SCL, GATA2, C/EBPα, PU.1, and Additional Ets Factors.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Stacy; Guo, Hong; Friedman, Alan D

    2015-01-01

    The murine Cebpa gene contains an evolutionarily conserved 453 bp enhancer located at +37 kb that, together with its promoter, directs expression to myeloid progenitors and to long-term hematopoietic stem cells in transgenic mice. In human acute myeloid leukemia cases, the enhancer lacks point mutations but binds the RUNX1-ETO oncoprotein. The enhancer contains the H3K4me1 and H3K27Ac histone modifications, denoting an active enhancer, at progressively increasing levels as long-term hematopoietic stem cells transition to granulocyte-monocyte progenitors. We previously identified four enhancer sites that bind RUNX1 and demonstrated that their integrity is required for maximal enhancer activity in 32Dcl3 myeloid cells. The +37 kb Cebpa enhancer also contains C/EBP, Ets factor, Myb, GATA, and E-box consensus sites conserved in the human +42 kb CEBPA enhancer. Mutation of the two C/EBP, seven Ets, one Myb, two GATA, or two E-box sites reduces activity of an enhancer-promoter reporter in 32Dcl3 cells. In 293T gel shift assays, exogenous C/EBPα binds both C/EBP sites, c-Myb binds the Myb site, PU.1 binds the second Ets site, PU.1, Fli-1, ERG, and Ets1 bind the sixth Ets site, GATA2 binds both GATA sites, and SCL binds the second E-box. Endogenous hematopoietic RUNX1, PU.1, Fli-1, ERG, C/EBPα, GATA2, and SCL were previously shown to bind the enhancer, and we find that endogenous PU.1 binds the second Ets site in 32Dcl3 cells. Using CRISPR/Cas9, we developed 32Dcl3 lines in which the wild-type enhancer alleles are replaced with a variant mutant in the seven Ets sites. These lines have 20-fold reduced Cebpa mRNA when cultured in IL-3 or G-CSF, demonstrating a critical requirement for enhancer integrity for optimal Cebpa expression. In addition, these results indicate that the +37 kb Cebpa enhancer is the focus of multiple regulatory transcriptional pathways that impact its expression during normal hematopoiesis and potentially during myeloid transformation.

  9. The WWW as a research medium: an illustrative survey on paranormal belief.

    PubMed

    Göritz, A S; Schumacher, J

    2000-06-01

    Data collected with a short World Wide Web (WWW) survey on paranormal belief, age, sex, locus of control, extraversion, emotional and physical well-being, and mood were compared with findings from recent literature while controlling for effects of self-selection. Each variable was measured with one item. The sample comprised 342 women, 648 men, and 8 participants of unknown sex, of whom 76.7% were self-selected and 23.3% did not select themselves. There was a weak but, given the large sample, significant effect of self-selection regarding paranormal belief (rpb 932 = .08) but no relationships for paranormal belief and the examined variables. In the entire sample, statistically significant correlations ranging from .13 to .07 between paranormal belief and female sex, scores on external locus of control, good mood, extraversion, and emotional well-being corresponded with previous offline results.

  10. A WWW Implementation of National Recommendations for Protecting Electronic Health Information

    PubMed Central

    Halamka, John D.; Szolovits, Peter; Rind, David; Safran, Charles

    1997-01-01

    Abstract In March of 1997, the National Research Council (NRC) of the National Academy of Sciences issued the report, “For the Record: Protecting Electronic Health Information.” Concluding that the current practices at the majority of health care facilities in the United States are insufficient, the Council delineated both technical and organizational approaches to protecting electronic health information. The Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center recently implemented a proof-of-concept, Web-based, cross-institutional medical record, CareWeb, which incorporates the NRC security and confidentiality recommendations. We report on our WWW implementation of the NRC recommendations and an initial evaluation of the balance between ease of use and confidentiality. PMID:9391933

  11. Acceptance of the German e-mental health portal www.psychenet.de: an online survey

    PubMed Central

    Tlach, Lisa; Thiel, Juliane; Härter, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Taking into account the high prevalence of mental disorders and the multiple barriers to the use of mental health services, new forms of fostering patient information, involvement, and self-management are needed to complement existing mental health services. The study aimed at investigating acceptance regarding design and content of the e-mental health portal www.psychenet.de. Methods. An online cross-sectional survey was conducted between May 2013 and May 2015 using a self-administered questionnaire including items on perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, attitude towards using, and perceived trust. Effects of different participants’ characteristics on the portals’ acceptance were analyzed. Results. The majority of the N = 252 respondents suffered from mental disorders (n = 139) or were relatives from persons with mental disorders (n = 65). The portal was assessed as “good” or “very good” by 71% of the respondents. High levels of agreement (89–96%) were shown for statements on the perceived ease of use, the behavioral intention to use the portal, and the trustworthiness of the portal. Lower levels of agreement were shown for some statements on the perceived usefulness of the portals’ content. There were no effects of different participants’ characteristics on the perceived ease of use, the perceived usefulness, the attitude towards using the website and the perceived trust. Discussion. This survey provides preliminary evidence that the e-mental health portal www.psychenet.de appears to be a usable, useful and trustworthy information resource for a broad target group. The behavioral usefulness of the portals’ content might be improved by integrating more activating patient decision aids. PMID:27547515

  12. 9 years of existence of the site astronomy.ro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haus, Marian

    2013-06-01

    The article represents a history of the Astronomical site: http://www.astronomy.ro and its forum http://www.astronomy.ro/forum/. To the actual moment about 1700 members - amateur astronomers from every where in Romania and outside - contribute to this site and forum. The main areas of interst are: Astronomical Instruments, Astrophotography, Eclipses, Solar Astronomy, Comets, Asteroids and Meteors, Optics.

  13. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  14. Integrating NASA Dryden Research Endeavors into the Teaching-Learning of Mathematics in the K-12 Classroom via the WWW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, Robin A.

    2002-01-01

    The primary goal of this project was to continue populating the currently existing web site developed in 1998 in conjunction with the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center and California Polytechnic State University, with more mathematics lesson plans and activities that K-12 teachers, students, home-schoolers, and parents could access. All of the activities, while demonstrating some mathematical topic, also showcase the research endeavors of the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. The website is located at: http://daniel.calpoly.edu/dfrc/Robin. The secondary goal of this project was to share the web-based activities with educators at various conferences and workshops. To address the primary goal of this project, over the past year, several new activities were posted on the web site and some of the existing activities were enhanced to contain more video clips, photos, and materials for teachers. To address the project's secondary goal, the web-based activities were showcased at several conferences and workshops. Additionally, in order to measure and assess the outreach impact of the web site, a link to the web site hitbox.com was established in April 2001, which allowed for the collection of traffic statistics against the web site (such as the domains of visitors, the frequency of visitors to this web site, etc.) Provided is a description of some of the newly created activities posted on the web site during the project period of 2001-2002, followed by a description of the conferences and workshops at which some of the web-based activities were showcased. Next is a brief summary of the web site's traffic statistics demonstrating its worldwide educational impact, followed by a listing of some of the awards and accolades the web site has received.

  15. Murra: Guidelines for the Evaluation of Indigenous Content on the WWW.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Victorian Aboriginal Education Association, Fitzroy (Australia).

    There are over 600 sites on the World Wide Web with substantial Australian Indigenous content. This guide provides strategies for determining which Indigenous sites may be useful in an educational context. Section 1 deals with finding Indigenous content on the World Wide Web. The three main types of search engines are keyword, directory, and…

  16. Addition of N-glycosylation sites on the globular head of the H5 hemagglutinin induces the escape of highly pathogenic avian influenza A H5N1 viruses from vaccine-induced immunity.

    PubMed

    Hervé, Pierre-Louis; Lorin, Valérie; Jouvion, Grégory; Da Costa, Bruno; Escriou, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza A H5N1 viruses remain endemic in poultry in several countries and still constitute a pandemic threat. Since the early 20th century, we experienced four influenza A pandemics. H3N2 and H1N1pdm09 viruses that respectively emerged during 1968 and 2009 pandemics are still responsible for seasonal epidemics. These viruses evolve regularly by substitutions in antigenic sites of the hemagglutinin (HA), which prevent neutralization by antibodies directed against previous strains (antigenic drift). For seasonal H3N2 viruses, an addition of N-glycosylation sites (glycosites) on H3 contributed to this drift. Here, we questioned whether additional glycosites on H5 could induce an escape of H5N1 virus from neutralization, as it was observed for seasonal H3N2 viruses. Seven H5N1 mutants were produced by adding glycosites on H5. The most glycosylated virus escaped from neutralizing antibodies, in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, a single additional glycosite was responsible for this escape.

  17. Binding of [3H]idazoxan and of its methoxy derivative [3H] RX821002 in human fat cells: [3H]idazoxan but not [3H] RX821002 labels additional non-alpha 2-adrenergic binding sites.

    PubMed

    Langin, D; Paris, H; Lafontan, M

    1990-06-01

    Binding studies were carried out in human fat cell membranes with two alpha 2-adrenergic antagonists, [3H]idazoxan and its methoxy derivative [3H]RX821002. Inhibition studies with epinephrine enantiomers indicate that [3H]RX821002 only binds to alpha 2-adrenoceptors, whereas [3H]idazoxan labels alpha 2-adrenoceptors and additional nonadrenergic sites (NAIBS). NAIBS and alpha 2-adrenoceptors display different affinities towards drugs from various chemical families. Imidazoline and some guanidine derivatives exhibit a high affinity for NAIBS. Pharmacological studies of human NAIBS indicate that they are slightly different from those previously reported in the rabbit, suggesting the existence of several subtypes of NAIBS. Furthermore, NAIBS are different from the previously described "imidazoline-preferring sites." [3H]idazoxan and [3H]RX821002 saturation analyses were performed in human adipocytes from different anatomical locations, in order to compare the number of NAIBS and alpha 2-adrenoceptors. Although there was an important variation in NAIBS and alpha 2-adrenoceptor numbers in the studied samples, a very poor correlation was obtained between the Bmax values of the two sites. Moreover, alkylation of alpha 2-adrenoceptors by phenoxybenzamine produces a 90% reduction in accessible [3H]RX821002 binding sites, without modification of [3H]idazoxan binding. These data show that NAIBS are not closely related to the alpha 2-adrenergic molecule. In addition, benextramine appears to be a reversible competitor at NAIBS. [3H]idazoxan binding, but not [3H]RX821002 binding, is sensitive to K+, suggesting that the domains involved in the ligand-NAIBS interaction are different from those involved in the ligand-alpha 2-adrenoceptor interaction.

  18. Technical and architectural issues in deploying electronic health records (EHRs) over the WWW.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Brian; Kushniruk, Andre; Joe, Ron; Borycki, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    In this paper technical and architectural issues are described in deploying electronic health records (EHRs) over the WWW. The project described involved deployment of EHRs that have been designed to serve in the education of health professionals and health/biomedical informaticians. In order to allow for ubiquitous access to a range of EHRs remotely an architecture was designed with three layers: (a) the "Internet" or remote user access layer (2) the "Perimeter Network", or middle firewall security and authentication layer (3) the "HINF EHR Network", consisting of the internal servers hosting EHR applications and databases. The approaches allow for a large number of remote users running a range of operating systems to access the educational EHRs from any location remotely. Virtual machine (VM) technology is employed to allow multiple versions and platforms of operating systems to be installed side-by-side on a single server. Security, technical and budgetary considerations are described as well as past and current applications of the architecture for a number of projects for the education of health professionals in the area of electronic health records.

  19. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    ... or natural. Natural food additives include: Herbs or spices to add flavor to foods Vinegar for pickling ... Certain colors improve the appearance of foods. Many spices, as well as natural and man-made flavors, ...

  20. 2007 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ratel,K.

    2008-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. Volume I of the SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and performance in restoration and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. Volume II of the SER, the Groundwater Status Report, also is prepared annually to report on the status of and evaluate the performance of groundwater treatment systems at the Laboratory. Volume II includes detailed technical summaries of groundwater data and its interpretation, and is intended for internal BNL users, regulators, and other technically oriented stakeholders. A brief summary of the information contained in Volume II is included in this volume in Chapter 7, Groundwater Protection. Both reports are available in print and as downloadable files on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. An electronic version on compact disc is distributed with each printed report. In addition, a summary of Volume I is prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a compact disc containing the-length report.

  1. The distribution alloying elements in alnico 8 and 9 magnets: Site preference of ternary Ti, Fe, Co, and Ni additions in DO3 Fe3Al, Co3Al, and Ni3Al based intermetallic phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samolyuk, G. D.; Újfalussy, B.; Stocks, G. M.

    2014-11-01

    Recently, interest in alnico magnetic alloys has been rekindled due to their potential to substitute for rare-earth based permanent magnets provided modest improvements in their coercivity can be achieved without loss of saturation magnetization. Recent experimental studies have indicated that atomic and magnetic structure of the two phases (one AlNi-based, the other FeCo-based) that comprise these spinodally decomposed alloy is not as simple as previously thought. A key issue that arises is the distribution of Fe, Co, and Ti within the AlNi-based matrix phase. In this paper, we report the results of first-principles calculations of the site preference of ternary alloying additions in DO3 Fe3Al, Co3Al, and Ni3Al alloys, as models for the aluminide phase. For compound compositions that are Al rich, which correspond to experimental situation, Ti and Fe are found to occupy the α sites, while Co and Ni prefer the γ sites of the DO3 lattice. An important finding is that the magnetic moments of transition metals in Fe3Al and Co3Al are ordered ferromagnetically, whereas the Ni3Al were found to be nonmagnetic unless the Fe or Co is added as a ternary element.

  2. The distribution alloying elements in alnico 8 and 9 magnets: Site preference of ternary Ti, Fe, Co, and Ni additions in DO3 Fe3Al, Co3Al, and Ni3Al based intermetallic phases

    DOE PAGES

    Samolyuk, G. D.; Újfalussy, B.; Stocks, G. M.

    2014-11-07

    Recently, interest in alnico magnetic alloys has been rekindled due to their potential to substitute for rare-earth based permanent magnets provided modest improvements in their coercivity can be achieved without loss of saturation magnetization. Recent experimental studies have indicated that atomic and magnetic structure of the two phases (one AlNi-based, the other FeCo-based) that comprise these spinodally decomposed alloy is not as simple as previously thought. A key issue that arises is the distribution of Fe, Co and Ti within the AlNi-based matrix phase. In our paper we report the results of first-principles calculations of the site preference of ternarymore » alloying additions in DO3 Fe3Al, Co3Al and Ni3Al alloys, as models for the aluminide phase. For compound compositions that are Al rich, which corresponds to experimental situation, Ti and Fe are found to occupy the sites, while Co and Ni prefer the sites of the DO3 lattice. Finally, an important finding is that the magnetic moments of transition metals in Fe3Al and Co3Al are ordered ferromagnetically, whereas the Ni3Al were found to be nonmagnetic unless the Fe or Co are added as a ternary element.« less

  3. A movie of the RNA polymerase nucleotide addition cycle.

    PubMed

    Brueckner, Florian; Ortiz, Julio; Cramer, Patrick

    2009-06-01

    During gene transcription, RNA polymerase (Pol) passes through repetitive cycles of adding a nucleotide to the growing mRNA chain. Here we obtained a movie of the nucleotide addition cycle by combining structural information on different functional states of the Pol II elongation complex (EC). The movie illustrates the two-step loading of the nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) substrate, closure of the active site for catalytic nucleotide incorporation, and the presumed two-step translocation of DNA and RNA, which is accompanied by coordinated conformational changes in the polymerase bridge helix and trigger loop. The movie facilitates teaching and a mechanistic analysis of transcription and can be downloaded from http://www.lmb.uni-muenchen.de/cramer/pr-materials.

  4. 22 CFR 502.3 - Availability of program materials on public Web sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS PROGRAM MATERIALS § 502.3 Availability of program materials on public Web sites... information Web sites designed for foreign audiences. To access currently-available Agency program materials, please visit www.voanews.com and www.martinoticias.com. The homepages of these Web sites display...

  5. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  6. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  7. Gero-Informatics and the Internet: Loading Gerontology Information on the World Wide Web (WWW).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, R. Darin; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Provides background on the World Wide Web, reasons for its growth, its potential usefulness to gerontologists, and the results of an exhaustive search of over 300 sites. Relevant information was discovered in five general categories of gerontology-related information: academic institutions, government agencies, biomedical and health research…

  8. WWW.Cell Biology Education: Using the World Wide Web to Develop a New Teaching Topic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blystone, Robert V.; MacAlpine, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    "Cell Biology Education" calls attention each quarter to several Web sites of educational interest to the biology community. The Internet provides access to an enormous array of potential teaching materials. In this article, the authors describe one approach for using the World Wide Web to develop a new college biology laboratory exercise. As a…

  9. Opportunities for Condensed Matter Research at the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network (http://www.nnin.org)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Sandip

    2004-03-01

    A major challenge in science and engineering research at the nano-scale, and particularly for condensed matter, is the availability of infrastructure that can allow easy and quick implementation of structures, devices, or more complex systems necessary for making rigorous measurements or for other exploratory directions of interest. The experiments connect across length scales - nanometer and up, employ a variety of materials and techniques of assembly and patterning, and require a complex knowledge-mix derived from other research areas and tools that require skill and are hard to access. The National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network (NNIN; www.nnin.org) is an NSF-funded infrastructure of open shared facilities across the country that enables the national community to pursue research and technology development that can benefit from nanotechnology. The NNIN provides easy hands-on access to external users, remote usage, staff support, low cost usage, knowledge infrastructure, and brings together an extensive coordinated array of instruments for fabrication, synthesis, and characterization together with other infrastructure. Particularly relevant to condensed matter physics (e.g., in experiments involving single-electron transistor or its use in ultra-sensitive measurements, or measurements across a single nano-scale structure such as a molecule or a nanocrystal, development of new apparatus that allows X-ray measurements of soft materials, etc.) is the ability to integrate the small length scale through synthesis and electron-beam lithography, growth and deposition of a variety materials with controlled properties, patterning of complex shapes in the three-dimensions, connecting such structures, characterization, and the ability to achieve this quickly and at low cost. NNIN tool resources that span focused-ion beam, electron microscopy, spectroscopic techniques, etc. for characterization; synthesis, growth, deposition, etc. for assembling; lithography, etching

  10. The Study Guides and Strategies Website (www.studygs.net): Ten-Year Update and Current Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landsberger, Joe

    2006-01-01

    Over five years ago the author began his "TechTrends" column, then titled "E-Learning by Design," with a self interview. In that first column he interviewed himself on how he came to develop the Study Guides and Strategies (SGS) Website www.studygs.net. This educational public service and resource now contains 120 topics (200 English webpages) in…

  11. Extended telemedical consultation using Arden Syntax based decision support, hypertext and WWW technique.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, D; Ekdahl, C; Wigertz, O; Shahsavar, N; Gill, H; Forsum, U

    1997-02-01

    There is an obvious need for geographic distribution of expert knowledge among several health care units without increasing the cost of on-site expertise in locations where health care is provided. This paper describes the design of a knowledge-based decision-support system for extended consultation in clinical medicine. The system is based on Arden Syntax for Medical Logic Modules and hypertext using World Wide Web technology. It provides advice and explanations regarding the given advice. The explanations are presented in a hypertext format allowing the user to browse related information and to verify the relevance of the given advice. The system is intended to be used in a closed local network. With special precautions regarding issues of safety and patient security, the system can be used over wider areas such as in rural medicine. A prototype has been developed in the field of clinical microbiology and infectious diseases regarding infective endocarditis.

  12. http://www.esa.int/esaSC/Pr_21_2004_s_en.html

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-09-01

    is in the form of gas between the galaxies and not locked up in the galaxies or stars themselves. The massive forces of the merging clusters accelerated intergalactic gas to great speeds. This resulted in shock waves that heat the gas to very high temperatures, which then radiated X-ray light, far more energetic than the visible light our eyes can detect. XMM-Newton, in orbit, detects this type of high-energy light. The dynamics of the merger revealed by XMM-Newton point to a cluster in transition. "One cluster has apparently smashed into the other from the 'north-west' and has since made one pass through," said Finoguenov. "Now, gravity will pull the remnants of this first cluster back towards the core of the second. Over the next few thousand million of years, the remnants of the clusters will settle and the merger will be complete." The observation implies that the largest structures in the Universe are essentially still forming in the modern era. Abell 754 is relatively close, about 800 million light years away. The construction boom may soon be over in a few more thousand million years though. A mysterious substance dubbed 'dark energy' appears to be accelerating the Universe's expansion rate. This means that objects are flying apart from each other at an ever-increasing speed and that clusters may eventually never have the opportunity to collide with each other. X-ray observations of galaxy clusters such as Abell 754 will help to better define dark energy and also dark matter, an ‘invisible’ and mysterious substance that appears to comprise over 80 percent of a galaxy cluster's mass. Notes for editors: This observation was announced at a NASA Internet press conference today. A paper describing these results, by Patrick Henry and his collaborators, will be published in the Astrophysical Journal. Images and other visual material are available at: http://www.gsfc.nasa.gov/topstory/2004/0831galaxymerger_media.html More about XMM-Newton ESA's XMM-Newton can

  13. 77 FR 74266 - Review of National Environmental Policy Act Categorical Exclusion Survey Posted on DOT/FHWA Web Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... Categorical Exclusion Survey Posted on DOT/FHWA Web Site AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA... notice to advise the public that the CE survey review is now available on the FHWA Web site, http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/map21 , and FTA Web site, http://www.fta.dot.gov/map21 . DATES: These reports were...

  14. W.W.W. MOON? The why, what and when of a permanent manned lunar colony.

    PubMed

    Morabito, Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    Several reasons for going back to the Moon are listed: scientific study of our natural satellite, Earth and in general the Solar System; exploitation of the resources of Outer Space; geopolitical considerations that made Apollo possible and are still valid in the long term; advancement of manned spaceflight, as robot-based exploration is time-wise inefficient and politically negligible. Technological, organisational and legal challenges are then outlined. After a discussion of human physiology, building materials and transportation of people and goods, an underground polar location is proposed as settlement site, either within kilometre-size lava tubes or man-made caves. An analysis of spaceflight history is conducted to determine a target date for returning to the Moon to stay. In the absence of political or commercial competition, experience indicates the last decades of the XXI century. To shorten this timescale, it is recommended to focus on accomplishing the task of establishing a reliable lunar travel and settlement system, rather than developing new technologies: simplifying the goals of each single step forward (as was the case of the Clementine mission) and concentrating on production-ready (or almost-ready) equipment (compare the ill-fated X-33 to the dependable Soyuz capsules).

  15. Seeing and Reading Red: Hue and Color-word Correlation in Images and Attendant Text on the WWW

    SciTech Connect

    Newsam, S

    2004-07-12

    This work represents an initial investigation into determining whether correlations actually exist between metadata and content descriptors in multimedia datasets. We provide a quantitative method for evaluating whether the hue of images on the WWW is correlated with the occurrence of color-words in metadata such as URLs, image names, and attendant text. It turns out that such a correlation does exist: the likelihood that a particular color appears in an image whose URL, name, and/or attendant text contains the corresponding color-word is generally at least twice the likelihood that the color appears in a randomly chosen image on the WWW. While this finding might not be significant in and of itself, it represents an initial step towards quantitatively establishing that other, perhaps more useful correlations exist. These correlations form the basis for exciting novel approaches that leverage semi-supervised datasets, such as the WWW, to overcome the semantic gap that has hampered progress in multimedia information retrieval for some time now.

  16. MediAgent: a WWW-based scalable and self-learning medical search engine.

    PubMed Central

    Tay, J.; Ke, S.; Lun, K. C.

    1998-01-01

    Searching for medical information on the Internet can be tedious and frustrating due to the number of irrelevant entries returned from generic search engines. We have developed MediAgent, a scalable search engine that aims to deliver a web-based medical search solution which is focused, exhaustive and able to keep improving its databases. The software package can run off a single low-end system and be scaled into a client-server, distributed computing architecture for high-end needs. This scalable architecture boosts MediAgent's handling capacity to tens of millions of web pages. In addition to large volume handling, MediAgent is designed to be manageable. All subsystems are not only highly configurable, but also support remote, interactive management and monitoring by the system administrator. PMID:9929289

  17. BRAVO/TeleTrend: a comprehensive WWW-based neuromonitoring system for the neurosurgery ICU.

    PubMed

    Nenov, V I; Buxey, F; Yamaguchi, Y

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes BRAVO/TeleTrend--a comprehensive client/server-based system for remote access, review and analyses of continuously acquired multiparametric physiological data from Intensive Care unit (ICU) patients. The system is designed as a distributed three tier model and implemented in Java (Sun Microsystems). TeleTrend is a data review package, which interfaces to existing physiological bedside monitors such as the BRAVO suite of products (Nicolet Biomedical, Madison, WI) and the vital signs monitors compatible with the Unity Network (Marquette Electronics, Milwaukee, WI). It does not transfer over the web the entire patient record, which can be hundreds of megabytes. Instead, it provides tools to view a compressed representation of the raw data in a trend display and to zoom into the raw data if needed. Thus, it eliminates the need for a high-bandwidth Internet connection and makes possible the use of a slower modem access to the vast amount of physiological data acquired per patient. In addition, TeleTrend features a rule-based module capable of generating clinical alerts, which is a potentially useful tool for neurointensivists and other critical care personnel. Finally, TeleTrend is intended as a multi-user, semi real-time telemedical application, which features built-in white-board and chat components. These components allow several physicians at different locations around the world to simultaneously view and brainstorm over critical chunks of continuously recorded raw and trend data. By allowing the end-user user to switch on-the-fly from monitoring patients in one ICU to those in another, and by integrating an HL7 interface TeleTrend steps over the boundaries of a single ICU. Thus, it can be provide a medical enterprise-wide solution to the remote access of an important component of the electronic patient medical record. Currently in house validation, verification and alpha testing of the system are underway.

  18. 10 CFR Appendix Q to Part 50 - Pre-Application Early Review of Site Suitability Issues

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... FACILITIES Pt. 50, App. Q Appendix Q to Part 50—Pre-Application Early Review of Site Suitability Issues This... the Federal Register and shall make the report available at the NRC Web site, http://www.nrc.gov....

  19. 10 CFR Appendix Q to Part 50 - Pre-Application Early Review of Site Suitability Issues

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... FACILITIES Pt. 50, App. Q Appendix Q to Part 50—Pre-Application Early Review of Site Suitability Issues This... the Federal Register and shall make the report available at the NRC Web site, http://www.nrc.gov....

  20. 10 CFR Appendix Q to Part 50 - Pre-Application Early Review of Site Suitability Issues

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... FACILITIES Pt. 50, App. Q Appendix Q to Part 50—Pre-Application Early Review of Site Suitability Issues This... the Federal Register and shall make the report available at the NRC Web site, http://www.nrc.gov....

  1. 9 CFR 392.9 - Availability of additional guidance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... 392.9 Section 392.9 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS PETITIONS FOR RULEMAKING § 392.9... rulemaking may be found on the FSIS Web site at http://www/fsis.usda.gov/....

  2. 9 CFR 392.9 - Availability of additional guidance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... 392.9 Section 392.9 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS PETITIONS FOR RULEMAKING § 392.9... rulemaking may be found on the FSIS Web site at http://www/fsis.usda.gov/....

  3. 9 CFR 392.9 - Availability of additional guidance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... 392.9 Section 392.9 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS PETITIONS FOR RULEMAKING § 392.9... rulemaking may be found on the FSIS Web site at http://www/fsis.usda.gov/....

  4. 9 CFR 392.9 - Availability of additional guidance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .... 392.9 Section 392.9 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS PETITIONS FOR RULEMAKING § 392.9... rulemaking may be found on the FSIS Web site at http://www/fsis.usda.gov/....

  5. 9 CFR 392.9 - Availability of additional guidance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... 392.9 Section 392.9 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS PETITIONS FOR RULEMAKING § 392.9... rulemaking may be found on the FSIS Web site at http://www/fsis.usda.gov/....

  6. http://www.esa.int/esaSC/Pr_11_2004_s_en.html

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-06-01

    surface of the moon and, most importantly, the presence of layers of dark material at the top of crater walls. "The imaging team is in hot debate at the moment on the interpretations of our findings," said Dr Carolyn Porco, Cassini imaging team leader at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, USA. "Based on our images, some of us are leaning towards the view that has been promoted recently, that Phoebe is probably ice-rich and may be an object originating in the outer solar system, more related to comets and Kuiper Belt objects than to asteroids." The high-resolution images of Phoebe show a world of dramatic landforms, with landslides and linear structures such as grooves, ridges and chains of pits. Craters are ubiquitous, with many smaller than one kilometre. "This means, besides the big ones, lots of projectiles smaller than 100 metres must have hit Phoebe," said Prof. Gerhard Neukum, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Germany, and a member of the imaging team. Whether these projectiles came from outside or within the Saturn system is debatable. There is a suspicion that Phoebe, the largest of Saturn's outer moons, might be parent to the other, much smaller retrograde outer moons that orbit Saturn. They could have resulted from the impact ejecta that formed the many craters on Phoebe. Besides these stunning images, the instruments on board Cassini collected a wealth of other data, which will allow scientists to study the surface structures, determine the mass and composition of Phoebe and create a global map of it. "If these additional data confirm that Phoebe is mostly ice, covered by layers of dust, this may well mean that we are looking at a 'leftover' from the formation of the Solar System about 4600 million years ago," said Dr Jean-Pierre Lebreton, ESA Huygens Project Scientist. Phoebe might indeed be an icy wanderer from the distant outer reaches of the Solar System, which, like a comet, was dislodged from the Kuiper Belt and captured by Saturn when the planet was

  7. Hosting an `Ask the Astronomer' Site on the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odenwald, S. F.

    1996-12-01

    Since 1995, the World Wide Web has explosively evolved into a significant medium for dispensing astronomical information to the general public. In addition to the numerous image archives that have proliferated, an increasing number of sites invite visitors to pose questions about astronomy and receive answers provided by professional astronomers. In this paper, I describe the operation of an Ask the Astronomer site that was opened on the WWW during August, 1995 as part of an astronomy education resource area called the "Astronomy Cafe" (URL=http://www2.ari.net/home/odenwald/cafe.html). The Astronomy Cafe includes a number of documents describing: a career in astronomy; how research papers are written; essays about cosmology, hyperspace and infrared astronomy; and the results from a 100-question, just for fun, personality test which distinguishes astronomers from non-astronomers. The Ask the Astronomer site is operated by a single astronomer through private donations and is now approaching its 500th day of operation. It contains over 2000+ questions and answers with a growth rate of 5 - 10 questions per day. It has attracted 70,000 visitors who are responsible for nearly 1 million 'hits' during the site's lifetime. The monthly statistics provide a unique survey of the kinds of individuals and organizations who visit Ask the Astronomer-type web sites, moreover, the accumulated questions provide a diagnostic X-ray into the public mind in the area of astronomy. I will present an analysis of the user demographics, and the types of questions that appear to be the most frequently asked. A paper copy of the complete index of these questions will be available for inspection.

  8. 75 FR 6063 - Availability of NRC Open Government Web Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ... COMMISSION Availability of NRC Open Government Web Site AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of Availability of Open Government Web site for Online Public Comments. SUMMARY: This notice, which... Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Open Government Web site ( http://www.nrc.gov/open ) will...

  9. 75 FR 75170 - APHIS User Fee Web Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-02

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service APHIS User Fee Web Site AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health... announces the availability of a Web site that contains information about the Agency's user fees. ADDRESSES: The Agency's user fee Web site is located at: http://www.aphis.usda.gov/userfees/index.shtml ....

  10. Never Too Young to Learn: Web Site Evaluation Is Elementary!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Lori L.

    2006-01-01

    This article is based on a series of lessons prepared for a class of third graders who were going to research specific planets. With so many Web sites on the Internet, there is a need to be concerned about information overload for the audience. The NASA site (www.nasa.gov) is filled with lots of sites providing factual information about the…

  11. 12 CFR 4.4 - Washington office and web site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Washington office and web site. 4.4 Section 4.4... EXAMINERS Organization and Functions § 4.4 Washington office and web site. The Washington office of the OCC...'s Web site is at http://www.occ.gov....

  12. 12 CFR 4.4 - Washington office and web site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Washington office and web site. 4.4 Section 4.4... EXAMINERS Organization and Functions § 4.4 Washington office and web site. The Washington office of the OCC...'s Web site is at http://www.occ.gov....

  13. 12 CFR 4.4 - Washington office and web site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Washington office and web site. 4.4 Section 4.4... EXAMINERS Organization and Functions § 4.4 Washington office and web site. The Washington office of the OCC...'s Web site is at http://www.occ.gov....

  14. www.nasa.gov

    NASA Website

    ... [3J6Ô#á S“ ¼!Y k²YÖ-X¨>æO©vbJ…ªeL„ !`$Y¯ëØÒ -—šÒ çÛU­'#|fx» <]˜“ŽÐ{r 9ÝÓ>øj¶i aÓt’÷gÝSRz°oKîÇ †ÅbÀì– ‡uóðÙ½ Æ‹¶ &‡s`) ÆdQÃ’Ñ ...

  15. WWW: The Scientific Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blystone, Robert V.; Blodgett, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    The scientific method is the principal methodology by which biological knowledge is gained and disseminated. As fundamental as the scientific method may be, its historical development is poorly understood, its definition is variable, and its deployment is uneven. Scientific progress may occur without the strictures imposed by the formal…

  16. www.fermiqcd.net

    SciTech Connect

    Massino Di Pierro et al.

    2004-03-09

    FermiQCD is a C++ library for fast development of parallel lattice QCD applications. The expression FermiQCD Collaboration is used as a collective name to indicate both the users of the software and its contributors. One of the main differences between FermiQCD and libraries developed by other collaborations is that it follows an object oriented design as opposed to a procedural design. FermiQCD should not be identified exclusively with the implementation of the algorithms but, rather, with the strict specifications that define its Application Program Interface. One should think of FermiQCD as a language on its own (a superset of the C++ language), designed to describe Lattice QCD algorithms. The objects of the language include complex numbers (mdp-complex), matrices (mdp-matrix), lattices (mdp-lattice), fields (gauge-field, fermi-field, staggered-field), propagators (fermi-propagator) and actions. Algorithms written in terms of these objects are automatically parallel.

  17. Cybersecurity, massive data processing, community interaction, and other developments at WWW-based computational X-ray Server

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Sergey

    2013-03-01

    X-Ray Server (x-server.gmca.aps.anl.gov) is a WWW-based computational server for modeling of X-ray diffraction, reflection and scattering data. The modeling software operates directly on the server and can be accessed remotely either from web browsers or from user software. In the later case the server can be deployed as a software library or a data fitting engine. As the server recently surpassed the milestones of 15 years online and 1.5 million calculations, it accumulated a number of technical solutions that are discussed in this paper. The developed approaches to detecting physical model limits and user calculations failures, solutions to spam and firewall problems, ways to involve the community in replenishing databases and methods to teach users automated access to the server programs may be helpful for X-ray researchers interested in using the server or sharing their own software online.

  18. A New Cross-Link for an Old Cross-Linking Drug: The Nitrogen Mustard Anticancer Agent Mechlorethamine Generates Cross-Links Derived from Abasic Sites in Addition to the Expected Drug-Bridged Cross-Links.

    PubMed

    Nejad, Maryam Imani; Johnson, Kevin M; Price, Nathan E; Gates, Kent S

    2016-12-20

    Nitrogen mustard anticancer drugs generate highly reactive aziridinium ions that alkylate DNA. Monoadducts arising from reaction with position N7 of guanine residues are the major DNA adducts generated by these agents. Interstrand cross-links in which the drug bridges position N7 of two guanine residues are formed in low yields relative to those of the monoadducts but are generally thought to be central to medicinal activity. The N7-alkylguanine residues generated by nitrogen mustards are depurinated to yield abasic (Ap) sites in duplex DNA. Here, we show that Ap sites generated by the nitrogen mustard mechlorethamine lead to interstrand cross-links of a type not previously associated with this drug. Gel electrophoretic data were consistent with early evolution of the expected drug-bridged cross-links, followed by the appearance of Ap-derived cross-links. The evidence is further consistent with a reaction pathway involving alkylation of a guanine residue in a 5'-GT sequence, followed by depurination to generate the Ap site, and cross-link formation via reaction of the Ap aldehyde residue with the opposing adenine residue at this site [Price, N. E., Johnson, K. M., Wang, J., Fekry, M. I., Wang, Y., and Gates, K. S. (2014) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 136, 3483-3490]. The monofunctional DNA-alkylating agents 2-chloro-N,N-diethylethanamine 5, (2-chloroethyl)ethylsulfide 6, and natural product leinamycin similarly were found to induce the formation of Ap-derived cross-links in duplex DNA. This work provides the first characterization of Ap-derived cross-links at sequences in which a cytosine residue is located directly opposing the Ap site. Cross-linking processes of this type could be relevant in medicine and biology because Ap sites with directly opposing cytosine residues occur frequently in genomic DNA via spontaneous or enzymatic depurination of guanine and N7-alkylguanine residues.

  19. Determination of the specific site occupation of rare earth additions in Y/sub 1/ /sub 7/SM/sub 0/ /sub 6/Lu/sub 0/ /sub 7/Fe/sub 5/O/sub 12/ thin films by the orientation dependence of characteristic x-ray emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, K.M.; Rez, P.; Mishra, R.; Thomas, G.

    1983-11-01

    The orientation dependence of characteristic x-ray emissions have been used to determine specific site occupations of Rare Earth additions in epitaxially grown films of Y/sub 1/ /sub 7/Sm/sub 0/ /sub 6/Lu/sub 0/ /sub 7/Fe/sub 5/O/sub 12/. A theoretical formulation based on the assumption of highly localized inner shell excitations was used not only to predict specific site sensitive orientations, but also to refine experimentally observed data employing a constrained least squares analysis to give probabilities for the occupation of the RE additions in the different crystallographic sites. Thus, it has been shown that in this compound the preference for the RE additions is a predominantly octahedral occupation with a probability greater than or equal to 95%. Some of the assumptions and limitations of the technique have also been discussed.

  20. Collaborative Community: Health Education Web Site

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Setta

    2004-01-01

    Four community colleges in Western Massachusetts--Berkshire Community College (BCC), Greenfield Community College (GCC), Holyoke Community College (HCC), and Springfield Technical Community College (STCC)--have created a collaborative Web site, at www.healthprograms.org, to present information on allied health associate degrees or certificate…

  1. Systematic Site Characterization at Seismic Stations combined with Empirical Spectral Modeling: critical data for local hazard analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Clotaire; Hobiger, Manuel; Edwards, Benjamin; Poggi, Valerio; Burjanek, Jan; Cauzzi, Carlo; Kästli, Philipp; Fäh, Donat

    2016-04-01

    The Swiss Seismological Service operates one of the densest national seismic networks in the world, still rapidly expanding (see http://www.seismo.ethz.ch/monitor/index_EN). Since 2009, every newly instrumented site is characterized following an established procedure to derive realistic 1D VS velocity profiles. In addition, empirical Fourier spectral modeling is performed on the whole network for each recorded event with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio. Besides the source characteristics of the earthquakes, statistical real time analyses of the residuals of the spectral modeling provide a seamlessly updated amplification function w.r. to Swiss rock conditions at every station. Our site characterization procedure is mainly based on the analysis of surface waves from passive experiments and includes cross-checks of the derived amplification functions with those obtained through spectral modeling. The systematic use of three component surface-wave analysis, allowing the derivation of both Rayleigh and Love waves dispersion curves, also contributes to the improved quality of the retrieved profiles. The results of site characterisation activities at recently installed strong-motion stations depict the large variety of possible effects of surface geology on ground motion in the Alpine context. Such effects range from de-amplification at hard-rock sites to amplification up to a factor of 15 in lacustrine sediments with respect to the Swiss reference rock velocity model. The derived velocity profiles are shown to reproduce observed amplification functions from empirical spectral modeling. Although many sites are found to exhibit 1D behavior, our procedure allows the detection and qualification of 2D and 3D effects. All data collected during the site characterization procedures in the last 20 years are gathered in a database, implementing a data model proposed for community use at the European scale through NERA and EPOS (www.epos-eu.org). A web stationbook derived from it

  2. 2010 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ratel, K.; Lee, R; Remien, J; Hooda, B; Green, T; Williams, J; Pohlot, P; Dorsch, W; Paquette, D; Burke, J

    2011-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. Volume I of the SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and performance in restoration and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. Volume II of the SER, the Groundwater Status Report, also is prepared annually to report on the status of and evaluate the performance of groundwater treatment systems at the Laboratory. Volume II includes detailed technical summaries of groundwater data and its interpretation, and is intended for internal BNL users, regulators, and other technically oriented stakeholders. A brief summary of the information contained in Volume II is included in Chapter 7, Groundwater Protection, of this volume. Both reports are available in print and as downloadable files on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. An electronic version on compact disc is distributed with each printed report. In addition, a summary of Volume I is prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a compact disc containing the full report. BNL is operated and managed for DOE's Office of Science by Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA), a partnership formed by Stony Brook University and Battelle Memorial Institute. For more than 60 years, the Laboratory has played a lead role in the DOE Science and Technology mission and continues to contribute to the DOE missions in energy resources, environmental quality, and national security

  3. Site Environmental Report for 2002, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Pauer, Ron

    2003-07-01

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1. The ''Site Environmental Report for 2002'' summarizes Berkeley Lab's compliance with environmental standards and requirements, characterizes environmental management efforts through surveillance and monitoring activities, and highlights significant programs and efforts for calendar year 2002. Throughout this report, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is referred to as ''Berkeley Lab,'' ''the Laboratory,'' ''Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,'' and ''LBNL.'' The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains a general overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities. Volume II contains individual data results from the monitoring programs. This year, the ''Site Environmental Report'' was distributed on a CD in PDF format that includes Volume I, Volume II, and related documents. The report is also available on the Web at http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/esg/. The report follows the Laboratory's policy of using the International System of Units (SI), also known as the metric system of measurements. Whenever possible, results are additionally reported using the more conventional (non-SI) system of measurements because this system is referenced by some current regulatory standards and is more familiar to some readers. The tables included at the end of the Glossary are intended to help readers understand the various prefixes used with SI units of measurement and convert these units from one system to the other.

  4. Site Environmental Report for 2002, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Pauer, Ron

    2003-07-01

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1. The ''Site Environmental Report for 2002'' summarizes Berkeley Lab's compliance with environmental standards and requirements, characterizes environmental management efforts through surveillance and monitoring activities, and highlights significant programs and efforts for calendar year 2002. Throughout this report, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is referred to as ''Berkeley Lab,'' ''the Laboratory,'' ''Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,'' and ''LBNL.'' The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains a general overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities. Volume II contains individual data results from the monitoring programs. This year, the ''Site Environmental Report'' was distributed on a CD in PDF format that includes Volume I, Volume II, and related documents. The report is also available on the Web at http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/esg/. The report follows the Laboratory's policy of using the International System of Units (SI), also known as the metric system of measurements. Whenever possible, results are additionally reported using the more conventional (non-SI) system of measurements because this system is referenced by some current regulatory standards and is more familiar to some readers. The tables included at the end of the Glossary are intended to help readers understand the various prefixes used with SI units of measurement and convert these units from one system to the other.

  5. 17 CFR 230.493 - Additional Schedule B disclosure and filing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... disclose in its Schedule B registration statement: (1) That the Commission maintains an Internet site that... (2) The address for the Commission Internet site (http://www.sec.gov). A foreign government or political subdivision filing on EDGAR is further encouraged to give its Internet address, if available....

  6. 17 CFR 230.493 - Additional Schedule B disclosure and filing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... disclose in its Schedule B registration statement: (1) That the Commission maintains an Internet site that... (2) The address for the Commission Internet site (http://www.sec.gov). A foreign government or political subdivision filing on EDGAR is further encouraged to give its Internet address, if available....

  7. Increased intensity of Ecstasy and polydrug usage in the more experienced recreational Ecstasy/MDMA users: a WWW study.

    PubMed

    Scholey, Andrew B; Parrott, Andrew C; Buchanan, Tom; Heffernan, Thomas M; Ling, Jonathan; Rodgers, Jacqui

    2004-06-01

    Recreational Ecstasy/MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) users often take a variety of psychoactive drugs, but there is little empirical data on how these drug consumption patterns change with greater experience of Ecstasy. The aim of this study was to compare the polydrug usage patterns reported by non-Ecstasy users, novice Ecstasy users, moderate Ecstasy users, and heavy Ecstasy users. In a WWW study of 763 unpaid volunteers, 481 had never taken Ecstasy, whereas 282 reported they had taken it. The Ecstasy users comprised 109 novice users (1-9 occasions), 136 moderate Ecstasy users (10-99 occasions), and 36 heavy Ecstasy users (+100 occasions). Each participant also reported their experience with a range of other psychoactive drugs. The Ecstasy users reported significantly greater psychoactive drug usage than the non-Ecstasy users. The novice, moderate, and heavy Ecstasy users also differed significantly from each other in the use of cocaine, amphetamine, LSD, and psilocybin mushrooms, but not of alcohol, cannabis, or cigarettes/nicotine. Experienced Ecstasy users also took significantly more MDMA tablets on each occasion, and reported a higher maximum weekly intake. The increased use of Ecstasy is associated with more intensive patterns of Ecstasy/MDMA intake, and the greater use of illicit CNS stimulants and hallucinogens, but not of alcohol, nicotine, or cannabis. These results are discussed in the context of cross-tolerance and drug predisposition/preference.

  8. Anatomy online: presentation of a detailed WWW atlas of human gross anatomy--reference for medical education.

    PubMed

    Jastrow, Holger; Vollrath, Lutz

    2002-11-01

    We present an online anatomy atlas based on the Visible Human Project (VHP) of the US National Library of Medicine. The objective is to provide original unlabeled as well as labeled sections of the human body of high quality and resolution on the Internet, for use in basic and continuing medical education. For a representative overview of the body, 370 axial sections were selected from the male and female data base of the VHP with special regard to regions of clinical interest. Each section is accompanied by its corresponding computer tomography (CT) image and, if available, magnetic resonance images (MRI) for quick and easy comparison of morphologic and radiologic structures. The sections can be studied unlabeled or labeled according to the current Terminologia Anatomica. A linked vocabulary with more than 850 terms explains the labeling. Animations of the sections as well as of CT and MR images allow for further visualization of the topographic relationships of anatomical structures. The responses to the project indicate that students and physicians regard the Internet Atlas of Human Gross Anatomy as a most useful aid for learning and reviewing anatomical details. The atlas is accessible on: http://www.uni-mainz.de/FB/Medizin/Anatomie/workshop/vishuman/Eready.html.

  9. The MicrobesOnline Web site for comparative genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Alm, Eric J.; Huang, Katherine H.; Price, Morgan N.; Koche,Richard P.; Keller, Keith; Dubchak, Inna L.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2004-11-05

    At present, hundreds of microbial genomes have been sequenced, and hundreds more are currently in the pipeline. The Virtual Institute for Microbial Stress and Survival has developed a publicly available suite of Web-based comparative genomic tools (http://www.microbesonline.org) designed to facilitate multispecies comparison among prokaryotes. Highlights of the Microbes Online Web site include operon and regulon predictions, a multispecies genome browser, a multispecies Gene Ontology browser, a comparative KEGG metabolic pathway viewer, a Bioinformatics Workbench for in-depth sequence analysis, and Gene Carts that allow users to save genes of interest for further study while they browse. In addition, we provide an interface for genome annotation, which like all of the tools reported here, is freely available to the scientific community.

  10. 78 FR 9910 - Circle Environmental #1 and #2 Sites; Dawson, Terrell County, GA; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    .... Submit your comments by Site name Circle Environmental 1 and 2 Site by one of the following methods: www... AGENCY Circle Environmental 1 and 2 Sites; Dawson, Terrell County, GA; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... removal action at the Circle Environmental 1 and 2 Superfund Sites located in Dawson, Terrell...

  11. 77 FR 4559 - Ecusta Mill Site, Pisgah Forest, Transylvania County, NC; Notice of Amended Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-30

    ... by Site name Ecusta Mill Superfund Site by one of the following methods: www.epa.gov/region4/waste/sf... AGENCY Ecusta Mill Site, Pisgah Forest, Transylvania County, NC; Notice of Amended Settlement AGENCY... Ecusta Mill Superfund Site located in Pisgah Forest, Transylvania County, North Carolina. DATES:...

  12. Long-term variability of aerosol optical thickness in Eastern Europe over 2001-2014 according to the measurements at the Moscow MSU MO AERONET site with additional cloud and NO2 correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubarova, N. Y.; Poliukhov, A. A.; Gorlova, I. D.

    2015-07-01

    The aerosol properties of the atmosphere were obtained within the framework of the AERONET program at the Moscow State University Meteorological Observatory (Moscow MSU MO) over 2001-2014 period. The quality data control has revealed the necessity of their additional cloud and NO2 correction. The application of cloud correction according to hourly visual cloud observations provides a decrease in average aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 500 nm of up to 0.03 compared with the standard dataset. We also show that the additional NO2 correction of the AERONET data is needed in large megalopolis, like Moscow, with 12 million residents and the NOx emission rates of about 100 kt yr-1. According to the developed method we estimated monthly mean NO2 content, which provides an additional decrease of 0.01 for AOT at 340 nm, and of about 0.015 - for AOT at 380 and 440 nm. The ratios of NO2 optical thickness to AOT at 380 and 440 nm are about 5-6 % in summer and reach 15-20 % in winter when both factors have similar effects on UV irradiance. Seasonal cycle of AOT at 500 nm is characterized by a noticeable summer and spring maxima, and minimum in winter conditions, changing from 0.08 in December and January up to 0.3 in August. The application of the additional cloud correction removes a local AOT maximum in February, and lowered the December artificial high AOT values. The pronounced negative AOT trends of about -1-5 % yr-1 have been obtained for most months, which could be attributed to the negative trends in emissions (E) of different aerosol precursors of about 116 Gg yr-2 in ESOx, 78 Gg yr-2 in ENMVOC, and 272 Gg yr-2 in ECO over European territory of Russia. No influence of natural factors on temporal AOT variations has been revealed.

  13. Long-term variability of aerosol optical thickness in Eastern Europe over 2001-2014 according to the measurements at the Moscow MSU MO AERONET site with additional cloud and NO2 correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubarova, N. Y.; Poliukhov, A. A.; Gorlova, I. D.

    2016-02-01

    The atmospheric aerosol properties were obtained within the framework of the AERONET program at the Moscow State University Meteorological Observatory (Moscow MSU MO) over the 2001-2014 period. The quality data control has revealed the necessity of additional cloud screening and NO2 correction. The application of additional cloud screening according to hourly visual cloud observations provides a decrease in monthly average aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 500 nm of up to 0.03 compared with the standard data set. We also show that the additional NO2 correction of the AERONET version 2 data is needed in large megalopolis, like Moscow, with 12 million residents and NOx emission rates of about 100 kt yr-1. According to the developed method, we estimated monthly mean NO2 content, which provides an additional decrease of 0.01 for AOT at 340 nm, and of about 0.015 - for AOT at 380 and 440 nm. The ratios of NO2 optical thickness to AOT at 380 and 440 nm are about 5-6 % in summer and reach 15-20 % in winter when both factors have similar effects on UV irradiance. Seasonal cycle of AOT at 500 nm is characterized by a noticeable summer and spring maxima, and a minimum in winter conditions, changing from 0.08 in December and January up to 0.3 in August. The application of the additional cloud screening removes a local AOT maximum in February. Statistically significant negative trends in annual AOT for UV and mid-visible spectral range have been obtained both for average and 50 % quantile values. The pronounced negative changes were observed in most months with the rate of about -1-5 % yr-1 and could be attributed to the negative trends in emissions (E) of different aerosol precursors of about 135 Gg yr-2 in ESOx, 54 Gg yr-2 in ENMVOC, and slight negative changes in NOx over the European part of Russia. No significant influence of natural factors on temporal AOT variations has been revealed.

  14. 2006 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY; RATEL,K.

    2007-10-01

    Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

  15. 2009 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ratel, K.M.; Brookhaven National Laboratory

    2010-09-30

    Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

  16. 2005 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    2006-08-29

    Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

  17. Co-Evolution of User and Organizational Interfaces: A Longitudinal Case Study of WWW Dissemination of National Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchionini, Gary

    2002-01-01

    Describes how user interfaces for the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) web site evolved over a 5-year period along with the larger organizational interface and how this co-evolution has influenced the institution. Interviews with BLS staff and transaction log analysis are the foci of this study, as well as user information-seeking studies and user…

  18. Levelling the Road Ahead: Guidelines for the Creation of WWW Pages Accessible to Blind and Visually Handicapped Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Judith M.

    1996-01-01

    Suggests guidelines for creating World Wide Web sites that accommodate those using speech or braille aids. Hypertext Markup Language coding should provide (1) one-column format rather than side-by-side columns; (2) stand-alone hyperlinks; (3) "ALT=" attributes for image displays; (4) text alternatives to images or image maps as links or…

  19. 75 FR 71513 - Senior Community Service Employment Program; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, Additional Indicator...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-23

    ... Rulemaking, Additional Indicator on Volunteer Work; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 225... Rulemaking, Additional Indicator on Volunteer Work AGENCY: Employment and Training Administration, Labor... to the proposed additional indicator on http://www.regulations.gov without making any change to...

  20. Evidence for an additional intracellular site of action of probucol in the prevention of oxidative modification of low density lipoprotein. Use of a new water-soluble probucol derivative.

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, S

    1992-01-01

    Oxidative modification of low density lipoprotein (LDL) renders it more atherogenic. Probucol, a highly nonpolar antioxidant, is transported in lipoproteins, including LDL, and inhibits oxidative modification of LDL in vitro. The ability of probucol to inhibit atherogenesis in the LDL receptor-deficient rabbit has been attributed to its antioxidant effect. We report synthesis of a new water-soluble analogue of probucol that is very effective in preventing cell-induced LDL oxidation. The polar probucol derivative, diglutaryl probucol, is efficiently taken up by endothelial cells and macrophages in culture and is hydrolyzed to release the active antioxidant, probucol. The treated cells, after thorough washing, show a marked decrease in their capacity to oxidize LDL during a subsequent incubation. At high concentrations of the derivative, the cells also released free probucol into the medium. Thus, the effectiveness of probucol in vivo may be related both to its presence in LDL, acting as a nonspecific antioxidant, and to an additional ability to inhibit cell-mediated oxidation of LDL by virtue of its uptake into cells. PMID:1569200

  1. EPA True NO2 ground site measurements ?? multiple sites, TCEQ ground site measurements of meteorological and air pollution parameters ?? multiple sites ,GeoTASO NO2 Vertical Column

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA True NO2 ground site measurements ?? multiple sites - http://www-air.larc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/ArcView/discover-aq.tx-2013; TCEQ ground site measurements of meteorological and air pollution parameters ?? multiple sites - http://www-air.larc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/ArcView/discover-aq.tx-2013; GeoTASO NO2 Vertical Column - http://www-air.larc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/ArcView/discover-aq.tx-2013?FALCON=1This dataset is associated with the following publication:Nowlan, C., X. Lu, J. Leitch, K. Chance, G. González Abad, C. Lu, P. Zoogman, J. Cole, T. Delker, W. Good, F. Murcray, L. Ruppert, D. Soo, M. Follette-Cook, S. Janz, M. Kowalewski, C. Loughner, K. Pickering, J. Herman, M. Beaver, R. Long, J. Szykman, L. Judd, P. Kelley, W. Luke, X. Ren, and J. Al-Saadi. Nitrogen dioxide observations from the Geostationary Trace gas and Aerosol Sensor Optimization (GeoTASO) airborne instrument: Retrieval algorithm and measurements during DISCOVER-AQ Texas 2013. Atmospheric Measurement Techniques. Copernicus Publications, Katlenburg-Lindau, GERMANY, 9(6): 2647-2668, (2016).

  2. WIND Toolkit Power Data Site Index

    DOE Data Explorer

    Draxl, Caroline; Mathias-Hodge, Bri

    2016-10-19

    This spreadsheet contains per-site metadata for the WIND Toolkit sites and serves as an index for the raw data hosted on Globus connect (nrel#globus:/globusro/met_data). Aside from the metadata, per site average power and capacity factor are given. This data was prepared by 3TIER under contract by NREL and is public domain. Authoritative documentation on the creation of the underlying dataset is at: Final Report on the Creation of the Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit and API: http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy16osti/66189.pdf

  3. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Cathy A. Wills

    2009-09-01

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) 2008 was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This and previous years’ NTSERs are posted on the NNSA/NSO website at http://www.nv.doe.gov/library/publications/aser.aspx.

  4. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Cathy A. Wills

    2009-09-01

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) 2008 was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This and previous years’ NTSERs are posted on the NNSA/NSO website at http://www.nv.doe.gov/library/publications/aser.aspx.

  5. Site Development Planning Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    The Handbook provides facility managers and site planners at DOE organizations responsible for planning site developments and facilities utilization a step-by-step planning checklist to ensure that planners at each site are focusing on Department-wide goals and objectives. It begins with a brief discussion of a site development-by-objectives program design to promote, recognize, and implement opportunities for improvements in site utilization through planning. Additional information is included on: assembling existing data, plans, programs, and procedures; establishing realistic objectives; identifying site problems, opportunities; and development needs; determining priorities among development needs; developing short and long-range plans; choosing the right development solutions and meeting minimum legal site restrictions; presenting the plan; implementing elements of the plan; monitoring and reporting plan status; and modifying development program plans. (MCW)

  6. Evaluation of Subsurface Engineered Barriers at Waste Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    Evaluation of Subsurface Engineered Barriers at Waste Sites United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste and Emergency...of Subsurface Engineered Barriers at Waste Sites 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...1998 www.epa.gov clu-in.com EVALUATION OF SUBSURFACE ENGINEERED BARRIERS AT WASTE SITES i NOTICE This document was prepared for the U.S. Environmental

  7. 77 FR 46023 - Proposed Foreign-Trade Zone-Chenango County, NY; Under Alternative Site Framework

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    ...-Trade Zone--Chenango County, NY; Under Alternative Site Framework An application has been submitted to... alternative site framework (ASF) adopted by the Board (15 CFR 400.2(c)). The ASF is an option for grantees for... the Board's Web site, which is accessible via www.trade.gov/ftz . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  8. 78 FR 76391 - Proposed Enhancements to the Motor Carrier Safety Measurement System (SMS) Public Web Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-17

    ... System (SMS) Public Web Site AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), DOT. ACTION... Safety Measurement System (SMS) public Web site. On December 6, 2013, Advocates ] for Highway and Auto...://www.regulations.gov Web site is generally available 24 hours each day, 365 days each year. You can...

  9. 75 FR 22391 - Notice of Web Site Publication for the Climate Program Office

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-28

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Notice of Web Site Publication for the Climate Program... Climate Program Office solicitation of grant proposals on its Web site at http://www.climate.noaa.gov... Climate Program Office Web site pertaining to the CPO's research strategies, objectives, and...

  10. 75 FR 8051 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Hanford

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a combined meeting of the Environmental Management Site... Stewardship Plan for the Hanford site. Public Participation: The meeting is open to the public. The EM SSAB... available at the following Web site: http://www.hanford.gov/page.cfm/hab . Issued at Washington, DC,...

  11. WWW.com: A Brief Intervention to Bolster a 5th Grader's Regrouping Skills in Math

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waugh, Matthew; Harrison, Gina L.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the efficacy of a brief math intervention using cognitive behaviour instruction (CBI) supplemented by a mnemonic cue system for a 5th grade student with math computation and fluency difficulties. Regrouping operations in addition and subtraction were the targeted skills. Curriculum-based measurements were conducted at the end…

  12. 78 FR 47317 - Ore Knob Mine Superfund Site; Laurel Springs, Ashe County, North Carolina; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ... comments by site name ``Ore Knob Mine Superfund Site'' by one of the following methods: www.epa.gov/region4... AGENCY Ore Knob Mine Superfund Site; Laurel Springs, Ashe County, North Carolina; Notice of Settlement... Superfund Site located in Laurel Springs, Ashe County, North Carolina. The settlement addresses...

  13. 2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    ENVIRONMENT AND WASTE MANAGMENT SERVICES DIVISION; ET AL.

    2004-10-01

    Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a multi-program national laboratory, prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The SER is written to inform outside regulators, the public, and Laboratory employees of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review, and to summarize BNL's on-site environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), state, and local regulations; and environmental, restoration, and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. This report is intended to be a technical document. It is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.ser.htm. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview, and is distributed with a CD version of the full-length SER. The summary supports BNL's educational and community outreach program.

  14. Azasugar inhibitors as pharmacological chaperones for Krabbe disease† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of IGF, AGF, IGL and DIL syntheses including NMR spectra. Table containing X-ray data collection and refinement statistics. Dose dependence of thermal stabilization of GALC. Controls for DSF assays. IGF- and AGF-mediated stabilization of GALC is buffer and pH dependent. See DOI: 10.1039/c5sc00754b Click here for additional data file. ‡ ‡Data deposition: the atomic coordinates and structure factors have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank, http://www.pdb.org [PDB ID codes 4UFH (IGF), 4UFI (AGF), 4UFJ (IGL), 4UFK (DIL), 4UFL (DGN) and 4UFM (DGJ)].

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Chris H.; Viuff, Agnete H.; Spratley, Samantha J.; Salamone, Stéphane; Christensen, Stig H.; Read, Randy J.; Moriarty, Nigel W.

    2015-01-01

    Krabbe disease is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by rapid demyelination of nerve fibers. This disease is caused by defects in the lysosomal enzyme β-galactocerebrosidase (GALC), which hydrolyzes the terminal galactose from glycosphingolipids. These lipids are essential components of eukaryotic cell membranes: substrates of GALC include galactocerebroside, the primary lipid component of myelin, and psychosine, a cytotoxic metabolite. Mutations of GALC that cause misfolding of the protein may be responsive to pharmacological chaperone therapy (PCT), whereby small molecules are used to stabilize these mutant proteins, thus correcting trafficking defects and increasing residual catabolic activity in cells. Here we describe a new approach for the synthesis of galacto-configured azasugars and the characterization of their interaction with GALC using biophysical, biochemical and crystallographic methods. We identify that the global stabilization of GALC conferred by azasugar derivatives, measured by fluorescence-based thermal shift assays, is directly related to their binding affinity, measured by enzyme inhibition. X-ray crystal structures of these molecules bound in the GALC active site reveal which residues participate in stabilizing interactions, show how potency is achieved and illustrate the penalties of aza/iminosugar ring distortion. The structure–activity relationships described here identify the key physical properties required of pharmacological chaperones for Krabbe disease and highlight the potential of azasugars as stabilizing agents for future enzyme replacement therapies. This work lays the foundation for new drug-based treatments of Krabbe disease. PMID:26029356

  15. 78 FR 73143 - Negotiated Rulemaking Committee, Notice of Additional Committee Meeting-Title IV Federal Student...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-05

    ...., Eighth Floor Conference Center, Washington, DC 20006. Electronic Access to This Document: The official... access documents of the Department published in the Federal Register by using the article search feature at: www.federalregister.gov . Specifically, through the advanced search feature at this site, you...

  16. 76 FR 78335 - Identification of Additional Entities Pursuant to Executive Order 13469

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ... identified as entities in which the Zimbabwe Mining Development Corporation, a person whose property and... concerning OFAC are available from OFAC's Web site ( http://www.treas.gov/ofac ) or via facsimile through a... Director of OFAC identified two entities in which the Zimbabwe Mining Development Corporation, an...

  17. 75 FR 72964 - Disapproval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Addition of Incentive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... http://www.regulations.gov Web site. Although listed in the index, some information is not publicly available, i.e., Confidential Business Information (CBI) or other information whose disclosure is restricted... Region 5 office. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Steven Rosenthal, Environmental Engineer,...

  18. 78 FR 12271 - Wireline Competition Bureau Seeks Additional Comment In Connect America Cost Model Virtual Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ... Virtual Workshop AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: In this... Site: http://fjallfoss.fcc.gov/ecfs2/ . Follow the instructions for submitting comments. Virtual...://www.fcc.gov/blog/wcb-cost-model-virtual-workshop-2012 . People with Disabilities: Contact the FCC...

  19. Additive Similarity Trees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sattath, Shmuel; Tversky, Amos

    1977-01-01

    Tree representations of similarity data are investigated. Hierarchical clustering is critically examined, and a more general procedure, called the additive tree, is presented. The additive tree representation is then compared to multidimensional scaling. (Author/JKS)

  20. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. R.; St. Clair, T. L.; Burks, H. D.; Stoakley, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been found for enhancing the melt flow of thermoplastic polyimides during processing. A high molecular weight 422 copoly(amic acid) or copolyimide was fused with approximately 0.05 to 5 pct by weight of a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive, and this melt was studied by capillary rheometry. Excellent flow and improved composite properties on graphite resulted from the addition of a PMDA-aniline additive to LARC-TPI. Solution viscosity studies imply that amic acid additives temporarily lower molecular weight and, hence, enlarge the processing window. Thus, compositions containing the additive have a lower melt viscosity for a longer time than those unmodified.

  1. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects.

  2. An introduction to the special issue on ecological sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The establishment of the Rangeland Interagency Ecological Site Manual by the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), Forest Service (FS), and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) heralds a new era of rangeland management in the United States (http://www.fs.fed.us/biology/soil/Signed_RIESM_2010...

  3. Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Wills, C.

    2014-09-09

    This report was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) (formerly designated as the Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO]). The new field office designation occurred in March 2013. Published reports cited in this 2013 report, therefore, may bear the name or authorship of NNSA/NSO. This and previous years’ reports, called Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASERs), Nevada Test Site Environmental Reports (NTSERs), and, beginning in 2010, Nevada National Security Site Environmental Reports (NNSSERs), are posted on the NNSA/NFO website at http://www.nv.energy.gov/library/publications/aser.aspx.

  4. SITE CHARACTERIZATION LIBRARY VERSION 3.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Site Characterization Library is a CD that provides a centralized, field-portable source for site characterization information. Version 3 of the Site Characterization Library contains additional (from earlier versions) electronic documents and computer programs related to th...

  5. The distribution alloying elements in alnico 8 and 9 magnets: Site preference of ternary Ti, Fe, Co, and Ni additions in DO{sub 3} Fe{sub 3}Al, Co{sub 3}Al, and Ni{sub 3}Al based intermetallic phases

    SciTech Connect

    Samolyuk, G. D.; Stocks, G. M.; Újfalussy, B.

    2014-11-07

    Recently, interest in alnico magnetic alloys has been rekindled due to their potential to substitute for rare-earth based permanent magnets provided modest improvements in their coercivity can be achieved without loss of saturation magnetization. Recent experimental studies have indicated that atomic and magnetic structure of the two phases (one AlNi-based, the other FeCo-based) that comprise these spinodally decomposed alloy is not as simple as previously thought. A key issue that arises is the distribution of Fe, Co, and Ti within the AlNi-based matrix phase. In this paper, we report the results of first-principles calculations of the site preference of ternary alloying additions in DO{sub 3} Fe{sub 3}Al, Co{sub 3}Al, and Ni{sub 3}Al alloys, as models for the aluminide phase. For compound compositions that are Al rich, which correspond to experimental situation, Ti and Fe are found to occupy the α sites, while Co and Ni prefer the γ sites of the DO{sub 3} lattice. An important finding is that the magnetic moments of transition metals in Fe{sub 3}Al and Co{sub 3}Al are ordered ferromagnetically, whereas the Ni{sub 3}Al were found to be nonmagnetic unless the Fe or Co is added as a ternary element.

  6. The distribution alloying elements in alnico 8 and 9 magnets: Site preference of ternary Ti, Fe, Co, and Ni additions in DO3 Fe3Al, Co3Al, and Ni3Al based intermetallic phases

    SciTech Connect

    Samolyuk, G. D.; Újfalussy, B.; Stocks, G. M.

    2014-11-07

    Recently, interest in alnico magnetic alloys has been rekindled due to their potential to substitute for rare-earth based permanent magnets provided modest improvements in their coercivity can be achieved without loss of saturation magnetization. Recent experimental studies have indicated that atomic and magnetic structure of the two phases (one AlNi-based, the other FeCo-based) that comprise these spinodally decomposed alloy is not as simple as previously thought. A key issue that arises is the distribution of Fe, Co and Ti within the AlNi-based matrix phase. In our paper we report the results of first-principles calculations of the site preference of ternary alloying additions in DO3 Fe3Al, Co3Al and Ni3Al alloys, as models for the aluminide phase. For compound compositions that are Al rich, which corresponds to experimental situation, Ti and Fe are found to occupy the sites, while Co and Ni prefer the sites of the DO3 lattice. Finally, an important finding is that the magnetic moments of transition metals in Fe3Al and Co3Al are ordered ferromagnetically, whereas the Ni3Al were found to be nonmagnetic unless the Fe or Co are added as a ternary element.

  7. Data Validation Package, June 2016 Groundwater Sampling at the Hallam, Nebraska, Decommissioned Reactor Site, August 2016

    SciTech Connect

    Surovchak, Scott; Miller, Michele

    2016-08-01

    The 2008 Long-Term Surveillance Plan [LTSP] for the Decommissioned Hallam Nuclear Power Facility, Hallam, Nebraska (http://www.lm.doe.gov/Hallam/Documents.aspx) requires groundwater monitoring once every 2 years. Seventeen monitoring wells at the Hallam site were sampled during this event as specified in the plan. Planned monitoring locations are shown in Attachment 1, Sampling and Analysis Work Order. Water levels were measured at all sampled wells and at two additional wells (6A and 6B) prior to the start of sampling. Additionally, water levels of each sampled well were measured at the beginning of sampling. See Attachment 2, Trip Report, for additional details. Sampling and analysis were conducted as specified in Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PRO/S04351, continually updated, http://energy.gov/lm/downloads/sampling-and-analysis-plan-us-department- energy-office-legacy-management-sites). Gross alpha and gross beta are the only parameters that were detected at statistically significant concentrations. Time/concentration graphs of the gross alpha and gross beta data are included in Attachment 3, Data Presentation. The gross alpha and gross beta activity concentrations observed are consistent with values previously observed and are attributed to naturally occurring radionuclides (e.g., uranium and uranium decay chain products) in the groundwater.

  8. Theatre fleet's vital additional capacity.

    PubMed

    2012-11-01

    Vanguard Healthcare's fleet of mobile surgical facilities has been deployed to healthcare sites throughout Europe and beyond for over a decade, providing vital additional clinical capacity when existing buildings are refurbished or upgraded, in the event of flood or fire, or simply to help hospitals cater for rising demand. It is a combination of careful planning, teamwork, and the specialist expertise of Vanguard's personnel--many with a clinical background--that ensures not only each unit's successful installation, but equally its subsequent running, servicing, and maintenance, the company explains.

  9. An energy-dependent numerical model for the condensation probability, www.elsevier.com/xml/xocs/dtd" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">γj

    SciTech Connect

    Kerby, Leslie Marie

    2016-12-09

    The “condensation” probability, γj, is an important variable in the preequilibrium stage of nuclear spallation reactions. It represents the probability that pj excited nucleons (excitons) will “condense” to form complex particle type j in the excited residual nucleus. In addition, it has a significant impact on the emission width, or probability of emitting fragment type j from the residual nucleus. Previous formulations for γj were energy-independent and valid for fragments up to 4He only. This paper explores the formulation of a new model for γj, one which is energy-dependent and valid for up to 28Mg, and which provides improved fits compared to experimental fragment spectra.

  10. Polylactides in additive biomanufacturing.

    PubMed

    Poh, Patrina S P; Chhaya, Mohit P; Wunner, Felix M; De-Juan-Pardo, Elena M; Schilling, Arndt F; Schantz, Jan-Thorsten; van Griensven, Martijn; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2016-12-15

    New advanced manufacturing technologies under the alias of additive biomanufacturing allow the design and fabrication of a range of products from pre-operative models, cutting guides and medical devices to scaffolds. The process of printing in 3 dimensions of cells, extracellular matrix (ECM) and biomaterials (bioinks, powders, etc.) to generate in vitro and/or in vivo tissue analogue structures has been termed bioprinting. To further advance in additive biomanufacturing, there are many aspects that we can learn from the wider additive manufacturing (AM) industry, which have progressed tremendously since its introduction into the manufacturing sector. First, this review gives an overview of additive manufacturing and both industry and academia efforts in addressing specific challenges in the AM technologies to drive toward AM-enabled industrial revolution. After which, considerations of poly(lactides) as a biomaterial in additive biomanufacturing are discussed. Challenges in wider additive biomanufacturing field are discussed in terms of (a) biomaterials; (b) computer-aided design, engineering and manufacturing; (c) AM and additive biomanufacturing printers hardware; and (d) system integration. Finally, the outlook for additive biomanufacturing was discussed.

  11. Additive Manufactured Product Integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess; Wells, Doug; James, Steve; Nichols, Charles

    2017-01-01

    NASA is providing key leadership in an international effort linking NASA and non-NASA resources to speed adoption of additive manufacturing (AM) to meet NASA's mission goals. Participants include industry, NASA's space partners, other government agencies, standards organizations and academia. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) is identified as a universal need for all aspects of additive manufacturing.

  12. 2004 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY; SER TEAM; ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SERVICES GROUP; ENVIROMENTAL AND WASTE MANAGEMENT SERVICES DIVISION FIELD SAMPLING TEAM

    2005-08-22

    Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The SER is written to inform the public, regulators, Laboratory employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The report summarizes BNL's environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and restoration and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The SER is intended to be a technical document. It is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/esd/SER.htm. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD version of the full report. The summary supports BNL's educational and community outreach program.

  13. Implementation of the direct www.elsevier.com/xml/xocs/dtd" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">S(α,β) method in the KENO Monte Carlo code

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, Shane W. D.; Maldonado, G. Ivan

    2016-11-25

    The Monte Carlo code KENO contains thermal scattering data for a wide variety of thermal moderators. These data are processed from Evaluated Nuclear Data Files (ENDF) by AMPX and stored as double differential probability distribution functions. The method examined in this study uses S(α,β) probability distribution functions derived from the ENDF data files directly instead of being converted to double differential cross sections. This allows the size of the cross section data on the disk to be reduced substantially amount. KENO has also been updated to allow interpolation in temperature on these data so that problems can be run at any temperature. Results are shown for several simplified problems for a variety of moderators. In addition, benchmark models based on the KRITZ reactor in Sweden were run, and the results are compared with the previous versions of KENO without the direct S(α,β) method. Results from the direct S(α,β) method compare favorably with the original results obtained using the double differential cross sections. Finally, sampling the data increases the run-time of the Monte Carlo calculation, but memory usage is decreased substantially.

  14. Measurement of the total cross section from elastic scattering in pp collisions at www.elsevier.com/xml/xocs/dtd" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">s=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adachi, S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alshehri, A. A.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisits, M-S; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska-Blenessy, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethani, A.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Billoud, T. R. V.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bisanz, T.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blue, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.

    2016-10-01

    A measurement of the total ppcross section at the LHC at √s=8TeV is presented. An integrated luminosity of 500 μb-1 was accumulated in a special run with high-β beam optics to measure the differential elastic cross section as a function of the Mandelstam momentum transfer variable t. The measurement is performed with the ALFA sub-detector of ATLAS. Using a fit to the differential elastic cross section in the -t range from 0.014GeV2 to 0.1GeV2 to extrapolate t→0, the total cross section, σtot(pp →X), is measured via the optical theorem to be σtot(pp→ X) = 96.07±0.18 (stat.)±0.85 (exp.)± 0.31 (extr.) mb, where the first error is statistical, the second accounts for all experimental systematic uncertainties and the last is related to uncertainties in the extrapolation t→0. In addition, the slope of the exponential function describing the elastic cross section at small t is determined to be B =19.74 ±0.05 (stat.) ±0.23 (syst.) GeV-2.

  15. Spectral Quadrature method for accurate www.elsevier.com/xml/xocs/dtd" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">O(N) electronic structure calculations of metals and insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Pratapa, Phanisri P.; Suryanarayana, Phanish; Pask, John E.

    2015-12-02

    We present the Clenshaw–Curtis Spectral Quadrature (SQ) method for real-space O(N) Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. In this approach, all quantities of interest are expressed as bilinear forms or sums over bilinear forms, which are then approximated by spatially localized Clenshaw–Curtis quadrature rules. This technique is identically applicable to both insulating and metallic systems, and in conjunction with local reformulation of the electrostatics, enables the O(N) evaluation of the electronic density, energy, and atomic forces. The SQ approach also permits infinite-cell calculations without recourse to Brillouin zone integration or large supercells. We employ a finite difference representation in order to exploit the locality of electronic interactions in real space, enable systematic convergence, and facilitate large-scale parallel implementation. In particular, we derive expressions for the electronic density, total energy, and atomic forces that can be evaluated in O(N) operations. We demonstrate the systematic convergence of energies and forces with respect to quadrature order as well as truncation radius to the exact diagonalization result. In addition, we show convergence with respect to mesh size to established O(N3) planewave results. In conclusion, we establish the efficiency of the proposed approach for high temperature calculations and discuss its particular suitability for large-scale parallel computation.

  16. Mars exobiology landing sites for future exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landheim, Ragnhild; Greeley, Ronald; Desmarais, David; Farmer, Jack D.; Klein, Harold

    1993-01-01

    The selection of landing sites for Exobiology is an important issue for planning for future Mars missions. Results of a recent site selection study which focused on potential landing sites described in the Mars Landing Site Catalog are presented. In addition, basic Exobiology science objectives in Mars exploration are reviewed, and the procedures used in site evaluation and prioritization are outlined.

  17. Search for associated higgs boson production WH-->WWW*-->l+/-nul'+/-nu'+X in pp collisions at square root s=1.96 Te V.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J-L; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Das, M; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, A; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lager, S; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A-C; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; Mattingly, S E K; McCarthy, R; Meder, D; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundim, L; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'dell, V; O'neil, D C; Obrant, G; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Peters, K; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rud, V I; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shephard, W D; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vlimant, J-R; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xuan, N; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2006-10-13

    We present a search for associated Higgs boson production in the process pp-->WH-->WWW*-->l;+/-nul'+/-nu'+X in final states containing two like-sign isolated electrons or muons (e+/-e;+/-, e+/-micro+/-, or micro+/-micro+/-). The search is based on D0 run II data samples corresponding to integrated luminosities of 360-380 pb-1. No excess is observed over the predicted standard model background. We set 95% C.L. upper limits on sigma(pp-->WH)xBr(H-->WW*) between 3.2 and 2.8 pb for Higgs boson masses from 115 to 175 GeV.

  18. Site selection

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, C.W.

    1983-07-01

    The conditions and criteria for selecting a site for a nuclear weapons test at the Nevada Test Site are summarized. Factors considered are: (1) scheduling of drill rigs, (2) scheduling of site preparation (dirt work, auger hole, surface casing, cementing), (3) schedule of event (when are drill hole data needed), (4) depth range of proposed W.P., (5) geologic structure (faults, Pz contact, etc.), (6) stratigraphy (alluvium, location of Grouse Canyon Tuff, etc.), (7) material properties (particularly montmorillonite and CO/sub 2/ content), (8) water table depth, (9) potential drilling problems (caving), (10) adjacent collapse craters and chimneys, (11) adjacent expended but uncollapsed sites, (12) adjacent post-shot or other small diameter holes, (13) adjacent stockpile emplacement holes, (14) adjacent planned events (including LANL), (15) projected needs of Test Program for various DOB's and operational separations, and (16) optimal use of NTS real estate.

  19. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  20. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  1. 76 FR 61075 - Foreign-Trade Zone 275-Lansing, MI; Application for Reorganization Under Alternative Site Framework

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ... Alternative Site Framework An application has been submitted to the Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board (the Board... zone under the alternative site framework (ASF) adopted by the Board (74 FR 1170, 1/ 12/09 (correction... ``Reading Room'' section of the Board's Web site, which is accessible via http://www.trade.gov/ftz ....

  2. 76 FR 79228 - Combined Licenses at William States Lee III Nuclear Station Site, Units 1 and 2; Duke Energy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    .... You may submit comments by any one of the following methods: Federal Rulemaking Web Site: Go to http... Information Comments submitted in writing or in electronic form will be posted on the NRC Web site and on the Federal rulemaking Web site, http://www.regulations.gov . Because your comments will not be edited...

  3. Publishing on the WWW. Part 2 - Copyright and the WWW

    PubMed Central

    Grech, V

    2001-01-01

    Copyright on the Internet is becoming an increasingly important issue, as the copying of material in its original digital form is extremely easy, and such copies can be made without any degradation of the copies whatsoever. But what exactly is copyright? In this article, I will discuss copyright and related issues as defined by United States law, since the Internet was an American concept and continues to be dominated by the United States. Other countries have similar laws with relatively minor variations. PMID:22368591

  4. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wender, Ester H.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that food additives are causally associated with hyperkinesis and learning disabilities in children is reviewed, and available data are summarized. Available from: American Medical Association 535 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610. (JG)

  5. Smog control fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lundby, W.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described of controlling, reducing or eliminating, ozone and related smog resulting from photochemical reactions between ozone and automotive or industrial gases comprising the addition of iodine or compounds of iodine to hydrocarbon-base fuels prior to or during combustion in an amount of about 1 part iodine per 240 to 10,000,000 parts fuel, by weight, to be accomplished by: (a) the addition of these inhibitors during or after the refining or manufacturing process of liquid fuels; (b) the production of these inhibitors for addition into fuel tanks, such as automotive or industrial tanks; or (c) the addition of these inhibitors into combustion chambers of equipment utilizing solid fuels for the purpose of reducing ozone.

  6. Documentation for a web site to serve ULF-EM (Ultra-Low Frequency Electromagnetic) data to the public

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neumann, Danny A.; McPherson, Selwyn; Klemperer, Simon L.; Glen, Jonathan M.G.; McPhee, Darcy K.; Kappler, Karl

    2011-01-01

    The Stanford Ultra-Low Frequency Electromagnetic (ULF-EM) Monitoring Project is recording naturally varying electromagnetic signals adjacent to active earthquake faults, in an attempt to establish whether there is any variation in these signals associated with earthquakes. Our project is collaborative between Stanford University, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and UC Berkeley. Lead scientists are Simon Klemperer (Stanford University), Jonathan Glen (USGS) and Darcy Karakelian McPhee (USGS). Our initial sites are in the San Francisco Bay Area, monitoring different strands of the San Andreas fault system, at Stanford University's Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve (JRSC), Marin Headlands of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area (MHDL), and the UC Berkeley's Russell Reservation Field Station adjacent to Briones Regional Park (BRIB). In addition, we maintain in conjunction with the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory (BSL) two remote reference stations at the Bear Valley Ranch in Parkfield, Calif., (PKD) and the San Andreas Geophysical Observatory at Hollister, Calif., (SAO). Metadata about our site can be found at http://ulfem-data.stanford.edu/info.html. Site descriptions can be found at the BSL at http://seismo.berkeley.edu/, and seismic data can be obtained from the Northern California Earthquake Data Center at http://www.ncedc.org/. The site http://ulfem-data.stanford.edu/ allows access to data from the Stanford-USGS sites JRSC, MHDL and BRIB, as well as UC Berkeley sites PKD and SAO.

  7. 76 FR 14386 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Hanford

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ... open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific...: The meeting is open to the public. The EM SSAB, Hanford, welcomes the attendance of the public at its... site: http://www.hanford.gov/page.cfm/hab . Issued at Washington, DC, on March 11, 2011. LaTanya...

  8. 76 FR 28218 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Hanford

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-16

    ... open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific... Discussions: Issue Managers. Advice Development. Public Participation: The meeting is open to the public. The... the following Web site: http://www.hanford.gov/page.cfm/hab . ] Issued at Washington, DC on May...

  9. 75 FR 27999 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Hanford

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-19

    ... open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific..., M-91) 2012 Budget Request Board Business Public Participation: The meeting is open to the public... also be available at the following Web site: http://www.hanford.gov/page.cfm/hab . Issued at...

  10. Group Sparse Additive Models

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Junming; Chen, Xi; Xing, Eric P.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the problem of sparse variable selection in nonparametric additive models, with the prior knowledge of the structure among the covariates to encourage those variables within a group to be selected jointly. Previous works either study the group sparsity in the parametric setting (e.g., group lasso), or address the problem in the nonparametric setting without exploiting the structural information (e.g., sparse additive models). In this paper, we present a new method, called group sparse additive models (GroupSpAM), which can handle group sparsity in additive models. We generalize the ℓ1/ℓ2 norm to Hilbert spaces as the sparsity-inducing penalty in GroupSpAM. Moreover, we derive a novel thresholding condition for identifying the functional sparsity at the group level, and propose an efficient block coordinate descent algorithm for constructing the estimate. We demonstrate by simulation that GroupSpAM substantially outperforms the competing methods in terms of support recovery and prediction accuracy in additive models, and also conduct a comparative experiment on a real breast cancer dataset.

  11. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  12. Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Cathy Wills, ed

    2012-09-12

    This report was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This and previous years reports, called Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASERs), Nevada Test Site Environmental Reports (NTSERs), and, beginning in 2010, Nevada National Security Site Environmental Reports (NNSSERs), are posted on the NNSA/NSO website at http://www.nv.energy.gov/library/publications/aser.aspx. This NNSSER was prepared to satisfy DOE Order DOE O 231.1B, 'Environment, Safety and Health Reporting.' Its purpose is to (1) report compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, (2) present results of environmental monitoring of radiological and nonradiological effluents, (3) report estimated radiological doses to the public from releases of radioactive material, (4) summarize environmental incidents of noncompliance and actions taken in response to them, (5) describe the NNSA/NSO Environmental Management System and characterize its performance, and (6) highlight significant environmental programs and efforts. This NNSSER summarizes data and compliance status for calendar year 2011 at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) (formerly the Nevada Test Site) and its two support facilities, the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF) and the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Nellis (RSL-Nellis). It also addresses environmental restoration (ER) projects conducted at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). Through a Memorandum of Agreement, NNSA/NSO is responsible for the oversight of TTR ER projects, and the Sandia Site Office of NNSA (NNSA/SSO) has oversight of all other TTR activities. NNSA/SSO produces the TTR annual environmental report available at http://www.sandia.gov/news/publications/environmental/index.html.

  13. Computers and small satellites: How FORTE is utilizing the WWW as a {open_quotes}paperless{close_quotes} information resource and the development of a unique resource management planning tool

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel-Dupre, D.; Carter, M.; Franz, R.

    1997-10-01

    The Fast-On-orbit Recording of Transient Events (FORTE) satellite is the second satellite to be developed and flown by Los Alamos National Laboratory and is scheduled to be launched August, 1997 by a Pegasus XL rocket. FORTE follows in the footsteps of the ALEXIS satellite in utilizing a very small operations crew for mission operations. Partially based upon the ALEXIS automation and World Wide Web (WWW) usage for data dissemination, FORTE began at an early stage of ground processing to use the web as a repository of information about all aspects of the satellite. Detailed descriptions of the various satellite and experiment components, cable diagrams, integration photographs as well as extensive test data have all been compiled into a single site as a means of archiving the data at a single location. In this manner, it is readily available during times of ground testing, ground station operation training as well as anomaly resolution. Small satellites usually require extensive effort to optimize operation under minimal resources. For the FORTE satellite, a unique planning tool has been developed over the past 2 years which balances the various resources of the satellite (power, memory, downlink, on board command buffer, etc.) to provide the maximum data acquisition. This paper will concentrate on a description of both the extensive web interface and the planning tool. 6 refs.

  14. Bayesian multiple-instance motif discovery with BAMBI: inference of recombinase and transcription factor binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Jajamovich, Guido H.; Wang, Xiaodong; Arkin, Adam P.; Samoilov, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Finding conserved motifs in genomic sequences represents one of essential bioinformatic problems. However, achieving high discovery performance without imposing substantial auxiliary constraints on possible motif features remains a key algorithmic challenge. This work describes BAMBI—a sequential Monte Carlo motif-identification algorithm, which is based on a position weight matrix model that does not require additional constraints and is able to estimate such motif properties as length, logo, number of instances and their locations solely on the basis of primary nucleotide sequence data. Furthermore, should biologically meaningful information about motif attributes be available, BAMBI takes advantage of this knowledge to further refine the discovery results. In practical applications, we show that the proposed approach can be used to find sites of such diverse DNA-binding molecules as the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) and Din-family site-specific serine recombinases. Results obtained by BAMBI in these and other settings demonstrate better statistical performance than any of the four widely-used profile-based motif discovery methods: MEME, BioProspector with BioOptimizer, SeSiMCMC and Motif Sampler as measured by the nucleotide-level correlation coefficient. Additionally, in the case of Din-family recombinase target site discovery, the BAMBI-inferred motif is found to be the only one functionally accurate from the underlying biochemical mechanism standpoint. C++ and Matlab code is available at http://www.ee.columbia.edu/~guido/BAMBI or http://genomics.lbl.gov/BAMBI/. PMID:21948794

  15. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  16. Fused Lasso Additive Model

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Ashley; Witten, Daniela; Simon, Noah

    2016-01-01

    We consider the problem of predicting an outcome variable using p covariates that are measured on n independent observations, in a setting in which additive, flexible, and interpretable fits are desired. We propose the fused lasso additive model (FLAM), in which each additive function is estimated to be piecewise constant with a small number of adaptively-chosen knots. FLAM is the solution to a convex optimization problem, for which a simple algorithm with guaranteed convergence to a global optimum is provided. FLAM is shown to be consistent in high dimensions, and an unbiased estimator of its degrees of freedom is proposed. We evaluate the performance of FLAM in a simulation study and on two data sets. Supplemental materials are available online, and the R package flam is available on CRAN. PMID:28239246

  17. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamines containing phenylethynyl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidi none to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  18. www.ceebic.org/~cleanenergyalabama

    SciTech Connect

    Tom Siegwald

    2003-01-02

    The Business Innovation Center will fully participate as a member and support as fully as possible the goals of “The Alliance of Clean Energy Business Incubators” by: 1. Participating in NREL-sponsored Clean Energy Investor Forums, when possible Attended 15th Annual Growth Forum in Albany, NY, October 2003 2. Marketing our incubation services to Clean Energy Companies. October, 2002: Traveled to the University of Southern Mississippi Center for Economic and Community Development to make a presentation concerning the National Alliance of Clean Energy Incubators to the participants of the New South Economic Course. This course was attended by 65 Economic Developers, Small Business Development Center personel, and Chambers of Commerce personnel from 9 states around the South East U.S. These are people who have direct contact with entrepreneurs and can act as referrals to the Clean Energy Incubator and NREL online database, as specified in the Scope of Work

  19. WWW To Support Classroom Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Terry D.; Joerg, Werner B.

    1996-01-01

    A study conducted in two undergraduate classes found that the World Wide Web was perceived by students and instructors as a valuable classroom tool but that significant barriers to its adoption existed, including access restrictions, inadequate training, difficulty logging on, poor keyboarding skills, difficulty reading screens, getting lost in…

  20. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Deanin, R D

    1975-01-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products. PMID:1175566

  1. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed

    Deanin, R D

    1975-06-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products.

  2. Biobased lubricant additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fully biobased lubricants are those formulated using all biobased ingredients, i.e. biobased base oils and biobased additives. Such formulations provide the maximum environmental, safety, and economic benefits expected from a biobased product. Currently, there are a number of biobased base oils that...

  3. More Than Additional Space...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CEFP Journal, 1973

    1973-01-01

    A much needed addition to the Jamestown Elementary School turned out to be more than an expansion of walls for more space. A new educational program, a limited budget, and a short time line were tackled on a team approach basis and were successfully resolved. (Author)

  4. Vinyl capped addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D. (Inventor); Malarik, Diane C. (Inventor); Delvigs, Peter (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimide resins (PMR) are generally useful where high strength and temperature capabilities are required (at temperatures up to about 700 F). Polyimide resins are particularly useful in applications such as jet engine compressor components, for example, blades, vanes, air seals, air splitters, and engine casing parts. Aromatic vinyl capped addition polyimides are obtained by reacting a diamine, an ester of tetracarboxylic acid, and an aromatic vinyl compound. Low void materials with improved oxidative stability when exposed to 700 F air may be fabricated as fiber reinforced high molecular weight capped polyimide composites. The aromatic vinyl capped polyimides are provided with a more aromatic nature and are more thermally stable than highly aliphatic, norbornenyl-type end-capped polyimides employed in PMR resins. The substitution of aromatic vinyl end-caps for norbornenyl end-caps in addition polyimides results in polymers with improved oxidative stability.

  5. Electrophilic addition of astatine

    SciTech Connect

    Norseev, Yu.V.; Vasaros, L.; Nhan, D.D.; Huan, N.K.

    1988-03-01

    It has been shown for the first time that astatine is capable of undergoing addition reactions to unsaturated hydrocarbons. A new compound of astatine, viz., ethylene astatohydrin, has been obtained, and its retention numbers of squalane, Apiezon, and tricresyl phosphate have been found. The influence of various factors on the formation of ethylene astatohydrin has been studied. It has been concluded on the basis of the results obtained that the univalent cations of astatine in an acidic medium is protonated hypoastatous acid.

  6. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online.

  7. [Construction of DICOM-WWW gateway by open source, and application to PDAs using the high-speed mobile communications network].

    PubMed

    Yokohama, Noriya

    2003-09-01

    The author constructed a medical image network system using open source software that took security into consideration. This system was enabled for search and browse with a WWW browser, and images were stored in a DICOM server. In order to realize this function, software was developed to fill in the gap between the DICOM protocol and HTTP using PHP language. The transmission speed was evaluated by the difference in protocols between DICOM and HTTP. Furthermore, an attempt was made to evaluate the convenience of medical image access with a personal information terminal via the Internet through the high-speed mobile communication terminal. Results suggested the feasibility of remote diagnosis and application to emergency care.

  8. WWW Table of Radioactive Isotopes (TORI or ToI) from the Isotopes Project: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory - Lund University Collaboration

    DOE Data Explorer

    Firestone, R. B. [LBNL; Ekstrom, L. P. [LUNDS Universitet; Chu, S. Y.F. [LBNL

    The handbook titled "Table of Isotopes" has long been a standard source of information for nuclear structure and decay data. This web page provides online access to the "Table of Isotopes" data. It provides specialized interfaces to search, including: 1) Radiation search - search for by energy range and/or parent properties; 2) Nuclide search - search for nuclides by A, Z, N, and/or half-life range; 3) Atomic data - search for X-rays and Auger electrons; 4) Periodic table interface to the nuclides; 5) Summary drawings for A=1-277 (PDF). This page also provides access to various other resources, including the WWW Table of Nuclear Structure where the user can interactively search adopted nuclear level and gamma-ray properties or display tables, level scheme ladder diagrams and nuclear charts.

  9. MX Siting Investigation. Mineral Resources Survey, Seven Additional Valleys, Nevada/Utah Siting Area. Volume I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-23

    market for certain clays and result in commercial exploitation. P 5.3.4.5 Pegmatite Minerals Feldspar, beryl, and mica are the economically important...pegma- P tite minerals in Nevada; however, no production from pegmatites is known in the study area. Since pegmatites are not common in the study area

  10. 31 CFR 380.5 - Where can I find current information, and who can I contact for additional guidance and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... interpretation? You can find a current list of acceptable classes of securities, instruments and respective valuations on Treasury's Bureau of the Fiscal Service Web site at http://www.treasurydirect.gov. You may also..., Bureau of the Fiscal Service, Office of the Commissioner, Government Securities Regulations Staff,...

  11. 31 CFR 380.5 - Where can I find current information, and who can I contact for additional guidance and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...? You can find a current list of acceptable classes of securities, instruments and respective valuations on Treasury's Bureau of the Public Debt Web site at http://www.treasurydirect.gov. You may also..., Bureau of the Public Debt, Office of the Commissioner, Government Securities Regulations Staff, 799...

  12. Site clearance working group

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana continue to be areas with a high level of facility removal, and the pace of removal is projected to increase. Regulations were promulgated for the Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana requiring that abandoned sites be cleared of debris that could interfere with fishing and shrimping activities. The site clearance regulations also required verification that the sites were clear. Additionally, government programs were established to compensate fishermen for losses associated with snagging their equipment on oil and gas related objects that remained on the water bottoms in areas other than active producing sites and sites that had been verified as clear of obstructions and snags. The oil and gas industry funds the compensation programs. This paper reviews the regulations and evolving operating practices in the Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana where site clearance and fisherman`s gear compensation regulations have been in place for a number of years. Although regulations and guidelines may be in place elsewhere in the world, this paper focuses on the Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana. Workshop participants are encouraged to bring up international issues during the course of the workshop. Additionally, this paper raises questions and focuses on issues that are of concern to the various Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana water surface and water bottom stakeholders. This paper does not have answers to the questions or issues. During the workshop participants will debate the questions and issues in an attempt to develop consensus opinions and/or make suggestions that can be provided to the appropriate organizations, both private and government, for possible future research or policy adjustments. Site clearance and facility removal are different activities. Facility removal deals with removal of the structures used to produce oil and gas including platforms, wells, casing, piles, pipelines, well protection structures, etc.

  13. Siloxane containing addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maudgal, S.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Addition polyimide oligomers have been synthesized from bis(gamma-aminopropyl) tetramethyldisiloxane and 3, 3', 4, 4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride using a variety of latent crosslinking groups as endcappers. The prepolymers were isolated and characterized for solubility (in amide, chlorinated and ether solvents), melt flow and cure properties. The most promising systems, maleimide and acetylene terminated prepolymers, were selected for detailed study. Graphite cloth reinforced composites were prepared and properties compared with those of graphite/Kerimid 601, a commercially available bismaleimide. Mixtures of the maleimide terminated system with Kerimid 601, in varying proportions, were also studied.

  14. QuickMap: a public tool for large-scale gene therapy vector insertion site mapping and analysis.

    PubMed

    Appelt, J-U; Giordano, F A; Ecker, M; Roeder, I; Grund, N; Hotz-Wagenblatt, A; Opelz, G; Zeller, W J; Allgayer, H; Fruehauf, S; Laufs, S

    2009-07-01

    Several events of insertional mutagenesis in pre-clinical and clinical gene therapy studies have created intense interest in assessing the genomic insertion profiles of gene therapy vectors. For the construction of such profiles, vector-flanking sequences detected by inverse PCR, linear amplification-mediated-PCR or ligation-mediated-PCR need to be mapped to the host cell's genome and compared to a reference set. Although remarkable progress has been achieved in mapping gene therapy vector insertion sites, public reference sets are lacking, as are the possibilities to quickly detect non-random patterns in experimental data. We developed a tool termed QuickMap, which uniformly maps and analyzes human and murine vector-flanking sequences within seconds (available at www.gtsg.org). Besides information about hits in chromosomes and fragile sites, QuickMap automatically determines insertion frequencies in +/- 250 kb adjacency to genes, cancer genes, pseudogenes, transcription factor and (post-transcriptional) miRNA binding sites, CpG islands and repetitive elements (short interspersed nuclear elements (SINE), long interspersed nuclear elements (LINE), Type II elements and LTR elements). Additionally, all experimental frequencies are compared with the data obtained from a reference set, containing 1 000 000 random integrations ('random set'). Thus, for the first time a tool allowing high-throughput profiling of gene therapy vector insertion sites is available. It provides a basis for large-scale insertion site analyses, which is now urgently needed to discover novel gene therapy vectors with 'safe' insertion profiles.

  15. Platelet additive solution - electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Hiroshi; Hirayama, Junichi; Akino, Mitsuaki; Ikeda, Hisami

    2011-06-01

    Recent attention to solutions that replace most or all plasma in platelet concentrates, while maintaining satisfactory platelet function, is motivated by the potential of plasma reduction or depletion to mitigate various transfusion-related adverse events. This report considers the electrolytic composition of previously described platelet additive solutions, in order to draw general conclusions about what is required for platelet function and longevity. The optimal concentrations of Na(+) and Cl(-) are 69-115 mM. The presence of both K(+) and Mg(2+) in platelet suspension at nearly physiological concentrations (3-5mM and 1.5-3mM, respectively) is indispensable for good preservation capacity because both electrolytes are required to prevent platelet activation. In contrast to K(+) and Mg(2+), Ca(2+) may not be important because no free Ca(2+) is available in M-sol, which showed excellent platelet preservation capacity at less than 5% plasma concentration. The importance of bicarbonate (approximately 40 mM) can be recognized when the platelets are suspended in additive solution under less than 5% residual plasma concentration.

  16. Publicity through Better Web Site Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guenther, Kim

    1999-01-01

    Describes how to design Web sites that will reach the most people possible. Discusses publicity; Web search engine sites; adopting Web development standards; using metatags to effectively index a site; Web site addresses and naming conventions; writing for the Web; mass submissions; subject area knowledge; making Web rings; and additional ideas to…

  17. CHARACTERIZING SITE HYDROLOGY (REGION 5)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  18. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Cathy Wills, ed.

    2010-09-13

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2009 was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This and previous years’ Nevada Test Site Environmental Reports (NTSERs) are posted on the NNSA/NSO website at http://www.nv.doe.gov/library/publications/aser.aspx. This NTSER was prepared to satisfy DOE Order DOE O 231.1A, “Environment, Safety and Health Reporting.” Its purpose is to (1) report compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, (2) present results of environmental monitoring of radiological and nonradiological effluents, (3) report estimated radiological doses to the public from releases of radioactive material, (4) summarize environmental incidents of noncompliance and actions taken in response to them, (5) describe the NNSA/NSO Environmental Management System and characterize its performance, and (6) highlight significant environmental programs and efforts. This NTSER summarizes data and compliance status for calendar year 2009 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and its two support facilities, the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF) and the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL)-Nellis. It also addresses environmental restoration (ER) projects conducted at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). Through a Memorandum of Agreement, NNSA/NSO is responsible for the oversight of TTR ER projects, and the Sandia Site Office of NNSA (NNSA/SSO) has oversight of all other TTR activities. NNSA/SSO produces the TTR annual environmental report available at http://www.sandia.gov/news/publications/environmental/index.html.

  19. Additive composition, for gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Vataru, M.

    1989-01-10

    An admixture is described that comprises Diesel fuel and an additive composition added thereto which is between about 0.05 to about 2.0 percent by weight of the fuel, the composition comprising: (a) between about 0.05 and 25% relative weight parts of an organic peroxide, and (b) between about 0.1 and 25% relative weight parts of detergent selected from the component group that consists of: (i) fatty amines; (ii) ethoxylated and propoxylated derivatives of fatty amines; (iii) fatty diamines; (iv) fatty imidazlines; (v) polymeric amines and derivatives thereof; (vi) combination of one or more of the (i) through (v) components with carboxylic acid or acids having from three to forth carbon atoms, (c) from about 99.0 to about 50% by weight of a hydrocarbon solvent.

  20. Teardrop bladder: additional considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Wechsler, R.J.; Brennan, R.E.

    1982-07-01

    Nine cases of teardrop bladder (TDB) seen at excretory urography are presented. In some of these patients, the iliopsoas muscles were at the upper limit of normal in size, and additional evaluation of the perivesical structures with computed tomography (CT) was necessary. CT demonstrated only hypertrophied muscles with or without perivesical fat. The psoas muscles and pelvic width were measured in 8 patients and compared with the measurements of a control group of males without TDB. Patients with TDB had large iliopsoas muscles and narrow pelves compared with the control group. The psoas muscle width/pelvic width ratio was significantly greater (p < 0.0005) in patients with TDB than in the control group, with values of 1.04 + 0.05 and 0.82 + 0.09, respectively. It is concluded that TDB is not an uncommon normal variant in black males. Both iliopsoas muscle hypertrophy and a narrow pelvis are factors that predispose a patient to TDB.

  1. New addition curing polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frimer, Aryeh A.; Cavano, Paul

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to improve the thermal-oxidative stability (TOS) of PMR-type polymers, the use of 1,4-phenylenebis (phenylmaleic anhydride) PPMA, was evaluated. Two series of nadic end-capped addition curing polyimides were prepared by imidizing PPMA with either 4,4'-methylene dianiline or p-phenylenediamine. The first resulted in improved solubility and increased resin flow while the latter yielded a compression molded neat resin sample with a T(sub g) of 408 C, close to 70 C higher than PME-15. The performance of these materials in long term weight loss studies was below that of PMR-15, independent of post-cure conditions. These results can be rationalized in terms of the thermal lability of the pendant phenyl groups and the incomplete imidization of the sterically congested PPMA. The preparation of model compounds as well as future research directions are discussed.

  2. Perspectives on Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourell, David L.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has skyrocketed in visibility commercially and in the public sector. This article describes the development of this field from early layered manufacturing approaches of photosculpture, topography, and material deposition. Certain precursors to modern AM processes are also briefly described. The growth of the field over the last 30 years is presented. Included is the standard delineation of AM technologies into seven broad categories. The economics of AM part generation is considered, and the impacts of the economics on application sectors are described. On the basis of current trends, the future outlook will include a convergence of AM fabricators, mass-produced AM fabricators, enabling of topology optimization designs, and specialization in the AM legal arena. Long-term developments with huge impact are organ printing and volume-based printing.

  3. Sewage sludge additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Mueller, W. A.; Ingham, J. D. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The additive is for a raw sewage treatment process of the type where settling tanks are used for the purpose of permitting the suspended matter in the raw sewage to be settled as well as to permit adsorption of the dissolved contaminants in the water of the sewage. The sludge, which settles down to the bottom of the settling tank is extracted, pyrolyzed and activated to form activated carbon and ash which is mixed with the sewage prior to its introduction into the settling tank. The sludge does not provide all of the activated carbon and ash required for adequate treatment of the raw sewage. It is necessary to add carbon to the process and instead of expensive commercial carbon, coal is used to provide the carbon supplement.

  4. Searches for heavy long-lived sleptons and R-hadrons with the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at www.elsevier.com/xml/xocs/dtd" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd">s=7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Atkinson, M.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, A. K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bittner, B.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brendlinger, K.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Buttinger, W.; Byszewski, M.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capriotti, D.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castaneda Hernandez, A. M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Cataldi, G.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, K.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Chapman, J. W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D. G.; Chavda, V.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. 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V.; Kubota, T.; Kuday, S.; Kuehn, S.; Kugel, A.; Kuhl, T.; Kuhn, D.; Kukhtin, V.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Kuleshov, S.; Kummer, C.; Kuna, M.; Kunkle, J.; Kupco, A.; Kurashige, H.; Kurata, M.; Kurochkin, Y. A.; Kus, V.; Kuwertz, E. S.; Kuze, M.; Kvita, J.; Kwee, R.; La Rosa, A.; La Rotonda, L.; Labarga, L.; Labbe, J.; Lablak, S.; Lacasta, C.; Lacava, F.; Lacker, H.; Lacour, D.; Lacuesta, V. R.; Ladygin, E.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lagouri, T.; Lai, S.; Laisne, E.; Lamanna, M.; Lambourne, L.; Lampen, C. L.; Lampl, W.; Lancon, E.; Landgraf, U.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lane, J. L.; Lang, V. S.; Lange, C.; Lankford, A. J.; Lanni, F.; Lantzsch, K.; Laplace, S.; Lapoire, C.; Laporte, J. F.; Lari, T.; Larner, A.; Lassnig, M.; Laurelli, P.; Lavorini, V.; Lavrijsen, W.; Laycock, P.; Le Dortz, O.; Le Guirriec, E.; Le Menedeu, E.; LeCompte, T.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lee, H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Lee, S. 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M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urquijo, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valenta, J.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Berg, R.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Vulpen, I.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watanabe, I.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Weydert, C.; Whalen, K.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wraight, K.; Wright, M.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xie, S.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ybeles Smit, G. V.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Young, C. J.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zinonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zieminska, D.; Zimin, N. I.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2013-03-01

    A search for long-lived particles is performed using a data sample of 4.7 fb-1 from proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy √s=7 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. No excess is observed above the estimated background and lower limits, at 95% confidence level, are set on the mass of the long-lived particles in different scenarios, based on their possible interactions in the inner detector, the calorimeters and the muon spectrometer. Long-lived staus in gauge-mediated SUSY-breaking models are excluded up to a mass of 300 GeV for tan β= 5-20. Directly produced long-lived sleptons are excluded up to a mass of 278 GeV. R-hadrons, composites of gluino (stop, sbottom) and light quarks, are excluded up to a mass of 985 GeV (683 GeV, 612 GeV) when using a generic interaction model. Additionally two sets of limits on R-hadrons are obtained that are less sensitive to the interaction model for R-hadrons. One set of limits is obtained using only the inner detector and calorimeter observables, and a second set of limits is obtained based on the inner detector alone.

  5. Brookhaven National Laboratory 2008 Site Environment Report Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    2009-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. Volume I of the SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and performance in restoration and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. Volume II of the SER, the Groundwater Status Report, also is prepared annually to report on the status of and evaluate the performance of groundwater treatment systems at the Laboratory. Volume II includes detailed technical summaries of groundwater data and its interpretation, and is intended for internal BNL users, regulators, and other technically oriented stakeholders. A brief summary of the information contained in Volume II is included in this volume in Chapter 7, Groundwater Protection. Both reports are available in print and as downloadable files on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. An electronic version on compact disc is distributed with each printed report. In addition, a summary of Volume I is prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a compact disc containing the full report.

  6. Addition of a single E2 binding site to the human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 long control region enhances killing of HPV positive cells via HPV E2 protein-regulated herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase-mediated suicide gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rachna; Palefsky, Joel M

    2010-07-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) is associated with the development of anogenital cancers and their precursor lesions, intraepithelial neoplasia. Treatment strategies against HPV-induced intraepithelial neoplasia are not HPV specific and mostly consist of physical removal or ablation of lesions. We had previously designed an HPV-specific approach to kill HPV-infected cells by the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (TK) gene driven by HPV E2 binding to E2-binding sites (E2BS) in the native HPV16 long control region. E2-induced TK expression renders the cells sensitive to the prodrug ganciclovir. To optimize this therapeutic approach, we modified the native long control region by adding variable numbers of E2BS adjacent to E2BS4, resulting in greatly increased cell death in HPV-positive cell lines with variable levels of E2 protein expression and no reduction in HPV specificity. Our results showed maximum increase in TK expression and cell killing when one additional E2BS was added adjacent to E2BS. As HPV-infected patients also exhibit variable E2 expression across lesions and within a lesion, this approach may potentiate the clinical utility of the herpes simplex virus type 1 TK/ganciclovir therapeutic approach.

  7. Site selection for Mars exobiology.

    PubMed

    Farmer, J; Des Marais, D; Greeley, R; Landheim, R; Klein, H

    1995-03-01

    The selection of sites on Mars that have a high priority for exobiological research is fundamental for planning future exploration. The most immediate need is to identify targets for high resolution orbital imaging during the Mars Observer and Mars '94/'96 missions that can be used to refine site priorities for surface exploration. We present an objective approach to site selection whereby individual sites are selected and scored, based on the presence of key geological features which indicate high priority environments. Prime sites are those that show evidence for the prolonged activity of liquid water and which have sedimentary deposits that are likely to have accumulated in environments favorable for life. High priority areas include fluvio-lacustrine (stream-fed lake systems), springs, and periglacial environments. Sites where mineralization may have occurred in the presence of organisms (e.g. springs) are given high priority in the search for a fossil record on Mars. A systematic review of Viking data for 83 sites in the Mars Landing Site Catalog resulted in the selection of 13 as being of exobiological interest. The descriptions of these sites were expanded to address exobiological concerns. An additional five sites were identified for inclusion in the second edition of the MLSC. We plan to broaden our site selection activities to include a systematic global reconnaissance of Mars using Viking data, and will continue to refine site priorities for exobiological research based on data from future missions in order to define strategies for surface exploration.

  8. Site selection for Mars exobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, J.; Des Marais, D.; Greeley, R.; Landheim, R.; Klein, H.

    1995-01-01

    The selection of sites on Mars that have a high priority for exobiological research is fundamental for planning future exploration. The most immediate need is to identify targets for high resolution orbital imaging during the Mars Observer and Mars '94/'96 missions that can be used to refined site priorities for surface exploration. We present an objective approach to site selection whereby individual sites are selected and scored, based on the presence of key geological features which indicate high priority environments. Prime sites are those that show evidence for the prolonged activity of liquid water and which have sedimentary deposits that are likely to have accumulated in environments favorable for life. High priority areas include fluvio-lacustrine (stream-fed lake systems), springs, and periglacial environments. Sites where mineralization may have occurred in the presence of organisms (e.g. springs) are given high priority in the search for a fossil record on Mars. A systematic review of Viking data for 83 sites in the Mars Landing Site Catalog (MLSC) resulted in the selection of 13 as being of exobiological interest. The descriptions of these sites were expanded to address exobiological concerns. An additional five sites were identified for inclusion in the second edition of the MLSC. We plan to broaden our site selection activities to include a systematic global reconnaissance of Mars using Viking data, and will continue to refine site priorities for exobiological research based on data from future missions in order to define strategies for surface exploration.

  9. Additive lattice kirigami.

    PubMed

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D

    2016-09-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes.

  10. Ceramics with Different Additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juanjuan; Feng, Lajun; Lei, Ali; Zhao, Kang; Yan, Aijun

    2014-09-01

    Li2CO3, MgCO3, BaCO3, and Bi2O3 dopants were introduced into CaCu3Ti4O12 (CCTO) ceramics in order to improve the dielectric properties. The CCTO ceramics were prepared by conventional solid-state reaction method. The phase structure, microstructure, and dielectric behavior were carefully investigated. The pure structure without any impurity phases can be confirmed by the x-ray diffraction patterns. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis illuminated that the grains of Ca0.90Li0.20Cu3Ti4O12 ceramics were greater than that of pure CCTO. It was important for the properties of the CCTO ceramics to study the additives in complex impedance spectroscopy. It was found that the Ca0.90Li0.20Cu3Ti4O12 ceramics had the higher permittivity (>45000), the lower dielectric loss (<0.025) than those of CCTO at 1 kHz at room temperature and good temperature stability from -30 to 75 °C.

  11. Additive lattice kirigami

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M.; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D.

    2016-01-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes. PMID:27679822

  12. Preliminary Site Characterization Report, Rulsion Site, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    This report is a summary of environmental information gathered during a review of the documents pertaining to Project Rulison and interviews with personnel who worked on the project. Project Rulison was part of Operation Plowshare (a program designed to explore peaceful uses for nuclear devices). The project consisted of detonating a 43-kiloton nuclear device on September 10, 1969, in western Colorado to stimulate natural gas production. Following the detonation, a reentry well was drilled and several gas production tests were conducted. The reentry well was shut-in after the last gas production test and was held in standby condition until the general cleanup was undertaken in 1972. A final cleanup was conducted after the emplacement and testing wells were plugged in 1976. However, some surface radiologic contamination resulted from decontamination of the drilling equipment and fallout from the gas flaring during drilling operations. With the exception of the drilling effluent pond, all surface contamination at the Rulison Site was removed during the cleanup operations. All mudpits and other excavations were backfilled, and both upper and lower drilling pads were leveled and dressed. This report provides information regarding known or suspected areas of contamination, previous cleanup activities, analytical results, a review of the regulatory status, the site`s physical environment, and future recommendations for Project Ruhson. Based on this research, several potential areas of contamination have been identified. These include the drilling effluent pond and mudpits used during drilling operations. In addition, contamination could migrate in the gas horizon.

  13. 76 FR 71914 - Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability in Air Travel: Accessibility of Web Sites and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... the Basis of Disability in Air Travel: Accessibility of Web Sites and Automated Kiosks at U.S... supplemental notice of proposed rulemaking (SNPRM) on the accessibility of Web sites and automated kiosks that... for an extension, citing difficulties in using the online comment form on the www.regulations.gov...

  14. Estimating Absolute Site Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Malagnini, L; Mayeda, K M; Akinci, A; Bragato, P L

    2004-07-15

    the distance-corrected S-wave spectra. Typically, removing the S-wave source spectrum is difficult because of inadequate corrections for the source radiation pattern, directivity and random interference. In addition to complexities near the source, 2-D and 3-D structure beneath the recording site will result in an azimuth-dependent site effect. Since the direct wave only samples a narrow range in take-off and back-azimuth angles, multi-station averaging is needed to minimize the inherent scatter. To minimize these complicating effects, they apply the coda methodology outlined by Mayeda et al., (2003) to obtain stable moment-rate spectra. This methodology provides source amplitude and derived source spectra that are a factor of 3-to-4 times more stable than those derived from direct waves. Since the coda is commonly thought of as scattered energy that samples all ray parameters and back-azimuths, it is not very sensitive to the source radiation pattern and 3-D structure. This property makes it an excellent choice for use in obtaining average properties of the source, site and path effects in a region. Due to the characteristics of the techniques used in this study, all the inverted quantities are azimuthally averaged, since the aximuthal information is lost in the processing.

  15. Oak Ridge Reservation annual site environmental report for 2008

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2009-09-01

    The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) consists of three major government-owned, contractor-operated facilities: the Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and East Tennessee Technology Park. The ORR was established in the early 1940s as part of the Manhattan Project, a secret undertaking that produced materials for the first atomic bombs. The reservation’s role has evolved over the years, and it continues to adapt to meet the changing defense, energy, and research needs of the United States. Both the work carried out for the war effort and subsequent research, development, and production activities have involved, and continue to involve, the use of radiological and hazardous materials. The Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report and supporting data are available at http://www.ornl.gov/sci/env_rpt or from the project director. This document is prepared annually to summarize environmental activities, primarily environmental monitoring activities, on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and within the ORR surroundings. The document fulfills the requirement of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, for an annual summary of environmental data to characterize environmental performance. The environmental monitoring criteria are described in DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program. The results summarized in this report are based on data collected prior to and through 2008. This report is not intended to provide the results of all sampling on the ORR. Additional data collected for other site and regulatory purposes, such as environmental restoration/remedial investigation reports, waste management characterization sampling data, and environmental permit compliance data, are presented in other documents that have been prepared in accordance with applicable DOE guidance and/or laws and are referenced herein as appropriate. Corrections to the report for the previous year are found in Appendix

  16. YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE DESCRIPTION

    SciTech Connect

    A.M. Simmons

    2004-04-16

    The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' summarizes, in a single document, the current state of knowledge and understanding of the natural system at Yucca Mountain. It describes the geology; geochemistry; past, present, and projected future climate; regional hydrologic system; and flow and transport within the unsaturated and saturated zones at the site. In addition, it discusses factors affecting radionuclide transport, the effect of thermal loading on the natural system, and tectonic hazards. The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' is broad in nature. It summarizes investigations carried out as part of the Yucca Mountain Project since 1988, but it also includes work done at the site in earlier years, as well as studies performed by others. The document has been prepared under the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management quality assurance program for the Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain is located in Nye County in southern Nevada. The site lies in the north-central part of the Basin and Range physiographic province, within the northernmost subprovince commonly referred to as the Great Basin. The basin and range physiography reflects the extensional tectonic regime that has affected the region during the middle and late Cenozoic Era. Yucca Mountain was initially selected for characterization, in part, because of its thick unsaturated zone, its arid to semiarid climate, and the existence of a rock type that would support excavation of stable openings. In 1987, the United States Congress directed that Yucca Mountain be the only site characterized to evaluate its suitability for development of a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.

  17. Site environmental report: 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) has in place an extensive radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring program which monitors air emissions, groundwater, soil, and ambient air around the facility. ITRI is operated in a manner that minimizes any adverse impact to the environment. The ITRI facility is in compliance with air quality and hazardous waste regulations. However, due to the previous operations of its six on-site sewage lagoons, groundwater in the ITRI vicinity contains nitrate, total dissolved solids, and sulfate contamination that exceeds state groundwater standards. Also, due to an underground fuel system leak, a localized area of groundwater is contaminated with diesel fuel. In addition, a small quantity of mixed low-level waste generated in the process of laboratory research is presently stored on site while treatment and disposal options are determined. Based on present information, the contaminant plume originating from the sewage lagoons has not migrated off the ITRI site. In addition, a groundwater assessment is underway to determine the extent of groundwater contamination and options for remediation, if required. Diesel fuel leaks and spills have been characterized, and the extent of the contamination is currently being assessed with five new monitoring wells, MW-12 through {minus}15. All underground tanks and fuel lines have been removed, along with associated contaminated soil. A soil venting and volatilization remediation system continues to operate in the area of a fuel leak, where further remediation may be required to remove diesel oil in the groundwater.

  18. ZFNGenome: A comprehensive resource for locating zinc finger nuclease target sites in model organisms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) have tremendous potential as tools to facilitate genomic modifications, such as precise gene knockouts or gene replacements by homologous recombination. ZFNs can be used to advance both basic research and clinical applications, including gene therapy. Recently, the ability to engineer ZFNs that target any desired genomic DNA sequence with high fidelity has improved significantly with the introduction of rapid, robust, and publicly available techniques for ZFN design such as the Oligomerized Pool ENgineering (OPEN) method. The motivation for this study is to make resources for genome modifications using OPEN-generated ZFNs more accessible to researchers by creating a user-friendly interface that identifies and provides quality scores for all potential ZFN target sites in the complete genomes of several model organisms. Description ZFNGenome is a GBrowse-based tool for identifying and visualizing potential target sites for OPEN-generated ZFNs. ZFNGenome currently includes a total of more than 11.6 million potential ZFN target sites, mapped within the fully sequenced genomes of seven model organisms; S. cerevisiae, C. reinhardtii, A. thaliana, D. melanogaster, D. rerio, C. elegans, and H. sapiens and can be visualized within the flexible GBrowse environment. Additional model organisms will be included in future updates. ZFNGenome provides information about each potential ZFN target site, including its chromosomal location and position relative to transcription initiation site(s). Users can query ZFNGenome using several different criteria (e.g., gene ID, transcript ID, target site sequence). Tracks in ZFNGenome also provide "uniqueness" and ZiFOpT (Zinc Finger OPEN Targeter) "confidence" scores that estimate the likelihood that a chosen ZFN target site will function in vivo. ZFNGenome is dynamically linked to ZiFDB, allowing users access to all available information about zinc finger reagents, such as the effectiveness of a given

  19. In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation at the Northeast Site Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Juhlin, R.; Butherus, M.

    2006-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting thermal remediation to remove non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) from the subsurface at the Northeast Site that is part of the Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project. The Northeast Site is located on the Young - Rainey Science, Technology, and Research (STAR) Center in Largo, Florida. The STAR Center was formerly a DOE facility. The NAPL remediation was performed at Area A and is currently being performed at Area B at the Northeast Site. The remediation at Area A was completed in 2003 and covered an area of 900 m{sup 2} (10,000 ft{sup 2}) and a depth of remediation that extended to 10.7 m (35 ft) below ground surface. Cleanup levels achieved were at or below maximum contaminant levels in almost all locations. The remediation project at Area B is ongoing and covers an area of 3,240 m{sup 2} (36,000 ft{sup 2}), a volume of 41,300 m (54,000 yd 3), and a depth of remediation to 12 m (40 ft) below ground surface. In addition, a portion of the subsurface under an occupied building in Area B is included in the remediation. The cleanup levels achieved from this remediation will be available in the Area B Final Report that will be posted on the DOE Office of Legacy Management web site (www.lm.doe.gov/land/sites/fl/ pinellas/pinellas.htm) in January 2007. Electrical resistive heating and steam were the chosen remediation methods at both areas. Lessons learned from the Area A remediation were incorporated into the Area B remediation and could benefit managers of similar remediation projects. (authors)

  20. Prediction of protein-protein interaction sites from weakly homologous template structures using meta-threading and machine learning.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Surabhi; Brylinski, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The identification of protein-protein interactions is vital for understanding protein function, elucidating interaction mechanisms, and for practical applications in drug discovery. With the exponentially growing protein sequence data, fully automated computational methods that predict interactions between proteins are becoming essential components of system-level function inference. A thorough analysis of protein complex structures demonstrated that binding site locations as well as the interfacial geometry are highly conserved across evolutionarily related proteins. Because the conformational space of protein-protein interactions is highly covered by experimental structures, sensitive protein threading techniques can be used to identify suitable templates for the accurate prediction of interfacial residues. Toward this goal, we developed eFindSite(PPI) , an algorithm that uses the three-dimensional structure of a target protein, evolutionarily remotely related templates and machine learning techniques to predict binding residues. Using crystal structures, the average sensitivity (specificity) of eFindSite(PPI) in interfacial residue prediction is 0.46 (0.92). For weakly homologous protein models, these values only slightly decrease to 0.40-0.43 (0.91-0.92) demonstrating that eFindSite(PPI) performs well not only using experimental data but also tolerates structural imperfections in computer-generated structures. In addition, eFindSite(PPI) detects specific molecular interactions at the interface; for instance, it correctly predicts approximately one half of hydrogen bonds and aromatic interactions, as well as one third of salt bridges and hydrophobic contacts. Comparative benchmarks against several dimer datasets show that eFindSite(PPI) outperforms other methods for protein-binding residue prediction. It also features a carefully tuned confidence estimation system, which is particularly useful in large-scale applications using raw genomic data. eFindSite(PPI) is

  1. Stressor Identification (Si) at Contaminated Sites: Upper Arkansas River, Colorado (Final)

    EPA Science Inventory

    www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2015-07/ca_gulch_cover.jpg" vspace = "5" hspace="5" width = "218" height = "286" align="right" border="1" alt="Cover of the CADDIS Arkansas River, CO Case Study Final Report "> This report describes a causal assessment for...

  2. 75 FR 13269 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Hanford

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... Open Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific... meeting is open to the public. The EM SSAB, Hanford, welcomes the attendance of the public at its advisory.... Minutes will also be available at the following website: http://www.hanford.gov/page.cfm/hab . Issued...

  3. Did You Just See that? Online Video Sites Can Jumpstart Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oishi, Lindsay

    2007-01-01

    Free video sharing Web sites like www.youtube.com allow millions of people to witness videos that are free and can be viewed immediately without having to download any software. These videos do not provide content, but they can stimulate the interest that makes curriculum relevant or "jumpstart" lessons. The YouTube video blog of World War II…

  4. Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Wills, Cathy

    2013-09-11

    This report was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) (formerly designated as the Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO]). The new field office designation occurred in March 2013. Published reports cited in this 2012 report, therefore, may bear the name or authorship of NNSA/NSO. This and previous years’ reports, called Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASERs), Nevada Test Site Environmental Reports (NTSERs), and, beginning in 2010, Nevada National Security Site Environmental Reports (NNSSERs), are posted on the NNSA/NFO website at http://www.nv.energy.gov/library/publications/aser.aspx. This NNSSER was prepared to satisfy DOE Order DOE O 231.1B, “Environment, Safety and Health Reporting.” Its purpose is to (1) report compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, (2) present results of environmental monitoring of radiological and nonradiological effluents, (3) report estimated radiological doses to the public from releases of radioactive material, (4) summarize environmental incidents of noncompliance and actions taken in response to them, (5) describe the NNSA/NFO Environmental Management System and characterize its performance, and (6) highlight significant environmental programs and efforts. This NNSSER summarizes data and compliance status for calendar year 2012 at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) (formerly the Nevada Test Site) and its two support facilities, the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF) and the Remote Sensing Laboratory–Nellis (RSL-Nellis). It also addresses environmental restoration (ER) projects conducted at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR). Through a Memorandum of Agreement, NNSA/NFO is

  5. Collaboration To Teach the Critical Thinking Skills Needed To Become a Successful Internet Searcher: The Planning of a WWW Search Engine Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Douglas

    2000-01-01

    Describes a collaborative workshop designed by the Associated College Libraries of Central Pennsylvania to identify and teach World Wide Web search skills to librarians. Highlights include how information get on the Web and is indexed; evaluation of Web resources; types of search sites; and which search engine is the best. (Author/LRW)

  6. Developing Study Stations on Your School Site.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Natural Resources, Columbus. Office of Information and Education.

    The school site is a convenient location for study stations since it is available for short periods of time and can be used consistently. Special preparations, such as transportation, required for off-site fieldtrips can be eliminated. In addition, on-site activities provide students with concrete experiences necessary to understand difficult…

  7. Nuclear power: Siting and safety

    SciTech Connect

    Openshaw, S.

    1986-01-01

    By 2030, half, or even two-thirds, of all electricity may be generated by nuclear power. Major reactor accidents are still expected to be rare occurrences, but nuclear safety is largely a matter of faith. Terrorist attacks, sabotage, and human error could cause a significant accident. Reactor siting can offer an additional, design-independent margin of safety. Remote geographical sites for new plants would minimize health risks, protect the industry from negative changes in public opinion concerning nuclear energy, and improve long-term public acceptance of nuclear power. U.K. siting practices usually do not consider the contribution to safety that could be obtained from remote sites. This book discusses the present trends of siting policies of nuclear power and their design-independent margin of safety.

  8. 12. POWER PLANT PART OF BUILDING SHOWING RELATION TO ADDITION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. POWER PLANT PART OF BUILDING SHOWING RELATION TO ADDITION AND EQUIPMENT PART OF BUILDING - Boswell Bay White Alice Site, Radio Relay Building, Chugach National Forest, Cordova, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

  9. Packaging and Transportation of Additional Neptunium Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, R.; Jordan, J.; Hensel, S.

    2010-05-05

    The Savannah River Site's HB-Line Facility completed a second neptunium oxide production campaign in which nine (9) additional cans of neptunium oxide were produced and shipped to the Idaho National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the 9975 shipping container. These additional cans were from a different feed solution than the first fifty (50) cans of neptunium oxide that were previously produced and shipped via a Letter of Amendment to the 9975 Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) content table. This paper will address the challenges associated with demonstrating the neptunium oxide produced from the additional feed solution was equivalent to the original neptunium oxide and within the content description of the Letter of Amendment.

  10. Site hydrogeologic/geotechnical characterization report for Site B new municipal solid waste landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, R.; Nowacki, P.

    1991-04-01

    This Site Hydrogeologic/Geotechnical Characterization Report (SHCR) presents the results of a comprehensive study conducted on a proposed solid waste landfill site, identified herein as Site B, at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This report is intended to satisfy all requirements of the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) with regard to landfill siting requirements and ground water and environmental protection. In addition, this report provides substantial geotechnical data pertinent to the landfill design process.

  11. 38 CFR 61.17 - Site control for capital grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., unless the site is in a building or on land owned by VA. Such site control must be demonstrated within 1... change the site to a new site meeting the requirements of this part subject to VA approval under § 61.62... any additional costs resulting from the change in site. (Authority: 38 U.S.C. 501, 2002, 2011,...

  12. How Safe Are Color Additives?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates How Safe are Color Additives? Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Consumer Updates RSS Feed Download PDF (380 K) Color additives give the red tint to your fruit ...

  13. Addition of a breeding database in the Genome Database for Rosaceae.

    PubMed

    Evans, Kate; Jung, Sook; Lee, Taein; Brutcher, Lisa; Cho, Ilhyung; Peace, Cameron; Main, Dorrie

    2013-01-01

    Breeding programs produce large datasets that require efficient management systems to keep track of performance, pedigree, geographical and image-based data. With the development of DNA-based screening technologies, more breeding programs perform genotyping in addition to phenotyping for performance evaluation. The integration of breeding data with other genomic and genetic data is instrumental for the refinement of marker-assisted breeding tools, enhances genetic understanding of important crop traits and maximizes access and utility by crop breeders and allied scientists. Development of new infrastructure in the Genome Database for Rosaceae (GDR) was designed and implemented to enable secure and efficient storage, management and analysis of large datasets from the Washington State University apple breeding program and subsequently expanded to fit datasets from other Rosaceae breeders. The infrastructure was built using the software Chado and Drupal, making use of the Natural Diversity module to accommodate large-scale phenotypic and genotypic data. Breeders can search accessions within the GDR to identify individuals with specific trait combinations. Results from Search by Parentage lists individuals with parents in common and results from Individual Variety pages link to all data available on each chosen individual including pedigree, phenotypic and genotypic information. Genotypic data are searchable by markers and alleles; results are linked to other pages in the GDR to enable the user to access tools such as GBrowse and CMap. This breeding database provides users with the opportunity to search datasets in a fully targeted manner and retrieve and compare performance data from multiple selections, years and sites, and to output the data needed for variety release publications and patent applications. The breeding database facilitates efficient program management. Storing publicly available breeding data in a database together with genomic and genetic data will

  14. Detergent Additive for Lubricating Oils,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The Russian patent pertains to a method of producing additives for lubricating oils . A method is known for producing an antiwear additive for... lubricating oils by processing phenols with phosphorus oxychloride, phosphoric acid esters are obtained. In order to give the additive detergent properties

  15. [E-learning in medicine: appraisal and perspectives. Example of an educational website about echocardiography in anaesthesia, intensive care and emergencies: www.echorea.org].

    PubMed

    Muller, M; Duperret, S; Viale, J-P

    2008-10-01

    Internet is a mode of quick and more and more easily approachable communication. Its use as support of education allows an enrichment of the master-pupil relation by its availability, its interactivity and the multiplicity of its means. Medicine benefits particularly from these new means of virtual companionship. This review offers to characterize means and constraints of the use of Internet in medical education, and to illustrate these purposes by an example of site created for the teaching of ultrasound use in anaesthesia, intensive care and emergency.

  16. Incorporation of additives into polymers

    DOEpatents

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Yates, Matthew Z.

    2003-07-29

    There has been invented a method for incorporating additives into polymers comprising: (a) forming an aqueous or alcohol-based colloidal system of the polymer; (b) emulsifying the colloidal system with a compressed fluid; and (c) contacting the colloidal polymer with the additive in the presence of the compressed fluid. The colloidal polymer can be contacted with the additive by having the additive in the compressed fluid used for emulsification or by adding the additive to the colloidal system before or after emulsification with the compressed fluid. The invention process can be carried out either as a batch process or as a continuous on-line process.

  17. AlpArray-Italy: Site description and noise characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govoni, Aladino; D'Alema, Ezio; Capello, Marco; Cavaliere, Stefania Danesi, Adriano; Margheriti, Lucia; Massa, Marco; Mazza, Salvatore; Mazzarini, Francesco; Monna, Stephen; Moretti, Milena; Nardi, Anna; Piccinini, Davide; Piromallo, Claudia; Pondrelli, Silvia; Salimbeni, Simone; Serpelloni, Enrico; Solarino, Stefano; Vallocchia, Massimiliano; Lovati, Sara; Santulin, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Within the framework of the European joint research initiative AlpArray (http://www.alparray.ethz.ch/), we deployed overall 20 seismic broad-band stations in Northern Italy and on two islands in the Tyrrhenian Sea (Capraia and Montecristo) during Fall-Winter 2015. All the stations, connected in real-time, were installed at sites selected according to the AlpArray Seismic Network plan: 16 temporary stations running for two to three years and 4 new permanent stations in sites already occupied by accelerometers of the INGV national network. Most temporary stations are equipped with REF TEK 130S digitizers and Nanometrics Trillium Compact 120s sensors (a couple have Nanometrics Trillium 120P and one Streckeisen STS2). For each site we describe the settings and discuss the noise levels, the site effects and the preliminary sensitivity analysis.

  18. Additive manufacturing of optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Andreas; Rank, Manuel; Maillard, Philippe; Suckow, Anne; Bauckhage, Yannick; Rößler, Patrick; Lang, Johannes; Shariff, Fatin; Pekrul, Sven

    2016-08-01

    The development of additive manufacturing methods has enlarged rapidly in recent years. Thereby, the work mainly focuses on the realization of mechanical components, but the additive manufacturing technology offers a high potential in the field of optics as well. Owing to new design possibilities, completely new solutions are possible. This article briefly reviews and compares the most important additive manufacturing methods for polymer optics. Additionally, it points out the characteristics of additive manufactured polymer optics. Thereby, surface quality is of crucial importance. In order to improve it, appropriate post-processing steps are necessary (e.g. robot polishing or coating), which will be discussed. An essential part of this paper deals with various additive manufactured optical components and their use, especially in optical systems for shape metrology (e.g. borehole sensor, tilt sensor, freeform surface sensor, fisheye lens). The examples should demonstrate the potentials and limitations of optical components produced by additive manufacturing.

  19. Evaluations of QMI After-Market Additives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    9001 CERTIFIED FAX: (210) 522-3950 ISO 14001 Certified S A N A N T O N I O , T E X A S HOUSTON, TEXAS i WASHINGTON, DC i ANN ARBOR, MI...TEXAS, USA 78228-0510 i (210) 684-5111 i WWW.SWRI.ORG HTTP://ENGINEANDVEHICLE .SWRI.ORG ENGINE, EMISSIONS, AND VEHICLE RESEARCH DIVISION ISO

  20. Implementation: Preparing the Site.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Susan Baerg

    1983-01-01

    Considers site requirements that should be specified by the library and the vendor for a library automated system located at a central site away from the library, including size of site, the environment, cleanliness, electrical power, security/safety (fire, restricted access), site certification, telecommunications, and terminal sites. (EJS)

  1. Environment - avoiding destructive remediation at DOE sites.

    SciTech Connect

    Whicker, F. W.; MacDonell, M. M.; Hinton, T. G.; Pinder, J. E., III; Habegger, L. J.; Environmental Assessment; usdoe

    2004-03-12

    Public perceptions and regulatory agreements have forced the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to spend tens of billions of dollars for environmental cleanup of relatively low levels of contamination of soil and water within the nuclear weapons complex. Much of this costly remediation has caused significant ecological damage, but has not resulted in corresponding reductions in public health risks. This Policy Forum www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/303/5664/1615> offers a potential remedy involving continued federal control of the larger DOE lands and cleanup criteria based on long-term protection of ecosystems and public health, rather than criteria based on the protection of hypothetical future site residents. Recent DOE policy to avoid unnecessary environmental damage using a risk-based strategy is briefly described.

  2. Enantioselective Michael addition of water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Resch, Verena; Otten, Linda G; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-02-09

    The enantioselective Michael addition using water as both nucleophile and solvent has to date proved beyond the ability of synthetic chemists. Herein, the direct, enantioselective Michael addition of water in water to prepare important β-hydroxy carbonyl compounds using whole cells of Rhodococcus strains is described. Good yields and excellent enantioselectivities were achieved with this method. Deuterium labeling studies demonstrate that a Michael hydratase catalyzes the water addition exclusively with anti-stereochemistry.

  3. Enantioselective Michael Addition of Water

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Resch, Verena; Otten, Linda G; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The enantioselective Michael addition using water as both nucleophile and solvent has to date proved beyond the ability of synthetic chemists. Herein, the direct, enantioselective Michael addition of water in water to prepare important β-hydroxy carbonyl compounds using whole cells of Rhodococcus strains is described. Good yields and excellent enantioselectivities were achieved with this method. Deuterium labeling studies demonstrate that a Michael hydratase catalyzes the water addition exclusively with anti-stereochemistry. PMID:25529526

  4. User needs on Nursing Net (The Kango Net) - analyzing the total consultation page - http://www.kango-net.jp/en/index.html.

    PubMed

    Sakyo, Yumi; Nakayama, Kazuhiro; Komatsu, Hiroko; Setoyama, Yoko

    2009-01-01

    People are required to take in and comprehend a massive amount of health information and in turn make some serious decisions based on that information. We, at St. Luke's College of Nursing, provide a rich selection of high-quality health information, and have set up Nursing Net (The Kango Net:Kango is Nursing in Japanese). This website provides information for consumers as well as people interested in the nursing profession. In an attempt to identify the needs of users, this study conducted an analysis of the contents on the total consultation page. Many readers voted that responses to nursing techniques and symptoms questions proved instrumental in their queries. Based on the results of this study, we can conclude that this is an easy-to-access, convenient site for getting health information about physical symptoms and nursing techniques.

  5. 2013 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2014-03-01

    This report, in fulfillment of a license requirement, presents the results of long-term surveillance and maintenance activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) in 2013 at 19 uranium mill tailings disposal sites established under Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978.1 These activities verified that the UMTRCA Title I disposal sites remain in compliance with license requirements. DOE operates 18 UMTRCA Title I sites under a general license granted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in accordance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 40.27 (10 CFR 40.27). As required under the general license, a long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for each site was prepared by DOE and accepted by NRC. The Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site, one of the 19 Title I sites, will not be included under the general license until the open, operating portion of the cell is closed. The open portion will be closed either when it is filled or in 2023. This site is inspected in accordance with an interim LTSP. Long-term surveillance and maintenance services for these disposal sites include inspecting and maintaining the sites; monitoring environmental media and institutional controls; conducting any necessary corrective actions; and performing administrative, records, stakeholder relations, and other regulatory stewardship functions. Annual site inspections and monitoring are conducted in accordance with site-specific LTSPs and procedures established by DOE to comply with license requirements. Each site inspection is performed to verify the integrity of visible features at the site; to identify changes or new conditions that may affect the long-term performance of the site; and to determine the need, if any, for maintenance, follow-up or contingency inspections, or corrective action in accordance with the LTSP. LTSPs and site compliance reports are available on the Internet at http://www.lm.doe.gov/.

  6. Ocean Disposal Site Monitoring

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is responsible for managing all designated ocean disposal sites. Surveys are conducted to identify appropriate locations for ocean disposal sites and to monitor the impacts of regulated dumping at the disposal sites.

  7. Asphalt and asphalt additives. Transportation research record

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Contents: use of asphalt emulsions for in-place recycling: oregon experience; gap-graded cold asphalt concrete: benefits of polymer-modified asphalt cement and fibers; cold in-place recycling for rehabilitation and widening of low-volume flexible pavements in indiana; in situ cold recycling of bituminous pavements with polymer-modified high float emulsions; evaluation of new generation of antistripping additives; correlation between performance-related characteristics of asphalt cement and its physicochemical parameters using corbett's fractions and hpgc; reaction rates and hardening susceptibilities as determined from pressure oxygen vessel aging of asphalts; evaluation of aging characteristics of asphalts by using tfot and rtfot at different temperature levels; summary of asphalt additive performance at selected sites; relating asphalt absorption to properties of asphalt cement and aggregate; study of the effectiveness of styrene-butadiene rubber latex in hot mix asphalt mixes; stability of straight and polymer-modified asphalts.

  8. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step…

  9. Additive Effects on Asymmetric Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Liang; Sun, Wangsheng; Yang, Dongxu; Li, Guofeng; Wang, Rui

    2016-03-23

    This review highlights a number of additives that can be used to make asymmetric reactions perfect. Without changing other reaction conditions, simply adding additives can lead to improved asymmetric catalysis, such as reduced reaction time, improved yield, or/and increased selectivity.

  10. Hanford Site Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Rinne, C.A.; Curry, R.H.; Hagan, J.W.; Seiler, S.W.; Sommer, D.J. ); Yancey, E.F. )

    1990-01-01

    The Hanford Site Development Plan (Site Development Plan) is intended to guide the short- and long-range development and use of the Hanford Site. All acquisition, development, and permanent facility use at the Hanford Site will conform to the approved plan. The Site Development Plan also serves as the base document for all subsequent studies that involve use of facilities at the Site. This revision is an update of a previous plan. The executive summary presents the highlights of the five major topics covered in the Site Development Plan: general site information, existing conditions, planning analysis, Master Plan, and Five-Year Plan. 56 refs., 67 figs., 31 tabs.

  11. The EuroSITES network: Integrating and enhancing fixed-point open ocean observatories around Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampitt, Richard S.; Larkin, Kate E.; EuroSITES Consortium

    2010-05-01

    EuroSITES is a 3 year (2008-2011) EU collaborative project (3.5MEuro) with the objective to integrate and enhance the nine existing open ocean fixed point observatories around Europe (www.eurosites.info). These observatories are primarily composed of full depth moorings and make multidisciplinary in situ observations within the water column as the European contribution to the global array OceanSITES (www.oceansites.org). In the first 18 months, all 9 observatories have been active and integration has been significant through the maintenance and enhancement of observatory hardware. Highlights include the enhancement of observatories with sensors to measure O2, pCO2, chlorophyll, and nitrate in near real-time from the upper 1000 m. In addition, some seafloor missions are also actively supported. These include seafloor platforms currently deployed in the Mediterranean, one for tsunami detection and one to monitor fluid flow related to seismic activity and slope stability. Upcoming seafloor science missions in 2010 include monitoring benthic biological communities and associated biogeochemistry as indicators of climate change in both the Northeast Atlantic and Mediterranean. EuroSITES also promotes the development of innovative sensors and samplers in order to progress capability to measure climate-relevant properties of the ocean. These include further developing current technologies for autonomous long-term monitoring of oxygen consumption in the mesopelagic, pH and mesozooplankton abundance. Many of these science missions are directly related to complementary activities in other European projects such as EPOCA, HYPOX and ESONET. In 2010 a direct collaboration including in situ field work will take place between ESONET and EuroSITES. The demonstration mission MODOO (funded by ESONET) will be implemented in 2010 at the EuroSITES PAP observatory. Field work will include deployment of a seafloor lander system with various sensors which will send data to shore in real

  12. Decision-Making, Science and Gasoline Additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, J. W.; Small, M. C.

    2001-12-01

    Methyl-tert butyl ether (MTBE) has been used as a gasoline additive to serve two major purposes. The first use was as an octane-enhancer to replace organic lead, beginning in 1979. The second use, which began about 1992, was as a oxygenated additive to meet requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. Generally, the amount of MTBE used for octane enhancement was lower than that required to meet CAAA requirements. An unintended consequence of MTBE use has been widespread groundwater contamination. The decision to use certain amounts of MTBE or other chemcials as gasoline additives is the outcome of economic, regulatory, policy, political, and scientific considerations. Decision makers ask questions such as "How do ground water impacts change with changing MTBE content? How many wells would be impacted? and What are the associated costs?" These are best answered through scientific inquiry, but many different approaches could be developed. Decision criteria include time, money, comprehensiveness, and complexity of the approach. Because results must be communicated to a non-technical audience, there is a trade off between the complexity of the approach and the ability to convince economists, lawyers and policy makers that results make sense. The question on MTBE content posed above was investigated using transport models, a release scenario and gasoline composition. Because of the inability of transport models to predict future concentrations, an approach was chosen to base comparative assessment on a calibrated model. By taking this approach, "generic" modeling with arbitrarily selected parameters was avoided and the validity of the simulation results rests upon relatively small extrapolations from the original calibrated models. A set of simulations was performed that assumed 3% (octane enhancement) and 11% (CAAA) MTBE in gasoline. The results were that ground water concentrations would be reduced in proportion to the reduction of MTBE in the fuel

  13. Report of early site suitability evaluation of the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Younker, J.L.; Andrews, W.B.; Fasano, G.A.; Herrington, C.C.; Mattson, S.R.; Murray, R.C.; Ballou, L.B.; Revelli, M.A.; Ducharme, A.R.; Shephard, L.E.; Dudley, W.W.; Hoxie, D.T.; Herbst, R.J.; Patera, E.A.; Judd, B.R.; Docka, J.A.; Rickertsen, L.D.

    1992-01-01

    This study evaluated the technical suitability of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential site for a mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of radioactive waste. The evaluation was conducted primarily to determine early in the site characterization program if there are any features or conditions at the site that indicate it is unsuitable for repository development. A secondary purpose was to determine the status of knowledge in the major technical areas that affect the suitability of the site. This early site suitability evaluation (ESSE) was conducted by a team of technical personnel at the request of the Associate Director of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Geologic Disposal, a unit within the DOE`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The Yucca Mountain site has been the subject of such evaluations for over a decade. In 1983, the site was evaluated as part of a screening process to identify potentially acceptable sites. The site was evaluated in greater detail and found suitable for site characterization as part of the Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE, 1986) required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA). Additional site data were compiled during the preparation of the Site Characterization Plan (SCP) (DOE, 1988a). This early site suitability evaluation has considered information that was used in preparing both-documents, along with recent information obtained since the EA and SCP were published. This body of information is referred to in this report as ``current information`` or ``available evidence.``

  14. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-10-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step in understanding mathematical representations of RGB color. Finally, color addition and subtraction are presented for the X11 colors from web design to illustrate yet another real-life application of color mixing.

  15. 2013 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites

    SciTech Connect

    2013-11-01

    This report, in fulfillment of a license requirement, presents the results of long-term surveillance and maintenance activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management in 2013 at six uranium mill tailings disposal sites reclaimed under Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. These activities verified that the UMTRCA Title II disposal sites remain in compliance with license requirements. DOE manages six UMTRCA Title II disposal sites under a general license granted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established at Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 40.28. Reclamation and site transition activities continue at other sites, and DOE ultimately expects to manage approximately 27 Title II disposal sites. Long-term surveillance and maintenance activities and services for these disposal sites include inspecting and maintaining the sites; monitoring environmental media and institutional controls; conducting any necessary corrective action; and performing administrative, records, stakeholder services, and other regulatory functions. Annual site inspections and monitoring are conducted in accordance with site-specific long-term surveillance plans (LTSPs) and procedures established by DOE to comply with license requirements. Each site inspection is performed to verify the integrity of visible features at the site; to identify changes or new conditions that may affect the long-term performance of the site; and to determine the need, if any, for maintenance, follow-up inspections, or corrective action. LTSPs and site compliance reports are available online at http://www.lm.doe.gov

  16. Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2010

    SciTech Connect

    C. Wills, ed.

    2011-09-13

    This NNSSER was prepared to satisfy DOE Order DOE O 231.1B, “Environment, Safety and Health Reporting.” Its purpose is to (1) report compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, (2) present results of environmental monitoring of radiological and nonradiological effluents, (3) report estimated radiological doses to the public from releases of radioactive material, (4) summarize environmental incidents of noncompliance and actions taken in response to them, (5) describe the NNSA/NSO Environmental Management System and characterize its performance, and (6) highlight significant environmental programs and efforts. This NNSSER summarizes data and compliance status for calendar year 2010 at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) (formerly the Nevada Test Site) and its two support facilities, the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF) and the Remote Sensing Laboratory–Nellis (RSL-Nellis). It also addresses environmental restoration (ER) projects conducted at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). Through a Memorandum of Agreement, NNSA/NSO is responsible for the oversight of TTR ER projects, and the Sandia Site Office of NNSA (NNSA/SSO) has oversight of all other TTR activities. NNSA/SSO produces the TTR annual environmental report available at http://www.sandia.gov/news/publications/environmental/index.html.

  17. Adverse reactions to drug additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1984-10-01

    There is a long list of additives used by the pharmaceutical industry. Most of the agents used have not been implicated in hypersensitivity reactions. Among those that have, only reactions to parabens and sulfites have been well established. Parabens have been shown to be responsible for rare immunoglobulin E-mediated reactions that occur after the use of local anesthetics. Sulfites, which are present in many drugs, including agents commonly used to treat asthma, have been shown to provoke severe asthmatic attacks in sensitive individuals. Recent studies indicate that additives do not play a significant role in "hyperactivity." The role of additives in urticaria is not well established and therefore the incidence of adverse reactions in this patient population is simply not known. In double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, reactions to tartrazine or additives other than sulfites, if they occur at all, are indeed quite rare for the asthmatic population, even for the aspirin-sensitive subpopulation.

  18. Radiation Therapy: Additional Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... SNIPEND SNIPSTART Find A Radiation Oncologist SNIPEND Additional Treatment Options SNIPSTART A A SNIPEND Chemotherapy Medicines prescribed ... such as antibodies, to fight cancer. Novel Targeted Therapies Cancer doctors now know much more about how ...

  19. Calculators and Computers: Graphical Addition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spero, Samuel W.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program is presented that generates problem sets involving sketching graphs of trigonometric functions using graphical addition. The students use calculators to sketch the graphs and a computer solution is used to check it. (MP)

  20. Site Environmental Report for 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Pauer, Ron

    2002-07-01

    The mission of Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is to continue the long tradition of outstanding research that has made it a premier national and international multiprogram laboratory. In order to provide the highest degree of protection for the public and the environment, Berkeley Lab employs Integrated Safety Management (ISM). ISM is a comprehensive U.S. Department of Energy management system that involves five core functions (work planning, hazard and risk analysis, establishment of controls, work performance, and feedback and improvement). These five core functions are applied to all activities at Berkeley Lab. Laboratory activities are planned and conducted with full regard to protecting the public and the environment and complying with appropriate environmental laws and regulations. Both radiological and nonradiological activities are thoroughly monitored to assess their potential impact on public health and the environment. This annual Site Environmental Report covers activities for calendar year (CY) 2001. Volume I summarizes environmental protection performance and environmental monitoring activities. Volume II contains individual analytical data summarized in the first volume. Volume II is available on request. (For details, see the Preface.) Data are presented in the report using the International System of Units measuring system, more commonly referred to as the metric system. For the convenience of readers, both volumes of this report can be accessed on the Web from the Berkeley Lab Environmental Services home page, which is located at http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/esg. Readers are encouraged to comment on this report by completing either the survey card included with the distributed hard copy of the report or the survey form in the Web version of the report. The format and content of this report satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting,1 and

  1. Food additives and preschool children.

    PubMed

    Martyn, Danika M; McNulty, Breige A; Nugent, Anne P; Gibney, Michael J

    2013-02-01

    Food additives have been used throughout history to perform specific functions in foods. A comprehensive framework of legislation is in place within Europe to control the use of additives in the food supply and ensure they pose no risk to human health. Further to this, exposure assessments are regularly carried out to monitor population intakes and verify that intakes are not above acceptable levels (acceptable daily intakes). Young children may have a higher dietary exposure to chemicals than adults due to a combination of rapid growth rates and distinct food intake patterns. For this reason, exposure assessments are particularly important in this age group. The paper will review the use of additives and exposure assessment methods and examine factors that affect dietary exposure by young children. One of the most widely investigated unfavourable health effects associated with food additive intake in preschool-aged children are suggested adverse behavioural effects. Research that has examined this relationship has reported a variety of responses, with many noting an increase in hyperactivity as reported by parents but not when assessed using objective examiners. This review has examined the experimental approaches used in such studies and suggests that efforts are needed to standardise objective methods of measuring behaviour in preschool children. Further to this, a more holistic approach to examining food additive intakes by preschool children is advisable, where overall exposure is considered rather than focusing solely on behavioural effects and possibly examining intakes of food additives other than food colours.

  2. Yucca Mountain site characterization project: Site atlas 1997. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting site characterization studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to determine if the site is suitable for an underground repository for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) Site Atlas is a tool used to cartographically display some of the Geographic Information System (GIS) data in the form of thematic map products. Essentially, the Site Atlas is a compilation of map products that are designed to illustrate the location and extent of site characterization studies. Additionally, the Site Atlas provides maps showing project administrative boundaries and basemaps in the vicinity of the project. The data are current through September 1997. The Atlas is divided into two parts: Part 1 contains GIS maps and supporting characteristic data for geology; stratigraphy; tectonics; volcanism; hydrology; geochemistry; environmental issues; paleontology; repository design; YMP boreholes, trenches, pits, pavements, and exposures; basemap features; and surface-based testing activities, and Part 2 contains 1:6,000- and 1:12,000-scale orthophotography basemaps and orthophotography-based hypsography maps (topographic data). This data is shown at a 50% reduction. The maps and orthophotographs in this Site Atlas are provided to YMP participants as an informational source only and are not for making precise measurements. The Quality Assurance Requirements and Description statement on each map identifies the quality status of the thematic data presented. The Site Atlas is not a comprehensive guide; it does not include all scientific features or studies undertaken for the YMP. The features presented are a small subset of the total work being conducted for the project.

  3. Viking site selection and certification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masursky, H.; Crabill, N. L.

    1981-01-01

    The landing site selection and certification effort for the Viking mission to Mars is reviewed from the premission phase through the acquisition of data and decisions during mission operations and the immediate postlanding evaluation. The utility and limitations of the orbital television and infrared data and ground based radar observation of candidate and actual landing sites are evaluated. Additional instruments and types of observations which would have been useful include higher resolution cameras, radar altimeters, and terrain hazard avoidance capability in the landing system. Suggestions based on this experience that might be applied to future missions are included.

  4. Site selectivity and reversibility in the reactions of titanium hydrazides with Si-H, Si-X, C-X and H+ reagents: Ti=N(α) 1,2-silane addition, Nβ alkylation, Nα protonation and σ-bond metathesis.

    PubMed

    Tiong, Pei Jen; Nova, Ainara; Schwarz, Andrew D; Selby, Jonathan D; Clot, Eric; Mountford, Philip

    2012-02-28

    We report a combined experimental and computational comparative study of the reactions of the homologous titanium dialkyl- and diphenylhydrazido and imido compounds Cp*Ti{MeC(N(i)Pr)(2)}(NNR(2)) (R = Me (1) or Ph (2)) and Cp*Ti{MeC(N(i)Pr)(2)}(NTol) (3) with silanes, halosilanes, alkyl halides and [Et(3)NH][BPh(4)]. Compound 1 underwent reversible Si-H 1,2-addition to Ti=N(α) with RSiH(3) (experimental ΔH ca. -17 kcal mol(-1)), and irreversible addition with PhSiH(2)X (X = Cl, Br). DFT found that the reaction products and certain intermediates were stabilised by β-NMe(2) coordination to titanium. The Ti-D bond in Cp*Ti{MeC(N(i)Pr)(2)}(D){N(NMe(2))SiD(2)Ph} underwent σ-bond metathesis with BuSiH(3) and H(2). Compound 1 reacted with RR'SiCl(2) at N(α) to transfer both Cl atoms to Ti; 2 underwent a similar reaction. Compound 3 did not react with RSiH(3) or alkyl halides but formed unstable Ti=N(α) 1,2-addition or N(α) protonation products with PhSiH(2)X or [Et(3)NH][BPh(4)]. Compound 1 underwent exclusive alkylation at N(β) with RCH(2)X (R = H, Me or Ph; X = Br or I) whereas protonation using [Et(3)NH][BPh(4)] occurred at N(α). DFT studies found that in all cases electrophile addition to N(α) (with or without NMe(2) chelation) was thermodynamically favoured compared to addition to N(β).

  5. 77 FR 9250 - Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-16

    ... designate a class of employees from the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina, as an addition to the... contractors and subcontractors who worked at the Savannah River Site from January 1, 1953, through...

  6. Hanford Site Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Hathaway, H.B.; Daly, K.S.; Rinne, C.A.; Seiler, S.W.

    1993-05-01

    The Hanford Site Development Plan (HSDP) provides an overview of land use, infrastructure, and facility requirements to support US Department of Energy (DOE) programs at the Hanford Site. The HSDP`s primary purpose is to inform senior managers and interested parties of development activities and issues that require a commitment of resources to support the Hanford Site. The HSDP provides an existing and future land use plan for the Hanford Site. The HSDP is updated annually in accordance with DOE Order 4320.1B, Site Development Planning, to reflect the mission and overall site development process. Further details about Hanford Site development are defined in individual area development plans.

  7. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, and to prepare specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives, including flavouring agents. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for eight food additives (Benzoe tonkinensis; carrageenan; citric and fatty acid esters of glycerol; gardenia yellow; lutein esters from Tagetes erecta; octenyl succinic acid-modified gum arabic; octenyl succinic acid-modified starch; paprika extract; and pectin) and eight groups of flavouring agents (aliphatic and alicyclic hydrocarbons; aliphatic and aromatic ethers; ionones and structurally related substances; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; monocyclic and bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; phenol and phenol derivatives; phenyl-substituted aliphatic alcohols and related aldehydes and esters; and sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: citric acid; gellan gum; polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monostearate; potassium aluminium silicate; and Quillaia extract (Type 2). Annexed to the report are tables summarizing the Committee's recommendations for dietary exposures to and toxicological evaluations of all of the food additives and flavouring agents considered at this meeting.

  8. [INVITED] Lasers in additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkerton, Andrew J.

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing is a topic of considerable ongoing interest, with forecasts predicting it to have major impact on industry in the future. This paper focusses on the current status and potential future development of the technology, with particular reference to the role of lasers within it. It begins by making clear the types and roles of lasers in the different categories of additive manufacturing. This is followed by concise reviews of the economic benefits and disadvantages of the technology, current state of the market and use of additive manufacturing in different industries. Details of these fields are referenced rather than expanded in detail. The paper continues, focusing on current indicators to the future of additive manufacturing. Barriers to its development, trends and opportunities in major industrial sectors, and wider opportunities for its development are covered. Evidence indicates that additive manufacturing may not become the dominant manufacturing technology in all industries, but represents an excellent opportunity for lasers to increase their influence in manufacturing as a whole.

  9. Perceptions of Business Students' Feature Requirements in Educational Web Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazari, Sunil; Johnson, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    There is paucity of original research that explains phenomena related to content organization and site design of educational Web sites. Educational Web sites are often used to provide Web-based instruction, which itself is a relatively recent phenomenon for business schools, and additional research is needed in this area. Educational Web sites are…

  10. CHARACTERIZING SITE HYDROLOGY (REGION 8 WORKSHOP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  11. Characterizing Site Hydrology (Region 10, Seattle, WA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  12. CHARACTERIZING SITE HYDROLOGY (WORKSHOP MSA PRESENTATION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  13. Site amplifications for generic rock sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, D.M.; Joyner, W.B.

    1997-01-01

    Seismic shear-wave velocity as a function of depth for generic rock sites has been estimated from borehole data and studies of crustal velocities, and these velocities have been used to compute frequency-dependent amplifications for zero attenuation for use in simulations of strong ground motion. We define a generic rock site as one whose velocity at shallow depths equals the average of those from the rock sites sampled by the borehole data. Most of the boreholes are in populated areas; for that reason, the rock sites sampled are of particular engineering significance. We consider two generic rock sites: rock, corresponding to the bulk of the borehole data, and very hard rock, such as is found in glaciated regions in large areas of eastern North America or in portions of western North America. The amplifications on rock sites can be in excess of 3.5 at high frequencies, in contrast to the amplifications of less than 1.2 on very hard rock sites. The consideration of unattenuated amplification alone is computationally convenient, but what matters for ground-motion estimation is the combined effect of amplification and attenuation. For reasonable values of the attenuation parameter K0, the combined effect of attenuation and amplification for rock sites peaks between about 2 and 5 Hz with a maximum level of less than 1.8. The combined effect is about a factor of 1.5 at 1 Hz and is less than unity for frequencies in the range of 10 to 20 Hz (depending on K0). Using these amplifications, we find provisional values of about ???? = 70 bars and K0 = 0.035 sec for rock sites in western North America by fitting our empirically determined response spectra for an M 6.5 event to simulated values. The borehole data yield shear velocities (V??30) of 618 and 306 m/sec for "rock" and "soil" sites, respectively, when averaged over the upper 30 m. From this, we recommend that V??30 equals 620 and 310 m/sec for applications requiring the average velocity for rock and soil sites in

  14. Additive manufacturing of hybrid circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Nelson S.; Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; Clem, Paul G.; Keicher, David M.; Hirschfeld, Deidre; Hall, Aaron Christopher

    2016-03-26

    There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming hybrid circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer hybrid circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects. Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (AD), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. As a result, we show examples of hybrid circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or AD processes and conventional, established processes.

  15. Tougher Addition Polyimides Containing Siloxane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, T. L.; Maudgal, S.

    1986-01-01

    Laminates show increased impact resistances and other desirable mechanical properties. Bismaleamic acid extended by reaction of diaminosiloxane with maleic anhydride in 1:1 molar ratio, followed by reaction with half this molar ratio of aromatic dianhydride. Bismaleamic acid also extended by reaction of diaminosiloxane with maleic anhydride in 1:2 molar ratio, followed by reaction with half this molar ratio of aromatic diamine (Michael-addition reaction). Impact resistances improved over those of unmodified bismaleimide, showing significant increase in toughness. Aromatic addition polyimides developed as both matrix and adhesive resins for applications on future aircraft and spacecraft.

  16. The Additive Property of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaoussis, Dimitris S.

    1995-01-01

    Presents exercises that analyze the additive property of energy. Concludes that if a body has more than one component of energy depending on the same physical quantity, the body's total energy will be the algebraic sum of the components if a linear relationship exists between the energy components and that physical quantity. (JRH)

  17. Tetrasulfide extreme pressure lubricant additives

    SciTech Connect

    Gast, L.E.; Kenney, H.E.; Schwab, A.W.

    1980-08-19

    A novel class of compounds has been prepared comprising the tetrasulfides of /sup 18/C hydrocarbons, /sup 18/C fatty acids, and /sup 18/C fatty and alkyl and triglyceride esters. These tetrasulfides are useful as extreme pressure lubricant additives and show potential as replacements for sulfurized sperm whale oil.

  18. Out of bounds additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Holshouser, Chris; Newell, Clint; Palas, Sid; Love, Lonnie J.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Lind, Randall F.; Lloyd, Peter D.; Rowe, John C.; Blue, Craig A.; Duty, Chad E.; Peter, William H.; Dehoff, Ryan R.

    2013-03-01

    Lockheed Martin and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working on an additive manufacturing system capable of manufacturing components measured not in terms of inches or feet, but multiple yards in all dimensions with the potential to manufacture parts that are completely unbounded in size.

  19. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, with a view to concluding as to safety concerns and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives, including flavouring agents. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for five food additives (magnesium dihydrogen diphosphate; mineral oil (medium and low viscosity) classes II and III; 3-phytase from Aspergillus niger expressed in Aspergillus niger; serine protease (chymotrypsin) from Nocardiopsis prasina expressed in Bacillus licheniformis; and serine protease (trypsin) from Fusarium oxysporum expressed in Fusarium venenatum) and 16 groups of flavouring agents (aliphatic and aromatic amines and amides; aliphatic and aromatic ethers; aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and related esters, sulfides, disulfides and ethers containing furan substitution; aliphatic linear alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, acids and related alcohols, acetals and esters; amino acids and related substances; epoxides; furfuryl alcohol and related substances; linear and branched-chain aliphatic, unsaturated, unconjugated alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; phenol and phenol derivatives; pyrazine derivatives; pyridine, pyrrole and quinoline derivatives; saturated aliphatic acyclic branched-chain primary alcohols, aldehydes and acids; simple aliphatic and aromatic sulfides and thiols; sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds; and sulfur-substituted furan derivatives). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: ethyl cellulose, mineral oil (medium viscosity), modified starches and titanium

  20. Photo Library of the Nevada Site Office (Includes historical archive of nuclear testing images)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Nevada Site Office makes available publicly released photos from their archive that includes photos from both current programs and historical activities. The historical collections include atmospheric and underground nuclear testing photos and photos of other events and people related to the Nevada Test Site. Current collections are focused on homeland security, stockpile stewardship, and environmental management and restoration. See also the Historical Film Library at http://www.nv.doe.gov/library/films/testfilms.aspx and the Current Film Library at http://www.nv.doe.gov/library/films/current.aspx. Current films can be viewed online, but only short clips of the historical films are viewable. They can be ordered via an online request form for a very small shipping and handling fee.

  1. The Frontiers of Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, Christopher John

    2016-03-03

    Additive manufacturing, more commonly known as 3-D printing, has become a ubiquitous tool in science for its precise control over mechanical design. For additive manufacturing to work, a 3-D structure is split into thin 2D slices, and then different physical properties, such as photo-polymerization or melting, are used to grow the sequential layers. The level of control allows not only for devices to be made with a variety of materials: e.g. plastics, metals, and quantum dots, but to also have finely controlled structures leading to other novel properties. While 3-D printing is widely used by hobbyists for making models, it also has industrial applications in structural engineering, biological tissue scaffolding, customized electric circuitry, fuel cells, security, and more.

  2. Decontamination formulation with sorbent additive

    DOEpatents

    Tucker; Mark D. , Comstock; Robert H.

    2007-10-16

    A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a bleaching activator, a sorbent additive, and water. The highly adsorbent, water-soluble sorbent additive (e.g., sorbitol or mannitol) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients, such as the liquid bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate) and convert the activator into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

  3. Transient design of landfill liquid addition systems.

    PubMed

    Jain, Pradeep; Townsend, Timothy G; Tolaymat, Thabet M

    2014-09-01

    This study presents the development of design charts that can be used to estimate lateral and vertical spacing of liquids addition devices (e.g., vertical well, horizontal trenches) and the operating duration needed for transient operating conditions (conditions until steady-state operating conditions are achieved). These design charts should be used in conjunction with steady-state design charts published earlier by Jain et al. (2010a, 2010b). The data suggest that the liquids addition system operating time can be significantly reduced by utilizing moderately closer spacing between liquids addition devices than the spacing needed for steady-state conditions. These design charts can be used by designers to readily estimate achievable flow rate and lateral and vertical extents of the zone of impact from liquid addition devices, and analyze the sensitivity of various input variables (e.g., hydraulic conductivity, anisotropy, well radius, screen length) to the design. The applicability of the design charts, which are developed based on simulations of a continuously operated system, was also evaluated for the design of a system that would be operated intermittently (e.g., systems only operated during facility operating hours). The design charts somewhat underestimates the flow rate achieved and overestimates the lateral extent of the zone of impact over an operating duration for an intermittently operated system. The associated estimation errors would be smaller than the margin of errors associated with measurement of other key design inputs such as waste properties (e.g., hydraulic conductivity) and wider variation of these properties at a given site due to heterogeneous nature of waste.

  4. Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Roderick; Lee, Brian; Love, Lonnie; Mabe, Gavin; Keller, Martin; Curran, Scott; Chinthavali, Madhu; Green, Johney; Sawyer, Karma; Enquist, Phil

    2016-02-05

    Meet AMIE - the Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy demonstration project. Led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and many industry partners, the AMIE project changes the way we think about generating, storing, and using electrical power. AMIE uses an integrated energy system that shares energy between a building and a vehicle. And, utilizing advanced manufacturing and rapid innovation, it only took one year from concept to launch.

  5. Robust stability under additive perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhaya, A.; Desoer, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    A MIMO linear time-invariant feedback system 1S(P,C) is considered which is assumed to be U-stable. The plant P is subjected to an additive perturbation Delta P which is proper but not necessarily stable. It is proved that the perturbed system is U-stable if and only if Delta P(I + Q x Delta P) exp -1 is U-stable.

  6. Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy Demonstration

    ScienceCinema

    Jackson, Roderick; Lee, Brian; Love, Lonnie; Mabe, Gavin; Keller, Martin; Curran, Scott; Chinthavali, Madhu; Green, Johney; Sawyer, Karma; Enquist, Phil

    2016-07-12

    Meet AMIE - the Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy demonstration project. Led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and many industry partners, the AMIE project changes the way we think about generating, storing, and using electrical power. AMIE uses an integrated energy system that shares energy between a building and a vehicle. And, utilizing advanced manufacturing and rapid innovation, it only took one year from concept to launch.

  7. Nanoengineered Additives for Active Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    commercial ad bial activ component from the coating, leading to eventual depletion of the film. Small TPU samples were evaluated using a Kirby - Bauer ...7 Table 5. Summary of 24-hr ASTM E 2180 tests with 1 weight-percent additive in PUr (solvent dispersible) based on 6-log loading of...Noveon X-1150). The ASTM E 2180 test is run in triplicate (Note that alternative ro 1° amines) was suspended in dry tetrahydrofuran (THF) (150 mL) in

  8. Superfund Site Assessment Process

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn about the site assessment process used by the federal Superfund program to evaluate releases of hazardous substances that may pose a threat to human health or the environment and select an appropriate program for sites needing cleanup.

  9. Pesticide Use Site Index

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Pesticide Use Site Index will help a company (or other applicant) identify which data requirements are needed to register a pesticide product. It provides information on pesticide use sites and pesticide major use patterns.

  10. SMARTE'S SITE CHARACTERIZATION TOOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Site Characterization involves collecting environmental data to evaluate the nature and extent of contamination. Environmental data could consist of chemical analyses of soil, sediment, water or air samples. Typically site characterization data are statistically evaluated for thr...

  11. Past Project Expo Sites

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page provides information for Project Expo sites that were featured at the LMOP Conferences in 2013 and 2014. Project Expo sites were featured as being interested in identifying project partners for the development of an LFG energy project.

  12. Reversible Oxidative Addition at Carbon.

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, Antonius F; Fuchs, Sonja; Flock, Marco; Marder, Todd B; Radius, Udo

    2017-04-07

    The reactivity of N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) and cyclic alkyl amino carbenes (cAACs) with arylboronate esters is reported. The reaction with NHCs leads to the reversible formation of thermally stable Lewis acid/base adducts Ar-B(OR)2 ⋅NHC (Add1-Add6). Addition of cAAC(Me) to the catecholboronate esters 4-R-C6 H4 -Bcat (R=Me, OMe) also afforded the adducts 4-R-C6 H4 Bcat⋅cAAC(Me) (Add7, R=Me and Add8, R=OMe), which react further at room temperature to give the cAAC(Me) ring-expanded products RER1 and RER2. The boronate esters Ar-B(OR)2 of pinacol, neopentylglycol, and ethyleneglycol react with cAAC at RT via reversible B-C oxidative addition to the carbene carbon atom to afford cAAC(Me) (B{OR}2 )(Ar) (BCA1-BCA6). NMR studies of cAAC(Me) (Bneop)(4-Me-C6 H4 ) (BCA4) demonstrate the reversible nature of this oxidative addition process.

  13. Additive manufacturing of hybrid circuits

    DOE PAGES

    Bell, Nelson S.; Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; ...

    2016-03-26

    There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming hybrid circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer hybrid circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects.more » Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (AD), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. As a result, we show examples of hybrid circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or AD processes and conventional, established processes.« less

  14. Fire-Retardant Polymeric Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K.; Smith, Trent M.

    2011-01-01

    Polyhydroxyamide (PHA) and polymethoxyamide (PMeOA) are fire-retardant (FR) thermoplastic polymers and have been found to be useful as an additive for imparting fire retardant properties to other compatible, thermoplastic polymers (including some elastomers). Examples of compatible flammable polymers include nylons, polyesters, and acrylics. Unlike most prior additives, PHA and PMeOA do not appreciably degrade the mechanical properties of the matrix polymer; indeed, in some cases, mechanical properties are enhanced. Also, unlike some prior additives, PHA and PMeOA do not decompose into large amounts of corrosive or toxic compounds during combustion and can be processed at elevated temperatures. PMeOA derivative formulations were synthesized and used as an FR additive in the fabrication of polyamide (PA) and polystyrene (PS) composites with notable reduction (>30 percent for PS) in peak heat release rates compared to the neat polymer as measured by a Cone Calorimeter (ASTM E1354). Synergistic effects were noted with nanosilica composites. These nanosilica composites had more than 50-percent reduction in peak heat release rates. In a typical application, a flammable thermoplastic, thermoplastic blend, or elastomer that one seeks to render flame-retardant is first dry-mixed with PHA or PMeOA or derivative thereof. The proportion of PHA or PMeOA or derivative in the mixture is typically chosen to lie between 1 and 20 weight percent. The dry blend can then be melt-extruded. The extruded polymer blend can further be extruded and/or molded into fibers, pipes, or any other of a variety of objects that may be required to be fire-retardant. The physical and chemical mechanisms which impart flame retardancy of the additive include inhibiting free-radical oxidation in the vapor phase, preventing vaporization of fuel (the polymer), and cooling through the formation of chemical bonds in either the vapor or the condensed phase. Under thermal stress, the cyclic hydroxyl/ methoxy

  15. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, with a view to recommending acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation and assessment of intake of food additives (in particular, flavouring agents). A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and intake data for certain food additives (asparaginase from Aspergillus niger expressed in A. niger, calcium lignosulfonate (40-65), ethyl lauroyl arginate, paprika extract, phospholipase C expressed in Pichia pastoris, phytosterols, phytostanols and their esters, polydimethylsiloxane, steviol glycosides and sulfites [assessment of dietary exposure]) and 10 groups of related flavouring agents (aliphatic branched-chain saturated and unsaturated alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters; aliphatic linear alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, acids and related alcohols, acetals and esters; aliphatic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; alkoxy-substituted allylbenzenes present in foods and essential oils and used as flavouring agents; esters of aliphatic acyclic primary alcohols with aliphatic linear saturated carboxylic acids; furan-substituted aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and related esters, sulfides, disulfides and ethers; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; monocyclic and bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; hydroxy- and alkoxy-substituted benzyl derivatives; and substances structurally related to menthol). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: canthaxanthin; carob bean gum and carob bean gum (clarified); chlorophyllin copper complexes, sodium and potassium salts; Fast Green FCF; guar gum and guar gum (clarified

  16. DOE candidate site meteorological measurement program

    SciTech Connect

    Renne, D. S.; Sandusky, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    In March 1976, DOE issued an RFP to acquire, on a competitive basis, a group of candidate sites, proposed by utilities interested in the field testing program. A total of 17 candidate sites were selected from the 64 proposals submitted in response to the RFP. From these sites, five have been chosen thus far to receive turbines for field testing. This paper discusses the meteorological measurement activities at these sites and provides details of the measurement program as it exists in late 1979. In addition, the paper briefly discusses the directions this program will take in the near future, and the options interested electric service organizations have for participating in the program.

  17. Report on Lessons Learned from the NP 2010 Early Site Permit Program FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    2008-03-26

    This report provides a summary of lessons learned from the demonstration of the licensing process for three Early Site Permit (ESP) applications supported as part of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Nuclear Power 2010 (NP 2010) program. The ESP process was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to enable completion of the site evaluation component of nuclear power plant licensing under 10 CFR Part 52 before a utility makes a decision to build a plant. Early Site Permits are valid for 10 to 20 years and can be renewed for an additional 10 to 20 years. NRC review of an ESP application addresses site safety issues, environmental protection issues, and plans for coping with emergencies. Successful completion of the ESP process will establish that a site is suitable for possible future construction and operation of a nuclear power plant. Most importantly, an ESP resolves significant site-related safety and environmental issues early in the decision process and helps achieve acceptance by the public. DOE competitively selected Dominion Nuclear Energy North Anna, LLC (Dominion); System Energy Resources, Inc. (an Entergy subsidiary); and Exelon Generation Company, LLC (Exelon) in 2002 to demonstrate the ESP process and provided cost-shared support through the NP 2010 program. Dominion pursued an ESP for the North Anna site in Virginia; System Energy Resources, Inc. pursued an ESP for the Grand Gulf site in Mississippi; and Exelon pursued an ESP for the Clinton site in Illinois. After successfully demonstrating the process, the NRC issued an ESP for Clinton on March 17, 2007; Grand Gulf on April 5, 2007; and North Anna on November 27, 2007. As with all successful projects, there are lessons to be learned from the NP 2010 early site permitting demonstration that can help improve future implementation guidance documents and regulatory review standards. In general, these lessons pertain to the effectiveness of the regulatory process, experience related to

  18. Recover bromine on site

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, P.; Mahajan, S.; Beatty, R.D.; Rostrup-Nielsen, T.; Schubert, D.W.; Lu, Phat Tan

    1993-04-01

    Chemists have long recognized the importance of recovering bromine from waste streams, and attempts to do so catalytically date back more than 50 years. Although the early interest in bromine recovery was driven primarily by economics, increased environmental pressures are providing additional incentives to recycle this element. As the acceptability of discharging wastes into the environment decreases, the cost of doing so increases, creating a need for alternative handling. The authors interest in waste bromine recovery was driven by both economic and environmental factors. In their evaluation of a research program that included a bromination step as part of a synthesis process, Catalytica researchers found that the process would be feasible commercially only if the waste HBr produced were recycled on site to bromine. A nonbromine route was eventually adopted for this particular research program, but the need for an economical and environmentally sound process for recycling HBr to bromine was recognized. The development of this process became a project in its own right. This process eliminates the need to form and ship aqueous sodium bromide offsite. It converts the waste HBr directly to bromine by catalytic oxidation.

  19. [Evaluation of an internet site on evidence-based medicine].

    PubMed

    Mathys, J; Steurer, J

    2000-10-19

    The present study evaluated a Swiss internet provider of Evidence-based Medicine (EBM) with regard to its utilization and function for medical practitioners. The internet provider under study (www.evimed.ch) primarily provides abstracts of original articles relevant to medical practice that are presented according to the criteria of EBM and includes information about EBM itself. In March 1999 a survey was conducted to better appraise the benefits gained from the information provided from the website visitors' point of view. Around 400 persons who had entered their names in the homepage guest book were informed about the survey by e-mail. A total of 167 questionnaires were filled in online, which is equivalent to the reply rate of close to 42%. The majority of the replies (63.5%) were from private-practice physicians, 22.2% from hospital-based physicians. The average age ranged between 40 and 49 years. 67.7% of the 167 respondents had internet access at their workplace, 72.5% had private internet access. For their own practical work, 61.1% of the respondents rated the information provided by www.evimed.ch as generally useful. The clinical relevance of the studies presented in the Journal Club was rated as good by 55.7% and as very good by 26.9%. The reliability of the information provided was rated as good by 56.3% and as very good by 35.3%. The majority regarded the following homepage sites as personally important: Journal Club (55.7%), articles about EBM (46.1%), MEDLINE access (37.7%) and article citations/links (41.3%). The homepage was visited at an average frequency of 1-3 times a month. 50.3% preferred electronic media (40.1% using various internet providers, 10.2% www.evimed.ch) and 44.3% preferred print media to search for specialist information on a specific medical subject. With regard to new medical findings, 44.9% of the respondents stated that they used print media, 17.4% the www.evimed.ch homepage and 28.7% other internet sources as their primary

  20. The Mozart Effect: Additional Data.

    PubMed

    Hughes, John R.

    2002-04-01

    After the review of the Mozart effect was published in this journal (Hughes JR. Epilepsy Behav 2001;2:369-417), additional data from the music of Haydn and Liszt have been analyzed that may account for the decrease in seizure activity originally reported during Mozart music. Even with these added data Mozart music continued to score significantly higher than the selections from the other six composers in one of the important characteristics of this music, namely, the repetition of the melody. However Haydn's values were second highest among Mozart, J. S. Bach, Wagner, Beethoven, Chopin, and Liszt.

  1. Water based drilling mud additive

    SciTech Connect

    McCrary, J.L.

    1983-12-13

    A water based fluid additive useful in drilling mud used during drilling of an oil or gas well is disclosed, produced by reacting water at temperatures between 210/sup 0/-280/sup 0/ F. with a mixture comprising in percent by weight: gilsonite 25-30%, tannin 7-15%, lignite 25-35%, sulfonating compound 15-25%, water soluble base compound 5-15%, methylene-yielding compound 1-5%, and then removing substantially all of the remaining water to produce a dried product.

  2. Metal Additive Manufacturing: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, William E.

    2014-06-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of an important, rapidly emerging, manufacturing technology that is alternatively called additive manufacturing (AM), direct digital manufacturing, free form fabrication, or 3D printing, etc. A broad contextual overview of metallic AM is provided. AM has the potential to revolutionize the global parts manufacturing and logistics landscape. It enables distributed manufacturing and the productions of parts-on-demand while offering the potential to reduce cost, energy consumption, and carbon footprint. This paper explores the material science, processes, and business consideration associated with achieving these performance gains. It is concluded that a paradigm shift is required in order to fully exploit AM potential.

  3. Shale JP-4 Additive Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-01

    8217. •% . , ’ ,,,r ,% . -- - ,.-. ’ ’ 4,w% %’. " - ,’ . . . * ’, .* . TABLE OF CONTENTS .4q ,4 . * SECTION PAGE I. INTRODUCTION 1 II. TEST PARAMETERS 2 1...42 PRECEDING PAGE BLANK TABLE OF CONTENTS (CON’T) SECT ION PAGE V. CONCLUSIONS 44 REFERENCES 46 APPENDIX A Drum to Test Sample Relationship 47 APPENDIX...B.O.C.L.E. Results 40 vii LIST OF TABLES TABLE PAGE 1 Antioxidants 3 2 Raw Shale/Petroleum Fuel Properties 10 3 Drum Sample Additive Content 13 4

  4. Site Environmental Report, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program.`` This 1993 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the site`s progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in the Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish to read more detailed descriptions of the information than those which are presented here.

  5. Site Screening and Technical Guidance for Monitored Natural Attenuation at DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Borns, D.J.; Brady, P.V.; Brady, W.D.; Krupka, K.M.; Spalding, B.P.; Waters, R.D.; Zhang, P.

    1999-03-01

    Site Screening and Technical Guidance for Monitored Natural Attenuation at DOE Sites briefly outlines the biological and geochemical origins of natural attenuation, the tendency for natural processes in soils to mitigate contaminant transport and availability, and the means for relying on monitored natural attenuation (MNA) for remediation of contaminated soils and groundwaters. This report contains a step-by-step guide for (1) screening contaminated soils and groundwaters on the basis of their potential for remediation by natural attenuation and (2) implementing MNA consistent with EPA OSWER Directive 9200.4-17. The screening and implementation procedures are set up as a web-based tool (http://www.sandia.gov/eesector/gs/gc/na/mnahome.html) to assist US Department of Energy (DOE) site environmental managers and their staff and contractors to adhere to EPA guidelines for implementing MNA. This document is intended to support the Decision Maker's Framework Guide and Monitoring Guide both to be issued from DOE EM-40. Further technical advances may cause some of the approach outlined in this document to change over time.

  6. High Flow Addition Curing Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Vannucci, Raymond D.; Ansari, Irfan; Cerny, Lawrence L.; Scheiman, Daniel A.

    1994-01-01

    A new series of high flow PMR-type addition curing polyimides was developed, which employed the substitution of 2,2'-bis (trifluoromethyl) -4,4'-diaminobiphenyl (BTDB) for p-phenylenediamine (p -PDA) in a PMR-IL formulation. These thermoset polyimides, designated as 12F resins, were prepared from BTDB and the dimethyl ester of 4,4'- (hexafluo- roisopropylidene) -diphthalic acid (HFDE) with either nadic ester (NE) or p-aminostyrene (PAS) as the endcaps for addition curing. The 12F prepolymers displayed lower melting temperatures in DSC analysis, and higher melt flow in rheological studies than the cor- responding PMR-11 polyimides. Long-term isothermal aging studies showed that BTDB- based 12F resins exhibited comparable thermo-oxidative stability to P-PDA based PMR-11 polyimides. The noncoplanar 2- and 2'-disubstituted biphenyldiamine (BTDB) not only lowered the melt viscosities of 12F prepolymers, but also retained reasonable thermal sta- bility of the cured resins. The 12F polyimide resin with p-aminostyrene endcaps showed the best promise for long-term, high-temperature application at 343 C (650 F).

  7. Fuel Additives: Canada bans MMT

    SciTech Connect

    Sissell, K.

    1997-04-16

    The Canadian Senate voted late last week to ban use of the manganese-based fuel additive MMT, produced only in the US by Ethyl. MMT, which has been sold in Canada for the past 20 years and accounts for about half of Ethyl`s Canadian sales, has been criticized by environmentalists, who have raised public health concerns, and automakers, who say it harms emission control systems. {open_quotes}Canada`s vote is a great victory for public health and the environment,{close_quotes} says Environmental Defense Fund executive director Fred Krupp. {open_quotes}The US should move swiftly to follow suit and suspend sales of MMT until adequate toxicity testing on the additive is completed.{close_quotes} EPA had refused to approve MMT for sale because of health concerns but was compelled to do so by a December 1995 court ruling. Ethyl asserts the ban violates Canada`s obligations under Nafta and says it will file a damage claim with the Nafta arbitration panel.

  8. Additive interaction between heterogeneous environmental ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    BACKGROUND Environmental exposures often occur in tandem; however, epidemiological research often focuses on singular exposures. Statistical interactions among broad, well-characterized environmental domains have not yet been evaluated in association with health. We address this gap by conducting a county-level cross-sectional analysis of interactions between Environmental Quality Index (EQI) domain indices on preterm birth in the Unites States from 2000-2005.METHODS: The EQI, a county-level index constructed for the 2000-2005 time period, was constructed from five domain-specific indices (air, water, land, built and sociodemographic) using principal component analyses. County-level preterm birth rates (n=3141) were estimated using live births from the National Center for Health Statistics. Linear regression was used to estimate prevalence differences (PD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) comparing worse environmental quality to the better quality for each model for a) each individual domain main effect b) the interaction contrast and c) the two main effects plus interaction effect (i.e. the “net effect”) to show departure from additive interaction for the all U.S counties. Analyses were also performed for subgroupings by four urban/rural strata. RESULTS: We found the suggestion of antagonistic interactions but no synergism, along with several purely additive (i.e., no interaction) associations. In the non-stratified model, we observed antagonistic interac

  9. Additive manufacturing of RF absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Matthew S.

    The ability of additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate integrated electromagnetic absorbers tuned for specific radio frequency bands within structural composites allows for unique combinations of mechanical and electromagnetic properties. These composites and films can be used for RF shielding of sensitive electromagnetic components through in-plane and out-of-plane RF absorption. Structural composites are a common building block of many commercial platforms. These platforms may be placed in situations in which there is a need for embedded RF absorbing properties along with structural properties. Instead of adding radar absorbing treatments to the external surface of existing structures, which adds increased size, weight and cost; it could prove to be advantageous to integrate the microwave absorbing properties directly into the composite during the fabrication process. In this thesis, a method based on additive manufacturing techniques of composites structures with prescribed electromagnetic loss, within the frequency range 1 to 26GHz, is presented. This method utilizes screen printing and nScrypt micro dispensing to pattern a carbon based ink onto low loss substrates. The materials chosen for this study will be presented, and the fabrication technique that these materials went through to create RF absorbing structures will be described. The calibration methods used, the modeling of the RF structures, and the applications in which this technology can be utilized will also be presented.

  10. Bulk Site Reference Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Barich, J.J. III; Jones, R.R. Sr.

    1996-12-31

    The selection, manufacture and use of Bulk Site Reference Materials (BSRMs) at hazardous waste sites is discussed. BSRMs are useful in preparing stabilization/solidification (S/S) formulations for soils, ranking competing S/S processes, comparing S/S alternatives to other technologies, and in interpreting data from different test types. BSRMs are large volume samples that are representative of the physical and chemical characteristics of a site soil, and that contain contaminants at reasonably high levels. A successful BSRM is extremely homogeneous and well-characterized. While not representative of any point on the site, they contain the contaminants of the site in the matrices of the site. Design objectives for a BSRM are to produce a material that (1) maintains good fidelity to site matrices and contaminants, and (2) exhibits the lowest possible relative standard deviation.

  11. Brownfields Technology Primer: Selecting and Using Phytoremediation for Site Cleanup

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This primer explains the phytoremediation process, discusses the potential advantages and considerations in selecting phytoremediation to clean up brownfields sites, and provides information on additional resources about phytoremediation.

  12. Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer, Jeffrey P.

    2013-02-13

    The Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report (HSWMUR) has been created to meet the requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) Action Plan, Section 3.5, which states: “The Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report shall be generated, in a format agreed upon by the Parties, as a calendar year report and issued annually by the DOE by the end of February of each year, and posted electronically for regulator and public access. This report shall reflect all changes made in waste management unit status during the previous year.” This February 2013 version of the HSWMUR contains a comprehensive inventory of the 3427 sites and 564 subsites in the Waste Information Data System (WIDS). The information for each site contains a description of each unit and the waste it contains, where applicable. The WIDS database provides additional information concerning the sites contained in this report and is maintained with daily changes to these sites.

  13. Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer, Jeffrey P.

    2012-02-29

    The Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report (HSWMUR) has been created to meet the requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) Action Plan, Section 3.5, which states: “The Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report shall be generated, in a format agreed upon by the Parties, as a calendar year report and issued annually by the DOE by the end of February of each year, and posted electronically for regulator and public access. This report shall reflect all changes made in waste management unit status during the previous year.” This February 2012 version of the HSWMUR contains a comprehensive inventory of the 3389 sites and 540 subsites in the Waste Information Data System (WIDS). The information for each site contains a description of each unit and the waste it contains, where applicable. The WIDS database provides additional information concerning the sites contained in this report and is maintained with daily changes to these sites.

  14. Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer, Jeffrey P.

    2014-02-19

    The Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report (HSWMUR) has been created to meet the requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) Action Plan, Section 3.5, which states: “The Hanford Site Waste Management Units Report shall be generated, in a format agreed upon by the Parties, as a calendar year report and issued annually by the DOE by the end of February of each year, and posted electronically for regulator and public access. This report shall reflect all changes made in waste management unit status during the previous year.” This February 2013 version of the HSWMUR contains a comprehensive inventory of the 3438 sites and 569 subsites in the Waste Information Data System (WIDS). The information for each site contains a description of each unit and the waste it contains, where applicable. The WIDS database provides additional information concerning the sites contained in this report and is maintained with daily changes to these sites.

  15. Neutron Characterization for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Thomas; Bilheux, Hassina; An, Ke; Payzant, Andrew; DeHoff, Ryan; Duty, Chad; Peter, William; Blue, Craig; Brice, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is leveraging decades of experience in neutron characterization of advanced materials together with resources such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) shown in Fig. 1 to solve challenging problems in additive manufacturing (AM). Additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3-D) printing, is a rapidly maturing technology wherein components are built by selectively adding feedstock material at locations specified by a computer model. The majority of these technologies use thermally driven phase change mechanisms to convert the feedstock into functioning material. As the molten material cools and solidifies, the component is subjected to significant thermal gradients, generating significant internal stresses throughout the part (Fig. 2). As layers are added, inherent residual stresses cause warping and distortions that lead to geometrical differences between the final part and the original computer generated design. This effect also limits geometries that can be fabricated using AM, such as thin-walled, high-aspect- ratio, and overhanging structures. Distortion may be minimized by intelligent toolpath planning or strategic placement of support structures, but these approaches are not well understood and often "Edisonian" in nature. Residual stresses can also impact component performance during operation. For example, in a thermally cycled environment such as a high-pressure turbine engine, residual stresses can cause components to distort unpredictably. Different thermal treatments on as-fabricated AM components have been used to minimize residual stress, but components still retain a nonhomogeneous stress state and/or demonstrate a relaxation-derived geometric distortion. Industry, federal laboratory, and university collaboration is needed to address these challenges and enable the U.S. to compete in the global market. Work is currently being conducted on AM technologies at the ORNL

  16. Additives in fibers and fabrics.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, R H

    1975-01-01

    The additives and contaminants which occur in textile fibers vary widely, depending on the type of fiber and the pretreatment which it has received. Synthetic fibers such as nylon and polyester contain trace amounts of contaminants such as catalysts and catalyst deactivators which remain after the synthesis of the basic polymers. In addition, there are frequently a number of materials which are added to perform specific functions in almost all man-made fibers. Examples of these would include traces of metals or metal salts used as tracers for identification of specific lots of fiber, TiO2 or similar materials added as delustrants, and a host of organic species added for such special purposes as antistatic agents or flame retardants. There may also be considerable quantities of residual monomer or small oligomers dissolved in the polymer matrix. The situation becomes even more complex after the fibers are converted into fabric form. Numerous materials are applied at various stages of fabric preparation to act as lubricants, sizing agents, antistats, bleaches, and wetting agents to facilitate the processing, but these are normally removed before the fabric reaches the cutters of the ultimate consumers and therefore usually do not constitute potential hazards. However, there are many other chemical agents which are frequently added during the later stages of fabric preparation and which are not designed to be removed. Aside from dyes and printing pigments, the most common additive for apparel fabrics is a durable press treatment. This generally involves the use of materials capable of crosslinking cellulosics by reacting through such functions as N-methylolated amides or related compounds such as ureas and carbamates. These materials pose some potential hazards due to both the nitrogenous bases and the formaldehyde which they usually release. There is usually also some residual catalyst in fabrics which have received such treatments. Other types of chemical treatments

  17. Prediction of RNA binding sites in a protein using SVM and PSSM profile.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish; Gromiha, M Michael; Raghava, G P S

    2008-04-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play key roles in post-transcriptional control of gene expression, which, along with transcriptional regulation, is a major way to regulate patterns of gene expression during development. Thus, the identification and prediction of RNA binding sites is an important step in comprehensive understanding of how RBPs control organism development. Combining evolutionary information and support vector machine (SVM), we have developed an improved method for predicting RNA binding sites or RNA interacting residues in a protein sequence. The prediction models developed in this study have been trained and tested on 86 RNA binding protein chains and evaluated using fivefold cross validation technique. First, a SVM model was developed that achieved a maximum Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.31. The performance of this SVM model further improved the MCC from 0.31 to 0.45, when multiple sequence alignment in the form of PSSM profiles was used as input to the SVM, which is far better than the maximum MCC achieved by previous methods (0.41) on the same dataset. In addition, SVM models were also developed on an alternative dataset that contained 107 RBP chains. Utilizing PSSM as input information to the SVM, the training/testing on this alternate dataset achieved a maximum MCC of 0.32. Conclusively, the prediction performance of SVM models developed in this study is better than the existing methods on the same datasets. A web server 'Pprint' was also developed for predicting RNA binding residues in a protein sequence which is freely available at http://www.imtech.res.in/raghava/pprint/.

  18. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact

    PubMed Central

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system. PMID:26601039

  19. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact.

    PubMed

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system.

  20. Optics of progressive addition lenses.

    PubMed

    Sheedy, J E; Buri, M; Bailey, I L; Azus, J; Borish, I M

    1987-02-01

    The optical characteristics of the major progressive addition lenses were measured using an automated lensometer with a specially designed lens holder to simulate eye rotation. Measurements were made every 3 degrees (about 1.5 mm) and graphs of isospherical equivalent lines and isocylinder lines were developed. Generally the near zone of these lenses is narrower and lower than in bifocal or trifocal lenses. Distinct differences exist between the various progressive lenses. The width of the near zone, rate of power progression, amount of unwanted cylinder (level with the distance center), and clarity of the distance zone are compared for the various lenses. The optical measurements demonstrate an apparent trade-off between the size of the cylinder-free area of the lens and the amount of the cylinder.

  1. Report on July 2015 Additional Protocol Coordinators Best Practices Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Gitau, Ernest T.N.; Burbank, Roberta L.; Finch, Valerie A.

    2016-07-31

    After 10 years of implementation experience, the Office of Nonproliferation and Arms Control (NPAC) within the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) conducted the Additional Protocol (AP) Coordinators Best Practices Workshop at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from July 29-30, 2015. The goal of this workshop was to identify implementation best practices, lessons learned, and compliance challenges from the various Additional Protocol Coordinators (APCs) at each laboratory in the DOE/NNSA complex and associated sites. The workshop provided the opportunity for participants to share their insights and establish networks that APCs can utilize to continue to discuss challenges (new and old), identify best practices, and enhance communication and coordination for reporting multi-lab research projects during review activities. Workshop participants included DOE/NNSA HQ, laboratory and site APCs, seasoned experts, members of the original implementation outreach team, and Field Element and site security representatives.

  2. The AASTINO: Automated Astrophysical Site Testing INvincible Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, J. S.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Burton, M. G.; Calisse, P. G.; Dempsey, J. T.; Everett, J. R.; Maher, O.; Storey, J. W. V.; Travouillon, T.

    The AASTINO is a remote observatory that has been deployed at the Italian/French base Dome C (75 S, 123 E, 3200 m) on the Antarctic plateau in January 2003. It is designed to run throughout the Antarctic winter without intervention. An extensive site testing program at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole station has shown that the atmosphere above the Antarctic plateau offers major benefits for performing astronomical observations in the infrared and submillimetre. The purpose of the AASTINO is to extend these site testing studies to Dome C, where it is believed even better conditions will be found. Data are available in real time (www.phys.unsw.edu.au/ ~ mcba/aastino).

  3. 3. VIEW OF NORTHEAST ELEVATION AND 19061010 ONESTORY SHED ADDITION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF NORTHEAST ELEVATION AND 1906-1010 ONE-STORY SHED ADDITION AT LEFT; NORTHWEST ELEVATION AND PARKING AREA AT RIGHT; PARKING AREA WAS SITE OF FORMER STOREHOUSE 'A' AND 'B'; LANE AT LEFT IS NORTH DRIVEWAY, BUILT CA. 1935 - Massachusetts Mills, Cloth Room-Section 15, 95 Bridge Street, Lowell, Middlesex County, MA

  4. Use of Additives in Bioremediation of Contaminated Groundwater and Soil

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter reviews application of additives used in bioremediation of chlorinated solvents and fuels for groundwater and soil remediation. Soluble carbon substrates are applicable to most site conditions except aquifers with very high or very low groundwater flow. Slow-release ...

  5. Virtual reality simulation mechanism on WWW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Feng, Yuncheng; Wei, Youshuang

    2000-06-01

    This paper addresses a fundamental, easy but powerful mechanism of Virtual Reality Simulation system on World Wide Web. The basic idea is to use Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) to build the virtual world, and design a specific simulator to complete the common simulation work and drive the VR animation. According to the achievable mathematics and animation function, two types of this VR Simulation system are founded. The first one is to use VRMLScript or JavaScript to code the specific simulator. This mechanism really can be realized, however, the mathematical operations and the simulation model scale are limited. The other is to apply Java for coding the simulator, then use HTML to combine the VR scene and the simulator in the same WebPage, which can harmonize the VR animation running according to the simulation logic. Because Java is fully mathematics functioned and the Java code modules are entirely reusable, this VR simulation system, which is mainly recommended, can be easily realized on desktop PC and meet the basic interactive requirements of VR Technology without any extra hardware. A VR M/M/1/k Queuing simulation system is given to explain the mechanism. Finally, the overall Integrated Development Environment for this VR simulation system is also discussed.

  6. Adding Graphics to Your WWW Page.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Descy, Don E.

    1995-01-01

    Explains how to retrieve graphics that are available on the World Wide Web and add them to a Web page using a word processor that can save documents in an ASCII (American Standard Code Information Interchange) text format and a new version of Netscape. A list of various, unrelated Internet resources is also included. (LRW)

  7. WWW Technologies and Adult Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Bruce; Yiu, S. M.

    Adult continuing education (ACE) has different audiences and characteristics than distance learning and full-time education. The University of Hong Kong is regarded as the leading provider of ACE through the programs offered by the School of Professional and Continuing Education (SPACE). To maintain that position, SPACE's challenge is to develop…

  8. Double tracks test site characterization report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    This report presents the results of site characterization activities performed at the Double Tracks Test Site, located on Range 71 North, of the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR) in southern Nevada. Site characterization activities included reviewing historical data from the Double Tracks experiment, previous site investigation efforts, and recent site characterization data. The most recent site characterization activities were conducted in support of an interim corrective action to remediate the Double Tracks Test Site to an acceptable risk to human health and the environment. Site characterization was performed using a phased approach. First, previously collected data and historical records sere compiled and reviewed. Generalized scopes of work were then prepared to fill known data gaps. Field activities were conducted and the collected data were then reviewed to determine whether data gaps were filled and whether other areas needed to be investigated. Additional field efforts were then conducted, as required, to adequately characterize the site. Characterization of the Double Tracks Test Site was conducted in accordance with the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER).

  9. Implications of NGA for NEHRP site coefficients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borcherdt, Roger D.

    2012-01-01

    Three proposals are provided to update tables 11.4-1 and 11.4-2 of Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures (7-10), by the American Society of Civil Engineers (2010) (ASCE/SEI 7-10), with site coefficients implied directly by NGA (Next Generation Attenuation) ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs). Proposals include a recommendation to use straight-line interpolation to infer site coefficients at intermediate values of ̅vs (average shear velocity). Site coefficients are recommended to ensure consistency with ASCE/SEI 7-10 MCER (Maximum Considered Earthquake) seismic-design maps and simplified site-specific design spectra procedures requiring site classes with associated tabulated site coefficients and a reference site class with unity site coefficients. Recommended site coefficients are confirmed by independent observations of average site amplification coefficients inferred with respect to an average ground condition consistent with that used for the MCER maps. The NGA coefficients recommended for consideration are implied directly by the NGA GMPEs and do not require introduction of additional models.

  10. Web Site Usability: First, Ignore the Science.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pharris, K.

    2005-12-01

    Web sites within our industry serve complex information to a gamut of user audiences that are constantly evolving, making effective site design a challenge. In addition, the average lifecycle of a Web site is 2-3 years. If a site is to maintain user satisfaction and technical usability, revision is inevitable. Effective revision begins with the ability to clearly identify the successes and failures of your current site's usability. To do this, you must first ignore the science - -you must address those Web characteristics that have emerged through years of testing as indicators of usability, regardless of the site's target audiences or content. If you cannot successfully execute the basic principles of usability, any work completed to meet the specific needs of your scientific community will be ineffective. A checklist of usability principles can be used to objectively score your site's excellent or poor execution of such Web site features. With quantifiable results, you have an impartial measure of your current site's usability from which a prioritized list of recommended revisions can be created. You can find checklists of this nature, or the information you need to create a list for your organization, with some online and print investigation. This session will provide checklist examples and an explanation of how to use checklists to achieve basic Web site usability.

  11. KSC Vertical Launch Site Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Lynne V.

    2007-01-01

    RS&H was tasked to evaluate the potential available launch sites for a combined two user launch pad. The Launch sites were to be contained entirely within current Kennedy Space Center property lines. The user launch vehicles to be used for evaluation are in the one million pounds of first stage thrust range. Additionally a second evaluation criterion was added early on in the study. A single user launch site was to be evaluated for a two million pound first stage thrust vehicle. Both scenarios were to be included in the report. To provide fidelity to the study criteria, a specific launch vehicle in the one million pound thrust range was chosen as a guide post or straw-man launch vehicle. The RpK K-1 vehicle is a current Commercial Orbital Transportation System (COTS), contract awardee along with the SpaceX Falcon 9 vehicle. SpaceX, at the time of writing, is planning to launch COTS and possibly other payloads from Cx-40 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station property. RpK has yet to declare a specific launch site as their east coast US launch location. As such it was deemed appropriate that RpK's vehicle requirements be used as conceptual criteria. For the purposes of this study those criteria were marginally generalized to make them less specifiC.

  12. TOPOGRAPHIC SITE RESPONSE AT HARD ROCK SITES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, A. K.; Hough, S. E.

    2009-12-01

    Site (material impedance) and topographic (geometric form) effects are known to be key factors that influence seismic ground motions. To characterize site effects, Yong et al. (2009) developed a terrain-based Vs30 prediction model using an automated classification method (Iwahashi and Pike, 2007) that relied on taxonomic criteria (slope gradient, local convexity and surface texture) developed from geomorphometry to identify 16 terrain types from a 1-km spatial resolution (SRTM30 data) digital elevation model of California. On the basis that the underlying framework for this model contains parameters (esp., local convexity) which aptly describe the geometry (i.e., base to height ratio) of relief features that are known to also control the behavior of ground motions (Bouchon, 1973), we extend our investigation to study topographic effects. Focusing on sites that would generally be considered “hard rock,” the classification scheme distinguishes 7 separate terrain types ranging from “moderately eroded mountains” to “well dissected alpine summits.” Observed 1-Hz amplification factors at Southern California Seismographic Network sites reveal a weak but systematic correlation with these 7 terrain types. Significant scatter is also found within each terrain type; typical standard deviations of logarithmic amplification factors are 0.2-0.3. Considering stations that have high amplification factors, we find some that have apparently been misclassified due to data resolution limitations. Many of the remaining stations with higher than expected amplifications are located on or near topographic peaks or ridges. The unusually high amplification factors at hard-rock sites, typically factors of 1.5-2, can most plausibly be explained as a topographic effect.

  13. Viking landing sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panagakos, N.

    1973-01-01

    A valley near the mouth of the 20,000-foot-deep Martian Grand Canyon has been chosen by NASA as the site of its first automated landing on the planet Mars. The landing site for the second mission of the 1975-76 Viking spacecraft will probably be an area about 1,000 miles northeast of the first site, where the likelihood of water increases the chances of finding evidence of life.

  14. Site environmental report summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    In this summary of the Fernald 1992 Site Environmental Report the authors will describe the impact of the Fernald site on man and the environment and provide results from the ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included is a summary of the data obtained from sampling conducted to determine if the site complies with DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA) requirements. These requirements are set to protect both man and the environment.

  15. Site environmental programs

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J.W.; Hanf, R.W.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the site environmental programs. Effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs monitor for impacts from operations in several areas. The first area consists of the point of possible release into the environment. The second area consists of possible contamination adjacent to DOE facilities, and the third area is the general environment both on and off the site.

  16. Additively manufactured porous tantalum implants.

    PubMed

    Wauthle, Ruben; van der Stok, Johan; Amin Yavari, Saber; Van Humbeeck, Jan; Kruth, Jean-Pierre; Zadpoor, Amir Abbas; Weinans, Harrie; Mulier, Michiel; Schrooten, Jan

    2015-03-01

    The medical device industry's interest in open porous, metallic biomaterials has increased in response to additive manufacturing techniques enabling the production of complex shapes that cannot be produced with conventional techniques. Tantalum is an important metal for medical devices because of its good biocompatibility. In this study selective laser melting technology was used for the first time to manufacture highly porous pure tantalum implants with fully interconnected open pores. The architecture of the porous structure in combination with the material properties of tantalum result in mechanical properties close to those of human bone and allow for bone ingrowth. The bone regeneration performance of the porous tantalum was evaluated in vivo using an orthotopic load-bearing bone defect model in the rat femur. After 12 weeks, substantial bone ingrowth, good quality of the regenerated bone and a strong, functional implant-bone interface connection were observed. Compared to identical porous Ti-6Al-4V structures, laser-melted tantalum shows excellent osteoconductive properties, has a higher normalized fatigue strength and allows for more plastic deformation due to its high ductility. It is therefore concluded that this is a first step towards a new generation of open porous tantalum implants manufactured using selective laser melting.

  17. Additive Transforms Paint into Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Tech Traders Inc. sought assistance developing low-cost, highly effective coatings and paints that created useful thermal reflectance and were safe and non-toxic. In cooperation with a group of engineers at Kennedy Space Center., Tech Traders created Insuladd, a powder additive made up of microscopic, inert gas-filled, ceramic microspheres that can be mixed into ordinary interior or exterior paint, allowing the paint to act like a layer of insulation. When the paint dries, this forms a radiant heat barrier, turning the ordinary house paint into heat-reflecting thermal paint. According to Tech Traders, the product works with all types of paints and coatings and will not change the coverage rate, application, or adhesion of the paint. Other useful applications include feed storage silos to help prevent feed spoilage, poultry hatcheries to reduce the summer heat and winter cold effects, and on military vehicles and ships. Tech Traders has continued its connection to the aerospace community by recently providing Lockheed Martin Corporation with one of its thermal products for use on the F-22 Raptor.

  18. Sustainability Characterization for Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Mahesh; Lyons, Kevin W; Gupta, SK

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to create geometrically complex parts that require a high degree of customization, using less material and producing less waste. Recent studies have shown that AM can be an economically viable option for use by the industry, yet there are some inherent challenges associated with AM for wider acceptance. The lack of standards in AM impedes its use for parts production since industries primarily depend on established standards in processes and material selection to ensure the consistency and quality. Inability to compare AM performance against traditional manufacturing methods can be a barrier for implementing AM processes. AM process sustainability has become a driver due to growing environmental concerns for manufacturing. This has reinforced the importance to understand and characterize AM processes for sustainability. Process characterization for sustainability will help close the gaps for comparing AM performance to traditional manufacturing methods. Based on a literature review, this paper first examines the potential environmental impacts of AM. A methodology for sustainability characterization of AM is then proposed to serve as a resource for the community to benchmark AM processes for sustainability. Next, research perspectives are discussed along with relevant standardization efforts. PMID:26601038

  19. Sustainability Characterization for Additive Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Mani, Mahesh; Lyons, Kevin W; Gupta, S K

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to create geometrically complex parts that require a high degree of customization, using less material and producing less waste. Recent studies have shown that AM can be an economically viable option for use by the industry, yet there are some inherent challenges associated with AM for wider acceptance. The lack of standards in AM impedes its use for parts production since industries primarily depend on established standards in processes and material selection to ensure the consistency and quality. Inability to compare AM performance against traditional manufacturing methods can be a barrier for implementing AM processes. AM process sustainability has become a driver due to growing environmental concerns for manufacturing. This has reinforced the importance to understand and characterize AM processes for sustainability. Process characterization for sustainability will help close the gaps for comparing AM performance to traditional manufacturing methods. Based on a literature review, this paper first examines the potential environmental impacts of AM. A methodology for sustainability characterization of AM is then proposed to serve as a resource for the community to benchmark AM processes for sustainability. Next, research perspectives are discussed along with relevant standardization efforts.

  20. Dynamics of ultrasonic additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Hehr, Adam; Dapino, Marcelo J

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) is a solid-state technology for joining similar and dissimilar metal foils near room temperature by scrubbing them together with ultrasonic vibrations under pressure. Structural dynamics of the welding assembly and work piece influence how energy is transferred during the process and ultimately, part quality. To understand the effect of structural dynamics during UAM, a linear time-invariant model is proposed to relate the inputs of shear force and electric current to resultant welder velocity and voltage. Measured frequency response and operating performance of the welder under no load is used to identify model parameters. Using this model and in-situ measurements, shear force and welder efficiency are estimated to be near 2000N and 80% when welding Al 6061-H18 weld foil, respectively. Shear force and welder efficiency have never been estimated before in UAM. The influence of processing conditions, i.e., welder amplitude, normal force, and weld speed, on shear force and welder efficiency are investigated. Welder velocity was found to strongly influence the shear force magnitude and efficiency while normal force and weld speed showed little to no influence. The proposed model is used to describe high frequency harmonic content in the velocity response of the welder during welding operations and coupling of the UAM build with the welder.

  1. Dimensionless numbers in additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, T.; Manvatkar, V.; De, A.; DebRoy, T.

    2017-02-01

    The effects of many process variables and alloy properties on the structure and properties of additively manufactured parts are examined using four dimensionless numbers. The structure and properties of components made from 316 Stainless steel, Ti-6Al-4V, and Inconel 718 powders for various dimensionless heat inputs, Peclet numbers, Marangoni numbers, and Fourier numbers are studied. Temperature fields, cooling rates, solidification parameters, lack of fusion defects, and thermal strains are examined using a well-tested three-dimensional transient heat transfer and fluid flow model. The results show that lack of fusion defects in the fabricated parts can be minimized by strengthening interlayer bonding using high values of dimensionless heat input. The formation of harmful intermetallics such as laves phases in Inconel 718 can be suppressed using low heat input that results in a small molten pool, a steep temperature gradient, and a fast cooling rate. Improved interlayer bonding can be achieved at high Marangoni numbers, which results in vigorous circulation of liquid metal, larger pool dimensions, and greater depth of penetration. A high Fourier number ensures rapid cooling, low thermal distortion, and a high ratio of temperature gradient to the solidification growth rate with a greater tendency of plane front solidification.

  2. Children's understanding of additive concepts.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Katherine M; Dubé, Adam K; Beatch, Jacqueline-Ann

    2017-04-01

    Most research on children's arithmetic concepts is based on one concept at a time, limiting the conclusions that can be made about how children's conceptual knowledge of arithmetic develops. This study examined six arithmetic concepts (identity, negation, commutativity, equivalence, inversion, and addition and subtraction associativity) in Grades 3, 4, and 5. Identity (a-0=a) and negation (a-a=0) were well understood, followed by moderate understanding of commutativity (a+b=b+a) and inversion (a+b-b=a), with weak understanding of equivalence (a+b+c=a+[b+c]) and associativity (a+b-c=[b-c]+a). Understanding increased across grade only for commutativity and equivalence. Four clusters were found: The Weak Concept cluster understood only identity and negation; the Two-Term Concept cluster also understood commutativity; the Inversion Concept cluster understood identity, negation, and inversion; and the Strong Concept cluster had the strongest understanding of all of the concepts. Grade 3 students tended to be in the Weak and Inversion Concept clusters, Grade 4 students were equally likely to be in any of the clusters, and Grade 5 students were most likely to be in the Two-Term and Strong Concept clusters. The findings of this study highlight that conclusions about the development of arithmetic concepts are highly dependent on which concepts are being assessed and underscore the need for multiple concepts to be investigated at the same time.

  3. 1994 Site environmental report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    The Fernald site is a Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facility that produced high-quality uranium metals for military defense for nearly 40 years. DOE suspended production at the site in 1989 and formally ended production in 1991. Although production activities have ceased, the site continues to examine the air and liquid pathways as possible routes through which pollutants from past operations and current remedial activities may leave the site. The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program. This 1994 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the site`s progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in this Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish to read more detailed descriptions of the information than those which are presented here. All information presented in this summary is discussed more fully in the main body of this report.

  4. Surgical Site Infections

    PubMed Central

    Kleinman, Ken; Huang, Susan S.; Murphy, Michael V.; Yokoe, Deborah S.; Platt, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Background: Surgical site infection (SSI) rates are publicly reported as quality metrics and increasingly used to determine financial reimbursement. Objective: To evaluate the volume-outcome relationship as well as the year-to-year stability of performance rankings following coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery and hip arthroplasty. Research Design: We performed a retrospective cohort study of Medicare beneficiaries who underwent CABG surgery or hip arthroplasty at US hospitals from 2005 to 2011, with outcomes analyzed through March 2012. Nationally validated claims-based surveillance methods were used to assess for SSI within 90 days of surgery. The relationship between procedure volume and SSI rate was assessed using logistic regression and generalized additive modeling. Year-to-year stability of SSI rates was evaluated using logistic regression to assess hospitals’ movement in and out of performance rankings linked to financial penalties. Results: Case-mix adjusted SSI risk based on claims was highest in hospitals performing <50 CABG/year and <200 hip arthroplasty/year compared with hospitals performing ≥200 procedures/year. At that same time, hospitals in the worst quartile in a given year based on claims had a low probability of remaining in that quartile the following year. This probability increased with volume, and when using 2 years’ experience, but the highest probabilities were only 0.59 for CABG (95% confidence interval, 0.52–0.66) and 0.48 for hip arthroplasty (95% confidence interval, 0.42–0.55). Conclusions: Aggregate SSI risk is highest in hospitals with low annual procedure volumes, yet these hospitals are currently excluded from quality reporting. Even for higher volume hospitals, year-to-year random variation makes past experience an unreliable estimator of current performance. PMID:27517331

  5. Additive Construction using Basalt Regolith Fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Sibille, Laurent; Hintze, Paul E.; Lippitt, Thomas C.; Mantovani, James G.; Nugent, Matthew W.; Townsend, Ivan I.

    2014-01-01

    Planetary surfaces are often covered in regolith (crushed rock), whose geologic origin is largely basalt. The lunar surface is made of small-particulate regolith and areas of boulders located in the vicinity of craters. Regolith composition also varies with location, reflecting the local bedrock geology and the nature and efficiency of the micrometeorite-impact processes. In the lowland mare areas (suitable for habitation), the regolith is composed of small granules (20 - 100 microns average size) of mare basalt and volcanic glass. Impacting micrometeorites may cause local melting, and the formation of larger glassy particles, and this regolith may contain 10-80% glass. Studies of lunar regolith are traditionally conducted with lunar regolith simulant (reconstructed soil with compositions patterned after the lunar samples returned by Apollo). The NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Granular Mechanics & Regolith Operations (GMRO) lab has identified a low fidelity but economical geo-technical simulant designated as Black Point-1 (BP-1). It was found at the site of the Arizona Desert Research and Technology Studies (RATS) analog field test site at the Black Point lava flow in adjacent basalt quarry spoil mounds. This paper summarizes activities at KSC regarding the utilization of BP-1 basalt regolith and comparative work with lunar basalt simulant JSC-1A as a building material for robotic additive construction of large structures. In an effort to reduce the import or in-situ fabrication of binder additives, we focused this work on in-situ processing of regolith for construction in a single-step process after its excavation. High-temperature melting of regolith involves techniques used in glassmaking and casting (with melts of lower density and higher viscosity than those of metals), producing basaltic glass with high durability and low abrasive wear. Most Lunar simulants melt at temperatures above 1100 C, although melt processing of terrestrial regolith at 1500 C is not

  6. 78 FR 52759 - Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 75 Under Alternative Site Framework; Phoenix, Arizona

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-26

    ... ASF to include an additional magnet site, proposed Site 9, within the Phoenix, Arizona U.S. Customs...,000-acre activation limit for the zone, and to a five-year ASF sunset provision for magnet sites...

  7. The contribution of atom accessibility to site of metabolism models for cytochromes P450.

    PubMed

    Rydberg, Patrik; Rostkowski, Michal; Gloriam, David E; Olsen, Lars

    2013-04-01

    Three different types of atom accessibility descriptors are investigated in relation to site of metabolism predictions. To enable the integration of local accessibility we have constructed 2DSASA, a method for the calculation of the atomic solvent accessible surface area that is independent of 3D coordinates. The method was implemented in the SMARTCyp site of metabolism prediction models and improved the results by up to 4 percentage points for nine cytochrome P450 isoforms. The final models are made available at http://www.farma.ku.dk/smartcyp.

  8. Installing a Local Copy of the Reactome Web Site and Knowledgebase.

    PubMed

    McKay, Sheldon J; Weiser, Joel

    2015-06-19

    The Reactome project builds, maintains, and publishes a knowledgebase of biological pathways. The information in the knowledgebase is gathered from the experts in the field, peer reviewed and edited by Reactome editorial staff, and then published to the Reactome Web site, http://www.reactome.org. The Reactome software is open source and builds on top of other open-source or freely available software. Reactome data and code can be freely downloaded in its entirety and the Web site installed locally. This allows for more flexible interrogation of the data and also makes it possible to add one's own information to the knowledgebase.

  9. Savannah River Site's Site Specific Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities that were identified during the preparation of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) for FY 1992--1996. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. The purpose of the SSP is to develop a baseline for policy, budget, and schedules for the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities. The plan explains accomplishments since the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 plan, demonstrates how present and future activities are prioritized, identifies currently funded activities and activities that are planned to be funded in the upcoming fiscal year, and describes future activities that SRS is considering.

  10. Search for associated Higgs boson production WH ---> WWW* ---> l+- nu l-prime+- nu-prime + X in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota

    2006-07-01

    The authors present a search for associated Higgs boson production in the process p{bar p} {yields} WH {yields} WWW* {yields} {ell}{sup {+-}}{nu} {ell}{prime}{sup {+-}} {nu}{prime} + X in final states containing two like-sign isolated electrons or muons (e{sup {+-}}e{sup {+-}}, e{sup {+-}} {mu}{sup {+-}}, or {mu}{sup {+-}} {mu}{sup {+-}}). The search is based on D0 Run II data samples corresponding to integrated luminosities of 360-380 pb{sup -1}. No excess is observed over the predicted standard model background. They set 95% C.L. upper limits on {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} WH) x Br(H {yields} WW*) between 3.2 and 2.8 pb for Higgs masses from 115 to 175 GeV.

  11. Additives In Meat and Poultry Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... What is a food additive? What is a "direct" food additive? What is an 'indirect" food additive? ... convenience foods. [ Top of Page ] What is a “direct” food additive? According to the FDA, “Direct food ...

  12. Site characterization handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    This Handbook discusses both management and technical elements that should be considered in developing a comprehensive site characterization program. Management elements typical of any project of a comparable magnitude and complexity are combined with a discussion of strategies specific to site characterization. Information specific to the technical elements involved in site characterization is based on guidance published by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with respect to licensing requirements for LLW disposal facilities. The objective of this Handbook is to provide a reference for both NRC Agreement States and non-Agreement States for use in developing a comprehensive site characterization program that meets the specific objectives of the State and/or site developer/licensee. Each site characterization program will vary depending on the objectives, licensing requirements, schedules/budgets, physical characteristics of the site, proposed facility design, and the specific concerns raised by government agencies and the public. Therefore, the Handbook is not a prescriptive guide to site characterization. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Tremont Field Site

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Tremont Field Site is a 41.5-acre public park located northeast of the intersection of West 11th Street and Clark Avenue in Cleveland, Ohio. Through two deed transfers in 1948 and 1949, the City acquired the site from the United States Government.

  14. Plugged-in SITE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Rhys

    2003-01-01

    Examines form, color, and technology at the University of Ottawa's School of Information Technology and Engineering (SITE) building, focusing on systems (e.g., SITE is a data wired building, but with no expensive raised floors or cheap dropped ceilings); assembly rather than construction (replacing standard notions of construction with the process…

  15. SAMPLING OF CONTAMINATED SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A critical aspect of characterization of the amount and species of contamination of a hazardous waste site is the sampling plan developed for that site. f the sampling plan is not thoroughly conceptualized before sampling takes place, then certain critical aspects of the limits o...

  16. Commercial Web Site Links.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thelwall, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Discusses business use of the Web and related search engine design issues as well as research on general and academic links before reporting on a survey of the links published by a collection of business Web sites. Results indicate around 66% of Web sites do carry external links, most of which are targeted at a specific purpose, but about 17%…

  17. The Iowa Validation Site

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remote sensing can be used to observe the land surface hydrologic cycle, but the quantitative aspects of these observations are not well known. We present a small (1 km^2) experimental validation site, the Iowa Validation Site. Initially we have focused on validating remotely-sensed observations of ...

  18. Site Planning and Layout.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Gary T.

    1998-01-01

    Examines five issues related to child care facility design: (1) siting the building, outdoor play, and service areas; (2) creating favorable microclimates; (3) developmentally appropriate play yards; (4) pedestrian access and site circulation; and (5) vehicular access and parking away from pedestrians and play. (KB)

  19. Sites of the Holocaust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCleary, George F., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a map of Europe identifying the location of major concentration camps, extermination camps, and massacre sites during World War II. Maintains that only a few of the over 400 sites in the former Soviet Union where entire Jewish villages were exterminated are shown. (CFR)

  20. 24 CFR 891.320 - Site and neighborhood standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Site and neighborhood standards... Section 811 Supportive Housing for Persons With Disabilities § 891.320 Site and neighborhood standards. In addition to the requirements in § 891.125 and § 891.680, if applicable, the following site and...

  1. 24 CFR 891.320 - Site and neighborhood standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Site and neighborhood standards... Section 811 Supportive Housing for Persons With Disabilities § 891.320 Site and neighborhood standards. In addition to the requirements in § 891.125 and § 891.680, if applicable, the following site and...

  2. 24 CFR 891.320 - Site and neighborhood standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Site and neighborhood standards... Section 811 Supportive Housing for Persons With Disabilities § 891.320 Site and neighborhood standards. In addition to the requirements in § 891.125 and § 891.680, if applicable, the following site and...

  3. Site decommissioning management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Fauver, D.N.; Austin, J.H.; Johnson, T.C.; Weber, M.F.; Cardile, F.P.; Martin, D.E.; Caniano, R.J.; Kinneman, J.D.

    1993-10-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has identified 48 sites contaminated with radioactive material that require special attention to ensure timely decommissioning. While none of these sites represent an immediate threat to public health and safety they have contamination that exceeds existing NRC criteria for unrestricted use. All of these sites require some degree of remediation, and several involve regulatory issues that must be addressed by the Commission before they can be released for unrestricted use and the applicable licenses terminated. This report contains the NRC staff`s strategy for addressing the technical, legal, and policy issues affecting the timely decommissioning of the 48 sites and describes the status of decommissioning activities at the sites.

  4. Site directed recombination

    DOEpatents

    Jurka, Jerzy W.

    1997-01-01

    Enhanced homologous recombination is obtained by employing a consensus sequence which has been found to be associated with integration of repeat sequences, such as Alu and ID. The consensus sequence or sequence having a single transition mutation determines one site of a double break which allows for high efficiency of integration at the site. By introducing single or double stranded DNA having the consensus sequence flanking region joined to a sequence of interest, one can reproducibly direct integration of the sequence of interest at one or a limited number of sites. In this way, specific sites can be identified and homologous recombination achieved at the site by employing a second flanking sequence associated with a sequence proximal to the 3'-nick.

  5. CUES - A Study Site for Measuring Snowpack Energy Balance in the Sierra Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bair, Edward; Dozier, Jeff; Davis, Robert; Colee, Michael; Claffey, Keran

    2015-09-01

    Accurate measurement and modeling of the snowpack energy balance are critical to understanding the terrestrial water cycle. Most of the water resources in the western US come from snowmelt, yet statistical runoff models that rely on the historical record are becoming less reliable because of a changing climate. For physically based snow melt models that do not depend on past conditions, ground based measurements of the energy balance components are imperative for verification. For this purpose, the US Army Corps of Engineers Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) and the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) established the “CUES” snow study site (CRREL/UCSB Energy Site, http://www.snow.ucsb.edu/) at 2940 m elevation on Mammoth Mountain, California. We describe CUES, provide an overview of research, share our experience with scientific measurements, and encourage future collaborative research. Snow measurements began near the current CUES site for ski area operations in 1969. In the 1970s, researchers began taking scientific measurements. Today, CUES benefits from year round gondola access and a fiber optic internet connection. Data loggers and computers automatically record and store over 100 measurements from more than 50 instruments each minute. CUES is one of only five high altitude mountain sites in the Western US where a full suite of energy balance components are measured. In addition to measuring snow on the ground at multiple locations, extensive radiometric and meteorological measurements are recorded. Some of the more novel measurements include scans by an automated terrestrial LiDAR, passive and active microwave imaging of snow stratigraphy, microscopic imaging of snow grains, snowflake imaging with a multi-angle camera, fluxes from upward and downward looking radiometers, snow water equivalent from different types of snow pillows, snowmelt from lysimeters, and concentration of impurities in the snowpack. We give an

  6. Complementing computationally predicted regulatory sites in Tractor_DB using a pattern matching approach.

    PubMed

    Guía, Marylens Hernández; Pérez, Abel González; Angarica, Vladimir Espinosa; Vasconcelos, Ana T; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2005-01-01

    Prokaryotic genomes annotation has focused on genes location and function. The lack of regulatory information has limited the knowledge on cellular transcriptional regulatory networks. However, as more phylogenetically close genomes are sequenced and annotated, the implementation of phylogenetic footprinting strategies for the recognition of regulators and their regulons becomes more important. In this paper we describe a comparative genomics approach to the prediction of new gamma-proteobacterial regulon members. We take advantage of the phylogenetic proximity of Escherichia coli and other 16 organisms of this subdivision and the intensive search of the space sequence provided by a pattern-matching strategy. Using this approach we complement predictions of regulatory sites made using statistical models currently stored in Tractor_DB, and increase the number of transcriptional regulators with predicted binding sites up to 86. All these computational predictions may be reached at Tractor_DB (www.bioinfo.cu/Tractor_DB, www.tractor.lncc.br, www.ccg.unam.mx/Computational_Genomics/tractorDB/). We also take a first step in this paper towards the assessment of the conservation of the architecture of the regulatory network in the gamma-proteobacteria through evaluating the conservation of the overall connectivity of the network.

  7. Lunar Polar Landing Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamps, Oscar; Foing, Bernard H.; Flahaut, Jessica

    2016-07-01

    An important step for a scientific mission is to assess on where the mission should be conducted. This study on landing site selection focuses on a mission to the poles of the Moon where an in-situ mission should be conducted to answer the questions with respect to volatiles and ices. The European interest for a mission to the poles of the Moon is presented in the mission concept called Heracles. This mission would be a tele-operated, sample return mission where astronauts will controlling a rover from an Orion capsule in cislunar orbit. The primary selection of landing sites was based on the scientific interest of areas near the poles. The maximum temperature map from Diviner was used to select sites where CO^2¬ should always be stable. This means that the maximum temperature is lower than 54K which is the sublimation temperature for CO^2¬ in lunar atmospheric pressure. Around these areas 14 potential regions of interest were selected. Further selection was based on the epoch of the surface in these regions of interest. It was thought that it would be of high scientific value if sites are sampled which have another epoch than already sampled by one of the Apollo or Luna missions. Only 6 sites on both North as South Pole could contain stable CO^2 ¬and were older than (Pre-)Necterian. Before a landing site and rover traverse was planned these six sites were compared on their accessibility of the areas which could contain stable CO^2. It was assumed that slope lower than 20^o is doable to rove. Eventually Amundsen and Rozhdestvenskiy West were selected as regions of interest. Assumptions for selecting landing sites was that area should have a slope lower than 5^o, a diameter of 1km, in partial illuminated area, and should not be isolated but inside an area which is in previous steps marked as accessible area to rove. By using multiple tools in ArcGIS it is possible to present the area's which were marked as potential landing sites. The closest potential landing

  8. HEPA Filter Use at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Kriskovich, J. R.

    2002-02-28

    High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters are relied upon at the Hanford site to support several different activities. Each facility relies upon the filters to provide the same function; remove radioactive particulate from various air streams. However, HEPA filters are operated in differing environmental conditions from one facility to another and the constituents in the air streams also differ. In addition, some HEPA filters at the Hanford site have been in service for several years. As a result, an assessment was performed which evaluated the service life and conditions of the HEPA filters at the Hanford site.

  9. Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition

    SciTech Connect

    Popple, Richard A. Brezovich, Ivan A.; Fiveash, John B.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. Results: In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. Conclusions: For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify

  10. Mineral Resources Survey, Seven Additional Valleys, Nevada/Utah Siting Area. Volume III.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-23

    rocks cc Intermediate volcanic rocks S"T" . Silicic volcanic rocks - includes shallow intrusives Intrusive rocks undifferentiated, mainly granodiorite and...mainly granodiorite and quartz monzonite ; Older volcanic rocks, undifferentiated 0 J :i. Intrusive rocks, undifferentiated N-o JURASSIC -J Sandstone 11W...intrusives Oddie Rhyolite ly granodiorite and one Newark Canyon Fmn. d quartz-monzonite conglomeratic sandstone Excelsior Fm., Luning Fm. ne, typically red

  11. Nitroxide polymer networks formed by Michael addition: on site-cured electrode-active organic coating.

    PubMed

    Ibe, Takeshi; Frings, Rainer B; Lachowicz, Artur; Kyo, Soichi; Nishide, Hiroyuki

    2010-05-28

    Highly and homogeneously crosslinked poly(beta-ketoester) networks densely bearing robust nitroxide radicals were prepared via a click-type and stepwise Michael polyaddition. A half-battery cell composed of the thermally-cured radical network coatings displayed a rapid, reversible, and almost stoichiometric redox-activity even with a thickness of ca. 10 mum, which may be applicable as the electrode of organic-based rechargeable devices.

  12. Astronomical Alignments in a Neolithic Chinese Site?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, S.; Stencel, R. E.

    1997-12-01

    In the Manchurian province of Liaoning, near 41N19' and 119E30', exist ruins of a middle Neolithic society (2500 to 4000 BC) known as the Hongshan culture. This location, called Niuheliang, is comprised of 16 locations with monumental structures scattered over 80 square kilometers of hills. Most are stone burial structures that contain jade artifacts implying wealth and power. One structure is unique in being unusually shaped and containing oversized effigies of goddess figures. This structure also has a commanding view of the surrounding landscape. The presence of decorated pottery, jade and worked copper suggests the Hongshan people were sophisticated artisans and engaged in long-distance trading. During 1997, we've conducted a course at Denver as part of our Core Curriculum program for upper division students, that has examined the astronomical and cultural aspects of the Niuheliang site, to attempt to determine whether these contemporaries of the builders of Stonehenge may have included astronomical alignments into their constructions. The preliminary result of our studies suggests that certain monuments have potential for lunar standstill observation from the "goddess temple". For updates on these results, please see our website: www.du.edu/ rstencel/core2103.html.

  13. Master Plans for Park Sites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Meter, Jerry R.

    This booklet is a general guide to park site planning. The four basic steps involved in developing a park site are a) determination of the uses of the site, b) analysis of the site potential for these uses, c) identification of the functional relationship among the uses, and d) coordination of the uses to the park sites. Uses of park sites are…

  14. 32 CFR Appendix A to 32 Cfr Part 65 - Additional Reporting Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Data System (RCCPDS)” (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/773054m_vol1.pdf). (11) Direct... of Active Duty Military Personnel Records” (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/133605p... the TEB Web application at https://www.dmdc.osd.mil/milconnect/. The TEB Users Manual, maintained...

  15. NGNP SITE 2 HAZARDS ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Moe

    2011-10-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project initiated at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) by the U.S. Department of Energy pursuant to the 2005 Energy Policy Act, is based on research and development activities supported by the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative. The principal objective of the NGNP Project is to support commercialization of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology. The HTGR is a helium-cooled and graphite-moderated reactor that can operate at temperatures much higher than those of conventional light water reactor (LWR) technologies. Accordingly, it can be applied in many industrial applications as a substitute for burning fossil fuels, such as natural gas, to generate process heat in addition to producing electricity, which is the principal application of current LWRs. Nuclear energy in the form of LWRs has been used in the U.S. and internationally principally for the generation of electricity. However, because the HTGR operates at higher temperatures than LWRs, it can be used to displace the use of fossil fuels in many industrial applications. It also provides a carbon emission-free energy supply. For example, the energy needs for the recovery and refining of petroleum, for the petrochemical industry and for production of transportation fuels and feedstocks using coal conversion processes require process heat provided at temperatures approaching 800 C. This temperature range is readily achieved by the HTGR technology. This report summarizes a site assessment authorized by INL under the NGNP Project to determine hazards and potential challenges that site owners and HTGR designers need to be aware of when developing the HTGR design for co-location at industrial facilities, and to evaluate the site for suitability considering certain site characteristics. The objectives of the NGNP site hazard assessments are to do an initial screening of representative sites in order to identify potential challenges and restraints

  16. Avian flu: sites seek to respond and reassure.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Marilynn

    2005-03-01

    Avian flu outbreaks in Thailand and Vietnam, followed by a reported case of human-to-human transmission in Cambodia (http://www.who.int/csr/disease/avian_influenza/country/cases_table_2005_02_02/en/) prompted rapid responses by health authorities around the world. The WHO and local health ministries launched investigations into the potential source(s) of the outbreaks, and millions of ducks and other farm poultry were slaughtered (http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/influenza/avianflu/news/feb0205cambodian.html). The US Centers for Disease Control responded by elevating its previous advice to travellers about avian influenza A (H5N1) in Asia from an Outbreak Notice to a Travel Health Precaution, and increased surveillance for the disease. Some experts predict that the world is on the brink of an avian flu pandemic; others say a pandemic may not be inevitable, but urge caution and ongoing monitoring. The following sites offer background information and the latest news on avian flu.

  17. Gibbs Recursive Sampler: finding transcription factor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Thompson, William; Rouchka, Eric C; Lawrence, Charles E

    2003-07-01

    The Gibbs Motif Sampler is a software package for locating common elements in collections of biopolymer sequences. In this paper we describe a new variation of the Gibbs Motif Sampler, the Gibbs Recursive Sampler, which has been developed specifically for locating multiple transcription factor binding sites for multiple transcription factors simultaneously in unaligned DNA sequences that may be heterogeneous in DNA composition. Here we describe the basic operation of the web-based version of this sampler. The sampler may be acces-sed at http://bayesweb.wadsworth.org/gibbs/gibbs.html and at http://www.bioinfo.rpi.edu/applications/bayesian/gibbs/gibbs.html. An online user guide is available at http://bayesweb.wadsworth.org/gibbs/bernoulli.html and at http://www.bioinfo.rpi.edu/applications/bayesian/gibbs/manual/bernoulli.html. Solaris, Solaris.x86 and Linux versions of the sampler are available as stand-alone programs for academic and not-for-profit users. Commercial licenses are also available. The Gibbs Recursive Sampler is distributed in accordance with the ISCB level 0 guidelines and a requirement for citation of use in scientific publications.

  18. 77 FR 15759 - Final Effect of Designation of a Class of Employees for Addition to the Special Exposure Cohort

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-16

    ... Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina, as an addition to the Special Exposure Cohort (SEC) under the... contractors and subcontractors who worked at the Savannah River Site from January 1, 1953, through...

  19. Retroviral integration: Site matters

    PubMed Central

    Demeulemeester, Jonas; De Rijck, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Here, we review genomic target site selection during retroviral integration as a multistep process in which specific biases are introduced at each level. The first asymmetries are introduced when the virus takes a specific route into the nucleus. Next, by co‐opting distinct host cofactors, the integration machinery is guided to particular chromatin contexts. As the viral integrase captures a local target nucleosome, specific contacts introduce fine‐grained biases in the integration site distribution. In vivo, the established population of proviruses is subject to both positive and negative selection, thereby continuously reshaping the integration site distribution. By affecting stochastic proviral expression as well as the mutagenic potential of the virus, integration site choice may be an inherent part of the evolutionary strategies used by different retroviruses to maximise reproductive success. PMID:26293289

  20. Siting Air Monitoring Stations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludwig, F. L.

    1978-01-01

    Describes guidelines for consideration in selecting sites for air monitoring systems. Careful selection for spatial scale and specific sources assures that the collected data are accurately representing the situation. (Author/MA)

  1. Programming for SITE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mody, Bella

    1979-01-01

    Describes the Satellite Instructional Television Experiment (SITE) project in India during 1975-76, including programing patterns, formats, and audiences. Demonstrates that countries like India have the technical and managerial capability to design, operate, and maintain advanced communication technology. (JMF)

  2. Solar site test module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kissel, R. R.; Scott, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    A solar site test module using the Rockwell AIM 65microcomputer is described. The module is designed to work at any site where an IBM site data acquisition system (SDAS) is installed and is intended primarily as a troubleshooting tool. It collects sensor information (temperatures, flow rates, etc.) and displays or prints it immediately in calibrated engineering units. It will read one sensor on demand, periodically read up to 10sensors or periodically read all sensors. Performance calculations can also be included with sensor data. Unattended operation is possible to, e.g., monitor a group of sensors once per hour. Work is underway to add a data acquisition system to the test module so that it can be used at sites which have no SDAS.

  3. The stability of alloying additions in Zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumley, S. C.; Murphy, S. T.; Burr, P. A.; Grimes, R. W.; Chard-Tuckey, P. R.; Wenman, M. R.

    2013-06-01

    identical number of atoms, and hence identical alloying addition concentrations of 1.85 at.%. This concentration is useful, as the weight percent composition is appropriate to commercial alloys, particularly in the case of Sn, although it is still relevant with other alloying additions.It is important to note that magnetic effects can have a substantial impact on overall lattice parameters and energies. Consequently care must be taken to ensure that the correct final magnetic state is converged upon. For all simulations carried out, this was achieved by setting the initial spin state of the system to the sum of individual formal spins of each of the present atoms and performing a spin polarised calculation. This produced reasonable magnetic configurations in most cases, with the exception of pure Cr. In order that the known magnetic state of Cr (anti-ferromagnetic) was achieved, it was necessary to specify the spin states of each atom individually, prior to convergence. Overall, much of the behaviour of this system can be understood in terms of simple trends in energy and defect volume as a function of the electronegativities, metallic radii or valence electron concentrations of the alloying elements. Formation energies for intermetallic phases show that some compounds are stable, while others are metastable. In particular, ZrFe and ZrNi are metastable, although ZrNi has a more negative formation energy. It may be that the presence of the ZrFe phase in Zr alloys is a result of kinetics rather than thermodynamics. It is also likely that the corresponding Ni and Fe phases stabilise each other to some degree. Speculative ZrCr and ZrV intermetallics have substantially positive formation energies, implying they are not stable. There is an energetic preference for Cr and Fe to reside on interstitial sites, rather than substitutional sites. With all additions, an interstitial alloy produces a significant, anisotropic lattice strain. Defect volumes for the different elements

  4. A novel classification and online platform for planning and documentation of medical applications of additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Tuomi, Jukka; Paloheimo, Kaija-Stiina; Vehviläinen, Juho; Björkstrand, Roy; Salmi, Mika; Huotilainen, Eero; Kontio, Risto; Rouse, Stephen; Gibson, Ian; Mäkitie, Antti A

    2014-12-01

    Additive manufacturing technologies are widely used in industrial settings and now increasingly also in several areas of medicine. Various techniques and numerous types of materials are used for these applications. There is a clear need to unify and harmonize the patterns of their use worldwide. We present a 5-class system to aid planning of these applications and related scientific work as well as communication between various actors involved in this field. An online, matrix-based platform and a database were developed for planning and documentation of various solutions. This platform will help the medical community to structurally develop both research innovations and clinical applications of additive manufacturing. The online platform can be accessed through http://www.medicalam.info.

  5. Lunar resource evaluation and mine site selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bence, A. Edward

    1992-01-01

    Two scenarios in this evaluation of lunar mineral resources and the selection of possible mining and processing sites are considered. The first scenario assumes that no new surface or near-surface data will be available before site selection (presumably one of the Apollo sites). The second scenario assumes that additional surface geology data will have been obtained by a lunar orbiter mission, an unmanned sample return mission (or missions), and followup manned missions. Regardless of the scenario, once a potentially favorable mine site has been identified, a minimum amount of fundamental data is needed to assess the resources at that site and to evaluate its suitability for mining and downstream processing. Since much of the required data depends on the target mineral(s), information on the resource, its beneficiation, and the refining, smelting, and fabricating processes must be factored into the evaluation. The annual capacity and producing lifetime of the mine and its associated processing plant must be estimated before the resource reserves can be assessed. The available market for the product largely determines the capacity and lifetime of the mine. The Apollo 17 site is described as a possible mining site. The use of new sites is briefly addressed.

  6. Effect of alloying additions on secondary hardening behavior of Mo-containing steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, H.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, K. B.; Kim, C. M.; Yang, H. R.

    1997-03-01

    The effect of alloying additions on secondary hardening behavior in Fe-Mo-C steels has been investigated by means of the successive alloying additions of Cr, Co, and Ni. The Cr additions promote M3C cementite formation. The Ni additions destabilize the cementite formation, while the Co additions retard dislocation recovery and present the necessary sites for M2C formation which provides the secondary hardening.

  7. Role of additional radiotherapy in advanced stages of Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Meerwaldt, J H; Coleman, C N; Fischer, R I; Lister, T A; Diehl, V

    1992-09-01

    Although radiotherapy is widely used as additional treatment following chemotherapy, its precise role has never been clearly proven. Relapses tend to occur in previously involved bulky sites. Non-randomized studies may suggest a positive effect of the addition of radiotherapy. This effect however, might also be caused by selection. Randomized studies have not resulted in a survival advantage for the patients treated with additional radiotherapy compared to no further treatment or additional chemotherapy. The SWOG study 7808 suggest a 20% benefit in remission duration for the nodular sclerosis histology subgroup. Definitive conclusions have to wait for more mature results of randomized studies including the ongoing EORTC study and the possibility to perform an overview of all studies.

  8. Overview of Food Ingredients, Additives and Colors

    MedlinePlus

    ... pesticides where other legal premarket approval requirements apply. Direct food additives are those that are added to ... and other foods to add texture -- is a direct additive. Most direct additives are identified on the ...

  9. Secure Web-Site Access with Tickets and Message-Dependent Digests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donato, David I.

    2008-01-01

    Although there are various methods for restricting access to documents stored on a World Wide Web (WWW) site (a Web site), none of the widely used methods is completely suitable for restricting access to Web applications hosted on an otherwise publicly accessible Web site. A new technique, however, provides a mix of features well suited for restricting Web-site or Web-application access to authorized users, including the following: secure user authentication, tamper-resistant sessions, simple access to user state variables by server-side applications, and clean session terminations. This technique, called message-dependent digests with tickets, or MDDT, maintains secure user sessions by passing single-use nonces (tickets) and message-dependent digests of user credentials back and forth between client and server. Appendix 2 provides a working implementation of MDDT with PHP server-side code and JavaScript client-side code.

  10. Uniform Additivity in Classical and Quantum Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Andrew; Li, Ke; Smith, Graeme

    2017-01-01

    Information theory quantifies the optimal rates of resource interconversions, usually in terms of entropies. However, nonadditivity often makes evaluating entropic formulas intractable. In a few auspicious cases, additivity allows a full characterization of optimal rates. We study uniform additivity of formulas, which is easily evaluated and captures all known additive quantum formulas. Our complete characterization of uniform additivity exposes an intriguing new additive quantity and identifies a remarkable coincidence—the classical and quantum uniformly additive functions with one auxiliary variable are identical.

  11. A Gateway MultiSite Recombination Cloning Toolkit

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Lena K.; Stowers, R. Steven

    2011-01-01

    The generation of DNA constructs is often a rate-limiting step in conducting biological experiments. Recombination cloning of single DNA fragments using the Gateway system provided an advance over traditional restriction enzyme cloning due to increases in efficiency and reliability. Here we introduce a series of entry clones and a destination vector for use in two, three, and four fragment Gateway MultiSite recombination cloning whose advantages include increased flexibility and versatility. In contrast to Gateway single-fragment cloning approaches where variations are typically incorporated into model system-specific destination vectors, our Gateway MultiSite cloning strategy incorporates variations in easily generated entry clones that are model system-independent. In particular, we present entry clones containing insertions of GAL4, QF, UAS, QUAS, eGFP, and mCherry, among others, and demonstrate their in vivo functionality in Drosophila by using them to generate expression clones including GAL4 and QF drivers for various trp ion channel family members, UAS and QUAS excitatory and inhibitory light-gated ion channels, and QUAS red and green fluorescent synaptic vesicle markers. We thus establish a starter toolkit of modular Gateway MultiSite entry clones potentially adaptable to any model system. An inventory of entry clones and destination vectors for Gateway MultiSite cloning has also been established (www.gatewaymultisite.org). PMID:21931740

  12. 15. MAP OF ALAMEDA SHIPYARD SHOWING PROPOSED ADDITIONAL FACILITIES. United ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. MAP OF ALAMEDA SHIPYARD SHOWING PROPOSED ADDITIONAL FACILITIES. United Engineering Company Ltd., Alameda Shipyard. A site map with all existing structures keyed to an identification legend. Also shows proposed new structures. No architect noted. Drawn by "J.B.H." (John Hudspeth?). Sheet 2. Plan no. 10,528. Scale one inch to 100 feet. November 12, 1943, last revised 1/18/44. pencil on vellum - United Engineering Company Shipyard, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  13. 16 CFR 1102.16 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE Content Requirements § 1102.16 Additional... in the Database any additional information it determines to be in the public interest,...

  14. 16 CFR 1102.16 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE Content Requirements § 1102.16 Additional... in the Database any additional information it determines to be in the public interest,...

  15. 16 CFR 1102.16 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE Content Requirements § 1102.16 Additional... in the Database any additional information it determines to be in the public interest,...

  16. 40 CFR 262.43 - Additional reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Recordkeeping and Reporting § 262.43 Additional... require generators to furnish additional reports concerning the quantities and disposition of...

  17. 40 CFR 262.43 - Additional reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Recordkeeping and Reporting § 262.43 Additional... require generators to furnish additional reports concerning the quantities and disposition of...

  18. 40 CFR 262.43 - Additional reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Recordkeeping and Reporting § 262.43 Additional... require generators to furnish additional reports concerning the quantities and disposition of...

  19. 40 CFR 262.43 - Additional reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Recordkeeping and Reporting § 262.43 Additional... require generators to furnish additional reports concerning the quantities and disposition of...

  20. 40 CFR 262.43 - Additional reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Recordkeeping and Reporting § 262.43 Additional... require generators to furnish additional reports concerning the quantities and disposition of...