Science.gov

Sample records for additionally participants reported

  1. Magnet Assistance Program Enrollment and Participation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlotte-Mecklenburg Public Schools, Charlotte, NC.

    This report recounts the enrollment and participation of minority and nonminority students in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools (CMS) Magnet Program. The 1994-95 school year was the second year in which federal support was received. The magnet program is part of a 5-year Student Assignment Plan that seeks to eliminate racial isolation and to…

  2. 40 CFR 262.43 - Additional reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... require generators to furnish additional reports concerning the quantities and disposition of wastes identified or listed in 40 CFR part 261. ...) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Recordkeeping and Reporting § 262.43...

  3. 40 CFR 262.43 - Additional reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... require generators to furnish additional reports concerning the quantities and disposition of wastes identified or listed in 40 CFR part 261. ...) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Recordkeeping and Reporting § 262.43...

  4. 40 CFR 262.43 - Additional reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... require generators to furnish additional reports concerning the quantities and disposition of wastes identified or listed in 40 CFR part 261. ...) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Recordkeeping and Reporting § 262.43...

  5. 40 CFR 262.43 - Additional reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... require generators to furnish additional reports concerning the quantities and disposition of wastes identified or listed in 40 CFR part 261. ...) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Recordkeeping and Reporting § 262.43...

  6. 40 CFR 262.43 - Additional reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... require generators to furnish additional reports concerning the quantities and disposition of wastes identified or listed in 40 CFR part 261. ...) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Recordkeeping and Reporting § 262.43...

  7. Major oil, gas reserve additions reported

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-10

    Several large, internationally active, US-based companies have recently reported sizable gains in oil and gas reserves in 1996. The biggest reserves addition in absolute terms reported to date belongs to Exxon Corp. However, Amoco Corp. scored the largest percentage gain. The paper discusses gains reported by Exxon, Amoco, ARCO, Phillips, and Oryx.

  8. Youth Participation: A Concept Paper. RFY Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dollar, Bruce

    The document establishes the need for a nationwide youth participation program and suggest strategies and problems in implementing such programs. Youth participation provides a means for young people to be released from their isolation from the rest of society by providing the opportunity for participation in socially productive activities. The…

  9. 10 CFR 431.175 - Additional requirements applicable to non-Voluntary Independent Certification Program participants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Additional requirements applicable to non-Voluntary Independent Certification Program participants. 431.175 Section 431.175 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY... requirements applicable to non-Voluntary Independent Certification Program participants. If you are...

  10. 42 CFR 482.104 - Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... for kidney transplant centers. 482.104 Section 482.104 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID....104 Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers. (a) Standard: End stage renal disease (ESRD) services. Kidney transplant centers must directly...

  11. 42 CFR 482.104 - Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... for kidney transplant centers. 482.104 Section 482.104 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID....104 Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers. (a) Standard: End stage renal disease (ESRD) services. Kidney transplant centers must directly...

  12. 42 CFR 482.104 - Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... for kidney transplant centers. 482.104 Section 482.104 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID....104 Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers. (a) Standard: End stage renal disease (ESRD) services. Kidney transplant centers must directly...

  13. 42 CFR 482.104 - Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... for kidney transplant centers. 482.104 Section 482.104 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID....104 Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers. (a) Standard: End stage renal disease (ESRD) services. Kidney transplant centers must directly...

  14. 42 CFR 482.104 - Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... for kidney transplant centers. 482.104 Section 482.104 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID....104 Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers. (a) Standard: End stage renal disease (ESRD) services. Kidney transplant centers must directly...

  15. 78 FR 55135 - Request for Comments on Additional Participants in Trade in Services Agreement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ... additional trading partners, Paraguay and Liechtenstein, are willing and able to meet the high standards... http://www.regulations.gov under docket number USTR-2013-0001. With the addition of Paraguay and... Participants--Paraguay and Liechtenstein.'' In order to be assured of consideration, comments should...

  16. Electric utility use of fireside additives. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Locklin, D.W.; Krause, H.H.; Anson, D.; Reid, W.

    1980-01-01

    Fireside additives have been used or proposed for use in fossil-fired utility boilers to combat a number of problems related to boiler performance and reliability. These problems include corrosion, fouling, superheat control, and acidic emissions. Fuel additives and other fireside additives have been used mainly with oil firing; however, there is growing experience with additives in coal-firing, especially for flyash conditioning to improve the performance of electrostatic precipitators. In decisions regarding the selection and use of additives, utilities have had to rely extensively on empiricism, due partly to an incomplete understanding of processes involved and partly to the limited amount of quantitative data. The study reported here was sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute to assemble and analyze pertinent operating experience and to recommend guidelines for utility decisions on the use of additives. The combined results of the state-of-the-art review of technical literature and a special survey of utility experience are reported. A total of 38 utilities participated in the survey, providing information on trials conducted on 104 units in 93 different plants. Altogether, 445 separate trials were reported, each representing a unit/additive/fuel combination. Additives used in these trials included 90 different additive formulations, both pure compounds and proprietary products. These formulations were categorized into 37 generic classes according to their chemical constituents, and the results of the survey are presented by these generic classes. The findings are organized according to the operating problems for which fireside additives are used. Guidelines are presented for utility use in additive selection and in planning additive trials.

  17. Electric utility use of fireside additives. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Locklin, D.W.; Krause, H.H.; Anson, D.; Reid, W.

    1980-01-01

    Fireside additives have been used or proposed for use in fossil-fired utility boilers to combat a number of problems related to boiler performance and reliability. These problems include corrosion, fouling, superheat control, and acidic emissions. Fuel additivies and other fireside additives have been used mainly with oil firing; however, there is growing experience with additives in coal-firing, especially for flyash conditioning to improve the performance of electrostatic precipitators. In decisions regarding the selection and use of additives, utilities have had to rely extensively on empiricism, due partly to our incomplete understanding of processes involved and partly to the limited amount of quantitative data. The study reported here was sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute to assemble and analyze pertinent operating experience and to recommend guidelines for utility decisions on the use of additives. This report describes the combined results of the state-of-the-art review of technical literature and a special survey of utility experience. A total of 38 utilities participated in the survey, providing information on trials conducted on 104 units in 93 different plants. Altogether, 445 separate trials were reported, each representing a unit/additive/fuel combination. 90 different additive formulations, both pure compounds and proprietary products, were categorized into 37 generic classes according to their chemical constituents, and the results of the survey are presented by these generic classes. This report is organized according to the operating problems for which fireside additives are used. Guidelines are presented for utility use in additive selection and in planning additive trials.

  18. Additional EIPC Study Analysis. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, Stanton W; Gotham, Douglas J.; Luciani, Ralph L.

    2014-12-01

    Between 2010 and 2012 the Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) conducted a major long-term resource and transmission study of the Eastern Interconnection (EI). With guidance from a Stakeholder Steering Committee (SSC) that included representatives from the Eastern Interconnection States Planning Council (EISPC) among others, the project was conducted in two phases. Phase 1 involved a long-term capacity expansion analysis that involved creation of eight major futures plus 72 sensitivities. Three scenarios were selected for more extensive transmission- focused evaluation in Phase 2. Five power flow analyses, nine production cost model runs (including six sensitivities), and three capital cost estimations were developed during this second phase. The results from Phase 1 and 2 provided a wealth of data that could be examined further to address energy-related questions. A list of 14 topics was developed for further analysis. This paper brings together the earlier interim reports of the first 13 topics plus one additional topic into a single final report.

  19. 42 CFR 493.1807 - Additional sanctions: Laboratories that participate in Medicare.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... in Medicare. 493.1807 Section 493.1807 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Enforcement Procedures § 493.1807 Additional sanctions: Laboratories that participate in Medicare. The... CLIA conditions and that have approval to receive Medicare payment for their services. (a)...

  20. Regional Assessment and Participative Evaluation: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Roger L.; Gould, John A., Jr.

    The report surveys the occupational environment of the towns in the region within 30 to 45 minutes' commuting time of North Reading, Massachusetts. A random sample of manufacturing, wholesale and retail trade, service, and to a much lesser extent finance, insurance, real estate establishments was surveyed in person or by mail. Information…

  1. 17 CFR 4.22 - Reporting to pool participants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reporting to pool participants... POOL OPERATORS AND COMMODITY TRADING ADVISORS Commodity Pool Operators § 4.22 Reporting to pool participants. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(4) or (a)(6) of this section, each commodity...

  2. 17 CFR 4.22 - Reporting to pool participants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... thereto, other Account Statements or Annual Reports. (4) For the purpose of the Account Statement delivery... reporting period of the pool's fiscal year need not be distributed if the Annual Report required by... Act must distribute an Annual Report to each participant in each pool that it operates, and...

  3. 40 CFR 265.77 - Additional reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....77 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) INTERIM STATUS STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL... submitting the biennial report and unmanifested waste reports described in §§ 265.75 and 265.76, the owner...

  4. 40 CFR 265.77 - Additional reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....77 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) INTERIM STATUS STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL... submitting the biennial report and unmanifested waste reports described in §§ 265.75 and 265.76, the owner...

  5. 40 CFR 265.77 - Additional reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....77 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) INTERIM STATUS STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL... submitting the biennial report and unmanifested waste reports described in §§ 265.75 and 265.76, the owner...

  6. Hemophilia and Sports: Guidelines for Participation. Case Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLain, Larry G.; Heldrich, Fred T.

    1990-01-01

    Presents a case report of a 15-year-old boy with severe hemophilia who played soccer 1 school year but was denied continued participation following another screening examination. Before deciding about participation, physicians must assess the type and severity of hemophilia and risk factors for injury. Appropriate sports for hemophiliacs are…

  7. Factors Associated with School Meal Participation and the Relationship between Different Participation Measures. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Quinn; Hulsey, Lara; Ponza, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This report investigates three important aspects of National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and School Breakfast Program (SBP) participation using recently collected data on a large, nationally representative sample of students certified for free and reduced-price meals during the 2005-2006 school year. First, we examine the factors that influence…

  8. 10 CFR 431.174 - Additional requirements applicable to Voluntary Independent Certification Program participants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Independent Certification Program participants. 431.174 Section 431.174 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY... requirements applicable to Voluntary Independent Certification Program participants. (a) Description of Voluntary Independent Certification Program participant. For purposes of this subpart, a manufacturer...

  9. 29 CFR 1602.37 - Additional reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AND REPORTING REQUIREMENTS UNDER TITLE VII, THE ADA AND GINA State and Local Government Information Report § 1602.37 Additional reporting requirements. The Commission reserves the right to require reports, other than that designated as the “State and Local Government Information Report EEO-4,” about...

  10. 29 CFR 1602.37 - Additional reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AND REPORTING REQUIREMENTS UNDER TITLE VII, THE ADA AND GINA State and Local Government Information Report § 1602.37 Additional reporting requirements. The Commission reserves the right to require reports, other than that designated as the “State and Local Government Information Report EEO-4,” about...

  11. 29 CFR 1602.37 - Additional reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AND REPORTING REQUIREMENTS UNDER TITLE VII, THE ADA AND GINA State and Local Government Information Report § 1602.37 Additional reporting requirements. The Commission reserves the right to require reports, other than that designated as the “State and Local Government Information Report EEO-4,” about...

  12. 29 CFR 1602.37 - Additional reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AND REPORTING REQUIREMENTS UNDER TITLE VII, THE ADA AND GINA State and Local Government Information Report § 1602.37 Additional reporting requirements. The Commission reserves the right to require reports, other than that designated as the “State and Local Government Information Report EEO-4,” about...

  13. 29 CFR 1602.37 - Additional reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AND REPORTING REQUIREMENTS UNDER TITLE VII, THE ADA AND GINA State and Local Government Information Report § 1602.37 Additional reporting requirements. The Commission reserves the right to require reports, other than that designated as the “State and Local Government Information Report EEO-4,” about...

  14. 39 CFR 3050.40 - Additional financial reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Additional financial reporting. 3050.40 Section 3050.40 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL PERIODIC REPORTING § 3050.40 Additional financial reporting. (a) In general. The Postal Service shall file with the Commission: (1) Within 40 days after the end of each fiscal quarter,...

  15. Potential Factors Influencing Indigenous Education Participation and Achievement. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddle, Nicholas; Cameron, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    This report examines two sets of issues, the first being whether Indigenous Australians obtain a lower return on investment in education and training than other Australians. If they do, then this would partly explain why, in general, Indigenous participation in education and training is relatively low. The second issue is whether Indigenous…

  16. Reporting of participant compliance in randomized controlled trials of nutrition supplements during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kehoe, Sarah H; Chheda, Purvi S; Sahariah, Sirazul A; Baird, Janis; Fall, Caroline H D

    2009-04-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCT) are widely considered to be the gold standard for demonstrating intervention effects. Adequacy of reporting of participant compliance in RCTs affects the interpretation of study results. Our aims were two-fold: first, to assess the adequacy of reporting of participant compliance in RCTs investigating the effect of maternal nutritional supplements on infant outcomes; and second, to examine authors' adherence to the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) guidelines on participant flow. Papers reporting trials of nutritional supplementation during pregnancy, and published after revision of the CONSORT recommendations, were identified using a search of medical databases. Two researchers systematically reviewed the papers to assess the reporting of participant compliance according to specified criteria, and the presentation of participant flow data recommended in the CONSORT guidelines. The literature search identified 58 papers. Almost a third (n = 18) did not describe how participant compliance was assessed. Nearly half of the papers (n = 27) failed to report participant compliance numerically (absolute numbers or percentage) and differences in compliance data between treatment arms were not reported in 52% of papers (n = 28). The majority (83%) gave no information on whether the study protocol included any researcher input aimed at maximizing compliance. In addition to inadequate reporting of compliance, two of the CONSORT requirements (eligibility criteria and numbers discontinuing the intervention) were inadequately reported in 69% and 60% of papers, respectively. We conclude that participant compliance in nutrition trials is frequently inadequately reported. 'False negative' results from RCTs with poor compliance could wrongly influence policy and inhibit further research concerned with nutritional supplementation for women of child-bearing age. We suggest that changes to the CONSORT guidelines may improve RCT

  17. 42 CFR 441.256 - Additional condition for Federal financial participation (FFP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... participation (FFP). 441.256 Section 441.256 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT... financial participation (FFP). (a) FFP is not available in expenditures for any sterilization or... through November 2, 1982, FFP is available in expenditures for those services if the documentation...

  18. 25 CFR 1000.15 - How many additional Tribes/Consortia may participate in self-governance per year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... self-governance per year? 1000.15 Section 1000.15 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN... Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Eligibility § 1000.15 How many additional Tribes/Consortia may participate in self-governance per year? (a) Sections 402(b) and (c) of the Act authorize the Director...

  19. 25 CFR 1000.15 - How many additional Tribes/Consortia may participate in self-governance per year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... self-governance per year? 1000.15 Section 1000.15 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN... Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Eligibility § 1000.15 How many additional Tribes/Consortia may participate in self-governance per year? (a) Sections 402(b) and (c) of the Act authorize the Director...

  20. 25 CFR 1000.15 - How many additional Tribes/Consortia may participate in self-governance per year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... self-governance per year? 1000.15 Section 1000.15 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN... Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Eligibility § 1000.15 How many additional Tribes/Consortia may participate in self-governance per year? (a) Sections 402(b) and (c) of the Act authorize the Director...

  1. 25 CFR 1000.15 - How many additional Tribes/Consortia may participate in self-governance per year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... self-governance per year? 1000.15 Section 1000.15 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN... Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Eligibility § 1000.15 How many additional Tribes/Consortia may participate in self-governance per year? (a) Sections 402(b) and (c) of the Act authorize the Director...

  2. 25 CFR 1000.15 - How many additional Tribes/Consortia may participate in self-governance per year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... self-governance per year? 1000.15 Section 1000.15 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN... Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Eligibility § 1000.15 How many additional Tribes/Consortia may participate in self-governance per year? (a) Sections 402(b) and (c) of the Act authorize the Director...

  3. Least-cost utility planning consumer participation manual. [Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, C.; Wellinghoff, J.; Goldberg, F.

    1989-12-31

    This manual is designed to provide guidance to state consumer advocates and other state consumer groups interested in either initiating and/or participating in an Least-Cost Utility Planning (LCUP) process in their state. Least cost utility planning examined primarily as a regulatory framework to be implemented by an appropriate state authority -- usually the public utility commission -- for the benefit of the state`s citizens and electric utility customers. LCUP is also a planning process to be used by investor owned and public utilities to select, support and justify future expenditures in resource additions. This manual is designed as a ``How-To`` manual for implementing and participating in a statewide LCUP process. Its goal is to guide the reader through the LCUP maze so that meaningful, forward-looking, and cost minimizing electric utility planning can be initiated and sustained in your state.

  4. National Geographic Society Kids Network: Report on 1994 teacher participants

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    In 1994, National Geographic Society Kids Network, a computer/telecommunications-based science curriculum, was presented to elementary and middle school teachers through summer programs sponsored by NGS and US DOE. The network program assists teachers in understanding the process of doing science; understanding the role of computers and telecommunications in the study of science, math, and engineering; and utilizing computers and telecommunications appropriately in the classroom. The program enables teacher to integrate science, math, and technology with other subjects with the ultimate goal of encouraging students of all abilities to pursue careers in science/math/engineering. This report assesses the impact of the network program on participating teachers.

  5. 10 CFR 70.74 - Additional reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional reporting requirements. 70.74 Section 70.74 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Additional Requirements for Certain Licensees Authorized To Possess a Critical Mass of Special...

  6. 10 CFR 70.74 - Additional reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Additional reporting requirements. 70.74 Section 70.74 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Additional Requirements for Certain Licensees Authorized To Possess a Critical Mass of Special...

  7. The Milwaukee Parental Choice Program: Descriptive Report on Participating Schools. SCDP Milwaukee Evaluation Report #8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kisida, Brian; Jensen, Laura I.; Wolf, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    This report is the second in a series of annual reports produced by the School Choice Demonstration Project (SCDP) providing descriptive information about the schools participating in the Milwaukee Parental Choice Program (MPCP). Following a brief history of the MPCP, this year's report contains a set of baseline descriptive statistics about…

  8. The Milwaukee Parental Choice Program: Baseline Descriptive Report on Participating Schools. SCDP Milwaukee Evaluation Report #3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kisida, Brian; Jensen, Laura; Rahn, James C.; Wolf, Patrick J.

    2008-01-01

    This report is the first in a series of annual reports produced by the School Choice Demonstration Project (SCDP) that will provide descriptive information about the schools participating in the Milwaukee Parental Choice Program (MPCP). Following a brief history of the MPCP, this year's report contains a set of baseline descriptive statistics…

  9. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  10. Regulating tissue research: do we need additional rules to protect research participants?

    PubMed

    Wright, Jessica; Ploem, Corrette; Sliwka, Marcin; Gevers, Sjef

    2010-12-01

    This article explores whether additional rules are needed for the regulation of tissue research in Europe. A human rights-based approach (referring to international documents and illustrative examples from national legislation) is taken to address the question: what is so special about tissue, in particular when compared to personal data? The existing regimes in Europe on data protection and clinical trials are presented and examined for their suitability to govern tissue research, taking into account the differences between data and tissue. Six recommendations are outlined, highlighting important points future legislation on tissue research must take into account.

  11. Readability and Understanding of Informed Consent Among Participants With Low Incomes: A Preliminary Report.

    PubMed

    Ittenbach, Richard F; Senft, Elizabeth C; Huang, Guixia; Corsmo, Jeremy J; Sieber, Joan E

    2015-12-01

    With passage and implementation of the Affordable Health Care Act, more vulnerable segments of the U.S. population will now have access to regular health care and increased opportunities to participate in biomedical research. Yet, access to new groups brings with it new responsibilities for investigators, most importantly, reducing burdens for participants. Data collected through this small pilot study suggest several preliminary but potentially important findings when working with adults from low-income populations: First, while all participants read some parts of the consent forms (55%), only a minority reported reading the entire form (45%); second, 73% of participants reported understanding the study very well whereas only 27% reported understanding the study "a little"; third, there was a slight reported advantage of the simplified form over the regular form; however, this difference varied by section. Relatedly, other research has shown a high incidence of persons reading none of the consent form, but signing a statement that they have read and understood the study. Why does this occur? What are we teaching people when we request that they sign a consent form they have chosen not to read? What are the ethical and regulatory implications? Embedded ethics studies such as this one, although pilot and preliminary in nature, offer a number of advantages, such as stimulating additional scientific inquiry as well as challenging established institutional practices. PMID:26564942

  12. National Retired Senior Volunteer Program Participant Impact Evaluation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booz Allen and Hamilton, Inc., Washington, DC.

    A study examined the long-term effects of participation in the Retired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) on participants from 20 RSVP projects nationwide. Three rounds of interviews were conducted. In Round 1, 750 volunteers were interviewed: 595 veteran volunteers and 155 new volunteers. In Round 2, 792 volunteers were intereviewed: 175 new…

  13. Impact of Open Data Policies on Consent to Participate in Human Subjects Research: Discrepancies between Participant Action and Reported Concerns.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Jorden A; Zagrodney, Jessica M; Day, T Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Research outlets are increasingly adopting open data policies as a requisite for publication, including studies with human subjects data. We investigated whether open data policies influence participants' rate of consent by randomly assigning participants to view consent forms with and without discussion of open data policies. No participants declined to participate, regardless of condition, nor did rates of drop-out vs. completion vary between conditions. Furthermore, no significant change in potential consent rates was reported when participants were openly asked about the influence of open data policies on their likelihood of consent. However, follow-up analyses indicated possible poor attention to consent forms, consistent with previous research. Moreover, thematic analysis of participants' considerations of open data policy indicated multiple considerations such as concerns regarding confidentiality, anonymity, data security, and study sensitivity. The impact of open data policies on participation raises complex issues at the intersection of ethics and scientific innovation. We conclude by encouraging researchers to consider participants as stakeholders in open data policy and by providing recommendations for open data policies in human subjects research.

  14. Survey of Public Participation in the Arts: Volume II. Changes in American's Participation, 1982-1985. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, John P.; And Others

    The primary purpose of this report was to compare data obtained from the 1982 and 1985 "Survey of Public Participation in the Arts." Comparisons of core questions and responses indicate that: (1) 1985 results are very close to those obtained in 1982; (2) there was a statistically significant decline in musical theater performance attendance; and…

  15. SPARK: Student Participation And Retention Keys. Demonstration Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Rick

    The Student Participation And Retention Keys (SPARK) project at Blue Ridge Community College sought to determine why adult basic education (ABE) and General Educational Development (GED) students dropped out of the college's basic skills program and how student retention could be improved. With input from current and former students, a survey form…

  16. Impact of Open Data Policies on Consent to Participate in Human Subjects Research: Discrepancies between Participant Action and Reported Concerns

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Research outlets are increasingly adopting open data policies as a requisite for publication, including studies with human subjects data. We investigated whether open data policies influence participants’ rate of consent by randomly assigning participants to view consent forms with and without discussion of open data policies. No participants declined to participate, regardless of condition, nor did rates of drop-out vs. completion vary between conditions. Furthermore, no significant change in potential consent rates was reported when participants were openly asked about the influence of open data policies on their likelihood of consent. However, follow-up analyses indicated possible poor attention to consent forms, consistent with previous research. Moreover, thematic analysis of participants’ considerations of open data policy indicated multiple considerations such as concerns regarding confidentiality, anonymity, data security, and study sensitivity. The impact of open data policies on participation raises complex issues at the intersection of ethics and scientific innovation. We conclude by encouraging researchers to consider participants as stakeholders in open data policy and by providing recommendations for open data policies in human subjects research. PMID:25993308

  17. RECRUITING, RETAINING, AND REPORTING EXPOSURE STUDY RESULTS TO PARTICIPANTS AND THE PUBLIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) is developing techniques and capabilities to recruit and retain participants in exposure measurement studies and to effectively report study results to participants and the public. These techniques are being applied in three N...

  18. Neutron Characterization of Additively Manufactured Components. Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, Thomas R.; Payzant, E. Andrew; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2015-09-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is a collection of promising manufacturing methods that industry is beginning to explore and adopt. Macroscopically complicated and near net shape components are being built using AM, but how the material behaves in service is a big question for industry. Consequently, AM components/materials need further research into exactly what is made and how it will behave in service. This one and a half day workshop included a series of invited presentations from academia, industry and national laboratories (see Appendix A for the workshop agenda and list of talks). The workshop was welcomed by Alan Tennant, Chief Scientist, Neutron Sciences Directorate, ORNL, and opened remotely by Rob Ivestor, Deputy Director, Advanced Manufacturing Office-DOE, who declared AM adoptees as titans who will be able to create customized 3-D structures with 1 million to 1 billion micro welds with locally tailored microstructures. Further he stated that characterization with neutrons is key to be able to bring critical insight/information into the AM process/property/behavior relationship. Subsequently, the presentations spanned a slice of the current state of the art AM techniques and many of the most relevant characterization techniques using neutrons. After the talks, a panel discussion was held; workshop participants (see Appendix B for a list of attendees) providing questions and the panel answers. The main purpose of the panel discussion was to build consensus regarding the critical research needs in AM that can be addressed with neutrons. These needs were placed into three categories: modes of access for neutrons, new capabilities needed, new AM material issues and neutrons. Recommendations from the workshop were determined based on the panel discussion.

  19. Strabismus, a preventable barrier to social participation: a short report.

    PubMed

    Blair, Eve; Smithers-Sheedy, Hayley

    2016-02-01

    Isolated strabismus does not significantly impair visual functionality and has traditionally been considered a primarily cosmetic defect of little importance. However, even in the absence of strabismus amblyopia, manifest strabismus and its non-surgical treatments can render the person less socially acceptable, creating a barrier to participation and resulting in psychosocial disadvantage that has been documented in the typically developing population. The Australian Cerebral Palsy Register traditionally recorded strabismus only if it were not accompanied by visual impairment; however, even these data indicate that the proportion of cerebral palsy registrants with strabismus is many times higher than in comparable population samples, compounding their challenges to achieve participation. It is therefore inappropriate to continue to consider strabismus as merely a cosmetic defect, but one that deserves surgical correction early in life. PMID:26762817

  20. Strabismus, a preventable barrier to social participation: a short report.

    PubMed

    Blair, Eve; Smithers-Sheedy, Hayley

    2016-02-01

    Isolated strabismus does not significantly impair visual functionality and has traditionally been considered a primarily cosmetic defect of little importance. However, even in the absence of strabismus amblyopia, manifest strabismus and its non-surgical treatments can render the person less socially acceptable, creating a barrier to participation and resulting in psychosocial disadvantage that has been documented in the typically developing population. The Australian Cerebral Palsy Register traditionally recorded strabismus only if it were not accompanied by visual impairment; however, even these data indicate that the proportion of cerebral palsy registrants with strabismus is many times higher than in comparable population samples, compounding their challenges to achieve participation. It is therefore inappropriate to continue to consider strabismus as merely a cosmetic defect, but one that deserves surgical correction early in life.

  1. 17 CFR 4.22 - Reporting to pool participants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the reporting period. (3) The Account Statement must also disclose any material business dealings... corresponding period of the previous fiscal year. (5) Appropriate footnote disclosure and such further material... the laws of a foreign jurisdiction; (B) The Annual Report will include a condensed schedule...

  2. Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad Program: Malaysia 1995. Participants' Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malaysian-American Commission on Educational Exchange, Kuala Lumpur.

    These reports and lesson plans were developed by teachers and coordinators who traveled to Malaysia during the summer of 1995 as part of the U.S. Department of Education's Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad Program. Sections of the report include: (1) "Gender and Economics: Malaysia" (Mary C. Furlong); (2) "Malaysia: An Integrated, Interdisciplinary…

  3. 42 CFR 484.20 - Condition of participation: Reporting OASIS information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Reporting OASIS... § 484.20 Condition of participation: Reporting OASIS information. HHAs must electronically report all OASIS data collected in accordance with § 484.55. (a) Standard: Encoding and transmitting OASIS data....

  4. 42 CFR 484.20 - Condition of participation: Reporting OASIS information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition of participation: Reporting OASIS... § 484.20 Condition of participation: Reporting OASIS information. HHAs must electronically report all OASIS data collected in accordance with § 484.55. (a) Standard: Encoding and transmitting OASIS data....

  5. 42 CFR 484.20 - Condition of participation: Reporting OASIS information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition of participation: Reporting OASIS... § 484.20 Condition of participation: Reporting OASIS information. HHAs must electronically report all OASIS data collected in accordance with § 484.55. (a) Standard: Encoding and transmitting OASIS data....

  6. 42 CFR 484.20 - Condition of participation: Reporting OASIS information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition of participation: Reporting OASIS... § 484.20 Condition of participation: Reporting OASIS information. HHAs must electronically report all OASIS data collected in accordance with § 484.55. (a) Standard: Encoding and transmitting OASIS data....

  7. 42 CFR 484.20 - Condition of participation: Reporting OASIS information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition of participation: Reporting OASIS... § 484.20 Condition of participation: Reporting OASIS information. HHAs must electronically report all OASIS data collected in accordance with § 484.55. (a) Standard: Encoding and transmitting OASIS data....

  8. Caregiver Reports of Children's Activity Participation Following Serious Injury.

    PubMed

    Braaf, Sandra; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Teague, Warwick; Jowett, Helen; Gabbe, Belinda

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric trauma can result in significant levels of on-going disability. The aim of this study was to explore the restrictions on activity participation that children experience following serious injury from the perspective of their caregivers. We performed a thematic analysis of transcripts of semi-structured in-depth interviews with the caregivers of 44 seriously injured children, conducted three-years after the injury, and purposively sampled from a population-based cohort study. Both temporary and on-going restrictions on school, sport, leisure and social activities were identified, some of which were imposed by caregivers, schools, or recommended by health providers. The perceived risk of further injury, physical restrictions, emotional state and fatigue levels were important influences on degrees of activity restriction. Children who were socially less engaged, especially those who were more severely injured, had difficulty making and retaining friends, and exhibited signs of depression or social withdrawal. The activities of pre-school children were strongly regulated by their caregivers, while school age children faced obstacles with participation in aspects such as study, sport, and peer and teacher relationships, affecting learning, school attendance and enjoyment. The findings highlight the need for primary prevention and reducing the impacts of serious injury throughout the continuum of care. PMID:27399741

  9. ADDITIVE TESTING FOR IMPROVED SULFUR RETENTION: PRELIMINARY REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Amoroso, J.; Fox, K.

    2011-09-07

    The Savannah River National Laboratory is collaborating with Alfred University to evaluate the potential for additives in borosilicate glass to improve sulfur retention. This preliminary report provides further background on the incorporation of sulfur in glass and outlines the experiments that are being performed by the collaborators. A simulated waste glass composition has been selected for the experimental studies. The first phase of experimental work will evaluate the impacts of BaO, PbO, and V{sub 2}O{sub 5} at concentrations of 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0 wt % on sulfate retention in simulated high level waste borosilicate glass. The second phase of experimental work will evaluate the effects of time at the melt temperature on sulfur retention. The resulting samples will be characterized to determine the amount of sulfur remaining as well as to identify the formation of any crystalline phases. The results will be used to guide the future selection of frits and glass forming chemicals in vitrifying Department of Energy wastes containing high sulfur concentrations.

  10. Science team participation in the ARM program. Progress report, October 31, 1992--November 1, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Cess, R.D.

    1993-11-01

    This progress report discusses the Science Team participation in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program for the period of October 31, 1992 to November 1, 1993. This report summarized the research accomplishments of six papers.

  11. Report from Norway on the Participation of Women in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredriksen, Åshild; Borg, Anne

    2009-04-01

    In Norway, the number of female physics professors has been increasing moderately over the past 5 to 10 years, and a focus of university leadership has been on the advancement of women to full professors. Recruitment of women to studies in physics is still a matter of concern, in absolute as well as relative numbers. To recruit students to the fields of science, universities have sought to increase interest for science in general. In this report, we present developments regarding the status of women in physics in Norway, particularly the recent recruitment of women to physics studies.

  12. 10 CFR 70.74 - Additional reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Additional Requirements for Certain Licensees Authorized To Possess a Critical Mass of Special Nuclear... subpart is complete. (5) Each licensee shall provide reasonable assurance that reliable communication...

  13. Case for US participation in NATO multinational corps. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Young, T.D.; Lowe, K.H.

    1990-10-05

    The massive political changes underway in Europe have necessitated a rethinking of U.S. strategy and force structure in NATO. Two guiding requirements are clear. First, the Federal Republic of Germany must lose its characterization of singularization brought on by the presence of a sizeable number of allied forces stationed on its soil. Second, it is absolutely imperative that the U.S. Army remain stationed in Europe in order to guard against residual Soviet military threats and assuage Bonn's neighbors of its continued benign external intentions. The solution to both challenges is the organization of multinational corps in NATO in the Allied Forces Central Europe (AFCENT) command area, accompanied by the abolishment of CENTAG and NORTHAG with multinational corps reporting directly to AFCENT. This study describes the political rationales for the creation of multinational corps in NATO, and presents a national corps structure for the AFCENT region. It also argues the case for the organization of special functional multinational corps to meet future European and U.S. security requirements.

  14. IAEA Fellowship Program, 1997 report on United States participants

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Fellowship Program began in April 1958 as a part of the Agency`s Technical Cooperation (TC) Program. Through the TC Program, the IAEA provides technical assistance to meet the needs of recipient countries and to bring about a substantial transfer of technology. This is done by providing experts, equipment, fellowships, and training courses. This report addresses the US component of the fellowship program. These fellowships provide opportunities for research and training of scientists, engineers and physicians from developing countries in the peaceful application of nuclear energy. The fellowships are awarded to persons who are, or soon will be, trusted with responsibilities that are important to the development of their countries. Fellowship awards are classified into two groups, those financed by the IAEA General Fund or the UNDP Fund (Type 1 Fellowships and Scientific Visits), and those offered by Member States (Type 2 Fellowships). In placing individuals, preference is given to applicants from countries that are signatories to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons or to the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America.

  15. IAEA Fellowship Program, 1996 report on United States participants

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Fellowship Program began in April 1958 as a part of the Agency`s Technical Cooperation (TC) Program. Through the TC Program, the IAEA provides technical assistance to meet the needs of recipient countries and to bring about a substantial transfer of technology. This is done by providing experts, equipment, fellowships, and training courses. This report addresses the US component of the fellowship program. These fellowships provide opportunities for research and training of scientists, engineers and physicians from developing countries in the peaceful application of nuclear energy. The fellowships are awarded to persons who are, or soon will be, trusted with responsibilities that are important to the development of their countries. Fellowship awards are classified into two groups, those financed by the IAEA General Fund or the UNDP Fund (Type 1 Fellowships and Scientific Visits), and those offered by Member States (Type 2 Fellowships). In placing individuals, preference is given to applicants from countries that are signatories to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons or to the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America.

  16. Additives for high temperature liquid lubricants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Yavrouian, A.H.; Repar, J.; Moran, C.M.; Lawton, E.A.; Anderson, M.S.

    1994-01-15

    The purpose of this task was to perform research for the Department of Energy (DOE) on the synthesis and characterization of additives for liquid lubricants which could lead to significant improvements in the major tribological task area of friction and wear reduction at high temperature. To this end JPL surveyed candidate precursor compounds which are soluble in liquid lubricants, synthesized the most promising of these materials, characterized them and submitted these additives to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for evaluation.

  17. Reporting of NSC Additional (A2) Data Elements. Updated July 29, 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Student Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Since the 2008-09 academic year, the National Student Clearinghouse has provided its participating institutions with the option to include 13 additional data elements in their enrollment submissions. These additional data elements help make Clearinghouse data more comprehensive and enable StudentTracker? participants to utilize a more robust data…

  18. 39 CFR 3050.40 - Additional financial reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... after the end of each fiscal quarter, a quarterly report containing the information required by the... assumptions underlying the relevant actuarial valuations; (5) The effect of a 1 percentage point increase...

  19. 39 CFR 3050.40 - Additional financial reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... after the end of each fiscal quarter, a quarterly report containing the information required by the... assumptions underlying the relevant actuarial valuations; (5) The effect of a 1 percentage point increase...

  20. Does Mandating Nursing Home Participation In Quality Reporting Make A Difference? Evidence from Massachusetts

    PubMed Central

    Mukamel, Dana B.; Ye, Zhiqiu; Glance, Laurent G.; Li, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Background Quality report cards have been shown to be effective in influencing patients' referrals and promoting quality improvement in some instances and not others. In this study we investigate one of the mechanisms that may detract from their effectiveness: voluntary versus mandatory participation of nursing homes in public quality reporting. Objectives To answer two questions: 1) Were the nursing homes choosing not to participate low quality performers relative to those who chose to participate? 2) Once participation became mandatory, did those that did not voluntarily participate initially, improve more than those that participated voluntarily? Research Design Massachusetts published the Massachusetts Satisfaction Survey report card for nursing homes for the years 2005, 2007, and 2009. Nursing homes' participation was voluntary in 2005 and mandatory in 2007 and 2009. We performed a retrospective statistical analysis of the relationship between nursing homes' decision to participate in quality reporting and 12 quality outcomes: deficiency citations, staffing, and 8 survey domains. Subjects 424 Massachusetts nursing homes. Results 67% of nursing homes participated in reporting voluntarily. Volunteer nursing homes had better quality for all measures (significant at the 0.05 level or trending towards significance at the 0.10 level for all but 2). Once reporting became mandatory, non-volunteers improved more than volunteers in all but 2 staffing measures (trending towards significance at the 0.10 level in 5). Conclusions Report cards are more effective if nursing homes' participation is mandated. Non-mandatory reporting systems, as those implemented by some states and professional associations, lead to missed opportunities for quality improvements. PMID:26125418

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: ENVIROFUELS DIESEL FUEL CATALYZER FUEL ADDITIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Environmental Technology Verification Program has tested EnviroFuels diesel fuel additive, called the Diesel Fuel Catalyzer. EnviroFuels has stated that heavy-duty on and off road diesel engines are the intended market for the catalyzer. Preliminary tests conducted indicate...

  2. Measuring Communicative Participation: A Review of Self-Report Instruments in Speech-Language Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Eadie, Tanya L.; Yorkston, Kathryn M.; Klasner, Estelle R.; Dudgeon, Brian J.; Deitz, Jean C.; Baylor, Carolyn R.; Miller, Robert M.; Amtmann, Dagmar

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To assess the adequacy of self-report instruments in speech-language pathology for measuring a construct called communicative participation. Method Six instruments were evaluated relative to (a) the construct measured, (b) the relevance of individual items to communicative participation, and (c) their psychometric properties. Results No instrument exclusively measured communicative participation. Twenty-six percent (n = 34) of all items (N = 132) across the reviewed instruments were consistent with communicative participation. The majority (76%) of the 34 items were associated with general communication, while the remaining 24% of the items were associated with communication at work, during leisure, or for establishing relationships. Instruments varied relative to psychometric properties. Conclusions No existing self-report instruments in speech-language pathology were found to be solely dedicated to measuring communicative participation. Developing an instrument for measuring communicative participation is essential for meeting the requirements of our scope of practice. PMID:17102143

  3. The effect of participation in an incentive-based wellness program on self-reported exercise.

    PubMed

    Crespin, Daniel J; Abraham, Jean M; Rothman, Alexander J

    2016-01-01

    Employers are increasingly trying to promote healthy behaviors, including regular exercise, through wellness programs that offer financial incentives. However, there is limited evidence that these types of programs affect exercise habits within employee populations. In this study, we estimate the effect of participation in an incentive-based wellness program on self-reported exercise. Since 2008, the University of Minnesota's Fitness Rewards Program has offered a $20 monthly incentive to encourage fitness center utilization among its employees. Using 2006 to 2010 health risk assessments and university administrative files for 2972 employees, we conducted a retrospective cohort study utilizing propensity score methods to estimate the effect of participation in the Fitness Rewards Program on self-reported exercise days per week from 2008 to 2010. On average, participation in the program led to an increase of 0.59 vigorous exercise days per week (95% Confidence Interval: 0.42, 0.78) and 0.43 strength-building exercise days per week (95% Confidence Interval: 0.31, 0.58) in 2008 for participants relative to non-participants. Increases in exercise persisted through 2010. Employees reporting less frequent exercise prior to the program were least likely to participate in the program, but when they participated they had the largest increases in exercise compared to non-participants. Offering an incentive for fitness center utilization encourages higher levels of exercise. Future policies may want to concentrate on how to motivate participation among individuals who are less frequently physically active.

  4. The effect of participation in an incentive-based wellness program on self-reported exercise.

    PubMed

    Crespin, Daniel J; Abraham, Jean M; Rothman, Alexander J

    2016-01-01

    Employers are increasingly trying to promote healthy behaviors, including regular exercise, through wellness programs that offer financial incentives. However, there is limited evidence that these types of programs affect exercise habits within employee populations. In this study, we estimate the effect of participation in an incentive-based wellness program on self-reported exercise. Since 2008, the University of Minnesota's Fitness Rewards Program has offered a $20 monthly incentive to encourage fitness center utilization among its employees. Using 2006 to 2010 health risk assessments and university administrative files for 2972 employees, we conducted a retrospective cohort study utilizing propensity score methods to estimate the effect of participation in the Fitness Rewards Program on self-reported exercise days per week from 2008 to 2010. On average, participation in the program led to an increase of 0.59 vigorous exercise days per week (95% Confidence Interval: 0.42, 0.78) and 0.43 strength-building exercise days per week (95% Confidence Interval: 0.31, 0.58) in 2008 for participants relative to non-participants. Increases in exercise persisted through 2010. Employees reporting less frequent exercise prior to the program were least likely to participate in the program, but when they participated they had the largest increases in exercise compared to non-participants. Offering an incentive for fitness center utilization encourages higher levels of exercise. Future policies may want to concentrate on how to motivate participation among individuals who are less frequently physically active. PMID:26577868

  5. Characteristics of Teacher Participation in Curriculum Planning and Reported Acts of Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kardas, Barbara J.; Talmage, Harriet

    A study was designed to identify and examine the relationship between selected characteristics of teacher participation in curriculum planning activities and reported acts of implementation. Subjects were 100 elementary teachers (K-8) who had participated in curriculum planning activities in 27 schools in nine school districts in suburban Chicago.…

  6. Participation in Education and Training, 1980-1994. Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Michael; Carpenter, Peter; Hayden, Martin

    This report draws on the Youth in Transition surveys to present educational participation rates for various categories of Australian youth. The focus is on how educational experiences differ among the categories and on the way in which such differences may have changed over time. Chapter 2 describes the way in which educational participation of…

  7. Does Participation in an Intervention Affect Responses on Self-Report Questionnaires?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baranowski, Tom; Allen, Diane D.; Masse, Louise C.; Wilson, Mark

    2006-01-01

    There has been some concern that participation in an intervention and exposure to a measurement instrument can change participants' interpretation of the items on a self-report questionnaire thereby distorting subsequent responses and biasing results. Differential item functioning (DIF) analysis using item response modeling can ascertain possible…

  8. 45 CFR 61.10 - Reporting exclusions from participation in Federal or State health care programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... or State health care programs. 61.10 Section 61.10 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ON HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS, SUPPLIERS AND PRACTITIONERS Reporting of Information § 61.10 Reporting exclusions from participation in Federal or State health care programs. (a) Who must report. Federal...

  9. 45 CFR 61.10 - Reporting exclusions from participation in Federal or State health care programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... or State health care programs. 61.10 Section 61.10 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ON HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS, SUPPLIERS AND PRACTITIONERS Reporting of Information § 61.10 Reporting exclusions from participation in Federal or State health care programs. (a) Who must report. Federal...

  10. Participation and Performance Reporting for the Alternate Assessment Based on Modified Achievement Standards (AA-MAS). Technical Report 58

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albus, Deb; Thurlow, Martha L.; Lazarus, Sheryl S.

    2011-01-01

    This report examines publicly reported participation and performance data for the alternate assessment based on modified achievement standards (AA-MAS). The authors' analysis of these data included all states publicly reporting AA-MAS data, regardless of whether they had received approval to use the results for Title I accountability calculations.…

  11. Evaluation of certain food additives. Seventy-first report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives.

    PubMed

    2010-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, with a view to recommending acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation and assessment of intake of food additives. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and intake data for certain food additives: branching glycosyltransferase from Rhodothermus obamensis expressed in Bacillus subtilis, cassia gum, cyclamic acid and its salts (dietary exposure assessment), cyclotetraglucose and cyclotetraglucose syrup, ferrous ammonium phosphate, glycerol ester of gum rosin, glycerol ester of tall oil rosin, lycopene from all sources, lycopene extract from tomato, mineral oil (low and medium viscosity) class II and class III, octenyl succinic acid modified gum arabic, sodium hydrogen sulfate and sucrose oligoesters type I and type II. Specifications for the following food additives were revised: diacetyltartaric acid and fatty acid esters of glycerol, ethyl lauroyl arginate, glycerol ester of wood rosin, nisin preparation, nitrous oxide, pectins, starch sodium octenyl succinate, tannic acid, titanium dioxide and triethyl citrate. Annexed to the report are tables summarizing the Committee's recommendations for intakes and toxicological evaluations of the food additives considered.

  12. Evaluation of certain food additives and contaminants. Eightieth report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives and contaminants and to prepare specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a brief description of general considerations addressed at the meeting, including updates on matters of interest to the work of the Committee. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and/or dietary exposure data for seven food additives (benzoates; lipase from Fusarium heterosporum expressed in Ogataea polymorpha; magnesium stearate; maltotetraohydrolase from Pseudomonas stutzeri expressed in Bacillus licheniformis; mixed β-glucanase, cellulase and xylanase from Rasamsonia emersonii; mixed β-glucanase and xylanase from Disporotrichum dimorphosporum; polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)- polyethylene glycol (PEG) graft copolymer) and two groups of contaminants (non-dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls and pyrrolizidine alkaloids). Specifications for the following food additives were revised or withdrawn: advantame; annatto extracts (solavnt extracted bixin, ad solvent-extracted norbixin); food additives containing aluminium and/or silicon (aluminium silicate; calcium aluminium silicate; calcium silicate; silicon dioxide, amorphous; sodium aluminium silicate); and glycerol ester of gum rosin. Annexed to the report are tables or text summarizing the toxicological and dietary exposure information and information on specifications as well as the Committees recommendations on the food additives and contaminants considered at this meeting.

  13. Evaluation of certain food additives and contaminants. Eightieth report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives and contaminants and to prepare specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a brief description of general considerations addressed at the meeting, including updates on matters of interest to the work of the Committee. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and/or dietary exposure data for seven food additives (benzoates; lipase from Fusarium heterosporum expressed in Ogataea polymorpha; magnesium stearate; maltotetraohydrolase from Pseudomonas stutzeri expressed in Bacillus licheniformis; mixed β-glucanase, cellulase and xylanase from Rasamsonia emersonii; mixed β-glucanase and xylanase from Disporotrichum dimorphosporum; polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)- polyethylene glycol (PEG) graft copolymer) and two groups of contaminants (non-dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls and pyrrolizidine alkaloids). Specifications for the following food additives were revised or withdrawn: advantame; annatto extracts (solavnt extracted bixin, ad solvent-extracted norbixin); food additives containing aluminium and/or silicon (aluminium silicate; calcium aluminium silicate; calcium silicate; silicon dioxide, amorphous; sodium aluminium silicate); and glycerol ester of gum rosin. Annexed to the report are tables or text summarizing the toxicological and dietary exposure information and information on specifications as well as the Committees recommendations on the food additives and contaminants considered at this meeting. PMID:27514183

  14. Evaluation of certain food additives. Fifty-first report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives.

    PubMed

    2000-01-01

    This report presents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, with a view to recommending Acceptable Daily Intakes (ADIs) for humans, and to prepare specifications for the identity and purity of food additives. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of food additives, the assessment of intake of food additives, and the establishment and revision of specifications, including comments concerning enzyme preparations derived from genetically modified microorganisms and limits for heavy metals. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological data on specific food additives, including enzyme preparations (alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase and maltogenic amylase), flavouring agents (trans-anethole, furfural and menthol), food colours (curcumin and riboflavin from genetically modified Bacillus subtilis), glazing agents (medium- and low-viscosity mineral oils), preservatives (sulfur dioxide and sulfites), a sweetening agent (stevioside), thickening agents (carrageenan, processed Eucheuma seaweed and enzymatically hydrolysed sodium carboxymethyl cellulose), gamma-cyclodextrin, glucono-delta-lactone and the calcium, magnesium, potassium and sodium salts of gluconic acid, and polyglycitol syrup. The Committee also evaluated the safety of various groups of flavouring agents and assessed the intake of specific food additives, including benzoates, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), sulfites and tert-butylhydroquinone (TBHQ). Annexed to the report are tables summarizing the Committee's recommendations for ADIs of the food additives considered, changes in the status of specifications for these substances and specific flavouring agents, and further toxicological studies and other information required or desired. PMID:10876377

  15. Evaluation of certain food additives. Fifty-first report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives.

    PubMed

    2000-01-01

    This report presents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, with a view to recommending Acceptable Daily Intakes (ADIs) for humans, and to prepare specifications for the identity and purity of food additives. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of food additives, the assessment of intake of food additives, and the establishment and revision of specifications, including comments concerning enzyme preparations derived from genetically modified microorganisms and limits for heavy metals. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological data on specific food additives, including enzyme preparations (alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase and maltogenic amylase), flavouring agents (trans-anethole, furfural and menthol), food colours (curcumin and riboflavin from genetically modified Bacillus subtilis), glazing agents (medium- and low-viscosity mineral oils), preservatives (sulfur dioxide and sulfites), a sweetening agent (stevioside), thickening agents (carrageenan, processed Eucheuma seaweed and enzymatically hydrolysed sodium carboxymethyl cellulose), gamma-cyclodextrin, glucono-delta-lactone and the calcium, magnesium, potassium and sodium salts of gluconic acid, and polyglycitol syrup. The Committee also evaluated the safety of various groups of flavouring agents and assessed the intake of specific food additives, including benzoates, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), sulfites and tert-butylhydroquinone (TBHQ). Annexed to the report are tables summarizing the Committee's recommendations for ADIs of the food additives considered, changes in the status of specifications for these substances and specific flavouring agents, and further toxicological studies and other information required or desired.

  16. 45 CFR 60.15 - Reporting exclusions from participation in Federal or state health care programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... or state health care programs. 60.15 Section 60.15 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human... exclusions from participation in Federal or state health care programs. (a) Who must report. Federal Government agencies and state law and fraud enforcement agencies must report health care...

  17. 45 CFR 60.15 - Reporting exclusions from participation in Federal or state health care programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... or state health care programs. 60.15 Section 60.15 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... exclusions from participation in Federal or state health care programs. (a) Who must report. Federal Government agencies and state law and fraud enforcement agencies must report health care...

  18. Reporting and referring research participants: ethical challenges for investigators studying children and youth.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Celia B

    1994-01-01

    Researchers studying at-risk and socially disenfranchised child and adolescent populations are facing ethical dilemmas not previously encountered in the laboratory or the clinic. One such set of ethical challenges involves whether to: (a) share with guardians research-derived information regarding participant risk, (b) provide participants with service referrals, or (c) report to local authorities problems uncovered during the course of investigation. The articles assembled for this special section address the complex issues of deciding if, when, and how to report or provide referrals for research participants who are minors (referred to hereafter as minor research participants). This paper focuses on two factors underlying these decisions: the validity of risk estimates and meta-ethical positions on scientific responsiblity. It is suggested that, before sharing information about minor research participants investigators should do the following: critically examine the diagnostic validity of developmental measures, include the scope and limitations of information sharing in informed consent procedures, and become familiar with state reporting laws. I discuss the impact of the traditionally accepted act utilitarian meta-ethical position on the investigator-participant relationship, and I recommend consideration of alternative positions as a step toward developing a research ethic of scientific responsibility and care.

  19. Differences Between Participants and Non-Participants in Campus Demonstrations at the University of Maryland. Research Report #2-71.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimball, Ronald L.; Sedlacek, William E.

    Differences between background characteristics and attitudes of participants and nonparticipants in campus demonstrations were studied. An anonymous questionnaire was administered to 5,671 University of Maryland, College Park, undergraduates during fall registration, 1970. Results show that 50 percent of the sample had participated in some campus…

  20. The Parent Professional Partnership: African American Parents' Participation in the Special Education Process. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Norma N.; And Others

    This report describes a project that sought to ascertain the educational expectations and actual levels of participation by Black, low to low-middle income parents of 36 regular and special education students entering three Baltimore (Maryland) public schools. The parents' initial expectations and the development of these expectations over the…

  1. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 23 - Uniform Report of ACDBE Participation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... financial assistance and AIP number. 2. Provide the name and contact information (phone, fax, e-mail) for... 5 concerns all non-car rental concession activity covered by 49 CFR part 23 during the reporting... as part of the base for ACDBE goals, the cells for total management contract participation and...

  2. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 23 - Uniform Report of ACDBE Participation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... financial assistance and AIP number. 2. Provide the name and contact information (phone, fax, e-mail) for... 5 concerns all non-car rental concession activity covered by 49 CFR part 23 during the reporting... as part of the base for ACDBE goals, the cells for total management contract participation and...

  3. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 23 - Uniform Report of ACDBE Participation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... financial assistance and AIP number. 2. Provide the name and contact information (phone, fax, e-mail) for... 5 concerns all non-car rental concession activity covered by 49 CFR part 23 during the reporting... as part of the base for ACDBE goals, the cells for total management contract participation and...

  4. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 23 - Uniform Report of ACDBE Participation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... financial assistance and AIP number. 2. Provide the name and contact information (phone, fax, e-mail) for... 5 concerns all non-car rental concession activity covered by 49 CFR part 23 during the reporting... as part of the base for ACDBE goals, the cells for total management contract participation and...

  5. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 23 - Uniform Report of ACDBE Participation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... financial assistance and AIP number. 2. Provide the name and contact information (phone, fax, e-mail) for... 5 concerns all non-car rental concession activity covered by 49 CFR part 23 during the reporting... as part of the base for ACDBE goals, the cells for total management contract participation and...

  6. 15 CFR 310.9 - Report of the Secretary on Federal participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Report of the Secretary on Federal participation. 310.9 Section 310.9 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MISCELLANEOUS REGULATIONS OFFICIAL...

  7. Educators' Perceptions and Reported Behaviors Associated with Participation in Informal, Online Professional Development Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fucoloro, Deborah J.

    2012-01-01

    Few comprehensive, descriptive studies regarding educator use of social media for informal professional learning have been conducted. The purpose of this study was to examine, through a survey tool with both qualitative and quantitative components, educators' perceptions and reported behaviors associated with participation in informal, online…

  8. A Learning Package in Energy Conservation for Participants in the Home Building Industry. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston Univ., TX. College of Architecture.

    Presented is the final report for a project designed to develop an experimental learning package for educating participants in the home building industry in energy conservation. The project addresses deficiencies in the present knowledge status of members of the home building industry, effective marketing techniques for energy conserving homes,…

  9. Stationary Cycling and Children with Cerebral Palsy: Case Reports for Two Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siebert, Kara L.; DeMuth, Sharon K.; Knutson, Loretta M.; Fowler, Eileen G.

    2010-01-01

    These case reports describe a stationary cycling intervention and outcomes for two child participants (P1 and P2) with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy. Each child completed a 12-week, 30-session cycling intervention consisting of strengthening and cardiorespiratory fitness phases. P1 exhibited higher training intensities, particularly during the…

  10. 20 CFR 641.680 - How should grantees report on participants who are co-enrolled?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PROVISIONS GOVERNING THE SENIOR COMMUNITY SERVICE EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM Private Sector Training Projects Under Section 502(e) of the OAA § 641.680 How should grantees report on participants who are co-enrolled? Referrals from a regular SCSEP grantee to a 502(e) only grantee that...

  11. Nonelite exercise-related injuries: Participant reported frequency, management and perceptions of their consequences

    PubMed Central

    Grice, A; Kingsbury, S R; Conaghan, P G

    2014-01-01

    This mixed methods study explored the frequency of sport/exercise-related injuries in nonelite sport, participant-reported management and perceptions of potential injury consequences. Focus group participants, who trained two to four times a week and had previously sustained musculoskeletal sports-related injuries, reported seeking medical advice secondary to advice from teammates or online research. General practitioners were viewed as gatekeepers to specialist secondary care and less able to effectively treat sport-related injuries. Participants displayed limited awareness of potential future implications of injury, and considered physical and psychological benefits of exercise more valuable than potential injury-associated risks. In the survey of physically active people, over half reported sustaining an exercise-related injury (562/1002, 56%). Previously injured respondents were less likely to consider consulting a health professional for injury-related advice than those with no injury history (45% vs 64%; P < 0.001) and more likely to continue exercising despite injury (51% vs 37%; P < 0.001). Concerns about injuries largely related to short-term issues; only 32% were concerned about possible long-term joint problems including osteoarthritis. Exercise-related injury was common in nonelite exercise participants. There was some dissatisfaction with care pathways for sports-related injuries and a lack of awareness about appropriate injury management and potential consequences of injury, particularly in the long-term. PMID:24000831

  12. 48 CFR 1852.235-74 - Additional Reports of Work-Research and Development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-Research and Development. 1852.235-74 Section 1852.235-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL... Provisions and Clauses 1852.235-74 Additional Reports of Work—Research and Development. As prescribed in 1835.070(e), insert a clause substantially the same as the following: Additional Reports of...

  13. 48 CFR 1852.235-74 - Additional Reports of Work-Research and Development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-Research and Development. 1852.235-74 Section 1852.235-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL... Provisions and Clauses 1852.235-74 Additional Reports of Work—Research and Development. As prescribed in 1835.070(e), insert a clause substantially the same as the following: Additional Reports of...

  14. 48 CFR 1852.235-74 - Additional Reports of Work-Research and Development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-Research and Development. 1852.235-74 Section 1852.235-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL... Provisions and Clauses 1852.235-74 Additional Reports of Work—Research and Development. As prescribed in 1835.070(e), insert a clause substantially the same as the following: Additional Reports of...

  15. 48 CFR 1852.235-74 - Additional Reports of Work-Research and Development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-Research and Development. 1852.235-74 Section 1852.235-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL... Provisions and Clauses 1852.235-74 Additional Reports of Work—Research and Development. As prescribed in 1835.070(e), insert a clause substantially the same as the following: Additional Reports of...

  16. 48 CFR 1852.235-74 - Additional Reports of Work-Research and Development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-Research and Development. 1852.235-74 Section 1852.235-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL... Provisions and Clauses 1852.235-74 Additional Reports of Work—Research and Development. As prescribed in 1835.070(e), insert a clause substantially the same as the following: Additional Reports of...

  17. Compatibility of lubricant additives with HFC refrigerants and synthetic lubricants. Final report, Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Cavestri, R.C.

    1997-07-01

    Part one of this research provides manufacturers of components of air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment with a useful list of lubricant additives, sources, functional properties and chemical species. The list in part one is comprised of domestic lubricant additive suppliers and the results of a literature search that was specifically targeted for additives reported to be useful in polyolester chemistry.

  18. A Real-Time Safety and Quality Reporting System: Assessment of Clinical Data and Staff Participation

    SciTech Connect

    Rahn, Douglas A.; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Mundt, Arno J.; Pawlicki, Todd

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To report on the use of an incident learning system in a radiation oncology clinic, along with a review of staff participation. Methods and Materials: On September 24, 2010, our department initiated an online real-time voluntary reporting system for safety issues, called the Radiation Oncology Quality Reporting System (ROQRS). We reviewed these reports from the program's inception through January 18, 2013 (2 years, 3 months, 25 days) to assess error reports (defined as both near-misses and incidents of inaccurate treatment). Results: During the study interval, there were 60,168 fractions of external beam radiation therapy and 955 brachytherapy procedures. There were 298 entries in the ROQRS system, among which 108 errors were reported. There were 31 patients with near-misses reported and 27 patients with incidents of inaccurate treatment reported. These incidents of inaccurate treatment occurred in 68 total treatment fractions (0.11% of treatments delivered during the study interval). None of these incidents of inaccurate treatment resulted in deviation from the prescription by 5% or more. A solution to the errors was documented in ROQRS in 65% of the cases. Errors occurred as repeated errors in 22% of the cases. A disproportionate number of the incidents of inaccurate treatment were due to improper patient setup at the linear accelerator (P<.001). Physician participation in ROQRS was nonexistent initially, but improved after an education program. Conclusions: Incident learning systems are a useful and practical means of improving safety and quality in patient care.

  19. The impact of syphilis mass treatment one year later: self-reported behaviour change among participants.

    PubMed

    Rekart, Michael L; Wong, Thomas; Wong, Elsie; Hutchinson, Kylie; Ogilvie, Gina

    2005-08-01

    In 2000, syphilis mass treatment using oral azithromycin was delivered to at-risk British Columbians during a sex trade-related outbreak. The initiative included education, counselling and referral. This cross-sectional, observational study examines knowledge, attitudes and self-reported behaviour after one year among mass treatment participants compared with eligible non-participants. Participants self-reported positive changes: reduction in sexual partners overall (P=0.001) and for sex workers (P<0.01), decrease in unprotected oral sex (P=0.03), knowledge of asymptomatic syphilis (P=0.02), positive attitudes to mass treatment (P=0.02) and to the street nurses (P=0.01). Increased awareness was associated with increased condom use for vaginal sex overall (P=0.02) and for sex workers (P=0.03) and increased condom use for oral sex (P=0.05). There was no difference in syphilis incidence. Syphilis outbreak interventions that include education, support and referral can result in long-term positive behaviour changes. PMID:16105193

  20. 32 CFR Appendix A to 32 Cfr Part 65 - Additional Reporting Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Additional Reporting Requirements A Appendix A to 32 CFR Part 65 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN POST-9/11 GI BILL Pt. 65, App. A Appendix A to 32 CFR Part 65—Additional...

  1. 32 CFR Appendix A to 32 Cfr Part 65 - Additional Reporting Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Additional Reporting Requirements A Appendix A to 32 CFR Part 65 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN POST-9/11 GI BILL Pt. 65, App. A Appendix A to 32 CFR Part 65—Additional...

  2. Reported changes in sexual behaviour and human papillomavirus knowledge in Peruvian female sex workers following participation in a human papillomavirus vaccine trial.

    PubMed

    Brown, B; Blas, M M; Heidari, O; Carcamo, C; Halsey, N A

    2013-07-01

    Limited data exist on the effect of clinical trial participation on sexual behavioural change. Two hundred female sex workers working in Lima, Peru received human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in either the standard (0, 2, 6 months) or modified (0, 3, 6 months) schedule. Participants received comprehensive screening and treatment for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), counselling on safe sex practices, education about HPV and the HPV vaccine, contraceptives (oral and condoms) and family planning at each visit. We assessed vaccine completion rates, change in sexual practices, and changes in HPV knowledge before and after participation in the vaccine trial. There were high rates of vaccine completion, 91% overall. The estimated number of reported new and total clients over a 30-day period decreased significantly (P < 0.001). Knowledge about HPV and HPV-related disease increased among all participants. In addition, all participants listed at least one preventive strategy during the month 7 follow-up survey. PMID:23970767

  3. 36 CFR 1206.86 - What additional materials must I submit with the final narrative report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What additional materials must I submit with the final narrative report? 1206.86 Section 1206.86 Parks, Forests, and Public... narrative report? You must submit the materials required in the NHPRC grant announcements and in the...

  4. 36 CFR 1206.86 - What additional materials must I submit with the final narrative report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true What additional materials must I submit with the final narrative report? 1206.86 Section 1206.86 Parks, Forests, and Public... narrative report? You must submit the materials required in the NHPRC grant announcements and in the...

  5. 36 CFR 1206.86 - What additional materials must I submit with the final narrative report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What additional materials must I submit with the final narrative report? 1206.86 Section 1206.86 Parks, Forests, and Public... narrative report? You must submit the materials required in the NHPRC grant announcements and in the...

  6. 36 CFR 1206.86 - What additional materials must I submit with the final narrative report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional materials must I submit with the final narrative report? 1206.86 Section 1206.86 Parks, Forests, and Public... narrative report? You must submit the materials determined by the Commission as found in the NHPRC...

  7. 36 CFR 1206.86 - What additional materials must I submit with the final narrative report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What additional materials must I submit with the final narrative report? 1206.86 Section 1206.86 Parks, Forests, and Public... narrative report? You must submit the materials required in the NHPRC grant announcements and in the...

  8. 32 CFR Appendix A to 32 Cfr Part 65 - Additional Reporting Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to 32 CFR Part 65 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN POST-9/11 GI BILL Pt. 65, App. A Appendix A to 32 CFR Part 65—Additional Reporting... applicable or unknown, report all zeros 293 b. Commissioned Officer Accession Program Source Code The...

  9. CAL Community School: An Invitation to Patrons To Participate. 1995-96 Report to the Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAL Community School, Latimer, IA.

    This annual report provides information on the CAL Community School, a small K-12 school that serves the communities of Alexander, Coulter, and Latimer, Iowa. The mission of the school is to provide a positive educational environment, maintain high academic standards, and promote the value of life-long learning among students. In addition, the…

  10. Brief report: Performing on the stage, the field, or both? Australian adolescent extracurricular activity participation and self-concept.

    PubMed

    Blomfield, Corey J; Barber, Bonnie L

    2009-06-01

    The relationship between Australian adolescents' participation in extracurricular activities and their self-concepts was investigated. A total of 1489 adolescents (56% female; mean age 13.8 years) completed measures of social self-concept, academic self-concept, and general self-worth, and reported on their extracurricular activity participation. In general, participation in any type of extracurricular activity was associated with a higher social and academic self-concept, and general self-worth, compared to no participation. Adolescents who participated in both sports and non-sports also reported a more positive social self-concept and general self-worth, compared to those who only participated in one of the activity types. This research provides support for extracurricular activities as a context facilitative of positive self-concept, and demonstrates the importance of a mixed participation profile for an adolescent's self-concept.

  11. Parental perceptions surrounding polio and self-reported non-participation in polio supplementary immunization activities in Karachi, Pakistan: a mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    Khowaja, Asif Raza; Khan, Sher Ali; Nizam, Naveeda; Omer, Saad Bin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess parent’s knowledge and perceptions surrounding polio and polio vaccination, self-reported participation in polio supplementary immunization activities (SIAs) targeting children aged < 5 years, and reasons for non-participation. Methods The mixed methods study began with a cross-sectional survey in Karachi, Pakistan. A structured questionnaire was administered to assess parental knowledge of polio and participation in polio SIAs conducted in September and October 2011. Additionally, 30 parents of Pashtun ethnicity (a high-risk group) who refused to vaccinate their children were interviewed in depth to determine why. Descriptive and bivariate analyses by ethnic and socioeconomic group were performed for quantitative data; thematic analysis was conducted for qualitative interviews with Pashtun parents. Findings Of 1017 parents surveyed, 412 (41%) had never heard of polio; 132 (13%) did not participate in one SIA and 157 (15.4%) did not participate in either SIA. Among non-participants, 34 (21.6%) reported not having been contacted by a vaccinator; 116 (73.9%) reported having refused to participate, and 7 (4.5%) reported that the child was absent from home when the vaccinator visited. Refusals clustered in low-income Pashtun (43/441; 9.8%) and high-income families of any ethnic background (71/153; 46.4%). Low-income Pashtuns were more likely to not have participated in polio SIAs than low-income non-Pashtuns (odds ratio, OR: 7.1; 95% confidence interval, CI: 3.47–14.5). Reasons commonly cited among Pashtuns for refusing vaccination included fear of sterility; lack of faith in the polio vaccine; scepticism about the vaccination programme, and fear that the vaccine might contain religiously forbidden ingredients. Conclusion In Karachi, interruption of polio transmission requires integrated and participatory community interventions targeting high-risk populations. PMID:23226894

  12. Widening the participation gap: the effect of educational track on reported voting in England.

    PubMed

    Janmaat, Jan Germen; Mostafa, Tarek; Hoskins, Bryony

    2014-06-01

    This article explores the effect of tracked education in upper secondary on voting behaviour. It discusses two causal mechanisms that link tracked education to greater disparities of political participation: the curriculum and peer socialization. Data of Waves 1, 2, 5 and 7 of the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England (LSYPE) is used to assess the hypothesis that educational track has an independent effect on voting. Controlling for several pre- and post-track influences, the paper shows that students who have taken vocational courses in less prestigious schools indeed have lower reported voting levels at age 20 than those who have pursued an academic qualification (A levels) in prestigious schools. It is proposed that the effect of tracked education on political participation is likely to vary across Europe and that this variation may well be explained by differences across Europe in the extent to which the academic and vocational tracks are integrated, both in terms of the curriculum and in their social intake.

  13. Widening the participation gap: the effect of educational track on reported voting in England.

    PubMed

    Janmaat, Jan Germen; Mostafa, Tarek; Hoskins, Bryony

    2014-06-01

    This article explores the effect of tracked education in upper secondary on voting behaviour. It discusses two causal mechanisms that link tracked education to greater disparities of political participation: the curriculum and peer socialization. Data of Waves 1, 2, 5 and 7 of the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England (LSYPE) is used to assess the hypothesis that educational track has an independent effect on voting. Controlling for several pre- and post-track influences, the paper shows that students who have taken vocational courses in less prestigious schools indeed have lower reported voting levels at age 20 than those who have pursued an academic qualification (A levels) in prestigious schools. It is proposed that the effect of tracked education on political participation is likely to vary across Europe and that this variation may well be explained by differences across Europe in the extent to which the academic and vocational tracks are integrated, both in terms of the curriculum and in their social intake. PMID:24793395

  14. U.S. Department of Education Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad Program, Malaysia June 26 - July 24, 1993. Participants' Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malaysian-American Commission on Educational Exchange, Kuala Lumpur.

    This document contains reports by 14 participants of a Fulbright-Hays seminar in Malaysia. Participants were introduced to Malaysia and the Malaysian way of life through talks, discussion and field trips to schools, and educational institutions and cultural centers throughout the country. At every location the group was given presentations on…

  15. Using Biometrics for Participant Identification in a Research Study: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Corby, Patricia M.; Schleyer, Titus; Spallek, Heiko; Hart, Thomas C.; Weyant, Robert J.; Corby, Andrea L.; Bretz, Walter A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper illustrates the use of biometrics through the application of an iris-based biometrics system for identifying twins and their parents in a longitudinal research study. It explores the use of biometrics (science of measuring physical or anatomical characteristics of individuals) as a technology for correct identification of individuals during longitudinal studies to help ensure data fidelity. Examples of these circumstances include longitudinal epidemiological and genetic studies, clinical trials, and multicenter collaborative studies where accurate identification of subjects over time can be difficult when the subject may be young or an unreliable source of identification information. The use of technology can automate the process of subject identification thereby reducing the need to depend on subject recall during repeated visits thus helping to ensure data quality. This case report provides insights that may serve as useful hints for those responsible for planning system implementation that involves participants' authentication that would require a more secure form of identification. PMID:16357359

  16. Undergraduate research studies program at participating institutions of the HBCU Fossil Energy Consortium. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bota, K.B.

    1991-12-31

    The primary objective of this research program is to expose students in the Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Fossil Energy Consortium Institutions to energy and fossil fuels research, to stimulate their interest in the sciences and engineering and to encourage them to pursue graduate studies. This report provides the research accomplishment of the various students who participated in the program. Research results are presented on the following topics: Energy Enhancement and Pollutant Reduction in Coal by Cryogenic Diminution; Competition of NO and SO{sub 2} for OH Generated witin Electrical Aerosol Analyzers; Dispersed Iron Catalysts for Coal Gasification; NQR/NMR Studies of Copper-Cobalt Catalysts for Syngas Concersion; Catalytic gasification of Coal Chars by Potassium Sulfate and Ferrous Sulfate Mixtures; A New Method for Cleaning and Beneficiation of Ultrafine Coal; Characterization Studies of Coal-Derived Liquids; Study of Coal Liquefaction Catalysts and Removal of Certain Toxic Heavy Metal Ions from Coal Conversion Process Wastewaters.

  17. 45 CFR 287.60 - Are there additional financial reporting and auditing requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... generally subject to the requirements of 45 CFR 92.41. (b) NEW Program funds and activities are subject to the audit requirement of the Single Audit Act of 1984 (45 CFR 92.26). (c) A NEW Program grantee must... 45 Public Welfare 2 2014-10-01 2012-10-01 true Are there additional financial reporting...

  18. 45 CFR 287.60 - Are there additional financial reporting and auditing requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... generally subject to the requirements of 45 CFR 92.41. (b) NEW Program funds and activities are subject to the audit requirement of the Single Audit Act of 1984 (45 CFR 92.26). (c) A NEW Program grantee must... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Are there additional financial reporting...

  19. 45 CFR 287.60 - Are there additional financial reporting and auditing requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... generally subject to the requirements of 45 CFR 92.41. (b) NEW Program funds and activities are subject to the audit requirement of the Single Audit Act of 1984 (45 CFR 92.26). (c) A NEW Program grantee must... 45 Public Welfare 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Are there additional financial reporting...

  20. 17 CFR 4.27 - Additional reporting by advisors of certain large commodity pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... advisors of certain large commodity pools. 4.27 Section 4.27 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION COMMODITY POOL OPERATORS AND COMMODITY TRADING ADVISORS Commodity Pool Operators § 4.27 Additional reporting by advisors of certain large commodity pools. (a) General...

  1. 17 CFR 4.27 - Additional reporting by advisors of certain large commodity pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... advisors of certain large commodity pools. 4.27 Section 4.27 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION COMMODITY POOL OPERATORS AND COMMODITY TRADING ADVISORS Commodity Pool Operators § 4.27 Additional reporting by advisors of certain large commodity pools. (a) General...

  2. 17 CFR 4.27 - Additional reporting by advisors of commodity pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... advisors of commodity pools. 4.27 Section 4.27 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION COMMODITY POOL OPERATORS AND COMMODITY TRADING ADVISORS Commodity Pool Operators § 4.27 Additional reporting by advisors of commodity pools. Except as otherwise expressly provided in this section, CPOs...

  3. Microcephaly-lymphedema syndrome: report of a family with short stature as additional manifestation.

    PubMed

    Strenge, S; Froster, U G

    1998-12-28

    Patients with the rare autosomal dominant microcephaly-lymphedema syndrome have apparently normal intelligence. We report on a boy with microcephaly, lymphedema, and short stature as an additional manifestation. The family history of our patient suggests autosomal dominant inheritance with reduced penetrance and variable expressivity. However, X-linked inheritance cannot be excluded. PMID:9880217

  4. The National Advisory Committee on Hyperkinesis and Food Additives. Report to the Nutrition Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Advisory Committee on Hyperkinesis and Food Additives.

    Reviewed in the report is research on hyperkinesis, specifically B. Feingold's hypotheses on the role of salicylates and food additives. Criticisms of Feingold's studies are seen to include methodological weaknesses (no double blind controlled experiments), nutritional concerns over the adequacy of prescribed diets, and lack of a specifically…

  5. RELIABILITY OF REPORTING ON LIFESTYLE AND AGRICULTURAL FACTORS BY A SAMPLE OF PARTICIPANTS IN THE AGRICULTURAL HEALTH STUDY FROM IOWA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Repeat interviews from 4,088 Iowa pesticide applicators participating in the Agricultural Health Study provided the opportunity to evaluate the reliability of self-reported information on pesticide use and various demographic and lifestyle factors. Self-completed questionnaire...

  6. Pay-for-performance and public reporting program participation and administrative challenges among small- and medium-sized physician practices.

    PubMed

    Hearld, Larry R; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Shi, Yunfeng; Casalino, Lawrence P

    2014-06-01

    A key component of efforts to improve the quality of care in the United States is the use of public reporting and pay-for-performance programs. Little is known, however, about the extent to which small- and medium-sized physician practices are participating in these programs. This study examined the participation of small- and medium-sized physician practices in pay-for-performance and public reporting programs and the characteristics of the participating practices. Using cross-sectional data from a national sample of 1,734 small- and medium-sized physician practices throughout the United States, we found that many practices (61.2%) were participating in at least one program, while far fewer (19.2%) were participating in multiple programs. Among practices participating in multiple programs, relatively few (21.9%) reported high levels of administrative problems due to a lack of standardization on performance measures. The study also suggests that some structural features are associated with participation and may provide leverage points for fostering participation. PMID:24263052

  7. Report on student participants at the 2003 Annual Meeting of the National Society of Black Physicists

    SciTech Connect

    Julius Dollison, Michael Neuchatz

    2003-07-01

    . Student participants at the conference were asked to provide data on various aspects of their backgrounds and demographic characteristics. We found that there were significantly more undergraduate participants than graduate participants present at the conference (65% versus 35%). More than two-thirds of the undergraduate student attendees were upperclassmen. On the other hand, close to half of the graduate student attendees were still in the early stages of their graduate career. The overall median age was 23 years. The median age for undergraduates was 21, while for graduate students it was 29 years. We found no age difference between undergraduate males and females. However, there was an age difference between graduate male and female students. While among females the median age was 27, for graduate males the median age was 30 years. As shown, we see that women were well represented at this year's conference. The overall proportion of female student respondents was 41%. Among undergraduates, the proportion of females was 48%. While comparable data on all Black physics students nationwide are not available, this number bachelors recipients going to women, as reported by Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) on AIP's most recent ''Enrollments and Degrees Study''. HBCUs confer more than half of all physics degrees by African-Americans in the US. The proportion of females among graduate student participants at the NSBP conference was 29%.

  8. School Meal Program Participation and Its Association with Dietary Patterns and Childhood Obesity. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gleason, Philip; Briefel, Ronette; Wilson, Ander; Dodd, Allison Hedley

    2009-01-01

    We used data from the School Nutrition Dietary Assessment III Study to examine the dietary patterns of school meal program participants and nonparticipants and the relationship between school meal participation and children's BMI and risk of overweight or obesity. School Breakfast Program (SBP) participants consumed more low nutrient energy dense…

  9. Participation in Sports by People with Intellectual Disabilities in England: A Brief Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Janet; Emerson, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Background: Participation in sports has been linked to a range of physical, social and mental health benefits. Little is known about the extent to which people with intellectual disabilities take part in sports. This study looks at participation in sports and factors associated with participation by people with intellectual disabilities in…

  10. Acceptance test report for the 241-AN-107 caustic addition mixer pump data logger

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, J.L.

    1996-04-05

    The Acceptance Test Procedure for the 241-AN-107 Caustic Addition Mixer Pump Data logger, WHC-SD-WM-ATP-149, was started on September 25, 1995, and completed November 13, 1995. K.G. Carothers of Tank Waste Remediation Engineering requested the test procedure and ICF Kaiser Control Systems Engineering group wrote the test procedure and executed it at the 305 building in 300 area and at the 241-AN Tank Farm in 200 East area. The purpose of this report is to document that the Caustic addition Mixer Pump Data logger, functioned as intended as installed at 241-AN-107 tank farm.

  11. Adults' strategies for simple addition and multiplication: verbal self-reports and the operand recognition paradigm.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, Arron W S; Campbell, Jamie I D

    2011-05-01

    Accurate measurement of cognitive strategies is important in diverse areas of psychological research. Strategy self-reports are a common measure, but C. Thevenot, M. Fanget, and M. Fayol (2007) proposed a more objective method to distinguish different strategies in the context of mental arithmetic. In their operand recognition paradigm, speed of recognition memory for problem operands after solving a problem indexes strategy (e.g., direct memory retrieval vs. a procedural strategy). Here, in 2 experiments, operand recognition time was the same following simple addition or multiplication, but, consistent with a wide variety of previous research, strategy reports indicated much greater use of procedures (e.g., counting) for addition than multiplication. Operation, problem size (e.g., 2 + 3 vs. 8 + 9), and operand format (digits vs. words) had interactive effects on reported procedure use that were not reflected in recognition performance. Regression analyses suggested that recognition time was influenced at least as much by the relative difficulty of the preceding problem as by the strategy used. The findings indicate that the operand recognition paradigm is not a reliable substitute for strategy reports and highlight the potential impact of difficulty-related carryover effects in sequential cognitive tasks. PMID:21261421

  12. PAT-1 safety analysis report addendum author responses to request for additional information.

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, Ruth F.; Schmale, David T.; Kalan, Robert J.; Akin, Lili A.; Miller, David Russell; Knorovsky, Gerald Albert; Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki; Lopez, Carlos; Harding, David Cameron; Jones, Perry L.; Morrow, Charles W.

    2010-09-01

    The Plutonium Air Transportable Package, Model PAT-1, is certified under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) per Certificate of Compliance (CoC) USA/0361B(U)F-96 (currently Revision 9). The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) submitted SAND Report SAND2009-5822 to NRC that documented the incorporation of plutonium (Pu) metal as a new payload for the PAT-1 package. NRC responded with a Request for Additional Information (RAI), identifying information needed in connection with its review of the application. The purpose of this SAND report is to provide the authors responses to each RAI. SAND Report SAND2010-6106 containing the proposed changes to the Addendum is provided separately.

  13. A technology to measure multiple driving behaviors without self-report or participant reactivity.

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, T E; Geller, E S

    2001-01-01

    An in-vehicle information system (IVIS) was used to videotape drivers (N = 61) without their knowledge while driving 22 miles in normal traffic. The drivers were told that they were participating in a study of direction following and map reading. Two data-coding procedures were used to analyze videotapes. Safety-related behaviors were counted during consecutive 15-s intervals of a driving trial, and the occurrence of certain safety-related behaviors was assessed under critical conditions. These two methods of data coding were assessed for practicality, reliability, and sensitivity. Interobserver agreement for the five different driving behaviors ranged from 85% to 95%. Within-subject variability in safe driving was more pronounced among younger drivers and decreased as a function of age. Contrary to previous research that has relied on self-reports, driver risk taking did not vary significantly as a function of gender. These results are used to illustrate the capabilities of the technology introduced here to design and evaluate behavior-analytic interventions to increase safe driving. PMID:11317986

  14. Stationary cycling and children with cerebral palsy: case reports for two participants.

    PubMed

    Siebert, Kara L; DeMuth, Sharon K; Knutson, Loretta M; Fowler, Eileen G

    2010-05-01

    These case reports describe a stationary cycling intervention and outcomes for two child participants (P1 and P2) with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy. Each child completed a 12-week, 30-session cycling intervention consisting of strengthening and cardiorespiratory fitness phases. P1 exhibited higher training intensities, particularly during the cardiorespiratory phase. Average training heart rates were 59% and 35% of maximum heart rate for P1 and P2, respectively. Lower extremity peak knee flexor and extensor moments, gross motor function (Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM-66)), preferred walking speed (thirty-second walk test), and walking endurance (600-yard walk-run test) were measured pre- and postintervention. Changes in outcome measurements corresponded with differences in exercise intensity. Greater gains in peak knee extensor moments, GMFM-66 scores (+4.2 versus +0.9), 600-yard walk-run test (-29% versus 0%) occurred for P1 versus P2, respectively. Preferred walking speeds did not increase substantially for P1 and decreased for P2. PMID:20367517

  15. Measuring Participation: The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Experience

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Rita K.; Hahn, Elizabeth A.; DeVellis, Robert; Cella, David

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To describe the lessons learned in the initial development of PROMIS social function item banks. Design Development and testing of two item pools within a general population to create item banks that measure ability-to-participate and satisfaction-with-participation in social activities. Setting Administration via the Internet. Participants General population members (N=956) of a national polling organization registry participated; data for 768 and 778 participants used in the analysis. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Measures of ability-to-participate and satisfaction-with-participation in social activities. Results Fifty six items measuring the ability-to-participate were essentially unidimensional but did not fit an IRT model. As a result, item banks were not developed for these items. Of the 56 items measuring satisfaction-with-participation, 14 items measuring social roles and 12 items measuring discretionary activities were unidimensional and met IRT model assumptions. Two 7-item short forms were also developed. Conclusions Four lessons, mostly concerning item content, were learned in the development of banks measuring social function. These lessons led to item revisions that are being tested in subsequent studies. PMID:20801282

  16. Adult Vocational Education Follow Through. A System for Participant Feedback for Decision Makers. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Thomas R.

    The objectives of this project were (1) to develop participant feedback materials that can be used by local adult vocational education (AVE) administrators for program planning, implementation, and evaluation and (2) to determine why participants enroll in AVE programs. A follow-up survey which contained key items from the follow-through system…

  17. Turning On and Tuning In: Media Participation in the Arts. Research Division Report #33.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Charles M.

    Data gleaned from the 1982, 1985, and 1992 Surveys of Public Participation in the Arts (SPPAs) were used in this analysis of participation in the arts via television, radio, and sound recordings. The arts examined were jazz, classical music, opera, musicals and operettas, plays, dance, and the visual arts. Selected findings are as follows: (1)…

  18. Effects of Arts Education on Participation in the Arts. Research Division Report 36.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergonzi, Louis; Smith, Julia

    Using data from the 1992 Survey of Public Participation in the Arts (SPPA92), research focused on the question: "Does arts education make arts participation more accessible to Americans?" The effects of both school-based arts education and community-based arts education were considered and compared. Art forms considered in this investigation were…

  19. Assessment of a WIN Quality Training Demonstration Project. Phase 1 Report: Characteristics of Participants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Richard N.

    A group of interested and academically qualified female Aid to Families with Dependent Children recipients was identified to participate in the assessment of a demonstration program to train female Work incentive Program (WIN) participants. Training for electronics technicians was conducted at DeVry Institute of Technology (Chicago) and Ohio…

  20. 77 FR 20127 - Swap Dealer and Major Swap Participant Recordkeeping, Reporting, and Duties Rules; Futures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-03

    ... Commission considered ] each of these comments in formulating the final regulations.\\5\\ \\2\\ See 75 FR 76666... Major Swap Participants (Recordkeeping NPRM)); 75 FR 71397 (Nov. 23, 2010) (Regulations Establishing and Governing the Duties of Swap Dealers and Major Swap Participants (Duties NPRM)); 75 FR 70152 (Nov. 17,...

  1. Nondestructive Evaluation of Additive Manufacturing State-of-the-Discipline Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess M.; Parker, Bradford H.; Hodges, Kenneth L.; Burke, Eric R.; Walker, James L.

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations (NASA) state of the art of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for additive manufacturing (AM), or "3-D printed", hardware. NASA's unique need for highly customized spacecraft and instrumentation is suited for AM, which offers a compelling alternative to traditional subtractive manufacturing approaches. The Agency has an opportunity to push the envelope on how this technology is used in zero gravity, an enable in-space manufacturing of flight spares and replacement hardware crucial for long-duration, manned missions to Mars. The Agency is leveraging AM technology developed internally and by industry, academia, and other government agencies for its unique needs. Recent technical interchange meetings and workshops attended by NASA have identified NDE as a universal need for all aspects of additive manufacturing. The impact of NDE on AM is cross cutting and spans materials, processing quality assurance, testing and modeling disciplines. Appropriate NDE methods are needed before, during, and after the AM production process.

  2. Identifying Head Start and Public Pre-K Participation in NSECE Data on Center-Based ECE Programs. NSECE Technical Report Supplement. OPRE Report 2015-92b

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goerge, Robert; Datta, A. Rupa; Xia, Kanru; Witte, Ann D.; Gennetian, Lisa A.; Milesi, Carolina; Brandon, Richard; Guzman, Lina; Zanoni, Wladimir

    2015-01-01

    The analyses presented in the Technical Report, "Which Centers Participate in Head Start or Public Pre-Kindergarten" characterize centers that have at least one child whose enrollment is funded through Head Start or Public Pre-K funds. This supplement to the technical report provides interested readers with technical details of the…

  3. 40 CFR 33.503 - How does a recipient calculate MBE and WBE participation for reporting purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ENTERPRISES IN UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY PROGRAMS Recordkeeping and Reporting § 33.503 How... participation are calculated as a percentage of total financial assistance agreement project procurement costs... agreements that capitalize revolving loan programs, the total amount is the total procurement dollars in...

  4. 40 CFR 33.503 - How does a recipient calculate MBE and WBE participation for reporting purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ENTERPRISES IN UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY PROGRAMS Recordkeeping and Reporting § 33.503 How... participation are calculated as a percentage of total financial assistance agreement project procurement costs... agreements that capitalize revolving loan programs, the total amount is the total procurement dollars in...

  5. National Study of Student Support Services. Interim Report: Volume 2: Profile of Freshman Participants and Project Services: 1991-92.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahalan, Margaret; And Others

    An interim report on the congressionally mandated National Study of Student Support Services (SSS) focuses on the characteristics of college freshmen program participants and on the level and type of services they receive. The federally funded grant program is designed to help economically disadvantaged students achieve success at the…

  6. 13 CFR 124.603 - What reports regarding the continued business operations of former Participants does SBA require?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What reports regarding the continued business operations of former Participants does SBA require? 124.603 Section 124.603 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 8(a) BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT/SMALL...

  7. 13 CFR 124.603 - What reports regarding the continued business operations of former Participants does SBA require?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What reports regarding the continued business operations of former Participants does SBA require? 124.603 Section 124.603 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 8(a) BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT/SMALL...

  8. 13 CFR 124.603 - What reports regarding the continued business operations of former Participants does SBA require?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false What reports regarding the continued business operations of former Participants does SBA require? 124.603 Section 124.603 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 8(a) BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT/SMALL...

  9. 13 CFR 124.601 - What reports does SBA require concerning parties who assist Participants in obtaining federal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false What reports does SBA require concerning parties who assist Participants in obtaining federal contracts? 124.601 Section 124.601 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 8(a) BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT/SMALL...

  10. 13 CFR 124.601 - What reports does SBA require concerning parties who assist Participants in obtaining federal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What reports does SBA require concerning parties who assist Participants in obtaining federal contracts? 124.601 Section 124.601 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 8(a) BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT/SMALL...

  11. The Effects of Participating in Vocational Education: Summary of Studies Reported Since 1968. Research and Development Series No. 202.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mertens, Donna M.; And Others

    A total of 232 studies on the effects of participation in vocational education that were reported from 1968 through 1979 were analyzed. The studies were classified into more rigorous, less rigorous, and national studies, and were summarized within these groups. Studies of secondary and postsecondary programs were reviewed separately. Focus on the…

  12. State ESEA Title I Participation Information for 2001-02. Final Summary Report 2005. PPSS Doc # 2005-03

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Beth

    2005-01-01

    This state "Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA)" report summarizes data for the Title I, Part A, Grants to Local Education Agencies (LEAs) program. It provides Title I participation data for 2001-02, prior to the implementation of the "No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB)," and reflects implementation under the prior law, the…

  13. Kohlschütter-Tönz Syndrome – Report of an additional case

    PubMed Central

    González-Arriagada, Wilfredo A.; Carlos-Bregni, Román; Contreras, Elisa; Almeida, Oslei P.

    2013-01-01

    Kohlschütter-Tönz Syndrome is a rare disorder clinically characterized by amelogenesis imperfecta, epilepsy and progressive mental deterioration. We present an additional case of this syndrome of a nine year-old boy who was referred by pigmented teeth. The mental deterioration was associated with speech delay, impulsive behavior, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and learning problems. The physical examination revealed a reduction of lower third, slightly palpebral fissures, low ear and hair implantation, coarse hair and hypertrichosis. The intraoral examination showed alteration in teeth pigmentation diagnosed as amelogenesis imperfecta. Although rare, the present case report illustrates a syndrome that has dental anomalies and systemic alterations. It is important to recognize this syndrome as early as possible and paediatric dentist may contribute to the diagnosis and consequently to better manage the patients. Key words:Kohlschütter-Tönz syndrome, amelogenesis imperfecta, seizures, mental deterioration. PMID:24455057

  14. Addressing Issues of Broadening Participation Highlighted in the Report on the Future of Undergraduate Geoscience Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDaris, J. R.; Manduca, C. A.; Macdonald, H.; Iverson, E. A. R.

    2015-12-01

    The final report for the Summit on the Future of Geoscience Education lays out a consensus on issues that must be tackled by the geoscience community collectively if there are to be enough qualified people to fill the large number of expected geoscience job vacancies over the coming decade. Focus areas cited in the report include: Strengthening the connections between two-year colleges and four-year institutions Sharing and making use of successful recruitment and retention practices for students from underrepresented groups Making students aware of high-quality job prospects in the geosciences as well as its societal relevance The InTeGrate STEP Center for the Geosciences, the Supporting and Advancing Geoscience Education at Two-Year Colleges (SAGE 2YC) program, and the Building Strong Geoscience Departments (BSGD) project together have developed a suite of web resources to help faculty and program leaders begin to address these and other issues. These resources address practices that support the whole student, both in the classroom and as a part of the co-curriculum as well as information on geoscience careers, guidance for developing coherent degree programs, practical advice for mentoring and advising, and many others. In addition to developing web resources, InTeGrate has also undertaken an effort to profile successful program practices at a variety of institutions. An analysis of these data shows several common themes (e.g. proactive marketing, community building, research experiences) that align well with the existing literature on what works to support student success. But there are also indications of different approaches and emphases between Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs) and Primarily White Institutions (PWIs) as well as between different kinds of MSIs. Highlighting the different strategies in use can point both MSIs and PWIs to possible alternate solutions to the challenges their students face. InTeGrate - http

  15. Motives for sports participation as predictions of self-reported outcomes after anterior cruciate ligament injury of the knee.

    PubMed

    Roessler, K K; Andersen, T E; Lohmander, S; Roos, E M

    2015-06-01

    Aim of the study was to access how individual's motives for participation in sports impact on self-reported outcomes 2 years after an anterior cruciate ligament injury. Based on a longitudinal cohort study, this secondary analysis present data from the Knee Anterior Cruciate Ligament, Nonsurgical versus Surgical Treatment (KANON) study, a randomized controlled trial. At baseline, 121 patients recorded in an initial questionnaire that their motives for sports participation fell into four categories: achievement, health, social integration, or fun and well-being. These four categories were used as variables in the analyses. All 121 subjects completed the 2-year follow-up. The largest improvement was seen in the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) subscale sports and recreation function, with an effect size of 2.43. KOOS sports and recreation function was also the subscale score best predicted by the motives for sports participation. Baseline motives achievement and fun and well-being predicted worse levels of pain and function 2 years after the injury, even after adjusting for age, gender, treatment and baseline scores. Psychological aspects, such as motives for participation in sport, can be factors in predicting of patient-reported outcomes 2 years after injury. Evaluating motives for sports participation may help predict the outcome 2 years after ACL injury.

  16. Adverse events and deterioration reported by participants in the PACE trial of therapies for chronic fatigue syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dougall, Dominic; Johnson, Anthony; Goldsmith, Kimberley; Sharpe, Michael; Angus, Brian; Chalder, Trudie; White, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Objective Adverse events (AEs) are health related events, reported by participants in clinical trials. We describe AEs in the PACE trial of treatments for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and baseline characteristics associated with them. Methods AEs were recorded on three occasions over one year in 641 participants. We compared the numbers and nature of AEs between treatment arms of specialist medical care (SMC) alone, or SMC supplemented by adaptive pacing therapy (APT), cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) or graded exercise therapy (GET). We examined associations with baseline measures by binary logistic regression analyses, and compared the proportions of participants who deteriorated by clinically important amounts. Results Serious adverse events and reactions were infrequent. Non-serious adverse events were common; the median (quartiles) number was 4 (2, 8) per participant, with no significant differences between treatments (P = .47). A greater number of NSAEs were associated with recruitment centre, and baseline physical symptom count, body mass index, and depressive disorder. Physical function deteriorated in 39 (25%) participants after APT, 15 (9%) after CBT, 18 (11%) after GET, and 28 (18%) after SMC (P < .001), with no significant differences in worsening fatigue. Conclusions The numbers of adverse events did not differ significantly between trial treatments, but physical deterioration occurred most often after APT. The reporting of non-serious adverse events may reflect the nature of the illness rather than the effect of treatments. Differences between centres suggest that both standardisation of ascertainment methods and training are important when collecting adverse event data. PMID:24913337

  17. Reported Sports Participation, Race, Sex, Ethnicity, and Obesity in US Adolescents From NHANES Physical Activity (PAQ_D).

    PubMed

    Turner, Robert W; Perrin, Eliana M; Coyne-Beasley, Tamera; Peterson, Camilla J; Skinner, Asheley C

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To understand the relationships between participation in different types of leisure time sport activity and adolescent obesity, and how those relationships might differ based on race, gender, and household income. Methods. Data consisted of 6667 students that took part in the 1999 to 2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The authors used adjusted Wald tests to examine differences in the prevalence of obesity (body mass index >95th percentile for age and sex) by sport for boys and girls separately. Results. Among adolescent youth age 12 to 19 years, 16.6% of male leisure time sport participants and 15.3% of female sport participants were obese, compared with 23.6% for male nonathlete participant-in-other-activities and 17.0% obesity rate for female nonathlete/participant-in-other-activities. For both males and females, reported participation in leisure time sports decreased between middle school and high school, and this reduction was associated with higher body mass index.

  18. Reported Sports Participation, Race, Sex, Ethnicity, and Obesity in US Adolescents From NHANES Physical Activity (PAQ_D)

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, Eliana M.; Coyne-Beasley, Tamera; Peterson, Camilla J.; Skinner, Asheley C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To understand the relationships between participation in different types of leisure time sport activity and adolescent obesity, and how those relationships might differ based on race, gender, and household income. Methods. Data consisted of 6667 students that took part in the 1999 to 2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The authors used adjusted Wald tests to examine differences in the prevalence of obesity (body mass index >95th percentile for age and sex) by sport for boys and girls separately. Results. Among adolescent youth age 12 to 19 years, 16.6% of male leisure time sport participants and 15.3% of female sport participants were obese, compared with 23.6% for male nonathlete participant-in-other-activities and 17.0% obesity rate for female nonathlete/participant-in-other-activities. For both males and females, reported participation in leisure time sports decreased between middle school and high school, and this reduction was associated with higher body mass index. PMID:27335953

  19. The effect of adolescents' sports clubs participation on self-reported mental and physical conditions and future expectations.

    PubMed

    Gísladóttir, Thórdís Lilja; Matthíasdóttir, Asrún; Kristjánsdóttir, Hafrún

    2013-01-01

    Sports clubs create conditions for people of all ages to pursue a healthy lifestyle through exercise in sports and attend to constructive pedagogical work which creates much value for society. This study investigates the relationship between adolescents' sports clubs participation and self-reported mental and physical conditions and future expectations. The participants were 10,987 pupils in the final three years of their compulsory education in Iceland (aged 14-16 years). The participants completed questionnaires administered to students in the classroom relating to health and behaviour. The results indicate that participation in sports clubs influences adolescents positively; adolescents who work hard at sport not only believe they are in better mental and physical condition, they also believe they can succeed in other areas such as their studies. Sports clubs promote positive influence on adolescents' mental and physical conditions and their future expectations toward work and happiness. It can be concluded that participation in organised sports clubs affects the participants in a positive way. PMID:23428254

  20. The effect of adolescents' sports clubs participation on self-reported mental and physical conditions and future expectations.

    PubMed

    Gísladóttir, Thórdís Lilja; Matthíasdóttir, Asrún; Kristjánsdóttir, Hafrún

    2013-01-01

    Sports clubs create conditions for people of all ages to pursue a healthy lifestyle through exercise in sports and attend to constructive pedagogical work which creates much value for society. This study investigates the relationship between adolescents' sports clubs participation and self-reported mental and physical conditions and future expectations. The participants were 10,987 pupils in the final three years of their compulsory education in Iceland (aged 14-16 years). The participants completed questionnaires administered to students in the classroom relating to health and behaviour. The results indicate that participation in sports clubs influences adolescents positively; adolescents who work hard at sport not only believe they are in better mental and physical condition, they also believe they can succeed in other areas such as their studies. Sports clubs promote positive influence on adolescents' mental and physical conditions and their future expectations toward work and happiness. It can be concluded that participation in organised sports clubs affects the participants in a positive way.

  1. Exclusive breastfeeding practices reported by mothers and the introduction of additional liquids

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Alessandra Marcuz de Souza; Chaoul, Camila de Oliveira; Carmona, Elenice Valentim; Higa, Rosângela; do Vale, Ianê Nogueira

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To assess the concept of exclusive breastfeeding held by nursing women by comparing the period they consider that they perform it and the infants' age at the introduction of additional liquids. METHOD: Cross-sectional descriptive study conducted with 309 women who delivered babies at a university hospital in the interior of São Paulo, Brazil. The data were subjected to descriptive analysis; the variables of interest were crossed using the non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test, the chi-square test and Fisher's exact test. RESULTS: Approximately 30% of the women reported having introduced additional liquids before the infants reached aged six months old, while asserting that they were performing exclusive breastfeeding. The following variables were associated with early introduction of liquids: lack of employment (p = 0.0386), younger maternal age (p = 0.0159) and first pregnancy (p = 0.003). CONCLUSION: The concept of exclusive breastfeeding might not be fully clear to women, as they seem to believe that it means not to feed the children other types of milk but that giving other liquids is allowed. These results show that promotion of breastfeeding should take beliefs and values into consideration to achieve effective dialogue and understanding with mothers. PMID:26039299

  2. 20 CFR 641.540 - What types of training may grantees and sub-recipients provide to SCSEP participants in addition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... available resources, including host agencies, at no cost or reduced cost to the SCSEP. (e) Grantees and sub-recipients may pay for participant training, including the payment of reasonable costs of instructors, classroom rental, training supplies, materials, equipment, and tuition. (OAA § 502(c)(6)(A)(ii))....

  3. 20 CFR 641.540 - What types of training may grantees and sub-recipients provide to SCSEP participants in addition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... available resources, including host agencies, at no cost or reduced cost to the SCSEP. (e) Grantees and sub-recipients may pay for participant training, including the payment of reasonable costs of instructors, classroom rental, training supplies, materials, equipment, and tuition. (OAA § 502(c)(6)(A)(ii))....

  4. 77 FR 42873 - Defining Larger Participants of the Consumer Reporting Market

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... rulemaking to establish uniform procedures relating to this provision of the Dodd- Frank Act. 77 FR 31226... requested and received public comment on the Proposed Rule. \\9\\ 76 FR 38059 (June 29, 2011). \\10\\ In July... more than 40 participants. \\11\\ 77 FR 9592 (Feb. 17, 2012). The Proposed Rule defined certain...

  5. Dynamics of WIC Program Participation by Infants and Children, 2001 to 2003. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castner, Laura; Mabli, James; Sykes, Julie

    2009-01-01

    The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) provides nutritious foods that promote the health of low-income pregnant women, new mothers, infants, and preschool children. This study examines WIC participation dynamics of infants and children from 2001 to 2003 using the Survey of Income and Program Participation…

  6. Graduation Policies for Students with Disabilities Who Participate in States' General Assessments. Synthesis Report 98

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurlow, Martha L.; Albus, Debra A.; Lazarus, Sheryl S.

    2015-01-01

    Graduation requirements and diploma options for students with disabilities who participate in the general assessment has been a topic of interest for many years. The recent push for all students, including those with disabilities, to leave school ready for college and career has heightened the importance of understanding what states are requiring…

  7. Parent Participation Reading Clinic--A Research-Demonstration Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, James H.

    The general purpose of this study was to explore the possibility of developing a Parent Participation Reading Clinic home-based instructional model for assisting in the teaching of reading to economically disadvantaged elementary school children. Working within a community-based child health care agency in Washington, D.C., the Parent…

  8. Obesity, Poverty, and Participation in Nutrition Assistance Programs. Family Programs. Report No. FSP-04-PO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linz, Paul; Lee, Michael; Bell, Loren

    2005-01-01

    In September 2003, the U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) contracted with ALTA Systems to conduct a project with the goal of providing a comprehensive overview of the relationship between poverty, program participation and obesity by conducting an in depth literature review; and convening an expert panel. The…

  9. Expanding Access, Participation, and Success in International Baccalaureate Programmes (IB Access Project): Evaluation Report Year Two

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerry, Gail; Corcoran, Tom

    2011-01-01

    In the fall of 2009, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation funded a three-year project proposed by the International Baccalaureate (IB) to demonstrate the feasibility of increasing the participation of minority students and students in poverty in its Middle Years Programme (MYP) and Diploma Programme (DP) in selected school districts in the…

  10. Expanding Access, Participation, and Success in International Baccalaureate Programmes: Year 1 Documentation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Thomas B.; Gerry, Gail B.

    2010-01-01

    In fall 2009, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation funded a three-year project (IB Access Project) with International Baccalaureate (IB) to increase participation of minority students and students in poverty in the Middle Years Programme (MYP) and Diploma Programme (DP). The IB Access Project seeks to do four things: (1) Improve teacher practice…

  11. Evaluation of the DC Opportunity Scholarship Program. Second Year Report on Participation. NCEE 2006-4003

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Patrick; Gutmann, Babette; Puma, Michael; Silverberg, Marsha

    2006-01-01

    By fall 2005, the DC Opportunity Scholarship Program (OSP), the first federally funded voucher program in the United States, was in its second year serving low-income students in the nation's capital. More than 5,800 students have applied to the Program over the 2 years, and about 2,300 of them--eligible public school students who participated in…

  12. Program Participation and Academic Progress of Second Language Learners: Texas Middle School Update. Policy Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Div. of Research and Evaluation.

    This study examined program participation and academic progress of second language learners, following a cohort of Texas public school students from the school years, 1992-93 to 1999-00 as they progressed through the elementary and middle grades. Researchers examined the following: changes in Texas policy related to students with limited English…

  13. Social Influences on the Participation of Mexican-American Women in Science. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacCorquodale, Patricia

    Researchers attempting to identify factors that affect the participation of Mexican American females in science courses and careers studied cultural, social, and educational factors affecting 2,442 Arizona secondary school students. Questionnaire responses and interviews with the students and their teachers, counselors, and parents revealed that…

  14. 34 CFR 668.47 - Report on athletic program participation rates and financial support data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... section is a participant, including a student on a team the institution designates or defines as junior.... (7) The ratio of athletically related student aid awarded male athletes to athletically related student aid awarded female athletes. (8) The total amount of recruiting expenses incurred, aggregately...

  15. 34 CFR 668.47 - Report on athletic program participation rates and financial support data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... section is a participant, including a student on a team the institution designates or defines as junior.... (7) The ratio of athletically related student aid awarded male athletes to athletically related student aid awarded female athletes. (8) The total amount of recruiting expenses incurred, aggregately...

  16. 34 CFR 668.47 - Report on athletic program participation rates and financial support data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... section is a participant, including a student on a team the institution designates or defines as junior.... (7) The ratio of athletically related student aid awarded male athletes to athletically related student aid awarded female athletes. (8) The total amount of recruiting expenses incurred, aggregately...

  17. 34 CFR 668.47 - Report on athletic program participation rates and financial support data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... section is a participant, including a student on a team the institution designates or defines as junior.... (7) The ratio of athletically related student aid awarded male athletes to athletically related student aid awarded female athletes. (8) The total amount of recruiting expenses incurred, aggregately...

  18. Conditions Enhancing Self-Directed Learning in the Workplace. A Report to the Participants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1992

    The appreciative inquiry process was used to identify conditions enhancing self-directed learning. Participants in the project did the following: (1) used the five-step process to identify factors/conditions/forces that seemed to cause self-directed learning to occur; (2) created a matrix by combining the factors/conditions/forces with six…

  19. Study of the Cost to Borrowers of Participating in the Guaranteed Student Loan Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Touche Ross and Co., Washington, DC.

    The cost to a typical borrower of participating in the Guaranteed Student Loan (GSL) program was studied, based on the analysis of automated models that calculate total borrower costs under various scenarios. The focus was related to the actual costs of obtaining and repaying a student loan. Conclusions are as follows: (1) student borrowers under…

  20. Validating self-report of diabetes use by participants in the 45 and up study: a record linkage study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    people with diabetes without additional information. Kappa values were 0.80, 0.70 and 0.80 for APDC, MBS and PBS respectively reflecting the large population sample under consideration. Compared to APDC, there was poor agreement about identifying type 1 diabetes status. Conclusions Self-report of diagnosis augmented with free text data indicating diabetes as a chronic condition and/or use of insulin among medications used was able to identify participants with diabetes with high sensitivity and specificity compared to available administrative data collections. PMID:24245780

  1. Beyond Attendance: A Multi-Modal Understanding of Arts Participation. Based on the 2008 Survey of Public Participation in the Arts. Research Report #54

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak-Leonard, Jennifer L.; Brown, Alan S.

    2011-01-01

    First conducted in 1982, the National Endowment for the Arts' (NEA's) Survey of Public Participation in the Arts (SPPA) serves as the longest-standing resource for studying U.S. adult levels of arts attendance, personal arts creation and performance, and arts participation through electronic media. The environment in which arts organizations…

  2. Advanced Placement® Exam Participation: Is AP® Exam Participation and Performance Related to Choice of College Major? Research Report No. 2011-6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattern, Krista D.; Shaw, Emily J.; Ewing, Maureen

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has found a positive relationship between AP® participation and performance with various college outcomes. Building on this work, the current study investigated the relationship between AP participation and performance with choice of college major. Specifically, this study examined whether students who take an AP Exam in a…

  3. Participation Trends and Publicity; Preliminary Report Number 4. Wisconsin County and District Fair Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groot, Hans C.; And Others

    The fourth in a series of nine proposed reports on the evaluation of Wisconsin's County and District Fairs, this report has three objectives: (1) to study the relationship among various factors associated with fair and grandstand attendance, the number of exhibitors, and the amount of state aid fairs receive, as well as the amount they pay out in…

  4. Prospective memory rehabilitation using smartphones in patients with TBI: What do participants report?

    PubMed

    Evald, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Use of assistive devices has been shown to be beneficial as a compensatory memory strategy among brain injury survivors, but little is known about possible advantages and disadvantages of the technology. As part of an intervention study participants were interviewed about their experiences with the use of low-cost, off-the-shelf, unmodified smartphones combined with Internet calendars as a compensatory memory strategy. Thirteen community-dwelling patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) received a 6-week group-based instruction in the systematic use of a smartphone as a memory compensatory aid followed by a brief structured open-ended interview regarding satisfaction with and advantages and disadvantages of the compensatory strategy. Ten of 13 participants continued to use a smartphone as their primary compensatory strategy. Audible and visual reminders were the most frequently mentioned advantages of the smartphone, and, second, the capability as an all-in-one memory device. In contrast, battery life was the most often mentioned disadvantage, followed by concerns about loss or failure of the device. Use of a smartphone seems to be a satisfactory compensatory memory strategy to many patients with TBI and smartphones come with features that are advantageous to other compensatory strategies. However, some benefits come hand-in-hand with drawbacks, such as the feeling of dependency. These aspects should be taken into account when choosing assistive technology as a memory compensatory strategy.

  5. Prospective memory rehabilitation using smartphones in patients with TBI: What do participants report?

    PubMed

    Evald, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Use of assistive devices has been shown to be beneficial as a compensatory memory strategy among brain injury survivors, but little is known about possible advantages and disadvantages of the technology. As part of an intervention study participants were interviewed about their experiences with the use of low-cost, off-the-shelf, unmodified smartphones combined with Internet calendars as a compensatory memory strategy. Thirteen community-dwelling patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) received a 6-week group-based instruction in the systematic use of a smartphone as a memory compensatory aid followed by a brief structured open-ended interview regarding satisfaction with and advantages and disadvantages of the compensatory strategy. Ten of 13 participants continued to use a smartphone as their primary compensatory strategy. Audible and visual reminders were the most frequently mentioned advantages of the smartphone, and, second, the capability as an all-in-one memory device. In contrast, battery life was the most often mentioned disadvantage, followed by concerns about loss or failure of the device. Use of a smartphone seems to be a satisfactory compensatory memory strategy to many patients with TBI and smartphones come with features that are advantageous to other compensatory strategies. However, some benefits come hand-in-hand with drawbacks, such as the feeling of dependency. These aspects should be taken into account when choosing assistive technology as a memory compensatory strategy. PMID:25333304

  6. Caregiver Reports of Children’s Activity Participation Following Serious Injury

    PubMed Central

    Braaf, Sandra; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Teague, Warwick; Jowett, Helen; Gabbe, Belinda

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric trauma can result in significant levels of on-going disability. The aim of this study was to explore the restrictions on activity participation that children experience following serious injury from the perspective of their caregivers. We performed a thematic analysis of transcripts of semi-structured in-depth interviews with the caregivers of 44 seriously injured children, conducted three-years after the injury, and purposively sampled from a population-based cohort study. Both temporary and on-going restrictions on school, sport, leisure and social activities were identified, some of which were imposed by caregivers, schools, or recommended by health providers. The perceived risk of further injury, physical restrictions, emotional state and fatigue levels were important influences on degrees of activity restriction. Children who were socially less engaged, especially those who were more severely injured, had difficulty making and retaining friends, and exhibited signs of depression or social withdrawal. The activities of pre-school children were strongly regulated by their caregivers, while school age children faced obstacles with participation in aspects such as study, sport, and peer and teacher relationships, affecting learning, school attendance and enjoyment. The findings highlight the need for primary prevention and reducing the impacts of serious injury throughout the continuum of care. PMID:27399741

  7. [Citizens' participation in health: education and shared decision-making. SESPAS Report 2012].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Azarola, Ainhoa; Perestelo-Pérez, Lilisbeth

    2012-03-01

    In recent decades, citizen's participation has become increasingly important in the field of public health, with the new role of the patient as an active agent, manager and producer of his or her own health, and the paradigm of patient-centered care. These changes have represented some of the most important milestones in the continuous improvement of healthcare. The involvement of patients is a new way of understanding the relationship between patients, health professionals and health systems, not only in terms of knowledge management and patients' control of their own health, individually or collectively, but also in terms of the influence that patients may have in health policy planning. Increased life expectancy and the consequent rise in the prevalence of chronic diseases, which already account for 80% of primary care consultations, is one of the key factors changing the role of patients. The place traditionally occupied by professional consultations given any symptoms or signs of alarm is beginning to be occupied by self-care and information and health education resources within the reach of patients and citizens. Internet access is an inexhaustible source of health information resources aimed at patients and provides participation tools. Social networks are places to exchange information and practical advice among patients, families and health professionals. Patients may be experts in their own illnesses and may thus take a more active role in decisions about their health, such as in shared decision making, as part of initiatives, and as part of evaluation of public health activities and health services.

  8. Effects of an intervention based on self-determination theory on self-reported leisure-time physical activity participation.

    PubMed

    Chatzisarantis, Nikos L D; Hagger, Martin S

    2009-01-01

    Based on self-determination theory, the present study developed and evaluated the utility a school-based intervention to change pupils' physical activity intentions and self-reported leisure-time physical activity behaviour. The study evaluated utility of the intervention to promote physical activity participation over a 5-week interval of time. A cluster randomised design targeting 215 pupils from 10 schools with schools as the unit of randomisation was adopted (Male = 106, Female = 109, Age = 14.84, SD = 0.48). Results indicated that pupils who were taught by autonomy-supportive teachers reported stronger intentions to exercise during leisure time and participated more frequently in leisure-time physical activities than pupils in the control condition. Autonomous motivation and intentions mediated the effects of the intervention on self-reported physical activity behaviour. It is concluded that self-determination theory provides a useful framework for the development of school-based interventions that ultimately affect leisure-time physical activity participation.

  9. 45 CFR 61.10 - Reporting exclusions from participation in Federal or State health care programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of any monetary penalty resulting from the reported action; (iv) The date the action was taken, its...; and (v) If deceased, date of death. (2) If the subject is an individual, that individual's...

  10. BSC Final Report: Lessons Learned from Building America Participation; February 1995 - December 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Hendron, Bob

    2004-04-01

    This report chronicles the how and why of the key BSC Building America outcomes. It is organized and put in the context of what the Building Science Consortium has learned from and with its building industry partners.

  11. Measuring children's self-reported sport participation, risk perception and injury history: development and validation of a survey instrument.

    PubMed

    Siesmaa, Emma J; Blitvich, Jennifer D; White, Peta E; Finch, Caroline F

    2011-01-01

    Despite the health benefits associated with children's sport participation, the occurrence of injury in this context is common. The extent to which sport injuries impact children's ongoing involvement in sport is largely unknown. Surveys have been shown to be useful for collecting children's injury and sport participation data; however, there are currently no published instruments which investigate the impact of injury on children's sport participation. This study describes the processes undertaken to assess the validity of two survey instruments for collecting self-reported information about child cricket and netball related participation, injury history and injury risk perceptions, as well as the reliability of the cricket-specific version. Face and content validity were assessed through expert feedback from primary and secondary level teachers and from representatives of peak sporting bodies for cricket and netball. Test-retest reliability was measured using a sample of 59 child cricketers who completed the survey on two occasions, 3-4 weeks apart. Based on expert feedback relating to face and content validity, modification and/or deletion of some survey items was undertaken. Survey items with low test-retest reliability (κ≤0.40) were modified or deleted, items with moderate reliability (κ=0.41-0.60) were modified slightly and items with higher reliability (κ≥0.61) were retained, with some undergoing minor modifications. This is the first survey of its kind which has been successfully administered to cricketers aged 10-16 years to collect information about injury risk perceptions and intentions for continued sport participation. Implications for its generalisation to other child sport participants are discussed.

  12. Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS), Phase I: Soil washing final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    As a result of the U.S. Department of Energy`s environmental restoration and technology development activities, GTS Duratek, Inc., and its subcontractors have demonstrated an integrated thermal waste treatment system at Fernald, OH, as part the Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS) Program. Specifically, MAWS integrates soil washing, vitrification of mixed waste streams, and ion exchange to recycle and remediate process water to achieve, through a synergistic effect, a reduction in waste volume, increased waste loading, and production of a durable, leach-resistant, stable waste form suitable for disposal. This report summarizes the results of the demonstration/testing of the soil washing component of the MAWS system installed at Fernald (Plant 9). The soil washing system was designed to (1) process contaminated soil at a rate of 0.25 cubic yards per hour; (2) reduce overall waste volume and provide consistent-quality silica sand and contaminant concentrates as raw material for vitrification; and (3) release clean soil with uranium levels below 35 pCi/g. Volume reductions expected ranged from 50-80 percent; the actual volume reduction achieved during the demonstration reached 66.5 percent. The activity level of clean soil was reduced to as low as 6 pCi/g from an initial average soil activity level of 17.6 pCi/g (the highest initial level of soil provided for testing was 41 pCi/g). Although the throughput of the soil washing system was inconsistent throughout the testing period, the system was online for sufficient periods to conclude that a rate equivalent to 0.25 cubic yards per hour was achieved.

  13. Minority Business Participation in Public/Private Partnerships: A Manual on Joint Development. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beltran, Celestino M.; And Others

    The Urban Mass Transportation Association promotes Commercial real estate development projects in and adjacent to transit facilities as a means of generating additional revenues to defray part of local transit agency operating cost. Transit-related real estate development, or joint development, provides unique financial benefits for investors and…

  14. Comment on "Multidimensional results reporting to participants in genomic studies: getting it right".

    PubMed

    Bookman, Ebony B; Langehorne, Aleisha A; Eckfeldt, John H; Glass, Kathleen C; Jarvik, Gail P; Klag, Michael; Koski, Greg; Motulsky, Arno; Wilfond, Benjamin; Manolio, Teri A; Fabsitz, Richard R; Luepker, Russell V

    2011-02-16

    Bookman et al. write to correct the impression given in the Commentary by Kohane and Taylor that the recommendations of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Working Group "Reporting Genetic Results in Research Studies" included advice to return genetic information to research subjects only in cases where there is a proven or preventative intervention for the identified disorder. In fact, the report does recommend that genetic information be returned to subjects when there is an intervention available, but it does not recommend against giving this kind of information to subjects if there is no available intervention.

  15. Can research participants comment authoritatively on the validity of their self-reports of mind wandering and task engagement?

    PubMed

    Seli, Paul; Jonker, Tanya R; Cheyne, James Allan; Cortes, Kassandra; Smilek, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    The study of mind wandering rests upon the assumption that people are able to consistently and accurately introspect and report on these sorts of mental experiences. Although there is some initial evidence that people can indeed accurately report on the subjective experience of mind wandering, to date, no work has directly examined people's degree of confidence in their self-reports of mind wandering and the effects that confidence has on the accuracy of such reports. In the present study, participants completed a sustained-attention task during which they intermittently provided assessments of task engagement (i.e., whether they were focused on the task or mind wandering), as well as reports of confidence in the accuracy of their assessments. This study yielded 3 key findings: We found substantial between- and within-subject variability in both (a) reported mind wandering and (b) confidence in mind-wandering reports, and, most critically, (c) we found that the relation of reported mind wandering and task performance varied as a function of confidence. We discuss the implications of these findings in the context of the literature on mind wandering.

  16. 17 CFR 229.1118 - (Item 1118) Reports and additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... transaction documents. Describe the reports or other documents provided to security holders required under the... Commission maintains an Internet site that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other... electronically filed with, or furnished to, the Commission. (2) Disclose whether other reports to...

  17. Cultural Dimensions of Indigenous Participation in Vocational Education and Training: New Perspectives. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dockery, Alfred Michael

    2013-01-01

    This study provides new evidence on the inter-relationships between Indigenous Australians' association with their traditional culture and their engagement with vocational education and training. It builds on previous work to develop a "richer" measure of the concept of cultural attachment. This report discusses the links between cultural identity…

  18. Incentive and Disincentive to Participation in the Work Incentive Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garvin, Charles D., Ed.

    Initially this report presents a summary of three Work Incentive Programs (WIN) undertaken by a consortium of schools of social work at the University of Chicago, University of Michigan, and Case Western Reserve University, discussing in detail the design, major findings, and recommendations made. The next two chapters are devoted to discussions…

  19. Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. First topical report, Results of laboratory screening of additives

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, M.D.

    1993-04-16

    Several tasks have been completed in a program to evaluate additives to improve fine particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. Screening tests and laboratory evaluations of additives are summarized in this report. Over 20 additives were evaluated; four were found to improve flyash precipitation rates. The Insitec particle analyzer was also evaluated; test results show that the analyzer will provide accurate sizing and counting information for particles in the size range of {le} 10 {mu}m dia.

  20. 40 CFR 60.5423 - What additional recordkeeping and reporting requirements apply to my sweetening unit affected...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reporting requirements apply to my sweetening unit affected facilities at onshore natural gas processing... Oil and Natural Gas Production, Transmission and Distribution § 60.5423 What additional recordkeeping and reporting requirements apply to my sweetening unit affected facilities at onshore natural...

  1. 40 CFR 60.5423 - What additional recordkeeping and reporting requirements apply to my sweetening unit affected...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reporting requirements apply to my sweetening unit affected facilities at onshore natural gas processing... Oil and Natural Gas Production, Transmission and Distribution § 60.5423 What additional recordkeeping and reporting requirements apply to my sweetening unit affected facilities at onshore natural...

  2. 32 CFR 37.680 - Must I require a participant to report when it enters into a subaward allowing a for-profit firm...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Award Terms Affecting Participants' Financial, Property, and Purchasing Systems Financial Matters § 37.680 Must I require a participant to report when it enters into a subaward allowing a... does not itself have to be reported again. Property...

  3. 32 CFR 37.680 - Must I require a participant to report when it enters into a subaward allowing a for-profit firm...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Award Terms Affecting Participants' Financial, Property, and Purchasing Systems Financial Matters § 37.680 Must I require a participant to report when it enters into a subaward allowing a... does not itself have to be reported again. Property...

  4. 32 CFR 37.680 - Must I require a participant to report when it enters into a subaward allowing a for-profit firm...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Award Terms Affecting Participants' Financial, Property, and Purchasing Systems Financial Matters § 37.680 Must I require a participant to report when it enters into a subaward allowing a... does not itself have to be reported again. Property...

  5. 32 CFR 37.680 - Must I require a participant to report when it enters into a subaward allowing a for-profit firm...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Award Terms Affecting Participants' Financial, Property, and Purchasing Systems Financial Matters § 37.680 Must I require a participant to report when it enters into a subaward allowing a... does not itself have to be reported again. Property...

  6. 32 CFR 37.680 - Must I require a participant to report when it enters into a subaward allowing a for-profit firm...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Award Terms Affecting Participants' Financial, Property, and Purchasing Systems Financial Matters § 37.680 Must I require a participant to report when it enters into a subaward allowing a... does not itself have to be reported again. Property...

  7. Hispanic business community participation in conservation and solar energy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This report summarizes the accomplishments made by the Latin American Manufacturers Association (LAMA) in a effort to promote the research, development, and commercialization of energy technologies supported by the DOE Conservation and Solar Applications (CSA) Division. Activities included the identification of Hispanic manufacturing and technical firms with energy-related capabilities, the dissemination of information to the Hispanic business community regarding DOE/CSA activities, and a pilot marketing effort designed to enhance Hispanic business involvement in the procurement activity of CSA-funded organization.

  8. Selected effects of the Conservation Reserve Program on program participants: A report to survey respondents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vandever, Mark W.; Allen, Arthur W.; Sexton, Natalie R.

    2002-01-01

    As a result, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was asked to survey CRP contractees on these issues. Preliminary results from this study have been furnished to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and are being considered as new conservation and management policies for the CRP are being developed (as part of the recently passed Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002). This report includes preliminary results of the study and is being sent to survey respondents. A formal publication of survey results is also being prepared and should be completed by the winter of 2002.

  9. Qualitatively Assessing the Experiences of College Students Completing AlcoholEdu: Do Participants Report Altering Behavior After Intervention?

    PubMed

    Barry, Adam E; Hobbs, Laura Ansley; Haas, Emily J; Gibson, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    To reduce college student drinking and associated alcohol-related consequences, many universities are turning to e-interventions, such as AlcoholEdu. To date, however, results of evaluations examining the impact of AlcoholEdu are mixed. Among these evaluations, few qualitative assessments have examined the experiences and perceptions of students who complete AlcoholEdu. This investigation aimed to assess whether students (a) find the program educational and engaging, (b) implemented specific strategies learned from participation, and (c) self-report altering their behavior as a result of participation. Even though respondents universally reported an increase in alcohol-related knowledge, there was an evident disconnect between this knowledge and their actual behavior. In other words, respondents reported that they did not implement what was taught in AlcoholEdu. Moreover, students highlighted several limitations associated with the program that would have influenced its overall impact, such as ignoring video segments of the program and clicking through assessments simply to complete the task. If used, college administrators and health professionals should implement e-interventions such as AlcoholEdu as one component of a multifaceted approach rather than a panacea for the current high-risk drinking practices of college students.

  10. Arts Education in America: What the Declines Mean for Arts Participation. Based on the 2008 Survey of Public Participation in the Arts. Research Report #52

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabkin, Nick; Hedberg, E. C.

    2011-01-01

    The Surveys of Public Participation in the Arts (SPPAs), conducted for the National Endowment for the Arts, have shown a steady decline in the rates of adult attendance at most "benchmark" arts events--specifically, classical music and jazz concerts, musical and non-musical plays, opera, and ballet performances--as well as declines in other forms…

  11. Report of the Committee on the Participation of Women in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Adam D.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleks; Gallagher, John S.; Gillespie, Bruce Andrew; Ho, Shirley; Kinemuchi, Karen; Lucatello, Sara; Lundgren, Britt; Tremonti, Christina A.; Zasowski, Gail; SDSS-III Collaboration, SDSS-IV Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Committee on the Participation of Women in the SDSS (CPWS) was formed by the SDSS to evaluate the gender climate within the collaboration. The CPWS seeks to foster gender balance in our collaboration by fielding concerns from our members and by recommending best practices for establishing the SDSS leadership team. An important aspect of the mission of the CPWS is to regularly assess gender diversity and inclusiveness within the SDSS. Against the backdrop of the transition from SDSS-III to SDSS-IV, the CPWS has been collecting data relevant to gender issues through interviews and surveys. In April, 2014, the CPWS surveyed 251 SDSS-IV members (~50% of active membership) regarding gender and leadership. Broad findings from this survey include that the male-to-female ratio in SDSS-IV is about 3:1 and that the male-to-female ratio among those that identify themselves as being in an SDSS-IV leadership role is also close to 3:1. About 35% of those surveyed self-identify as an SDSS-IV "leader," though we recognize the possibility that active stakeholders might be more likely to respond to a demographics survey. About 80% of those that self-identify as leaders consider their leadership role within SDSS-IV to be officially acknowledged, regardless of gender. The fraction of women in SDSS leadership roles appears to be a weak function of current job position in that 6 of 32 (19%) senior faculty that are SDSS leaders are women, compared to 4 of 13 (31%) postdocs. Similarly, the fraction of SDSS leaders who are women is highest (32%) amongst those leaders who received their PhDs 6-10 years ago, while the fraction of female leaders amongst other age demographics is somewhat lower (20%). Although these are small sample sizes, this hints at a trend where women are most likely to fill SDSS leadership roles at certain stages of their lives and careers. The CPWS intends to use this initial survey data to establish a baseline for tracking SDSS-IV demographics, and thus hopes to

  12. 17 CFR 229.1118 - (Item 1118) Reports and additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 1934 AND ENERGY POLICY AND CONSERVATION ACT OF 1975-REGULATION S-K Asset-Backed Securities (Regulation... (http://www.sec.gov). (c) Web site access to reports. (1) State whether the issuing entity's...

  13. 17 CFR 229.1118 - (Item 1118) Reports and additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 1934 AND ENERGY POLICY AND CONSERVATION ACT OF 1975-REGULATION S-K Asset-Backed Securities (Regulation... (http://www.sec.gov). (c) Web site access to reports. (1) State whether the issuing entity's...

  14. Use of additives to facilitate on-load cleaning of utility boilers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hazard, H.R.; Krause, H.H.; Sekercioglu, I.

    1983-11-01

    The objectives of this research are to explore the use of coal additives for reducing the strength of sintered ash deposits on boiler furnace walls, thus improving effectiveness of wall blowers in removing ash and slag deposits, and to identify the mechanisms contributing to their effectiveness. The research approach was to prepare sintered, cylindrical pellets of coal ash and measure their compressive strength. Magnesia, silica, calcia, and dolomite, in particle sizes of 2, 10, and 50 microns were mixed with fine fly ash at a concentration of one percent by weight and sintered at temperatures of 1600, 1800, and 2000/sup 0/F. It was found that silica and magnesia additives reduced sintering strength of three types of coal ash significantly. Study of microstructure of sintered specimens led to the conclusion that the additives had reacted with volatile species. Magnesia reacted with species of silica, phosphorus, and sulfur; silica reacted with species of alkali metal and iron. It appears probable that these volatile species deposit on all ash particles, changing thier surface properties and promoting sintering reactions. These results are promising, in that they show that additives, even in very small amounts, can cause a significant reduction in ash sintering strength. The possibility that the surface modification of ash particles by small quantities of volatile species may contribute to sintering suggests that correspondingly small quantities of additives may have significant effects.

  15. Shale JP-4 additive evaluation. Final report, September 1983-May 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Boos, T.A.; Dues, T.L.

    1986-10-01

    A shale JP-4 jet fuel was obtained from the Caribou Refinery of Woods Cross UT as the test fuel. Combinations of additives in varying concentrations were blended to make the test samples. The thermal and storage stability, lubricity, conductivity and water-separation characteristics of the samples were studied over 15 months. The additives chosen were nine antioxidants, at the minimum and two times the maximum concentration, and four corrosion inhibitors, at the minimum and maximum concentration. The limits were set by the JP-4 specification. Other additives in the test program were Fuel System Icing Inhibitor (FSII), anti-static additive, JFA-5 and metal deactivator. Five-gallon test samples were stored for 15 months: antioxidant samples in a 110 F oven and corrosion inhibitor samples in 70 F - 80 F room storage. Two drums of fuel containing FSII, anti-static additive, and maximum antioxidant and corrosion inhibitor were stored at other conditions, one in cold storage and one at ambient conditions (outdoors).

  16. Passive solar addition to therapeutic pre-school. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    This project consisted of designing and constructing a passive solar system on a new classroom addition to the Peanut Butter and Jelly Therapeutic Pre-School in Albuquerque, NM. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the applicability of solar space heating systems to large institutional buildings, and to demonstrate the energy and cost savings available through the use of such systems. Preliminary estimates indicated that the passive solar systems will provide about 90 percent of the heating and cooling needs for the new classroom addition to the school.

  17. DOD Health Care. Additional Efforts Needed To Verify Physicians' Qualifications. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    The Department of Defense's (DOD) efforts to assure that its physicians are qualified to perform their assigned duties are discussed. Five sections include: introduction; additional actions needed to help assure that military physicians have proper qualifications; hospital credentialing and privileging systems needed to comply with DOD…

  18. Brief Report: Additive and Subtractive Counterfactual Reasoning of Children with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Begeer, Sander; Terwogt, Mark Meerum; Lunenburg, Patty; Stegge, Hedy

    2009-01-01

    The development of additive ("If only I had done...") and subtractive ("If only I had not done....") counterfactual reasoning was examined in children with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders (HFASD) (n = 72) and typically developing controls (n = 71), aged 6-12 years. Children were presented four stories where they could generate…

  19. The National Advisory Committee on Hyperkinesis and Food Additives. Final Report to the Nutrition Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nutrition Foundation, Inc., Washington, DC.

    In response to the issues raised by B. Feingold regarding the possible role of food additives as a cause of hyperactivity and learing disability, the Nutrition Foundation organized a critical review of Feinfold's claims by a group of behavioral and medical scientists. Among the cliams made by Feingold was that, when treated with the salicylate and…

  20. 76 FR 24854 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Additional Protocol Report Forms

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) on a number of commercial nuclear and nuclear-related items, materials... for a nuclear weapons program. These forms provides the IAEA with information about additional aspects...; buildings on sites of facilities selected by the IAEA from the U.S. Eligible Facilities List;...

  1. A Japanese male patient with 'fibular aplasia, tibial campomelia and oligodactyly': an additional case report.

    PubMed

    Kitaoka, Taichi; Namba, Noriyuki; Kim, Ji Yoo; Kubota, Takuo; Miura, Kohji; Miyoshi, Yoko; Hirai, Haruhiko; Kogo, Mikihiko; Ozono, Keiichi

    2009-07-01

    We report a male infant with FATCO syndrome, an acronym for fibular aplasia, tibial campomelia, and oligosyndactyly. Courtens et al. reported an infant with oligosyndactyly of the left hand, complete absence of the right fibula, bowing of the right tibia, and absence of the right fifth metatarsal and phalanges. They noted 5 patients with similar clinical features, and proposed the FATCO syndrome. Our patient had a left-sided cleft lip, cleft palate, oligosyndactyly of the right hand and bilateral feet, and bilateral anterior bowing of the limbs associated with overlying skin dimpling. Radiographs showed a short angulated tibia with left fibular aplasia and right fibular hypoplasia. We consider our case the 6th patient with FATCO syndrome, and the cleft lip and palate, not reported in the previous 5 patients, may allow us to further understand the development of the extremities and facies. PMID:23926365

  2. The Initial Development of a Technique for Deriving Additional Information from Test Performance. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wick, John W.

    A pattern-analytical technique, Similar Response Analysis (SRA), was developed, validated with contrived data, verified using previously reported data based on other pattern-analytical methods, and used successfully with "real" data. This technique orders subjects on the basis of the similarity of responses of adjacent individuals, not on the…

  3. Adults' Strategies for Simple Addition and Multiplication: Verbal Self-Reports and the Operand Recognition Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalfe, Arron W. S.; Campbell, Jamie I. D.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate measurement of cognitive strategies is important in diverse areas of psychological research. Strategy self-reports are a common measure, but C. Thevenot, M. Fanget, and M. Fayol (2007) proposed a more objective method to distinguish different strategies in the context of mental arithmetic. In their operand recognition paradigm, speed of…

  4. 77 FR 71561 - Health and Safety Data Reporting; Addition of Certain Chemicals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-03

    ... shown to be a developmental toxicant in animals, resulting in fetal malformations and other effects, but.... Federal Register (41 FR 36902, September 1, 1976). 2. EPA. Integrated Risk Information System. Cadmium... Environmental Protection Agency; Receipt of Report and Request for Comments; Notice. Federal Register (76...

  5. 76 FR 36339 - Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases: Additional Sources of Fluorinated GHGs: Extension of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... Regulations EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency FR Federal Register GHG greenhouse gas mm millimeters...: Electronics Manufacturing of the Greenhouse Gas Reporting Rule on December 1, 2010 (75 FR 74774). This subpart... Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993) and, therefore, not subject to review under Executive...

  6. Review and evaluation of literature on testing of chemical additives for scale control in geothermal fluids. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, C.H.; Kenkeremath, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    A selected group of reported tests of chemical additives in actual geothermal fluids are reviewed and evaluated to summarize the status of chemical scale-control testing and identify information and testing needs. The task distinguishes between scale control in the cooling system of a flash plant and elsewhere in the utilization system due to the essentially different operating environments involved. Additives for non-cooling geothermal fluids are discussed by scale type: silica, carbonate, and sulfide.

  7. Investigation of fuel-additive effects on sooting flames. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Bonczyk, P.A.

    1987-06-30

    The objective of this research is to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the suppression of soot in flames by fuel additives. Measurements are limited to well-defined hydrocarbon/air prevaporized liquid- and gaseous-fueled flames. Emphasis is given to ferrocene in a diffusion flame fueled by prevaporized iso-octane. Nonperturbing laser/optical diagnostic techniques are used to relate changes in soot particulate size, number density, and volume fraction to additive concentration. Ferrocene is observed to suppress a visible soot plume completely and, in general, to intervene at a late combustion stage. Suppression is due to both size and number density reduction, which suggests that ferrocene enhances the oxidative burn-out of soot. In contrast, at an early combustion stage nearer the burner lip, a slight enhancement of soot observed with ferrocene seeding.

  8. Shelter upgrading manual: host area shelters. Revisions and additions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilton, C.; Gabrielsen, B.L.; Tansley, R.S.

    1981-05-01

    The Shelter Upgrading Manual: Host Area Shelters, which was originally developed under Contract No. DCPA01-78-C-0215, Work Unit 1127H, is in looseleaf form to permit removal of pertinent worksheets and charts for developing upgrading plans for a specific building and to permit the addition of new and replacement material as the work progresses. The manual is one of a series being developed in support of the civil defense concept of crisis relocation planning and is designed to be used by planners in host areas. It presents a methodology for evaluating floors, roofs, and openings and develops a variety of ways to provide the necessary structural upgrading for blast and fallout protection. The revisions included here are based on a testing program and are generally in the area of modified survival ratings. Additional new material on expedient shelters is included in an appendix.

  9. 32 CFR Appendix A to 32 Cfr Part 65 - Additional Reporting Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... title 38, United States Code (U.S.C.) (also known and hereafter referred to as “the Post-9/11 GI Bill... to 32 CFR Part 65 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN POST-9/11 GI BILL Pt. 65, App. A Appendix A to 32 CFR Part 65—Additional...

  10. Report on the Implementation of the Education (Additional Support for Learning) (Scotland) Act 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Additional Support for Learning Act is a key piece of legislation in Scotland's efforts to achieve a more inclusive society and to give all young people the access to the learning opportunities they need in order to meet their potential. The Act also has a key role to play in the day-to-day preventative action that schools can take to be…

  11. Use of chemical additives with steam injection to increase oil recovery. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Handy, L.L.

    1984-09-01

    Surfactants and certain inorganic bases have been evaluated as possible chemical additives to improve performance of steamfloods. Special emphasis was given to chemicals which would reduce the residual oil saturation in regions flooded by hot water below the steam zone. Problems considered were the effect of prolonged exposure to steam temperature on the stability of petroleum sulfonates, the effect of temperature on surfactant adsorption and the effect of temperature on interfacial tensions. Methods were developed for measuring quantitatively the thermal stability of the aryl sulfonate class of surfactant. This class includes the petroleum sulfonates. The best of the surfactants evaluated in this study had marginal stability for use with steamfloods. The surfactants in combination with elevated temperatures do reduce residual oil saturations. Data are presented on the temperature effects on interfacial tensions and on adsorption. Certain inorganic chemicals which give high pH are effective and inexpensive but hydroxyl ions react with silica in the reservoir. This reaction is accentuated at higher temperatures. Data show that the pH of the injected hot water with caustic decreases with contact time. The experiments did not permit determining if an equilibrium pH would be obtained which would be high enough to be effective in recovering oil. Core floods showed that pH's in excess of 12 would be required to reduce residual oil saturations if sodium hydroxide was the injected chemical. The addition of surfactants with caustic or the use of sodium carbonate may permit recovery of oil at lower pH's. A reservoir simulator is being developed to predict performance of steamfloods with chemical additives. This has been completed for simple linear floods but is being extended to three dimensions and to more complicated flooding operations. 31 references, 43 figures, 2 tables.

  12. Sorbent preparation/modification/additives. Final report, September 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Prudich, M.E.; Venkataramakrishnan, R.

    1994-02-01

    Sorbent preparation techniques used today have generally been adapted from techniques traditionally used by the lime industry. Traditional dry hydration and slaking processes have been optimized to produce materials intended for use in the building industry. These preparation techniques should be examined with an eye to optimization of properties important to the SO{sub 2} capture process. The study of calcium-based sorbents for sulfur dioxide capture is complicated by two factors: (1) little is known about the chemical mechanisms by which the standard sorbent preparation and enhancement techniques work, and (2) a sorbent preparation technique that produces a calcium-based sorbent that enjoys enhanced calcium utilization in one regime of operation [flame zone (>2400 F), in-furnace (1600--2400 F), economizer (800--1100 F), after air preheater (<350 F)] may not produce a sorbent that enjoys enhanced calcium utilization in the other reaction zones. Again, an in-depth understanding of the mechanism of sorbent enhancement is necessary if a systematic approach to sorbent development is to be used. As a long-term goal, an experimental program is being carried out for the purpose of (1) defining the effects of slaking conditions on the properties of calcium-based sorbents, (2) determining how the parent limestone properties of calcium-based sorbents, and (3) elucidating the mechanism(s) relating to the activity of various dry sorbent additives. An appendix contains a one-dimensional duct injection model with modifications to handle the sodium additives.

  13. Burning of suspended coal-water slurry droplet with oil as combustion additive. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, S.C.

    1984-10-01

    The combustion of single coal-water slurry droplet with oil as combustion additive (CWOM) has been studied. In this study, the droplet is suspended on a fine quartz fiber and is exposed to the hot combustion product of propane (C/sub 3/H/sub 8/) and air. The results are documented in a movie series. The combustion of CWOM with various combinations of concentrations are compared with that of coal-water slurry and water-oil mixture droplets. The combustion of coal-water slurry is enhanced significantly due to the presence of emulsified kerosene. The enhancement is also dependent upon the mixing procedure during preparation of CWOM. The presence of emulsified kerosene induces local boil-off and combustion that coal particles are splashed as fire works during the early evaporation stage of droplet heat-up. After particle splashing, blow-holes appear on the droplet surface. The popcorn and swelling phenomena usually occurred in coal-water-slurry combustion is greatly reduced. Significant combustion enhancement occurs with the use of kerosene in an amount of about 15 percent of the overall CWOM. This process of using kerosene as combustion additive may provide obvious advantage for the combustion of bituminous coal-water slurry. 4 references, 6 figures.

  14. Hanford waste-form release and sediment interaction: A status report with rationale and recommendations for additional studies

    SciTech Connect

    Serne, R.J. ); Wood, M.I. )

    1990-05-01

    This report documents the currently available geochemical data base for release and retardation for actual Hanford Site materials (wastes and/or sediments). The report also recommends specific laboratory tests and presents the rationale for the recommendations. The purpose of this document is threefold: to summarize currently available information, to provide a strategy for generating additional data, and to provide recommendations on specific data collection methods and tests matrices. This report outlines a data collection approach that relies on feedback from performance analyses to ascertain when adequate data have been collected. The data collection scheme emphasizes laboratory testing based on empiricism. 196 refs., 4 figs., 36 tabs.

  15. 30 CFR 250.1166 - What additional reporting is required for developments in the Alaska OCS Region?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... developments in the Alaska OCS Region? 250.1166 Section 250.1166 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Requirements Other Requirements § 250.1166 What additional reporting is required...

  16. 41 CFR 102-75.140 - In addition to the title report, and all necessary environmental information and certifications...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 102-75.140 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false In addition to the title report, and all necessary environmental information and certifications, what information must...

  17. 40 CFR 60.5422 - What are my additional reporting requirements for my affected facility subject to VOC...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements for my affected facility subject to VOC requirements for onshore natural gas processing plants? 60... Natural Gas Production, Transmission and Distribution § 60.5422 What are my additional reporting requirements for my affected facility subject to VOC requirements for onshore natural gas processing plants?...

  18. 40 CFR 60.5422 - What are my additional reporting requirements for my affected facility subject to VOC...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements for my affected facility subject to VOC requirements for onshore natural gas processing plants? 60... Natural Gas Production, Transmission and Distribution § 60.5422 What are my additional reporting requirements for my affected facility subject to VOC requirements for onshore natural gas processing plants?...

  19. 77 FR 1073 - Privacy Act of 1974; Report of an Altered System of Records, Including Addition of Routine Uses...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Privacy Act of 1974; Report of an Altered System of Records, Including Addition of Routine Uses to an Existing System of Records; Bioresearch Monitoring Information System AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of an altered system of records....

  20. Participation in the United States Department of Energy Reactor Sharing Program. Final report, September 1980--August 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Mulder, R.U.; Benneche, P.E.; Hosticka, B.

    1992-12-01

    The University of Virginia Reactor Facility is an integral part of the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering and is used to support educational programs in engineering and science at the University of Virginia and at other area colleges and universities. The University of Virginia Research Reactor (UVAR) is the highest power (two megawatts thermal power) and one of the most utilized university research reactor in the mid-Atlantic states. A major objective of this facility is to support educational programs in the region. The University of Virginia has received support under the US Department of Energy (DOE) Reactor Sharing Program every year since 1978 to assist in meeting this objective. This report documents the major educational accomplishments under the Reactor Sharing Program for the period September 1991 through August 1992. This report is also to final report under this contract. Previous annual reports should be consulted if any information from those periods is desired. Additional information about the programs conducted at UVA under this contract may be found in the yearly requests for additional funds which have been submitted.

  1. Glassy slags for minimum additive waste stabilization. Interim progress report, May 1993--February 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Bates, J.K.; Brown, N.R.; Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Gong, M.; Emery, J.W.

    1994-05-01

    Glassy slag waste forms are being developed to complement glass waste forms in implementing Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS) for supporting DOE`s environmental restoration efforts. The glassy slag waste form is composed of various crystalline and metal oxide phases embedded in a silicate glass phase. The MAWS approach was adopted by blending multiple waste streams to achieve up to 100% waste loadings. The crystalline phases, such as spinels, are very durable and contain hazardous and radioactive elements in their lattice structures. These crystalline phases may account for up to 80% of the total volume of slags having over 80% metal loading. The structural bond strength model was used to quantify the correlation between glassy slag composition and chemical durability so that optimized slag compositions were obtained with limited crucible melting and testing. Slag compositions developed through crucible melts were also successfully generated in a pilot-scale Retech plasma centrifugal furnace at Ukiah, California. Utilization of glassy slag waste forms allows the MAWS approach to be applied to a much wider range of waste streams than glass waste forms. The initial work at ANL has indicated that glassy slags are good final waste forms because of (1) their high chemical durability; (2) their ability to incorporate large amounts of metal oxides; (3) their ability to incorporate waste streams having low contents of flux components; (4) their less stringent requirements on processing parameters, compared to glass waste forms; and (5) their low requirements for purchased additives, which means greater waste volume reduction and treatment cost savings.

  2. 20 CFR 411.325 - What reporting requirements are placed on an EN as a participant in the Ticket to Work program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... EN as a participant in the Ticket to Work program? 411.325 Section 411.325 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Employment Networks § 411.325 What reporting requirements are placed on an EN as a participant in the Ticket to Work program? An EN must:...

  3. 20 CFR 411.325 - What reporting requirements are placed on an EN as a participant in the Ticket to Work program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... EN as a participant in the Ticket to Work program? 411.325 Section 411.325 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Employment Networks § 411.325 What reporting requirements are placed on an EN as a participant in the Ticket to Work program? An EN must:...

  4. 20 CFR 411.325 - What reporting requirements are placed on an EN as a participant in the Ticket to Work program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... EN as a participant in the Ticket to Work program? 411.325 Section 411.325 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Employment Networks § 411.325 What reporting requirements are placed on an EN as a participant in the Ticket to Work program? An EN must:...

  5. Validation of obesity based on self-reported data in Spanish women participants in breast cancer screening programmes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Measurement of obesity using self-reported anthropometric data usually involves underestimation of weight and/or overestimation of height. The dual aim of this study was, first, to ascertain and assess the validity of new cut-off points, for both overweight and obesity, using self-reported Body Mass Index furnished by women participants in breast cancer screening programmes, and second, to estimate and validate a predictive model that allows recalculate individual BMI based on self-reported data. Methods The study covered 2927 women enrolled at 7 breast cancer screening centres. At each centre, women were randomly selected in 2 samples, in a ratio of 2:1. The larger sample (n = 1951) was used to compare the values of measured and self-reported weight and height, to ascertain new overweight and obesity cut-off points with self-reported data, using ROC curves, and to estimate a predictive model of real BMI using a regression model. The second sample (n = 976) was used to validate the proposed cut-off points and the predictive model. Results Whereas reported prevalence of obesity was 19.8%, measured prevalence was 28.2%. The sensitivity and specificity of this classification would be maximised if the new cut-off points were 24.30 kg/m2 for overweight and 28.39 kg/m2 for obesity. The probability of classifying women correctly in their real weight categories on the basis of these points was 82.5% in the validation sample. Sensitivity and specificity for determining obesity using the new cut-off point in the validation sample were 90.0% and 92.3% respectively. The predictive model for real BMI included the self-reported BMI, age and educational level (university studies vs lower levels of education). This model succeeded in correctly classifying 90.5% of women according to BMI categories, but its performance was similar to that obtained with the new cut-off points. Conclusions Quantification of self-reported obesity entails a considerable underestimation of

  6. New report of additional enterobacterial species causing wilt in West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Shamayeeta; Chaudhuri, Sujata

    2015-07-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is known to be the most prominent causal agent of bacterial wilt worldwide. It has a wide host range comprising solanaceous and nonsolanaceous plants. Typical symptoms of the disease are leaf wilt, browning of vascular tissues, and collapsing of the plant. With the objective of studying the diversity of pathogens causing bacterial wilt in West Bengal, we collected samples of diseased symptomatic crops and adjacent symptomatic and asymptomatic weeds from widespread locations in West Bengal. By means of a routine molecular identification test specific to "R. solanacearum species complex", the majority of these strains (68 out of 71) were found to not be R. solanacearum. Presumptive identification of these isolates with conventional biochemicals, extensive testing of pathogenicity of a subset involving greenhouse trials fulfilling Koch's postulate test, and scanning electron microscopic analysis for the presence of pathogen in diseased plants were done. 16S rDNA sequencing of a subset of these strains (GenBank accession Nos. JX880249-JX880251) and analysis of sequences with the nBLAST programme showed a high similarity (97%-99%) to sequences of the Enterobacteriaceae group available in GenBank. Molecular phylogeny further established the taxonomic position of the strains. The 3 bacterial strain cultures have been submitted to MTCC, Institute of Microbial Technology, Chandigarh, India, and were identified as Klebsiella oxytoca, Enterobacter cowanii, and Klebsiella oxytoca, respectively. Although Enterobacter sp. has previously been reported to cause wilt in many plants, susceptibility of most of the dedicated hosts of R. solanacearum to wilt caused by Enterobacter and other bacteria from Enterobacteriaceae is being reported for the first time in this work.

  7. FGD Additives to Segregate and Sequester Mercury in Solid Byproducts - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Searcy, K; Bltyhe, G M; Steen, W A

    2012-02-28

    Many mercury control strategies for U.S. coal-fired power generating plants involve co-benefit capture of oxidized mercury from flue gases treated by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. For these processes to be effective at overall mercury control, the captured mercury must not be re-emitted to the atmosphere or into surface or ground water. The project sought to identify scrubber additives and FGD operating conditions under which mercury re-emissions would decrease and mercury would remain in the liquor and be blown down from the system in the chloride purge stream. After exiting the FGD system, mercury would react with precipitating agents to form stable solid byproducts and would be removed in a dewatering step. The FGD gypsum solids, free of most of the mercury, could then be disposed or processed for reuse as wallboard or in other beneficial reuse. The project comprised extensive bench-scale FGD scrubber tests in Phases I and II. During Phase II, the approaches developed at the bench scale were tested at the pilot scale. Laboratory wastewater treatment tests measured the performance of precipitating agents in removing mercury from the chloride purge stream. Finally, the economic viability of the approaches tested was evaluated.

  8. Geothermal Economics Calculator (GEC) - additional modifications to final report as per GTP's request.

    SciTech Connect

    Gowda, Varun; Hogue, Michael

    2015-07-17

    This report will discuss the methods and the results from economic impact analysis applied to the development of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), conventional hydrothermal, low temperature geothermal and coproduced fluid technologies resulting in electric power production. As part of this work, the Energy & Geoscience Institute (EGI) has developed a web-based Geothermal Economics Calculator (Geothermal Economics Calculator (GEC)) tool that is aimed at helping the industry perform geothermal systems analysis and study the associated impacts of specific geothermal investments or technological improvements on employment, energy and environment. It is well-known in the industry that geothermal power projects will generate positive economic impacts for their host regions. Our aim in the assessment of these impacts includes quantification of the increase in overall economic output due to geothermal projects and of the job creation associated with this increase. Such an estimate of economic impacts of geothermal investments on employment, energy and the environment will also help us understand the contributions that the geothermal industry will have in achieving a sustainable path towards energy production.

  9. Can the Swedish new variant of Chlamydia trachomatis (nvCT) be detected by UK NEQAS participants from seventeen European countries and five additional countries/regions in 2009?

    PubMed

    Unemo, M; Rossouw, A; James, V; Jenkins, C

    2009-05-14

    In 2006, a new variant of Chlamydia trachomatis (nvCT) was reported in Sweden. The nvCT contains a deletion that includes the targets for the C. trachomatis genetic diagnostic single-target systems from Roche Diagnostics and Abbott Laboratories. Roche and Abbott have now developed certified dual-target assays that can detect the nvCT. This study examined the nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) currently used (in 2009) for C. trachomatis detection in laboratories from 17 European countries and five countries/regions outside Europe that are participating in the United Kingdom (UK) National External Quality Assessment Service (NEQAS). It further examined changes in these laboratories' testing strategy during the period from 2006 to 2009, and their performance regarding nvCT detection. A UK NEQAS blinded nvCT specimen was distributed to all 283 participating laboratories, which were asked to analyse the specimen according to their routine C. trachomatis diagnostic protocols for endocervical swabs. BD ProbeTec was the most commonly used NAAT, followed by Cobas Amplicor, Cobas TaqMan, and Aptima. From 2006 to 2009, the use of Cobas Amplicor, which does not detect the nvCT, decreased, but it was still used by 22% (n=57) of responding participants in 59% of the countries, 54 of these 57 used it as first assay. Virtually all of the other participants detected the nvCT correctly. Laboratories using commercial or in house NAATs that do not detect the nvCT are encouraged to carefully monitor their C. trachomatis incidence, participate in effective internal and external quality assurance and controls schemes, and to consider changing their testing system. PMID:19442398

  10. States' Participation Guidelines for Alternate Assessments Based on Modified Academic Achievement Standards (AA-MAS) in 2010. Synthesis Report 82

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Sheryl S.; Hodgson, Jennifer R.; Price, Lynn M.; Thurlow, Martha L.

    2011-01-01

    Federal legislation requires that all students participate in state accountability systems. Most students with disabilities participate in the regular assessment, with or without accommodations. Students with more significant cognitive disabilities participate in the Alternate Assessment based on Alternate Achievement Standards (AA-AAS). A few…

  11. Nitrogen oxide abatement by distributed fuel addition. Quarterly report No. 2, November 1, 1987--January 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, J.O.L.; Meraab, J.

    1988-03-25

    The purpose of this project is to develop techniques for nitrogen oxides abatement by distributed fuel addition. The major nitrogen oxide of interest is Nitric Oxide (NO), a precursor to premature forest damage and to acid rain. Recently interest has also been evoked with respect to an additional oxide of nitrogen, namely Nitrous Oxide (N{sub 2}O). Therefore, abatement measures for NO{sub x} are being investigated to determine their influence on N{sub 2}O as well. This report briefly describes the significance of N{sub 2}O emissions to the environment and the urgent need to develop techniques that can reduce emissions of both NO and N{sub 2}O. Reburning through distributed fuel addition may be an effective technique for NO{sub x} (mainly NO) emission control as described in the previous quarterly report. Reburning may also be effective in reducing N{sub 2}O levels. A technique for N{sub 2}O measurement by gas chromatography/electron capture detection was developed during this quarter, and is described in this report. This analysis technique will be used in the proposed experimental study to investigate the effectiveness of reburning on N{sub 2}O control.

  12. Work-Life Issues and Participation in Education and Training. A National Vocational Education and Training Research and Evaluation Program Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Natalie

    2009-01-01

    Using data from the 2009 Australian Work and Life Index, this report examines how work-life pressures influence the capacity and motivation of individuals, particularly low-paid workers, to engage in education and training. This report is part of a larger project, "Low-paid workers and VET: Increasing VET participation amongst lower-paid workers…

  13. The "Mentor Paper" Writing Assignment in One Community College Puente Class: Preliminary Report from a Participant Observer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cazden, Courtney B.

    An educator participating in a community college Puente class as both participant and observer analyzes the structure and experience of one writing assignment representative of the program's objectives. The Puente program combines teaching, counseling, and mentoring to California community college students as a means of promoting learning,…

  14. Increasing Women's Participation in International Scholarship Programs: An Analysis of Nine Case Studies. IIE Research Report Number Twenty-Seven.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kluger, Rona

    Part of a larger study of women's participation in international scholarship and fellowship programs, this volume describes and profiles women's participation in nine programs: (1) the American Association of University Women International Fellows Program; (2) America-Mideast Educational and Training Services, Inc. (AMIDEAST); (3) African Training…

  15. Self-Reported Treatment-Associated Symptoms among Patients with Urea Cycle Disorders Participating in Glycerol Phenylbutyrate Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Nagamani, Sandesh C. S.; Diaz, George A.; Rhead, William; Berry, Susan A.; Le Mons, Cynthia; Lichter-Konecki, Uta; Bartley, James; Feigenbaum, Annette; Schulze, Andreas; Longo, Nicola; Berquist, William; Gallagher, Renata; Bartholomew, Dennis; Harding, Cary O.; Korson, Mark S.; McCandless, Shawn E.; Smith, Wendy; Vockley, Jerry; Kronn, David; Zori, Robert; Cederbaum, Stephen; Merritt, J. Lawrence; Wong, Derek; Coakley, Dion F.; Scharschmidt, Bruce F.; Dickinson, Klara; Marino, Miguel; Lee, Brendan H.; Mokhtarani, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background Health care outcomes have been increasingly assessed through health-related quality of life (HRQoL) measures. While the introduction of nitrogen-scavenging medications has improved survival in patients with urea cycle disorders (UCDs), they are often associated with side effects that may affect patient compliance and outcomes. Methods Symptoms commonly associated with nitrogen-scavenging medications were evaluated in 100 adult and pediatric participants using a non-validated UCD-specific questionnaire. Patients or their caregivers responded to a pre-defined list of symptoms known to be associated with the use of these medications. Responses were collected at baseline (while patients were receiving sodium phenylbutyrate [NaPBA]) and during treatment with glycerol phenylbutyrate (GPB). Results After 3 months of GPB dosing, there were significant reductions in the proportion of patients with treatment-associated symptoms (69% vs. 46%; p<0.0001), the number of symptoms per patient (2.5 vs. 1.1; p<0.0001), and the frequency of the more commonly reported individual symptoms such as body odor, abdominal pain, nausea, burning sensation in mouth, vomiting, and heartburn (p<0.05). The reduction in symptoms was observed in both pediatric and adult patients. The presence or absence of symptoms or change in severity did not correlate with plasma ammonia levels or NaPBA dose. Conclusions The reduction in symptoms following 3 months of open-label GPB dosing was similar in pediatric and adult patients and may be related to chemical structure and intrinsic characteristics of the product rather than its effect on ammonia control. PMID:26296711

  16. 43 CFR 3276.13 - What additional information must I give BLM in the monthly report for flash and dry steam...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... BLM in the monthly report for flash and dry steam facilities? 3276.13 Section 3276.13 Public Lands... What additional information must I give BLM in the monthly report for flash and dry steam facilities? In addition to the regular monthly report information required by § 3276.12, send to BLM: (a)...

  17. 43 CFR 3276.13 - What additional information must I give BLM in the monthly report for flash and dry steam...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... BLM in the monthly report for flash and dry steam facilities? 3276.13 Section 3276.13 Public Lands... What additional information must I give BLM in the monthly report for flash and dry steam facilities? In addition to the regular monthly report information required by § 3276.12, send to BLM: (a)...

  18. 43 CFR 3276.13 - What additional information must I give BLM in the monthly report for flash and dry steam...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... BLM in the monthly report for flash and dry steam facilities? 3276.13 Section 3276.13 Public Lands... What additional information must I give BLM in the monthly report for flash and dry steam facilities? In addition to the regular monthly report information required by § 3276.12, send to BLM: (a)...

  19. 43 CFR 3276.13 - What additional information must I give BLM in the monthly report for flash and dry steam...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... BLM in the monthly report for flash and dry steam facilities? 3276.13 Section 3276.13 Public Lands... What additional information must I give BLM in the monthly report for flash and dry steam facilities? In addition to the regular monthly report information required by § 3276.12, send to BLM: (a)...

  20. Polymelous layer chick displaying additional malformations of the hind gut: case report and in-depth review of related literature.

    PubMed

    Hirschberg, R M; Saleh, M; Kaiser, S; Lierz, M; Hafez, H M; Bragulla, H H

    2012-08-01

    A case report of a male 6-day-old male layer chick featuring incomplete polymelia of the hind limbs and hindgut malformations is presented. The chick was submitted to computed tomography (CT) examination and subsequent anatomical dissection. Apart from the two supernumerary hind limbs, the anatomical dissection revealed additional hindgut alterations: three uniform-sized caeca flanked the ileum, and the rectum branched into paired cloacae. The supernumerary hind limbs were localized caudal to the normal hind limbs in an inverted position and were attached to pelvic girdle elements and to a curtate pygostyle. They featured a prominent unpaired femur besides paired tibiotarsi, tarsometatarsi and species-specific phalanges of the toes. Additionally, two separate bones attached to the caudoventral aspect of the regular hip bones were developed. The supernumerary limbs were in part mobile and received nerve and vascular supply. Digital 3D-reconstruction based on the CT datasets revealed the osseous components of the malformed body parts. The possible morphogenesis including an in-depth literature review and the clinical implications of the reported malformations are discussed. PMID:22250842

  1. 45 CFR 261.60 - What hours of participation may a State report for a work-eligible individual?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Verification Plan. (e) A State may count supervised homework time and up to one hour of unsupervised homework time for each hour of class time. Total homework time counted for participation cannot exceed the...

  2. 45 CFR 261.60 - What hours of participation may a State report for a work-eligible individual?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Verification Plan. (e) A State may count supervised homework time and up to one hour of unsupervised homework time for each hour of class time. Total homework time counted for participation cannot exceed the...

  3. 45 CFR 261.60 - What hours of participation may a State report for a work-eligible individual?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Verification Plan. (e) A State may count supervised homework time and up to one hour of unsupervised homework time for each hour of class time. Total homework time counted for participation cannot exceed the...

  4. 45 CFR 261.60 - What hours of participation may a State report for a work-eligible individual?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Verification Plan. (e) A State may count supervised homework time and up to one hour of unsupervised homework time for each hour of class time. Total homework time counted for participation cannot exceed the...

  5. 45 CFR 261.60 - What hours of participation may a State report for a work-eligible individual?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Verification Plan. (e) A State may count supervised homework time and up to one hour of unsupervised homework time for each hour of class time. Total homework time counted for participation cannot exceed the...

  6. Group cohesion and between session homework activities predict self-reported cognitive-behavioral skill use amongst participants of SMART Recovery groups.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Peter J; Deane, Frank P; Baker, Amanda L

    2015-04-01

    SMART Recovery groups are cognitive-behaviorally oriented mutual support groups for individuals with addictions. The aim of the study was to assess the extent to which the quality of group facilitation, group cohesion and the use of between session homework activities contribute to self-rated use of cognitive-behavioral skills amongst group participants. Participants attending SMART Recovery groups in Australia completed a cross sectional survey (N=124). The survey included measures of cognitive and behavioral skill utilization, group cohesion, quality of group facilitation and a rating of how frequently participants leave group meetings with an achievable between session homework plan. On average, participants had been attending SMART Recovery meetings for 9 months. Participants were most likely to attend SMART Recovery for problematic alcohol use. Regression analyses indicated that group cohesion significantly predicted use of cognitive restructuring, but that only provision of homework at the end of each group session predicted self-reported behavioral activation. Both group cohesion and leaving a group with an achievable homework plan predicted participant use of cognitive behavioral skills. The concrete actions associated with homework activities may facilitate behavioral activation. There is a need for longitudinal research to examine the relationship between the utilization of cognitive and behavioral skills and participant outcomes (e.g. substance use, mental health) for people attending SMART Recovery groups. PMID:25535099

  7. Underrepresented minority high school and college students report STEM-pipeline sustaining gains after participating in the Loma Linda University Summer Health Disparities Research Program.

    PubMed

    Salto, Lorena M; Riggs, Matt L; Delgado De Leon, Daisy; Casiano, Carlos A; De Leon, Marino

    2014-01-01

    An urgent need exists for graduate and professional schools to establish evidence-based STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) pipeline programs to increase the diversity of the biomedical workforce. An untapped yet promising pool of willing participants are capable high school students that have a strong STEM interest but may lack the skills and the guided mentoring needed to succeed in competitive STEM fields. This study evaluates and compares the impact of the Loma Linda University (LLU) Summer Health Disparities Research Program on high school (HS) and undergraduate (UG) student participants. The primary focus of our summer research experience (SRE) is to enhance the research self-efficacy of the participants by actively involving them in a research project and by providing the students with personalized mentoring and targeted career development activities, including education on health disparities. The results of our study show that our SRE influenced terminal degree intent and increased participant willingness to incorporate research into future careers for both the HS and the UG groups. The quantitative data shows that both the HS and the UG participants reported large, statistically significant gains in self-assessed research skills and research self-efficacy. Both participant groups identified the hands-on research and the mentor experience as the most valuable aspects of our SRE and reported increased science skills, increased confidence in science ability and increased motivation and affirmation to pursue a science career. The follow-up data indicates that 67% of the HS participants and 90% of the UG participants graduated from college with a STEM degree; for those who enrolled in graduate education, 61% and 43% enrolled in LLU, respectively. We conclude that structured SREs can be highly effective STEM strengthening interventions for both UG and HS students and may be a way to measurably increase institutional and biomedical workforce

  8. Underrepresented minority high school and college students report STEM-pipeline sustaining gains after participating in the Loma Linda University Summer Health Disparities Research Program.

    PubMed

    Salto, Lorena M; Riggs, Matt L; Delgado De Leon, Daisy; Casiano, Carlos A; De Leon, Marino

    2014-01-01

    An urgent need exists for graduate and professional schools to establish evidence-based STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) pipeline programs to increase the diversity of the biomedical workforce. An untapped yet promising pool of willing participants are capable high school students that have a strong STEM interest but may lack the skills and the guided mentoring needed to succeed in competitive STEM fields. This study evaluates and compares the impact of the Loma Linda University (LLU) Summer Health Disparities Research Program on high school (HS) and undergraduate (UG) student participants. The primary focus of our summer research experience (SRE) is to enhance the research self-efficacy of the participants by actively involving them in a research project and by providing the students with personalized mentoring and targeted career development activities, including education on health disparities. The results of our study show that our SRE influenced terminal degree intent and increased participant willingness to incorporate research into future careers for both the HS and the UG groups. The quantitative data shows that both the HS and the UG participants reported large, statistically significant gains in self-assessed research skills and research self-efficacy. Both participant groups identified the hands-on research and the mentor experience as the most valuable aspects of our SRE and reported increased science skills, increased confidence in science ability and increased motivation and affirmation to pursue a science career. The follow-up data indicates that 67% of the HS participants and 90% of the UG participants graduated from college with a STEM degree; for those who enrolled in graduate education, 61% and 43% enrolled in LLU, respectively. We conclude that structured SREs can be highly effective STEM strengthening interventions for both UG and HS students and may be a way to measurably increase institutional and biomedical workforce

  9. Underrepresented Minority High School and College Students Report STEM-Pipeline Sustaining Gains After Participating in the Loma Linda University Summer Health Disparities Research Program

    PubMed Central

    Salto, Lorena M.; Riggs, Matt L.; Delgado De Leon, Daisy; Casiano, Carlos A.; De Leon, Marino

    2014-01-01

    An urgent need exists for graduate and professional schools to establish evidence-based STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) pipeline programs to increase the diversity of the biomedical workforce. An untapped yet promising pool of willing participants are capable high school students that have a strong STEM interest but may lack the skills and the guided mentoring needed to succeed in competitive STEM fields. This study evaluates and compares the impact of the Loma Linda University (LLU) Summer Health Disparities Research Program on high school (HS) and undergraduate (UG) student participants. The primary focus of our summer research experience (SRE) is to enhance the research self-efficacy of the participants by actively involving them in a research project and by providing the students with personalized mentoring and targeted career development activities, including education on health disparities. The results of our study show that our SRE influenced terminal degree intent and increased participant willingness to incorporate research into future careers for both the HS and the UG groups. The quantitative data shows that both the HS and the UG participants reported large, statistically significant gains in self-assessed research skills and research self-efficacy. Both participant groups identified the hands-on research and the mentor experience as the most valuable aspects of our SRE and reported increased science skills, increased confidence in science ability and increased motivation and affirmation to pursue a science career. The follow-up data indicates that 67% of the HS participants and 90% of the UG participants graduated from college with a STEM degree; for those who enrolled in graduate education, 61% and 43% enrolled in LLU, respectively. We conclude that structured SREs can be highly effective STEM strengthening interventions for both UG and HS students and may be a way to measurably increase institutional and biomedical workforce

  10. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  11. 17 CFR 240.3a71-2A - Report regarding the “security-based swap dealer” and “major security-based swap participant...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...-based swap dealerâ and âmajor security-based swap participantâ definitions (Appendix A to 17 CFR 240... A to 17 CFR 240.3a71-2). Appendix A to § 240.3a71-2 sets forth guidelines applicable to a report... consider this report in reviewing the effect and application of these rules based on the evolution of...

  12. 17 CFR 240.3a71-2A - Report regarding the “security-based swap dealer” and “major security-based swap participant...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...-based swap dealerâ and âmajor security-based swap participantâ definitions (Appendix A to 17 CFR 240... A to 17 CFR 240.3a71-2). Appendix A to § 240.3a71-2 sets forth guidelines applicable to a report... consider this report in reviewing the effect and application of these rules based on the evolution of...

  13. Evaluation of the DC Opportunity Scholarship Program: An Early Look at Applicants and Participating Schools under the SOAR Act. Year 1 Report, Executive Summary. NCEE 2015-4000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Jill; Lucas-McLean, Juanita; Gutmann, Babette; Dynarski, Mark; Betts, Julian

    2014-01-01

    This report explores implementation of the District of Columbia Opportunity Scholarship Program (OSP) in the first two years after Congress reauthorized it with some changes under the SOAR Act of 2011. Key findings include the following: (1) Just over half of all DC private schools participated in the OSP, with current schools more likely to have…

  14. Evaluation of the DC Opportunity Scholarship Program: An Early Look at Applicants and Participating Schools under the SOAR Act. Year 1 Report. NCEE 2015-4000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Jill; Lucas-McLean, Juanita; Gutmann, Babette; Dynarski, Mark; Betts, Julian

    2014-01-01

    This report explores implementation of the District of Columbia Opportunity Scholarship Program (OSP) in the first two years after Congress reauthorized it with some changes under the SOAR Act of 2011. Key findings include the following: (1) Just over half of all DC private schools participated in the OSP, with current schools more likely to have…

  15. 20 CFR 411.325 - What reporting requirements are placed on an EN as a participant in the Ticket to Work program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What reporting requirements are placed on an EN as a participant in the Ticket to Work program? 411.325 Section 411.325 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Employment Networks § 411.325...

  16. 20 CFR 411.325 - What reporting requirements are placed on an EN as a participant in the Ticket to Work program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What reporting requirements are placed on an EN as a participant in the Ticket to Work program? 411.325 Section 411.325 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Employment Networks § 411.325...

  17. The Learning Divide Revisited: A Report on the Findings of a UK-Wide Survey on Adult Participation in Education and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sargant, Naomi

    Based on a 1999 survey of 5,054 adults, this report describes those who are and are not participating in adult learning in Great Britain. It covers factors such as age, gender, previous education experiences, socioeconomic background, and geographical location and points to the workplace as a significant source of information, motivation, and…

  18. A Status Report on the SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes) Project and Some Issues Affecting Ozone Climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Witte, J. C.; McPeters, R. D.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    SHADOZ aims to support the study of local and global patterns in stratospheric and tropospheric ozone and to provide a data set for the validation for satellite products and model calculations of ozone. Southern hemispheric tropical ozone is of particular interest because this region appears to have complex interplay among photochemical ozone formation (from biomass burning and lightning), stratospheric dynamics, convection and possibly cross-hemispheric transport. Balloon-borne ozone instrumentation (ozonesondes), joined with standard radiosondes for measurement of pressure, temperature and relative humidity, is used to collect profiles throughout the troposphere and lower- to mid-stratosphere. A network of 10 southern hemisphere tropical and subtropical stations, called the Southern Hemisphere ADditional OZonesondes (SHADOZ) project, has been established from operational sites to assemble sonde data for 1998-2000. A status report on the archive, with station operating characteristics, will be given, along with some operational issues that may affect data analysis and interpretation.

  19. 36 CFR 1281.12 - What information must be provided to NARA for its report to Congress on a change or addition to a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... provided to NARA for its report to Congress on a change or addition to a Presidential library facility... ADMINISTRATION NARA FACILITIES PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY FACILITIES § 1281.12 What information must be provided to NARA for its report to Congress on a change or addition to a Presidential library facility? (a)...

  20. 36 CFR 1281.12 - What information must be provided to NARA for its report to Congress on a change or addition to a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... provided to NARA for its report to Congress on a change or addition to a Presidential library facility... ADMINISTRATION NARA FACILITIES PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY FACILITIES § 1281.12 What information must be provided to NARA for its report to Congress on a change or addition to a Presidential library facility? (a)...

  1. 36 CFR 1281.12 - What information must be provided to NARA for its report to Congress on a change or addition to a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... provided to NARA for its report to Congress on a change or addition to a Presidential library facility... ADMINISTRATION NARA FACILITIES PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY FACILITIES § 1281.12 What information must be provided to NARA for its report to Congress on a change or addition to a Presidential library facility? (a)...

  2. 36 CFR 1281.12 - What information must be provided to NARA for its report to Congress on a change or addition to a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... provided to NARA for its report to Congress on a change or addition to a Presidential library facility... ADMINISTRATION NARA FACILITIES PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY FACILITIES § 1281.12 What information must be provided to NARA for its report to Congress on a change or addition to a Presidential library facility? (a)...

  3. Adult Community Orchestras in Texas: Activity and Background Profiles of Participants with a Report of Organizational Standing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Kathryn Dharlene

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and assess Texas community orchestras and create a demographic and musical profile of participants. This was accomplished through use of two online questionnaires. A director survey questionnaire determined the organizational status of each orchestra. The directors surveyed were leaders in these…

  4. The Determinants of Labor Force Participation Rates, with Special Reference to the Ozark Low-Income Area. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandmeyer, Robert L.; Warner, Larkin B.

    The study's primary purpose was to identify and evaluate the relative importance of factors responsible for the generally low labor force participation rates observable in the Ozark Low-Income Area, and variations in rates within the area itself. The study focused on 108 contiguous, rural-oriented, low-income counties in the states of Arkansas,…

  5. 32 CFR 37.900 - May I tell a participant that information in financial and programmatic reports will not be...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR 286.23(h) (and any DoD Component supplementary procedures) to determine whether it is privileged or confidential information under the FOIA exemption at 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(4), as implemented by the DoD at 32 CFR 286.12(d). (b) If the participant also provides information in the course of a...

  6. 32 CFR 37.900 - May I tell a participant that information in financial and programmatic reports will not be...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR 286.23(h) (and any DoD Component supplementary procedures) to determine whether it is privileged or confidential information under the FOIA exemption at 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(4), as implemented by the DoD at 32 CFR 286.12(d). (b) If the participant also provides information in the course of a...

  7. 32 CFR 37.900 - May I tell a participant that information in financial and programmatic reports will not be...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CFR 286.23(h) (and any DoD Component supplementary procedures) to determine whether it is privileged or confidential information under the FOIA exemption at 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(4), as implemented by the DoD at 32 CFR 286.12(d). (b) If the participant also provides information in the course of a...

  8. 32 CFR 37.900 - May I tell a participant that information in financial and programmatic reports will not be...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CFR 286.23(h) (and any DoD Component supplementary procedures) to determine whether it is privileged or confidential information under the FOIA exemption at 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(4), as implemented by the DoD at 32 CFR 286.12(d). (b) If the participant also provides information in the course of a...

  9. 32 CFR 37.900 - May I tell a participant that information in financial and programmatic reports will not be...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CFR 286.23(h) (and any DoD Component supplementary procedures) to determine whether it is privileged or confidential information under the FOIA exemption at 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(4), as implemented by the DoD at 32 CFR 286.12(d). (b) If the participant also provides information in the course of a...

  10. Options for the Development of a Voluntary Network of Participants in the National Environmental Data Referral Service. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MAXIMA Corp., Silver Spring, MD.

    Building on the findings of a survey of potential users and a descriptive review of five existing information networks, the present study represents an attempt to characterize several options for a voluntary confederation of participants in operating the National Environmental Data Referral Services (NEDRES) being developed by the Assessment and…

  11. [Impairment - disability - participation for all : New federal reporting in light of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities].

    PubMed

    Wacker, Elisabeth

    2016-09-01

    The new Federal Government's Report on Participation explores the contexts in which impairments become disabilities for those individuals who experience them. In parallel, it outlines the factors that foster inclusion and opportunities to act for everyone in society - despite existing impairments.From a sociopolitical and health policy perspective, disability refers to unequal opportunities based on impairment. Hence, the focus here is on the equalisation of these participation opportunities to match those of the entire population - but always from differentiated perspectives on the various social arenas. The human rights approach stresses protection against discrimination as well as dignity and self-determination for all. From a human resources angle, the emphasis is on the performance of individuals in favourable conditions and the attainment of personal goals within their actual everyday circumstances.The new reporting concept is indebted to these perspectives and thus focuses on individual life circumstances, while referring to the WHO's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) - an approach now validated on a global scale. Therefore, it does not only report on measures provided by services for persons with disabilities but, more crucially, investigates determinants on the personal and environmental levels, unequal opportunities and the interdependency between context and competence for particular sections of the population. Two groups are singled out in the process: elderly persons and individuals with mental health impairments.The participation report is part of the National Action Plan to implement the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD). An independent scientific committee conceptualises the design of the report while accompanying and commenting upon its realisation. Currently, a second federal report on participation is emerging from the new concept.

  12. [Impairment - disability - participation for all : New federal reporting in light of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities].

    PubMed

    Wacker, Elisabeth

    2016-09-01

    The new Federal Government's Report on Participation explores the contexts in which impairments become disabilities for those individuals who experience them. In parallel, it outlines the factors that foster inclusion and opportunities to act for everyone in society - despite existing impairments.From a sociopolitical and health policy perspective, disability refers to unequal opportunities based on impairment. Hence, the focus here is on the equalisation of these participation opportunities to match those of the entire population - but always from differentiated perspectives on the various social arenas. The human rights approach stresses protection against discrimination as well as dignity and self-determination for all. From a human resources angle, the emphasis is on the performance of individuals in favourable conditions and the attainment of personal goals within their actual everyday circumstances.The new reporting concept is indebted to these perspectives and thus focuses on individual life circumstances, while referring to the WHO's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) - an approach now validated on a global scale. Therefore, it does not only report on measures provided by services for persons with disabilities but, more crucially, investigates determinants on the personal and environmental levels, unequal opportunities and the interdependency between context and competence for particular sections of the population. Two groups are singled out in the process: elderly persons and individuals with mental health impairments.The participation report is part of the National Action Plan to implement the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD). An independent scientific committee conceptualises the design of the report while accompanying and commenting upon its realisation. Currently, a second federal report on participation is emerging from the new concept. PMID:27492314

  13. Adolescent and Young Adult Patient Engagement and Participation in Survey-Based Research: A Report From the "Resilience in Adolescents and Young Adults With Cancer" Study.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Abby R; Bona, Kira; Wharton, Claire M; Bradford, Miranda; Shaffer, Michele L; Wolfe, Joanne; Baker, Kevin Scott

    2016-04-01

    Conducting patient-reported outcomes research with adolescents and young adults (AYAs) is difficult due to low participation rates and high attrition. Forty-seven AYAs with newly diagnosed cancer at two large hospitals were prospectively surveyed at the time of diagnosis and 3-6 and 12-18 months later. A subset participated in 1:1 semistructured interviews. Attrition prompted early study closure at one site. The majority of patients preferred paper-pencil to online surveys. Interview participants were more likely to complete surveys (e.g., 93% vs. 58% completion of 3-6 month surveys, P = 0.02). Engaging patients through qualitative methodologies and using patient-preferred instruments may optimize future research success.

  14. Changes in self-reported experienced health and psychosomatic symptoms in voluntary participants in a 1-year extensive newspaper exercise campaign.

    PubMed

    Andersson, G; Malmgren, S

    1986-01-01

    Starting in 1977 the newspaper Ostgötacorrespondenten carried through a 1-year health information campaign in Linköping. The campaign included exercise, dietary and anti-smoking components. It was given a great deal of space in the paper with special supplements almost every week. The purpose of the study is to throw light upon self-reported changed general well-being and experienced psychosomatic symptoms and health of the participants in this campaign. 2,887 persons registered voluntarily for the campaign. After the campaign a questionnaire was sent to the 1,568 participants who had been the most active in the campaign. 935 persons (60%) answered the questionnaire. One fourth of the participants with headache, back pain, stomach problems or sleeping trouble before the campaign experienced that their symptoms had decreased during the campaign, primarily due to changed exercise habits. Half of the participants reported that their general well-being was better and 42% experienced themselves healthier as a result of changed health habits in connection with the campaign. In the group that felt healthier, almost twice as many, 62% compared with 34%, had increased their exercising compared with those who experienced themselves as neither healthier nor less healthy.

  15. 13 CFR 124.603 - What reports regarding the continued business operations of former Participants does SBA require?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 8(a) BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT/SMALL DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS STATUS DETERMINATIONS 8(a) Business Development Miscellaneous Reporting Requirements § 124.603... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What reports regarding...

  16. 13 CFR 124.601 - What reports does SBA require concerning parties who assist Participants in obtaining federal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 8(a) BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT/SMALL DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS STATUS DETERMINATIONS 8(a) Business Development Miscellaneous Reporting Requirements § 124.601... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What reports does SBA...

  17. 13 CFR 124.601 - What reports does SBA require concerning parties who assist Participants in obtaining federal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 8(a) BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT/SMALL DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS STATUS DETERMINATIONS 8(a) Business Development Miscellaneous Reporting Requirements § 124.601... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What reports does SBA...

  18. 13 CFR 124.603 - What reports regarding the continued business operations of former Participants does SBA require?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 8(a) BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT/SMALL DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS STATUS DETERMINATIONS 8(a) Business Development Miscellaneous Reporting Requirements § 124.603... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What reports regarding...

  19. Reliability of reporting on life-style and agricultural factors by a sample of participants in the Agricultural Health Study from Iowa.

    PubMed

    Blair, Aaron; Tarone, Robert; Sandler, Dale; Lynch, Charles F; Rowland, Andrew; Wintersteen, Wendy; Steen, William C; Samanic, Claudine; Dosemeci, Mustafa; Alavanja, Michael C R

    2002-01-01

    Repeat interviews from 4,088 Iowa pesticide applicators participating in the Agricultural Health Study provided the opportunity to evaluate the reliability of self-reported information on pesticide use and various demographic and life-style factors. Self-completed questionnaires were administered 1 year apart when participants returned to county agricultural extension offices for pesticide certification or training. Percentage agreement for ever-/never-use of specific pesticides and application practices was quite high, generally ranging from 70% to more than 90%, and did not vary by age, educational level, or farm size. Agreement was lower (typically 50-60%) for duration, frequency, or decade of first use of specific pesticides. Level of agreement regarding pesticide use in this population is similar to that generally found for factors typically used in epidemiologic studies such as tobacco use and higher than typically reported for diet, physical activity, and medical conditions. PMID:11805592

  20. A semi-centennial report on the participants depicted in Joel Babb's portrait, 'the first successful kidney transplantation'.

    PubMed

    Desai, S P; Desai, M S; Wood, D N; Maddi, R; Leeson, S; Tilney, N L

    2007-07-01

    Joseph Murray performed the first successful human kidney transplant on December 23, 1954. Forty-three years later, he along with participants Francis Moore and Leroy Vandam, commissioned a painting of the event from artist Joel Babb (1). To document this unique record of medical history, we identify all those present at the operation and depicted in the portrait, describe how the artist created the work, explain irregularities and inaccuracies in the painting, provide a 50-year follow-up on everyone involved, and comment on any influence this landmark event may have had on their subsequent careers. PMID:17532749

  1. A new approach to community participation in tsetse control in the Busoga sleeping sickness focus, Uganda. A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Okoth, J O; Kirumira, E K; Kapaata, R

    1991-06-01

    A process is described by which trapping technology is being taught to a rural community which has been affected continuously by an epidemic of sleeping sickness for over a decade. Through a systematic health education programme, people are actively involved in making and setting traps and in learning about the general characteristics of the tsetse fly and the disease. A mono-screen trap has been developed for community use and is being used to trap flies. This is the first time that this kind of community participation has been attempted in tsetse control--and this approach is discussed in relation to other approaches.

  2. The relationship between health promoting resources and work participation in a sample reporting musculoskeletal pain from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study, HUNT 3, Norway

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal pain (MSP) is one of the most frequent causes of sick leave from work, and is a common and potentially disabling condition. This study is based on the salutogenic perspective and investigates the relationship between personal, social, and functional health resources and work participation in a population reporting MSP. Method Analysis was performed on cross sectional data from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study, HUNT 3, in Norway. The sample of n= 6702 was extracted from HUNT 3, including a total of N= 50807 participants. Self-reported health (SRH) and, personal, social, and functional resources were assessed by a questionnaire. Reported sick leave was collected by interview at the point of time when the data were collected, from October 2006 until June 2008. Results Logistic regression analysis demonstrated statistically significant differences between the work group and sick leave group in self-rated health, work support, work control, work load, and feeling strong, and the model predicted 68% of the cases correctly. Females had a lower statistically significant probability (B= −.53) to be in the work group then men when suffering from MSP, with odds of 41%. Conclusion There was a statistically significant relationship between health promoting resources such as SRH, feeling strong, absence of neuroticism, work load, work control, and work participation in MSP population. PMID:23509959

  3. Assessment of PNGV fuels infrastructure. Phase 1 report: Additional capital needs and fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.; Stork, K.; Vyas, A.; Mintz, M.; Singh, M.; Johnson, L.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents the methodologies and results of Argonne`s assessment of additional capital needs and the fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of using six different fuels in the vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) that the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles is currently investigating. The six fuels included in this study are reformulated gasoline, low-sulfur diesel, methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen. Reformulated gasoline, methanol, and ethanol are assumed to be burned in spark-ignition, direct-injection engines. Diesel and dimethyl ether are assumed to be burned in compression-ignition, direct-injection engines. Hydrogen and methanol are assumed to be used in fuel-cell vehicles. The authors have analyzed fuels infrastructure impacts under a 3X vehicle low market share scenario and a high market share scenario. The assessment shows that if 3X vehicles are mass-introduced, a considerable amount of capital investment will be needed to build new fuel production plants and to establish distribution infrastructure for methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen. Capital needs for production facilities will far exceed those for distribution infrastructure. Among the four fuels, hydrogen will bear the largest capital needs. The fuel efficiency gain by 3X vehicles translates directly into reductions in total energy demand, fossil energy demand, and CO{sub 2} emissions. The combination of fuel substitution and fuel efficiency results in substantial petroleum displacement and large reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, sulfur oxide, and particulate matter of size smaller than 10 microns.

  4. Serum 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin levels in Air Force health study participants - preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-24

    In 1978, the US Air Force responded to a congressional mandate to initiate an epidemiologic study of the possible health effects of exposure to herbicides and their 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) contaminants in Air Force veterans who served in the Ranch Hand defoliation operation during the Vietnam conflict. Accordingly, the Air Force conducted a nonconcurrent prospective study, the Air Force Health Study, of all 1267 members of the Ranch Hand unit and a series of matched controls. This phase of the Air Force study focused on measuring serum TCDD levels in 150 Ranch Hand veterans and 50 controls. All participants were enlisted men; the Ranch Hand veterans had been either herbicide loaders or herbicide specialists in Vietnam. The demographic and health characteristics of Ranch Hand personnel and controls were similar; however, their serum TCDD levels differed markedly.

  5. Preschool Participation and the Cognitive and Social Development of Language-Minority Students. CSE Technical Report 674. UC LMRI Technical Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rumberger, Russell W.; Tran, Loan

    2006-01-01

    This study examined participation in preschool and its relationship with the cognitive and social development of language-minority students. Although there is a large body of research that demonstrates the cognitive and social benefits of attending preschool (Barnett, 1995; Gorey, 2001; National Research Council, Committee on Early Childhood…

  6. Evaluation of Early Childhood Coaching Implementation in Nebraska. Technical Report Vol. 2: Key Findings from Participant Observational and Self-Reported Data. CYFS Working Paper 2014-2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayaraman, Gayatri; Knoche, Lisa; Marvin, Christine; Bainter, Sue

    2014-01-01

    The Nebraska Early Childhood Coach (ECC) training was a 3 day (8 hours) professional development event sponsored by the Nebraska Department of Education, Office of Child Development in 2009-2010. Sixty-five early childhood teachers and related service providers participated for the purpose of learning the basic principles and behaviors associated…

  7. Validation of internet-based self-reported anthropometric, demographic data and participant identity in the Food4Me study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND In e-health intervention studies, there are concerns about the reliability of internet-based, self-reported (SR) data and about the potential for identity fraud. This study introduced and tested a novel procedure for assessing the validity of internet-based, SR identity and validated anth...

  8. Linkage between Vocationally Trained Participants and Industry Registered Apprenticeship Programs: A Study of Barriers and Facilitators. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Hollie B.; And Others

    The study described in this report was conducted to identify the barriers and facilitators to establishing a system of linkages between vocational education and apprenticeship programs. Following an extensive review of literature that showed various barriers to linkages and described some facilitating steps, data were collected through an initial…

  9. Labor Force Participation in Formal Work-Related Education in 2000-01. Statistical Analysis Report. NCES 2005-048

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Lisa; Bhandari, Rajika; Peter, Katharin; Bills, David B.

    2005-01-01

    Of the many purposes education serves in society, one of the most important is to prepare people for work. In today's economy, education is important not just to help adults enter the labor market, but also to ensure that adults remain marketable throughout their working lives. This report examines how adults in the labor force use formal…

  10. Stress perceptions of soldiers participating in training at the Chemical Defense Training Facility: The mediating effects of motivation, experience, and confidence level. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fatkin, L.T.; Hudgens, G.A.

    1994-01-01

    An investigation was conducted by the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and funded by the Physiological and Psychological Effects of the Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical (NBC) Environment and Sustained Operations on Systems in Combat (P2NBC2) program to assess the psychological reactions of soldiers in mission-oriented protective posture (MOPP) IV participating in training in a simulated chemical agent environment and in a toxic agent environment. A total of 155 soldiers who participated in the basic course (junior enlisted) and the advanced courses (officer and noncommissioned officer NCO groups) as part of their military occupational specialty (MOS) training volunteered for the study. The junior enlisted group reported significant increases in anxiety during four sessions as they approached the toxic agent portion of the training. The more experienced groups showed a small, but significant increase in anxiety during sessions. Their level of hostility, a component of stress that usually relates to levels of personal frustration, decreased significantly from the time of their initial testing to just before the training began. Since the initial session occurred 1 to 2 weeks before the U.S. Army Chemical Defense Training Facility (CDTF) training, the elevated frustration level may be a reflection of their overall experiences within the intensive chemical defense training program. A significant drop in reported fatigue between the pre- and post-training sessions may indicate a certain level of vigilance gained by participating in the training.

  11. Adv. Simulation for Additive Manufacturing: 11/2014 Wkshp. Report for U.S. DOE/EERE/AMO

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, John A.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Blue, Craig A.

    2015-07-01

    The overarching question for the workshop was as following: How do we best utilize advanced modeling and high-performance computing (HPC) to address key challenges and opportunities in order to realize the full potential of additive manufacturing; and what are the key challenges of additive manufacturing to which modeling and simulation can contribute solutions, and what will it take to meet these challenges?

  12. Cessation assistance reported by smokers in 15 countries participating in the International Tobacco Control (ITC) policy evaluation surveys

    PubMed Central

    Borland, Ron; Li, Lin; Driezen, Pete; Wilson, Nick; Hammond, David; Thompson, Mary E.; Fong, Geoffrey T.; Mons, Ute; Willemsen, Marc C.; McNeill, Ann; Thrasher, James F.; Cummings, K. Michael

    2011-01-01

    Aims To describe some of the variability across the world in levels of quit smoking attempts and use of various forms of cessation support. Design Use of the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation Project surveys of smokers, using the 2007 survey wave (or later, where necessary). Settings Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany, Ireland, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, South Korea, Thailand, UK, Uruguay and USA. Measures Self-report on use of cessation aids and on visits to health professionals and provision of cessation advice during the visits. Findings Prevalence of quit attempts in the last year varied from under 20% to over 50% across countries. Similarly, smokers varied greatly in reporting of visiting health professionals in the last year (< 20% to over 70%), and among those who did, provision of advice to quit also varied greatly. There was also marked variability in the levels and types of help reported. Use of medication was generally more common than use of behavioural support, except where medications are not readily available. Conclusions There is wide variation across countries in rates of attempts to stop smoking and use of assistance with higher overall use of medication than behavioural support. There is also wide variation in the provision of brief advice to stop by health professionals. PMID:21883605

  13. Participation in the United States Department of Energy University Reactor Instrumentation Program. Final report, September 1990--August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Mulder, R.U.; Benneche, P.E.; Hosticka, B.

    1993-10-01

    The University of Virginia Reactor Facility is an integral part of the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering and is used to support educational programs in engineering and science at the University of Virginia and at other area colleges and universities. The University of Virginia Research Reactor (UVAR) is the highest power (two megawatts thermal power) and one of the most utilized university research reactor in the mid-Atlantic states. A major objective of this facility is to support educational programs in the region. The University of Virginia has received support under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) University Reactor Instrumentation Program every year since 1990. The monies from this program have been used to purchase new equipment to replace outdated or inadequate safety-related instrumentation used in conjunction with reactor operations. This report documents the equipment purchased and the status of the installation and use of this equipment from September 1990 through August 1993. This report constitutes the final report for this project period.

  14. Participative Design for Participative Democracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emery, Merrelyn, Ed.

    This four-part volume addresses design principles for introducing democratic forms in workplaces, educational institutions, and social institutions, based on a trend toward participative democracy in Australia. Following an introduction, part I sets the context with two papers: "The Agenda for the Next Wave" and "Educational Paradigms: An…

  15. Which Early Care and Education Centers Participate in Head Start or Public Pre-Kindergarten? National Survey of Early Care & Education. Technical Report. OPRE Report 2015-92a

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Administration for Children & Families, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This report draws on newly available data from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) to describe early care and education (ECE) centers that participate in two prominent publicly-funded ECE initiatives: Head Start and publicly-funded pre-kindergarten. Although a great deal is known about Head Start programs, and there are sources…

  16. Cleft palate-lateral synechiae syndrome: report on three new patients with additional findings and evidence for variability and heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Nakata, N M; Guion-Almeida, M L; Richieri-Costa, A

    1993-09-01

    We report on 3 Brazilian children with short stature, microcephaly, cleft palate, lateral synechiae, and mild mental retardation. One patient was an isolated case and the other had an equally affected brother. Genetic aspects and phenotypic manifestations are compared with those of previous reports with oral synechiae. Recurrence in sibs suggests autosomal recessive inheritance.

  17. Community-Academic Partnership Participation.

    PubMed

    Meza, Rosemary; Drahota, Amy; Spurgeon, Emily

    2016-10-01

    Community-academic partnerships (CAPs) improve the research process, outcomes, and yield benefits for the community and researchers. This exploratory study examined factors important in community stakeholders' decision to participate in CAPs. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) community stakeholders, previously contacted to participate in a CAP (n = 18), completed the 15-item Decision to Participate Questionnaire (DPQ). The DPQ assessed reasons for participating or declining participation in the ASD CAP. CAP participants rated networking with other providers, fit of collaboration with agency philosophy, and opportunity for future training/consultations as factors more important in their decision to participate in the ASD CAP than nonparticipants. Nonparticipants reported the number of requests to participate in research as more important in their decision to decline participation than participants. Findings reveal important factors in community stakeholders' decision to participate in CAPs that may provide guidance on increasing community engagement in CAPs and help close the science-to-service gap.

  18. Systemizers Are Better Code-Breakers: Self-Reported Systemizing Predicts Code-Breaking Performance in Expert Hackers and Naïve Participants.

    PubMed

    Harvey, India; Bolgan, Samuela; Mosca, Daniel; McLean, Colin; Rusconi, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Studies on hacking have typically focused on motivational aspects and general personality traits of the individuals who engage in hacking; little systematic research has been conducted on predispositions that may be associated not only with the choice to pursue a hacking career but also with performance in either naïve or expert populations. Here, we test the hypotheses that two traits that are typically enhanced in autism spectrum disorders-attention to detail and systemizing-may be positively related to both the choice of pursuing a career in information security and skilled performance in a prototypical hacking task (i.e., crypto-analysis or code-breaking). A group of naïve participants and of ethical hackers completed the Autism Spectrum Quotient, including an attention to detail scale, and the Systemizing Quotient (Baron-Cohen et al., 2001, 2003). They were also tested with behavioral tasks involving code-breaking and a control task involving security X-ray image interpretation. Hackers reported significantly higher systemizing and attention to detail than non-hackers. We found a positive relation between self-reported systemizing (but not attention to detail) and code-breaking skills in both hackers and non-hackers, whereas attention to detail (but not systemizing) was related with performance in the X-ray screening task in both groups, as previously reported with naïve participants (Rusconi et al., 2015). We discuss the theoretical and translational implications of our findings. PMID:27242491

  19. Systemizers Are Better Code-Breakers: Self-Reported Systemizing Predicts Code-Breaking Performance in Expert Hackers and Naïve Participants

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, India; Bolgan, Samuela; Mosca, Daniel; McLean, Colin; Rusconi, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Studies on hacking have typically focused on motivational aspects and general personality traits of the individuals who engage in hacking; little systematic research has been conducted on predispositions that may be associated not only with the choice to pursue a hacking career but also with performance in either naïve or expert populations. Here, we test the hypotheses that two traits that are typically enhanced in autism spectrum disorders—attention to detail and systemizing—may be positively related to both the choice of pursuing a career in information security and skilled performance in a prototypical hacking task (i.e., crypto-analysis or code-breaking). A group of naïve participants and of ethical hackers completed the Autism Spectrum Quotient, including an attention to detail scale, and the Systemizing Quotient (Baron-Cohen et al., 2001, 2003). They were also tested with behavioral tasks involving code-breaking and a control task involving security X-ray image interpretation. Hackers reported significantly higher systemizing and attention to detail than non-hackers. We found a positive relation between self-reported systemizing (but not attention to detail) and code-breaking skills in both hackers and non-hackers, whereas attention to detail (but not systemizing) was related with performance in the X-ray screening task in both groups, as previously reported with naïve participants (Rusconi et al., 2015). We discuss the theoretical and translational implications of our findings. PMID:27242491

  20. Systemizers Are Better Code-Breakers: Self-Reported Systemizing Predicts Code-Breaking Performance in Expert Hackers and Naïve Participants.

    PubMed

    Harvey, India; Bolgan, Samuela; Mosca, Daniel; McLean, Colin; Rusconi, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Studies on hacking have typically focused on motivational aspects and general personality traits of the individuals who engage in hacking; little systematic research has been conducted on predispositions that may be associated not only with the choice to pursue a hacking career but also with performance in either naïve or expert populations. Here, we test the hypotheses that two traits that are typically enhanced in autism spectrum disorders-attention to detail and systemizing-may be positively related to both the choice of pursuing a career in information security and skilled performance in a prototypical hacking task (i.e., crypto-analysis or code-breaking). A group of naïve participants and of ethical hackers completed the Autism Spectrum Quotient, including an attention to detail scale, and the Systemizing Quotient (Baron-Cohen et al., 2001, 2003). They were also tested with behavioral tasks involving code-breaking and a control task involving security X-ray image interpretation. Hackers reported significantly higher systemizing and attention to detail than non-hackers. We found a positive relation between self-reported systemizing (but not attention to detail) and code-breaking skills in both hackers and non-hackers, whereas attention to detail (but not systemizing) was related with performance in the X-ray screening task in both groups, as previously reported with naïve participants (Rusconi et al., 2015). We discuss the theoretical and translational implications of our findings.

  1. Prostate specific antigen testing in family practice: a cross sectional survey of self-reported rates of and reasons for testing participation and risk disclosure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite controversy about the benefits of routine prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing, rates of participation continue to rise. It is important to ensure that men are fully informed about the potential risks associated with this test. Little is known about the processes of shared decision making for PSA testing in the family practice setting. This study aimed to explore men’s experiences of PSA testing participation and risk disclosure for PSA testing. Methods A cross-sectional survey of male family practice attendees aged 40 years or older, with no previous history of prostate cancer, between June 2010 and November 2011. Questions related to whether participants had undertaken PSA testing or discussed this with their doctor over the past 5 years, whether the patient or doctor had initiated the discussion, reasons for undergoing testing, and whether their doctor had discussed particular risks associated with PSA testing. Results Sixty-seven percent (215/320) of men recalled having a PSA test in the past five years. Of the respondents who reported not having a test, 14% had discussed it with their doctor. The main reasons for having a PSA test were doctor recommendation and wanting to keep up to date with health tests. Thirty-eight percent or fewer respondents reported being advised of each potential risk. Conclusions Despite debate over the benefits of routine PSA testing, a high proportion of male family practice attendees report undertaking this test. Risks associated with testing appear to be poorly disclosed by general practitioners. These results suggest the need to improve the quality of informed consent for PSA testing in the family practice setting. PMID:24321004

  2. Participation in the US Department of Energy reactor sharing program. Final progress report, October 1996--September 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Mulder, R.U.; Benneche, P.E.; Hosticka, B.

    1998-04-01

    The objective of the DOE supported Reactor Sharing Program is to increase the availability of university nuclear reactor facilities to non-reactor-owning educational institutions. The educational and research programs of these user institutions is enhanced by the use of the nuclear facilities. Several methods have been used by the UVA Reactor Facility to achieve this objective. First, many college and secondary school groups toured the Reactor Facility and viewed the UVAR reactor and associated experimental facilities. Second, advanced undergraduate and graduate classes from area colleges and universities visited the facility to perform experiments in nuclear engineering and physics which would not be possible at the user institution. Third, irradiation and analysis services at the Facility have been made available for research by faculty and students from user institutions. Fourth, some institutions have received activated material from UVA from use at their institutions. These areas are discussed in this report.

  3. Participation in the US Department of Energy Reactor Sharing Program. Annual report, September 30, 1993--September 29, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The objective of the DOE supported Reactor Sharing Program is to increase the availability of university nuclear reactor facilities to non-reactor-owning educational institutions. The educational and research programs of these user institutions is enhanced by the use of the nuclear facilities. Several methods have been used by the UVA Reactor Facility to achieve this objective. First, many college and secondary school groups toured the Reactor Facility and viewed the UVAR reactor and associated experimental facilities. Second, advanced undergraduate and graduate classes from area colleges and universities visited the facility to perform experiments in nuclear engineering and physics which would not be possible at the user institution. Third, irradiation and analysis services at the Facility have been made available for research by faculty and students from user institutions. Fourth, some institutions have received activated material from UVA for use at their institutions. These areas are discussed further in the report.

  4. The effect of chemical additives on the synthesis of ethanol. Technical progress report 5, September 16, 1988--December 15, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, S.S.C.

    1989-02-04

    The objective of this research is to elucidate the role of various chemical additives on ethanol synthesis over Rh- and Ni-based catalysts. Chemical additives used will include S, P, Ag, Cu, Mn, and Na. The effect of additives on the surface state of the catalysts, heat of adsorption of reactant molecules, reaction intermediates, reaction pathways, reaction kinetics, and product distributions is/will be investigated by a series of studies including temperature programmed desorption, infrared study of NO adsorption, reactive probing, steady state rate measurement, and transient kinetic study. A better understanding of the role of additive may allow us to use chemical additives to manipulate the catalytic properties of Rh- and Ni-based catalysts for producing high yields of ethanol from syngas. CO insertion is known to be a key step to the formation of acetaldehyde and ethanol from CO hydrogenation over Rh catalysts. Ethylene hydroformylation has often served as a probe to determine CO insertion capabilities of Rh catalysts. The mechanism of CO insertion in ethylene hydroformylation over Rh/SiO{sub 2} was investigated.

  5. Investigation of fuel-additive effects on sooting flames. Final report, 1 June 1986-31 May 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Bonczyk, P.A.

    1989-07-28

    Research was conducted to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the suppression of soot in flames by selected fuel additives. Measurements were limited to well-defined prevaporized liquid- and gaseous-fueled hydrocarbon/air flames. Emphasis was given to ferrocene in a diffusion flame fueled by prevaporized iso-octane, as well as to alkali and alkaline-earth additives in premixed ethylene/air flames. Nonperturbing laser optical diagnostic techniques were used to measure flame temperature, as well as to relate changes in soot particulate size, number density, and volume fraction to additive type and concentration. Quartz probe sampling and gas chromatography were used to determine the additive's effect on soot precursor hydrocarbon and other species. For the diffusion flame, the time of the first appearance of soot is shortened when ferrocene is present. Following its appearance, the particulate's size and number density are perturbed by ferrocene. Ferrocene accelerates acetylene oxidation. Ferrocene is very effective at late stages, appearing to enhance soot burnout. Attempts were not successful to find iron occluded by soot as a possible mechanism of enhanced soot oxidation. Alkali metals were effective.

  6. The influence of ankle dorsiflexion and self-reported patient outcomes on dynamic postural control in participants with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Terada, Masafumi; Harkey, Matthew S; Wells, Ashley M; Pietrosimone, Brian G; Gribble, Phillip A

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the influence of ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (DF-ROM) and self-reported patient outcomes on dynamic postural control assessed with the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) in individuals with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Twenty-nine participants with self-reported CAI volunteered. The primary outcome measurements were categorized into clinician-and patient-generated. Clinician-generated outcome measurements included anterior (SEBT-A), posteriormedial (SEBT-PM) and posteriorlateral (SEBT-PL) reach distances (cm) normalized by leg length (cm) of the SEBT, maximum weight-bearing dorsiflexion (WB-DF) (cm), and open-chain DF-ROM (°). Self-reported patient-generated outcome measures included the foot and ankle ability measure and the level of perceived pain, stiffness, stability, and function of their involved ankle on a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS). Pearson product moment correlations were used to examine the relationship of the SEBT performances with DF-ROM and self-reported patient outcome measures. A multiple linear regression was performed to determine the influence of patient- and clinician-generated measures on the SEBT. SEBT-A performance was significantly and fairly correlated with WB-DF (r=0.410, p=0.014), perceived ankle stiffness (r=0.477, p=0.014), and open-chain DF-ROM (r=0.404, p=0.015). The strongest predictor of the variance in SEBT-A was the combination of the variance in WB-DF and VAS-stiffness (R2=0.348, p=0.004). There were no significant correlations with the SEBT-PM and SEBT-PL. WB-DF and VAS-stiffness may represent targets for intervention that need to be addressed to produce the best outcome in participants with CAI when altered dynamic postural control is detected on the SEBT-A. PMID:24768526

  7. Comprehensive data base of high-level nuclear waste glasses: September 1987 status report: Volume 2, Additional appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Kindle, C.H.; Kreiter, M.R.

    1987-12-01

    The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) is assembling a comprehensive data base (CDB) of experimental data collected for high-level nuclear waste package components. The status of the CDB is summarized in Volume I of this report. Volume II contains appendices that present data from the data base and an evaluation of glass durability models applied to the data base.

  8. Nitrogen oxide abatement by distributed fuel addition. Quarterly report No. 7, February 1, 1989--April 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, J.O.L.; Mereb, J.B.

    1989-06-20

    A combustor has been designed in order to retard the formation of nitrogen oxides by injection of reburning fuel. The design and the rebuilding of the new combustor was completed. Several new features were incorporated in the new design so that it would last longer. The design and construction of the furnace are discussed in this report. (VC)

  9. 30 CFR 250.1166 - What additional reporting is required for developments in the Alaska OCS Region?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Requirements Other Requirements § 250.1166... development in the Alaska OCS Region, you must submit an annual reservoir management report to the...

  10. Investigation of fuel-additive effects on sooting flames. Annual technical report, 1 June 1987-31 May 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Bonczyk, P.A.

    1988-06-30

    The objective of this research is to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the suppression of soot in flames by fuel additives. Measurements are limited to well-defined hydrocarbon air prevaporized liquid- and gaseous-fueled flames. Gas-phase hydrocarbon species measurements were made in an axisymmetric prevaporized iso-octane/air diffusion flame with and without ferrocene present as a fuel additive. The concentrations have been determined using quartz probe sampling and chromatographic analysis. Of the roughly twenty species detected, most were unaffected by the ferrocene. Expections were C2H2 and H2 which showed a decrease and increase, respectively, with ferrocene seeding. Solid effluent was collected and analyzed by ESCA (Electron Scattering for Chemical Analysis) for the seeded flame. For seeding levels sufficient to suppress a soot plume, the effluent was hematite.

  11. The effect of chemical additives on the synthesis of ethanol. Final technical report, September 15, 1987--March 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, S.S.C.

    1992-03-06

    The objective of this research was to investigate the reaction mechanism of higher alcohol and aldehyde synthesis from syngas and the role of additives in the synthesis. An in situ IR reaction system and probe molecule technique were developed to study adsorbed species, active sites, and reaction pathway during reaction. The catalysts used for this study included silica-supported Rh, Ru, and Ni. (VC)

  12. Development and testing of the Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS) system for Fernald wastes. Phase 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, S.S.; Matlack, K.S.; Mohr, R.K.; Brandys, M. Hojaji, H.; Bennett, S.; Ruller, J.; Pegg, I.L.

    1994-12-01

    This report presents results of a treatability study for the evaluation of the MAWS process for wastes stored at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site. Wastes included in the study were FEMP Pit 5 sludges, soil-wash fractions, and ion exchange media from a water treatment system supporting a soil washing system. MAWS offers potential for treating a variety of waste streams to produce a more leach resistant waste form at a lower cost than, say, cement stabilization.

  13. Children's Participation Rights in Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Mary Ann; Smith, Anne B.

    2009-01-01

    This article explores children's participation in research, from the perspectives of researchers who have conducted research with children. Researchers' reports, gained using an email interviewing method, suggest that children's participation rights are particularly compromised when the potential child participants are considered vulnerable and…

  14. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  15. The effect of chemical additives on the synthesis of ethanol. Technical progress report 15, March 15, 1991--June 15, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, S.S.C.; Pien, S.I.

    1991-06-01

    The objective of this research is to elucidate the role of various chemical additives on ethanol synthesis over Rh- and Ni-based catalysts. Chemical additives used for this study will include S, P, Ag, Cu, Mn, and Na which have different electronegativeities. The effect of additives on the surface state of the catalysts, heat of adsorption of reactant molecules, reaction intermediates, reaction pathways, reaction kinetics, and product distributions is/will be investigated by a series of experimental studies of NO adsorption, reactive probing, steady state rate measurement, and transient kinetic study. CO insertion is known to be a key step to the formation of acetaldehyde and ethanol from CO hydrogenation. Reaction of ethylene with syngas is used as a probe to determine CO insertion capabilities of metal catalysts. During the sixth quarter of the project, the mechanism of CO insertion on Ni/SiO{sub 2} was investigated by in-situ infrared spectroscopy. Ni/SiO{sub 2}, a methanation catalyst, has been shown to exhibit CO insertion activity. In situ infrared studies of CO/H{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/CO/H{sub 2} reactions show that the carbonylation of Ni/SiO{sub 2} to Ni(CO){sub 4} leads to an inhibition of methanation in CO hydrogenation but an enhancement of formation of propionaldehyde in C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/CO/H{sub 2} reaction. The results suggest that the sites for propionaldehyde formation is different from those for methanation.

  16. Use of pyrolyzed carbon black as an additive (part 3. Air-cooled furnace slag). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.H.; Lovell, C.W.; Salgado, R.

    1996-11-20

    Scrap tires, generated at the rate of over 242 million each year in the United States, are recognized as one of the most significant environmental problems. Most of these scrap tires have been disposed of in landfills, stockpiles, and illegal dumps (EPA 1991). There is a need to find more useful, environmentally friendly applications for these tires. Extensive researches have been conducted in the past years on the utilization of the scrap tires. The use of scrap tires for asphalt pavement, which is complicated by the complex behavior of asphalt, has received major attention. This research aims to describe the performance of mixtures of asphalt using pyrolyzed carbon black as an additive.

  17. Additional circular intercostal space created by bifurcation of the left 3rd rib and its costal cartilage: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In the thorax there are normally 11 pairs of intercostal spaces: the spaces between adjacent ribs. The intercostal spaces contain intercostal muscles, intercostal nerves and vessels. Case presentation During a routine dissection for undergraduate medical students, we observed a variation involving the left 3rd rib and 3rd costal cartilage in the cadaver of a man of Indian ethnicity aged about 65 years. The left 3rd rib and its costal cartilage were bifurcated at their costochondral junction enclosing a small circular additional intercostal space. Muscle tissue covered by deep fascia was present in this circular intercostal space. The muscle in the circular intercostal space received its nerve supply from a branch of the 2nd intercostal nerve. Conclusions Knowledge of such variations is helpful to surgeons operating on the anterior thoracic wall involving ribs and intercostal spaces. Knowing the possibility of the presence of an additional space between normal intercostal spaces can guide a surgeon through to a successful surgery. PMID:23298541

  18. Adenomyomatosis of the gallbladder in childhood: A systematic review of the literature and an additional case report

    PubMed Central

    Parolini, Filippo; Indolfi, Giuseppe; Magne, Miguel Garcia; Salemme, Marianna; Cheli, Maurizio; Boroni, Giovanni; Alberti, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the diagnostic and therapeutic assessment in children with adenomyomatosis of the gallbladder (AMG). METHODS: AMG is a degenerative disease characterized by a proliferation of the mucosal epithelium which deeply invaginates and extends into the thickened muscular layer of the gallbladder, causing intramural diverticula. Although AMG is found in up to 5% of cholecystectomy specimens in adult populations, this condition in childhood is extremely uncommon. Authors provide a detailed systematic review of the pediatric literature according to PRISMA guidelines, focusing on diagnostic and therapeutic assessment. An additional case of AMG is also presented. RESULTS: Five studies were finally enclosed, encompassing 5 children with AMG. Analysis was extended to our additional 11-year-old patient, who presented diffuse AMG and pancreatic acinar metaplasia of the gallbladder mucosa and was successfully managed with laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Mean age at presentation was 7.2 years. Unspecific abdominal pain was the commonest symptom. Abdominal ultrasound was performed on all patients, with a diagnostic accuracy of 100%. Five patients underwent cholecystectomy, and at follow-up were asymptomatic. In the remaining patient, completely asymptomatic at diagnosis, a conservative approach with monthly monitoring via ultrasonography was undertaken. CONCLUSION: Considering the remote but possible degeneration leading to cancer and the feasibility of laparoscopic cholecystectomy even in small children, evidence suggests that elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy represent the treatment of choice. Pre-operative evaluation of the extrahepatic biliary tree anatomy with cholangio-MRI is strongly recommended. PMID:27170933

  19. An Investigation of the Feasibility of Obtaining Additional Subscores on the GRE Advanced Psychology Test. GRE Board Professional Report GREB No. 74-4P.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPeek, Miles; And Others

    This study was undertaken to determine whether additional information useful for guidance or placement could be derived from the existing Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) Advanced Psychology Test. The number of subscores currently reported is limited by the high reliability required to make admissions decisions; subscores used only for guidance…

  20. Assessing the Value of Additional Years of Schooling for the Non-Academically Inclined. Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth. Research Report 38

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dockery, Alfred Michael

    2005-01-01

    In this report data from the 1995 Year 9 Cohort of the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) is used along with a variety of empirical approaches to assess the benefits of additional years of schooling for various groups of youth conditional upon their estimated propensity to engage in further schooling. Background material is provided…

  1. Evaluation of five additional enhancements to the building loads analysis and system thermodynamics (BLAST) program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nemeth, R.J.

    1993-04-01

    The Building Loads Analysis and System Thermodynamics (BLAST) energy analysis computer program has undergone a multiyear enhancement program based on feedback and priorities of the BLAST users' group. This project was conducted to evaluate the convenience and applicability of the following BLAST enhancements: Air-to-Air Heat Pump; Expanded Baseboard Heat Options; Report Writer; Thermal Comfort Model. Ice Storage Model; Evaluation responses indicate that the enhancements satisfied users' needs for advanced building energy analysis tools. Although the evaluations revealed program bugs and the lack of documentation in some areas, the programs were easy to install and use. The bugs have been removed and the documentation expanded in the BLAST Users Reference. It is recommended that the enhancements be distributed with future updates and releases of the BLAST program.... BLAST, Enhancements, Energy efficient, Comfort analysis, Technology Transfer Test Bed(T3B).

  2. The Diversity of Cultural Participation: Findings from a National Survey. Building Arts Participation: New Findings from the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostrower, Francie

    2005-01-01

    This survey represents a preliminary step toward demonstrating the diversity of motivations and circumstances that characterize cultural participation. This report examines only live attendance. The evidence presented in this report indicates the pressing need for additional analyses that make diversity a central facet of examining other…

  3. Vistazos Intimos De Puebla; Una Compilacion De Informes Individuales Preparados Por Los Participantes Del Instituto De Verano (NDEA) (Close-ups on Puebla; A Compilation of Individual Reports Prepared by the Participants of the NDEA Summer Institute).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wichita State Univ., KS.

    The individual and committee reports on the sociology of Puebla, Mexico, which are collected here, were written by participants in an NDEA Summer Institute program of the University of Wichita, Kansas. The underlying motives of the program, described in the preface, were to provide participants with real language experience and a chance to…

  4. Solitary fibrous tumor of the central nervous system: report of an additional 5 cases with comprehensive literature review.

    PubMed

    Bisceglia, Michele; Dimitri, Lucia; Giannatempo, Giuseppe; Carotenuto, Vincenzo; Bianco, Mario; Monte, Vincenzo; D'Angelo, Vincenzo; Magro, Gaetano

    2011-08-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) of the central nervous system was first described in 1996. A number of cases have been reported since. The authors present 5 new cases: 4 intracranial and 1 intraspinal. All patients were adults (age range, 47 to 75 years); 4 were male and 1 female; 4 cases were primary tumors; and 1 was a second tumor recurrence. All patients were surgically treated with gross total removal. All cases were histologically examined with immunohistochemical confirmation; 2 tumors exhibited diffuse classic histology, 1 tumor was a cellular variant, 1 tumor was myxoid, and 1 was predominantly classic with focal myxoid features and focally pleomorphic. The postoperative course was uneventful in all. The patient with the cellular variant experienced 2 local recurrences and eventually died of disease 10 years after the initial diagnosis. The patient with the myxoid variant--the tumor studied--which was the second recurrence of a previously misdiagnosed fibrous meningioma surgically treated 15 years earlier, had a recurrence after 2 years for the third time and eventually died of disease. Three patients are alive and well 11.6, 6, and 4 years after surgery. SFT is a rare tumor that needs to be differentiated from some mimickers, mainly fibrous meningioma, hemangiopericytoma, and with regard to the myxoid variant, also adult-onset myxochordoid meningioma and myxoid peripheral nerve sheath tumor. Immunohistochemistry is crucial for the correct diagnosis of SFT. The authors also performed a review of the literature and found a little more than 200 cases on record.

  5. Participation in research bronchoscopy: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Martinsen, Einar Marius Hjellestad; Leiten, Elise Orvedal; Bakke, Per Sigvald; Eagan, Tomas Mikal Lind; Grønseth, Rune

    2016-01-01

    Bronchoscopy is the preferred method for collecting biological samples from the lower airways of subjects in clinical research. However, ensuring participation in clinical research can be challenging when the research includes an invasive procedure. For this report we reviewed the literature to look for information on participation in research bronchoscopy studies to better design our own study, the Bergen COPD Microbiome study (MicroCOPD). We performed a systematic literature search on participation in research bronchoscopy studies in February 2014 using the search engines of PubMed and EMBASE. The literature search resulted in seven relevant papers. Motivation was an end point in six of the seven papers, but reasons for declining participation and recruitment strategies also seemed important. Human subjects participate in research bronchoscopy studies for personal benefit and altruistic reasons. Inconvenience associated with research, in addition to fear of procedures, is considered a barrier. Radio, especially news stations, generated the most inquiries for a clinical study involving bronchoscopy. There is a lack of information on participation in research bronchoscopy studies in the literature. A bronchoscopy study has been initiated at Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway, to examine the role of the microbiome in COPD, and participation will be explored as a substudy. PMID:26847517

  6. 22 CFR 513.510 - Participants' responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... principals. In addition, each participant may, but is not required to, check the Nonprocurement List for its... principals. In addition, a participant may, but is not required to, check the Nonprocurement List for...

  7. Validity of a self-reported diagnosis of depression among participants in a cohort study using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-I)

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Villegas, Almudena; Schlatter, Javier; Ortuno, Felipe; Lahortiga, Francisca; Pla, Jorge; Benito, Silvia; Martinez-Gonzalez, Miguel A

    2008-01-01

    Background Depression assessment in population studies is usually based on depressive symptoms scales. However, the use of scales could lead to the choice of an arbitrary cut-off point depending on the sample characteristics and on the patient diagnosis. Thus, the use of a medical diagnosis of depression could be a more appropriate approach. Objective To validate a self-reported physician diagnosis of depression using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-I) as Gold Standard and to assess the factors associated to a valid self-reported diagnosis. Methods The SUN Project is a cohort study based on university graduates followed-up through postal questionnaires. The response to the question included in the questionnaire: Have you ever been diagnosed of depression by a physician? was compared to that obtained through the SCID-I applied by a psychiatrist or a clinical psychologist. The percentages of confirmed depression and non-depression were assessed for the overall sample and according to several characteristics. Logistic regression models were fitted to ascertain the association between different factors and a correct classification regarding depression status. Results The percentage of confirmed depression was 74.2%; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 63.3–85.1. Out of 42 participants who did not report a depression diagnosis in the questionnaire, 34 were free of the disease (%confirmed non-depression = 81.1%; 95% CI = 69.1–92.9). The probability of being a true positive was higher among ex-smokers and non-smokers and among those overweight or obese but the differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion The validity of a self-reported diagnosis of depression in the SUN cohort is adequate. Thus, this question about depression diagnosis could be used in further investigations regarding this disease in this graduate cohort study. PMID:18558014

  8. School Readiness Act of 2005. Report Together with Additional Views. House of Representatives, One Hundred Ninth Congress, First Session (June 16, 2005). Report 109-136

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US House of Representatives, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The Committee on Education and the Workforce, to whom was referred the bill (H.R. 2123) to reauthorize the Head Start Act to improve the school readiness of disadvantaged children, and for other purposes, having considered the same, report favorably thereon with an amendment and recommend that the bill as amended do pass. Amended sections include:…

  9. Computer Literacy Act of 1984. Report together with Minority Views [and] Computer Literacy Act of 1983. Report together with Additional Views. To accompany H.R. 3750.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    These two reports contain supporting material intended to accompany the Computer Literacy Acts of 1983 and 1984 (H. R. 3750). This bill was designed to promote the use of computer technologies in elementary and secondary schools by authorizing: (1) grants to local school districts, particularly in poor areas, to purchase computer hardware; (2)…

  10. Copyright Law Revision; Report Together with Additional Views (to accompany S. 22). House of Representatives, Ninety-Fourth Congress, Second Session. Report No. 94-1476.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastenmeier, Robert W.

    This report of the Judiciary Committee revision of the proposed copyright law was recommended for passage and committed to the House of Representatives on September 3, 1976. The bill's first chapter defines the subject matter and scope of copyright and specifies "fair use" limitations on the rights of copyright holders. These limitations include…

  11. Is Self-Reported Physical Activity Participation Associated with Lower Health Services Utilization among Older Adults? Cross-Sectional Evidence from the Canadian Community Health Survey.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Koren L; Harrison, Elizabeth L; Reeder, Bruce A; Sari, Nazmi; Chad, Karen E

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To examine relationships between leisure time physical activity (LTPA) and health services utilization (H) in a nationally representative sample of community-dwelling older adults. Methods. Cross-sectional data from 56,652 Canadian Community Health Survey respondents aged ≥ 50 years (48% M; 52% F; mean age 63.5 ± 10.2 years) were stratified into three age groups and analysed using multivariate generalized linear modeling techniques. Participants were classified according to PA level based on self-reported daily energy expenditure. Nonleisure PA (NLPA) was categorized into four levels ranging from mostly sitting to mostly lifting objects. Results. Active 50-65-year-old individuals were 27% less likely to report any GP consultations (ORadj = 0.73;  P < 0.001) and had 8% fewer GP consultations annually (IRRadj = 0.92;  P < 0.01) than their inactive peers. Active persons aged 65-79 years were 18% less likely than inactive respondents to have been hospitalized overnight in the previous year (ORadj = 0.82,  P < 0.05). Higher levels of NLPA were significantly associated with lower levels of HSU, across all age groups. Conclusion. Nonleisure PA appeared to be a stronger predictor of all types of HSU, particularly in the two oldest age groups. Considering strategies that focus on reducing time spent in sedentary activities may have a positive impact on reducing the demand for health services. PMID:26347491

  12. Baseline Socio-demographic characteristics and self-reported diet and physical activity shifts among recent immigrants participating in the randomized controlled lifestyle intervention: "Live Well".

    PubMed

    Tovar, Alison; Boulos, Rebecca; Sliwa, Sarah; Must, Aviva; Gute, David M; Metayer, Nesly; Hyatt, Raymond R; Chui, Kenneth; Pirie, Alex; Luongo, Christina Kamis; Economos, Christina

    2014-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to describe the baseline characteristics of Live Well (intervention to prevent weight gain in recent immigrant mother-child dyads from Brazil, Haiti, and Latin America) participants, and to explore self-reported changes in diet and physical activity post-immigration. Baseline data from 383 mothers were used for this study. Dyads attended a measurement day where they completed self-administered surveys collecting information about socio-demographics, diet, physical activity, other psychosocial variables, and height and weight. Haitian mothers' socio-demographic profile differed significantly from that of Brazilians' and Latinas': they have been in the US for a shorter period of time, have higher rates of unemployment, are less likely to be married, more likely to have ≥3 children, more likely to be obese, and have immigrated for family or other reasons. In multivariate models, self-reported changes in diet and physical activity since migrating to the US were significantly associated with BMI with non-linear relationships identified. Future research is needed to understand how diet and physical activity change while acculturating to the US and explore the adoption of both healthy and unhealthy dietary changes.

  13. Depression in Caregivers of Status-Naïve Pediatric HIV Patients Participating in a Status Disclosure Study in Haiti and the Dominican Republic: Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Dévieux, Jessy G.; Pinzón-Iregui, María Claudia; Abreu-Pérez, Rosa; Lerebours-Nadal, Leonel; Gaston, Stephanie; Dean, Andrew G.; Halpern, Mina; Rouzier, Vanessa; Bertrand, Rachel; Rosenberg, Rhonda; Pape, Jean William; Nicholas, Stephen W.; Blasini, Ileana

    2015-01-01

    A pilot study is underway to assess safety and acceptability of an intervention to disclose their HIV infection status to status-naïve pediatric antiretroviral therapy patients in Hispaniola [the island shared by Haiti and the Dominican Republic (DR)]. Of 22 Haiti and 47 DR caregivers recruited to date, 68.2% Haiti and 34.0% DR caregivers had clinically significant depressive symptomatology at the time of enrollment (p = 0.008). Depressive symptom prevalence was higher in Haiti caregivers who were female (81.3% vs. 0 in males; p = 0.02) and in DR caregivers who were patients’ mothers (50.0%) or grandmothers (66.7%; 56.0% combined) than others (9.1%), (p < 0.001). Internalized stigma was more commonly reported by Haiti (85.7%) than DR (53.2%; p = 0.01) caregivers; 56.4% of Haiti and DR caregivers reporting internalized stigma vs. 26.1% of caregivers denying it had depressive symptoms (p = 0.02). Depression is common in Hispaniola caregivers possibly affecting disclosure timing. Study participation presents opportunities for addressing caregiver depression. PMID:25389181

  14. Depression in caregivers of status-naïve pediatric HIV patients participating in a status disclosure study in Haiti and the Dominican Republic: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Beck-Sagué, Consuelo M; Dévieux, Jessy G; Pinzón-Iregui, María Claudia; Abreu-Pérez, Rosa; Lerebours-Nadal, Leonel; Gaston, Stephanie; Dean, Andrew G; Halpern, Mina; Rouzier, Vanessa; Bertrand, Rachel; Rosenberg, Rhonda; Pape, Jean William; Nicholas, Stephen W; Blasini, Ileana

    2015-02-01

    A pilot study is underway to assess safety and acceptability of an intervention to disclose their HIV infection status to status-naïve pediatric antiretroviral therapy patients in Hispaniola [the island shared by Haiti and the Dominican Republic (DR)]. Of 22 Haiti and 47 DR caregivers recruited to date, 68.2% Haiti and 34.0% DR caregivers had clinically significant depressive symptomatology at the time of enrollment (p = 0.008). Depressive symptom prevalence was higher in Haiti caregivers who were female (81.3% vs. 0 in males; p = 0.02) and in DR caregivers who were patients' mothers (50.0%) or grandmothers (66.7%; 56.0% combined) than others (9.1%), (p < 0.001). Internalized stigma was more commonly reported by Haiti (85.7%) than DR (53.2%; p = 0.01) caregivers; 56.4% of Haiti and DR caregivers reporting internalized stigma vs. 26.1% of caregivers denying it had depressive symptoms (p = 0.02). Depression is common in Hispaniola caregivers possibly affecting disclosure timing. Study participation presents opportunities for addressing caregiver depression.

  15. Is Self-Reported Physical Activity Participation Associated with Lower Health Services Utilization among Older Adults? Cross-Sectional Evidence from the Canadian Community Health Survey

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Koren L.; Harrison, Elizabeth L.; Reeder, Bruce A.; Sari, Nazmi; Chad, Karen E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To examine relationships between leisure time physical activity (LTPA) and health services utilization (H) in a nationally representative sample of community-dwelling older adults. Methods. Cross-sectional data from 56,652 Canadian Community Health Survey respondents aged ≥ 50 years (48% M; 52% F; mean age 63.5 ± 10.2 years) were stratified into three age groups and analysed using multivariate generalized linear modeling techniques. Participants were classified according to PA level based on self-reported daily energy expenditure. Nonleisure PA (NLPA) was categorized into four levels ranging from mostly sitting to mostly lifting objects. Results. Active 50–65-year-old individuals were 27% less likely to report any GP consultations (ORadj = 0.73;  P < 0.001) and had 8% fewer GP consultations annually (IRRadj = 0.92;  P < 0.01) than their inactive peers. Active persons aged 65–79 years were 18% less likely than inactive respondents to have been hospitalized overnight in the previous year (ORadj = 0.82,  P < 0.05). Higher levels of NLPA were significantly associated with lower levels of HSU, across all age groups. Conclusion. Nonleisure PA appeared to be a stronger predictor of all types of HSU, particularly in the two oldest age groups. Considering strategies that focus on reducing time spent in sedentary activities may have a positive impact on reducing the demand for health services. PMID:26347491

  16. Baseline Socio-demographic characteristics and self-reported diet and physical activity shifts among recent immigrants participating in the randomized controlled lifestyle intervention: "Live Well".

    PubMed

    Tovar, Alison; Boulos, Rebecca; Sliwa, Sarah; Must, Aviva; Gute, David M; Metayer, Nesly; Hyatt, Raymond R; Chui, Kenneth; Pirie, Alex; Luongo, Christina Kamis; Economos, Christina

    2014-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to describe the baseline characteristics of Live Well (intervention to prevent weight gain in recent immigrant mother-child dyads from Brazil, Haiti, and Latin America) participants, and to explore self-reported changes in diet and physical activity post-immigration. Baseline data from 383 mothers were used for this study. Dyads attended a measurement day where they completed self-administered surveys collecting information about socio-demographics, diet, physical activity, other psychosocial variables, and height and weight. Haitian mothers' socio-demographic profile differed significantly from that of Brazilians' and Latinas': they have been in the US for a shorter period of time, have higher rates of unemployment, are less likely to be married, more likely to have ≥3 children, more likely to be obese, and have immigrated for family or other reasons. In multivariate models, self-reported changes in diet and physical activity since migrating to the US were significantly associated with BMI with non-linear relationships identified. Future research is needed to understand how diet and physical activity change while acculturating to the US and explore the adoption of both healthy and unhealthy dietary changes. PMID:23334749

  17. Final technical report: Partial support for US participants in the 5th International Marine Biotechnology Conference, Townsville, Australia, Sept 29 - Oct 5, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Zohar, Yonathan; Hill, R.; Robb, F.

    2001-04-09

    Funding was provided for US participants in the 5th International Marine Biotechnology Conference held in Townsville, Australia from September 29 to October 5, 2000. DOE funds were used for travel awards for six US participants in this conference. DOE funds were successfully used to advance participation of US scientists in the important emerging field of marine biotechnology.

  18. 32 CFR 37.1035 - How do I know if my TIA uses the 10 U.S.C. 2371 authority and I must report additional data under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I know if my TIA uses the 10 U.S.C. 2371 authority and I must report additional data under § 37.1030(b)? 37.1035 Section 37.1035 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DoD GRANT AND AGREEMENT REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Executing...

  19. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  20. Participation-Based Services: Promoting Children's Participation in Natural Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Philippa

    2004-01-01

    When children are young, the activities and routines in which they participate are influenced by family decisions as well as by opportunities for participation. Families report that finding community opportunities for their young children with disabilities can be difficult. Furthermore, ensuring their children's success in these settings requires…

  1. Effects of public health nursing participation in selected academic courses on self-reported functions and competencies: a collaborative pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lundy, K S; Bender, K W; Powell, C

    1993-03-01

    A profile of the education levels of practicing public health nurses (PHNs) in Mississippi in 1988 indicated that 71% of those nurses were prepared in associate degree or diploma programs. Since these programs typically do not provide formal academic courses in community health nursing, nurses currently enter the workplace with insufficient preparation for this increasingly complex role. A collaborative pilot study between the agency and a state-supported school of nursing evaluated the impact of participating in selected components of an academic community health nursing program on the self-reported competencies and functions of beginning PHNs. Twelve PHNs who were employed during six months in the geographic area contiguous to the school were selected to attend 10 classroom sessions on basic topics applicable to the generic PHN role in a southern state. A control group of 12 PHNs hired during the same period of time was also selected. Both groups completed an instrument on functions and competencies before and after the course. A significant difference was seen in certain functions and competencies between attenders and nonattenders.

  2. Evaluation of certain veterinary drug residues in food. Eighty-first report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of residues of certain veterinary drugs in food and to recommend maximum levels for such residues in food. The first part of the report considers general principles regarding the evaluation of residues of veterinary drugs within the terms of reference of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA), including MRLs for generic fish species, acute reference doses (ARfDs) for veterinary drugs, an approach for dietary exposure assessment of compounds used for multiple purposes (i.e veterinary drugs and pesticides), dietary exposure assessment for less-than-lifetime exposure, and the assessment of short-term (90-day and 12-month) studies in dogs. Summaries follow of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological and residue data on a variety of veterinary drugs: two insecticides (diflubenzuron and teflubenzuron), an antiparasitic agent (ivermectin), an ectoparasiticide (sisapronil) and a β2-adrenoceptor agonist (zilpaterol hydrochloride). In addition, the Committee considered issues raised in concern forms from the Codex Committee on Residues of Veterinary Drugs in Foods on lasalocid sodium, an antiparasitic agent. Annexed to the report is a summary of the Committee's recommendations on these drugs, including acceptable daily intakes (ADIs), ARfDs and proposed MRLs. PMID:27509597

  3. Evaluation of certain veterinary drug residues in food. Eighty-first report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of residues of certain veterinary drugs in food and to recommend maximum levels for such residues in food. The first part of the report considers general principles regarding the evaluation of residues of veterinary drugs within the terms of reference of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA), including MRLs for generic fish species, acute reference doses (ARfDs) for veterinary drugs, an approach for dietary exposure assessment of compounds used for multiple purposes (i.e veterinary drugs and pesticides), dietary exposure assessment for less-than-lifetime exposure, and the assessment of short-term (90-day and 12-month) studies in dogs. Summaries follow of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological and residue data on a variety of veterinary drugs: two insecticides (diflubenzuron and teflubenzuron), an antiparasitic agent (ivermectin), an ectoparasiticide (sisapronil) and a β2-adrenoceptor agonist (zilpaterol hydrochloride). In addition, the Committee considered issues raised in concern forms from the Codex Committee on Residues of Veterinary Drugs in Foods on lasalocid sodium, an antiparasitic agent. Annexed to the report is a summary of the Committee's recommendations on these drugs, including acceptable daily intakes (ADIs), ARfDs and proposed MRLs.

  4. Cross-sectional study of the severity of self-reported depressive symptoms in heroin users who participate in a methadone maintenance treatment program

    PubMed Central

    WU, Yafei; YAN, Shiyan; BAO, Yanping; LIAN, Zhi; QU, Zhi; LIU, Zhimin

    2016-01-01

    Background Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) is widely recognized as an effective method of combatting narcotic addiction. MMT reduces heroin withdrawal symptoms and, thus, makes it possible to provide the psychological and social support that is essential to the rehabilitation of drug users. Aim Compare the severity of depressive symptoms in heroin users who are currently receiving MMT to that of heroin users who are not receiving MMT. Methods We administered the 13-item version of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-13) and a demographic history form to 929 heroin users who had been receiving MMT at nine methadone treatment clinics in three Chinese cities for an average of 9 months and to 238 heroin users who had enrolled in a MMT program at the centers but had not yet begun MMT. Results Seventy-nine percent (188/238) of the untreated individuals reported depressive symptoms compared to 68% (628/929) of the individuals receiving MMT (χ2=11.69, p<0.001). The median (interquartile range) BDI score in the untreated group was 10.4 (7.9-11.4) compared to 8.0 (5.7-11.6) in the MMT group (Z=2.75, p=0.006). In the MMT group, there was a negative correlation between the severity of reported depressive symptoms and the duration of participation in the MMT program (rs=-0.24, Z=2.88, p=0.004). Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that after adjusting for all demographic variables the treated group still had less severe depressive symptoms than the untreated group. After adjusting for the effect of MMT treatment, depressive symptoms were more severe in heroin users who self-reported poor family relationships (standardized regression coefficient β=0.118, t=6.56, p<0.001) and in those who were divorced (β=0.120, t=3.73, p<0.001). Conclusions Moderate to severe depressive symptoms are common in heroin users. MMT is associated with lower levels of depressive symptoms in heroin users, but prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to determine whether or

  5. Cross-sectional study of the severity of self-reported depressive symptoms in heroin users who participate in a methadone maintenance treatment program

    PubMed Central

    WU, Yafei; YAN, Shiyan; BAO, Yanping; LIAN, Zhi; QU, Zhi; LIU, Zhimin

    2016-01-01

    Background Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) is widely recognized as an effective method of combatting narcotic addiction. MMT reduces heroin withdrawal symptoms and, thus, makes it possible to provide the psychological and social support that is essential to the rehabilitation of drug users. Aim Compare the severity of depressive symptoms in heroin users who are currently receiving MMT to that of heroin users who are not receiving MMT. Methods We administered the 13-item version of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-13) and a demographic history form to 929 heroin users who had been receiving MMT at nine methadone treatment clinics in three Chinese cities for an average of 9 months and to 238 heroin users who had enrolled in a MMT program at the centers but had not yet begun MMT. Results Seventy-nine percent (188/238) of the untreated individuals reported depressive symptoms compared to 68% (628/929) of the individuals receiving MMT (χ2=11.69, p<0.001). The median (interquartile range) BDI score in the untreated group was 10.4 (7.9-11.4) compared to 8.0 (5.7-11.6) in the MMT group (Z=2.75, p=0.006). In the MMT group, there was a negative correlation between the severity of reported depressive symptoms and the duration of participation in the MMT program (rs=-0.24, Z=2.88, p=0.004). Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that after adjusting for all demographic variables the treated group still had less severe depressive symptoms than the untreated group. After adjusting for the effect of MMT treatment, depressive symptoms were more severe in heroin users who self-reported poor family relationships (standardized regression coefficient β=0.118, t=6.56, p<0.001) and in those who were divorced (β=0.120, t=3.73, p<0.001). Conclusions Moderate to severe depressive symptoms are common in heroin users. MMT is associated with lower levels of depressive symptoms in heroin users, but prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to determine whether or

  6. Changing Focus: The Participation of Women in Educational Management in Australia. Report of a National Conference (Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, June 3-5, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randell, Shirley, Ed.

    In 1983, a National Conference on the Participation of Women in Educational Management in Australia was sponsored by the Australian College of Education. About 165 women senior administrators met to determine the extent of female participation in educational administration at all school and college levels. They also explored national trends to (1)…

  7. Participation in the Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Program as Reported by Documented and Undocumented Farm Worker Adults in the Households.

    PubMed

    Leigh, J Paul; Medel-Herrero, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Debate surrounds the provision of Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) benefits to undocumented immigrants. Few studies are available to estimate use of WIC services by documented and undocumented households using nationally representative data. The authors analyzed data from the National Agricultural Workers Survey (NAWS) annual cross-sections from 1993 through 2009 (N = 40,896 person-years). Household documentation status is defined by the status of the adults in the household, not children. Simple mean differences, logistic regressions, and time charts described household participation in WIC over 2-year intervals. Without adjustments for covariates, 10.7% of undocumented farm workers' households and 12.4% of documented households received WIC benefits, yielding an odds ratio of 0.84 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.76-0.94). Logistic regressions revealed that for the same number of children in the household, participation by undocumented persons was higher than participation by documented persons. Time charts and logistic regressions with interaction terms showed a stronger correspondence between participation in WIC and number of children <6 years old in undocumented households than documented households. Undocumented farm workers' households were only a little less likely to participate in WIC than documented farm workers' households, and undocumented households' participation was especially responsive to the presence of children. These results are consistent with the legal requirements for WIC participation, which do not distinguish between documented and undocumented households. These results may be helpful in the debate surrounding the effects of undocumented workers on WIC participation and costs. PMID:26471950

  8. Act for Better Child Care Services of 1988. Report from the Committee on Education and Labor (To Accompany H.R. 3660). Report Together with Dissenting, Additional, and Individual Views. House of Representatives, 100th Congress, 2d Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    Provided are a committee report on the Act for Better Child Care Services of 1988, as amended, and dissenting, additional, and individual views on the legislation. The Act, H.R. 3660, authorizes matching grants to states to: (1) assist low- and moderate-income families with their child care costs on a sliding fee scale basis; and (2) carry out…

  9. Epilepsy and sports participation.

    PubMed

    Howard, Gregory M; Radloff, Monika; Sevier, Thomas L

    2004-02-01

    Epilepsy is a common disease found in 2% of the population, affecting both young and old. Unfortunately, epileptics have previously been discouraged from participation in physical activity and sports for fear of inducing seizures or increasing seizure frequency. Despite a shift in medical recommendations toward encouraging rather than restricting participation, the stigma remains and epileptics continue to be less active than the general population. This results in increased body mass index, decreased aerobic endurance, poorer self-esteem, and higher levels of anxiety and depression. Although there are rare cases of exercise-induced seizures, studies have shown that physical activity can decrease seizure frequency, as well as lead to improved cardiovascular and psychologic health. The majority of sports are safe for epileptics to participate in with special attention to adequate seizure control, close monitoring of medications, and preparation of family, coaches, or trainers. Contact sports including football, hockey, and soccer have not been shown to induce seizures, and epileptics should not be precluded from participation. Water sports and swimming are felt to be safe if seizures are well controlled and direct supervision is present. Additional care must be taken in sports involving heights such as gymnastics, harnessed rock climbing, or horseback riding. Sports such as hang-gliding, scuba diving, or free climbing are not recommended, given the risk of severe injury or death, if a seizure were to occur during the activity. This article reviews the risks and benefits of physical activity in epileptics, discusses sports in which epileptics may participate, and addresses how to decrease possible risks for injury.

  10. Evaluation of certain veterinary drug residues in food. Sixty-sixth report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives.

    PubMed

    2006-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of residues of certain veterinary drugs in food and to recommend maximum levels for such residues in food. The first part of the report considers general principles regarding the evaluation of veterinary drugs within the terms of reference of JECFA, including compounds without an ADI or MRL; recommendations on principles and methods in derivation of MRLs, including a new procedure for estimating chronic dietary intakes; the use of a spreadsheet-based procedure for the statistical evaluation of residue depletion data; a revised approach for the derivation of microbiological ADIs; and the Committee's review of and comments on documents provided by the Codex Committee on Residues of Veterinary Drugs. Summaries follow of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological and residue data on a variety of veterinary drugs: three antimicrobial agents (colistin, erythromycin, flumequine), two production aids (melengestrol acetate, ractopamine hydrochloride), an insecticide (trichlorfon (metrifonate)) and an anthelminthic (triclabendazole). In addition, the attempt by the Committee to use tylosin as an example to investigate if evaluations are possible based on published data in the absence of data submissions from sponsors is described. Annexed to the report is a summary of the Committee's recommendations on these drugs, including acceptable daily intakes and proposed maximum residue limits. PMID:17373572

  11. Evaluation of certain veterinary drug residues in food. Seventy-eighth report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of residues of certain veterinary drugs in food and to recommend maximum levels for such residues of food. The first part of the report considers general principles regarding the evaluation of residues of veterinary drugs within the terms of reference of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA), including extrapolation of maximum residue limits (MRLs) to minor species, MRLs for veterinary drug residues in honey, MRLs relating to fish and fish species, dietary exposure assessment methodologies, the decision-tree approach to the evaluation of residues of veterinary drugs and guidance for JECFA experts. Summaries follow of the Committee's evaluations of toxicology and residue data on a variety of veterinary drugs: two anthelminthic agents (derquantel, monepantel), three antiparasitic agents (emanectin benzoate, ivermectin, lasalocid sodium), one antibacterial, antifungal and anthelminthic agent (gentian violet), a production aid (recombinant bovine somatotropins) and an adrenoceptor agonist and growth promoter (zilpaterol hydorchloride). Annexed to the report is a summary of the Committee's recommendations on these drugs, including acceptable daily intakes (ADIs)) and proposed MRLs. PMID:25591324

  12. Listening to victims: use of a Critical Incident Reporting System to enable adult victims of childhood sexual abuse to participate in a political reappraisal process in Germany.

    PubMed

    Rassenhofer, Miriam; Spröber, Nina; Schneider, Thekla; Fegert, Jörg M

    2013-09-01

    Recent revelations about the scope and severity of past child sexual abuse in German institutions set off a broad public debate on this issue, and led to the establishment of a politically appointed Round Table committee and an Independent Commissioner whose mandates were to reappraise the issue and develop recommendations for future policies. A media campaign was launched to publicize the establishment of a Critical Incident Reporting System (CIRS) whereby now-adult victims of past abuse could anonymously provide testimonials and let policy makers know what issues were important to them. Respondents could either call a hotline number or communicate by mail or email. The information collected was documented and analyzed by a research team, and the results of interim reports were included in the recommendations of the Independent Commissioner and the Round Table committee. Most of the respondents described severe and repeated occurrences of childhood sexual abuse. For many, priorities were improvements in therapy and counseling services, the abolishment of the statute of limitations on prosecuting offenders, and financial compensation. Based on the recommendations of the Round Table and the Independent Commissioner, two new laws were adopted as well as an action plan and some guidelines. In addition to rules for recompensation of victims in an institutional context a fund for victims of sexual abuse in intrafamilial context was established by the Federal Government. Another effect of this process was raising societal sensitivity to the problem of child sexual abuse. The use of a CIRS enabled those directly affected by childhood sexual abuse to have some input into a political process designed to address this issue. Such an approach could have applicability in other countries or in other domains of public health and other forms of societal conflict as well.

  13. Additional hemodynamic measurements with an esophageal Doppler monitor: a preliminary report of compliance, force, kinetic energy, and afterload in the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Atlas, Glen; Brealey, David; Dhar, Sunil; Dikta, Gerhard; Singer, Meryvn

    2012-12-01

    The esophageal Doppler monitor (EDM) is a minimally-invasive hemodynamic device which evaluates both cardiac output (CO), and fluid status, by estimating stroke volume (SV) and calculating heart rate (HR). The measurement of these parameters is based upon a continuous and accurate approximation of distal thoracic aortic blood flow. Furthermore, the peak velocity (PV) and mean acceleration (MA), of aortic blood flow at this anatomic location, are also determined by the EDM. The purpose of this preliminary report is to examine additional clinical hemodynamic calculations of: compliance (C), kinetic energy (KE), force (F), and afterload (TSVR(i)). These data were derived using both velocity-based measurements, provided by the EDM, as well as other contemporaneous physiologic parameters. Data were obtained from anesthetized patients undergoing surgery or who were in a critical care unit. A graphical inspection of these measurements is presented and discussed with respect to each patient's clinical situation. When normalized to each of their initial values, F and KE both consistently demonstrated more discriminative power than either PV or MA. The EDM offers additional applications for hemodynamic monitoring. Further research regarding the accuracy, utility, and limitations of these parameters is therefore indicated.

  14. Older Workers: Policies of Other Nations To Increase Labor Force Participation. Report to the Ranking Minority Member, Special Committee on Aging, U.S. Senate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    The General Accounting Office (GAO) studied selected nations' policies to increase the number of older workers participating in the labor force. The main data collection activities were as follows: (1) an analysis of population and labor force data from eight high-income Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development member nations; (2) an…

  15. Project for Minorities and Women in Research. Final Report of a Model to Increase Participation of Minorities and Women in Educational Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escobedo, Theresa H.

    A 3-year project was established at the University of Texas at Austin to enhance the educational research skills of minorities and women. The project emphasized four areas: (1) support of participants' research efforts through financial aid for research activities, training seminars, opportunities to engage in research projects, access to support…

  16. Participant Adherence Indicators Predict Changes in Blood Pressure, Anthropometric Measures, and Self-Reported Physical Activity in a Lifestyle Intervention: HUB City Steps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Jessica L.; Landry, Alicia S.; Zoellner, Jamie M.; Connell, Carol; Madson, Michael B.; Molaison, Elaine Fontenot; Yadrick, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this secondary analysis was to evaluate the utility of several participant adherence indicators for predicting changes in clinical, anthropometric, dietary, fitness, and physical activity (PA) outcomes in a lifestyle intervention, HUB City Steps, conducted in a southern, African American cohort in 2010. HUB City Steps was a…

  17. Research Reports and Teaching Materials Prepared by the Participants of the Department of Education-Fulbright Hays Summer Seminar (Cairo, Egypt, June-July, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Univ., Cairo (Egypt).

    The 20 items included in this document were prepared by teachers from the United States who traveled to Egypt in 1990 to participate in a seminar. The items are as follows: "Egypt and the Demographic Transition" (J. Bannister); "The Educational System: The Situation and the Challenge" (R. Bush); "Teaching Naguib Mahfouz''Midag Alley'" (J. Eret);…

  18. Evaluation of Early Childhood Coaching Implementation in Nebraska. Technical Report Vol. 1: Key Findings from Participant Follow Up Survey. CYFS Working Paper 2014-1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayaraman, Gayatri; Knoche, Lisa; Marvin, Christine; Bainter, Sue

    2014-01-01

    The Nebraska Early Childhood Coach (ECC) training was a 3 day (8 hours) professional development event sponsored by the Nebraska Department of Education, Office of Child Development in 2009-2010. Sixty-five early childhood teachers and related service providers participated for the purpose of learning the basic principles and behaviors associated…

  19. A Derived Transfer of Simple Discrimination and Self-Reported Arousal Functions in Spider Fearful and Non-Spider-Fearful Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smyth, Sinead; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot; Forsyth, John P.

    2006-01-01

    Two experiments investigated the derived transfer of functions through equivalence relations established using a stimulus pairing observation procedure. In Experiment 1, participants were trained on a simple discrimination (A1+/A2-) and then a stimulus pairing observation procedure was used to establish 4 stimulus pairings (A1-B1, A2-B2, B1-C1,…

  20. Personal and Situational Variables which Inhibit or Stimulate the Adoption of Agricultural Occupations Curricula as an Innovation in Vocational Agriculture by Institute Participants. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, David L.; Hull, William L.

    To identify variables accounting for variation in diffusion of cooperative agricultural occupations curriculums, data were collected by interviews with 32 teachers who were participants in one of the agricultural occupations institute workshops conducted at Oklahoma State University during the summers of 1965 or 1966 who were still teaching…

  1. Can Increasing Private School Participation and Monetary Loss in a Voucher Program Affect Public School Performance? Evidence from Milwaukee. Staff Report No. 300

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chakrabarti, Rajashri

    2007-01-01

    The Milwaukee voucher program, as implemented in 1990, allowed only nonsectarian private schools to participate in the program. However, following a Wisconsin Supreme Court ruling, the program was expanded to include religious private schools in 1998. This second phase of the voucher program led to more than a three-fold increase in the number of…

  2. Public Participation in Scientific Research: Defining the Field and Assessing Its Potential for Informal Science Education. A CAISE Inquiry Group Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonney, Rick; Ballard, Heidi; Jordan, Rebecca; McCallie, Ellen; Phillips, Tina; Shirk, Jennifer; Wilderman, Candie C.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the growing number of collaborations between volunteers and professional scientists, research efforts investigating the impacts of such collaborations, which we have termed Public Participation in Scientific Research (PPSR), have been very limited. Examples of PPSR projects include citizen science, volunteer monitoring, and participatory…

  3. Brief Report: Impact of Applied Behaviour Analysis (ABA) on Carer Burden and Community Participation in Challenging Behaviour--Results from a Randomised Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassiotis, A.; Robotham, D.; Canagasabey, A.; Marston, L.; Thomas, B.; King, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Applied behaviour analysis (ABA) reduces challenging behaviour in people with intellectual disability. There is interest, however, in whether such interventions reduce carer burden and increase community participation in this group. Methods: A 6-month randomised controlled trial was followed by a longer-term naturalistic follow-up of…

  4. Factors Influencing the Research Participation of Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Haas, Kaaren; Costley, Debra; Falkmer, Marita; Richdale, Amanda; Sofronoff, Kate; Falkmer, Torbjörn

    2016-05-01

    Recruiting adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) into research poses particular difficulties; longitudinal studies face additional challenges. This paper reports on a mixed methods study to identify factors influencing the participation in longitudinal autism research of adults with ASD, including those with an intellectual disability, and their carers. Common and differentiating factors influencing the research participation of participants are identified and discussed. Factors influencing participation were found to differ both between and within participant categories. We propose a dichotomy whereby factors influencing research participation can be classified as those arising from a participant's values, which act as either a motivator or a deterrent; and those based on convenience, which act as either an enabler or inhibitor. These findings are applicable to research studies that seek to recruit adults with ASD as participants. PMID:26810436

  5. [Data on disability and participation in Germany : Requirements, analysis options and results].

    PubMed

    Prütz, Franziska; Lange, Cornelia

    2016-09-01

    As a basis for political decisions and to meet the statistical requirements of the CRPD, reliable data and reporting on the situation of people with disabilities are essential. Based on results of the preliminary study for a German participation survey, this article firstly defines data requirements and areas of participation. Secondly, data sources regarding participation and disability in Germany that were identified in a literature search are described in detail. Only sources providing population-based data that are collected on a regular basis and that could contribute to participation reporting were taken into account. This includes data from official statistics, (panel) studies or surveys, administrative data and reporting systems. Finally, we exemplarily present the main statistical findings of the 2012 European health and social integration survey (EHSIS), a survey that was specifically designed to investigate participation of persons with disabilities. In addition to the surveys identified in the preliminary study for a German participation survey that could be used or expanded for participation reporting, and the data sources used in the participation report published by the federal government in 2013, the research yielded further publicly available data sources with a high potential for a participation reporting system. PMID:27503498

  6. Report: Maximizing recycling participation to reduce waste to landfill: a study of small to medium-sized enterprises in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Sam; Kriwoken, Lorne K

    2010-05-01

    Small to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia face many barriers to recycling participation. This study first investigated the volumes and types of waste produced by SMEs. Significant barriers were then identified and key motivators to recycle examined. Using the Australia New Zealand Standard of Industrial Classification, stratified sampling of SMEs (n = 436) was undertaken. Inadequate storage space, paucity of readily available information on recycling services and the lack of staff allocated to sort and recycle were identified as major barriers. Cardboard, paper and plastic waste were produced in large volumes with only a small percentage being recycled and these were identified as target areas for local government. Recommendations include the appointment of a dedicated recycling officer to maximize recycling participation for the reduction of waste to landfill and to undertake further research on minimizing recycling costs.

  7. Participant adherence indicators predict changes in blood pressure, anthropometric measures, and self-reported physical activity in a lifestyle intervention: HUB city steps.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Jessica L; Landry, Alicia S; Zoellner, Jamie M; Connell, Carol; Madson, Michael B; Molaison, Elaine Fontenot; Yadrick, Kathy

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this secondary analysis was to evaluate the utility of several participant adherence indicators for predicting changes in clinical, anthropometric, dietary, fitness, and physical activity (PA) outcomes in a lifestyle intervention, HUB City Steps, conducted in a southern, African American cohort in 2010. HUB City Steps was a 6-month, community-engaged, multicomponent, noncontrolled intervention targeting hypertension risk factors. Descriptive indicators were constructed using two participant adherence measures, education session attendance (ESA) and weekly steps/day pedometer diary submission (PDS), separately and in combination. Analyses, based on data from 269 primarily African American adult participants, included bivariate tests of association and multivariable linear regression to determine significant relationships between seven adherence indicators and health outcome changes, including clinical, anthropometric, dietary, fitness, and PA measures. ESA indicators were significantly correlated with four health outcomes: body mass index (BMI), fat mass, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and PA (-.29 ≤ r ≤ .23, p < .05). PDS indicators were significantly correlated with PA (r = .27, p < .001). Combination ESA/PDS indicators were significantly correlated with five health outcomes: BMI, percentage body fat (%BF), fat mass, LDL, and PA (r = -.26 to .29, p < .05). Results from the multivariate models indicated that the combination ESA/PDS indicators were the most significant predictors of changes for five outcomes--%BF, fat mass, LDL diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and PA--while ESA performed best for BMI only. For DBP, a one-unit increase in the continuous-categorical ESA/PDS indicator resulted in 0.3 mm Hg decrease. Implications for assessing participant adherence in community-based, multicomponent lifestyle intervention research are discussed.

  8. The infection connection. Only a few months remain until voluntary participation in CDC's reporting network begins, and Medicare dollars are on the line.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Maureen

    2010-08-01

    Participation in the CDC's National Healthcare Safety Network is voluntary, but hospitals must be onboard by January 2011 for central line-associated bloodstrea infections, or they risk Medicare payment penalties. A similar requirement is in place for surgical-site infections starting in 2012. "We're very pleased with the announcement", regarding the two measures, said Russell Olmsted, president-elect of APIC.

  9. Media participation and mental health in terrorist attack survivors.

    PubMed

    Thoresen, Siri; Jensen, Tine K; Dyb, Grete

    2014-12-01

    Terrorism and disasters receive massive media attention, and victims are often approached by reporters. Not much is known about how terror and disaster victims perceive the contact with media and whether such experiences influence mental health. In this study, we describe how positive and negative experiences with media relate to posttraumatic stress (PTS) reactions among survivors of the 2011 Utøya Island terrorist attack in Norway. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 285 survivors (47.0% female and 53.0% male) 14-15 months after the terrorist attack. Most survivors were approached by reporters (94%), and participated in media interviews (88%). The majority of survivors evaluated their media contact and participation as positive, and media participation was unrelated to PTS reactions. Survivors who found media participation distressing had more PTS reactions (quite distressing: B = 0.440, extremely distressing: B = 0.611, p = .004 in adjusted model). Perceiving media participation as distressing was slightly associated with lower levels of social support (r = -.16, p = .013), and regretting media participation was slightly associated with feeling let down (r = .18, p = .004). Reporters should take care when interviewing victims, and clinicians should be aware of media exposure as a potential additional strain on victims.

  10. Valid informed consent and participative decision-making in children with cancer and their parents: a report of the SIOP Working Committee on psychosocial issues in pediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Spinetta, John J; Masera, Giuseppe; Jankovic, Momcilo; Oppenheim, Daniel; Martins, Antonio Gentil; Ben Arush, Myriam Weyl; van Dongen-Melman, Jeanette; Epelman, Claudia; Medin, Gabriela; Pekkanen, Kirsti; Eden, Tim

    2003-04-01

    This is the tenth official document of the SIOP Working Committee on psychosocial issues in pediatric oncology, instituted in 1991. It is addressed to the pediatric oncology community. Children clearly have a right to participate in medical decisions regarding their own treatment, based on the developmental level of the child. The objective of these guidelines is to encourage physicians to share with the child developmentally relevant medical information specific to that particular child's health status, in the context of the child's own culture, so that he or she can actively participate in the decision-making process regarding his or her own health. These guidelines, geared toward this objective, discuss the child's right to medical information, the parents' legal responsibility for but not exclusive right over the child's health, and ways of encouraging the younger child's active participation in his or her own health care at an age-appropriate level of understanding. For adolescents, there should be a full and legally mandated power to make their own decisions regarding medical treatment.

  11. Fostering Participation and Leadership Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaiswal, Preeti

    2006-01-01

    Schools play a very significant role in fostering participation and leadership skills and in promoting the way forward to a better future. This article offers a number of strategies which can pave developmental pathways to student leadership. In addition, it analyses the beneficial aspects of such activities in enhancing the competency of students…

  12. Trial participation disclosure and gel use behavior in the CAPRISA 004 tenofovir gel trial.

    PubMed

    Succop, Stacey M; MacQueen, Kathleen M; van Loggerenberg, Francois; Majola, Nelisile; Karim, Quarraisha Abdool; Karim, Salim S Abdool

    2014-01-01

    Disclosure, or open communication, by female microbicide trial participants of their trial participation and use of an investigational HIV prevention drug to a sexual partner may affect participants' trial product usage behavior and contribute to poor adherence. With mixed results from recent microbicide clinical trials being linked to differing participant adherence, insights into the communication dynamics between trial participants and their sexual partners are particularly important. We examined the quantitative association between (1) communication of trial participation to a partner and participant adherence to gel and (2) communication of trial participation to a partner and participant HIV status. An in-depth adherence and product acceptability assessment was administered to the women participating in the CAPRISA 004 trial. Additionally, we collected qualitative data related to communication of trial participation and gel use. Qualitatively, among 165 women who had reported that they had discussed trial participation with others, most (68%) stated that they communicated participation to their sexual partner. Most of the women who had communicated study participation with their partners had received a positive/neutral response from their partner. Some of these women stated that gel use was easy; only a small number said that gel use was difficult. Among women who did not communicate their study participation to their partners, difficulty with gel use was more common and some women stated that they feared communicating their participation. Quantitatively, there was no statistically significant difference in the proportions of women who had communicated study participation to a partner across different adherence levels or HIV status. A deeper knowledge of the dynamics surrounding trial participation communication to male partners will be critical to understanding the spectrum of trial product usage behavior, and ultimately to designing tailored strategies to

  13. Funding to Support the Participation of Scientists Engaged in DOE Research in the 2008 AGU Chapman Conference on Biogeophysics. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, Lee D.

    2009-05-11

    This project provided travel awards for scientists engaged in research relevant to the DOE mission to participate in the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Chapman Conference on Biogeophysics held October 13-16, 2008, in Portland, Maine (http://www.agu.org/meetings/chapman/2008/fcall/). The objective of this Chapman Conference was to bring together geophysicists, biophysicists, geochemists, geomicrobiologists, and environmental microbiologists that are leaders in their field and have a personal interest in exploring this new interdisciplinary field or are conducting multidisciplinary research with potential impact on biogeophysics in order to define the current state of the science, identify the critical questions facing the community and to generate a roadmap for establishing biogeophysics as a critical subdiscipline of earth science research. The sixty participants were an international group of academics, graduate students and scientists at government laboratories engaged in biogeophysics related research. Scientists from Europe, Israel and China traveled to engage North American colleagues in this highly focused 3.5 day meeting. The group included an approximately equal mix of microbiologists, biogeochemists and near surface geophysicists. The recipients of the DOE travel awards were [1] Dennis Bazylinski (University of Nevada, Las Vegas), [2] Yuri Gorby (Craig Venter Institute), [3] Carlos Santamarina (Georgia Tech), [4] Susan Hubbard (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), [5] Roelof Versteeg (Idaho National Laboratory), [6] Eric Roden (University of Wisconsin), [7] George Luther (University of Delaware), and [8] Jinsong Chen (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory)

  14. The SDSS-IV in 2015: Report of the Committee on the Participation of Women in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Lucatello, Sara; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Cherinka, Brian; Cunha, Katia M. L.; Gillespie, Bruce Andrew; Hagen, Alex; Jones, Amy; Kinemuchi, Karen; Lundgren, Britt; Myers, Adam D.; Roman, Alexandre; Zasowski, Gail; SDSS-IV Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Given that many astronomers now participate in large international scientific collaborations, it is important to examine whether these structures foster a healthy scientific climate that is inclusive and diverse. The Committee on the Participation of Women in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (CPWS) was formed to evaluate the climate and demographics within the SDSS collaboration and to make recommendations for how best to establish the scientific and technical leadership team for SDSS-IV. Building on the work described in Lundgren et al. (2015), the CPWS conducted a demographic survey in Spring 2015 that included questions about career and leadership status, racial / ethnic identity, gender identity, identification with the LGBT community, disability, partnership status, and level of parental education. For example, 71% of survey respondents identify as male and 81% do not identify as a racial or ethnic minority at their current institution. This reflects the under-representation of women and men from minority groups (e.g., people of color in the United States) and women from majority groups (e.g., white women in the United States) in the field of astronomy. We have focused our analysis on the representation of scientists from these groups among the SDSS-IV leadership and the full collaboration. Our goal is to use these quantitative data to track the demographics of SDSS-IV membership and leadership over time as we work to assess and improve the climate of SDSS-IV.

  15. [Significance of the transference-countertransference constellation in motivation for participation in an epidemiologic field study of psychogenic disorders: a report of experiences].

    PubMed

    Sollors-Mossler, B; Reister, G

    1992-01-01

    The present article deals mainly with problems arising from the motivation of individuals for the participation in an epidemiological field study and their solutions on the basis of psychological-psychiatric findings. Subsequent to a more detailed survey of the research project in question formal and technical aspects of the motivational efforts (home visits, phone contacts) which had to be performed by the research group are mentioned. In the following the authors focus on the scientific concepts and orientations of their motivation work including the specific attention paid to the constellation of transference and countertransference. Particular importance is attributed to the presentation of several case studies which illustrate the influence of different psychoanalytical character traits on the motivational process. Finally the authors concentrate on specific problems regarding the sex of the probands as well as on their experiences with so-called hesitators i.e. individuals who for a longer period of time cannot decide whether to participate in the study or not.

  16. Teebi hypertelorism syndrome: additional cases.

    PubMed

    Machado-Paula, Ligiane Alves; Guion-Almeida, Maria Leine

    2003-03-01

    We report on two unrelated Brazilian boys who have craniofacial and digital anomalies resembling those reported with Teebi hypertelorism syndrome. Additional features such as cleft lip and palate, large uvula, atypical chin and abnormal scapulae were observed.

  17. Promoting People's Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Colin

    1981-01-01

    Discusses problems associated with communication in rural areas to promote participation in development programs. Suggests that success of such programs depends on continued government policy in favor of citizen participation in agricultural and rural development. (SK)

  18. Federal participation in LEED

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Christopher; Dyer, Beverly

    2004-11-10

    The federal government has been an active participant in the development and use of USGBC's Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design Green Building Rating System (LEED). This paper presents a review of this participation and some expectations for ongoing partnership.

  19. Use of RxNorm and NDF-RT to normalize and characterize participant-reported medications in an i2b2-based research repository

    PubMed Central

    Blach, Colette; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Dundee, Chandel; Frund, Julie; Richesson, Rachel; Smerek, Michelle; Walden, Anita; Tenenbaum, Jessica D.

    2014-01-01

    The MURDOCK Study is longitudinal, large-scale epidemiological study for which participants’ medication use is collected as free text. In order to maximize utility of drug data, while minimizing cost due to manual expert intervention, we have developed a generalizable approach to automatically coding medication data using RxNorm and NDF-RT and their associated application program interfaces (APIs). Of 130,273 entries, we were able to accurately map 122,523 (94%) to RxNorm concepts, and 106,135 (85%) of those drug concepts to nodes under the Drug by VA Class branch of NDF-RT. This approach has enabled use of drug data in combination with other complementary information for cohort identification within an i2b2-based participant registry. The method may be generalized to other projects requiring coding of medication data from free-text. PMID:25717397

  20. Toxicity of food additives (excluding antioxidants). January 1978-November 1987 (citations from the Life Sciences Collection data base). Report for January 1978-November 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the toxicity of food additives (excluding antioxidants) and their effects on the liver, kidneys, bladder, and other organs. The carcinogenic and teratogenic properties of these substances are also considered. The synthetic sweeteners, particularly the saccharins and cyclamates, and other additives, including nitrates and nitrites are discussed. Methods to detect and quantitate these additives are also included. (This updated bibliography contains 340 citations, 132 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  1. Participative Training Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodwell, John

    Based on extensive field experience, this two-part book is intended to be a practical guide for maximizing participative training methods. The first part of the book looks at the principles and the core skills involved in participative training. It shows how trainee participation corresponds to the processes of adult learning and describes each…

  2. School Lunch Program Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zucchino, Lori; Ranney, Christine K.

    1990-01-01

    Reductions in participation in National School Lunch Program in 1981-82 are of concern to hunger groups and legislators. Extent to which Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Acts (OBRA) of 1980-81 contributes to participation decline was measured by simulation model in New York State. Results suggest that OBRA increased participation; declining…

  3. Obstacles to Parental Involvement: A Study of Barriers to Participation in the Educational Process Faced by Black, Low Income, Inner City Parents of Handicapped Children. [Final Report].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowry, Mary S.

    To identify obstacles to involvement of Black, low income, innercity parents in the education of handicapped children 56 parents were interviewed. Transcriptions of the interviews revealed parents' feelings towards needs assessment, service delivery, information, attitudinal, and situational factors. In addition, patterns and recurrent themes in…

  4. Neuropathological Changes and Clinical Features of Autism Spectrum Disorder Participants Are Similar to that Reported in Congenital and Chronic Cerebral Toxoplasmosis in Humans and Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prandota, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Anatomic, histopathologic, and MRI/SPET studies of autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) patients' brains confirm existence of very early developmental deficits. In congenital and chronic murine toxoplasmosis several cerebral anomalies also have been reported, and worldwide, approximately two billion people are chronically infected with T. "gondii"…

  5. Higher Education: Better Management of Federal Grant and Loan Forgiveness Programs for Teachers Needed to Improve Participant Outcomes. Report to Congressional Requesters. GAO-15-314

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowicki, Jacqueline M.

    2015-01-01

    Education estimates 430,000 new teachers will be needed by 2020. It administers three programs that may help attract and retain qualified teachers by helping them finance their education. However, little is known about the efficacy of these programs. GAO was asked to examine the TEACH Grant and two loan forgiveness programs. This report examines…

  6. Utah Report of Participation in Part B Subpart 2 of the Education Professions Development Act (Title V of Higher Education Act of 1965). Phase I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Board of Education, Salt Lake City.

    This document contains seven reports on the first phase of EPDA programs in Utah which were intended to train people from the community to make a substantial contribution to the classroom. Carbon County School District provided a program for 19 teacher aides which included college courses and assignment to experienced classroom teachers. The…

  7. Meeting the Needs of Migrant Students in Schoolwide Programs. Technical Report of the Congressionally Mandated Study of Migrant Student Participation in Schoolwide Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siler, Amy; Stolzberg, Simeon; von Glatz, Adrienne; Strang, William

    In response to a legislative mandate, this report examines the ways in which migrant students are served in schoolwide program schools and the involvement of migrant representatives and migrant program staff in the schoolwide process. A survey was sent to a nationally representative sample (696) of the 2,770 Title I schools that implemented the…

  8. European Approaches to Special Education: A Summary of Impressions Reported by Students Participating in the Ithaca College Study Tour of 1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sehler, Arselia B.

    The content analysis of the impressions of 22 American educators who spent 6 weeks studying special education in Europe summarizes their impressions or concerns on the philosophy, diagnostic procedures, staffing, and post-school planning of the special education programs they visited. The report considers positive reactions and negative concerns…

  9. The effect of chemical additives on the synthesis of ethanol. Technical progress report No. 4, June 16, 1988--September 15, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, S.S.C.

    1988-11-14

    The objective of this research is to elucidate the role of various chemical additives on ethanol synthesis over Rh- and Ni-based catalysts. Chemical additives used for this study will include S, P, Ag, Cu, Mn, and Na which have different electronegativities. The effect of additives on the surface state of the catalysts, heat of adsorption of reactant molecules, reaction intermediates, reaction pathways, reaction kinetics, and product distributions is/will be investigated by a series of experimental studies including temperature programmed desorption, infrared study of NO adsorption, reactive probing, steady state rate measurement, and transient kinetic study. A better understanding of the role of additive on the synthesis reaction may allow us to use chemical additives to manipulate the catalytic properties of Rh- and Ni-based catalysts for producing high yields of ethanol from syngas.

  10. The effect of chemical additives on the synthesis of ethanol. Technical progress report No. 11, March 16, 1990--June 15, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, S.S.C.

    1990-07-01

    The objective of this research is to elucidate the role of various chemical additives on ethanol synthesis over Rh- and Ni-based catalysts. Chemical additives used for this study will include S, P, Ag, Cu, Mn, and Na which have different electronegativities. The effect of additives on the surface state of the catalysts, heat of adsorption of reactant molecules, reaction intermediates, reaction pathways, reaction kinetics, and product distributions is/will be investigated by a series of experimental studies of NO adsorption, reaction probing, study state rate measurement, and transient kinetic study. A better understanding of the role of additive on the synthesis reaction may allow us to sue chemical additives to manipulate the catalytic properties of Rh- and Ni-based catalysts for producing high yields of ethanol from syngas. (VC)

  11. Participation in the U.S. Department of Energy`s Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Site Operator`s Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The Center for Electrochemical Systems and Hydrogen Research (CESHR), a department of the Texas Engineering Station (TEES) at Texas A and M University (TAMU), has been involved in education, demonstration, research development, and testing of EVs and their components since 1988. CESHR`s participation in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Electric Vehicle and Site Operators` Programs (SOP) started in August 1991. The South Central Electric Vehicle Consortium (SCEVC), a CESHR-lead group of utilities and private companies in Texas and neighboring States, was organized at about the same time. The SCEVC has helped bring together electric vehicle (EV) fleet owners and operators in the south-central region of the country (Texas, Oklahoma, and Louisiana). The DOE, the SCEVC, TEES and the State of Texas Governor`s Energy Management Office supported the demonstration and field testing of EVs in the region. CESHR was, and continues to be, actively involved in the research in new materials for advanced batteries and in proton exchange membrane fuel cells for transportation applications. The above efforts at CESHR have been carried out by a dedicated team of engineering and electrochemical staff and graduate and undergraduate students in chemical, electrical, and mechanical engineering. The projects were supported by a cost share of 40%. The laboratory facilities available at CESHR are fully equipped for testing EV batteries of different technologies on programmable load profiles and other EV components.

  12. Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. Second topical report, Results of bench-scale screening of additives

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, M.D.

    1993-08-13

    ADA Technologies, Inc. (ADA) has completed the bench-scale testing phase of a program to evaluate additives that will improve the collection of fine particles in electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). A bench-scale ESP was installed at the Consolidation Coal Company (CONSOL) combustion research and development facility in Library, PA in order to conduct the evaluation. During a two-week test, four candidate additives were injected into the flue gas ahead of a 100 acfm ESP to determine the effect on fly ash collectability. Two additives were found to reduce the emissions from the ESP. Additives ``C`` and ``D`` performed better than initially anticipated -- reducing emissions initially by 17%. Emissions were reduced by 27% after the ESP was modified by the installation of baffles to minimize sneakage. In addition to the measured improvements in performance, no detrimental effects (i.e., electrode fouling) were observed in the operation of the ESP during the testing. The measures of success identified for the bench-scale phase of the program have been surpassed. Since the additives will affect only non-rapping reentrainment particle losses, it is expected that an even greater improvement in particle collection will be observed in larger-scale ESPs. Therefore, positive results are anticipated during the pilot-scale phase of the program and during a future full-scale demonstration test. A preliminary economic analysis was performed to evaluate the cost of the additive process and to compare its costs against alternative means for reducing emissions from ESPs. The results show that conditioning with additive C at a rate of 0.05% (wt. additive to wt. fly ash) is much less expensive than adding new ESP capacity, and more cost competitive than existing chemical conditioning processes. Preliminary chemical analysis of conditioned fly ash shows that it passes the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure criteria.

  13. 29 CFR 4043.23 - Active participant reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Active participant reduction. 4043.23 Section 4043.23 Labor... Active participant reduction. (a) Reportable event. A reportable event occurs when the number of active participants under a plan is reduced to less than 80 percent of the number of active participants at...

  14. 29 CFR 4043.23 - Active participant reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Active participant reduction. 4043.23 Section 4043.23 Labor... Active participant reduction. (a) Reportable event. A reportable event occurs when the number of active participants under a plan is reduced to less than 80 percent of the number of active participants at...

  15. Federal Student Aid: Recent Changes to Eligibility Requirements and Additional Efforts to Promote Awareness Could Increase Academic Competitiveness and SMART Grant Participation. Report to Congressional Requesters. GAO-09-343

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Government Accountability Office, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Academic Competitiveness (AC) and National Science and Mathematics Access to Retain Talent (SMART) Grants were established by the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005. The grants provide merit-based financial aid to certain low-income college students eligible for Federal Pell Grants and are administered by the Department of Education (Education).…

  16. An Exploratory Factor Analysis of a Brief Self-Report Scale to Detect Neurocognitive Impairment Among Participants Enrolled in Methadone Maintenance Therapy.

    PubMed

    Copenhaver, Michael; Shrestha, Roman; Wickersham, Jeffrey A; Weikum, Damian; Altice, Frederick L

    2016-04-01

    The present study examines the factor structure of the existing Neuropsychological Impairment Scale (NIS) through the use of exploratory factor analysis (EFA). The NIS is a brief, self-report measure originally designed to assess neurocognitive impairment (NCI) by having patients rate a range of items that may influence cognitive functioning. Stabilized patients on methadone maintenance therapy (MMT; N=339) in New Haven, CT who reported drug- or sex-related HIV risk behaviors in the past 6 months were administered the full 95-item NIS. An EFA was then conducted using principal axis factoring and orthogonal varimax rotation. The EFA resulted in retaining 57 items, with a 9-factor solution that explained 54.8% of the overall variance. The revised 9-factor measure--now referred to as the Brief Inventory of Neuro-cognitive Impairment (BINI)--showed a diverse set of factors with excellent to good reliability (i.e., F1 α=0.97 to F9 α=0.73). This EFA suggests the potential utility of using the BINI in the context of addiction treatment. Further research should examine the utility of this tool within other clinical care settings.

  17. Patterns of public participation.

    PubMed

    Slutsky, Jean; Tumilty, Emma; Max, Catherine; Lu, Lanting; Tantivess, Sripen; Hauegen, Renata Curi; Whitty, Jennifer A; Weale, Albert; Pearson, Steven D; Tugendhaft, Aviva; Wang, Hufeng; Staniszewska, Sophie; Weerasuriya, Krisantha; Ahn, Jeonghoon; Cubillos, Leonardo

    2016-08-15

    Purpose - The paper summarizes data from 12 countries, chosen to exhibit wide variation, on the role and place of public participation in the setting of priorities. The purpose of this paper is to exhibit cross-national patterns in respect of public participation, linking those differences to institutional features of the countries concerned. Design/methodology/approach - The approach is an example of case-orientated qualitative assessment of participation practices. It derives its data from the presentation of country case studies by experts on each system. The country cases are located within the historical development of democracy in each country. Findings - Patterns of participation are widely variable. Participation that is effective through routinized institutional processes appears to be inversely related to contestatory participation that uses political mobilization to challenge the legitimacy of the priority setting process. No system has resolved the conceptual ambiguities that are implicit in the idea of public participation. Originality/value - The paper draws on a unique collection of country case studies in participatory practice in prioritization, supplementing existing published sources. In showing that contestatory participation plays an important role in a sub-set of these countries it makes an important contribution to the field because it broadens the debate about public participation in priority setting beyond the use of minipublics and the observation of public representatives on decision-making bodies. PMID:27468773

  18. Additional guidance for including nuclear safety equivalency in the Canister Storage Building and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility final safety analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Garvin, L.J.

    1997-05-20

    This document provides guidance for the production of safety analysis reports that must meet both DOE Order 5480.23 and STD 3009, and be in compliance with the DOE regulatory policy that imposes certain NRC requirements.

  19. EPA evaluation of the SYNERGY-1 fuel additive under Section 511 of the Motor Vehicle Information and Cost Savings Act. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Syria, S.L.

    1981-06-01

    This document announces the conclusions of the EPA evaluation of the 'SYNERGY-1' device under provisions of Section 511 of the Motor Vehicle Information and Cost Savings Act. This additive is intended to improve fuel economy and exhaust emission levels of two and four cycle gasoline fueled engines.

  20. Children's Participation in Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brostrom, Stig

    2012-01-01

    In (post) modern society children are seen as active subjects and participants who have a legitimate basis in the United Nations Convention of the Rights of the Child. As a consequence of this, children are able to play an active role in the planning of/and participation in both education and research in their own preschool settings. This article…

  1. Participation in curbside recycling schemes and its variation with material types.

    PubMed

    Woodard, R; Harder, M K; Bench, M

    2006-01-01

    Local authorities throughout the UK are refining or implementing curbside recycling schemes as they attempt to achieve challenging statutory recycling targets. Despite the importance of curbside schemes there are few published studies that have reported on actual measured levels and frequency of participation by residents, hindering transferability of lessons learned nationally and internationally. This paper reports measurements and analysis over at least four weeks for three different curbside recycling schemes operating in England, with at least 1400 samples in each. It is found that the participation rate is higher in schemes that collect more types of materials. Participation rates of 38%, 49% and 65% were measured for schemes that collected 1, 2 and 3 material types, respectively. The increase appears to be related not only to extra participants setting out the additional materials, but also increased participation for the common materials. It is found that for one scheme, more households tend to set out plastics and cans compared to newspapers. PMID:16542833

  2. Development of an Eastern Shale Oil Residue as an Asphalt Additive - Subtask 2.5: Topical report, February 1, 1994-February 1, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    An evaluation of eastern shale oil as an asphalt additive to reduce oxidative age hardening and moisture susceptibility is being conducted. An eastern shale oil residue having a viscosity of 1.30 Pa`s at 60{degrees}C (140{degrees}F) was blended with three different petroleum-derived asphalts that are known to be very susceptible to oxidative aging. In addition, blends of the eastern shale oil residue and the petroleum-derived asphalts are being coated onto three different aggregates that are known to be susceptible to water stripping. The oxidative age hardening portion of this study is not complete at this time. To date, information has been obtained on the unaged samples and two of the aged petroleum-derived asphalts (AAD-1 and AAK-1). When complete, this data will include rheological data on the unaged, RTFO-aged, and the RTFO/PAV-aged samples and infrared data on the unaged and RTFO/PAV-aged samples. With respect to the rheological data, asphalt AAD-1 meets the specifications of a PG 58 asphalt while asphalt AAK-1 does not. In the latter case this indicates that AAK-1 is more appropriately evaluated at a higher temperature range. The infrared spectroscopic data obtained for the eastern shale oil residue show that it contains appreciable amounts of carbonyl and sulfoxide compound types, 0.22 absorbance units and 0. 27 moles/L, respectively. Thus, upon the addition of this residue to the three petroleum-derived asphalts the blends contain increased amounts of these functional groups relative to the petroleum-derived asphalts. This has been observed with other additives and is not considered detrimental. In addition, the data that has been collected to date indicate that the moisture susceptibility of blends of eastern shale oil residue and asphalt AAK-1 are somewhat improved when coated onto Lithonia granite.

  3. Evaluation of certain veterinary drug residues in food. Fiftieth report of the joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives.

    PubMed

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of residues of certain veterinary drugs in food and to recommend maximum levels for such residues. The first part of the report considers the neurotoxicity of anthelminthics belonging to the avermectin and milbemycin classes of compounds and the evaluation policy of the Committee in establishing Maximum Residue Levels (MRLs) for veterinary drugs in food. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological and residue data on a variety of veterinary drugs: five anthelminthic agents (eprinomectin, febantel, fenbendazole, oxfendazole and moxidectin), seven antimicrobial agents (gentamicin, procaine benzylpenicillin, sarafloxacin, spectinomycin, chlortetracycline, oxytetracycline and tetracycline), three antiprotozoal agents (diclazuril, imidocarb and nicarbazin), one glucocorticosteroid (dexamethasone), one production aid (recombinant bovine somatotropins) and one tranquilizing agent (azaperone). Annexed to the report are a summary of the Committee's recommendations on these drugs, including Acceptable Daily Intakes and MRLs, and further toxicological studies and other information required. PMID:10416362

  4. Evaluation of certain veterinary drug residues in food. Forty-eighth report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of residues of certain veterinary drugs in foods and to recommend maximum levels for such residues in food. The first part of the report considers standards for the performance of studies, residues at the injection site, and several initiatives to promote transparency of the process for setting Maximum Residue Limits (MRLs). A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological and residue data on a variety of veterinary drugs: two anthelminthic agents (moxidectin and tiabendazole), eight antimicrobial agents (ceftiofur, danofloxacin, dihydrostreptomycin, streptomycin, enrofloxacin, flumequine, gentamicin and spiramycin), one glucocorticosteroid (dexamethasone), and two insecticides (cyfluthrin and fluazuron). Annexed to the report are a summary of the Committee's recommendations on these drugs, including Acceptable Daily Intakes and MRL's and further toxicological studies and other information required.

  5. Evaluation of certain veterinary drug residues in food. Sixty-second report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on food additives.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of residues of certain veterinary drugs in food and to recommend maximum levels for such residues in food. The first part of the report considers conclusions on specific toxicological end-points, lipid-soluble residues of veterinary drugs with MRLs in milk, statistical methods for the estimation of MRLs, and the Committee's review and comments on documents provided by Codex Committees. Summaries follow of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological and residue data on a variety of veterinary drugs: five antibacterial agents (cefuroxime, chloramphenicol, flumequine, lincomycin, pirlimycin), four insecticides (cyhalothrin, cypermethrin and alpha-cypermethrin, doramectin, phoxim), and two production aids (melengestrol acetate, ractopamine). The Committee's comments on chloramphenicol found at low levels in animal products are also summarized. Annexed to the report is a summary of the Committee's recommendations on these drugs, including acceptable daily intakes and proposed maximum residue limits. PMID:15587045

  6. Evaluation of certain veterinary drug residues in food. Forty-eighth report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of residues of certain veterinary drugs in foods and to recommend maximum levels for such residues in food. The first part of the report considers standards for the performance of studies, residues at the injection site, and several initiatives to promote transparency of the process for setting Maximum Residue Limits (MRLs). A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological and residue data on a variety of veterinary drugs: two anthelminthic agents (moxidectin and tiabendazole), eight antimicrobial agents (ceftiofur, danofloxacin, dihydrostreptomycin, streptomycin, enrofloxacin, flumequine, gentamicin and spiramycin), one glucocorticosteroid (dexamethasone), and two insecticides (cyfluthrin and fluazuron). Annexed to the report are a summary of the Committee's recommendations on these drugs, including Acceptable Daily Intakes and MRL's and further toxicological studies and other information required. PMID:9727328

  7. Evaluation of certain veterinary drug residues in food. Forty-third report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of residues of certain veterinary drugs in food and to recommend maximum levels for such residues in foods. The first part of the report considers the evaluation of veterinary drugs with a long history of use and the implications of veterinary drug use in aquaculture, and discusses the need for adequate data. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological and residue data on a variety of veterinary drugs: a beta-adrenoceptor-blocking agent (carazolol), seven antimicrobial agents (dihydrostreptomycin and streptomycin, enrofloxacin, gentamicin, neomycin, oxolinic acid and spiramycin) a glucocorticosteroid (dexamethasone), and a tranquilizing agent (azaperone). Annexed to the report are a summary of the Committee's recommendations on these drugs, including Acceptable Daily intakes and Maximum Residue Limits, and a list of further toxicological studies and other information required or desired. PMID:8585227

  8. Depression and Political Participation*

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I propose that depression is a political phenomenon insofar as it has political sources and consequences. I then investigate one aspect of this argument—whether depression reduces participation. I hypothesize that individuals with depression lack the motivation and physical capacity to vote and engage in other forms of political participation due to somatic problems and feelings of hopelessness and apathy. Moreover, I examine how depression in adolescence can have downstream consequences for participation in young adulthood. The analyses, using both cross-sectional and longitudinal data, show that voter turnout and other forms of participation decrease as the severity of depressed mood increases. These findings are discussed in light of disability rights and potential efforts to boost participation among this group. PMID:26924857

  9. No Child Left Behind Act: Additional Assistance and Research on Effective Strategies Would Help Small Rural Districts. Report to Congressional Requesters. GAO-04-909

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickok, Eugene W.

    2004-01-01

    Congress has raised concerns about difficulties rural school districts face implementing the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLBA). This report describes: key challenges rural states and districts face; strategies rural districts have developed; expenditures and resources related to rural districts? compliance; and guidance and assistance from the…

  10. Homeless Families: A Neglected Crisis. Sixty-Third Report by the Committee on Government Operations together with Dissenting and Additional Views.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U. S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Government Operations.

    This report, based on a study by the Subcommittee on Intergovernmental Relations and Human Resources of the Committee on Government Operations examines the magnitude of the problem of homeless families. Its findings include the following: (1) causes of family homelessness include scarcity of low income housing, inadequate income or public…

  11. 2013 Mathematics Assessment Report Card: Summary Data Tables with Additional Detail for Average Scores and Achievement Levels for States and Jurisdictions. [Results Appendix. NCES 2014-451

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This document represents one of three appendices associated with "The Nation's Report Card: A First Look--2013 Mathematics and Reading. National Assessment of Educational Progress at Grade 4 and 8. NCES 2014-451." It includes tabular data relating to the mathematics portion of the Tables of Education Progress at Grade 4 and 8. [For the main…

  12. Draft Registration Implementation. Report Together with Dissenting Individual, Additional, and Separate Views. House of Representatives, Committee on Education and Labor, Ninety-eighth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    A report on a bill to delay the effective date for the denial of federal aid to students who have failed to comply with draft registration requirements is presented. The bill also directs the Comptroller General to conduct an ongoing study of the effectiveness of the Department of Defense Authorization Act of 1983 (Solomon/Hayakawa amendment) in…

  13. Workforce Development Act of 1995. Report together with Additional and Minority Views To Accompany S.143. 104th Congress, 1st Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

    This congressional report addresses the Workforce Development Act of 1995 that would consolidate federal employment training programs and create a new process and structure for funding the programs. Contents include the following: a summary of the bill; background and need for the legislation; history of the legislation and votes in committee;…

  14. Nurse Training Act of 1975. Report Together with Additional Views and Minority Views [to Accompany H.R. 4115], Ninety-Fourth Congress, First Session, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House.

    The report on the Nurse Training Act of 1975 focuses on the legislation to provide funds for nursing education through an amendment of title VIII of the Public Health Service Act. It proposes to continue, without change, for fiscal year 1975 the nurse training authorities of title VIII of the Act and to continue the authorities for fiscal years…

  15. Nurse Education Act of 1985. Report Together with Additional Views to Accompany H.R. 2370. House of Representatives, Ninety-ninth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

    A bill amending the Public Health Service Act (Title VIII) to extend programs of assistance for nurse education is addressed in this congressional report. After briefly reviewing the background and need for the legislation, a section-by-section analysis is presented. H.R. 2370 extends for 3 years the following programs in nurse education: special…

  16. Human Services Amendments of 1994. Report Together with Minority and Additional Views. To Accompany H.R. 4250. House of Representatives, 103rd Congress, 2d Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    This report presents amendments to H.R. 4250, a bill to authorize appropriations for fiscal years 1995 through 1998 to carry out the Head Start Act, the Community Services Block Grant Act, the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Act, and the newly enacted Family Resource and Support Act. The text of the amendments themselves, as well as the complete…

  17. Health Professions Educational Assistance Amendments of 1985. Report Together with Additional Views to Accompany H.R. 2410. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

    A bill amending the Public Health Service Act to revise and extend programs under Title VII (health professions programs) is addressed in this congressional report. The bill reauthorizes for 3 years the following programs: the Health Education Assistance Loan program of insurance for market-rate student loans (the ceiling is raised); the Health…

  18. STEM Club Participation and STEM Schooling Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottfried, Michael A.; Williams, Darryl N.

    2013-01-01

    To develop a more robust understanding of the relationship between non-formal, school-based STEM activities and students' success and persistence in STEM fields, this study evaluates how math club participation influences math GPA and how science club participation influences science GPA. Additionally, this study evaluates how math or science club…

  19. Participation in the scientific activities of the Waves in Space Plasma (WISP) project. Final report, 15 March 1992-14 March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Alpert, Y.L.; Grossi, M.D.

    1994-04-01

    This is the Final Report for Contract NAG5-1925, that consisted of experiment design, for possible use by the space science mission called WISP (Waves in Space Plasma). This mission is under study by the Canadian Space Agency and by NASA. Two WISP configurations are contemplated, under the name of BICEPS: one is called BOLAS, and the other WISPRS. Both these configurations are meant to perform bistatic sounding of the ionosphere, at a height close to F(sub 2) H(sub max) (about 350 Km), with a pair of satellites, either tethered or in free flight. Investigation A (with Y.L. Alpert as P.I.) addresses the subject of parametric decay effects, expected to arise in a magnetoplasma under the influence of high-intensity HF fields. Criteria were formulated that could be used in searching for parametric instabilities and of electric fields in the ionosphere and magnetosphere, by in-situ satellites, such as the BICEPS Pair. Investigation B (with M.D.Grossi as P.I.) addressed the bistatic measurement, by the BICEPS pair, of ionospheric features, such as large-scale and small-scale disturbances, travelling ionospheric disturbances, electron density irregularities, spread-F phenomena, etc. These measurements by BICEPS could be correlated with the waveform distortion and degradation experienced by microwave links from geosynchronous height to ground, such as the ACTS satellite, expected to radiate pulses as short as 1 nanosecond in the band 20 to 30 GHz. These links are transionospheric and propagate e.m. waves in the volume of the ionosphere where BICEPS operates. It will be possible, therefore, to correlate the two classes of measurements, and learn the causative mechanisms that are responsible for the time-spread and frequency-spread nature of communications waveforms at microwave, in geosynchronous height to ground paths.

  20. An investigation of the effects of smoke suppressant fuel additives on engine and test cell exhaust gas opacities. Final report for 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Thornburg, D.W.; Darnell, T.R.; Netzer, D.W.

    1982-05-01

    Tests were conducted in a one-eighth scale turbojet test cell with a ramjet type combustor to investigate the effects of fuel additives on smoke reduction. Particle size and mass concentrations were determined at the engine and stack exhausts using three wavelength optical detector systems. Particulate samples were also collected at the engine exhaust and analyzed with a scanning electron microscope. Combustor temperature and fuel additives were found to significantly affect particulate mass concentrations emitted from the engine while particle size appeared to be unaffected. No significant changes in the particulate size or mass occurred from the engine exhaust to the stack exhaust. The optical determination of exhaust mean particulate size/mass concentration with three wavelength optical detector systems appears to be reasonably accurate technique for evaluating the effects of engine and test cell operating conditions and fuel composition changes on the emitted particulates.

  1. Acute toxicity evaluation of JP-8 jet fuel and JP-8 jet fuel containing additives. Final report, November 1995-February 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, R.E.; Kinead, E.R.; Feldmann, M.L.; Leahy, H.F.; Jederberg, W.W.

    1996-11-01

    To reduce fuel fouling in current U.S Navy and Air Force aircraft systems and to provide additional heat sink and thermal stability for future systems, the Air Force is developing an improved JP-8 jet fuel (JP-8 + 100). Two companies (Betz and Mobil) have developed additive packages that are currently being tested in aircraft systems. To determine if the additive packages will produce health effects for flightline personnel, acute testing was performed on JP-8 and the two JP-8 + 100 jet fuels. A single oral dose at 5 mg jet fuel/kg body weight to five male and five female F-344 rats, and a single dermal application of 2 g jet fuel/kg body weight applied to five male and five female NZW rabbits resulted in no deaths. No signs of toxic stress were observed, and all animals gained weight over the 14-day observation periods. Single treatment of 0.5 mL neat jet fuel to rabbit skin produced negative results for skin irritation. Guinea pigs tailed to elicit a sensitization response following repeated applications of the jet fuels. Inhalation vapor exposure to JP-8, JP-8 + 100 (Betz), and JP-8 (Mobil) were determined to be >3.43, >3.52, and >3.57 mg/L, respectively. LD% values for aerosol exposure to JP-8, JP-8 + 100 (Betz), and JP-8 + 100 (Mobil) were >4.44, >4.39, and >4.54 mg/L, respectively. Under the conditions of these tests, the additive packages did not potentiate the acute effects normally associated with JP-8 jet fuel exposures.

  2. 33 CFR 238.8 - Other participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DEFENSE WATER RESOURCES POLICIES AND AUTHORITIES: FLOOD DAMAGE REDUCTION MEASURES IN URBAN AREAS § 238.8 Other participation. In addition to providing flood damage reduction works in urban areas, the Corps...

  3. 33 CFR 238.8 - Other participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... DEFENSE WATER RESOURCES POLICIES AND AUTHORITIES: FLOOD DAMAGE REDUCTION MEASURES IN URBAN AREAS § 238.8 Other participation. In addition to providing flood damage reduction works in urban areas, the Corps...

  4. Improved Solar Cell Efficiency Through the Use of an Additive Nanostructure-Based Optical Downshifter: Final Subcontract Report, January 28, 2010 -- February 28, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtin, J.

    2011-05-01

    This final report summarizes all SpectraWatt's progress in achieving a boost in solar cell efficiency using an optical downshifter. Spectrawatt's downshifting technology is based on a nanostructured material system which absorbs high energy (short wavelength) light and reemits it at a lower energy (long wavelength) with high efficiency. This system has shown unprecedented performance parameters including near unity quantum yield and high thermal stability.

  5. Mexican-Origin Youth Participation in Extracurricular Activities: Predicting Trajectories of Involvement from 7th to 12th Grade.

    PubMed

    Dawes, Nickki Pearce; Modecki, Kathryn L; Gonzales, Nancy; Dumka, Larry; Millsap, Roger

    2015-11-01

    The potential benefits of participation in extracurricular activities may be especially important for youth who are at risk for academic underachievement, such as low income Mexican-origin youth in the U.S. To advance understanding of factors that drive participation for this population, this study examined Mexican-origin youth's trajectories of participation in extracurricular activities across Grades 7-12 and tested theoretically-derived predictors of these trajectories. Participants were 178 adolescents (53.9 % Female, Mage = 12.28) and their mothers who separately completed in-home interviews. Youth reported the frequency of their participation across a range of extracurricular activities. Latent growth curve models of overall extracurricular activities participation, sports participation, and fine arts participation were individually estimated via structural equation modeling. The findings demonstrated developmental declines in overall participation and in sports participation. For fine arts, declines in participation in middle school were followed by subsequent increases during high school (a curvilinear pattern). Motivationally-salient predictors of participation trajectories included youth's traditional cultural values orientation (sports), the mothers' educational aspirations for the youth (sports, fine arts, overall activity), and youth gender (sports, fine arts). Overall, the results suggest variability in participation trajectories based on program type, and highlight the need for additional research to enhance our understanding of the impact of culturally-relevant predictors on participation over time.

  6. Effects of hafnium additions on the solidification behavior of directionally solidified superalloys. Final report, 1 June 1975-31 August 1977

    SciTech Connect

    Brody, H.D.; Giamei, A.F.

    1981-10-01

    A cooperative university/industry research program into the effect of hafnium additions on the solidification behavior of nickel base superalloys was carried out under Air Force sponsorship at the University of Pittsburgh and Pratt and Whitney Aircraft Company. The research was aimed at gaining a fundamental understanding of the basic solidification characteristics, i.e., development of structure and segregation, of hafnium-modified MAR-M200 over the normal range of casting conditions and for a reasonable variation in alloy content, especially hafnium content.

  7. Participating in Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Participating in Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials A Research Study With Human Subjects A clinical ... to treat or cure a disease. Phases of Clinical Trials Clinical trials of drugs are usually described based ...

  8. Understanding Participation in Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Alan L.

    1991-01-01

    Adherence to program planning principles does not guarantee participation. Attention must be paid to characteristics that make a program responsive: target audience, promotion and marketing, competition, and logistics. (SK)

  9. Clinical Trials - Participants

    MedlinePlus

    ... participating in was reviewed by an IRB. Further Reading For more information about research protections, see: Office ... data and decide whether the results have medical importance. Results from clinical trials are often published in ...

  10. Learning through Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeb, David; Prentiss, William C.

    1970-01-01

    An experimental program at Valencia Junior College (Florida) allows every student to actively participate in all phases of the political science course. A variety of multimedia materials, which the students help to develop and evaluate, are used. (BB)

  11. Public Participation Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The purpose of this Public Participation Plan is to describe the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) plan for involving the public in the decision-making process for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The plan describes how the DOE will meet the public participation requirements of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, as amended, and of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. It includes the UMTRA Project Office plans for complying with DOE Order 5440.1D and for implementing the DOE`s Public Participation Policy for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (1992) and Public Participation Guidance for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (1993).

  12. NITARP: Effects on Student Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Richard; Odden, Caroline; Hall, Garrison; Rebull, Luisa M.

    2016-01-01

    NITARP (NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program) is a teacher mentorship program designed to give educators experiences in authentic research in the area of astronomy. While the main focus of the program is aimed at giving educators experience working with and publishing scientific research, teachers are encouraged to involve students with the experience. NITARP funds up to two students to travel along with the educator while allowing an additional two students to attend but with no additional financial assistance. Teachers are welcome to have more student participants but no more than 4 may travel with the teacher to Caltech and the AAS meeting. Given that the focus of the NITARP program is on the educators, little is known about the effects of the program on the student participants other than anecdotal evidence. In order to better understand the impact on the students, we have designed a survey to be administered to past student participants. The survey was constructed with a goal to determine if the NITARP experience had an impact on students' views of science and influenced their educational paths. While the NITARP project has assembled some evidence of the impact on students, this is the first formal attempt to capture that impact. This poster will present the results of that survey.

  13. Cable Television: Citizen Participation in Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Robert K.

    The historical background of citizen participation in local affairs and its relevance at the onset of community concern about cable television are briefly discussed in this report. The participation of citizens, municipal officials, and cable operators in laying the groundwork for a cable system as well as the pros and cons of cable television as…

  14. New York's Experiment: Participation in Government.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragaw, Donald H.

    1989-01-01

    Reports a New York State Education Department mandated government participation course. Course requirements were to examine public policy issues and to incorporate a participatory element. Describes four programs that were implemented by school districts: Effective Participation in Government Program; The Community Service Corps; National Issues…

  15. The correlates of sports participation in Europe.

    PubMed

    Downward, Paul; Lera-López, Fernando; Rasciute, Simona

    2014-01-01

    Based on the Eurobarometer data from 2009 (N = 26,788), this paper investigates the correlates of sports participation. In addition to examining standard socio-demographic, economic and lifestyle factors, the paper also focuses on the impact of motivational factors, the availability of sports infrastructure and government support, for the first time collectively at the European level. A further contribution of the paper is that it simultaneously investigates both the decision to participate in sport and the frequency of sports participation in this context. This is made possible through the application of a Zero-Inflated Ordered Probit estimator. This estimator also takes into account two types of non-participants: those who have never participated in sport and those who did not participate at the time of the survey. The results show that the decision to participate in sports and the frequency of sports participation of males and females are affected by different factors, therefore distinct government policies should be applied to attract new, and retain the existing, participants. For example, women are affected more by a need to improve self-esteem, while the men to produce social integration. The provision of sports facilities is of more importance for males, which may indicate a male-oriented nature of the sports facilities, for example, the gym. However, the number of adults and the number of children in the household reduce the probability of sports participation by females. Therefore, higher provision of childcare may be important if female participation is to be increased.

  16. Act for Better Child Care Services of 1988. Report from the Committee on Labor and Human Resources Together with Additional Views (To Accompany S. 1885). 100th Congress, 2nd Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

    The Act for Better Child Care Services of 1988, additional views of members of the United States Senate, and related materials are reported. The purpose of the Act is to increase the availability, affordability, and quality of child care throughout the nation. The legislation provides direct financial assistance to low-income and working families…

  17. Benign pleomorphic adenoma of the larynx: report of a case and review and analysis of 20 additional cases in the literature.

    PubMed

    Dubey, S P; Banerjee, S; Ghosh, L M; Roy, S

    1997-08-01

    Among the benign pleomorphic adenomas of the minor salivary glands, those that develop in the larynx are very rare. One such case of benign pleomorphic adenoma of the larynx in an adult female is described. The patient was treated with epiglottectomy with a lateral pharyngotomy approach. Review of the literature showed an additional 20 well-described cases of benign pleomorphic adenoma of the larynx. These patients usually present with hoarseness, dyspnea or dysphagia, or any combination of these depending on the site of origin and the size of the tumor. Occasionally the tumor may be discovered incidentally. The tumor can occur in any part of the larynx with the epiglottis being the most common site. Clinically they are indistinguishable from other benign laryngeal neoplasms, as surface mucosal lining remains intact. Histopathological examination is used to make the definitive diagnosis, but rarely, misinterpretation may occur. Conservative surgery provides a lasting cure.

  18. Satellite Power System (SPS) student participation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladwig, A.; David, L.

    1978-01-01

    A assessment of methods which are appropriate to initiate student participation in the discussion of a satellite power system (SPS) is presented. Methods which are incorporated into the campus environment and the on-going learning experience are reported. The discussion of individual methods for student participation includes a description of the technique, followed by comments on its enhancing and limiting factors, references to situations where the method has been demonstrated, and a brief consideration of cost factors. The two categories of recommendations presented are: an outline of fourteen recommendations addressing specific activities related to student participation in the discussion of SPS, and three recommendations pertaining to student participation activities in general.

  19. Productivity enhancement planning using participative management concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, M. E.; Kukla, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    A productivity enhancement project which used participative management for both planning and implementation is described. The process and results associated with using participative management to plan and implement a computer terminal upgrade project where the computer terminals are used by research and development (R&D) personnel are reported. The upgrade improved the productivity of R&D personnel substantially, and their commitment of the implementation is high. Successful utilization of participative management for this project has laid a foundation for continued style shift toward participation within the organization.

  20. High SO{sub 2} removal efficiency testing. Topical report - results of sodium formate additive tests at New York State Electric & Gas Corporation`s Kintigh Station

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.

    1997-02-14

    Tests were conducted at New York State Gas & Electric`s (NYSEG`s) Kintigh Station to evaluate options for achieving high sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal efficiency in the wet limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. This test program was one of six conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy to evaluate low-capital-cost upgrades to existing FGD systems as a means for utilities to comply with the requirements of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. The upgrade option tested at Kintigh was sodium formate additive. Results from the tests were used to calibrate the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI) FGD PRocess Integration and Simulation Model (FGDPRISM) to the Kintigh scrubber configuration. FGDPRISM was then used to predict system performance for evaluating conditions other than those tested. An economic evaluation was then done to determine the cost effectiveness of various high-efficiency upgrade options. These costs can be compared with the estimated market value of SO{sub 2} allowance or the expected costs of allowances generated by other means, such as fuel switching or new scrubbers, to arrive at the most cost-effective strategy for Clean Air Act compliance.

  1. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) polymorphism among ethnic groups in Singapore with report of additional alleles at loci 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, S P; Saha, N; Wee, K P

    1989-04-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GST; E.C.2.5.1.18) were phenotyped by starch gel electrophoresis in post-mortem liver samples from 683 unrelated subjects of both sexes. 305 were Chinese, 185 Indians, 147 Malays and 46 from other racial groups of South-East Asia. GST1 and GST2 were found to be polymorphic in these populations. Additional alleles (GST1*3 and GST2*O) were observed at low frequency in all the ethnic groups. The frequency of GST1*1 was lower and that of GST1*2 was higher in Indians and Malays as compared to Chinese. GST1*0 and GST1*3 frequencies were similar in all these ethnic groups. The gene frequencies of the alleles of the GST2 locus varied significantly in the population studied. GST2*0 frequency was significantly higher in Indians than in Chinese and Malays, while the lowest frequency of GST2*1 was found in the Indians. GST2*2 frequency was higher in the Malays than in Chinese and Indians. GST1 and GST2 phenotype distributions were in agreement with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in all the ethnic groups studied. Sex made no significant difference in the phenotype distribution.

  2. Turning Despondency into Hope: Charting New Paths to Improve Students' Achievement and Participation in Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Alberto J.

    2004-01-01

    This monograph offers a realistic look at current trends in student achievement in science education, the participation of underrepresented populations, and the many factors that serve to sustain them. In addition, it offers new insights and concrete suggestions for change based on the analysis of recent reports and promising field-based studies.…

  3. Guide to Parent Involvement. Parents as Adult Learners. Parent Participation Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Univ., Washington, DC. Adult Learning Potential Inst.

    This document is the third of a series of four reports developed to provide a comprehensive overview of parent involvement, encompassing the family, parenting needs, and existing resources, in addition to current parent education approaches and practices. This Parent Participation Profile (PPR) is intended for use in needs assessment and program…

  4. A Survey of Students Participating in a Computer-Assisted Education Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yel, Elif Binboga; Korhan, Orhan

    2015-01-01

    This paper mainly examines anthropometric data, data regarding the habits, experiences, and attitudes of the students about their tablet/laptop/desktop computer use, in addition to self-reported musculoskeletal discomfort levels and frequencies of students participating in a tablet-assisted interactive education programme. A two-part questionnaire…

  5. Factors Influencing the Research Participation of Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Kaaren; Costley, Debra; Falkmer, Marita; Richdale, Amanda; Sofronoff, Kate; Falkmer, Torbjörn

    2016-01-01

    Recruiting adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) into research poses particular difficulties; longitudinal studies face additional challenges. This paper reports on a mixed methods study to identify factors influencing the participation in longitudinal autism research of adults with ASD, including those with an intellectual disability, and…

  6. Three-year summary report of biological monitoring at the Southwest Ocean dredged-material disposal site and additional locations off Grays Harbor, Washington, 1990--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Antrim, L.D.; Shreffler, D.K.; Pearson, W.H.; Cullinan, V.I.

    1992-12-01

    The Grays Harbor Navigation Improvement Project was initiated to improve navigation by widening and deepening the federal channel at Grays Harbor. Dredged-material disposal sites were selected after an extensive review process that included inter-agency agreements, biological surveys, other laboratory and field studies, and preparation of environmental impact statements The Southwest Site, was designated to receive materials dredged during annual maintenance dredging as well as the initial construction phase of the project. The Southwest Site was located, and the disposal operations designed, primarily to avoid impacts to Dungeness crab. The Final Environmental Impact Statement Supplement for the project incorporated a Site Monitoring Plan in which a tiered approach to disposal site monitoring was recommended. Under Tier I of the Site Monitoring Plan, Dungeness crab densities are monitored to confirm that large aggregations of newly settled Dungeness crab have not moved onto the Southwest Site. Tier 2 entails an increased sampling effort to determine whether a change in disposal operations is needed. Four epibenthic surveys using beam trawls were conducted in 1990, 1991, and 1992 at the Southwest Site and North Reference area, where high crab concentrations were found in the spring of 1985. Survey results during these three years prompted no Tier 2 activities. Epibenthic surveys were also conducted at two nearshore sites where construction of sediment berms has been proposed. This work is summarized in an appendix to this report.

  7. Characterization of Three mnp Genes of Fomitiporia mediterranea and Report of Additional Class II Peroxidases in the Order Hymenochaetales ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Morgenstern, Ingo; Robertson, Deborah L.; Hibbett, David S.

    2010-01-01

    We report the sequence-based characterization and expression patterns of three manganese peroxidase genes from the white rot fungus and grape vine pathogen Fomitiporia mediterranea (Agaricomycotina, Hymenochaetales), termed Fmmnp1, Fmmnp2, and Fmmnp3. The predicted open reading frames (ORFs) are 1,516-, 1,351-, and 1,345-bp long and are interrupted by seven, four, and four introns, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences encode manganese peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.13) containing 371, 369, and 371 residues, respectively, and are similar to the manganese peroxidases of the model white rot organism Phanerochaete chrysosporium. The expression of the genes is most likely differentially regulated, as revealed by real-time PCR analysis. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that other members of the order Hymenochaetales harbor mnp genes encoding proteins that are related only distantly to those of F. mediterranea. Furthermore, multiple partial lip- and mnp-like sequences obtained for Pycnoporus cinnabarinus (Agaricomycotina, Polyporales) suggest that lignin degradation by white rot taxa relies heavily on ligninolytic peroxidases and is not efficiently achieved by laccases only. PMID:20675443

  8. First Report of the Spiral Nematode Rotylenchus incultus (Nematoda: Hoplolaimidae) from Cultivated Olive in Tunisia, with Additional Molecular Data on Rotylenchus eximius

    PubMed Central

    Guesmi-Mzoughi, Ilhem; Archidona-Yuste, Antonio; Cantalapiedra-Navarrete, Carolina; Regaieg, Hajer; Horrigue-Raouani, Najet; Palomares-Rius, Juan E.; Castillo, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Spiral nematode species of the genus Rotylenchus have been reported on olive (Olea europaea L.) in several Mediterranean countries (Castillo et al., 2010; Ali et al., 2014). Nematological surveys for plant-parasitic nematodes on olive trees were carried out in Tunisia between 2013 and 2014, and two nematode species of Rotylenchus were collected from the rhizosphere of olive cv. Chemlali in several localities of Tunisia (Tables 1,2Table 1Rotylenchus eximius Siddiqi, 1964 and R. incultus Sher, 1965 sampled in olive cv. Chemlali in Tunisia and sequences used in this study.Table 2Morphometrics of Rotylenchus incultus Sher, 1965 from olive cv. Chemlali in Tunisia.a). Twenty-two soil samples of 3 to 4 kg were collected with a shovel from the upper 50 cm of soil from arbitrarily chosen olive trees. Nematodes were extracted from 500 cm3 of soil by centrifugal flotation method (Coolen, 1979). Specimens were heat killed by adding hot 4% formaldehyde solution and processed to pure glycerin using the De Grisse’s (1969) method. Measurements were done using a drawing tube attached to a Zeiss III compound microscope. Nematode DNA was extracted from single individuals and PCR assays were conducted as described by Castillo et al. (2003). Moderate-to-low soil populations of these spiral nematodes were detected (5.5–11.5, 1.5–5.0 individuals/500 cm3 of soil, respectively). This prompted us to undertake a detailed morphological and molecular comparative study with previous reported data. Morphological and molecular analyses of females identified these species as Rotylenchus eximius Siddiqi, 1964, and Rotylenchus incultus Sher, 1965. The morphology of R. eximius females (five specimens studied) was characterized by having a hemispherical lip region clearly off set, with four to five annuli, body without longitudinal striations, lateral fields areolated in the pharyngeal region only, stylet 32 to 36 μm long, and broadly rounded tail. The morphology of R. incultus females (51

  9. Analysis of operator participation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarakovskiy, G. M.; Zinchenko, V. P.

    1973-01-01

    The problem of providing a psychological conception of the analysis of operator participation in a form that will allow the qualitative approach to be combined with the quantitative approach is examined. This conception is based on an understanding of the essence of human endeavor in automated control systems that now determine the development of society's productive forces and that are the main object of ergonomic research. Two main types of operator participation were examined; information retrieval with immediate service and information retrieval with delayed service.

  10. Willingness to Participate in Clinical Trials among Patients of Chinese Heritage: A Meta-Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Limkakeng, Alexander; Phadtare, Amruta; Shah, Jatin; Vaghasia, Meenakshi; Wei, Ding Ying; Shah, Anand; Pietrobon, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Background Subjects of Chinese heritage have been found to participate in clinical research at lower rates than other groups despite growing in numbers as a population. While much research has examined research participants' motivation, there has not been a comprehensive synthesis of this information with respect to participants of Chinese descent. We sought to identify the factors that promote and hinder participation in clinical research among participants of Chinese heritage. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a systematic review of the literature in Pubmed, OpenJGATE, SCIRUS, and COCHRANE databases and performed a meta-synthesis of retrieved articles. We extracted qualitative data, such as quotes to identify emerging themes. We identified five studies that met our selection criteria. Of them, only one (1/5) was conducted in China while other studies involved Chinese emigrants in USA (3/5) and Singapore (1/5). Participants from China were similar to emigrants with regard to factors that either promoted or decreased research participation. Four studies reported data exclusively on Chinese subjects. Three of the five studies involved qualitative interviews while the others were conducted using a survey design. Six themes favoring research participation were identified: Personal Benefit to Participants, Financial Incentives, Participant Sense of Altruism, Family or Physician Recommendations, Advertisements, and Convenience to the Participant. Five factors were seen as a barrier to participation in clinical trials: Mistrust of Researchers, Language Barrier, Lack of Financial and Other Support, Cultural and Social Barriers, Lack of Knowledge about Clinical Trials. Conclusions/Significance Chinese heritage clinical research participants value personal benefit, financial incentives, the ability to help others, recommendations of others, advertisements, and convenience when considering clinical research participation. In addition, the establishment of trust and

  11. 7 CFR 1493.30 - Information required for program participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... participation, if any, during the past three years in U.S. Government programs, contracts or agreements; and (6... additional information for consideration by CCC. (d) Ineligibility for program participation. An...

  12. Katimavik Participant Information Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OPCAN, Montreal (Quebec).

    The guide provides prospective participants with an overview of Katimavik, a 9-month community volunteer service and learning program for 17- to 21-year-olds sponsored since 1977 by the Canadian Government. The guide describes the application process and computerized random selection procedures; work projects, which may range from building…

  13. Narrowing Participation Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hand, Victoria; Kirtley, Karmen; Matassa, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Shrinking the achievement gap in mathematics is a tall order. One way to approach this challenge is to think about how the achievement gap manifests itself in the classroom and take concrete action. For example, opportunities to participate in activities that involve mathematical reasoning and argumentation in a safe and supportive manner are…

  14. Participative Decision-Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindelow, John; And Others

    Chapter 6 in a volume on school leadership, this chapter makes a case for the use of participative decision-making (PDM) at the school-site level, outlines guidelines for its implementation, and describes the experiences of some schools with PDM systems. It begins by citing research indicating the advantages of PDM, including better decisions,…

  15. Participative Decision-Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindelow, John; And Others

    Chapter 7 of a revised volume on school leadership, this chapter advocates the use of participative decision-making (PDM) at the school site level, outlines implementation guidelines, and describes the experiences of some schools with PDM systems. A cornerstone of a reform movement to make organizational operations more democratic and less…

  16. Communication Games: Participant's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krupar, Karen R.

    Using a series of communicational games, the author leads the participant through self-awareness, verbal and nonverbal communication, decision-making, problem-solving, and skills in perception, listening, and small group, organizational, and cultural communications. The thesis behind the book is that model-making, role-playing, or other forms of…

  17. Canada's Participation in TIMSS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConaghy, Tom

    1998-01-01

    In the grade 12 portion of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study, Canadian students performed better than other participating G-8 countries. In fact, Canada scored consistently above the international mean for all three age groups tested. However, some educators and reformers have expressed dissatisfaction with these results. (MLH)

  18. Communication between Participants and Non-Participants in Analytical Capacity Building Projects: Management Advice to Family Farms in Benin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouchouse, Marine; Faysse, Nicolas; De Romemont, Aurelle; Moumouni, Ismail; Faure, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Approaches to build farmers' analytical capacities are said to trigger wide-ranging changes. This article reports on the communication process between participants and non-participants in one such approach, related to the technical and management skills learned by participants and the changes these participants subsequently made, and the…

  19. Leisure Activity Participation of Elderly Individuals with Low Vision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinemann, Allen W.

    1988-01-01

    Studied low vision elderly clinic patients (N=63) who reported participation in six categories of leisure activities currently and at onset of vision loss. Found subjects reported significant declines in five of six activity categories. Found prior activity participation was related to current participation only for active crafts, participatory…

  20. Developmental Brain Research with Participants from Underprivileged Communities: Strategies for Recruitment, Participation, and Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habibi, Assal; Sarkissian, Alissa Der; Gomez, Martha; Ilari, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Challenges associated with recruitment and retention of participants from underprivileged social communities, in addition to neuroscience researchers' unfamiliarity with these communities, possibly explain the limited number of individuals from these communities who participate in neuroscience research studies. The consequence is a scarcity of…