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Sample records for additionally semi-structured interviews

  1. The use of semi-structured interviews for the characterisation of farmer irrigation practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keeffe, J.; Buytaert, W.; Mijic, A.; Brozovic, N.; Sinha, R.

    2015-08-01

    Generating information on the behaviours, characteristics and drivers of users, as well on the resource itself, is vital in developing sustainable and realistic water security options. In this paper we present a methodology for collecting qualitative and quantitative data on water use practices through semi-structured interviews. This approach facilitates the collection of detailed information on actors' decisions in a convenient and cost-effective manner. The interview is organised around a topic guide, which helps lead the conversation in a standardised way while allowing sufficient opportunity to identify relevant issues previously unknown to the researcher. In addition, semi-structured interviews can be used to obtain certain types of quantitative data. While not as accurate as direct measurements, it can provide useful information on local practices and farmers' insights. We present an application of the methodology on two districts in the State of Uttar Pradesh in North India. By means of 100 farmer interviews, information was collected on various aspects of irrigation practices, including irrigation water volumes, irrigation cost, water source and their spatial variability. A statistical analysis of the information, along with some data visualisation is also presented, which highlights a significant variation in irrigation practices both within and between the districts. Our application shows that semi-structured interviews are an effective and efficient method of collecting both qualitative and quantitative information for the assessment of drivers, behaviours and their outcomes in a data scarce region. The collection of this type of data could significantly improve insight on water resources, leading to more realistic management options and increased water security in the future.

  2. How I Learned to Design and Conduct Semi-Structured Interviews: An Ongoing and Continuous Journey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabionet, Silvia E.

    2011-01-01

    Qualitative interviewing is a flexible and powerful tool to capture the voices and the ways people make meaning of their experience Learning to conduct semi-structure interviews requires the following six stages: (a) selecting the type of interview; (b) establishing ethical guidelines, (c) crafting the interview protocol; (d) conducting and…

  3. The use of semi-structured interviews for the characterisation of farmer irrigation practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keeffe, Jimmy; Buytaert, Wouter; Mijic, Ana; Brozović, Nicholas; Sinha, Rajiv

    2016-05-01

    For the development of sustainable and realistic water security, generating information on the behaviours, characteristics, and drivers of users, as well as on the resource itself, is essential. In this paper we present a methodology for collecting qualitative and quantitative data on water use practices through semi-structured interviews. This approach facilitates the collection of detailed information on actors' decisions in a convenient and cost-effective manner. Semi-structured interviews are organised around a topic guide, which helps lead the conversation in a standardised way while allowing sufficient opportunity for relevant issues to emerge. In addition, they can be used to obtain certain types of quantitative data. While not as accurate as direct measurements, they can provide useful information on local practices and users' insights. We present an application of the methodology on farmer water use in two districts in the state of Uttar Pradesh in northern India. By means of 100 farmer interviews, information was collected on various aspects of irrigation practices, including irrigation water volumes, irrigation cost, water source, and their spatial variability. Statistical analyses of the information, along with data visualisation, are also presented, indicating a significant variation in irrigation practices both within and between districts. Our application shows that semi-structured interviews are an effective and efficient method of collecting both qualitative and quantitative information for the assessment of drivers, behaviours, and their outcomes in a data-scarce region. The collection of this type of data could significantly improve insights on water resources, leading to more realistic management options and increased water security in the future.

  4. Rationale and procedures for nesting semi-structured interviews in surveys or censuses.

    PubMed

    Schatz, Enid

    2012-07-01

    Demographers who use survey data and census data from health and demographic surveillance areas can gain substantially from expanding their repertoire of methods to make use of qualitative methods. Similarly, those who conduct and analyse data primarily from semi-structured interviews or focus groups can benefit from information provided by survey research. This paper presents a systematic mixed-methods model-data-linked nested studies-for sampling respondents for semi-structured interviews from survey or census lists. The paper outlines how to conduct these types of study, and their technical and analytical advantages. It highlights the benefits of building on a strong foundation, the ability to compare samples, and the expansion of the range of evidence for, or against, the validity of the substantive findings. Case studies from two data-linked nested projects-in Malawi and South Africa-are used to describe in detail the nested-study approach.

  5. Assessment of Semi-Structured Clinical Interview for Mobile Phone Addiction Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Seyyed Salman; Jannatifard, Fereshteh; Mohammadi Kalhori, Soroush; Sepahbodi, Ghazal; BabaReisi, Mohammad; Sajedi, Sahar; Farshchi, Mojtaba; KhodaKarami, Rasul; Hatami Kasvaee, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) classified mobile phone addiction disorder under “impulse control disorder not elsewhere classified”. This study surveyed the diagnostic criteria of DSM-IV-TR for the diagnosis of mobile phone addiction in correspondence with Iranian society and culture. Method: Two hundred fifty students of Tehran universities were entered into this descriptive-analytical and cross-sectional study. Quota sampling method was used. At first, semi- structured clinical interview (based on DSM-IV-TR) was performed for all the cases, and another specialist reevaluated the interviews. Data were analyzed using content validity, inter-scorer reliability (Kappa coefficient) and test-retest via SPSS18 software. Results: The content validity of the semi- structured clinical interview matched the DSM–IV-TR criteria for behavioral addiction. Moreover, their content was appropriate, and two items, including “SMS pathological use” and “High monthly cost of using the mobile phone” were added to promote its validity. Internal reliability (Kappa) and test–retest reliability were 0.55 and r = 0.4 (p<0. 01) respectively. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that semi- structured diagnostic criteria of DSM-IV-TR are valid and reliable for diagnosing mobile phone addiction, and this instrument is an effective tool to diagnose this disorder. PMID:27437008

  6. Hospital pharmacists seen through the eyes of physicians: qualitative semi-structured interviews.

    PubMed

    Béchet, Clare; Pichon, Renaud; Giordan, André; Bonnabry, Pascal

    2016-12-01

    Background Pharmacist-physician collaboration can lead to many positive outcomes. However, collaboration between healthcare providers is complex and rarely performed optimally. Objectives To study physician-pharmacist collaboration in hospital settings, from the physician's point of view. Setting Eight regional non-teaching hospital facilities, within a local area of northwest Switzerland, supplied by an independent central pharmacy. Method Physicians were sampled using a maximal variation purposive method. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted and their content was recorded. Mind maps were made with the collected data. An inductive approach was used for the analysis. Main outcome measure Physicians' main perceptions of hospital pharmacists. Results Twelve physicians and one medical student were interviewed (average interview length 37 min). Key opinions (n ≥ 7) include the following: physicians lack knowledge about hospital pharmacists' roles, competences and activities. Physicians report a lack of presence and involvement of hospital pharmacists. Although physicians value hospital pharmacists' complementary competences, they also point out a knowledge gap between them and that hospital pharmacists lack clinical competences. Some pharmaceutical activities (e.g. drug formulary management or participation in ward rounds) lead to significant drawbacks for physicians. Other pharmaceutical activities (e.g. teaching and supervision) are valued and sought for by physicians. Physicians report they take drug treatment decisions as they bear the legal responsibility. Conclusion The presence, visibility and implication of hospital pharmacists need to be improved, and physicians should be more aware of what they can offer them. Physicians' expectations and needs should be taken further into consideration and new models of interaction should be developed.

  7. Barriers to administering non-oral formulations in a paediatric population: A semi-structured interview study.

    PubMed

    Venables, Rebecca; Batchelor, Hannah; Stirling, Heather; Marriott, John

    2016-01-30

    There is a paucity of research exploring barriers to non-oral medicines administration in paediatric patients; however, these undoubtedly influence medicines adherence. Studies conducted with healthcare professionals have identified various issues with the administration and acceptance of non-oral medicines and devices (Venables et al., 2012; Walsh et al., 2015). EMA (2014) guidelines specify that formulation teams should demonstrate 'acceptability' of paediatric formulations when developing pharmaceutical formulations. Semi-structured interviews exploring barriers to administering non-oral medicines were conducted with young persons and the parents/legal guardians of children (0-17 years) with chronic conditions at the University Hospital of Coventry and Warwickshire, UK. 90 children prescribed a total of 148 non-oral medicines were recruited to the study; 88 barriers to administering non-oral medicines were reported. The most commonly reported barriers were: poor acceptance of face mask/difficulties with spacer for inhaled formulations (38% of reports); disliking parenteral/preferring alternative formulations (38% of reports); greasy texture of topical preparations; difficulty with administering an ocular ointment and the large dose volume of a nasal preparation. Formulation teams should consider the use of child-friendly, age-appropriate designs to improve usability and acceptance, thus medicines adherence. These findings should be used to inform future development of non-oral formulations and devices, suitable in terms of safety, efficacy and acceptability to paediatric patients.

  8. The use of semi-structured interviews for collection of qualitative and quantitative data in hydrological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keeffe, Jimmy; Buytaert, Wouter; Mijic, Ana; Brozovic, Nicholas

    2015-04-01

    To build an accurate, robust understanding of the environment, it is important to not only collect information describing its physical characteristics, but also the drivers which influence it. As environmental change, from increasing CO2 levels to decreasing water levels, is often heavily influenced by human activity, gathering information on anthropogenic as well as environmental variables is extremely important. This can mean collecting qualitative, as well as quantitative information. In reality studies are often bound by financial and time constraints, limiting the depth and detail of the research. It is up to the researcher to determine what the best methodology to answer the research questions is likely to be. Here we present a methodology of collecting qualitative and quantitative information in tandem for hydrological studies through the use of semi-structured interviews. This is applied to a case study in two districts of Uttar Pradesh, North India, one of the most intensely irrigated areas of the world. Here, decreasing water levels exacerbated by unchecked water abstraction, an expanding population and government subsidies, have put the long term resilience of the farming population in doubt. Through random selection of study locations, combined with convenience sampling of the participants therein, we show how the data collected can provide valuable insight into the drivers which have led to the current water scenario. We also show how reliable quantitative information can, using the same methodology, be effectively and efficiently extracted for modelling purposes, which along with developing an understanding of the characteristics of the environment is vital in coming up with realistic and sustainable solutions for water resource management in the future.

  9. Students' exposure and career aspirations in ecology: A study using semi-structured interviews to gain knowledge of public school students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Heather C.

    Ecology as a field is dominated by white males, McCarter (2003) has noted that women and minorities are underrepresented in the discipline of ecology across the United States. The contribution of this research is to assess and quantify, in a scientific manner, students' exposure, and career aspirations towards ecology; 226 student responses were coded from semi-structured interviews. The main objectives of this study, using student interviews, were the following: (1) assess the importance of exposure to ecology and ecological related topics to: gender, ethnicity, region, grades in science, grades in non-science, grade level, and interest in ecology career. (2) determine if early exposure to ecology (i.e. gained in high school) and ecological related topics is related to an increased interest of students continuing in an ecologically related field and (3) assess if high school students who have been involved in more outdoor related activities such as camping, hiking, hunting, and/or fishing, will be more likely to be interested in an ecological career. Overall, the results indicated that students interviewed for this study generally responded in a positive manner, and were generally interested in ecology. Some students were even interested in pursuing a career in ecology. The study revealed significant differences in the exposure of ecology between school locations, girls and boys, and whites and non-whites. The results of this research and avenues for future research are discussed.

  10. Assessing DSM-5-oriented level of personality functioning: Development and psychometric evaluation of the Semi-Structured Interview for Personality Functioning DSM-5 (STiP-5.1).

    PubMed

    Hutsebaut, Joost; Kamphuis, Jan H; Feenstra, Dine J; Weekers, Laura C; De Saeger, Hilde

    2017-01-01

    The alternative model for personality disorders (AMPD) in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) features a Level of Personality Functioning Scale, measuring intrinsic personality processes that include identity, self-direction, empathy, and intimacy. This study describes the development and psychometric evaluation of a semistructured interview schedule for the multi-item assessment of the level of personality functioning, the Semi-Structured Interview for Personality Functioning DSM-5 (STiP-5.1). Eighty patients and 18 community subjects completed the STiP-5.1. Patients additionally completed the Brief Symptom Inventory, the Severity Indices of Personality Problems, and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I and Axis II Personality Disorders. Good interrater reliability was observed in subsamples of patients (n = 40) and nonpatients (n = 18). Associations between the interview scores and conceptually relevant external measures consistently supported the construct validity of the instrument. The STiP-5.1 thus offers a brief, relatively user-friendly instrument with generally favorable psychometric properties for the assessment of level of personality functioning of the DSM-5 AMPD. (PsycINFO Database Record

  11. Measuring current drug use in female sex workers and their non-commercial male partners in Mexico: Concordance between data collected from surveys versus semi-structured interviews

    PubMed Central

    Bazzi, Angela Robertson; Syvertsen, Jennifer L; Ulibarri, Monica D; Hernandez, Daniel; Rangel, Gudelia; Martinez, Gustavo; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2016-01-01

    Background Self-reports are commonly used to assess prevalence and frequency of drug use, but it is unclear whether qualitative methods like semi-structured interviews are as useful at obtaining such information as quantitative surveys. Objectives This study compared drug use occurrence and frequency using data collected from quantitative surveys and qualitative interviews. We also examined whether combining data from both sources could result in significant increases in percentages of current users and whether the concordance between the two sets of data was associated with the type of drug use, age, gender and socioeconomic status. Methods Self- reports of recent marijuana, heroin, crack, cocaine, crystal/methamphetamine, inhalant, and tranquilizer use were collected using both methods from a cohort of Mexican female sex workers and their non-commercial male partners (n = 82). Results Participants were significantly less likely to report marijuana, cocaine and tranquilizer use and frequency of use during the qualitative interviews than during the quantitative surveys. Agreement on frequency of drug use was excellent for crystal/methamphetamine, heroin and inhalant use, and weak for cocaine, tranquilizers and marijuana use. Older participants exhibited significantly higher concordance than younger participants in reports of marijuana and methamphetamine use. Higher monthly income was significantly associated with higher concordance in crack use but lower concordance with marijuana use. Conclusions Although use of such data can result in an underreporting of drug use, qualitative data can be quantified in certain circumstances to triangulate and confirm the results from quantitative analyses and provide a more comprehensive view of drug use. PMID:26683591

  12. Reliability and validity of a semi-structured DSM-based diagnostic interview module for the assessment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in adult psychiatric outpatients.

    PubMed

    Gorlin, Eugenia I; Dalrymple, Kristy; Chelminski, Iwona; Zimmerman, Mark

    2016-08-30

    Despite growing recognition that the symptoms and functional impairments of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) persist into adulthood, only a few psychometrically sound diagnostic measures have been developed for the assessment of ADHD in adults, and none have been validated for use in a broad treatment-seeking psychiatric sample. The current study presents the reliability and validity of a semi-structured DSM-based diagnostic interview module for ADHD, which was administered to 1194 adults presenting to an outpatient psychiatric practice. The module showed excellent internal consistency and interrater reliability, good convergent and discriminant validity (as indexed by relatively high correlations with self-report measures of ADHD and ADHD-related constructs and little or no correlation with other, non-ADHD symptom domains), and good construct validity (as indexed by significantly higher rates of psychosocial impairment and self-reported family history of ADHD in individuals who meet criteria for an ADHD diagnosis). This instrument is thus a reliable and valid diagnostic tool for the detection of ADHD in adults presenting for psychiatric evaluation and treatment.

  13. Engaging new migrants in infectious disease screening: a qualitative semi-structured interview study of UK migrant community health-care leads.

    PubMed

    Seedat, Farah; Hargreaves, Sally; Friedland, Jonathan S

    2014-01-01

    Migration to Europe - and in particular the UK - has risen dramatically in the past decades, with implications for public health services. Migrants have increased vulnerability to infectious diseases (70% of TB cases and 60% HIV cases are in migrants) and face multiple barriers to healthcare. There is currently considerable debate as to the optimum approach to infectious disease screening in this often hard-to-reach group, and an urgent need for innovative approaches. Little research has focused on the specific experience of new migrants, nor sought their views on ways forward. We undertook a qualitative semi-structured interview study of migrant community health-care leads representing dominant new migrant groups in London, UK, to explore their views around barriers to screening, acceptability of screening, and innovative approaches to screening for four key diseases (HIV, TB, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C). Participants unanimously agreed that current screening models are not perceived to be widely accessible to new migrant communities. Dominant barriers that discourage uptake of screening include disease-related stigma present in their own communities and services being perceived as non-migrant friendly. New migrants are likely to be disproportionately affected by these barriers, with implications for health status. Screening is certainly acceptable to new migrants, however, services need to be developed to become more community-based, proactive, and to work more closely with community organisations; findings that mirror the views of migrants and health-care providers in Europe and internationally. Awareness raising about the benefits of screening within new migrant communities is critical. One innovative approach proposed by participants is a community-based package of health screening combining all key diseases into one general health check-up, to lessen the associated stigma. Further research is needed to develop evidence-based community-focused screening

  14. Engaging New Migrants in Infectious Disease Screening: A Qualitative Semi-Structured Interview Study of UK Migrant Community Health-Care Leads

    PubMed Central

    Seedat, Farah; Hargreaves, Sally; Friedland, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    Migration to Europe - and in particular the UK - has risen dramatically in the past decades, with implications for public health services. Migrants have increased vulnerability to infectious diseases (70% of TB cases and 60% HIV cases are in migrants) and face multiple barriers to healthcare. There is currently considerable debate as to the optimum approach to infectious disease screening in this often hard-to-reach group, and an urgent need for innovative approaches. Little research has focused on the specific experience of new migrants, nor sought their views on ways forward. We undertook a qualitative semi-structured interview study of migrant community health-care leads representing dominant new migrant groups in London, UK, to explore their views around barriers to screening, acceptability of screening, and innovative approaches to screening for four key diseases (HIV, TB, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C). Participants unanimously agreed that current screening models are not perceived to be widely accessible to new migrant communities. Dominant barriers that discourage uptake of screening include disease-related stigma present in their own communities and services being perceived as non-migrant friendly. New migrants are likely to be disproportionately affected by these barriers, with implications for health status. Screening is certainly acceptable to new migrants, however, services need to be developed to become more community-based, proactive, and to work more closely with community organisations; findings that mirror the views of migrants and health-care providers in Europe and internationally. Awareness raising about the benefits of screening within new migrant communities is critical. One innovative approach proposed by participants is a community-based package of health screening combining all key diseases into one general health check-up, to lessen the associated stigma. Further research is needed to develop evidence-based community-focused screening

  15. Strengths and weaknesses of Global Positioning System (GPS) data-loggers and semi-structured interviews for capturing fine-scale human mobility: findings from Iquitos, Peru.

    PubMed

    Paz-Soldan, Valerie A; Reiner, Robert C; Morrison, Amy C; Stoddard, Steven T; Kitron, Uriel; Scott, Thomas W; Elder, John P; Halsey, Eric S; Kochel, Tadeusz J; Astete, Helvio; Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M

    2014-06-01

    Quantifying human mobility has significant consequences for studying physical activity, exposure to pathogens, and generating more realistic infectious disease models. Location-aware technologies such as Global Positioning System (GPS)-enabled devices are used increasingly as a gold standard for mobility research. The main goal of this observational study was to compare and contrast the information obtained through GPS and semi-structured interviews (SSI) to assess issues affecting data quality and, ultimately, our ability to measure fine-scale human mobility. A total of 160 individuals, ages 7 to 74, from Iquitos, Peru, were tracked using GPS data-loggers for 14 days and later interviewed using the SSI about places they visited while tracked. A total of 2,047 and 886 places were reported in the SSI and identified by GPS, respectively. Differences in the concordance between methods occurred by location type, distance threshold (within a given radius to be considered a match) selected, GPS data collection frequency (i.e., 30, 90 or 150 seconds) and number of GPS points near the SSI place considered to define a match. Both methods had perfect concordance identifying each participant's house, followed by 80-100% concordance for identifying schools and lodgings, and 50-80% concordance for residences and commercial and religious locations. As the distance threshold selected increased, the concordance between SSI and raw GPS data increased (beyond 20 meters most locations reached their maximum concordance). Processing raw GPS data using a signal-clustering algorithm decreased overall concordance to 14.3%. The most common causes of discordance as described by a sub-sample (n=101) with whom we followed-up were GPS units being accidentally off (30%), forgetting or purposely not taking the units when leaving home (24.8%), possible barriers to the signal (4.7%) and leaving units home to recharge (4.6%). We provide a quantitative assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of

  16. Strengths and Weaknesses of Global Positioning System (GPS) Data-Loggers and Semi-structured Interviews for Capturing Fine-scale Human Mobility: Findings from Iquitos, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Paz-Soldan, Valerie A.; Reiner, Robert C.; Morrison, Amy C.; Stoddard, Steven T.; Kitron, Uriel; Scott, Thomas W.; Elder, John P.; Halsey, Eric S.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.; Astete, Helvio; Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M.

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying human mobility has significant consequences for studying physical activity, exposure to pathogens, and generating more realistic infectious disease models. Location-aware technologies such as Global Positioning System (GPS)-enabled devices are used increasingly as a gold standard for mobility research. The main goal of this observational study was to compare and contrast the information obtained through GPS and semi-structured interviews (SSI) to assess issues affecting data quality and, ultimately, our ability to measure fine-scale human mobility. A total of 160 individuals, ages 7 to 74, from Iquitos, Peru, were tracked using GPS data-loggers for 14 days and later interviewed using the SSI about places they visited while tracked. A total of 2,047 and 886 places were reported in the SSI and identified by GPS, respectively. Differences in the concordance between methods occurred by location type, distance threshold (within a given radius to be considered a match) selected, GPS data collection frequency (i.e., 30, 90 or 150 seconds) and number of GPS points near the SSI place considered to define a match. Both methods had perfect concordance identifying each participant's house, followed by 80–100% concordance for identifying schools and lodgings, and 50–80% concordance for residences and commercial and religious locations. As the distance threshold selected increased, the concordance between SSI and raw GPS data increased (beyond 20 meters most locations reached their maximum concordance). Processing raw GPS data using a signal-clustering algorithm decreased overall concordance to 14.3%. The most common causes of discordance as described by a sub-sample (n = 101) with whom we followed-up were GPS units being accidentally off (30%), forgetting or purposely not taking the units when leaving home (24.8%), possible barriers to the signal (4.7%) and leaving units home to recharge (4.6%). We provide a quantitative assessment of the strengths and

  17. ‘Not Until I'm Absolutely Half-Dead and Have To:’ Accounting for Non-Use of Antiretroviral Therapy in Semi-Structured Interviews with People Living with HIV in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Limin; Persson, Asha; Holt, Martin; Slavin, Sean; Kidd, Michael R.; Post, Jeffrey J.; Wright, Edwina; de Wit, John

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Current debates regarding the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) to promote both individual- and population-level health benefits underscore the importance of understanding why a subpopulation of people with diagnosed HIV and access to treatment choose not to use it. Semi-structured interviews were conducted between 2012 and 2014 with 27 people living with HIV in Australia who were not using ART at the time of interview. Analytic triangulation permitted an appreciation of not only the varied personal reasons for non-use of treatment, but also underlying views on HIV treatment, and the ideal conditions imagined necessary for treatment initiation. Policy goals to increase the number of people with HIV using ART must recognize the diverse explanations for non-use of ART, which include concerns about the various impacts of committing to lifelong pharmaceutical treatment use. Our research identified distinctive subgroups among people who are not using antiretroviral therapy, with a range of individual and social needs that may affect treatment decisions. These findings challenge assumptions about treatment non-use in resource-rich settings, revealing persistent consumer fears about the potent and unknown effects of HIV medications that deserve greater recognition in policy debate on treatment uptake. PMID:25806574

  18. Querying Semi-Structured Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abiteboul, Serge

    1997-01-01

    The amount of data of all kinds available electronically has increased dramatically in recent years. The data resides in different forms, ranging from unstructured data in the systems to highly structured in relational database systems. Data is accessible through a variety of interfaces including Web browsers, database query languages, application-specic interfaces, or data exchange formats. Some of this data is raw data, e.g., images or sound. Some of it has structure even if the structure is often implicit, and not as rigid or regular as that found in standard database systems. Sometimes the structure exists but has to be extracted from the data. Sometimes also it exists but we prefer to ignore it for certain purposes such as browsing. We call here semi-structured data this data that is (from a particular viewpoint) neither raw data nor strictly typed, i.e., not table-oriented as in a relational model or sorted-graph as in object databases. As will seen later when the notion of semi-structured data is more precisely de ned, the need for semi-structured data arises naturally in the context of data integration, even when the data sources are themselves well-structured. Although data integration is an old topic, the need to integrate a wider variety of data- formats (e.g., SGML or ASN.1 data) and data found on the Web has brought the topic of semi-structured data to the forefront of research. The main purpose of the paper is to isolate the essential aspects of semi- structured data. We also survey some proposals of models and query languages for semi-structured data. In particular, we consider recent works at Stanford U. and U. Penn on semi-structured data. In both cases, the motivation is found in the integration of heterogeneous data.

  19. Data Collection Methods. Semi-Structured Interviews and Focus Groups

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    like? P5: I usually study in the library. I can’t study in my dorm room because my roommate is always playing video games or playing guitar . It’s...Study. Can’t in dorm rm - rmmate playing vid. games/ guitar . Distracting. Go 4 quiet. M - Usu. trip/length stay? 8 - Depends. stay betw 10...I can’t study in my dorm room because my roommate is always playing video games or his guitar , so it’s too distracting there. So I go to the

  20. Interviews in qualitative research.

    PubMed

    Peters, Kath; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2015-03-01

    Interviews are a common method of data collection in nursing research. They are frequently used alone in a qualitative study or combined with other data collection methods in mixed or multi-method research. Semi-structured interviews, where the researcher has some predefined questions or topics but then probes further as the participant responds, can produce powerful data that provide insights into the participants' experiences, perceptions or opinions.

  1. Tips for a physician in getting the right job, part VIII: additional types of questions during an executive interview.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay A

    2014-03-01

    The applicant for an administrative position may be asked situational and stress questions on an interview. Some possible questions and answers for these types of queries are included in this article. In addition, the candidate may be required to answer some odd or unusual questions to test his/her ability to be creative or respond to an unexpected question. Some suggestions regarding those queries are also given in this article.

  2. Performance on Addition and Subtraction Problems: Results from Individual Interviews - Sandy Bay Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romberg, Thomas A.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to relate children's cognitive processing capabilities and their grade level to their performance and to the strategies they used when working addition and subtraction problems. From two sets of data which assessed memory capacity and cognitive processing capacities, six groups of children with different cognitive…

  3. Semi-structured meshes for axial turbomachinery blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbardella, L.; Sayma, A. I.; Imregun, M.

    2000-03-01

    This paper describes the development and application of a novel mesh generator for the flow analysis of turbomachinery blades. The proposed method uses a combination of structured and unstructured meshes, the former in the radial direction and the latter in the axial and tangential directions, in order to exploit the fact that blade-like structures are not strongly three-dimensional since the radial variation is usually small. The proposed semi-structured mesh formulation was found to have a number of advantages over its structured counterparts. There is a significant improvement in the smoothness of the grid spacing and also in capturing particular aspects of the blade passage geometry. It was also found that the leading- and trailing-edge regions could be discretized without generating superfluous points in the far field, and that further refinements of the mesh to capture wake and shock effects were relatively easy to implement. The capability of the method is demonstrated in the case of a transonic fan blade for which the steady state flow is predicted using both structured and semi-structured meshes. A totally unstructured mesh is also generated for the same geometry to illustrate the disadvantages of using such an approach for turbomachinery blades. Copyright

  4. SEMCARE: Multilingual Semantic Search in Semi-Structured Clinical Data.

    PubMed

    López-García, Pablo; Kreuzthaler, Markus; Schulz, Stefan; Scherr, Daniel; Daumke, Philipp; Markó, Kornél; Kors, Jan A; van Mulligen, Erik M; Wang, Xinkai; Gonna, Hanney; Behr, Elijah; Honrado, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    The vast amount of clinical data in electronic health records constitutes a great potential for secondary use. However, most of this content consists of unstructured or semi-structured texts, which is difficult to process. Several challenges are still pending: medical language idiosyncrasies in different natural languages, and the large variety of medical terminology systems. In this paper we present SEMCARE, a European initiative designed to minimize these problems by providing a multi-lingual platform (English, German, and Dutch) that allows users to express complex queries and obtain relevant search results from clinical texts. SEMCARE is based on a selection of adapted biomedical terminologies, together with Apache UIMA and Apache Solr as open source state-of-the-art natural language pipeline and indexing technologies. SEMCARE has been deployed and is currently being tested at three medical institutions in the UK, Austria, and the Netherlands, showing promising results in a cardiology use case.

  5. Interviewing to develop Patient-Reported Outcome (PRO) measures for clinical research: eliciting patients' experience.

    PubMed

    Brédart, Anne; Marrel, Alexia; Abetz-Webb, Linda; Lasch, Kathy; Acquadro, Catherine

    2014-02-05

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures must provide evidence that their development followed a rigorous process for ensuring their content validity. To this end, the collection of data is performed through qualitative interviews that allow for the elicitation of in-depth spontaneous reports of the patients' experiences with their condition and/or its treatment. This paper provides a review of qualitative research applied to PRO measure development. A clear definition of what is a qualitative research interview is given as well as information about the form and content of qualitative interviews required for developing PRO measures. Particular attention is paid to the description of interviewing approaches (e.g., semi-structured and in-depth interviews, individual vs. focus group interviews). Information about how to get prepared for a qualitative interview is provided with the description of how to develop discussion guides for exploratory or cognitive interviews. Interviewing patients to obtain knowledge regarding their illness experience requires interpersonal and communication skills to facilitate patients' expression. Those skills are described in details, as well as the skills needed to facilitate focus groups and to interview children, adolescents and the elderly. Special attention is also given to quality assurance and interview training. The paper ends on ethical considerations since interviewing for the development of PROs is performed in a context of illness and vulnerability. Therefore, it is all the more important that, in addition to soliciting informed consent, respectful interactions be ensured throughout the interview process.

  6. Interviewing to develop Patient-Reported Outcome (PRO) measures for clinical research: eliciting patients’ experience

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures must provide evidence that their development followed a rigorous process for ensuring their content validity. To this end, the collection of data is performed through qualitative interviews that allow for the elicitation of in-depth spontaneous reports of the patients’ experiences with their condition and/or its treatment. This paper provides a review of qualitative research applied to PRO measure development. A clear definition of what is a qualitative research interview is given as well as information about the form and content of qualitative interviews required for developing PRO measures. Particular attention is paid to the description of interviewing approaches (e.g., semi-structured and in-depth interviews, individual vs. focus group interviews). Information about how to get prepared for a qualitative interview is provided with the description of how to develop discussion guides for exploratory or cognitive interviews. Interviewing patients to obtain knowledge regarding their illness experience requires interpersonal and communication skills to facilitate patients’ expression. Those skills are described in details, as well as the skills needed to facilitate focus groups and to interview children, adolescents and the elderly. Special attention is also given to quality assurance and interview training. The paper ends on ethical considerations since interviewing for the development of PROs is performed in a context of illness and vulnerability. Therefore, it is all the more important that, in addition to soliciting informed consent, respectful interactions be ensured throughout the interview process. PMID:24499454

  7. Mixing Interview and Questionnaire Methods: Practical Problems in Aligning Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Lois R.; Brown, Gavin T. L.

    2010-01-01

    Structured questionnaires and semi-structured interviews are often used in mixed method studies to generate confirmatory results despite differences in methods of data collection, analysis, and interpretation. A review of 19 questionnaire-interview comparison studies found that consensus and consistency statistics were generally weak between…

  8. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  9. Affinity+: Semi-Structured Brainstorming on Large Displays

    SciTech Connect

    Burtner, Edwin R.; May, Richard A.; Scarberry, Randall E.; LaMothe, Ryan R.; Endert, Alexander

    2013-04-27

    Affinity diagraming is a powerful method for encouraging and capturing lateral thinking in a group environment. The Affinity+ Concept was designed to improve the collaborative brainstorm process through the use of large display surfaces in conjunction with mobile devices like smart phones and tablets. The system works by capturing the ideas digitally and allowing users to sort and group them on a large touch screen manually. Additionally, Affinity+ incorporates theme detection, topic clustering, and other processing algorithms that help bring structured analytic techniques to the process without requiring explicit leadership roles and other overhead typically involved in these activities.

  10. Interviewing Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenzen, Elizabeth A.; And Others

    Directed especially at graduating college seniors, this paper contains information about employment interviews and how to prepare for them. Subjects discussed include the following: preparing for interviews (analyzing strengths and weaknesses, gathering information about the company); points to remember (dress codes, follow up thank-you letters);…

  11. Personal Social Networks and the Cultivation of Expertise in Magic: An Interview Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rissanen, Olli; Palonen, Tuire; Pitkänen, Petteri; Kuhn, Gustav; Hakkarainen, Kai

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine expertise in magic by interviewing 16 prominent Finnish magicians who were identified earlier through a social network analysis of 120 Finnish magicians. A semi-structured interview was administered that addressed the participants' histories; their relationship to magic, the nature of their…

  12. An Algorithm of Semi-structured Data Scheme Extraction Based on OEM Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, An; Yang, Xue-Wei

    In order to get the target model of semi-structured data rapidly, effectively and accurately, by combining the related nature of label path in the paper, this paper proposes an algorithm that can extract target model from the OEM model of semi-structured data directly. The basic idea of the Algorithm is: Using a Depth_First Search to get all of the label path expressions, with the help of the nature2 in this paper can reducing the number of path matching, we can generate all frequent label path expressions by layer. Finally, with the strategy of deletion we can get all of the longest frequent label path expressions effectively. Theoretical analysis and Experimental result shows that this algorithm can improve the accuracy of target model and reduce the size of candidate sets in pattern extraction.

  13. An Extensible Schema-less Database Framework for Managing High-throughput Semi-Structured Documents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maluf, David A.; Tran, Peter B.; La, Tracy; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Object-Relational database management system is an integrated hybrid cooperative approach to combine the best practices of both the relational model utilizing SQL queries and the object oriented, semantic paradigm for supporting complex data creation. In this paper, a highly scalable, information on demand database framework, called NETMARK is introduced. NETMARK takes advantages of the Oracle 8i object-relational database using physical addresses data types for very efficient keyword searches of records for both context and content. NETMARK was originally developed in early 2000 as a research and development prototype to solve the vast amounts of unstructured and semi-structured documents existing within NASA enterprises. Today, NETMARK is a flexible, high throughput open database framework for managing, storing, and searching unstructured or semi structured arbitrary hierarchal models, XML and HTML.

  14. NETMARK: A Schema-less Extension for Relational Databases for Managing Semi-structured Data Dynamically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maluf, David A.; Tran, Peter B.

    2003-01-01

    Object-Relational database management system is an integrated hybrid cooperative approach to combine the best practices of both the relational model utilizing SQL queries and the object-oriented, semantic paradigm for supporting complex data creation. In this paper, a highly scalable, information on demand database framework, called NETMARK, is introduced. NETMARK takes advantages of the Oracle 8i object-relational database using physical addresses data types for very efficient keyword search of records spanning across both context and content. NETMARK was originally developed in early 2000 as a research and development prototype to solve the vast amounts of unstructured and semi-structured documents existing within NASA enterprises. Today, NETMARK is a flexible, high-throughput open database framework for managing, storing, and searching unstructured or semi-structured arbitrary hierarchal models, such as XML and HTML.

  15. TagLine: Information Extraction for Semi-Structured Text in Medical Progress Notes.

    PubMed

    Finch, Dezon K; McCart, James A; Luther, Stephen L

    2014-01-01

    Statistical text mining and natural language processing have been shown to be effective for extracting useful information from medical documents. However, neither technique is effective at extracting the information stored in semi-structure text elements. A prototype system (TagLine) was developed to extract information from the semi-structured text using machine learning and a rule based annotator. Features for the learning machine were suggested by prior work, and by examining text, and selecting attributes that help distinguish classes of text lines. Classes were derived empirically from text and guided by an ontology developed by the VHA's Consortium for Health Informatics Research (CHIR). Decision trees were evaluated for class predictions on 15,103 lines of text achieved an overall accuracy of 98.5 percent. The class labels applied to the lines were then used for annotating semi-structured text elements. TagLine achieved F-measure over 0.9 for each of the structures, which included tables, slots and fillers.

  16. Weapons of the Spirit, Transcript of the Feature Documentary. Bill Moyers Interviews Filmmaker Pierre Sauvage, Transcript of the P. B. S. Broadcast, and Additional Background Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauvage, Pierre

    This documentary tells the wartime story of Le Chambon, a tiny Protestant village in France that defied the Nazi occupation and provided a safe haven for thousands of Jews. Using interviews, old photographs and footage, and specially declassified documents, the film [and transcript] examine the difference between being a bystander and a…

  17. Positioning identity in clinical interviews with people who stutter.

    PubMed

    Guendouzi, Jackie; Williams, Mandy J

    2010-01-01

    Clinicians often rely on ethnographic interviews to make judgments about the effect of stuttering on the lives of people who stutter. This form of interview aids the clinician in assessing specific dimensions of the client's life (e.g. career choice, education, etc.) that might be impacted by dysfluency. Further, the information gathered from ethnographic interviews is used to make professional judgments relating to the client's personality type and behavioral traits. This study used methods associated with discursive psychology to examine data taken from two ethnographic interviews between a clinician and two people who stuttered. The interviews were semi-structured and used probe questions to elicit the participants' viewpoints about the effects of stuttering on their lives. Data taken from the interviews were then examined to investigate the subject positions participants discursively aligned to within their accounts. We discuss the implications of making clinical judgments regarding a client's identity from such interviews.

  18. Compatibility of the Relationship of Early Recollections and Life Style with Parent Schemas Obtained through Adlerian Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canel, Azize Nilgün

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the Adlerian Interview Form has been used as a semi-structured, in-depth interview method to identify the experiences of six participants regarding Adler's concepts of early recollections and life style. Subsequent to transcribing the obtained information, recollections to be included in the analysis were subjected to the criterion…

  19. An Extensible "SCHEMA-LESS" Database Framework for Managing High-Throughput Semi-Structured Documents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maluf, David A.; Tran, Peter B.

    2003-01-01

    Object-Relational database management system is an integrated hybrid cooperative approach to combine the best practices of both the relational model utilizing SQL queries and the object-oriented, semantic paradigm for supporting complex data creation. In this paper, a highly scalable, information on demand database framework, called NETMARK, is introduced. NETMARK takes advantages of the Oracle 8i object-relational database using physical addresses data types for very efficient keyword search of records spanning across both context and content. NETMARK was originally developed in early 2000 as a research and development prototype to solve the vast amounts of unstructured and semistructured documents existing within NASA enterprises. Today, NETMARK is a flexible, high-throughput open database framework for managing, storing, and searching unstructured or semi-structured arbitrary hierarchal models, such as XML and HTML.

  20. EXTENSIBLE DATABASE FRAMEWORK FOR MANAGEMENT OF UNSTRUCTURED AND SEMI-STRUCTURED DOCUMENTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawdiak, Yuri O. (Inventor); La, Tracy T. (Inventor); Lin, Shu-Chun Y. (Inventor); Malof, David A. (Inventor); Tran, Khai Peter B. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Method and system for querying a collection of Unstructured or semi-structured documents to identify presence of, and provide context and/or content for, keywords and/or keyphrases. The documents are analyzed and assigned a node structure, including an ordered sequence of mutually exclusive node segments or strings. Each node has an associated set of at least four, five or six attributes with node information and can represent a format marker or text, with the last node in any node segment usually being a text node. A keyword (or keyphrase) is specified. and the last node in each node segment is searched for a match with the keyword. When a match is found at a query node, or at a node determined with reference to a query node, the system displays the context andor the content of the query node.

  1. Building large collections of Chinese and English medical terms from semi-structured and encyclopedia websites.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Wang, Yining; Sun, Jian-Tao; Zhang, Jianwen; Tsujii, Junichi; Chang, Eric

    2013-01-01

    To build large collections of medical terms from semi-structured information sources (e.g. tables, lists, etc.) and encyclopedia sites on the web. The terms are classified into the three semantic categories, Medical Problems, Medications, and Medical Tests, which were used in i2b2 challenge tasks. We developed two systems, one for Chinese and another for English terms. The two systems share the same methodology and use the same software with minimum language dependent parts. We produced large collections of terms by exploiting billions of semi-structured information sources and encyclopedia sites on the Web. The standard performance metric of recall (R) is extended to three different types of Recall to take the surface variability of terms into consideration. They are Surface Recall (R(S)), Object Recall (R(O)), and Surface Head recall (R(H)). We use two test sets for Chinese. For English, we use a collection of terms in the 2010 i2b2 text. Two collections of terms, one for English and the other for Chinese, have been created. The terms in these collections are classified as either of Medical Problems, Medications, or Medical Tests in the i2b2 challenge tasks. The English collection contains 49,249 (Problems), 89,591 (Medications) and 25,107 (Tests) terms, while the Chinese one contains 66,780 (Problems), 101,025 (Medications), and 15,032 (Tests) terms. The proposed method of constructing a large collection of medical terms is both efficient and effective, and, most of all, independent of language. The collections will be made publicly available.

  2. Sipping Coffee with a Serial Killer: On Conducting Life History Interviews with a Criminal Genius

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oleson, J. C.

    2004-01-01

    As part of my Ph.D. research on criminal genius, I conducted 44 semi-structured interviews. One of the 44 subjects, in particular, stood out. This noteworthy individual claimed that he had killed 15 people. His story was particularly interesting because--unlike most social research involving serial killers--he claimed that he had never been…

  3. Interview with Jessica Utts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossman, Allan; Utts, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a transcript of author Allan Rossman's interview with Jessica Utts, Professor and Chair of Statistics at the University of California-Irvine. Utts is also a Fellow of the American Statistical Association and a recipient of a Founders Award from ASA. Additionally, she has been elected as President of ASA for the year 2016. The…

  4. Men, masculinity and food: interviews with Finnish carpenters and engineers.

    PubMed

    Roos, G; Prättälä, R; Koski, K

    2001-08-01

    This study explores how Finnish men from two occupational groups describe food in their everyday life. The concept of masculinity is used in interpreting men's food-related behaviours and beliefs. Data are drawn from semi-structured interviews in the 1990s with twenty carpenters and twenty engineers involved in the building trade. The paper presents analyses of the similarities and differences in how the men talked about meat; vegetables; beer and wine as parts of meals; food as energy, health and pleasure; and cooking. The results show variation both between and within occupational groups. The men did not stress the role of meat, but rather emphasised the role of vegetables. The carpenters tended to favour meat whereas the engineers had a more positive attitude to vegetables. Eating was described as an everyday routine needed to refuel the body and stay healthy. In addition, the engineers talked about the pleasures of eating. The men described cooking as optional or exceptional. The carpenters seemed to more actively embrace hegemonic masculinity and reject what is feminine than the engineers, who have reformulated their definition of masculinity to encompass concerns with health. This study suggests that both masculinity and occupational class play a role in male food-related practices and preferences.

  5. The psychiatric interview: validity, structure, and subjectivity.

    PubMed

    Nordgaard, Julie; Sass, Louis A; Parnas, Josef

    2013-06-01

    There is a glaring gap in the psychiatric literature concerning the nature of psychiatric symptoms and signs, and a corresponding lack of epistemological discussion of psycho-diagnostic interviewing. Contemporary clinical neuroscience heavily relies on the use of fully structured interviews that are historically rooted in logical positivism and behaviorism. These theoretical approaches marked decisively the so-called "operational revolution in psychiatry" leading to the creation of DSM-III. This paper attempts to examine the theoretical assumptions that underlie the use of a fully structured psychiatric interview. We address the ontological status of pathological experience, the notions of symptom, sign, prototype and Gestalt, and the necessary second-person processes which are involved in converting the patient's experience (originally lived in the first-person perspective) into an "objective" (third person), actionable format, used for classification, treatment, and research. Our central thesis is that psychiatry targets the phenomena of consciousness, which, unlike somatic symptoms and signs, cannot be grasped on the analogy with material thing-like objects. We claim that in order to perform faithful distinctions in this particular domain, we need a more adequate approach, that is, an approach that is guided by phenomenologically informed considerations. Our theoretical discussion draws upon clinical examples derived from structured and semi-structured interviews. We conclude that fully structured interview is neither theoretically adequate nor practically valid in obtaining psycho-diagnostic information. Failure to address these basic issues may have contributed to the current state of malaise in the study of psychopathology.

  6. Situational awareness for unmanned ground vehicles in semi-structured environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodsell, Thomas G.; Snorrason, Magnus; Stevens, Mark R.

    2002-07-01

    Situational Awareness (SA) is a critical component of effective autonomous vehicles, reducing operator workload and allowing an operator to command multiple vehicles or simultaneously perform other tasks. Our Scene Estimation & Situational Awareness Mapping Engine (SESAME) provides SA for mobile robots in semi-structured scenes, such as parking lots and city streets. SESAME autonomously builds volumetric models for scene analysis. For example, a SES-AME equipped robot can build a low-resolution 3-D model of a row of cars, then approach a specific car and build a high-resolution model from a few stereo snapshots. The model can be used onboard to determine the type of car and locate its license plate, or the model can be segmented out and sent back to an operator who can view it from different viewpoints. As new views of the scene are obtained, the model is updated and changes are tracked (such as cars arriving or departing). Since the robot's position must be accurately known, SESAME also has automated techniques for deter-mining the position and orientation of the camera (and hence, robot) with respect to existing maps. This paper presents an overview of the SESAME architecture and algorithms, including our model generation algorithm.

  7. Autism spectrum disorder detection from semi-structured and unstructured medical data.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jianbo; Holtz, Chester; Smith, Tristram; Luo, Jiebo

    2017-12-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disorder that significantly impairs patients' ability to perform normal social interaction and communication. Moreover, the diagnosis procedure of ASD is highly time-consuming, labor-intensive, and requires extensive expertise. Although there exists no known cure for ASD, there is consensus among clinicians regarding the importance of early intervention for the recovery of ASD patients. Therefore, to benefit autism patients by enhancing their access to treatments such as early intervention, we aim to develop a robust machine learning-based system for autism detection by using Natural Language Processing techniques based on information extracted from medical forms of potential ASD patients. Our detecting framework involves converting semi-structured and unstructured medical forms into digital format, preprocessing, learning document representation, and finally, classification. Testing results are evaluated against the ground truth set by expert clinicians and the proposed system achieve a 83.4% accuracy and 91.1% recall, which is very promising. The proposed ASD detection framework could significantly simplify and shorten the procedure of ASD diagnosis.

  8. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a New Assessment Method for Childhood Maltreatment Experiences: The Interview for Traumatic Events in Childhood (ITEC)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobbestael, Jill; Arntz, Arnoud; Harkema-Schouten, Petra; Bernstein, David

    2009-01-01

    Objective: We conducted a comprehensive assessment of the reliability and validity of the Interview for Traumatic Events in Childhood (ITEC, Lobbestael, Arntz, Kremers, & Sieswerda, 2006), a retrospective, semi-structured interview for childhood maltreatment. The ITEC aims to yield dimensional scores for severity of experiences of different…

  9. Evaluation of the Criterion and Convergent Validity of the Diagnostic Interview for Social and Communication Disorders in Young and Low-Functioning Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maljaars, Jarymke; Noens, Ilse; Scholte, Evert; van Berckelaer-Onnes, Ina

    2012-01-01

    The Diagnostic Interview for Social and Communication Disorders (DISCO; Wing, 2006) is a standardized, semi-structured and interviewer-based schedule for diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The objective of this study was to evaluate the criterion and convergent validity of the DISCO-11 ICD-10 algorithm in young and low-functioning…

  10. Chemistry Teachers' Views on Teaching "Climate Change"--An Interview Case Study from Research-Oriented Learning in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feierabend, Timo; Jokmin, Sebastian; Eilks, Ingo

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a case study from research-oriented learning in chemistry teacher education. The study evaluates the views of twenty experienced German chemistry teachers about the teaching of climate change in chemistry education. Data was collected using semi-structured interviews about the teachers' experiences and their views about…

  11. The Structured Clinically Relevant Interview for Psychiatrists in Training (SCRIPT): A New Standardized Assessment Tool for Recruitment in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Rahul

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The multifaceted nature of training and the diverse backgrounds of potential Senior House Officers (Postgraduate Residents) require a novel approach to the selection of trainees wishing to pursue a career in psychiatry. The author reports the properties of a semi-structured interview (the SCRIPT) for assessing doctors short-listed for a…

  12. Reasons for Choosing a Technically Oriented Education: An Interview Study within the Fields of Pipefitting and Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjurulf, Veronica

    2012-01-01

    The article examines how professionals within technical businesses describe their ways into their trade and why they have remained. Semi-structured interviews, analyzed by analysis of narratives, have been conducted with six informants within pipefitting and industrial work aiming to understand how technically oriented professions can attract…

  13. Child and Interviewer Race in Forensic Interviewing.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Amy K; Mackey, Tomiko D; Langendoen, Carol; Barnard, Marie

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the potential effect of child race and interviewer race on forensic interviewing outcomes. The results of the regression analysis indicated that child race and interviewer race had a significant effect on interview outcome category (no findings, inconclusive, or findings consistent with sexual abuse). Furthermore, the results indicate that the interaction of child and interviewer race had predictive value for rates of findings consistent with sexual abuse but not in the direction predicted. Cross-race dyads had significantly higher rates of interview outcomes consistent with sexual abuse. These findings suggest that more research into the effect of race on disclosure of child sexual abuse is needed.

  14. A Semi-Structured MODFLOW-USG Model to Evaluate Local Water Sources to Wells for Decision Support.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, Daniel T; Fienen, Michael N; Reeves, Howard W; Langevin, Christian D

    2016-07-01

    In order to better represent the configuration of the stream network and simulate local groundwater-surface water interactions, a version of MODFLOW with refined spacing in the topmost layer was applied to a Lake Michigan Basin (LMB) regional groundwater-flow model developed by the U.S. Geological. Regional MODFLOW models commonly use coarse grids over large areas; this coarse spacing precludes model application to local management issues (e.g., surface-water depletion by wells) without recourse to labor-intensive inset models. Implementation of an unstructured formulation within the MODFLOW framework (MODFLOW-USG) allows application of regional models to address local problems. A "semi-structured" approach (uniform lateral spacing within layers, different lateral spacing among layers) was tested using the LMB regional model. The parent 20-layer model with uniform 5000-foot (1524-m) lateral spacing was converted to 4 layers with 500-foot (152-m) spacing in the top glacial (Quaternary) layer, where surface water features are located, overlying coarser resolution layers representing deeper deposits. This semi-structured version of the LMB model reproduces regional flow conditions, whereas the finer resolution in the top layer improves the accuracy of the simulated response of surface water to shallow wells. One application of the semi-structured LMB model is to provide statistical measures of the correlation between modeled inputs and the simulated amount of water that wells derive from local surface water. The relations identified in this paper serve as the basis for metamodels to predict (with uncertainty) surface-water depletion in response to shallow pumping within and potentially beyond the modeled area, see Fienen et al. (2015a).

  15. Whiffing the Airport Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, David

    2008-01-01

    An airport interview is an initial interview for a senior administrative position conducted at an airport hotel not too far from the campus in question. Meeting at an airport enables a search committee to interview a large number of candidates in a short period of time with a degree of confidentiality. At the conclusion of the airport interviews,…

  16. COMPRESSION MOLDED, BIO-FIBER REINFORCED, HIGH PERFORMANCE THERMOSET COMPOSITES FOR STRUCTURAL AND SEMI-STRUCTURAL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2010-09-15

    Major goals for the future of transportation materials include reduced weight of components, reduced cost of materials and increased use of renewable content. Reinforcement of transportation composites with plant fibers has the potential to decrease component weight relative to glass fiber reinforcement, reduce cost of materials relative to carbon fiber reinforcement, and significantly increase the fraction of composite components from a renewable source. Barriers to widespread application of natural fiber reinforced components in structural and semi-structural vehicle applications have included the natural propensity of these materials to uptake moisture and the corresponding loss of mechanical properties with exposure to moisture. Through novel advances in fiber treatment, processing and molding to address moisture absorption and resin interfacing, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is reducing these barriers. Herein we demonstrate natural fiber reinforced composites that are 1) composed of more than 50wt% renewable content, 2) weigh 17% less than glass fiber composites with the same fiber volume, and 3) exhibit wet mechanical properties suitable for semi-structural application. Lower cost, lower energy in production, and reduced greenhouse gas production are anticipated advantages of the described PNNL technologies.

  17. Women's Perceived Reasons for Their Excessive Postpartum Weight Retention: A Qualitative Interview Study

    PubMed Central

    Christenson, Anne; Johansson, Eva; Reynisdottir, Signy; Torgerson, Jarl; Hemmingsson, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obesity in Sweden has doubled to 14% over the last 20 years. New strategies for treatment and prevention are needed. Excessive gestational weight gain has been found to contribute substantially to obesity, and there is a consistent association between postpartum weight retention and obesity later in life. We aimed to explore what factors women perceive as reasons for having substantial postpartum weight retention, to identify areas for new and improved interventions. Methods Qualitative interview study (semi-structured) using an emergent design. Fifteen women, with a postpartum weight retention ≥ 10 kg, were interviewed by a trained cognitive therapist. Eight women had pre-pregnancy BMI below 30 kg/m2. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and data analysed using inductive manifest content analysis. Salient text passages were extracted, shortened, coded and clustered into categories. Results Participants reported no knowledge of current gestational weight gain recommendations or of risks for adverse pregnancy outcomes with excessive weight gain or postpartum weight retention. Excessive eating emerged as a common strategy to provide relief of psychological, emotional and physical discomfort, such as depression and morning sickness. Women perceived medical staff as being unconcerned about weight, and postpartum weight loss support was scarce or absent. Some women reported eating more due to a belief that breastfeeding would automatically lead to weight loss. Conclusion There is a need to raise awareness about risks with unhealthy gestational weight development and postpartum weight retention in women of childbearing age. The common strategy to cope with psychological, emotional or physical discomfort by eating is an important factor to target with intervention. The postpartum year is a neglected period where additional follow-up on weight and weight loss support is strongly indicated. PMID:27936110

  18. Interview with Sandra Thompson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chiung-chih

    1994-01-01

    Presents an interview of Sandra Thompson on various topics relating to the Chinese language. The interview touches on conversational data on Chinese, the lack of morphological complexity in Mandarin Chinese, and the development of Chinese functionalism. (12 references) (CK)

  19. Enterprise Data Analysis and Visualization: An Interview Study.

    PubMed

    Kandel, S; Paepcke, A; Hellerstein, J M; Heer, J

    2012-12-01

    Organizations rely on data analysts to model customer engagement, streamline operations, improve production, inform business decisions, and combat fraud. Though numerous analysis and visualization tools have been built to improve the scale and efficiency at which analysts can work, there has been little research on how analysis takes place within the social and organizational context of companies. To better understand the enterprise analysts' ecosystem, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 35 data analysts from 25 organizations across a variety of sectors, including healthcare, retail, marketing and finance. Based on our interview data, we characterize the process of industrial data analysis and document how organizational features of an enterprise impact it. We describe recurring pain points, outstanding challenges, and barriers to adoption for visual analytic tools. Finally, we discuss design implications and opportunities for visual analysis research.

  20. The acceptance of the K-SADS-PL - potential predictors for the overall satisfaction of parents and interviewers.

    PubMed

    Matuschek, Tina; Jaeger, Sonia; Stadelmann, Stephanie; Dölling, Katrin; Weis, Steffi; Von Klitzing, Kai; Grunewald, Madlen; Hiemisch, Andreas; Döhnert, Mirko

    2015-09-01

    The presented study investigated the interviewee (parents) and interviewer acceptance of the semi-structured diagnostic interview Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School Aged Children Present Lifetime version (KSADS-PL; German version). Seventeen certified interviewers conducted 231 interviews (interviewers conducted several interviews; interviewees were only questioned once). Interviewees and interviewers anonymously rated their acceptance right after the interview was finished. The nested data structure was analysed regarding an individual interviewer bias and potential predictors of overall satisfaction. Therefore, factors improvable by interviewer training were included, as well as fixed factors which cannot be improved by professional training. The overall satisfaction was evaluated as highly positive with significant higher interviewee and interviewer ratings in the research as compared to the clinical recruitment setting. An individual bias of the interviewer on his or her own acceptance over time, but not on the evaluation of the corresponding interviewee was found. Neither the professional background nor the gender of the interviewer had a significant contribution in predicting these differences. The interviewer model showed no significant change over time and only the interview duration and the interviewee acceptance were significant predictors for interviewer overall satisfaction. Regarding the interviewee model, just the interviewer acceptance was a significant predictor. Copyright Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. A semi-structured MODFLOW-USG model to evaluate local water sources to wells for decision support

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feinstein, Daniel T.; Fienen, Michael N.; Reeves, Howard W.; Langevin, Christian D.

    2016-01-01

    In order to better represent the configuration of the stream network and simulate local groundwater-surface water interactions, a version of MODFLOW with refined spacing in the topmost layer was applied to a Lake Michigan Basin (LMB) regional groundwater-flow model developed by the U.S. Geological. Regional MODFLOW models commonly use coarse grids over large areas; this coarse spacing precludes model application to local management issues (e.g., surface-water depletion by wells) without recourse to labor-intensive inset models. Implementation of an unstructured formulation within the MODFLOW framework (MODFLOW-USG) allows application of regional models to address local problems. A “semi-structured” approach (uniform lateral spacing within layers, different lateral spacing among layers) was tested using the LMB regional model. The parent 20-layer model with uniform 5000-foot (1524-m) lateral spacing was converted to 4 layers with 500-foot (152-m) spacing in the top glacial (Quaternary) layer, where surface water features are located, overlying coarser resolution layers representing deeper deposits. This semi-structured version of the LMB model reproduces regional flow conditions, whereas the finer resolution in the top layer improves the accuracy of the simulated response of surface water to shallow wells. One application of the semi-structured LMB model is to provide statistical measures of the correlation between modeled inputs and the simulated amount of water that wells derive from local surface water. The relations identified in this paper serve as the basis for metamodels to predict (with uncertainty) surface-water depletion in response to shallow pumping within and potentially beyond the modeled area, see Fienen et al. (2015a).

  2. Who am I and what am I doing? Becoming a qualitative research interviewer.

    PubMed

    Bulpitt, Helen; Martin, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    Qualitative research can be influenced by the researcher's role in the study. Here, the authors propose reflexive methodologies as a means by which the processes undertaken by the researcher can be made transparent and used as part of the data. Using this approach, this paper explores the experience of becoming a qualitative research interviewer. It provides an account of dilemmas faced while undertaking a series of semi-structured interviews as part of a discourse analytic study into the practice of clinical supervision in a number of mental health professions.

  3. The interview with a patient on dialysis: feeling, emotions and fears.

    PubMed

    Brunori, Francesco; Dozio, Beatrice; Colzani, Sara; Pozzi, Marco; Pisano, Lucia; Galassi, Andrea; Santorelli, Gennaro; Auricchio, Sara; Busnelli, Luisa; Di Carlo, Angela; Viganò, Monica; Calabrese, Valentina; Mariani, Laura; Mossa, Monica; Longoni, Stefania; Scanziani, Renzo

    2016-01-01

    This study has been performed in the Nephrology and Dialysis Unit, in Desio Hospital, Italy. The aim of this study is to evaluate, starting from research questions, which information is given to patient in the pre-dialysis colloquia for his/her chosen dialysis methods. Moreover, the study evaluated feelings, emotions and fears since the announcement of the necessity of dialysis treatment. The objective of the study was reached through the interview with patients on dialysis. The fact-finding survey was based on the tools of social research, as the semi-structured interview. Instead of using the questionnaire, even though it make it easier to collect larger set of data, the Authors decided to interview patients in person, since the interview allows direct patient contact and to build a relationship of trust with the interviewer, in order to allow patient explain better his/her feeling.

  4. Expertise among professional magicians: an interview study

    PubMed Central

    Rissanen, Olli; Pitkänen, Petteri; Juvonen, Antti; Kuhn, Gustav; Hakkarainen, Kai

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to analyse interviews of highly regarded Finnish magicians. Social network analysis (N = 120) was used to identify Finland's most highly regarded magicians (N = 16). The selected participants' careers in professional magic and various aspects of their professional conduct were examined by relying on semi-structured interviews. The results revealed that cultivation of professional level competence in magic usually requires an extensive period of time compared with other domains of expertise. Magic is a unique performing art and it differs from other professions focusing on deceiving the audience. A distinctive feature of magical expertise is that the process takes place entirely through informal training supported by communities of magical practitioners. Three interrelated aspects of magical activity were distinguished: magic tricks, performance, and audience. Although magic tricks constitute a central aspect of magic activity, the participants did not talk about their tricks extensively; this is in accordance with the secretive nature of magic culture. The interviews revealed that a core aspect of the magicians' activity is performance in front of an audience that repeatedly validates competence cultivated through years of practice. The interviewees reported investing a great deal of effort in planning, orchestrating, and reflecting on their performances. Close interaction with the audience plays an important role in most interviewees' activity. Many participants put a great deal of effort in developing novel magic tricks. It is common to borrow magic effects from fellow magicians and develop novel methods of implementation. Because magic tricks or programs are not copyrighted, many interviewees considered “stealing” an unacceptable and unethical aspect of magical activity. The interviewees highlighted the importance of personality and charisma in the successful pursuit of magic activity. PMID:25566156

  5. Expertise among professional magicians: an interview study.

    PubMed

    Rissanen, Olli; Pitkänen, Petteri; Juvonen, Antti; Kuhn, Gustav; Hakkarainen, Kai

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to analyse interviews of highly regarded Finnish magicians. Social network analysis (N = 120) was used to identify Finland's most highly regarded magicians (N = 16). The selected participants' careers in professional magic and various aspects of their professional conduct were examined by relying on semi-structured interviews. The results revealed that cultivation of professional level competence in magic usually requires an extensive period of time compared with other domains of expertise. Magic is a unique performing art and it differs from other professions focusing on deceiving the audience. A distinctive feature of magical expertise is that the process takes place entirely through informal training supported by communities of magical practitioners. Three interrelated aspects of magical activity were distinguished: magic tricks, performance, and audience. Although magic tricks constitute a central aspect of magic activity, the participants did not talk about their tricks extensively; this is in accordance with the secretive nature of magic culture. The interviews revealed that a core aspect of the magicians' activity is performance in front of an audience that repeatedly validates competence cultivated through years of practice. The interviewees reported investing a great deal of effort in planning, orchestrating, and reflecting on their performances. Close interaction with the audience plays an important role in most interviewees' activity. Many participants put a great deal of effort in developing novel magic tricks. It is common to borrow magic effects from fellow magicians and develop novel methods of implementation. Because magic tricks or programs are not copyrighted, many interviewees considered "stealing" an unacceptable and unethical aspect of magical activity. The interviewees highlighted the importance of personality and charisma in the successful pursuit of magic activity.

  6. Exploration of the impacts of distributed-site Research Experiences for Undergraduates using pre-/post- student interviews

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colella, H.; Hubenthal, M.; Brudzinski, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    The benefits for student participants of undergraduate research opportunities have been well documented. However, advancements in information and communications technologies (ICT) and cultural shifts around online education and virtual peer-to-peer interaction have lead to new models in which to structure such experiences. Currently, these ICT-enabled Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) programs connect geographically distributed interns in supportive e-learning communities while maintaining a traditional local mentoring arrangement. To document and explore the effects of distributed REU Sites in more depth, six interns from such a program, the Incorporated Research Institution for Seismology (IRIS) REU, were selected at random and asked to be interviewed about the REU experience. The primary targets of the interviews are to understand the mentor/mentee relationships, feeling of support and development and value of near-peer and far-peer relationships throughout their internship in a distributed REU program, and whether they receive the training necessary to gain confidence as a researcher. We also examine the various communication technologies as well as best practices and strategies that can increase intern connectedness. Pre-internship interviews were conducted in-person at the start of the centralized internship orientation week, while post-internship interviews were virtual (e.g. video chat with Skype or Google Hangout). These semi-structured interviews have full audio recordings and subsequent transcriptions. An additional, virtual follow-up interview will be conducted next spring after the interns have an opportunity to attend and present their research at a national conference (e.g., AGU). Interview material will be analyzed through a process of coding, sorting, local integration, and inclusive integration. Results will also be triangulated with pre- and post- survey data both from participants and other survey data from previous years of the IRIS

  7. [Motivational interview: supporting change].

    PubMed

    Fond, Guillaume; Ducasse, Déborah

    2015-01-01

    The motivational interview aims to help patients to resolve their ambivalence regarding problematic behaviors and to guide them into change. It differs from other therapeutic approaches mainly through the attitude of the therapist. In motivational interviewing, the therapist defends the statu quo. By reactance, the patient defends the change and enhance her/his motivation. This article provides a summary of the other concepts of motivational interviewing and its applications in the psychiatric daily practice.

  8. Psychiatric diagnosis of African Americans: diagnostic divergence in clinician-structured and semistructured interviewing conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Neighbors, H. W.; Trierweiler, S. J.; Munday, C.; Thompson, E. E.; Jackson, J. S.; Binion, V. J.; Gomez, J.

    1999-01-01

    This study is a primary data collection that varied patient race and diagnosis and used two diagnostic interviewing conditions: one clinician-structured (phase one) and the other a semi-structured diagnostic instrument (phase two). Four basic research questions are addressed: What is the relationship between race and the hospital diagnosis? How is race related to diagnosis in both research interviewing conditions? Why does diagnostic concordance between the hospital diagnosis and the research diagnosis vary by research interviewing condition? Is diagnostic concordance between the hospital and research diagnosis influenced by patient race? A total of 291 patients completed an interview during phase one, while 665 patients completed an interview during phase two. Blacks were more likely to receive a hospital diagnosis of schizophrenia and less likely to be diagnosed with mood disorder. Patient race was similarly related to the research diagnoses produced in the clinician-structured research condition (phase one). Although less pronounced, a higher percentage of African Americans than whites received a diagnosis of schizophrenia using the semi-structured DSM-III-R Symptom Checklist (phase two). The black-white distribution for mood disorders showed that whites were more likely than blacks to be diagnosed with mood disorder. PMID:10641496

  9. Interviewers' Experiences with Two Multiple Mini-Interview Scoring Methods Used for Admission to a Master of Physical Therapy Programme

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Angela; Bidonde, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To describe participants' attitudes, beliefs, and experiences with the use of two methods of scoring the Multiple Mini-Interview (MMI) for admission to a Master of Physical Therapy program: a rank-based scoring system (RBS; used from 2007 to 2013) and a criterion-based scoring system (CBS; tested in 2014). The MMI uses short independent assessments to obtain an aggregate score of candidates' professionalism and interpersonal skills, based on behavioural questions within scenarios that assess one attribute at a time. Method: This qualitative descriptive inquiry sought to capture the experiences of 18 MMI interviewers primarily through semi-structured interviews. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, and the data were analyzed using thematic analysis. The results were validated by theoretical and investigator triangulation and member checking. Results: One major theme, scoring systems, and two sub-themes, CBS and RBS, emerged across all data. Participants unanimously agreed that CBS is a more fair and objective way to score candidates' interviews. Conclusions: CBS was well accepted by participants, and the majority preferred it over RBS. Participants felt that CBS presented a more accurate depiction of candidates. PMID:27909365

  10. The Autism Symptom Interview, School-Age: A Brief Telephone Interview to Identify Autism Spectrum Disorders in 5-to-12-Year-Old Children

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Somer L.; Huerta, Marisela; Gotham, Katherine; Havdahl, Karoline Alexandra; Pickles, Andrew; Duncan, Amie; Bal, Vanessa Hus; Croen, Lisa; Lord, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Lay Abstract Recent advances in multiple areas of autism research, including genetics and epidemiology, have increased the need for large numbers of participants with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The Autism Symptom Interview (ASI) is a brief phone interview that was designed to facilitate rapid ascertainment of children with ASD for research studies. The ASI is based on questions from the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R), a comprehensive, semi-structured parent interview, but the ASI is designed to be administered in approximately 20 minutes by interviewers with minimal training. This study reports on the initial validation of the ASI, School-Age, for children ages 5 to 12 years. Children with previous diagnoses or suspicion of ASD or another neurodevelopmental disorder participated in a comprehensive diagnostic assessment as part of the study and were classified as ASD or non-ASD following the assessment. The ASI scores of children with and without ASD were then compared. For verbal children (defined as using phrases or better on a daily basis), the ASI showed reasonable accuracy in identifying children with ASD (sensitivity=.87), but specificity was low (.62). However, when ASI scores were considered together with scores from the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS), sensitivity was maintained at .82, and specificity improved to .92. These findings suggest that the ASI school age may serve as a useful tool to more quickly classify children with ASD for research purposes. Scientific Abstract This study reports on the initial validation of the Autism Symptom Interview (ASI), School-Age, a brief (15–20 minute) phone interview derived from questions from the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R). The ASI, School-Age was administered by interviewers with minimal training to parents of children ages 5 to 12 who had all been previously identified with (or referred for assessment of) ASD or another neurodevelopmental disorder. Children

  11. Questions in Reference Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Marilyn Domas

    1998-01-01

    Characterizes the questioning behavior in reference interviews preceding delegated online searches of bibliographic databases and relates it to questioning behavior in other types of interviews/settings. Compares questions asked by the information specialist and those asked by the client; findings show the information specialist dominates the…

  12. Employee Exit Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulk, Larry J.

    1984-01-01

    Describes an exit interview procedure for employees leaving the school system designed to identify potential personnel problems, maintain good employee relations, provide statistics on reasons for turnover, and provide assessment data for inservice education programs. Reports statistical data based on interview implementation, 1981-83. (TE)

  13. Interview with Ron Wasserstein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossmann, Allan; Wasserstein, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Ron Wasserstein is Executive Director of the American Statistical Association (ASA). He previously served as Vice-President for Academic Affairs and Professor of Statistics at Washburn University. This interview took place via email on January 21- February 24, 2014. Topics covered in this interview are as follows: 1) Beginnings, 2) Teaching…

  14. Literacy and Informational Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decarie, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Informational interviews are valuable tools for improving writing, editing, and interviewing skills, and they are also extremely valuable in improving the soft skills that are valued by employers, such as confidence, adaptability, the ability to set and keep deadlines, the ability to manage risk, and so on. These soft skills, this article argues,…

  15. Interviewing for a Principalship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daresh, John C.

    2001-01-01

    When interviewing for a principal position, candidates should practice with friends and acquaintances, anticipate "sure thing" questions, listen and respond carefully, know something about the school and community, show passion and enthusiasm, and ask interviewers what the new principal ought to tackle first. (MLH)

  16. Interview with Mark Ashwill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landsberger, Joe

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Mark Ashwill, Director of the Institute of International Education-Vietnam in Ha Noi, Vietnam, a branch of the Institute of International Education (IIE). In this interview, Ashwill talks about his work as Director of the Institute of International Education-Vietnam, the role that communications technology…

  17. Winning the interviewing game.

    PubMed

    Lyons, M F

    2000-01-01

    Those who don't "interview well" are not likely to receive the job offer, despite their qualifications. A job interview is actually a fierce competitive activity that offers only two grades: an A or F. By nature, physicians are competitive; they like to win. Infrequent interviewees are prone to making easily corrected mistakes, such as showing no enthusiasm or having poor eye contact. The key for interviewing success is preparation--doing research, developing a personal statement, and role-playing practice interviews. View the interview as a sales call whose bottom-line goal is to achieve an offer, or at least to let you leave with the option to return for future discussions.

  18. Reassuring and managing patients with concerns about swine flu: Qualitative interviews with callers to NHS Direct

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background During the early stages of the 2009 swine flu (influenza H1N1) outbreak, the large majority of patients who contacted the health services about the illness did not have it. In the UK, the NHS Direct telephone service was used by many of these patients. We used qualitative interviews to identify the main reasons why people approached NHS Direct with concerns about swine flu and to identify aspects of their contact which were reassuring, using a framework approach. Methods 33 patients participated in semi-structured interviews. All patients had telephoned NHS Direct between 11 and 14 May with concerns about swine flu and had been assessed as being unlikely to have the illness. Results Reasons for seeking advice about swine flu included: the presence of unexpectedly severe flu-like symptoms; uncertainties about how one can catch swine flu; concern about giving it to others; pressure from friends or employers; and seeking 'peace of mind.' Most participants found speaking to NHS Direct reassuring or useful. Helpful aspects included: having swine flu ruled out; receiving an alternative explanation for symptoms; clarification on how swine flu is transmitted; and the perceived credibility of NHS Direct. No-one reported anything that had increased their anxiety and only one participant subsequently sought additional advice about swine flu from elsewhere. Conclusions Future major incidents involving other forms of chemical, biological or radiological hazards may also cause large numbers of unexposed people to seek health advice. Our data suggest that providing telephone triage and information is helpful in such instances, particularly where advice can be given via a trusted, pre-existing service. PMID:20678192

  19. Children with Autism Understand Indirect Speech Acts: Evidence from a Semi-Structured Act-Out Task

    PubMed Central

    Kissine, Mikhail; Cano-Chervel, Julie; Carlier, Sophie; De Brabanter, Philippe; Ducenne, Lesley; Pairon, Marie-Charlotte; Deconinck, Nicolas; Delvenne, Véronique; Leybaert, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder are often said to present a global pragmatic impairment. However, there is some observational evidence that context-based comprehension of indirect requests may be preserved in autism. In order to provide experimental confirmation to this hypothesis, indirect speech act comprehension was tested in a group of 15 children with autism between 7 and 12 years and a group of 20 typically developing children between 2:7 and 3:6 years. The aim of the study was to determine whether children with autism can display genuinely contextual understanding of indirect requests. The experiment consisted of a three-pronged semi-structured task involving Mr Potato Head. In the first phase a declarative sentence was uttered by one adult as an instruction to put a garment on a Mr Potato Head toy; in the second the same sentence was uttered as a comment on a picture by another speaker; in the third phase the same sentence was uttered as a comment on a picture by the first speaker. Children with autism complied with the indirect request in the first phase and demonstrated the capacity to inhibit the directive interpretation in phases 2 and 3. TD children had some difficulty in understanding the indirect instruction in phase 1. These results call for a more nuanced view of pragmatic dysfunction in autism. PMID:26551648

  20. Children with Autism Understand Indirect Speech Acts: Evidence from a Semi-Structured Act-Out Task.

    PubMed

    Kissine, Mikhail; Cano-Chervel, Julie; Carlier, Sophie; De Brabanter, Philippe; Ducenne, Lesley; Pairon, Marie-Charlotte; Deconinck, Nicolas; Delvenne, Véronique; Leybaert, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder are often said to present a global pragmatic impairment. However, there is some observational evidence that context-based comprehension of indirect requests may be preserved in autism. In order to provide experimental confirmation to this hypothesis, indirect speech act comprehension was tested in a group of 15 children with autism between 7 and 12 years and a group of 20 typically developing children between 2:7 and 3:6 years. The aim of the study was to determine whether children with autism can display genuinely contextual understanding of indirect requests. The experiment consisted of a three-pronged semi-structured task involving Mr Potato Head. In the first phase a declarative sentence was uttered by one adult as an instruction to put a garment on a Mr Potato Head toy; in the second the same sentence was uttered as a comment on a picture by another speaker; in the third phase the same sentence was uttered as a comment on a picture by the first speaker. Children with autism complied with the indirect request in the first phase and demonstrated the capacity to inhibit the directive interpretation in phases 2 and 3. TD children had some difficulty in understanding the indirect instruction in phase 1. These results call for a more nuanced view of pragmatic dysfunction in autism.

  1. Manual for the Employability Maturity Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessler, Richard; Bolton, Brian

    The Employability Maturity Interview (EMI) is a 10-item structured interview developed to assess readiness for the vocational rehabilitation planning process and the need for additional vocational exploration and employability services. The items deal with occupational choice, self-appraisal of abilities, self-appraisal of personality…

  2. Interview: interview with P Jeffrey Conn. Interview by Hannah Coaker.

    PubMed

    Conn, P Jeffrey

    2013-09-01

    Dr Conn is the Lee E Limbird Professor of Pharmacology at Vanderbilt University and Director of the Vanderbilt Center for Neuroscience Drug Discovery (VCNDD). Dr Conn received a PhD in Pharmacology from Vanderbilt in 1986 and pursued postdoctoral studies at Yale University. He served as a professor of Pharmacology at Emory University from 1988 to 2000, before moving to Merck and Co. (PA, USA) as head of the Department of Neuroscience. Dr Conn moved to Vanderbilt University in 2003 where he is the founding director of the VCNDD, with a primary mission of facilitating translation of recent advances in basic science to novel therapeutics. The VCNDD consists of approximately 100 full-time scientists and has advanced novel molecules from four major programs as development candidates for clinical testing with industry partners. Dr Conn has served in editorial positions with multiple international journals and has served the scientific advisory boards of multiple foundations and companies. He has received numerous awards based on the impact of his basic and translational research. Dr Conn's current research is focused on development of novel treatment strategies for schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease and other serious brain disorders. Interview conducted by Hannah Coaker, Assistant Commissioning Editor.

  3. Comparing Lay Community and Academic Survey Center Interviewers in Conducting Household Interviews in Latino Communities

    PubMed Central

    Chan-Golston, Alec M.; Friedlander, Scott; Glik, Deborah C.; Prelip, Michael L.; Belin, Thomas R.; Brookmeyer, Ron; Santos, Robert; Chen, Jie; Ortega, Alexander N.

    2016-01-01

    Background The employment of professional interviewers from academic survey centers to conduct surveys has been standard practice. Because one goal of community-engaged research is to provide professional skills to community residents, this paper considers whether employing locally trained lay interviewers from within the community may be as effective as employing interviewers from an academic survey center with regard to unit and item nonresponse rates and cost. Methods To study a nutrition-focused intervention, 1035 in-person household interviews were conducted in East Los Angeles and Boyle Heights, 503 of which were completed by lay community interviewers. A chi-square test was used to assess differences in unit nonresponse rates between professional and community interviewers and Welch’s t tests were used to assess differences in item nonresponse rates. A cost comparison analysis between the two interviewer groups was also conducted. Results Interviewers from the academic survey center had lower unit nonresponse rates than the lay community interviewers (16.2% vs. 23.3%; p < 0.01). However, the item nonresponse rates were lower for the community interviewers than the professional interviewers (1.4% vs. 3.3%; p < 0.01). Community interviewers cost approximately $415.38 per survey whereas professional interviewers cost approximately $537.29 per survey. Conclusions With a lower cost per completed survey and lower item nonresponse rates, lay community interviewers are a viable alternative to professional interviewers for fieldwork in community-based research. Additional research is needed to assess other important aspects of data quality interviewer such as interviewer effects and response error. PMID:28230551

  4. Interview With Leland Melvin

    NASA Video Gallery

    Middle school student Molly Moore interviews NASA's Associate Administrator for Education, Leland Melvin. She asks about his career as an engineer and astronaut and what it was like to live and wor...

  5. Instructor Interviews Joseph Featherstone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 1987

    1987-01-01

    An interview with Joseph Featherstone, a teacher at Michigan State University, reveals his attitudes regarding good teaching. Good teaching is a victory over meaninglessness, giving children the chance to hope and to have faith in their future. (CB)

  6. Successful Interviewing: A Practical Guide for the Applicant and Interviewer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sitzmann, Marion; Garcia, Reloy

    This booklet offers practical examples and guidelines to assist job hunters and other applicants in effectively confronting the interview process. Chapters include "Preparing for an Interview," which traces the process from making an initial inquiry to the actual interview situation and analyzes the interviewer's role; "The Job Interview: Practice…

  7. Interjections in interviews.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Daniel C; Kowal, Sabine; Ageneau, Carie

    2005-03-01

    A psycholinguistic hypothesis regarding the use of interjections in spoken utterances, originally formulated by Ameka (1992b, 1994) for the English language, but not confirmed in the German-language research of Kowal and O'Connell (2004 a & c), was tested: The local syntactic isolation of interjections is paralleled by their articulatory isolation in spoken utterances i.e., by their occurrence between a preceding and a following pause. The corpus consisted of four TV and two radio interviews of Hillary Clinton that had coincided with the publication of her book Living History (2003) and one TV interview of Robin Williams by James Lipton. No evidence was found for articulatory isolation of English-language interjections. In the Hillary Clinton interviews and Robin Williams interviews, respectively, 71% and 73% of all interjections occurred initially, i.e., at the onset of various units of spoken discourse: at the beginning of turns; at the beginning of articulatory phrases within turns, i.e., after a preceding pause; and at the beginning of a citation within a turn (either Direct Reported Speech [DRS] or what we have designated Hypothetical Speaker Formulation [HSF]. One conventional interjection (OH) occurred most frequently. The Robin Williams interview had a much higher occurrence of interjections, especially nonconventional ones, than the Hillary Clinton interviews had. It is suggested that the onset or initializing role of interjections reflects the temporal priority of the affective and the intuitive over the analytic, grammatical, and cognitive in speech production. Both this temporal priority and the spontaneous and emotional use of interjections are consonant with Wundt's (1900) characterization of the primary interjection as psychologically primitive. The interjection is indeed the purest verbal implementation of conceptual orality.

  8. Dental Hygienists' Experiences with Motivational Interviewing: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Curry-Chiu, Margaret E; Catley, Delwyn; Voelker, Marsha A; Bray, Kimberly Krust

    2015-08-01

    The effectiveness of Motivational Interviewing (MI) to change health behaviors is well documented. Previous studies support use of MI to change oral health behaviors in the areas of early childhood caries and periodontal diseases, but research is limited due to the sparse number of oral health care providers with training in MI. The University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC) formally integrated MI training into its dental hygiene curriculum five years ago. Summative program evaluation of UMKC's MI training shows that it effectively equips graduates with MI skills. The aim of this qualitative study was to use semi-structured interviews with nine program alumni to provide insight into the experiences of MI-trained dental hygienists in clinical practice. All interviews were captured with a digital voice recorder, were transcribed, and were resubmitted to the interviewees for checking. Five themes emerged from the data analysis: salience, best practices, barriers, facilitators, and lessons learned. These dental hygienists strongly valued and embraced the spirit of MI. They reported feeling strongly that it should be part of all dental hygiene curricula, and they upheld MI as a best practice. The participants approved of their MI instruction as a whole but felt it was difficult and sometimes not viable in practice. They reported that MI training had improved their communication skills and increased treatment acceptance. Time, difficulty, and managing patient resistance were the most often cited barriers, while a supportive climate and creating a routine were the most often cited facilitators.

  9. Valuing technology: A qualitative interview study with physicians about insulin pump therapy for children with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Shulman, Rayzel; Miller, Fiona A; Daneman, Denis; Guttmann, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    Insulin pumps for children with type 1 diabetes have been broadly adopted despite equivocal evidence about comparative effectiveness. To understand why and inform policy related to public funding for new technologies, we explored how physicians interpret the value of pumps. We conducted open-ended, semi-structured interviews with 16 physicians from a pediatric diabetes network in Ontario, Canada, and analyzed the data using interpretive description. Respondents recognized that pumps fell short of expectations because they required hard work, as well as family and school support. Yet, pumps were valued for their status as new technologies and as a promising step in developing future technology. In addition, they were valued for their role within a therapeutic relationship, given the context of chronic childhood disease. These findings identify the types of beliefs that influence the adoption and diffusion of technologies. Some beliefs bear on hopes for new technology that may inappropriately hasten adoption, creating excess cost with little benefit. On the other hand, some beliefs identify potential benefits that are not captured in effectiveness studies, but may warrant consideration in resource allocation decisions. Still others suggest the need for remediation, such as those bearing on disparity in pump use by socioeconomic status. Understanding how technologies are valued can help stakeholders decide how to address such beliefs and expectations in funding decisions and implementation protocols.

  10. Factors that influence research involvement among registered dietitians working as university faculty: a qualitative interview study.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Kevin; Markless, Sharon

    2012-07-01

    Research involvement is fundamental to the practice of dietetics and dietetics faculty should be ideally placed to contribute to this. Studies have identified a range of factors that influence faculty research involvement, many of which are relevant to registered dietitians. The aim of this study was to explore the factors that influence research involvement among dietetics faculty using qualitative semi-structured interviews. Thirteen dietetics faculty members were purposively sampled and participated in semi-structured interviews. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed thematically by the same researcher. Eight themes emerged that influenced research involvement among dietetics faculty and these related to the following distinct factors: institution and department (ie, size and structure, research philosophy, being established in research); activities (ie, faculty roles, time and teaching, research and grants); and individuals (ie, significant others, self). There was complex interaction between each of the eight themes. Many of the themes were very specific to the dietetics context, including being a small discipline, being in newer universities without established research portfolios, having greater teaching responsibilities, and the availability of grants in areas related to nutrition. The factors influencing research involvement among dietetics faculty members are complex and interact; therefore, solutions to overcome these barriers will need to account for this. These findings provide understanding that can contribute to this endeavor.

  11. Interview: Dr. Nathan Hare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pete, Gregory

    1986-01-01

    Presents an interview with Dr. Nathan Hare, who proposes to address some of the problems of lower class, Black male youth by developing a formally supervised ritual to initiate the Black boy into adult male maturity and asserts that materialism prevents rather than promotes success. (KH)

  12. The Unstructured Clinical Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Karyn Dayle

    2010-01-01

    In mental health, family, and community counseling settings, master's-level counselors engage in unstructured clinical interviewing to develop diagnoses based on the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed., text rev.; "DSM-IV-TR"; American Psychiatric Association, 2000). Although counselors receive education about…

  13. TECHNOS Interview: Esther Dyson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raney, Mardell

    1997-01-01

    This interview with Esther Dyson, who is president and owner of EDventure Holdings which focuses on emerging information technology worldwide, discusses personal responsibility for technology; government's role; content ownership and intellectual property; Internet development; education and computers; parents' role in education; teacher…

  14. Interview With Shelley Harwayne.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albers, Peggy; Koshewa, Allen

    2003-01-01

    Interviews Shelley Harwayne, founder of the Manhattan New School, who has been named one of 10 new regional superintendents for New York City's public school system. Explains that Shelley's work is renowned in literacy. Discusses leadership, diversity, teaching, and professional development. (PM)

  15. Interview with Christine Franklin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossman, Allan; Franklin, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Chris Franklin is Senior Lecturer, Undergraduate Coordinator, and Lothar Tresp Honoratus Honors Professor of Statistics at the University of Georgia. She is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association and received the USCOTS Lifetime Achievement Award in 2013. This interview took place via email on August 16, 2013-October 9, 2013. Franklin…

  16. Interview with Louise Lonabocker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Munkwitz-Smith, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    This issue of "College and University" marks a transition in the Editor-in-Chief Position, with the interview of Louise Lonabocker, who has served in this capacity for the past ten years. She has also served as President of AACRAO, and in both positions, Lonabocker has been a role model for many AACRAO leaders. Lonabocker describes the…

  17. Interview with Deborah Andrews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Cynthia

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Deborah Andrews about her experiences during her editorship of "Business Communication Quarterly." From June 1997 to March 2005, Debby served as editor of the journal, encouraging all readers to ask important questions about their work: How should we define business communication? On which disciplines and…

  18. Interviewing Children: Reporter Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Interviewing children is a critical element of the education reporter's daily work. However, practices for gaining access and avoiding harm and embarrassment vary widely depending on the news organization and individual reporter in question. This document aims to provide journalists with broad guidelines, but it stops short of advocating for the…

  19. Interview with Patrick Shannon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albers, Peggy

    2002-01-01

    Presents an interview with Patrick Shannon, a professor of Education at Penn State University. Describes how he writes widely on the politics of literacy and, in particular, the marketing of literacy. Discusses his interpretation of how literacy is marketed in schools today. (SG)

  20. A General Interview Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ives, Edward D.

    This guide is divided into 11 sections, each containing a number of questions and suggestions for conducting successful folklore and oral history interviews. Section 1, "Settlement and Dwellings," deals with the physical environment, local inhabitants, houses and outbuildings, and public buildings. Section 2, "Livelihood and…

  1. The Eating Disorder Assessment for DSM-5 (EDA-5): Development and Validation of a Structured Interview for Feeding and Eating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sysko, Robyn; Glasofer, Deborah R.; Hildebrandt, Tom; Klimek, Patrycja; Mitchell, James E.; Berg, Kelly C.; Peterson, Carol B.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Walsh, B. Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Objective Existing measures for DSM-IV eating disorder diagnoses have notable limitations, and there are important differences between DSM-IV and DSM-5 feeding and eating disorders. This study developed and validated a new semi-structured interview, the Eating Disorders Assessment for DSM-5 (EDA-5). Method Two studies evaluated the utility of the EDA-5. Study 1 compared the diagnostic validity of the EDA-5 to the Eating Disorder Examination (EDE) and evaluated the test-retest reliability of the new measure. Study 2 compared the diagnostic validity of an EDA-5 electronic application (“app”) to clinician interview and self-report assessments. Results In Study 1, the kappa for EDE and EDA-5 eating disorder diagnoses was 0.74 across all diagnoses (n= 64), with a range of κ=0.65 for Other Specified Feeding or Eating Disorder (OSFED)/Unspecified Feeding or Eating Disorder (USFED) to κ=0.90 for Binge Eating Disorder (BED). The EDA-5 test-retest kappa coefficient was 0.87 across diagnoses. For Study 2, clinical interview versus “app” conditions revealed a kappa of 0.83 for all eating disorder diagnoses (n=71). Across individual diagnostic categories, kappas ranged from 0.56 for OSFED/USFED to 0.94 for BN. Discussion High rates of agreement were found between diagnoses by EDA-5 and the EDE, and EDA-5 and clinical interviews. As this study supports the validity of the EDA-5 to generate DSM-5 eating disorders and the reliability of these diagnoses, the EDA-5 may be an option for the assessment of Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, and BED. Additional research is needed to evaluate the utility of the EDA-5 in assessing DSM-5 feeding disorders. PMID:25639562

  2. A Course in Medical Interviewing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froelich, Robert E.

    1969-01-01

    Course develops medical interviewing skills of students through a programed manual, role-playing exercises, programed patients and medical interviewing films, and the writing of medical histories. (IR)

  3. Interviews to Assess Learners' Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seda, Ileana; Pearson, P. David

    1991-01-01

    Presents open-ended and semistructured interviews to assess reading comprehension. Highlights the potential value of interviews in aligning assessment practices with instruction and learning theory. (MG)

  4. STS-112 Crew Interviews - Wolf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-112 Mission Specialist David Wolf is seen during this preflight interview, where he first answers questions on his career path and role models. Other questions cover mission goals, ISS (International Space Station) Expedition 5 spacecrew, crew training, the S1 Truss and its radiators, the MBS (Mobile Base Structure), his experience onboard Mir, and his EVAs (extravehicular activities) on the coming mission. The EVAs are the subject of several questions. Wolf discusses his crew members, and elsewhere discusses Pilot Pamela Melroy's role as an IV crew member during EVAs. In addition, Wolf answers questions on transfer operations, the SHIMMER experiment, and his thoughts on multinational crews and crew bonding.

  5. Access to Opportunities for Bilingualism for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities: Key Informant Interviews.

    PubMed

    de Valenzuela, Julia Scherba; Bird, Elizabeth Kay-Raining; Parkington, Karisa; Mirenda, Pat; Cain, Kate; MacLeod, Andrea A N; Segers, Eliane

    The purpose of this article is to describe the results of a thematic analysis of 79 semi-structured interviews collected at six research sites in four countries in relation to the inclusion and exclusion of students with developmental disabilities (DD) in and from special education and bilingual opportunities. The participants were individuals with expertise either in special needs and/or language education to support bilingualism (e.g., second language (L2) instruction), who served as key informants about service delivery and/or policy in these areas. Six themes emerged as salient during the analysis: we include all kids, special needs drives it, time/scheduling conflicts, IEP/IPP/statement drives it, it's up to the parents, and service availability. The results suggested that access to language programs and services is limited for children with DD, even though participants at all sites reported adherence to a philosophy of inclusion. A priority on special education services over language services was identified, as well as barriers to providing children with DD access to programs and services to support bilingual development. Some of these barriers included time and scheduling conflicts and limited service availability. Additionally, the role of parents in decision making was affirmed, although, in contrast to special education services, decision-making about participation or exemption from language programs was typically left up to the parents. Overall, the results suggest a need for greater attention to providing supports for both first (L1) and L2 language development for bilingual children with DD and greater access to available language programs.

  6. An Examination of Music Teacher Job Interview Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juchniewicz, Jay

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine which interview questions principals consider most important when interviewing prospective music teachers. Additionally, data were examined to determine any differences between school grade level, school setting, or years of experience as a principal in preferences for specific interview questions.…

  7. STS-109 Crew Interviews - Altman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-109 crew Commander Scott D. Altman is seen during a prelaunch interview. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, which are all related to maintenance of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). After the Columbia Orbiter's rendezvous with the HST, extravehicular activities (EVA) will be focused on several important tasks which include: (1) installing the Advanced Camera for Surveys; (2) installing a cooling system on NICMOS (Near Infrared Camera Multi-Object Spectrometer); (3) repairing the reaction wheel assembly; (4) installing additional solar arrays; (5) augmenting the power control unit; (6) working on the HST's gyros. The reaction wheel assembly task, a late addition to the mission, may necessitate the abandonment of one or more of the other tasks, such as the gyro work.

  8. Effects of Interviewing Style and Interviewer Appearance on a Child Behavioral Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mader, Lothar; Quevillon, Randal

    Clinical child interviews have received little attention in the psychological literature and in the absence of empirical findings, curent interview practices are primarily based on clinical lore. In order to investigate the effects of interviewing style and interviewer mode of dress, on the quantity and quality of information obtained from 8 to 11…

  9. Intersubjectivity in video interview.

    PubMed

    Haddouk, Lise

    2014-01-01

    The concept of relationship has rapidly evolved over the past few years, since the emergence of the internet network and the development of remote communication and exchanges. The emergence of cyberculture with the development of the internet has led to a new representation of the social link, in which communication never stops. In this context, computer mediated intersubjective relationships represent a main line of thinking and research. Thus, can we consider for example that relationship is only composed of an informational exchange? Would there be other dimensions possibly missing in computer mediated relationships? In this case, how could we re-introduce these aspects, "re-humanize" the remote relationships? New practices in psychology emerge with the ICT usage, both in the fields of research and for therapeutic purposes. Some fields like medicine already use remote health platforms that have proven useful in certain situations. In the field of remote clinical psychology, different media are used that contribute to the framework definition of the remote clinical interview, where the concept of relation holds a central place. Videoconference enables the introduction of an important element from the point of view of sensoriality: the body image, which engages the subjects' interaction in a different way than in a written or verbal exchange. But is the use of videoconference sufficient to establish a clinical framework comparable to the traditional one? How can the computer-mediated relationship enable and establish a potential object relation, rather than a mirrored one? Thinking through an online adaptation of the clinical interview framework led to the elaboration of a specific tool dedicated to this purpose and to research into the access to intersubjectivity in clinical video interview. This study's encouraging results have fostered the pursuit of this experience in the form of a platform dedicated to the conduction of clinical interviews through

  10. Interviews with Mexican midwives.

    PubMed

    Bortin, S

    1993-01-01

    Mexican society contains a variety of indigenous cultures as well as European influences. Most babies in rural areas are delivered by midwives. Traditional midwives, government-trained and empirical midwives, nurse-midwives, and foreign-trained midwives all practice in Mexico. Nurse-midwives in one project are demonstrating their ability to meet the needs of urban childbearing women. A midwifery organization is developing under the leadership of midwives influenced by the contemporary midwifery movement in the United States. In this article, some traditional Mexican midwifery practices are discussed and interviews with several different Mexican midwives from a variety of backgrounds are presented.

  11. Application of a "Semi-Structured" Approach with MODFLOW-USG to Inform Metamodels of Stream Depletion for Decision-Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinstein, D.; Fienen, M. N.; Reeves, H. W.; Nolan, B. T.

    2015-12-01

    Regional MODFLOW models commonly use coarse grids which preclude model application to local management issues (e.g., surface-water depletion by wells) without recourse to labor-intensive inset models. The advent of MODFLOW-USG opens the possibility of applying regional models directly to local problems over large areas. A "semi-structured" approach (uniform grid within layers, different grids among layers) has been tested using the USGS Lake Michigan Basin (LMB) regional model. The original 20-layer model with uniform 5000-ft spacing was converted to four layers with 500-ft spacing in the top glacial layer (where surface-water features are located) overlying coarser resolution layers representing deeper deposits. The MODFLOW-USG version of the LMB model successfully reproduces regional flow conditions and the refined grid spacing improves the simulated response of surface water to nearby wells. Introduction of streamflow routing increases model power to properly simulate headwater streams. The semi-structured LMB model is designed to feed a decision-support system based on metamodels. A metamodel is a statistical model founded on a computationally-expensive distributed model. In this case three types of metamodels trained on the LMB semi-structured model were tested (artificial neural networks, bayesian networks, and gradient-boosted regression trees) to evaluate the contribution of surface water to wells in shallow groundwater systems. The metamodels show a strong statistical relation between surface-water configuration and stream depletion in the presence of shallow pumping. Two conceptualizations of stream depletion were tested - one related to source of water to wells ("well-centered"), the other to baseflow reduction ("stream-centered"). Both hold promise that the trained metamodels, incorporating existing geospatial data, allow practical decision support across at least part of the US glacial aquifer system.

  12. Public Participation Guide: Stakeholder Interviews

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Interviews with stakeholders are one-to-one conversations about a specific topic or issue. The primary purpose of these interviews is to obtain project-relevant information and elicit stakeholder reactions and suggestions.

  13. Motivational Interviewing and Adolescent Psychopharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dilallo, John J.; Weiss, Gony

    2009-01-01

    The use of motivational interviewing strategies in the practice of adolescent psychopharmacology is described. Motivational interviewing is an efficient and collaborative style of clinical interaction and this helps adolescent patients to integrate their psychiatric difficulties into a more resilient identity.

  14. The Art of the Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Rhonda

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the qualities it takes for journalism students to be good interviewers and outlines several guidelines to follow. Lists seven "Boy Scout rules of interviewing." Gives a list of eight points on how to "punctuate what people say." (SC)

  15. Job Interviewing? Try the Telephone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kegel, Paul L.

    1979-01-01

    Telephone interviews can save college and candidates time and money while precluding the judging of job candidates by extraneous factors. A format for a successful telephone interview is suggested. (Author/MLF)

  16. Planning for the Job Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Close, Elizabeth, Ed.; Ramsey, Katherine, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    Offers advice from middle school educators (a principal, a supervisor, and a teacher) on job interviews for teaching positions: how applicants are selected from the stack of applications, what happens during an interview, and what truly makes a difference. (SR)

  17. A comparison of mental state examination documentation by junior clinicians in electronic health records before and after the introduction of a semi-structured assessment template (OPCRIT+)

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Sarah E.M.; Rucker, James; Kerr, Madeleine; Gallo, Fidel; Constable, Giles; Hotopf, Matthew; Stewart, Robert; Broadbent, Matthew; Baggaley, Martin; Lovestone, Simon; McGuffin, Peter; Amarasinghe, Myanthi; Newman, Stuart; Schumann, Gunter; Brittain, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The mental state examination (MSE) provides crucial information for healthcare professionals in the assessment and treatment of psychiatric patients as well as potentially providing valuable data for mental health researchers accessing electronic health records (EHRs). We wished to establish if improvements could be achieved in the documenting of MSEs by junior doctors within a large United Kingdom mental health trust following the introduction of an EHR based semi-structured MSE assessment template (OPCRIT+). Methods First, three consultant psychiatrists using a modified version of the Physician Documentation Quality Instrument-9 (PDQI-9) blindly rated fifty MSEs written using OPCRIT+ and fifty normal MSEs written with no template. Second, we conducted an audit to compare the frequency with which individual components of the MSE were documented in the normal MSEs compared with the OPCRIT + MSEs. Results PDQI-9 ratings indicated that the OPCRIT + MSEs were more ‘Thorough’, ‘Organized’, ‘Useful’ and ‘Comprehensible’ as well as being of an overall higher quality than the normal MSEs. The audit identified that the normal MSEs contained fewer mentions of the individual components of ‘Thought content’, ‘Anxiety’ and ‘Cognition & Insight’. Conclusions These results indicate that a semi-structured assessment template significantly improves the quality of MSE recording by junior doctors within EHRs. Future work should focus on whether such improvements translate into better patient outcomes and have the ability to improve the quality of information available on EHRs to researchers. PMID:26033569

  18. Interviewing Skills for Supervisory Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinmetz, Lawrence L.

    This book has been designed to elaborate on what interviewing is in its basic forms and how these various forms can be utilized by the operating supervisor. Its intent is to develop, in simple language, the techniques of successful interviewing. Illustrations of real interviews are presented and the supervisor is encouraged to use role playing as…

  19. Preparing for Your Principal Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spanneut, Gene

    2007-01-01

    Being invited to the initial round of interviews for a principal opening is an opportunity; preparing for it is an investment. A successful interview requires that you create a detailed plan and take specific steps. This article provides tips on how to prepare yourself for a principal interview. Before you focus on what to do during your…

  20. Mock Interviews for Student Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Jill M.

    2007-01-01

    Each semester during student-teacher seminars, the author invites local administrators to come to campus and participate in mock job interviews. These practice interviews provide students an opportunity to prepare for a successful interview and give administrators the chance to meet graduating students who will help alleviate Arizona's teacher…

  1. STS-109 Crew Interviews - Currie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-109 Mission Specialist 2 Nancy Jane Currie is seen during a prelaunch interview. She answers questions about her inspiration to become an astronaut and her career path. She gives details on the Columbia Orbiter mission which has as its main tasks the maintenance and augmentation of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). While she will do many things during the mission, the most important will be her role as the primary operator of the robotic arm, which is responsible for grappling the HST, bringing it to the Orbiter bay, and providing support for the astronauts during their EVAs (Extravehicular Activities). Additionally, the robotic arm will be responsible for transferring new and replacement equipment from the Orbiter to the HST. This equipment includes: two solar arrays, a Power Control Unit (PCU), the Advanced Camera for Surveys, and a replacement cooling system for NICMOS (Near Infrared Camera Multi-Object Spectrometer).

  2. Is the patient able to watch TV or read the newspaper? A functional semi-structured scale to observe Hemineglect symptoms in Activities of Daily Living (H-ADL).

    PubMed

    Piccardi, L; Magnotti, L; Tanzilli, A; Aloisi, M; Guariglia, P

    2016-01-01

    We developed a functional semi-structured scale to observe Hemineglect symptoms in Activities of Daily Living (H-ADL). The scale could assist clinicians in assessing rehabilitation priorities aimed at correcting any persisting errors or omissions. In addition, the scale could also be used by caregivers to observe patients' progress and improve their participation. Two groups of right brain-damaged patients (25 with hemineglect; 27 without hemineglect) were tested twice: at admission and before discharge from hospital. A control group of healthy individuals matched to patients for age and education and patients' caregivers also participated. Two raters (A; B), experts in neuropsychology, observed patients and healthy individuals using the H-ADL. We found that the H-ADL final scores correlated with the standard hemineglect tests. The three groups differed in performance and differences also emerged between the first and the second assessment, suggesting an improvement due to the remission of hemineglect as a consequence of the treatment. Raters A and B did not differ in their observations, but there were some discrepancies with caregivers' observations. Therefore, although caregivers could help clinicians in detecting persistent hemineglect behaviour, the assessment should be performed by experts in neuropsychology.

  3. Philosophy, Rhetoric, Literacy Criticism: (Inter)views.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Gary A., Ed.

    In addition to a foreword by Clifford Geertz and an introduction by Patricia Bizzell, this book features 12 essays by rhetoric and composition scholars responding to interviews with prominent scholars outside the discipline. The commentaries in the book entertain a range of topics, including language, rhetoric, philosophy, feminism and literary…

  4. The facilitators of communication with people with dementia in a care setting: an interview study with healthcare workers

    PubMed Central

    Stanyon, Miriam Ruth; Griffiths, Amanda; Thomas, Shirley A.; Gordon, Adam Lee

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: to describe the views of healthcare workers on the facilitators of communication with people with dementia in a care setting. Design: thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews. Setting: all participants were interviewed in their place of work. Participants: sixteen healthcare workers whose daily work involves interacting with people with dementia. Results: four overarching categories of themes were identified from the interviews that impact on communication: the attributes of a care worker, communication strategies used, organisational factors and the physical characteristics of the care environment. Conclusion: many strategies used by healthcare workers to facilitate communication have not yet been studied in the research literature. Participants' views on training should be incorporated into future dementia training programmes. PMID:26764403

  5. The Economic Burden of Orthopedic Surgery Residency Interviews on Applicants

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Harold A.; Finkler, Elissa S.; Wu, Karen; Schiff, Adam P.; Nystrom, Lukas M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The intense competition for orthopedic surgery residency positions influences the interview process. The financial impact on residency applicants is less well understood. The purpose of the present study was to define the economic burden of the orthopedic surgery residency interview process while additionally describing how applicants finance the expense. Methods We distributed surveys to 48 nonrotating applicants at our institution’s residency interview days for the 2015 match year. The survey consisted of eleven questions specific to the costs of interviewing for orthopedic surgery residency positions. Results The survey response rate was 90% (43/48). Applicants applied to a median of 65 orthopedic surgery residency programs (range 21-88) and targeted a median of 15 interviews (range 12-25). The mean cost estimate for a single interview was $450 (range $200-800) and the cost estimate for all interviews was $7,119 (range $2,500-15,000). Applicants spent a mean of $344 (range $0-750) traveling to our interview. Seventy-two percent borrowed money to finance their interview costs and 28% canceled interviews for financial reasons. Conclusions The financial cost of interviewing for orthopedic surgery is substantial and a majority of applicants add to their educational debt by taking out loans to finance interviews. Future considerations should be made to minimize these costs for an already financially burdened population. PMID:27528831

  6. Assessing the diagnostic validity of a structured psychiatric interview in a first-admission hospital sample

    PubMed Central

    NORDGAARD, JULIE; REVSBECH, RASMUS; SÆBYE, DITTE; PARNAS, JOSEF

    2012-01-01

    The use of structured psychiatric interviews performed by non-clinicians is frequent for research purposes and is becoming increasingly common in clini-cal practice. The validity of such interviews has rarely been evaluated empirically. In this study of a sample of 100 diagnostically heterogeneous, first-admitted inpatients, the results of an assessment with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID), yielding a DSM-IV diagnosis and performed by a trained non-clinician, were compared with a consensus lifetime best diagnostic estimate (DSM-IV) by two experienced research clinicians, based on multiple sources of information, which included videotaped comprehensive semi-structured narrative interviews. The overall kappa agreement was 0.18. The sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of schizophrenia by SCID were 19% and 100%, respectively. It is concluded that structured interviews performed by non-clinicians are not recommendable for clinical work and should only be used in research with certain precautions. It is suggested that a revival of systematic theoretical and practical training in psychopathology is an obvious way forward in order to improve the validity and therapeutic utility of psychiatric diagnosis. PMID:23024678

  7. The Utilisation of Music by Casino Managers: An Interview Study.

    PubMed

    Bramley, Stephanie; Dibben, Nicola; Rowe, Richard

    2016-12-01

    Music is ubiquitous in retail and commercial environments, with some managers believing that music can enhance the customer experience, increase footfall and sales and improve consumer satisfaction. Casino gambling is popular in the United Kingdom and anecdotal evidence suggests that music is often present. However, little is known about the rationale for music use from the perspective of casino managers. In this study semi-structured interviews were conducted with five casino managers to establish their motivations for utilising music, the factors informing their choice of music and the extent to which music is used with the intention of influencing gambling behaviour. Results showed that casino managers utilised two types of music-recorded background music, often sourced via external music supply companies and live music. Live music was often situated away from the gaming floor and used primarily to accompany participation in non-gambling activities. Recorded background music was not used with the direct aim of influencing customers' gambling behaviour, but to create the right atmosphere for gambling and to promote certain moods within the casinos. To achieve these aims casino managers manipulated the tempo, volume and genre of the recorded background music. Casino managers also reported that some gamblers listen to music via portable music players, possibly with the intention of customising their gambling experience. This study is unique as it has provided a first-hand account of casino managers' implicit theories with regards to why they utilise music and the roles which music is considered to fulfil in casinos.

  8. An Interview with Stephen Vitiello

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lampert, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Stephen Vitiello is a world-renowned contemporary sound artist whom the author has known as a colleague for several years. This article presents an interview about the overall body of Vitiello's work to date, and his thoughts on teaching at Virginia Commonwealth University. The interview explores the creative and noncreative tensions between…

  9. Motivational Interviewing in Relational Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, William R.; Rose, Gary S.

    2010-01-01

    Responds to M. Stanton's comments on the current author's original article. One of the puzzles of motivational interviewing is why it works at all. How can it be that an individual interview or two yields change in a long-standing problem behavior even without any effort to alter social context? The time involved is such a tiny part of the…

  10. An Interview with Noam Chomsky

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jack, Gavin

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a transcript of an interview that the author conducted with Noam Chomsky. In this interview, Chomsky talks about language acquisition and his theory of Universal Grammar. He then explains how the USA best exemplifies the individualist national culture. He also cites the challenges researchers should address in intercultural…

  11. Secretarial Administraton: The Interviewing Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemesh, Anna

    1979-01-01

    Suggests classroom techniques to prepare business students for employment interviews and gives information on lawful and unlawful employment interview inquiries, as well as some fair employment legal requirements of the Equal Employment Opportunity Act of 1974, Civil Rights Act of 1964, Equal Pay Act of 1963, and Rehabilitation Act of 1973. (MF)

  12. Psychosocial Syndemics are Additively Associated with Worse ART Adherence in HIV-infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Blashill, Aaron J.; Bedoya, C. Andres; Mayer, Kenneth H.; O’Cleirigh, Conall; Pinkston, Megan; Remmert, Jocelyn E.; Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Safren, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV-infected individuals is necessary to both individual and public health, and psychosocial problems have independently been associated with poor adherence. To date, studies have not systematically examined the effect of multiple, co-occurring psychosocial problems (i.e., “syndemics”) on ART adherence. Participants included 333 HIV-infected individuals who completed a comprehensive baseline evaluation, as part of a clinical trial to evaluate an intervention to treat depression and optimize medication adherence. Participants completed self-report questionnaires, and trained clinicians completed semi-structured diagnostic interviews. ART non-adherence was objectively measured via an electronic pill cap (i.e., MEMS). As individuals reported a greater number of syndemic indicators, their odds of non-adherence increased. Co-occurring psychosocial problems have an additive effect on the risk for poor ART adherence. Future behavioral medicine interventions are needed that address these problems comprehensively, and/or the core mechanisms that they share. PMID:25331267

  13. Psychosocial Syndemics are Additively Associated with Worse ART Adherence in HIV-Infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Blashill, Aaron J; Bedoya, C Andres; Mayer, Kenneth H; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Pinkston, Megan M; Remmert, Jocelyn E; Mimiaga, Matthew J; Safren, Steven A

    2015-06-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV-infected individuals is necessary to both individual and public health, and psychosocial problems have independently been associated with poor adherence. To date, studies have not systematically examined the effect of multiple, co-occurring psychosocial problems (i.e., "syndemics") on ART adherence. Participants included 333 HIV-infected individuals who completed a comprehensive baseline evaluation, as part of a clinical trial to evaluate an intervention to treat depression and optimize medication adherence. Participants completed self-report questionnaires, and trained clinicians completed semi-structured diagnostic interviews. ART non-adherence was objectively measured via an electronic pill cap (i.e., MEMS). As individuals reported a greater number of syndemic indicators, their odds of non-adherence increased. Co-occurring psychosocial problems have an additive effect on the risk for poor ART adherence. Future behavioral medicine interventions are needed that address these problems comprehensively, and/or the core mechanisms that they share.

  14. [Interview with Dr. Ricardo Bressani].

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    In an interview Dr. Ricardo Bressani, a chemical engineer by profession and a consultant of the Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama (INCAP), talks about the search for a product later given the name of Incaparina, which was eventually developed for food supplementation programs by INCAP. Experiments were made with soybeans, cottonseed, and various cereals to arrive at the optimal mixture of 62% cereal and 38% protein for this product. In addition, vitamins and lysine were added. The major demand for this biscuit occurred between 1976 and 1978. Since that time sales have ebbed partly owing to the soaring commodity prices. Incaparina is sold in Guatemala and El Salvador and there are tests going on in Mexico, Colombia, and Cuba to produce it locally. This product is also proof of the benefit of developing leguminous cereal systems. The optimal combination is 70% cereals and 30% legumes, each providing 50% protein. The potential of mixing various other cereals and fruits are also being studied. A large number (up to 60 annually) of nutritional research papers are published on the national level and in Latin America in prestigious scientific journals whose monitoring calls for coordination between different authors.

  15. Understanding the role of farm dams in the Murray-Darling Basin in Australia through hydrological analysis coupled with stakeholder interviews

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuil, Linda; Winnubst, Madelinde; van Dijk, Albert

    2013-04-01

    Climate predictions suggest that surface water availability in the Murray-Darling Basin (MDB) in Australia is more likely to decline than to increase in the next decades. In 2000, farm dams were first recognized as a significant risk to future flows in the MDB and have since been the subject of hydrological research. This study was conducted to provide insight into the role of farm dams in the Yass catchment, which is a subcatchment of the MDB close to Canberra, in order to indentify obstacles for integrated water management. The role of farm dams was investigated from both a hydrological and social perspective. Model prediction and data inference were used to estimate the impact of farm dams on streamflow. The density of farm dams in the catchment was estimated at 5.7 dams km-2. The impact on the Yass River was simulated to be in the order of 20 percent of mean annual streamflow. To understand why farm dams are used, semi-structured interviews were conducted to capture views and opinions of land holders. Research found that farm dams play a very important role in terms of individuals' water supply, although other systems are also used. Furthermore, land holders are responsible for their own water supply for drinking and agricultural water needs. Water rights are based on a right to rainfall or groundwater that is present on an individual's property. This means that landholders have both a need and a right to collect and store runoff. Current legislation put in place by the New South Wales government to restrict the amount of rain water to be captured does not seem to affect most people. If additional policy to minimize the impact of farm dams on streamflow were to be introduced, this has to be based on well-thought-out arguments based on a long term vision as the interview results indicate that farm dams are deeply embedded in Australian rural culture.

  16. How illness affects family members: a qualitative interview survey

    PubMed Central

    Wittenberg, Eve; Saada, Adrianna; Prosser, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Spillover effects of illness on family members can be substantial. The purpose of this study was to identify the domains of family members’ health and well-being that are affected when a relative has a chronic health condition. Methods Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted in February, 2012 with 49 individuals whose relatives had any of five chronic health conditions (arthritis, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease/dementia, cerebral palsy, and depression), purposively sampled to include different relationships with the ill relative (parent, child, spouse). Subjects were queried on whether and how having an ill relative affected their health and well-being; they were also asked about their caregiving responsibilities and the relative’s health. Interview data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Results Family members in our sample reported experiencing psychological and non-health effects from having an ill relative, and secondarily somatic effects. Effects on emotional health were most commonly reported as psychological spillover; non-health effects frequently included changes in daily activities and provision of caregiving. Spouses of patients reported the broadest range of spillover domains affected and adolescents of ill parents the fewest. Family members reported experiencing effects that were perceived as both positive and negative. Conclusions Spillover of illness onto family members encompasses a wide range of domains of health and well-being, extending beyond those included in many existing health-related quality of life measures. Outcomes measurement efforts should be expanded to adequately capture these health and well-being outcomes for analysis, to ensure that the benefits of interventions are accurately estimated and conclusions are valid. PMID:24142495

  17. Understanding delayed access to antenatal care: a qualitative interview study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Delayed access to antenatal care ('late booking’) has been linked to increased maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. The aim of this qualitative study was to understand why some women are late to access antenatal care. Methods 27 women presenting after 19 completed weeks gestation for their first hospital booking appointment were interviewed, using a semi-structured format, in community and maternity hospital settings in South Yorkshire, United Kingdom. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and entered onto NVivo 8 software. An interdisciplinary, iterative, thematic analysis was undertaken. Results The late booking women were diverse in terms of: age (15–37 years); parity (0–4); socioeconomic status; educational attainment and ethnicity. Three key themes relating to late booking were identified from our data: 1) 'not knowing’: realisation (absence of classic symptoms, misinterpretation); belief (age, subfertility, using contraception, lay hindrance); 2) 'knowing’: avoidance (ambivalence, fear, self-care); postponement (fear, location, not valuing care, self-care); and 3) 'delayed’ (professional and system failures, knowledge/empowerment issues). Conclusions Whilst vulnerable groups are strongly represented in this study, women do not always fit a socio-cultural stereotype of a 'late booker’. We report a new taxonomy of more complex reasons for late antenatal booking than the prevalent concepts of denial, concealment and disadvantage. Explanatory sub-themes are also discussed, which relate to psychological, empowerment and socio-cultural factors. These include poor reproductive health knowledge and delayed recognition of pregnancy, the influence of a pregnancy 'mindset’ and previous pregnancy experience, and the perceived value of antenatal care. The study also highlights deficiencies in early pregnancy diagnosis and service organisation. These issues should be considered by practitioners and service commissioners in order to promote

  18. Interview with Alison Goate.

    PubMed

    Goate, Alison

    2008-12-01

    Alison M Goate is the Samuel & Mae S Ludwig Professor of Genetics in Psychiatry, Professor of Genetics and Professor of Neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis (MO, USA). Dr Goate studied for her undergraduate degree in biochemistry at the University of Bristol (UK) and received her graduate training at Oxford University (UK). She performed postdoctoral studies with Professor Theodore Puck, Professor Louis Lim and Dr John Hardy before receiving a Royal Society University Research Fellowship to support her independent research program at St Mary's Hospital Medical School in London. In 1991, Dr Goate and colleagues reported the first mutation linked to an inherited form of Alzheimer's disease, in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene on chromosome 21. The mutation was found to be linked to inherited cases of early-onset Alzheimer's disease. In 1992, Dr Goate moved to Washington University as an Associate Professor in Genetics and Psychiatry. Dr Goate and colleagues have since identified mutations in four other genes, including two that cause Alzheimer's disease and two that cause the related dementia frontotemporal dementia. In addition to her work on dementia, Dr Goate's laboratory also studies the genetics of alcohol and nicotine dependence. Dr Goate has received numerous awards including the Potamkin Award from the American Academy of Neurology, the Zenith Award from the Alzheimer's Association, the Senior Investigator Award from the Metropolitan Life Foundation, the St Louis Academy of Science Innovation Award and the Carl and Gerty Cori Faculty Achievement Award at Washington University. Dr Goate has been a member of many scientific Review Boards and currently serves on the Editorial Boards of several journals.

  19. A method of phenomenological interviewing.

    PubMed

    Bevan, Mark T

    2014-01-01

    In this article I propose a method of interviewing for descriptive phenomenological research that offers an explicit, theoretically based approach for researchers. My approach enables application of descriptive phenomenology as a total method for research, and not one just focused on data analysis. This structured phenomenological approach to interviewing applies questions based on themes of experience contextualization, apprehending the phenomenon and its clarification. The method of questioning employs descriptive and structural questioning as well as novel use of imaginative variation to explore experience. The approach will help researchers understand how to undertake descriptive phenomenological research interviews.

  20. Interview with James Bradner. Interviewed by Hannah Coaker.

    PubMed

    Bradner, James E

    2013-08-01

    James E Bradner is an Assistant Professor in Medicine at Harvard Medical School (MA, USA) as well as a Staff Physician in the Division of Hematologic Malignancies at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (MA, USA). The present research focus of the Bradner laboratory concerns the discovery and optimization of prototype drugs targeting cancer gene regulation. The clinical objective of the Bradner group is to deliver novel therapeutics for human clinical investigation in hematologic diseases. Bradner's awards and honors include the Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovation Award, the Smith Family Award for Excellence in Biomedical Research, the Dunkin' Donuts Rising Star Award and the HMS Distinguished Excellence in Teaching Award. He is a member of the American Society of Clinical Investigation, the American Society of Hematology, the American Chemical Society and the American Association of Cancer Research. His recent research has been published in Nature, Cell, Nature Chemical Biology and the Journal of the American Chemical Society. He has authored more than 20 US Patent applications, licensed to five pharmaceutical companies, and is a scientific founder of Acetylon Pharmaceuticals, SHAPE Pharmaceuticals, Tensha Therapeutics and Syros Pharmaceuticals. Bradner received his AB from Harvard University, his MD from the University of Chicago (IL, USA) and a MMS from Harvard Medical School. He completed his postgraduate training in Internal Medicine at Brigham & Women's Hospital (MA, USA), followed by a fellowship in Medical Oncology and Hematology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Following additional post-doctoral training in Chemistry at Harvard University and the Broad Institute (MA, USA) with Professor Stuart Schreiber, Bradner joined the research faculty of Dana-Farber in 2008. Interview conducted by Hannah Coaker, Assistant Commissioning Editor.

  1. Interview Questions with Bentham Scientific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2013-01-01

    John Mather answers questions for an interview for the Bentham Science Newsletter. He covers topics ranging from his childhood, his professional career and his thoughts on research, technology and today's scientists and engineers.

  2. National Health Interview Survey (NHIS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The NHIS collects data on a broad range of health topics through personal household interviews. The results of NHIS provide data to track health status, health care access, and progress toward achieving national health objectives.

  3. An Interview with John Wilson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halstead, J. Mark; McLaughlin, Terence H.

    2000-01-01

    Presents an interview with John Wilson covering topics such as: addressing the people who influenced him, highlighting Wilson's career and home background, and providing discussions on his opinions related to religion, morality, moral education, and the concept of authority. (CMK)

  4. An Interview with Jonathan Piel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Diane J.

    1992-01-01

    This transcript of an interview with Jonathan Piel, editor of "Scientific American," discusses communication between scientists and readers; scientific research publications and the publishing industry; universities as research publishers; library budget reductions and purchasing decisions; electronic publishing; NREN (National Research…

  5. An Interview with Constance Reid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexanderson, G. L.

    1980-01-01

    Constance Reid, a well-known author of books on mathematics and mathematicians, is interviewed at her home in San Francisco in July, 1979. She discusses her studies of the lives of Hilbert, Courant and other mathematicians. (MP)

  6. Usability of geographic information -- factors identified from qualitative analysis of task-focused user interviews.

    PubMed

    Harding, Jenny

    2013-11-01

    Understanding user needs for geographic information and the factors which influence the usability of such information in diverse user contexts is an essential part of user centred development of information products. There is relatively little existing research focused on the design and usability of information products in general. This paper presents a research approach based on semi structured interviews with people working with geographic information on a day to day basis, to establish a reference base of qualitative data on user needs for geographic information with respect to context of use. From this reference data nine key categories of geographic information usability are identified and discussed in the context of limited existing research concerned with geographic information usability.

  7. Color-coded audio computer-assisted self-interviews (C-ACASI) for poorly educated men and women in a semi-rural area of South India: "good, scary and thrilling".

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Tarun; Brown, Joelle; Saravanamurthy, P Sakthivel; Kumar, Raju Mohan; Detels, Roger

    2013-07-01

    It is challenging to collect accurate and complete data on sensitive issues such as sexual behaviors. Our objective was to explore experience and perceptions regarding the use of a locally programmed color-coded audio computer-assisted self interview (C-ACASI) system among men and women in a semi-rural setting in south India. We conducted a mixed-methods cross-sectional survey using semi-structured interviews among 89 truck drivers and 101 truck driver wives who had participated earlier in the C-ACASI survey across a predominantly rural district in Tamil Nadu. To assess the color-coded format used, descriptive quantitative analysis was coupled with thematic content analysis of qualitative data. Only 10% of participants had ever used a computer before. Nearly 75% did not report any problem in using C-ACASI. The length of the C-ACASI survey was acceptable to 98% of participants. Overall, 87% of wives and 73% of truck drivers stated that C-ACASI was user-friendly and felt comfortable in responding to the sensitive questions. Nearly all (97%) participants reported that using C-ACASI encouraged them to respond honestly compared to face-to-face personal interviews. Both the drivers and wives expressed that C-ACASI provided confidentiality, privacy, anonymity, and an easy mechanism for responding truthfully to potentially embarrassing questions about their personal sexual relationships. It is feasible and acceptable to use C-ACASI for collecting sensitive data from poorly computer-literate, non-English-speaking, predominantly rural populations of women and men. Our findings support the implementation of effective and culturally sensitive C-ACASI for data collection, albeit with additional validation.

  8. Studying Readiness for Clinical Decision Support for Worker Health Using the Rapid Assessment Process and Mixed Methods Interviews

    PubMed Central

    Ash, Joan S.; Chase, Dian; Wiesen, Jane F.; Murphy, Elizabeth V.; Marovich, Stacey

    2016-01-01

    To determine how the Rapid Assessment Process (RAP) can be adapted to evaluate the readiness of primary care clinics for acceptance and use of computerized clinical decision support (CDS) related to clinical management of working patients, we used a unique blend of ethnographic methods for gathering data. First, knowledge resources, which were prototypes of CDS content areas (diabetes, lower back pain, and asthma) containing evidence-based information, decision logic, scenarios and examples of use, were developed by subject matter experts. A team of RAP researchers then visited five clinic settings to identify barriers and facilitators to implementing CDS about the health of workers in general and the knowledge resources specifically. Methods included observations, semi-structured qualitative interviews and graphic elicitation interviews about the knowledge resources. We used both template and grounded hermeneutic approaches to data analysis. Preliminary results indicate that the methods succeeded in generating specific actionable recommendations for CDS design. PMID:28269822

  9. Studying Readiness for Clinical Decision Support for Worker Health Using the Rapid Assessment Process and Mixed Methods Interviews.

    PubMed

    Ash, Joan S; Chase, Dian; Wiesen, Jane F; Murphy, Elizabeth V; Marovich, Stacey

    2016-01-01

    To determine how the Rapid Assessment Process (RAP) can be adapted to evaluate the readiness of primary care clinics for acceptance and use of computerized clinical decision support (CDS) related to clinical management of working patients, we used a unique blend of ethnographic methods for gathering data. First, knowledge resources, which were prototypes of CDS content areas (diabetes, lower back pain, and asthma) containing evidence-based information, decision logic, scenarios and examples of use, were developed by subject matter experts. A team of RAP researchers then visited five clinic settings to identify barriers and facilitators to implementing CDS about the health of workers in general and the knowledge resources specifically. Methods included observations, semi-structured qualitative interviews and graphic elicitation interviews about the knowledge resources. We used both template and grounded hermeneutic approaches to data analysis. Preliminary results indicate that the methods succeeded in generating specific actionable recommendations for CDS design.

  10. "There's a whole different way of working with adolescents": interviews with Australian Genetic Counselors about their experiences with adolescent clients.

    PubMed

    Tse, Cheryl; Sahhar, Margaret; Wallace, Jane; Duncan, Rony E

    2013-10-01

    Adolescence is a developmental period marked by unique physical, psychological and social changes. Guidelines about working with adolescents are available to health professionals in other fields, yet few resources are tailored specifically to genetic counselors. The current qualitative study explored the experiences of genetic counselors who work with adolescent clients to determine whether challenges exist and if further training and support are needed. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 genetic counselors from Australia. Interview transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis from which 7 key themes emerged: 1) Adolescents: A distinct client group? 2) Characteristics of adolescents; 3) Strategies for working with adolescents; 4) Confidentiality; 5) Parental involvement and presence in sessions; 6) Benefits of working with adolescents; and 7) The effectiveness of past training and education. The findings hold important implications for clinical practice and may inform future training programs and guidelines for genetic counselors internationally.

  11. HCMR interviews physician administrator leaders. Interview by Michael J. Enright.

    PubMed

    Edwards, C; Henry, R A; Kiser, W S; Mayberry, W E; Kaufman, R P

    1984-01-01

    This interview departs from HCMR's usual format, interviewing several leaders in health care administration for their ideas on current economic pressures, the impact of competition and joint ventures, attitudes toward equity and capital formation, and competition between the interest of clinical medicine and the cost of care. The physician administrators interviewed hold senior administrative positions: Charles Edwards, President and Chief Executive Officer of Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation; Robert A. Henry, President and Chief Executive Officer of Swedish-American Corporation; William S. Kiser, Chairman of the Board of Governors at Cleveland Clinic Foundation; W. Eugene Mayberry, Chairman of the Board of Governors at Mayo Clinic; and Ronald P. Kaufman, Vice-President for Medical Affairs of George Washington University Hospital. All are members of the Board of Regents or Fellows of the American College of Physician Executives.

  12. STS-109 Crew Interviews: Michael J. Massimino

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-109 Mission Specialist Michael J. Massimino is seen during a prelaunch interview. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut, his career path, and his most memorable experiences. He gives details on the mission's goals and objectives, which focus on the refurbishing of the Hubble Space Telescope, and his role in the mission. He explains the plans for the rendezvous of the Columbia Orbiter with the Hubble Space Telescope. He provides details and timelines for each of the planned Extravehicular Activities (EVAs), which include replacing the solar arrays, changing the Power Control Unit, installing the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), and installing a new Cryocooler for the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). He also describes the break-out plan in place for these spacewalks. The interview ends with Massimino explaining the details of a late addition to the mission's tasks, which is to replace a reaction wheel on the Hubble Space Telescope.

  13. 37 CFR 1.133 - Interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Interviews. (a)(1) Interviews with examiners concerning applications and other matters pending before the... designate. Interviews will not be permitted at any other time or place without the authority of the Director... the interview as warranting favorable action must be filed by the applicant. An interview does...

  14. 37 CFR 1.133 - Interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Interviews. (a)(1) Interviews with examiners concerning applications and other matters pending before the... designate. Interviews will not be permitted at any other time or place without the authority of the Director... the interview as warranting favorable action must be filed by the applicant. An interview does...

  15. Janus Job Interview Guide. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingstone, Arnold

    Designed for below-average-reading-level students, the purpose of this interview guide is to help young job seekers prepare for the job interview process. The first three chapters explain the nature of the personal job interview, the steps to be followed in preparing for a job interview, and the do's and don't's of the interview itself. The…

  16. An interview with Michael Fordham. Interview by Paul Roazen.

    PubMed

    Fordham, Michael

    2005-02-01

    In the course of early interviews on the history of psychoanalysis, I saw Michael Fordham in the late summer of 1965. We concentrated primarily on the differences between Freud and Jung, as well as the characteristic distinctions between the two schools that they founded. Fordham also talked about some of his personal contacts with Jung.

  17. [Interview with Professor Reinhilde Jacobs. Interview by Th van Nuijs].

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2007-01-01

    Th. van Nuijs, chief editor of the Revue Belge de Médecine Dentaire, interviews professor Reinhilde Jacobs. R. Jacobs is professor of dento-maxillo-facial radiology and radioprotection at the Catholic University of Leuven. She is also head of the Oral Imaging Centre at the same university.

  18. STS-109 Crew Interview: Grunsfeld

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-109 Payload Commander John Grunsfeld is seen during a prelaunch interview answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goal (which is to service the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)), his role during the mission, the five scheduled spacewalks, the Columbia Orbiter's recent upgrades, and what he sees as the challenges of the mission. Grunsfeld describes how his experience on the STS-103 mission, a previous HST servicing mission, has helped prepare him for the STS-109 mission. The interview ends with Grunsfeld explaining why the servicing of the Reaction Wheel Assembly, a task added late in his training, is so important.

  19. What Rural Physicians Need to Engage in Community Based Education: A Qualitative Interview Survey

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Manabu; Kawabata, Hidenobu; Kisa, Kengo; Maezawa, Masaji

    2012-01-01

    There is systematic evidence that community-based education is effective in the recruitment of rural physicians to remote communities. However, various obstacles may exist that prevent rural physicians from sustaining their mentoring activities. The aim of this study was to explore ways for rural physicians to overcome such adversities and continue their mentoring activities. We interviewed four nominated physicians (all male, mean age 48 years) based in Hokkaido, Japan, who practiced in an area with less than 10,000 inhabitants. Semi-structured interviews of approximately 60 minutes were performed and focused on topics rural physicians’ found necessary for their teaching activities. All interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed, the verbatim transcripts were analyzed and repeated themes were identified. Three themes that emerged as needs were 1. sustained significant human relationship, including the formation of a network between students and university faculty, as well as developing partnerships with many community relationships, or other medical professions; 2. intrinsic motivations and satisfaction, including pleasure in mentoring the younger generations; and 3. rewards, including financial compensation. Rural physicians as preceptors require nonremunerative, intrinsic motivational factors, such as a sense of satisfaction regarding the education of medical students and being able to relate to residents and others health-care professions, when pursuing their educational activities. To support them, focusing only on monetary facets may be unsuccessful in encouraging them to continue their educational work. PMID:25648537

  20. Mental and physical attributes defining world-class Norwegian athletes: content analysis of interviews.

    PubMed

    Boes, R; Harung, H S; Travis, F; Pensgaard, A M

    2014-04-01

    This study reports the results of a content analysis of interviews with 28 Norwegian world-class athletes and 28 controls, matched for gender, age, and type of sport. Semi-structured interviews explored their perceptions of their best performance. The interviews were analyzed using the ATLAS.ti and yielded 20 higher-order codes. Nine higher-order codes were categorized as inner-oriented, five were categorized as outer-oriented, and six were a combination of inner- and outer-oriented. Statistical analysis, using the Mann-Whitney test, showed significant group differences for seven higher-order codes: (a) two outer-oriented codes relating to "mastery--achievements" and "training--outer"; and (b) five inner-oriented codes relating to "mental preparation," "self-reliance," "training--inner," "wholeness," "performance--inner," and "growth orientation." These findings highlight the importance of both inner- and outer-oriented development for high-level achievement in sports--the "mental game" is as important as the physical game, both during training and competitions. Previously published quantitative data reported higher levels of brain integration, faster habitation to a loud tone, and higher ego and moral development in these world-class athletes. These findings are interpreted in light of a Unified Theory of Performance, which proposes that higher mind-brain development provides a basis for higher performance in any activity.

  1. Factors associated with Taiwanese lesbians' breast health-care behavior and intentions: Qualitative interview findings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Ching; Griffiths, Jane; Grande, Gunn

    2016-08-11

    This article presents the qualitative findings of a mixed-methods study that explored factors influencing lesbians' breast health-care behavior and intentions. A total of 37 semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted among women who self-identified as lesbians or women who partnered with the same gender who were aged 20 years or above in four areas of Taiwan (North, Central, South, and East Taiwan) between August 2012 and October 2012. Interviews were audio recorded with participants' consent. The interviews were analyzed using constant comparative analysis with Nvivo audio-coding support. Four themes were identified to be strongly associated with the lesbians' breast health-care behavior and their intentions, namely, gender identity, gender role expression, partners' support, and concerns about health-care providers' reactions. Important barriers to the women's breast health-care behavior and intentions were masculine identity ("T-identity" in Taiwan), masculine appearance, concerns about health-care providers' lack of knowledge of multiple gender diversity, and their attitudes toward lesbians. Conversely, their partners' support was a factor facilitating the women's breast health-care behavior and intentions, particularly for the T-identity lesbians. These findings suggest the significance of and need for culturally competent care and are important for improving Taiwanese lesbians' breast health.

  2. A generalizability study of the medical judgment vignettes interview to assess students' noncognitive attributes for medical school

    PubMed Central

    Donnon, Tyrone; Paolucci, Elizabeth Oddone

    2008-01-01

    Background Although the reliability of admission interviews has been improved through the use of objective and structured approaches, there still remains the issue of identifying and measuring relevant attributes or noncognitive domains of interest. In this present study, we use generalizability theory to determine the estimated variance associated with participants, judges and stations from a semi-structured, Medical Judgment Vignettes interview used as part of an initiative to improve the reliability and content validity of the interview process used in the selection of students for medical school. Methods A three station, Medical Judgment Vignettes interview was conducted with 29 participants and scored independently by two judges on a well-defined 5-point rubric. Generalizability Theory provides a method for estimating the variability of a number of facets. In the present study each judge (j) rated each participant (p) on all three Medical Judgment Vignette stations (s). A two-facet crossed designed generalizability study was used to determine the optimal number of stations and judges to achieve a 0.80 reliability coefficient. Results The results of the generalizability analysis showed that a three station, two judge Medical Judgment Vignettes interview results in a G coefficient of 0.70. As shown by the adjusted Eρ2 scores, since interviewer variability is negligible, increasing the number of judges from two to three does not improve the generalizability coefficient. Increasing the number of stations, however, does have a substantial influence on the overall dependability of this measurement. In a decision study analysis, increasing the number of stations to six with a single judge at each station results in a G coefficient of 0.81. Conclusion The Medical Judgment Vignettes interview provides a reliable approach to the assessment of candidates' noncognitive attributes for medical school. The high inter-rater reliability is attributed to the greater

  3. Interview with Joe F. Head

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Kim

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Joe F. Head, Dean of University Admissions and Enrollment Services at Kennesaw State University (KSU) in Georgia, who has more than 35 years of experience in admissions and enrollment services. After completing an M.Ed. in higher education at Georgia Southern University, Head immediately landed a position as…

  4. Ralph Mero: An Omega Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastenbaum, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    Presents interview with Ralph Mero, Executive Director of Compassion in Dying, Seattle (Washington)-based organization that has brought new voice to controversial issue of physician-assisted rational suicide. Mero explains how his years as minister watching people suffer with cancer or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome led him to work for…

  5. An Interview with Oliver Sacks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Dale; Palo, Susan

    1989-01-01

    Presents an interview with Oliver Sachs. Discusses his approach to writing, including the physical pen-and-ink approach as opposed to using a word processor; his use of journals; his motivation for writing; his approach to revision; and his view of himself as a writer. (NH)

  6. An Interview with Fiona French

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, David

    2005-01-01

    In this interview Fiona French discusses her work and career with David Lewis. She describes early influences and stresses her lifelong love of colour and pattern. Amongst other themes she considers the factual basis of most of her books and her lack of interest in fantasy; her preference for clear, simple prose; her constant shifts in style and…

  7. An Interview with Ilan Stavans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prado, Jose

    2007-01-01

    This interview with Ilan Stavans addresses central experiences tied to the educational and immigrant experiences of Latinos in the United States. Culture, immigration, assimilation, and language are the prisms through which this experience is understood. Ilan Stavans responds to questions concerning cultural heterogeneity and cultural homogeneity.…

  8. Divergent Thinking and Interview Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batey, Mark; Rawles, Richard; Furnham, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    This study examined divergent thinking (DT) test scores of applicants taking part in a selection procedure for an undergraduate psychology degree (N = 370). Interviewers made six specific (creative intelligence, motivation, work habits, emotional stability, sociability, and social responsibility) and one overall recommendation rating on each…

  9. An Interview with John Stokes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Ellen Bennett

    1996-01-01

    As teacher, musician, and performing artist, John Stokes has traveled widely in his efforts to promote awareness of the natural world and the integrity of indigenous peoples. In this interview, Stokes discusses life experiences that led him to establish the Tracking Project, a program that has taught traditional tracking and survival skills to…

  10. An Interview with Jamelie Hassan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Lisa K.; Zine, Jasmin; Davis, Hilary E.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Jamelie Hassan. Jamelie Hassan is a visual artist and activist based in London, Ontario, Canada. Since the 1970s she has exhibited widely in Canada and internationally. In 1993 she was presented the "Canada 125 Medal" in recognition of her outstanding service to the community, and in 2001 she…

  11. International Book Review and Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dieker, Lisa; McTigue, Anna

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews the book "Helping Individuals with Disabilities and Their Families: Mexican and U.S. Perspectives," edited by Todd V. Fletcher and Candace S. Bos (1999). An interview with Todd V. Fletcher is presented in which he discusses the importance of U.S. understanding and collaboration with Mexico. (CR)

  12. An Interview with the Frontline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, June

    2009-01-01

    Encompassing a wide range of responsibilities, Access Services means many different things to many different people, with global variations in what it means to the end user. However, for almost all it means facilitating access to the wealth of information at their library. This particular interview is an attempt to shed light on how the current…

  13. Ian Stevenson: An Omega Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastenbaum, Robert

    1994-01-01

    Presents interview with Professor of Psychiatry and Director, Division of Personality Studies, in Department of Psychiatric Medicine at University of Virginia (Charlottesville). Discusses one controversial topic in area of death studies, cases suggestive of reincarnation. Describes first case he investigated, method of inquiry used to investigate…

  14. Interview with Forrest J. Gerard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Journal, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Focusing on the current policy, organization and direction of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, this edited interview addressed such issues as BIA reorganization, delivery systems, PL 93-638, Indian Water Rights, Senate Select Committee on Indian Affairs, PL 95-561 and Indian Education. (RTS)

  15. Job Interviews: Keys for Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Donald S.; Catt, Stephen E.; Slocombe, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Many students seem disinterested in learning to handle employment interviews effectively. This article discusses students' motivation to become skilled interviewees and steps educators and counselors can take to increase students' interest in this crucial career activity. The article also discusses mistakes students frequently make during…

  16. Interview with Andrew C. Kadak

    SciTech Connect

    Schabes, D.

    1996-01-01

    This article is an interview with the president and Chief Executive Officer of the Yankee Atomic Electric Company about a wide variety of aspects of the decommissioning of the Yankee Nuclear Power plant. Included are discussions of political aspects, decommissioning schedules, local impacts, technical issues of decommissioning, personnel management during decommissioning, etc.

  17. An Interview with Catherine Comet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scanlan, Mary

    1992-01-01

    Offers an interview with Catherine Comet, music director of the Grand Rapids (Michigan) Symphony. Reviews her childhood and early study in France and her experiences at the Julliard School of Music and on the contest circuit. Explains how she became a professional conductor. Discusses Comet's view of the importance that classical music can have…

  18. An Interview with John Dixon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durbin, William

    1987-01-01

    Relates a question-and-answer interview with British educator John Dixon that addressed such issues as Dixon's motivations for his book "Growth through English," his personal growth model of English instruction, his idea of a learning community, and his view of the school system in America. (JD)

  19. Children's Social Relations Interview Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volpe, Richard

    The Children's Social Relations Interview Scale (CSRIS) was developed to assess the role expectations and role behaviors associated with physical disabilities, namely low status and independence. Three traits are assessed: succorance, the seeking of help and support; restraint, physical and social limitation and circumscription by others; and…

  20. Interviews with Selectively Mute Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omdal, Heidi; Galloway, David

    2007-01-01

    The assessment of selective mutism usually takes place in a clinic, where the child often refuses to speak to the therapist. The challenge when trying to understand the child's own perspective is to find a medium for communication. Three selectively mute children were interviewed using Raven's Controlled Projection for Children (RCPC). The…

  1. An Interview with Zarqa Nawaz

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zine, Jasmin; Taylor, Lisa K.; Davis, Hilary E.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Zarqa Nawaz. Born in Liverpool, raised in Toronto and now living in Regina with her husband and four children, Zarqa has worked as a freelance writer/broadcaster with Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) radio, and in various capacities with CBC "Newsworld", CTV's Canada AM, and CBC's "The…

  2. Nam June Paik: An Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurbrugg, Nicholas

    1995-01-01

    Presents an interview with Nam June Paik, a seminal figure in video art, who candidly discusses his working processes and values. Offers his comments on such diverse problems as technology, cost, collaboration, MTV, and the artist's ego. Discusses also the values and the artists associated with the artistic movement Fluxus. (SR)

  3. An Interview with Karen Glover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, June

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Karen Glover of Georgia Tech, a key person behind the planning of the Access Services Conference held last fall, and now going into its second year. Glover started working in libraries as a part-time library assistant at her local public library during her high school years. She later became a Circulation…

  4. An interview with Rong Li. Interview by Kathryn Senior.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong

    2010-04-01

    Rong Li is an Investigator at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, USA. Her lab is made up of a lively team who are all fascinated by cellular asymmetry, division and evolution. Rong joined Development as an editor in 2009. We interviewed Rong to find out about her work and career, her interest in developmental biology and her new role with the journal.

  5. An interview with Angela Nieto. Interviewed by Eva Amsen.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Angela

    2012-04-01

    Angela Nieto is Full Professor at the Instituto de Neurociencias (CSIC-UMH) in Alicante, Spain, and Head of the institute's Developmental Neurobiology Unit. She is also the current president of the Spanish Society for Developmental Biology (Sociedad Española de Biología del Desarollo, SEBD). We interviewed her to talk about the plans of the SEBD for the coming years.

  6. Tips for a physician in getting the right job, part V: Some types of interviews for an executive position.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay A

    2013-12-01

    Some physicians interviewing for an executive job will encounter the same types of interviews that a physician looking for a clinical job will experience. Typically, at least some elements of the same types of interviews will be given. However, those who desire an administrative position may in addition encounter 1 or more different types of interviews, which are known as the stress, behavioral, and situational interviews. This article describes some characteristics of these interviews, to prepare physicians to do well in these situations.

  7. Comparative Reliability of Structured Versus Unstructured Interviews in the Admission Process of a Residency Program

    PubMed Central

    Blouin, Danielle; Day, Andrew G.; Pavlov, Andrey

    2011-01-01

    Background Although never directly compared, structured interviews are reported as being more reliable than unstructured interviews. This study compared the reliability of both types of interview when applied to a common pool of applicants for positions in an emergency medicine residency program. Methods In 2008, one structured interview was added to the two unstructured interviews traditionally used in our resident selection process. A formal job analysis using the critical incident technique guided the development of the structured interview tool. This tool consisted of 7 scenarios assessing 4 of the domains deemed essential for success as a resident in this program. The traditional interview tool assessed 5 general criteria. In addition to these criteria, the unstructured panel members were asked to rate each candidate on the same 4 essential domains rated by the structured panel members. All 3 panels interviewed all candidates. Main outcomes were the overall, interitem, and interrater reliabilities, the correlations between interview panels, and the dimensionality of each interview tool. Results Thirty candidates were interviewed. The overall reliability reached 0.43 for the structured interview, and 0.81 and 0.71 for the unstructured interviews. Analyses of the variance components showed a high interrater, low interitem reliability for the structured interview, and a high interrater, high interitem reliability for the unstructured interviews. The summary measures from the 2 unstructured interviews were significantly correlated, but neither was correlated with the structured interview. Only the structured interview was multidimensional. Conclusions A structured interview did not yield a higher overall reliability than both unstructured interviews. The lower reliability is explained by a lower interitem reliability, which in turn is due to the multidimensionality of the interview tool. Both unstructured panels consistently rated a single dimension, even when

  8. Lessons from Early Medicaid Expansions Under Health Reform: Interviews with Medicaid Officials

    PubMed Central

    Sommers, Benjamin D; Arntson, Emily; Kenney, Genevieve M; Epstein, Arnold M

    2013-01-01

    Background The Affordable Care Act (ACA) dramatically expands Medicaid in 2014 in participating states. Meanwhile, six states have already expanded Medicaid since 2010 to some or all of the low-income adults targeted under health reform. We undertook an in-depth exploration of these six “early-expander” states—California, Connecticut, the District of Columbia, Minnesota, New Jersey, and Washington—through interviews with high-ranking Medicaid officials. Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews with 11 high-ranking Medicaid officials in six states and analyzed the interviews using qualitative methods. Interviews explored enrollment outreach, stakeholder involvement, impact on beneficiaries, utilization and costs, implementation challenges, and potential lessons for 2014. Two investigators independently analyzed interview transcripts and iteratively refined the codebook until reaching consensus. Results We identified several themes. First, these expansions built upon pre-existing state-funded insurance programs for the poor. Second, predictions about costs and enrollment were challenging, indicating the uncertainty in projections for 2014. Other themes included greater than anticipated need for behavioral health services in the expansion population, administrative challenges of expansions, and persistent barriers to enrollment and access after expanding eligibility—though officials overall felt the expansions increased access for beneficiaries. Finally, political context—support or opposition from stakeholders and voters—plays a critical role in shaping the success of Medicaid expansions. Conclusions Early Medicaid expansions under the ACA offer important lessons to federal and state policymakers as the 2014 expansions approach. While the context of each state’s expansion is unique, key shared experiences were significant implementation challenges and opportunities for expanding access to needed services. PMID:24834369

  9. A balancing act: the curriculum vitae and the interview process.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, B A; Dickson, C J

    1994-01-01

    The authors believe that one possible solution to the dearth of minority nursing faculty in higher education is thorough preparation for the search process by the minority applicant. This article discusses the appointment/hiring process and provides the reader with authoritative and experiential information necessary for constructing a curriculum vitae (CV) and preparing for an interview. Armed with a proper CV and knowledge of potential interview questions, the authors believe that minority applicants will be able to maneuver their way through the maize of job interviews. In addition, suggestions are offered to those serving on promotion and tenure committees and administrators.

  10. 10 CFR 15.25 - Personal interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Personal interviews. 15.25 Section 15.25 Energy NUCLEAR... interviews. (a) The NRC may seek an interview with the debtor at the offices of the NRC when— (1) A matter...; or (3) An agreement for payment might be negotiated. (b) The NRC shall grant an interview with...

  11. 49 CFR 1018.22 - Personal interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Personal interviews. 1018.22 Section 1018.22... § 1018.22 Personal interviews. (a) The Board may seek an interview with the debtor at the offices of the... grant an interview with a debtor upon the debtor's request. The Board will not reimburse a...

  12. 8 CFR 245.6 - Interview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interview. 245.6 Section 245.6 Aliens and... ADMITTED FOR PERMANENT RESIDENCE § 245.6 Interview. Each applicant for adjustment of status under this part shall be interviewed by an immigration officer. This interview may be waived in the case of a...

  13. 8 CFR 1245.6 - Interview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interview. 1245.6 Section 1245.6 Aliens and... OF STATUS TO THAT OF PERSON ADMITTED FOR PERMANENT RESIDENCE § 1245.6 Interview. Each applicant for adjustment of status under this part shall be interviewed by an immigration officer. This interview may...

  14. Use of interviews in nursing research.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Gary

    2015-06-24

    Conducting interviews is one of the most common ways of collecting data in healthcare research. In particular, interviews are associated with qualitative research, where researchers seek to understand participants' experiences through their own words and perspectives. This article will help healthcare researchers prepare to carry out interviews as part of their research. It will also emphasise important skills to consider during the interview process. Consideration will also be given to remedying interviews that do not go according to plan, as well as identifying appropriate debriefing processes post-interview. With this knowledge, healthcare researchers are more likely to conduct effective interviews that will yield better quality data and protect the participant.

  15. Computer Interview Problem Assessment of Psychiatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Angle, Hugh V.; Ellinwood, Everett H.; Carroll, Judith

    1978-01-01

    Behavioral Assessment information, a more general form of Problem- Oriented Record data, appears to have many useful clinical qualities and was selected to be the information content for a computer interview system. This interview system was designed to assess problematic behaviors of psychiatric patients. The computer interview covered 29 life problem areas and took patients from four to eight hours to complete. In two reliability studies, the computer interview was compared to human interviews. A greater number of general and specific patient problems were identified in the computer interview than in the human interviews. The attitudes of computer patients and clinicians receiving the computer reports were surveyed.

  16. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  17. STS-112 Crew Interviews: Melroy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Pamela A. Melroy USAF Pilot, is seen during a prelaunch interview. She gives a brief overview of the STS-112 mission which is to install the S1 truss on the International Space Station. She also gives some specific details about the structural design of the S1 truss. Pamela Melroy is also the Internal EVA (IV) coordinator for this mission. She talks about her responsibilities as the IV which are to direct the spacewalkers back into the Airlock after the S1 is installed. A detailed description about the goals of EVA (2) and EVA (3) are also given by Melroy.

  18. STS-109 Crew Interviews - Carey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-109 pilot Duane G. Carey is seen during a prelaunch interview. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, as well as an extended description of his role in the Orbiter's return landing. As its primary objective, this mission has the maintenance of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Following the Columbia Orbiter's rendezvous with the telescope, extravehicular activities (EVA) will focus on repairs to and augmentation of the HST.

  19. Interview with Lisa Shipley. Interviewed by Lisa Parks.

    PubMed

    Shipley, Lisa

    2013-08-01

    Lisa Shipley is Vice President of Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Drug Metabolism at Merck Research Laboratories. She is responsible for preclinical and clinical ADME activities and molecular biomarker assay development activities at all Merck research sites and support of all programs from discovery through to post-product launch. Prior to joining Merck in 2008, Shipley spent over 20 years at Eli Lilly and Company in roles of increasing responsibility, including the positions of executive director at Lean Six Sigma and vice president of Drug Disposition, PK/PD and Trial Simulations. Shipley obtained her undergraduate degree from McDaniel College and her doctoral degree in Pharmacology and Toxicology from the University of Maryland at Baltimore. This interview was conducted by Lisa Parks, Assistant Commissioning Editor of Bioanalysis.

  20. [Polish version of the ADI-R (Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised)].

    PubMed

    Chojnicka, Izabela; Płoski, Rafał

    2012-01-01

    Childhood autism belongs to pervasive developmental disorders and is characterised by qualitative abnormalities in reciprocal social interactions, communication, and by restricted, repetitive interests and behaviours. Until now there was no standardised tool for a diagnosis of autism in Poland. The paper presents the Polish version of the Autism Diagnostic Interview - Revised (ADI-R), which is the "gold standard" for the diagnosis of autism in Europe, United States and Australia. It describes the translation process and adaptation of the original version into Polish, as well as differences between the two versions. ADI-R is a complex, standardised, semi-structured investigator-based interview for parent or caregiver of person with autism, linked to ICD-10 and DSM-IV-TR criteria and appropriate for both adults and children, who have the minimum mental age of 24 months. Moreover ADI-R consists of, beside diagnostic algorithms, the current behaviour algorithms, which enable to assess and compare various levels of functioning during planning and implementation of treatment and therapy. ADI-R is also a very useful tool in the diagnosis for scientific purposes due to its standardisation.

  1. [Diagnostic structured interviews in child and adolescent's psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Renou, S; Hergueta, T; Flament, M; Mouren-Simeoni, M-C; Lecrubier, Y

    2004-01-01

    Structured diagnostic interviews, which evolved along the development of classification's systems, are now widely used in adult psychiatry, in the fields of clinical trials, epidemiological studies, academic research as well as, more recently, clinical practice. These instruments improved the reliability of the data collection and interrater reliability allowing greater homogenisation of the subjects taking part in clinical research, essential factor to ensure the reproducibility of the results. The diagnostic instruments, conversely to the clinical traditional diagnostic processes allow a systematic and exhaustive exploration of disorders, diagnostic criteria but also severity levels, and duration. The format of the data collection, including the order of exploration of the symptoms, is fixed. The formulation of the questions is tested to be univocal, in order to avoid confusions. In child and adolescent, researches in pharmacology and epidemiology increased a lot in the last decade and the standardisation of diagnostic procedures is becoming a key feature. This Article aims to make an assessment, a selection, and a description of the standardized instruments helping psychiatric diagnosis currently available in the field of child and adolescent's psychiatry. Medline and PsycINFO databases were exhaustively checked and the selection of the instruments was based on the review of four main criteria: i) compatibility with international diagnostic systems (DSM IV and/or ICD-10); ii) number of disorders explored; iii) peer reviewed Journals and iv) richness of psychometric data. After the analysis of the instruments described or mentioned in the literature, 2 structured interviews [the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC) and the Children's Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes (ChIPS)] and 4 diagnostic semi-structured interviews [the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children (Kiddie-SADS), the Diagnostic Interview for

  2. STS-109 Crew Interviews: James H. Newman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-109 Mission Specialist James H. Newman is seen during a prelaunch interview. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut, his career path, and his most memorable experiences. He gives details on the mission's goals and objectives, which focus on the refurbishing of the Hubble Space Telescope, and his role in the mission. He provides a brief background on the Hubble Space Telescope, and explains the plans for the rendezvous of the Columbia Orbiter with the Hubble Space Telescope. He provides details and timelines for each of the planned Extravehicular Activities (EVAs), which include replacing the solar arrays, changing the Power Control Unit, installing the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), and installing a new Cryocooler for the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). He gives further explanation of each of these pieces of equipment. He also describes the break-out plan in place for these spacewalks. The interview ends with Newman explaining the details of a late addition to the mission's tasks, which is to replace a reaction wheel on the Hubble Space Telescope.

  3. How do health service professionals consider human factors when purchasing interactive medical devices? A qualitative interview study.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Christopher James; Blandford, Ann

    2017-03-01

    We present findings of a UK study into how those involved in purchasing interactive medical devices go about evaluating usability, the challenges that arise, and opportunities for improvement. The study focused on procurement of infusion devices because these are used by various professionals across healthcare. A semi-structured interview study was carried out involving a range of stakeholders (20 in total) involved in or impacted by medical device procurement. Data was analysed using thematic analysis, a qualitative method designed to support the identification, analysis and reporting of patterns. In principle, health service purchasing was found to accommodate consideration of equipment usability. In practice, the evaluation process was driven primarily by engineering standards; assessment of local needs did not accommodate substantive assessment of usability; and choice was limited by the availability of equipment on the marketplace. We discuss ways in which purchasing could be improved through techniques that account for social circumstances.

  4. STS-112 Crew Interviews - Magnus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-112 Mission Specialist 2 Sandra H. Magnus is seen during a prelaunch interview. She answers questions about her inspiration to become an astronaut and her career path. She gives details on the mission's goals, the most significant of which will be the installation of the S-1 truss structure on the International Space Station (ISS). The installation, one in a series of truss extending missions, will be complicated and will require the use of the robotic arm as well as extravehicular activity (EVA) by astronauts. Magnus also describes her function in the performance of transfer operations. Brief descriptions are given of experiments on board the ISS as well as on board the Shuttle.

  5. STS-112 Crew Interviews: Ashby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-112 Mission Commander Jeffrey Ashby is seen during this preflight interview, answering questions about his inspiration in becoming an astronaut and his career path and provides an overview of the mission. Ashby outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically during the docking and extravehicular activities (EVAs). He describes the payload (S1 truss) and the importance that the S1 truss will have in the development of the International Space Station (ISS). Ashby discusses the delivery and installation of the S1 truss scheduled to be done in the planned EVAs in some detail. He touches on the use and operation of the Canadarm 2 robotic arm in this process and outlines what supplies will be exchanged with the resident crew of the ISS during transfer activities. He ends with his thoughts on the value of the ISS in fostering international cooperation.

  6. STS-112 Crew Interviews: Yurchikhin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A preflight interview with mission specialist Fyodor Yurchikhin is presented. He worked for a long time in Energia in the Russian Mission Control Center (MCC). Yurchikhin discusses the main goal of the STS-112 flight, which is to install the Integrated Truss Assembly S1 (Starboard Side Thermal Radiator Truss) on the International Space Station. He also talks about the three space walks required to install the S1. After the installation of S1, work with the bolts and cameras are performed. Yurchikhin is involved in working with nitrogen and ammonia jumpers. He expresses the complexity of his work, but says that he and the other crew members are ready for the challenge.

  7. Interview with Philip W. Anderson

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, P.W.

    1988-08-01

    Phil Anderson, Professor of Physics at Princeton University, has devoted his career to research in theoretical physics. He is a member of the National Academy of Science and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a foreign member of the Royal Society, and a foreign associate of the Accademia Lincei in Rome. The Americal Physical Society awarded him the Oliver E. Buckley Solid State Physics Prize in 1964. In 1977 he won the Nobel Prize in Physics with J.H. van Vleck and N.F. Mott. His work has encompassed a broad range of subjects: quantum theory of condensed matter, broken symmetry, transport theory and localization, random statistical systems, spectral line broadening, superfluidity in helium and neutron stars, magnetism, and superconductivity. His avocations include ''hiking, the game of GO, Romanesque architecture, and the human condition.'' In this interview he explains his RVB theory of the oxide superconductors and its historical context.

  8. Using Joint Interviews to Add Analytic Value.

    PubMed

    Polak, Louisa; Green, Judith

    2016-10-01

    Joint interviewing has been frequently used in health research, and is the subject of a growing methodological literature. We review this literature, and build on it by drawing on a case study of how people make decisions about taking statins. This highlights two ways in which a dyadic approach to joint interviewing can add analytic value compared with individual interviewing. First, the analysis of interaction within joint interviews can help to explicate tacit knowledge and to illuminate the range of often hard-to-access resources that are drawn upon in making decisions. Second, joint interviews mitigate some of the weaknesses of interviewing as a method for studying practices; we offer a cautious defense of the often-tacit assumption that the "naturalness" of joint interviews strengthens their credibility as the basis for analytic inferences. We suggest that joint interviews are a particularly appropriate method for studying complex shared practices such as making health decisions.

  9. The Exit Interview for Graduating Seniors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doll, Paddy A.; Jacobs, Keith W.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the practice of holding exit interviews with graduating psychology students at Loyola University (Louisiana). Discusses the benefits and limitations of exit interviews, stating that they provide unique data unavailable from other sources. (GEA)

  10. College Recruiting: After the Campus Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitts, Robert A.; Swails, Richard G.

    1982-01-01

    Studied the effectiveness of off-campus recruiting in personnel selection. Suggests that after the campus interview, site visit interviews, employment-offer communication, and initial employee training are important for companies seeking new college-trained personnel. (JAC)

  11. The MLA Interview: The Department's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadoff, Dianne F.

    1999-01-01

    Offers advice about interviewing at the Modern Language Association (MLA) convention: practice or rehearse issues; allow enthusiasm about teaching to show; model good teaching practices in the interview; and listen thoughtfully and resist the temptation to talk too much. (RS)

  12. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    ... or natural. Natural food additives include: Herbs or spices to add flavor to foods Vinegar for pickling ... Certain colors improve the appearance of foods. Many spices, as well as natural and man-made flavors, ...

  13. Interviews as Performance: A Professional Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smillie, Jane

    1991-01-01

    Asserts that the interview is a complex communicative interaction rather than simply an exchange of information. Discusses the goals of the interviewer and the interviewee, their hidden agendas, and the effects of confrontation. Addresses issues of power and control and examines what makes an interview work. (PRA)

  14. Telephone Interviewing Practices within Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, Debra; Robbins, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the use of telephone interviews within academic libraries by surveying the 112 academic institutional members of the Association of Research Libraries to identify how telephone interviews are utilized. By comparing the literature to the research results, the authors conclude with best practices for telephone interviews.…

  15. Qualitative Interviewing as an Embodied Emotional Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ezzy, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    The article argues that the emotional framing of interviews plays a major role in shaping the content of interviews. Drawing on the psychoanalytic theory of Jessica Benjamin and Luce Irigaray, the article describes how interviews can be experienced as either conquest or communion. Qualitative researchers typically focus on the cognitively…

  16. The Novice Researcher: Interviewing Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danby, Susan; Ewing, Lynette; Thorpe, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Being a novice researcher undertaking research interviews with young children requires understandings of the interview process. By investigating the interaction between a novice researcher undertaking her first interview and a child participant, the authors attend to theoretical principles, such as the competence of young children as informants,…

  17. Interview "Problems" as Topics for Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roulston, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    In this article the author argues that interactional difficulties and questioning practices identified in the methodological literature on qualitative interviewing as "problems" provide topics of analysis. Methodological examinations of interview data drawing on conversation analysis also explicate how interview "problems" may be conceptualized in…

  18. The Emotionally Challenging, Open-Ended Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffmann, Elizabeth A.

    2008-01-01

    For most job candidates, the interview experience is "an emotionally challenging endeavor." To succeed in interviews, candidates must understand the emotional labor needed to "manage their feelings" as they "create a publicly observable facial and bodily display." This is particularly true when recruiters use open-ended interviews that are not…

  19. 28 CFR 540.63 - Personal interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Contact With News Media § 540.63 Personal interviews. (a) An inmate may not receive compensation or anything of value for interviews with the news media. (b) Either an inmate or a representative of the news media may initiate a request for a personal interview at...

  20. 28 CFR 540.63 - Personal interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Contact With News Media § 540.63 Personal interviews. (a) An inmate may not receive compensation or anything of value for interviews with the news media. (b) Either an inmate or a representative of the news media may initiate a request for a personal interview at...

  1. 28 CFR 540.63 - Personal interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Contact With News Media § 540.63 Personal interviews. (a) An inmate may not receive compensation or anything of value for interviews with the news media. (b) Either an inmate or a representative of the news media may initiate a request for a personal interview at...

  2. 28 CFR 540.63 - Personal interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Contact With News Media § 540.63 Personal interviews. (a) An inmate may not receive compensation or anything of value for interviews with the news media. (b) Either an inmate or a representative of the news media may initiate a request for a personal interview at...

  3. 28 CFR 540.63 - Personal interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Contact With News Media § 540.63 Personal interviews. (a) An inmate may not receive compensation or anything of value for interviews with the news media. (b) Either an inmate or a representative of the news media may initiate a request for a personal interview at...

  4. Qualitative Interviewing: The Art of Hearing Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Herbert J.; Rubin, Irene S.

    Intended for students and for researchers who conduct interviews as part of case studies or as ethnography, this book provides a comprehensive, up-to-date introduction to the theory and practice of qualitative interviewing. It shows researchers how to design research based on interview data; to stimulate conversation; to absorb what is being said;…

  5. An Interview with Jose Eustaquio Romao

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordao, Clarissa Menezes

    2007-01-01

    In anticipation of the European Union (EU) Year of Intercultural Dialogue, 2008, Clarissa Menezes Jordao interviewed Jose Eustaquio Romao, Director of the Paulo Freire Institute in Brazil. Her edited translation of that interview is presented here. In the interview Romao, guided by the legacy of Brazilian educator, Paulo Freire, discusses the…

  6. The Structured Assessment Interview: A Psychometric Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paget, Kathleen D.

    1984-01-01

    Examines five structured interview formats for assessing psychopathology in children. Presents information illustrating specific characteristics of each interview. Includes reliability and validity data, and draws implications for use of interviews in school settings. Offers suggestions for the development of structured formats and for avenues of…

  7. 14 CFR 1213.105 - Interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... regarding NASA policy, programmatic, and budget issues. (b) In response to media interview requests, NASA... American public. However, journalists may have access to the NASA officials they seek to interview, provided those NASA officials agree to be interviewed. (c) NASA employees may speak to the media and...

  8. 14 CFR 1213.105 - Interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... regarding NASA policy, programmatic, and budget issues. (b) In response to media interview requests, NASA... American public. However, journalists may have access to the NASA officials they seek to interview, provided those NASA officials agree to be interviewed. (c) NASA employees may speak to the media and...

  9. 14 CFR § 1213.105 - Interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... regarding NASA policy, programmatic, and budget issues. (b) In response to media interview requests, NASA... American public. However, journalists may have access to the NASA officials they seek to interview, provided those NASA officials agree to be interviewed. (c) NASA employees may speak to the media and...

  10. 14 CFR 1213.105 - Interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... regarding NASA policy, programmatic, and budget issues. (b) In response to media interview requests, NASA... American public. However, journalists may have access to the NASA officials they seek to interview, provided those NASA officials agree to be interviewed. (c) NASA employees may speak to the media and...

  11. STS-113 Crew Interviews: Jim Wetherbee, Commander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-113 Commander Jim Wetherbee is seen during this preflight interview where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. Wetherbee outlines his role in the mission, what his responsibilities will be, what the crew exchange will be like (transferring the Expedition 6 crew in place of the Expedition 5 crew on the International Space Station (ISS)) and what the importance of the primary payload (the P1 truss) will be. He also provides a detailed account of the three planned extravehicular activities (EVAs) and additional transfer duties. He ends by offering his thoughts on the success of the ISS as the second anniversary of continuous human occupation of the ISS approaches.

  12. Zimbabwean diabetics' beliefs about health and illness: an interview study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing globally, with the greatest increase in Africa and Asia. In Zimbabwe a threefold increase was shown in the 1990s. Health-related behaviour is important in maintaining health and is determined by individual beliefs about health and illness but has seen little study. The purpose of the study was to explore beliefs about health and illness that might affect self-care practice and health care seeking behaviour in persons diagnosed with DM, living in Zimbabwe. Methods Exploratory study. Consecutive sample from a diabetes clinic at a central hospital. Semi-structured interviews were held with 21 persons aged 19-65 years. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results Health was described as freedom from disease and well-being, and individual factors such as compliance with advice received and drugs were considered important to promote health. A mixture of causes of DM, predominantly individual factors such as heredity, overweight and wrong diet in combination with supernatural factors such as fate, punishment from God and witchcraft were mentioned. Most respondents did not recognize the symptoms of DM when falling ill but related the problems to other diseases, e.g. HIV, malaria etc. Limited knowledge about DM and the body was indicated. Poor economy was mentioned as harmful to health and a consequence of DM because the need to buy expensive drugs, food and attend check-ups. Self-care was used to a limited extent but if used, a combination of individual measures, household remedies or herbs and religious acts such as prayers and holy water were frequently used, and in some cases health care professionals were consulted. Conclusions Limited knowledge about DM, based on beliefs about health and illness including biomedical and traditional explanations related to the influence of supernatural forces, e.g. fate, God etc., were found, which affected patients' self-care and care-seeking behaviour. Strained economy

  13. Interview with Frank Ivy Carroll.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Frank Ivy; Coaker, Hannah

    2013-06-01

    Frank Ivy Carroll received his BS degree in chemistry from Auburn University (AL, USA) in 1957 and was awarded the PhD in chemistry by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (NC, USA) in 1961. He joined the research staff of the Research Triangle Institute (NC, USA) as a Research Chemist and rose steadily to the position of Vice President of the Chemistry and Life Sciences Group, a position he held from 1996-2001. Dr Carroll also served as Director of the Center for Organic and Medicinal Chemistry from 1975-2007. He is presently Distinguished Fellow for Medicinal Chemistry. Dr Carroll has varied research interests, but since 1990, a major thrust of his research efforts has involved development of pharmacotherapies for substance abuse (cocaine, nicotine, methamphetamine, opioids and ethanol) and other CNS disorders. Dr Carroll has published 468 peer-reviewed articles, 33 book chapters and 46 patents and has received numerous awards for his research accomplishments; the most recent are: the 2010 North Carolina Award for Science; the 2010 National Institute on Drug Abuse Public Service Award for Significant Achievement; and the 2012 Alfred Burger Award in Medicinal Chemistry from the American Chemical Society. In 2007, he was inducted into the American Chemical Society Medicinal Chemistry Hall of Fame. Interview conducted by Hannah Coaker, Assistant Commissioning Editor.

  14. STS-109 Crew Interviews - Linnehan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-109 Mission Specialist 3 (MS3) Richard M. Linnehan is seen during a prelaunch interview. He answers questions about his lifelong desire to become an astronaut and his career path, which included becoming a zoo veterinarian. He gives details on the Columbia Orbiter mission, which has as its main purpose the maintenance and augmentation of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). As MS3, his primary role in the mission pertains to EVAs (Extravehicular Activities) 1, 3, and 5. During EVA 1, Linnehan and another crewmember will replace one of two flexible solar arrays on the HST with a smaller, more efficient rigid solar array. The second solar array will be replaced on EVA 2 by other crewmembers. EVA 3 will involve the replacement of the Power Control Unit (PCU), and will require the first complete powering down of HST since its deployment. The possibility of a serious problem occurring is greatest during this portion of the mission because the original PCU was not built to be replaced. In EVA 5, Linnehan and another crewmember will install a replacement cooling system on NICMOS (Near Infrared Camera Multi-Object Spectrometer), which has not been operational. Linnehan discusses his role during the mission as well as that of his crewmates, and provides an abbreviated timeline, including possible contingencies.

  15. Motivational interviewing in adolescent treatment.

    PubMed

    Naar-King, Sylvie

    2011-11-01

    This paper briefly reviews the research literature on motivational interviewing (MI) and behaviour change in adolescents and then discusses the implications of adolescent cognitive and social-emotional developmental processes for the relational and technical components of MI. Research suggests that MI is efficacious in improving substance use in adolescents. Research has been slower to emerge in other behaviours, but available randomized controlled trials suggest that MI has great promise for improving mental and physical health outcomes in this developmental period. The relational and technical components of MI are highly relevant for the adolescent developmental period, and studies have shown that these components are related to outcomes in this population. There are several ways to include MI in clinical interventions for adolescents, ranging from MI in brief settings to using MI as a platform from which all other treatments are offered. Future research is necessary to test the effects of MI in adolescent group settings and the full integration of MI into other adolescent treatment approaches.

  16. Talking about Happiness: Interview Research and Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    In addition to teaching research and writing skills, First-Year Composition classes are well situated to help students develop strategies for managing stress and increasing well-being. I describe an assignment sequence in which students interview others from three generations about topics related to happiness and wellbeing, analyze shared…

  17. Creative Approaches to Motivational Interviewing: Addressing the Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowe, Allison; Parmenter, Anthony S.

    2012-01-01

    Scholars have suggested that counseling theory is greatly enhanced by adding creative approaches (Degges-White & Davis, 2011). However, few suggestions have been made in the counseling literature indicating how motivational interviewing can be creatively used. In addition, the majority of creative approaches for problem behaviors within the…

  18. Examining How Motivational Interviewing May Foster College Student Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iarussi, Melanie M.

    2013-01-01

    Professional counselors practicing in higher education settings aspire to meet the developmental needs of college students in addition to addressing their mental health and substance use concerns. Motivational interviewing (MI) is an evidence-based counseling approach that focuses on enhancing motivation and commitment to change. This article…

  19. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  20. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  1. Participant experiences of an internet-based intervention and randomised control trial: interview study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There are an increasing number of interventions being delivered online, and an expanding body of research to assess the effectiveness of such interventions. Yet, little is known about the motivations for participating in online research. Furthermore, internet interventions and online research studies are characterised by poor adherence and high attrition rates. This study aimed to explore participant motivations for taking part in an online trial of an internet intervention and the reasons for continuing. Methods Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with twenty members of the intervention arm of an internet-based randomised control trial evaluating an online cognitive behavioural tool to improve mental wellbeing. The qualitative interviews were analysed using the Framework Approach to identify themes and subthemes, through familiarization with the data, identifying a thematic framework, charting, indexing, mapping and interpreting the data. Results A number of key themes emerged. Trusted brands were key to participants feeling secure in engaging with the trial due to the association with institutions such as the UK National Health Service and the lead University conducting the research. Participants had a number of motivations for signing up with the study; altruism, low mood and as a replacement for a physical health professional. Participants felt the need for the language used in the intervention to be tailored to them as individuals. The majority of those interviewed also described multiple benefits from the intervention, which could have been a reason for them to persist. Conclusion The nascent field of research on internet delivered healthcare needs to take account of participant views, as have been identified in this trial and future studies would benefit from applying its findings. PMID:24165325

  2. Using Trial Interviews To Enhance Student Self-Efficacy towards Pre-placement Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coll, Richard K.; Lay, Mark

    2001-01-01

    New Zealand cooperative education students participated in mock and preemployment employer interviews. Responses from 10 students and 10 employers showed that most students had no formal interview experience and were apprehensive about preplacement interviews. Trial interviews improved self-efficacy through exposure to employer questions and…

  3. Exploratory Assessments of Child Abuse: Children's Responses to Interviewer's Questions across Multiple Interview Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Tess; Pipe, Margaret-Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The present study extends field research on interviews with young children suspected of having been abused by examining multiple assessment interviews designed to be inquisitory and exploratory, rather than formal evidential or forensic interviews. Methods: Sixty-six interviews with 24 children between the ages of 3 and 6 years who were…

  4. Oral History Interview Transcripts Tombigbee Historic Townsites Project. Volume 5 (Interview Numbers 123-128).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    Of STANDARDS-1963-A AL HISTORY INTERVIEW TRANSCR TOMBIGBEE HISTOMRIC TOWNSITES PROJECT AD ,Id4 3 5 Volume 5 (Interview Numbers 123 -128) Compiled by...HISTORY INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS TOMBIGBEE HISTORIC TOWNSITES PROJECT Volume 5 (Interview Nos. 123 -128) Compiled byJames N. McClurken and Peggy Uland...OH 123 Robert Adair. .. ......... ............. 761 OH 124 Jennie Mae Lenioir. .. ................... 788 OH 125

  5. Barriers to medication adherence for the secondary prevention of stroke: a qualitative interview study in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Jamison, James; Graffy, Jonathan; Mullis, Ricky; Mant, Jonathan; Sutton, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Background Medications are highly effective at reducing risk of recurrent stroke, but success is influenced by adherence to treatment. Among survivors of stroke and transient ischaemic attack (TIA), adherence to medication is known to be suboptimal. Aim To identify and report barriers to medication adherence for the secondary prevention of stroke/TIA. Design and setting A qualitative interview study was conducted within general practice surgeries in the East of England, UK. Method Patients were approached by letter and invited to take part in a qualitative research study. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with survivors of stroke, caregivers, and GPs to explore their perspectives and views around secondary prevention and perceived barriers to medication adherence. Key themes were identified using a grounded theory approach. Verbatim quotes describing the themes are presented here. Results In total, 28 survivors of stroke, including 14 accompanying caregivers and five GPs, were interviewed. Two key themes were identified. Patient level barriers included ability to self-care, the importance people attach to a stroke event, and knowledge of stroke and medication. Medication level barriers included beliefs about medication and beliefs about how pills work, medication routines, changing medications, and regimen complexity and burden of treatment. Conclusion Patients who have had a stroke are faced with multiple barriers to taking secondary prevention medications in UK general practice. This research suggests that a collaborative approach between caregivers, survivors, and healthcare professionals is needed to address these barriers and facilitate medication-taking behaviour. PMID:27215572

  6. Establishing efficient interview periods for gonorrhea patients.

    PubMed Central

    Starcher, E T; Kramer, M A; Carlota-Orduna, B; Lundberg, D F

    1983-01-01

    From February through December 1978, venereal disease casefinders in Polk County, Iowa used an expanded interview period of at least 120 days to interview 983 gonorrhea patients for sexual partner information. We grouped patients according to sex and clinical findings and evaluated the percentage of all new cases identified by time intervals within the expanded interview period. Ninety-one per cent of all untreated, infected sexual partners of symptomatic males were identified by using an interview period which spanned the interval from date of treatment to 15 days before symptom onset. In contrast, the traditional 30-day interview period missed 23 per cent of those untreated, infected partners named by women with pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), 34 per cent of those partners named by women with uncomplicated gonorrhea, and 29 per cent of those named by asymptomatic men. The Polk County data suggest the importance of basing interview periods upon a patient's sex and clinical presentation. PMID:6638232

  7. Clinical tasks of the dynamic interview.

    PubMed

    Fowler, J Christopher; Perry, J Christopher

    2005-01-01

    We examined psychodynamic interview tasks and techniques to identify clinical actions that improve or impede exploration of subjects' emotional responses, conflicts, defenses, and central relationship themes. This article extends previous quantitative studies (Perry, Fowler, & Greif, unpublished; Perry, Fowler, & Semeniuk, 2005) by examining interview vignettes in 50-minute psychodynamic research interviews. We conducted qualitative analyses on 72 dynamic research interviews given by 26 subjects to delineate categories of tasks and interventions. Results indicated five broad tasks of the dynamic interview: 1) Frame Setting; 2) Offering Support; 3) Exploring Affect; 4) Offering Trial Interpretations; and 5) Providing a Formulation and Feedback of relationship themes and conflicts. We further selected two interviews each from 10 subjects, in which there was a difference of one standard deviation or greater on the Overall Dynamic Interview Adequacy scale (Perry, 1999), and interviewer errors from the Therapeutic Alliance Analogue scale (Perry, Brysk, & Cooper, 1989). We utilized excerpts from these interviews to highlight the importance of these tasks and techniques in deepening discussion of dynamically meaningful material.

  8. Skype interviewing: the new generation of online synchronous interview in qualitative research.

    PubMed

    Janghorban, Roksana; Latifnejad Roudsari, Robab; Taghipour, Ali

    2014-01-01

    The most commonly used method for data collection in qualitative research is interviewing. With technology changes over the last few decades, the online interview has overcome time and financial constraints, geographical dispersion, and physical mobility boundaries, which have adversely affected onsite interviews. Skype as a synchronous online service offers researchers the possibility of conducting individual interviews as well as small focus groups, comparable to onsite types. This commentary presents the characteristics of the Skype interview as an alternative or supplemental choice to investigators who want to change their conventional approach of interviewing.

  9. How do healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information? A qualitative study using cognitive interviews

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background To date, online public healthcare reports have not been effectively used by consumers. Therefore, we qualitatively examined how healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information on the Internet. Methods Using semi-structured cognitive interviews, interviewees (n = 20) were asked to think aloud and answer questions, as they were prompted with three Dutch web pages providing comparative healthcare information. Results We identified twelve themes from consumers' thoughts and evaluations. These themes were categorized under four important areas of interest: (1) a response to the design; (2) a response to the information content; (3) the use of the information, and (4) the purpose of the information. Conclusion Several barriers to an effective use of comparative healthcare information were identified, such as too much information and the ambiguity of terms presented on websites. Particularly important for future research is the question of how comparative healthcare information can be integrated with alternative information, such as patient reviews on the Internet. Furthermore, the readability of quality of care concepts is an issue that needs further attention, both from websites and communication experts. PMID:19930564

  10. Challenges in the care for consanguineous couples: an exploratory interview study among general practitioners and midwives

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background It is often suggested that an effort must be made to increase awareness among consanguineous couples of their reproductive risk, and to refer them for genetic counseling if needed. Primary care professionals are considered most appropriate for addressing the subject and identifying couples at risk during consultations in their practice. This Dutch study aims to explore the experiences, attitudes and beliefs of such professionals regarding their care for consanguineous couples. Methods Sixteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with midwives and general practitioners. Results Although most primary care professionals considered it their task to inform couples about the risks of consanguinity, during consultations the topic was generally only briefly touched upon and quickly abandoned. Important reasons for this were professionals’ beliefs about religious and social values of couples, their low perception of the couples’ reproductive risk and expected limited feasibility of referral. Feelings of embarrassment regarding addressing consanguinity did not seem to play a significant role. Conclusions Primary care professional beliefs about their clients’ religious and social values, their attitudes toward the risk, and perceived limited options for referral seem to conflict with the professional norm to address the topic of consanguinity. PMID:23102514

  11. Interviewing Child Witnesses: A Developmental Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saywitz, Karen; Camparo, Lorinda

    1998-01-01

    Reviews suggestions derived from the clinical and experimental literatures for interviewing child witnesses to abuse. Guidelines for questioning children are provided and phases of a forensic interview are outlined in a step-by-step fashion. The suggestions presented highlight a developmental perspective designed to facilitate children's memory…

  12. An Interview with Werner F. Leopold.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakuta, Kenji

    A 1983 interview with Werner F. Leopold (1896-1984), a key figure in the study of bilingualism and child language, is presented. An introductory section gives some background to the interview. The discussion itself reviews Leopold's personal and professional background, work, and writing, and focuses largely on the linguistic development of…

  13. Teaching Focus Group Interviewing: Benefits and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Molly

    2013-01-01

    Focus group interviewing is widely used by academic and applied researchers. Given the popularity and strengths of this method, it is surprising how rarely focus group interviewing is taught in the undergraduate classroom and how few resources exist to support instructors who wish to train students to use this technique. This article fills the gap…

  14. An Abnormal Psychology Community Based Interview Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Geoffry D.

    1977-01-01

    A course option in abnormal psychology involves students in interviewing and observing the activities of individuals in the off-campus community who are concerned with some aspect of abnormal psychology. The technique generates student interest in the field when they interview people about topics such as drug abuse, transsexualism, and abuse of…

  15. Interviewing Women in Groups: A Liberating Methodology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Col, Jeanne-Marie

    Group interviews were found to be a liberating research methodology when used in a study to determine the views of 1,000 secondary school girls in Uganda concerning family life and work. A liberating method of interviewing has the following characteristics: it is nonexploitative, the subjects have some control over the situation, there is two-way…

  16. Interviewing Families for Effective Transition to Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Margaret P.; Renzaglia, Adelle

    1998-01-01

    Describes an interview format for use in engaging families of young people with disabilities in dialogue regarding vocational programming needs. The interview addresses parental expectations, family experiences and preferences, the student's personal needs, family support, transportation options, and wages and benefits. Ways to integrate results…

  17. The Information Interview: Bridging College and Beyond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvaney, Mary Kay

    2003-01-01

    Notes that university students know little about the realities of the workplace. Explains an assignment in which students interview a person currently working in a job that logically follows their major. Explains how to find the appropriate interviewee, and how to prepare, conduct, and report on the interview. Notes that end-of-class evaluations…

  18. 8 CFR 245a.19 - Interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interviews. 245a.19 Section 245a.19 Aliens... IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT Legal Immigration Family Equity (LIFE) Act Legalization Provisions § 245a.19 Interviews. (a) All aliens filing applications for adjustment of status with the Service under this...

  19. 8 CFR 245a.19 - Interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interviews. 245a.19 Section 245a.19 Aliens... IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT Legal Immigration Family Equity (LIFE) Act Legalization Provisions § 245a.19 Interviews. (a) All aliens filing applications for adjustment of status with the Service under this...

  20. Interview [with Dr. Gerald W. Bracey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Educational Research, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Dr. Gerald W. Bracey, author of "Reading Educational Research: How to Avoid Getting Statistically Snookered." During the interview, Bracey explains why he considers the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) as a "weapon of mass destruction" and that he sees nothing to suggest that NCLB has…

  1. An Interview with Beatrice Beach Szekely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner-Khamsi, Gita

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Beatrice Beach Szekely, a comparative education scholar that specialized in the Soviet Union. She was editor of the journal "Soviet Education" from 1970 to 1989. During the interview, Szekely talked about how she became personally involved in Russian/Soviet studies of education. She related that…

  2. Interview Schedule for Studying Why Adults Learn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tough, Allen

    Designed for use in a 1968 study of why adults learn, this interview schedule contains situation-description and question sheets for use by the interviewer and subject for examining thirteen reasons why adults begin and why they continue a learning project. (The study, "Why Adults Learn: A Study of the Major Reasons for Beginning and Continuing a…

  3. Character Interviews Help Bring Literature to Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swindall, Vickie; Cantrell, R. Jeffrey

    1999-01-01

    Describes "Character Interviews," a class activity that guides children, especially reluctant readers, to the meaning of a story through a thoughtful understanding of character as they consider a character's emotions and motives, to respond to a question as that character would. Describes the interview process. Offers sample interviews…

  4. Exploring Space and Place with Walking Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Phil; Bunce, Griff; Evans, James; Gibbs, Hannah; Hein, Jane Ricketts

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the use of walking interviews as a research method. In spite of a wave of interest in methods which take interviewing out of the "safe," stationary environment, there has been limited work critically examining the techniques for undertaking such work. Curiously for a method which takes an explicitly spatial approach, few…

  5. 8 CFR 245a.19 - Interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Interviews. 245a.19 Section 245a.19 Aliens... AND NATIONALITY ACT Legal Immigration Family Equity (LIFE) Act Legalization Provisions § 245a.19 Interviews. (a) All aliens filing applications for adjustment of status with the Service under this...

  6. 8 CFR 245a.19 - Interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Interviews. 245a.19 Section 245a.19 Aliens... AND NATIONALITY ACT Legal Immigration Family Equity (LIFE) Act Legalization Provisions § 245a.19 Interviews. (a) All aliens filing applications for adjustment of status with the Service under this...

  7. 8 CFR 245a.19 - Interviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interviews. 245a.19 Section 245a.19 Aliens... AND NATIONALITY ACT Legal Immigration Family Equity (LIFE) Act Legalization Provisions § 245a.19 Interviews. (a) All aliens filing applications for adjustment of status with the Service under this...

  8. Interviewing Techniques Used in Selected Organizations Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joyce, Marguerite P.

    2008-01-01

    Businesses continue to use the job interview as a final determinant of the applicant's good fit for the company and its culture. Today, many companies are hiring less and/or are taking longer to find just the right person with the right skills for the right job. If an applicant is asked to come for an interview, the general feeling is that the…

  9. Cues to Deception in an Interview Situation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Alberta A.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Interviewees were secretly instructed to answer six questions honestly and six deceptively. Deceptive answers were hesitant and lengthy. Visual presence of the interviewer increased variability in verbal response time and decreased the length of response. Interviewers were able to discriminate between truth and falsehood. Increased hesitation and…

  10. An Interview with Dr. Maurizio Andolfi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cron, Elyce A.

    2000-01-01

    Presents an interview with Maurizio Andolfi, M.D., professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Rome. He currently heads one of the most prestigious centers for training family therapists in Europe. The interview focuses on Andolfi's continuing professional and personal journeys. (GCP)

  11. The Interview Process. SPEC Kit 260.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Heidi, Comp.; Nicholson, Shawn, Comp.; Dickson, Laura, Comp.; Miller, Terri Tickle, Comp.

    2000-01-01

    This SPEC (Systems and Procedures Exchange Center) Kit reports results of a survey of ARL (Association of Research Libraries) that examined the nature and structure of the interview process at large research and academic libraries in the United States and Canada. By determining the nature and structure of the interview, it is hoped that candidates…

  12. Conducting a multi family member interview study.

    PubMed

    Reczek, Corinne

    2014-06-01

    Family researchers have long recognized the utility of incorporating interview data from multiple family members. Yet, relatively few contemporary scholars utilize such an approach due to methodological underdevelopment. This article contributes to family scholarship by providing a roadmap for developing and executing in-depth interview studies that include more than one family member. Specifically, it outlines the epistemological frames that most commonly underlie this approach, illustrates thematic research questions that it best addresses, and critically reviews the best methodological practices of conducting research with this approach. The three most common approaches are addressed in depth: separate interviews with each family member, dyadic or group interviews with multiple family members, and a combined approach that uses separate and dyadic or group interviews. This article speaks to family scholars who are at the beginning stages of their research project but are unsure of the best qualitative approach to answer a given research question.

  13. Cognitive interviews to test and refine questionnaires.

    PubMed

    García, Alexandra A

    2011-01-01

    Survey data are compromised when respondents do not interpret questions in the way researchers expect. Cognitive interviews are used to detect problems respondents have in understanding survey instructions and items, and in formulating answers. This paper describes methods for conducting cognitive interviews and describes the processes and lessons learned with an illustrative case study. The case study used cognitive interviews to elicit respondents' understanding and perceptions of the format, instructions, items, and responses that make up the Diabetes Symptom Self-Care Inventory (DSSCI), a questionnaire designed to measure Mexican Americans' symptoms of type 2 diabetes and their symptom management strategies. Responses to cognitive interviews formed the basis for revisions in the format, instructions, items, and translation of the DSSCI. All those who develop and revise surveys are urged to incorporate cognitive interviews into their instrumentation methods so that they may produce more reliable and valid measurements.

  14. An interview with Lewis Wolpert.

    PubMed

    Wolpert, Lewis; Vicente, Catarina

    2015-08-01

    Lewis Wolpert is a retired developmental biologist who, over his long career, has made many important contributions to the field, from his French Flag model and the concept of positional information to the famous quote that it is "not birth, marriage or death, but gastrulation which is truly the most important time in your life." In addition to his scientific contributions, Lewis is also a prolific writer, from the textbook 'Developmental Biology' to books about popular science, religion and his battle with depression. Although born in South Africa, it was in the United Kingdom that Lewis spent most of his scientific career. We met Lewis at the Spring Meeting of the British Society for Developmental Biology, where he was awarded the Waddington Medal.

  15. Teaching Interview Skills without Full-Fledged Interviewing: An Alternate Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Kathryn Sue; Bernum, Belinda A.

    For an instructor who feels the need to teach interviewing skills in the basic course, it is sometimes difficult to fit interviewing into a course that already covers many types of public speaking. An activity is presented that allows instructors to teach interviewing skills in either a one or one-half week time frame (two 50-minute class periods…

  16. Initial Evaluations in the Interview: Relationships with Subsequent Interviewer Evaluations and Employment Offers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrick, Murray R.; Swider, Brian W.; Stewart, Greg L.

    2010-01-01

    The authors of this study examine how evaluations made during an early stage of the structured interview (rapport building) influence end of interview scores, subsequent follow-up employment interviews, and actual internship job offers. Candidates making better initial impressions received more internship offers (r = 0.22) and higher interviewer…

  17. Writing Interview Protocols and Conducting Interviews: Tips for Students New to the Field of Qualitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacob, Stacy A.; Furgerson, S. Paige

    2012-01-01

    Students new to doing qualitative research in the ethnographic and oral traditions, often have difficulty creating successful interview protocols. This article offers practical suggestions for students new to qualitative research for both writing interview protocol that elicit useful data and for conducting the interview. This piece was originally…

  18. Using Micro-Analysis in Interviewer Training: "Continuers" and Interviewer Positioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Despite the recent growth of interest in the interactional construction of research interviews and advances made in our understanding of the nature of such encounters, relatively little attention has been paid to the implications of this for interviewer training, with the result that advice on interviewing techniques tends to be very general.…

  19. Motivational Interviewing (MINT) Improves Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Acceptance and Adherence: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Sara; Smith, Simon S.; Oei, Tian P. S.; Douglas, James

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is poor. We assessed the effectiveness of a motivational interviewing intervention (motivational interview nurse therapy [MINT]) in addition to best practice standard care to improve acceptance and adherence to CPAP therapy in people with…

  20. World TB Day 2016: an interview with leading experts in tuberculosis research.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Patrick P J; Fletcher, Helen A; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Lipman, Marc C I; McHugh, Timothy D

    2016-03-23

    In this interview, we talk to leading tuberculosis (TB) experts from University College London and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine about the current challenges in TB research. The video of this interview is available here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=75Die7MQBec&feature=youtu.be . The video can also be downloaded via Additional file 1.

  1. STS-103 Crew Interviews: Steven Smith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Mission Specialist Steven L. Smith is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Brown became an astronaut, the events that led to his interest, any role models that he had, and his inspiration. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is an explanation of the why this required mission to service the Hubble Space Telescope must take place at such an early date, replacement of the gyroscopes, transistors, and computers. Also discussed is Smith's responsibility during any of the planned space walks scheduled for this mission.

  2. STS-101: Crew Interview / Yuri Vladimirovich Usachev

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Mission Specialist Yuri Vladimirovich Usachev is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Usachev became a cosmonaut, the individuals who influenced him, and the events that led to his interest. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is his reaction and integration into the STS-101 crew. Usachev also mentions the scheduled space-walk of James S. Voss and Jeffrey N. Williams, his feeling once he steps into the International Space Station (ISS), the repairs of equipment, his handling of the hand held laser, and the change of the batteries.

  3. STS-103 Crew Interviews: Curtis Brown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Commander Curtis L. Brown is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Brown became an astronaut, the events that led to his interest, any role models that he had, and his inspiration. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is an explanation of the why this required mission to service the Hubble Space Telescope must take place at such an early date, replacement of the gyroscopes, transistors, and computers. Also discussed is Brown's responsibility during any of the planned space walks scheduled for this mission.

  4. STS-103 Crew Interviews: Scott Kelly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Pilot Scott J. Kelly is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Kelly became an astronaut, the events that led to his interest, any role models that he had, and his inspiration. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is an explanation of the why this required mission to service the Hubble Space Telescope must take place at such an early date, replacement of the gyroscopes, transistors, and computers. Also discussed are the Chandra X Ray Astrophysics Facility, and a brief touch on Kelly's responsibility during any of the given four space walks scheduled for this mission.

  5. Tips for a physician in getting the right job, part XVII: after the interview.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay

    2014-12-01

    The applicant should inquire about the follow-up after an interview, including the timeline for decision making, whether there will be a second interview, and how future communication will be made. Thank-you notes from the interviewee should be sent out immediately after the interview, not only as a courtesy, but also to include additional comments about why the candidate is an excellent fit for the job. The job seeker should also reflect carefully on what he/she did right or wrong during the interview and about what was learned about the job.

  6. Assessing Treatment-Resistant Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: The Emory Treatment Resistance Interview for PTSD (E-TRIP)

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, Boadie W.; Kaye, Joanna L.; Youngner, Cole; Rothbaum, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) who fail to respond to established treatments are at risk for chronic disability and distress. Although treatment-resistant PTSD (TR-PTSD) is a common clinical problem, there is currently no standard method for evaluating previous treatment outcomes. Development of a tool that could quantify the degree of resistance to previously provided treatments would inform research in patients with PTSD. We conducted a systematic review of PTSD treatment trials to identify medication and psychotherapy interventions proven to be efficacious for PTSD. We then developed a semi-structured clinician interview called the Emory Treatment Resistance Interview for PTSD (E-TRIP). The E-TRIP includes clinician-administered questions to assess the adequacy and benefit derived from past treatment trials. For each adequately delivered treatment to which the patient failed to respond, a score is assigned depending on the strength of evidence supporting the treatment’s efficacy. The E-TRIP provides a comprehensive assessment of prior PTSD treatments that should prove valuable for researchers studying TR-PTSD and evaluating the efficacy of new treatments for patients with PTSD. The E-TRIP is not intended to guide treatment; rather, the tool quantifies the level of treatment resistance in patients with PTSD in order to standardize TR-PTSD in the research domain. PMID:25494488

  7. Fostering sustainability: A qualitative interview study exploring how educators work to cultivate nature awareness in young children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Rebecca A.

    The purpose of this study is to examine how educators are working to foster sustainability through cultivating nature awareness in young children. Data were collected in the form of qualitative semi-structured interviews, which were analyzed using descriptive and deductive coding methods. Findings were viewed through the lens of critical pedagogy and the methods and models of teaching for nature awareness, which included ecological literacy, place based education, and education for sustainable development. There were five major themes and findings that emerged from the interviews with the participants in this study: terms and definitions used, personal stories, strategies for teaching nature awareness and sustainability, barriers, and current issues. This study may benefit those wishing to begin or continue to foster sustainability through teaching nature awareness. The literature review presented in the study aims to address the gap between the practice and pedagogy in teaching for nature awareness and sustainability. Keywords: teaching, nature awareness, sustainability, educators, young children, elementary, preschool, school, natural world, ecological literacy, place-based education, education for sustainable development, critical pedagogy

  8. The Diagnostic Interview of Children and Adolescents for Parents of Preschool and Young Children: psychometric properties in the general population.

    PubMed

    Ezpeleta, Lourdes; de la Osa, Núria; Granero, Roser; Domènech, Josep Maria; Reich, Wendy

    2011-11-30

    There is a need for reliable and well-validated diagnostic measures for studying psychopathology in preschool and young children. The goal is to study the psychometric properties of the Diagnostic Interview for Children and Adolescents for Parents of Preschool and Young Children (DICA-PPYC) in the general population. A sample of 852 Spanish school children, aged 3 to 7 years, were randomly selected and screened for a double phase design. A total of 251 families were interviewed with the DICA-PPYC and 244 participated in a test-retest design. Different measures of psychopathology and functional impairment were also administered. Test-retest agreement with a mean interval of 8.8 days ranged from excellent to slight (kappa from 1 to 0.39) for DSM-IV-TR and from good to fair (kappa from 0.77 to 0.49) for Research Diagnostic Criteria-Preschool Age diagnoses. Attenuation between test and retest was not significant for the prevalence of diagnoses, although it was significant for the number of externalising and total symptoms in the interview. The diagnoses converged moderately with the CBCL and Dominic scores. The presence of diagnoses in the DICA-PPYC significantly differentiated preschoolers and young children who had used mental health services, were more impaired, and presented more severe psychopathology measured by dimensional scales. The DICA-PPYC is a reliable and valid semi-structured interview schedule for preschool and young children, and can serve to advance the knowledge and mental health care of this population.

  9. E-Interview: Norma Fox Mazer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angel, Ann

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with Norma Fox Mazer, a writer of children's books. Describes how she creates a story. Discusses how writing a story, whether a short story or a novel, is an intricate balance of character, event, and voice. (SG)

  10. The Exit Interview--A Lasting Impression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworak, Linda L.

    1983-01-01

    Personnel administrators should insist on a well-managed exit interview process to monitor departmental turnover and to acquire feedback about the working environment. Some procedures to develop an effective process are discussed. (MLW)

  11. People Interview: Cosmic rays uncover universe theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-07-01

    INTERVIEW Cosmic rays uncover universe theories David Smith talks to Paula Chadwick about why she is fascinated by cosmic and gamma rays, and how this is the year that their profile is going to be raised

  12. Interview at a Small Maine School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartwright, Sally

    1991-01-01

    Presents an interview with the founder and director of the Riley School in Maine in which she discusses the school's educational philosophy and practices, curriculum design, and physical plant design. (BB)

  13. Reenactment interviewing: a methodology for phenomenological research.

    PubMed

    Drew, N

    1993-01-01

    Reenactment is proposed as an alternative interviewing strategy for phenomenological research. Three techniques borrowed from the psychodramatic method, warming up, scene-setting and soliloquy, are described as they were used in interviews with nurses participating in a study of caregiver/patient relationships. The rationale for and implementation of the techniques are discussed. Indications of successful reenactment during an interview are described and discussed. The data suggest that skillfully directed reenactment can generate intensely vivid recall of memories experiences and emotions, engendering rich descriptions of participants' lived experience and subsequently, produces significant dialogue between interviewer and participant. Parallels are drawn between phenomenological research/philosophy and the philosophy of action upon which psychodramatic techniques are based.

  14. The Diagnostic/Therapeutic Preabortion Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boekelheide, Priscilla Day

    1978-01-01

    The therapeutic and diagnostic aspect of the preabortion interview are discussed with attention to specifics that will identify students with the greatest likelihood for psychological problems and/or repeat abortions. (JD)

  15. An Interview with Sir Keith Joseph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Special Education: Forward Trends, 1983

    1983-01-01

    The interview with Britain's Secretary of State for Education focuses on special education policies, includng such topics as the role of microelectronics, parent participation, services for integrated students, and curriculum development for children with moderate learning difficultties. (CL)

  16. Imagining Stories: An Interview with Nancy Welsh.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arroyo, Fred Santiago; Gillam, Alice

    2001-01-01

    Interviews Nancy Welch, an Associate Professor of English and Women's Studies at the University of Vermont. Discusses Welch's background and attitudes towards writing instruction and the field of composition theory. Notes the intersections of women's studies and composition studies. (PM)

  17. Using Electronic Interviews to Explore Student Understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, D. J.; Rivera, J. J.; Mateycik, Fran; Jennings, Sybillyn

    2005-09-01

    This paper reports on methods used to probe student understandings of optical fibers and total internal reflection (TIR). The study was conducted as part of the expansion and improvement of web-based materials for an innovative introductory physics course. Initially, we conducted face-to-face Piaget-style interviews with a convenience sample. Our next step was to interview students taking the course at Rensselaer. Physical limitations necessitated that this be done from a distance, so we conducted "e-interviews" using a Chat Room. In this paper we focus on the e-interview experience, discussing similarities to and differences from the traditional face-to-face approach. In the process, we address how each method informs us about students' activation of prior experiences in making sense of unfamiliar phenomena (e.g., "transfer of learning").

  18. Using Nonmedically Trained Interviewers to Collect Biomeasures in a National In-Home Survey

    PubMed Central

    Jaszczak, Angela; Lundeen, Katie; Smith, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    A key operational component of the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP) is the use of nonmedically trained interviewers to collect biomeasures in a national in-home interview of health and aging. Few studies have integrated in-home biomeasure collection using nonmedically trained interviewers on a large scale. In this article, we discuss our approach to using nonmedically trained interviewers to collect biomeasures in the home. The article focuses on activities that impact the ability to integrate biomeasures into survey research, including developing field methods, recruiting and training interviewers, and monitoring data collection activities. In addition, cooperation rates and measures of interviewer productivity and data quality are provided to evaluate our approach. PMID:21796261

  19. Using Nonmedically Trained Interviewers to Collect Biomeasures in a National In-Home Survey.

    PubMed

    Jaszczak, Angela; Lundeen, Katie; Smith, Stephen

    2009-02-01

    A key operational component of the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP) is the use of nonmedically trained interviewers to collect biomeasures in a national in-home interview of health and aging. Few studies have integrated in-home biomeasure collection using nonmedically trained interviewers on a large scale. In this article, we discuss our approach to using nonmedically trained interviewers to collect biomeasures in the home. The article focuses on activities that impact the ability to integrate biomeasures into survey research, including developing field methods, recruiting and training interviewers, and monitoring data collection activities. In addition, cooperation rates and measures of interviewer productivity and data quality are provided to evaluate our approach.

  20. An Interview with J. Dudley Herron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardellini, Liberato

    2002-01-01

    This interview provides glimpses of Herron's private life from the time that he was a college student until he arrived at Purdue. His dedication to students and commitment to teaching are evident in many of his comments. In the interview, Herron discusses the meaning of laboratory work, preparation and in-service support of pre-college chemistry teachers, problems faced by researchers in chemical education, and some of his opinions about teaching problem solving and the proper role of textbooks in instruction.

  1. An interview with Bruce A. Bolt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1987-01-01

    Professor Bruce Bolt was educated in Australia and first came to the United States in 1960 on a Fulbright Fellowship to the Lamont Geological Observatory of Columbia University. In 1963 he was appointed Director of the Seismographic Stations at the University of California at Berkeley. In June 1988, he steps down as Director but his association will continue as Professor of Seismology. Henry Spall interviewed him again 10 years after a 977 interview published in the Earthquake Information Bulletin. 

  2. Performance Appraisal Interview: A Review of Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    In reviewing the previous research, four main determinants of supervisor ". -- and subordinate reactions to the PAl are posited : (1) the structure...what subordinates perceive should and does occur in the interview is needed for the interview to have a positive impact on subordinates. Future...research needs to focus on the antecedents and consequences of supervisors’ and subordinates’s divergent perceptions of the PAl. A positive first step to

  3. Can thermostable vaccines help address cold-chain challenges? Results from stakeholder interviews in six low- and middle-income countries

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Debra D.; Lorenson, Tina; Bartholomew, Kate; Villadiego, Shirley

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study captures the perspectives of stakeholders at multiple levels of the vaccine supply chain regarding their assessment of challenges with storing vaccines within recommended temperature ranges and their perceptions on the benefits of having vaccines with improved stability, including the potential short-term storage and transport of vaccines in a controlled-temperature chain. Methods Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with 158 immunization stakeholders in six countries. Interviewees included national decision-makers and advisors involved in vaccine purchasing decisions, national Expanded Programme on Immunization managers, and health and logistics personnel at national, subnational, and health facility levels. Results Challenges with both heat and freeze-exposure of vaccines were recognized in all countries, with heat-exposure being a greater concern. Conditions leading to freeze-exposure including ice build-up due to poor refrigerator performance and improper icepack conditioning were reported by 53% and 28% of participants, respectively. Respondents were interested in vaccine products with improved heat/freeze-stability characteristics. The majority of those involved in vaccine purchasing indicated they would be willing to pay a US$0.05 premium per dose for a freeze-stable pentavalent vaccine (68%) or a heat-stable rotavirus vaccine (59%), although most (53%) preferred not to pay the premium for a heat-stable pentavalent vaccine if the increased stability required changing from a liquid to a lyophilized product. Most respondents (73%) were also interested in vaccines labeled for short-term use in a controlled-temperature chain. The majority (115/158) recognized the flexibility this would provide during outreach or should cold-chain breaks occur. Respondents were also aware that possible confusion might arise and additional training would be required if handling conditions were changed for some, but not all vaccines. Conclusion

  4. The cognitive interview method of conducting police interviews: eliciting extensive information and promoting therapeutic jurisprudence.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Ronald P; Geiselman, R Edward

    2010-01-01

    Police officers receive little or no training to conduct interviews with cooperative witnesses, and as a result they conduct interviews poorly, eliciting less information than is available and providing little support to assist victims overcome psychological problems that may have arisen from the crime. We analyze the components of a typical police interview that limits the amount of information witnesses communicate, and which militate against victims' overcoming psychological problems. We then describe an alternative interviewing protocol, the Cognitive Interview, which enhances witness recollection and also likely contributes to victims' well being. The component elements of the Cognitive Interview are described, with emphasis on those elements that likely promote better witness recollection and also help to assist victims' psychological health.

  5. Go with Your Gut: Emotion and Evaluation in Job Interviews.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Lauren A

    2015-03-01

    This article presents hiring as an emotional process rooted in interpersonal evaluation. Drawing from Randall Collins's theory of interaction ritual, the author offers a qualitative case study of elite professional service firms to unpack how employers' emotional reactions to applicants in job interviews affect hiring evaluations. She finds that employers use subjective feelings of excitement and enthusiasm toward candidates-akin to Collins's concept of emotional energy--to-evaluate applicants and make hiring decisions. With these data, she constructs an original theoretical framework of emotional energy development, which highlights the qualities that tend to produce or inhibit the subjective experience of emotional energy in job interviews. Additionally, she outlines the particular phases of an encounter where energy gains and losses are most consequential for influencing hiring outcomes and inequalities. She discusses the implications of these findings for research on hiring, labor market stratification, and interaction rituals.

  6. STS-93: Crew Interview - Cady Coleman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman is presented. The interview addresses many different questions including why Coleman wanted to be an astronaut, why she wanted to become a chemist, and how this historic flight (first female Commander of a mission) will influence little girls. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is the deployment of the Chandra satellite, why people care about x ray energy, whether or not Chandra will compliment the other X Ray Observatories currently in operation, and her responsibilities during the major events of this mission. Coleman mentions the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) rocket that will deploy Chandra, and the design configuration of Chandra that will allow for the transfer of information. The Southwest Research Ultraviolet Imaging System (SWUIS) Telescope on board Columbia, the Plant Growth Investigation in Microgravity (PGIM) experiment, and the two observatories presently in orbit (Gamma Ray Observatory, and Hubble Space Telescope) are also discussed.

  7. STS-101: Crew Interview / Susan J. Helms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Mission Specialist Susan J. Helms is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Helms became an astronaut, the individuals who influenced her, and the events that led to her interest. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is his reaction to and the reasons for the change of the mission objectives. Susan also mentions the docking with the International Space Station (ISS), the repairs of equipment, the change of the batteries, and the transfer of equipment. Susan explains why she, James S. Voss, and Yuri Vladimirovich Usachev are the perfect choice for this mission because of their experience with the ISS modules. She also discusses what the ISS means to her as well as to the human efforts to explore space.

  8. STS-93 Crew Interview: Jeff Ashby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby is presented. The interview addresses many different questions including why Ashby wanted to be an astronaut, how he feels about being the rookie on this launch, and what he expects to feel when he lifts off. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is the deployment of the Chandra satellite, why people care about x ray energy, whether or not Chandra will compliment the other X Ray Observatories currently in operation, and his responsibilities during the major events of this mission. The Southwest Research Ultraviolet Imaging System (SWUIS) on board Columbia, and the two observatories presently in orbit (Gamma Ray Observatory, and Hubble Space Telescope) are also discussed.

  9. STS-101 Crew Interview / Scott Horowitz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Pilot Scott J. Horowitz is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Horowitz became an astronaut, the events that led to his interest, any role models that he had, and his inspiration. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is the reaction and reasons for the splitting-up of the objectives for STS-101 with STS-106. Horowitz also mentions the scheduled space-walk, docking with the International Space Station (ISS), the new glass cockpit of Atlantis, the repairs of equipment and change of the batteries. Horowitz also discusses his responsibilities during the space-walk, and docking of the spacecraft. He stresses that he will have an added challenge during the space-walk, his inability to see where he needs to place the Extravehicular Activities (EVA) crew.

  10. Stimulated recall interviews for describing pragmatic epistemology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubert, Christopher W.; Meredith, Dawn C.

    2015-12-01

    Students' epistemologies affect how and what they learn: do they believe physics is a list of equations, or a coherent and sensible description of the physical world? In order to study these epistemologies as part of curricular assessment, we adopt the resources framework, which posits that students have many productive epistemological resources that can be brought to bear as they learn physics. In previous studies, these epistemologies have been either inferred from behavior in learning contexts or probed through surveys or interviews outside of the learning context. We argue that stimulated recall interviews provide a contextually and interpretively valid method to access students' epistemologies that complement existing methods. We develop a stimulated recall interview methodology to assess a curricular intervention and find evidence that epistemological resources aptly describe student epistemologies.

  11. Pioneer profiles: An interview with Don Baer

    PubMed Central

    Wesolowski, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    This is an interview with Donald M. Baer. The interview includes discussion of his education at the University of Chicago, his work at the University of Washington and the University of Kansas, events that influenced his career, and his perspectives on various issues. His accomplishments include developing the standards for the practice of applied behavior analysis, creating an empirical research base for language training for people with severe disabilities, initiating procedures that led to generalized imitation, formulating experimental designs for applied behavioral research, and devising procedures for generalization and maintenance of behavior. PMID:22478382

  12. An interview with...Patricia Jacobs.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Patricia

    2011-06-01

    The 2011 March of Dimes Prize in Developmental Biology has been jointly awarded to Patricia Jacobs, of Southampton University Medical School and the Wessex Regional Genetics Laboratory, and to David Page, of the Whitehead Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, for their pioneering research on the X and Y chromosomes. The prize recognizes researchers whose work has contributed to our understanding of the science that underlies birth defects. We talked to the winners about their achievements and the impact these have had on human health. This month's interview is with Patricia Jacobs, who spoke to Louisa Flintoft. The interview with David Page will appear in our July issue.

  13. Analyses of Acceptability Judgments Made Toward the Use of Nanocarrier-Based Targeted Drug Delivery: Interviews with Researchers and Research Trainees in the Field of New Technologies.

    PubMed

    Chenel, Vanessa; Boissy, Patrick; Cloarec, Jean-Pierre; Patenaude, Johane

    The assessment of nanotechnology applications such as nanocarrier-based targeted drug delivery (TDD) has historically been based mostly on toxicological and safety aspects. The use of nanocarriers for TDD, a leading-edge nanomedical application, has received little study from the angle of experts' perceptions and acceptability, which may be reflected in how TDD applications are developed. In recent years, numerous authors have maintained that TDD assessment should also take into account impacts on ethical, environmental, economic, legal, and social (E(3)LS) issues in order to lead to socially responsible innovation. Semi-structured interviews (n = 22) were conducted with French and Canadian researchers and research trainees with diverse disciplinary backgrounds and involved in research related to emerging technologies. The interviews focussed on scenarios presenting two types of TDD nanocarriers (carbon, synthetic DNA) in two contexts of use (lung cancer, seasonal flu). Content and inductive analyses of interviews showed how facets of perceived impacts such as health, environment, social cohabitation, economy, life and death, representations of the human being and nature, and technoscience were weighed in acceptability judgments. The analyses also revealed that contextual factors related to device (nature of the treatment), to use (gravity of the disease), and to user (culture) influenced the weighting assigned to perceived impacts and thus contributed to variability in interviewees' judgments of acceptability. Giving consideration to researchers' perspective could accompany first steps of implementation and development of nanomedicine by producing a first, but wide, picture of the acceptability of nanocarrier-based TDD.

  14. Genetic Test Results and Disclosure to Family Members: Qualitative Interviews of Healthcare Professionals' Perceptions of Ethical and Professional Issues in France.

    PubMed

    D' Audiffret Van Haecke, Diane; de Montgolfier, Sandrine

    2016-06-01

    The benefit of disclosing test results to next of kin is to improve prognosis and-in some cases-even prevent death though earlier monitoring or preventive therapies. Research on this subject has explored the question of intra-familial communication from the standpoint of patients and relatives but rarely, from the standpoint of healthcare professionals. The purpose of this study was to interview relevant healthcare professionals in France, where legislation framing the issue was recently passed. A qualitative study consisting of semi-structured interviews was set up to get a clearer picture of the challenges arising from this issue, its consequences in terms of medical care-service practices, and the positions that frontline professionals have taken in response to this new legal framework. The findings from eight interviews with 7 clinical geneticists and 1 genetic counselor highlight very different patterns of practices among care services and among the genetic diseases involved. It is equally crucial to investigate other issues such as the nature of genetic testing and its consequences in terms of disclosing results to kin, the question of the role of genetic counseling in the disclosure process, the question of prescription by non-geneticist clinicians, and practical questions linked to information content, consent and medical follow-up for patients and their relatives.

  15. Developing Employment Interview and Interviewing Skills in Small-group Project Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hindle, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the value of communications skills in geographical education. Describes the use of realistic interviews that were a part of small-group project work. Explains that students wrote job specifications, a curriculum vitae, a cover letter, and conducted interview panels. (CMK)

  16. Characteristic Interviews, Different Strategies: Methodological Challenges in Qualitative Interviewing among Respondents with Mild Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigstad, Hanne Marie Høybråten

    2014-01-01

    Conducting qualitative research interviews among individuals with intellectual disabilities, including cognitive limitations and difficulties in communication, presents particular research challenges. One question is whether the difficulties that informants encounter affect interviews to such an extent that the validity of the results is weakened.…

  17. Empowering Interviews: Narrative Interviews in the Study of Information Literacy in Everyday Life Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckerdal, Johanna Rivano

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This paper presents a way to design and conduct interviews, within a sociocultural perspective, for studying information literacy practices in everyday life. Methods: A framework was developed combining a socio-cultural perspective with a narrative interview was developed. Interviewees were invited to participate by talking and using…

  18. Hearing as Touch in a Multilingual Film Interview: The Interviewer's Linguistic Incompetence as Aesthetic Key Moment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frimberger, Katja

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the author's embodied experience of linguistic incompetence in the context of an interview-based, short, promotional film production about people's personal connections to their spoken languages in Glasgow, Scotland/UK. The article highlights that people's right to their spoken languages during film interviews and the…

  19. Characteristics of Applicants' Questions and Employment Screening Interview Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babbitt, Laurie V.; Jablin, Fredric M.

    1985-01-01

    Results indicate that applicants tend to take fairly passive roles in job interviews and that successful applicants (those receiving second interview offers) tend to ask fewer new-information or interview-process questions than unsuccessful applicants. (PD)

  20. John A. Scigliano Interviews Allan B. Ellis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scigliano, John A.

    2000-01-01

    This interview with Allan Ellis focuses on a history of computer applications in education. Highlights include work at the Harvard Graduate School of Education; the New England Education Data System; and efforts to create a computer-based distance learning and development program called ISVD (Information System for Vocational Decisions). (LRW)

  1. Dame Cicely Saunders: An Omega Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastenbaum, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Presents interview with Dame Cicely Saunders, founder of international hospice care movement. Saunders describes her background and experiences that led her to form the hospice movement and discusses the need for pain control for terminally ill patients. Saunders also notes her opposition to euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. (NB)

  2. An Interview with John Trim at 80

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saville, Nick

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Dr. John Trim, which was recorded at his home in Cambridge on January 21, 2005, not long after his 80th birthday in October 2004. Although he would not consider himself a language tester, Dr. Trim has followed the trends in language assessment since the 1960s and his own work, particularly as a coauthor of…

  3. The Use of Paraphrasing in Investigative Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Angela D.; Roberts, Kim P.; Price, Heather L.; Stefek, Candyce P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Young children's descriptions of maltreatment are often sparse thus creating the need for techniques that elicit lengthier accounts. One technique that can be used by interviewers in an attempt to increase children's reports is "paraphrasing," or repeating information children have disclosed. Although we currently have a general…

  4. An Interview with Roy A. Herberger.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmotter, James W.

    1999-01-01

    An interview with Roy A. Herberger, president of Thunderbird, the American Graduate School of International Management (Arizona), addresses the strategy behind the school's great success, its curriculum and program development, faculty composition, institutional culture, faculty-employment practices, curriculum globalization, competition,…

  5. Understanding Infidelity: An Interview with Gerald Weeks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Travis

    2011-01-01

    In this interview, Gerald Weeks shares his expertise on the topic of infidelity and couples counseling. Dr. Weeks defines infidelity, presents assessment strategies for treating the issue of infidelity, and discusses an intersystemic model for infidelity treatment when counseling couples. Dr. Weeks also provides insight into common mistakes made…

  6. Complete Interview Procedures for Hiring School Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagnon Jr, William L.

    2003-01-01

    Most school districts do not have a full time human resources administrator to conduct interviews and this important task most often becomes the responsibility of the building principal or a department head. Here is a guide designed for hiring employees, both professional staff as well as non-professional, in public, parochial, or private schools.…

  7. An Interview with an Occupational Therapist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crane, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    Sharon Crane is a pediatric occupational therapist with over 20 years of experience working with children and families. "Zero to Three" interviews her to discuss how occupational therapy may move beyond a strictly therapeutic orientation toward services that address wellness and prevention. Crane has created programs for parents and…

  8. Toward a Theory of Motivational Interviewing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, William R.; Rose, Gary S.

    2009-01-01

    The widely disseminated clinical method of motivational interviewing (MI) arose through a convergence of science and practice. Beyond a large base of clinical trials, advances have been made toward "looking under the hood" of MI to understand the underlying mechanisms by which it affects behavior change. Such specification of outcome-relevant…

  9. Pewter Embossing: An Interview with Elitia Hart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Harriet

    2002-01-01

    Presents an interview with a South African artist, Elitia Hart, who uses the technique called pewter embossing. Focuses on her background, why she began using the pewter technique, the history of this technique, and teaching. Includes a project about how to create a decorated bottle. (CMK)

  10. Interview with Joyce VanTassel-Baska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula

    2001-01-01

    This interview with Joyce VanTassel-Baska discusses the growth of talent search programs to identify highly gifted students via the Scholastic Aptitude Test and the role of computer technology in what can be offered to gifted students. Also identified are key characteristics of gifted elementary, middle, and secondary school programs. (CR)

  11. An Interview with Herbert J. Walberg.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirschenbaum, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    This interview with Research Professor of Education at the University of Illinois at Chicago discusses a wide range of education topics, including improving school science, allocation of finite human capital, factors contributing to educational productivity, effect of social obstacles on higher education achievement, use of cooperative learning,…

  12. Corner Office Interviews: Oxford's Casper Grathwohl

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roncevic, Mirela

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Casper Grathwohl, VP and publisher of reference at Oxford University Press (OUP), regarding his background of reference publishing, his role in OUP, and his plans of moving on with Oxford Bibliographies Online (OBO). Over the past 12 years, Grathwohl, has led a successful transition of the venerable…

  13. Interview: Public Alternative Schools in Eugene, Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edcentric, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Information from interviews with a parent coordinator at Eastside Elementary School, a teacher at Silver Lea Corridor School, and a student at Action High and the Planning Course is presented to show history, relationship and function with parents, teachers, students, and administrators in the Eugene, Oregon, public alternative school system. (JT)

  14. Interviewing in Educational Research: A Bibliographic Essay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Felix T.

    Different types of interviews serve different purposes; however, they all share a common goal of collecting data in different situations. The data may be factual in generating quantitative input for a research project, attitudinal in gauging public acceptance of a proposed educational policy, or used in gaining a better understanding of a certain…

  15. Using Motivational Interviewing to Help Your Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheldon, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    Motivational interviewing, which began as a counseling technique in addiction recovery, is a client-centered tool for making changes, increasing helpful behaviors and decreasing unhelpful behaviors. It relies on an individual's intrinsic motivation and interest in change, using a non-confrontational approach to frame goals in a practical,…

  16. Excessive Interviews: Listening to Maternal Subjectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willink, Kate

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author revisits an interview with Ava Montalvo--a mother of two living in Albuquerque, New Mexico--which initially confounded her interpretive resources. This reflexive, performative article examines the role of excess as an analytical lens through which to understand maternal subjectivity and elaborates the methodological…

  17. STS-98 Crew Interview: Mark Polansky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The STS-98 Pilot Mark Polansky is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut, his career path, and his training. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, and the payload (ORU, PDGF) and hardware it brings to the International Space Station (ISS). Mr. Polansky discusses his role in the mission's spacewalks and activities.

  18. Action Man: An Interview with Gerard Egan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugarman, Leonie

    1995-01-01

    Presents an interview which explores the ideas and strategies of the counseling model contained in the interviewee's text, "The Skilled Helper". Discusses the cross-cultural applicability of the model and how conceptions of the prototype have changed or stayed the same across numerous editions of the text. (RJM)

  19. Keeping Bias Out of Job Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorpeland, Elaine, Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Points out recent developments surrounding employment inquiries and requirements and suggests guidelines for keeping job interview questions within the law. Available from: Association Management, American Society of Association Executives, 1101 16th Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. (MH)

  20. Frances Rauscher: Music and Reasoning. Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Neal

    1995-01-01

    Reports on an interview with Frances Rauscher, a research psychologist and musician who has studied the effects of music on the brain. Maintains that students who have studied music have enhanced spatial reasoning. Recommends that music education begin at younger ages. (CFR)

  1. Another Perspective: An Interview with David Smith

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Ruth A.; Johnson, Kelli

    2005-01-01

    To provide another perspective on evaluation within nonformal settings, "New Directions for Evaluation" recently interviewed David Smith, the coordinator of the Professional Learning to Close the Achievement Gap program for the Kansas City, Kansas, Public Schools, who has extensive background in education and educational research. He formerly held…

  2. Assessment Measures: The Reflective Judgment Interview (RJI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pike, Gary R.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author reviews King and Kitchener's "Reflective Judgment Interview" ("RJI"). On the "RJI" website Patricia King notes that a widely espoused outcome of college is the ability to draw reasonable conclusions about complex issues based on incomplete and/or conflicting information. Drawing on the…

  3. Recorded interviews with human and medical geneticists.

    PubMed

    Harper, Peter S

    2017-02-01

    A series of 100 recorded interviews with human and medical geneticists has been carried out and some general results are reported here. Twenty countries across the world are represented, mostly European, with a particular emphasis on the United Kingdom. A priority was given to older workers, many of whom were key founders of human genetics in their own countries and areas of work, and over 20 of whom are now no longer living. The interviews also give valuable information on the previous generation of workers, as teachers and mentors of the interviewees, thus extending the coverage of human genetics back to the 1930s or even earlier. A number of prominent themes emerge from the interview series; notably the beginnings of human cytogenetics from the late 1950s, the development of medical genetics research and its clinical applications in the 1960s and 1970s, and more recently the beginnings and rapid growth of human molecular genetics. The interviews provide vivid personal portraits of those involved, and also show the effects of social and political issues, notably those arising from World War 2 and its aftermath, which affected not only the individuals involved but also broader developments in human genetics, such as research related to risks of irradiation. While this series has made a start in the oral history of this important field, extension and further development of the work is urgently needed to give a fuller picture of how human genetics has developed.

  4. Analyzing Storytelling in TESOL Interview Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasper, Gabriele; Prior, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    Autobiographic research interviews have become an accepted and valued method of qualitative inquiry in TESOL and applied linguistics more broadly. In recent discussions surrounding the epistemological treatment of autobiographic stories, TESOL researchers have increasingly called for more attention to the ways in which stories are embedded in…

  5. The Cry for Help Unheard: Dropout Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan-Davis, Walter E.

    One of the concerns expressed by educators nationwide is the alarmingly high numbers of students who withdraw from schools before graduating. In response to this concern, the Austin Independent School District interviewed 95 dropouts in their homes, asking them why they left school and what could have been done that would have enabled them to…

  6. A Motivational Interviewing Intervention for the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reich, Catherine M.; Howard Sharp, Katianne M.; Berman, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite attempts to engage students, undergraduate instructors are often challenged by low motivation among students to study outside of the classroom. The current study adapted motivational interviewing, which is often used with therapy clients ambivalent to change, to target college student motivation to study for exams. Findings indicated…

  7. Motivational Interviewing and the Social Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanton, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Comments on the article by Miller and Rose (September 2009). As Miller and Rose opened "the black box of treatment to examine linkages between processes of delivery and client outcomes" (p. 529) in motivational interviewing (MI), it is important that their model include factors from the social context that may explain conditions that enhance or…

  8. Interviews with Children Exposed to Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eriksson, Maria; Nasman, Elisabet

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article is to show how research practices may simultaneously follow principles of children's citizenship rights to participation and principles of protection and support when children exposed to violence are informants. The article focuses upon organisation of interview processes and interactions between adult researchers and child…

  9. Assessment Interviewing for Treatment Planning: Trainer's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dendy, Robert F.; And Others

    The purpose of this trainer's manual is to teach drug abuse counselors: (1) the kinds of background information needed to assess a client; (2) how to interview clients to obtain the necessary information; (3) how to write up a case history; and (4) how to design individualized treatments. This trainer's manual is organized into three major…

  10. A Game Plan for the Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Arthur F.

    1981-01-01

    Proposes five rules to help job interviewers elicit data useful in predicting job performance. Rules include: developing critical job requirements; indirect exploration of job requirements; collecting data revealing motivated work behavior (such as candidate's self-reported enjoyable achievement experiences); and summing up data. (RC)

  11. Initial Interview Checklist Increases Counsellor Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vriend, John; Kottler, Jeffrey A.

    1980-01-01

    A structure is described for use by practicing counselors and trainees to help them systematically conduct initial interviews including all significant data gathering and process component variables. A checklist is suggested as a practical way in which practitioners may sequentially address key points. (Author)

  12. Motivational interviewing in the health care setting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alcohol use disorders are related to many negative health, emotional, societal, and economic consequences. These disorders are often difficult to treat because individuals suffering from them tend to be ambivalent about and resistant to change. Motivational interviewing (MI) provides healthcare prov...

  13. Interview Design for Ratio Comparison Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alatorre, Silvia; Figueras, Olimpia

    2003-01-01

    In this article, which is part of an ongoing research, a classification is proposed for ratio comparison problems, according to their context, their quantity type, and their numerical structure. Deriving from this classification, an interview protocol was designed, and guidelines for the interpretation of answers into strategies were decided. A…

  14. The Kodaikanal Experience: Kahn-Montessori Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, David

    1998-01-01

    An interview with Mario Montessori explores the origins of Cosmic Education and experiences of Montessori and his mother, Maria Montessori, in Kodaikanal, India, during World War II. Their experiences contributed to development of theories regarding the elementary child, the power of imagination, the intuition of a cosmic connection, the dynamism…

  15. An Interview with G. N. Getman.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Therapy, 1979

    1979-01-01

    The interview with G. N. Getman, a developmental optometrist specializing in learning problems and disabilities, focuses on vision's impact on learning, the role of the vision specialist in the remediation of learning problems and disabilities, early screening programs, and visual training programs. (DLS)

  16. Cross-Cultural Training in Motivational Interviewing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, William R.; Hendrickson, Stacey M. L.; Venner, Kamilla; Bisono, Ani; Daugherty, Mikyta; Yahne, Carolina E.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the cross-cultural transportability of motivational interviewing (MI), an evidence-based addiction treatment method. Free clinical training in MI was offered in separate targeted workshops for 86 African American, Native American, and Spanish-speaking addiction treatment providers. Audiotaped pre- and posttraining clinical…

  17. Author Profile: An Interview with Rosemary Wells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marantz, Sylvia; Marantz, Ken

    1999-01-01

    This interview with author and illustrator Rosemary Wells focuses on her picture books for children. Topics include reading aloud, saving and retelling the classics, influences on her work, page-design preferences, emotional content, the development process, working with other illustrators, and material from other cultures. (LRW)

  18. The Black Scholar Interviews: Alex Haley

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Robert L.

    1976-01-01

    A native of Henning, Tennessee, Alex Haley taught himself to write during a twenty year career in the U.S. Coast Guard. After retiring from that service, in 1959, he became a magazine writer and interviewer, and has spent 12 years researching and writing "Roots" (Doubleday, 1976), the epic drama of his family from the abduction of his…

  19. How to Survive an Academic Job Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman; Full, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Career development is an important issue, and there are aspects of finding the right position that are particular to science faculty. This article offers a checklist of questions to ask in an academic job interview. Some queries are more appropriate for the chairperson and other administrators; others are better asked of faculty or students. With…

  20. An Interview with William S. Pierce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Donald G.

    1992-01-01

    Following a brief account of his career as facilities planning officer for the Penn State University Libraries and library building consultant, this interview with William S. Pierce focuses on library facilities. Highlights include the importance of the workplace environment for library effectiveness, funding, attractiveness vs. functionality, the…

  1. Historical Truth: An Interview with Ken Burns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cripps, Thomas

    1995-01-01

    Asserts that, although documentary film is nearly 100 years old, historical film did not have a place in the "American Historical Review" until recent years. Presents an interview with documentary filmmaker Ken Burns on the history and significance of documentary film. (CFR)

  2. What Can Motivational Interviewing Do for You?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Brian L.

    2011-01-01

    Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a promising 25-year-old therapeutic approach that integrates relationship-building principles and more directive strategies to move clients toward behavioral change. A large and expanding number of controlled research studies of MI have demonstrated its efficacy for addictive behaviors ranging from use of alcohol,…

  3. Bertrand Russell Speaks: The BBC Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Woodrow

    1982-01-01

    Presents excerpts from 13 interviews with Bertrand Russell conducted for British television in 1959. The discussion covers the nature and purpose of philosophy, religion, war and pacifism, communism and capitalism, ethics and morality, personal and economic power, happiness, nationalism, individualism, fanaticism, and tolerance. (AM)

  4. Interviewing for Counselor and Reference Librarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penland, Patrick R.

    Interviewing as it is developed in this publication is a disciplined encounter technique for counselors and reference librarians who wish to be more effective in serving the individual patron. There seems to be two polar types of patrons: those who will not talk, and those who will not stop talking. Without training, librarians tend to rush…

  5. Vocation Project Interview Questions--Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheelahan, Leesa; Leahy, Mary; Fredman, Nick; Moodie, Gavin; Arkoudis, Sophie; Bexley, Emmaline

    2012-01-01

    This document was produced by the authors based on their research for the report "Missing Links: The Fragmented Relation between Tertiary Education and Jobs. It is an added resource for further information. It contains interview questions for: (1) graduates; (2) learning advisors; (3) managers; (4) pathways officers; (5) students; and (6)…

  6. Implementing Motivational Interviewing: Lessons from Clinical Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, Daniel M.; Edmundson, Eldon; Tomlin, Kathyleen

    2006-01-01

    Addiction treatment agencies face challenges in adopting and sustaining Motivational Interviewing (MI) use. Addiction Educators can assist agencies in changing practices by preparing new practitioners to have some beginning skills in adoption and sustaining strategies. Investigators assessed three types of agency training and six administrative…

  7. Enhancing Student Experiential Learning with Structured Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell, Robert M.; Johnson, Carol B.; Schwartz, William C., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Learning through experience can be rewarding but intimidating. To maximize the benefits of experiential learning assignments, students need to have confidence in their abilities. The authors report how a structured-interview instrument effectively facilitated experiential learning for accounting students without extensive content-specific…

  8. Interview to Boaventura de Sousa Santos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilherme, Manuela; Dietz, Gunther

    2017-01-01

    In this interview, Professor Boaventura de Sousa Santos addresses, on the one hand, the process of transnationalisation of universities and the neoliberalisation of the classical model of the European university. On the other hand, he stresses that the recognition of difference and internal pluralism of science, which have pervaded the…

  9. Dropout Interviews: Summer, 1982, Final Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin Independent School District, TX. Office of Research and Evaluation.

    In the summer of 1982, the Austin Independent School District (AISD) Office of Research and Evaluation (ORE) conducted a survey of dropouts. Dropouts are defined in this study as students who withdrew from AISD schools prior to receiving their high school diploma and are not known to have attended other schools. The dropouts were interviewed to…

  10. 32 CFR 637.21 - Recording interviews and interrogations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.21 Recording interviews and interrogations. The recording of interviews and interrogations by military police personnel...

  11. 32 CFR 637.21 - Recording interviews and interrogations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.21 Recording interviews and interrogations. The recording of interviews and interrogations by military police personnel...

  12. 32 CFR 637.21 - Recording interviews and interrogations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.21 Recording interviews and interrogations. The recording of interviews and interrogations by military police personnel...

  13. 32 CFR 637.21 - Recording interviews and interrogations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.21 Recording interviews and interrogations. The recording of interviews and interrogations by military police personnel...

  14. 32 CFR 637.21 - Recording interviews and interrogations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.21 Recording interviews and interrogations. The recording of interviews and interrogations by military police personnel...

  15. High and low contraceptive use amongst young male offenders: a qualitative interview study

    PubMed Central

    Buston, Katie; Parkes, Alison; Wight, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Objectives There are high rates of fatherhood and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among young incarcerated men. Here we focus on a sample of men incarcerated in a Scottish Young Offender Institution, analysing their accounts of their contraceptive use. Those who report low or no use of contraception are compared with those who report high use. Methods Semi-structured interviews with 40 young male offenders, aged 16–21 years. Participants were purposively sampled using answers from a questionnaire administered to 67 inmates. Data from those men (n=31) reporting either high (n=14) or low/no use (n=17) of contraception are analysed here. Results Low users emphasise their desire for pleasure and appear fatalistic about both pregnancy and disease prevention. High users report a strong desire to protect themselves and their ‘manliness’ by using condoms to avoid the risk of STIs and, to a lesser extent, pregnancy. Both sets of men present themselves in a traditionally masculine way, with high users emphasising power, authority and self-control to justify their non-risk-taking contraceptive behaviour. Conclusions The masculine narrative regarding self-protection, utilised by the high users, may be an effective method of intervention with potential and actual low users. Conventional masculinity valorises risk-taking but if particular forms of risk avoidance – condom use – can be legitimised as confirming one's masculinity it may be possible to persuade low users to adopt them. The opportunity to work with young men whilst incarcerated should be grasped. PMID:24736230

  16. Behavior Change Pathways to Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision: Narrative Interviews with Circumcision Clients in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Price, Jessica E.; Phiri, Lyson; Mulenga, Drosin; Hewett, Paul C.; Topp, Stephanie M.; Shiliya, Nicholas; Hatzold, Karin

    2014-01-01

    As an HIV prevention strategy, the scale-up of voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) is underway in 14 countries in Africa. For prevention impact, these countries must perform millions of circumcisions in adolescent and adult men before 2015. Although acceptability of VMMC in the region is well documented and service delivery efforts have proven successful, countries remain behind in meeting circumcision targets. A better understanding of men's VMMC-seeking behaviors and experiences is needed to improve communication and interventions to accelerate uptake. To this end, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 40 clients waiting for surgical circumcision at clinics in Zambia. Based on Stages of Change behavioral theory, men were asked to recount how they learned about adult circumcision, why they decided it was right for them, what they feared most, how they overcame their fears, and the steps they took to make it to the clinic that day. Thematic analysis across all cases allowed us to identify key behavior change triggers while within-case analysis elucidated variants of one predominant behavior change pattern. Major stages included: awareness and critical belief adjustment, norming pressures and personalization of advantages, a period of fear management and finally VMMC-seeking. Qualitative comparative analysis of ever-married and never-married men revealed important similarities and differences between the two groups. Unprompted, 17 of the men described one to four failed prior attempts to become circumcised. Experienced more frequently by older men, failed VMMC attempts were often due to service-side barriers. Findings highlight intervention opportunities to increase VMMC uptake. Reaching uncircumcised men via close male friends and female sex partners and tailoring messages to stage-specific concerns and needs would help accelerate men's movement through the behavior change process. Expanding service access is also needed to meet current demand

  17. Motivational Interviewing Support for a Behavioral Health Internet Intervention for Drivers with Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ingersoll, Karen S; Banton, Thomas; Gorlin, Eugenia; Vajda, Karen; Singh, Harsimran; Peterson, Ninoska; Gonder-Frederick, Linda; Cox, Daniel J

    2015-05-01

    While Internet interventions can improve health behaviors, their impact is limited by program adherence. Supporting program adherence through telephone counseling may be useful, but there have been few direct tests of the impact of support. We describe a Telephone Motivational Interviewing (MI) intervention targeting adherence to an Internet intervention for drivers with Type 1 Diabetes, DD.com, and compare completion of intervention benchmarks by those randomized to DD.com plus MI vs. DD.com only. The goal of the pre-intervention MI session was to increase the participant's motivation to complete the Internet intervention and all its assignments, while the goal of the post-treatment MI session was to plan for maintaining changes made during the intervention. Sessions were semi-structured and partially scripted to maximize consistency. MI Fidelity was coded using a standard coding system, the MITI. We examined the effects of MI support vs. no support on number of days from enrollment to program benchmarks. Results show that MI sessions were provided with good fidelity. Users who received MI support completed some program benchmarks such as Core 4 (t176 df= -2.25; p<.03) and 11 of 12 monthly driving diaries significantly sooner, but support did not significantly affect time to intervention completion (t177 df= -1.69; p<. 10) or rates of completion. These data suggest that there is little benefit to therapist guidance for Internet interventions including automated email prompts and other automated minimal supports, but that a booster MI session may enhance collection of follow-up data.

  18. Motivational Interviewing Support for a Behavioral Health Internet Intervention for Drivers with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ingersoll, Karen S.; Banton, Thomas; Gorlin, Eugenia; Vajda, Karen; Singh, Harsimran; Peterson, Ninoska; Gonder-Frederick, Linda; Cox, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    While Internet interventions can improve health behaviors, their impact is limited by program adherence. Supporting program adherence through telephone counseling may be useful, but there have been few direct tests of the impact of support. We describe a Telephone Motivational Interviewing (MI) intervention targeting adherence to an Internet intervention for drivers with Type 1 Diabetes, DD.com, and compare completion of intervention benchmarks by those randomized to DD.com plus MI vs. DD.com only. The goal of the pre-intervention MI session was to increase the participant's motivation to complete the Internet intervention and all its assignments, while the goal of the post-treatment MI session was to plan for maintaining changes made during the intervention. Sessions were semi-structured and partially scripted to maximize consistency. MI Fidelity was coded using a standard coding system, the MITI. We examined the effects of MI support vs. no support on number of days from enrollment to program benchmarks. Results show that MI sessions were provided with good fidelity. Users who received MI support completed some program benchmarks such as Core 4 (t176 df= -2.25; p<.03) and 11 of 12 monthly driving diaries significantly sooner, but support did not significantly affect time to intervention completion (t177 df= -1.69; p<. 10) or rates of completion. These data suggest that there is little benefit to therapist guidance for Internet interventions including automated email prompts and other automated minimal supports, but that a booster MI session may enhance collection of follow-up data. PMID:25774342

  19. General practitioners’ perceptions of COPD treatment: thematic analysis of qualitative interviews

    PubMed Central

    Molin, Katrine Rutkær; Egerod, Ingrid; Valentiner, Laura Staun; Lange, Peter; Langberg, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Background In Denmark, the treatment of COPD is mainly managed by general practitioners (GPs). Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is available to patients with COPD in the local community by GP referral, but in practice, many patients do not participate in rehabilitation. The aim of our study was to explore 1) GPs’ perceptions of their role and responsibility in the rehabilitation of patients with COPD, and 2) GPs’ perceptions of how patients manage their COPD. Methods The study was based on a qualitative design with semi-structured key-informant interviews with GPs. Investigator triangulation was applied during data generation, and analysis was done using thematic analysis methodology. Results Our main findings were that GPs relied on patients themselves to take the initiative to make clinic appointments and on professionals at health centers to provide the PR including consultations on lifestyle changes. The GPs experienced that patients chose to come to the clinic when they were in distress and that patients either declined or had poor adherence to rehabilitation when offered. The GPs were relieved that the health centers had taken over the responsibility of rehabilitation as GPs lacked the resources to discuss rehabilitation and follow up on individual plans. Conclusion Our study suggested a potential self-reinforcing problem with the treatment of COPD being mainly focused on medication rather than on PR. Neither GPs nor patients used a proactive approach. Further, GPs were not fully committed to discuss non-pharmacological treatment and perceived the patients as unmotivated for PR. As such, there is a need for optimizing non-pharmacological treatment of COPD and in particular the referral process to PR. PMID:27574417

  20. Behavior change pathways to voluntary medical male circumcision: narrative interviews with circumcision clients in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Price, Jessica E; Phiri, Lyson; Mulenga, Drosin; Hewett, Paul C; Topp, Stephanie M; Shiliya, Nicholas; Hatzold, Karin

    2014-01-01

    As an HIV prevention strategy, the scale-up of voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) is underway in 14 countries in Africa. For prevention impact, these countries must perform millions of circumcisions in adolescent and adult men before 2015. Although acceptability of VMMC in the region is well documented and service delivery efforts have proven successful, countries remain behind in meeting circumcision targets. A better understanding of men's VMMC-seeking behaviors and experiences is needed to improve communication and interventions to accelerate uptake. To this end, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 40 clients waiting for surgical circumcision at clinics in Zambia. Based on Stages of Change behavioral theory, men were asked to recount how they learned about adult circumcision, why they decided it was right for them, what they feared most, how they overcame their fears, and the steps they took to make it to the clinic that day. Thematic analysis across all cases allowed us to identify key behavior change triggers while within-case analysis elucidated variants of one predominant behavior change pattern. Major stages included: awareness and critical belief adjustment, norming pressures and personalization of advantages, a period of fear management and finally VMMC-seeking. Qualitative comparative analysis of ever-married and never-married men revealed important similarities and differences between the two groups. Unprompted, 17 of the men described one to four failed prior attempts to become circumcised. Experienced more frequently by older men, failed VMMC attempts were often due to service-side barriers. Findings highlight intervention opportunities to increase VMMC uptake. Reaching uncircumcised men via close male friends and female sex partners and tailoring messages to stage-specific concerns and needs would help accelerate men's movement through the behavior change process. Expanding service access is also needed to meet current demand

  1. Impossible meals? The food and meal situation of flight attendants in Scandinavia - A qualitative interview study.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Maria; Lennernäs Wiklund, Maria

    2017-02-24

    The working conditions of flight attendants (FAs) often involve extended and irregular working hours, short rest periods, difficulties in planning for breaks and high demands of service provision. Moreover, work schedules including early check-in, shifts during circadian low and time-zone transitions imply constant exposure to alterations in circadian systems and related health risks. The aim of this explorative study was to investigate how the organisation of work, time and place influence the food and meal situation of FAs when at work, focusing on patterns, form and social context of meals. The research questions posed were how food and meals at work were characterised and perceived among the FAs, and what strategies were adopted to manage the food and meal situation. Qualitative, semi-structured interviews were conducted with fourteen FAs working in Scandinavia. The results indicated that the organisation of work, time and place have a major influence on the meal situation at work, and how food and meals are perceived and managed by FAs. The work was defined as fragmented and inconsistent regarding time and place resulting in scattered meals and a more snack-based form of eating. The meal situation was characterised by irregularity as well as unpredictability. Eating took place when food was available and when there was enough time to eat, rather than being guided by hunger or social context. Various strategies such as eating in prevention, using emergency food, avoiding certain food and drinks or eating little or nothing at all were used to manage the unpredictability of the meal situation as well as the gap between organisational and individual times. The findings demonstrated the individual responsibility to solve the meal at work, e.g. to solve organisational times.

  2. STS-100 Crew Interview: John Phillips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-100 Mission Specialist John Phillips is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, the rendezvous and docking of Endeavour with the International Space Station (ISS), the mission's spacewalks, and installation and capabilities of the Space Station robotic arm, UHF antenna, and Rafaello Logistics Module. Phillips then discusses his views about space exploration as it becomes an international collaboration.

  3. STS-100 Crew Interview: Jeff Ashby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-100 Pilot Jeff Ashby is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, the rendezvous and docking of Endeavour with the International Space Station (ISS), the mission's spacewalks, and installation and capabilities of the Space Station robotic arm, UHF antenna, and Rafaello Logistics Module. Ashby then discusses his views about space exploration as it becomes an international collaboration.

  4. STS-100 Crew Interview: Chris Hadfield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-100 Mission Specialist Chris Hadfield is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, the rendezvous and docking of Endeavour with the International Space Station (ISS), the mission's spacewalks, and installation and capabilities of the Space Station robotic arm, UHF antenna, and Rafaello Logistics Module. Hadfield then discusses his views about space exploration as it becomes an international collaboration.

  5. STS-100 Crew Interview: Umberto Guidoni

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-100 Mission Specialist Umberto Guidoni is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, the rendezvous and docking of Endeavour with the International Space Station (ISS), the mission's spacewalks, and installation and capabilities of the Space Station robotic arm, UHF antenna, and Rafaello Logistics Module. Guidoni then discusses his views about space exploration as it becomes an international collaboration.

  6. STS-100 Crew Interview: Yuri Lonchakov

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-100 Mission Specialist Yuri Lonchakov is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, the rendezvous and docking of Endeavour with the International Space Station (ISS), the mission's spacewalks, and installation and capabilities of the Space Station robotic arm, UHF antenna, and Rafaello Logistics Module. Lonchakov then discusses his views about space exploration as it becomes an international collaboration.

  7. STS-100 Crew Interview: Kent Rominger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-100 Commander Kent Rominger is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, the rendezvous and docking of Endeavour with the International Space Station (ISS), the mission's spacewalks, and installation and capabilities of the Space Station robotic arm, UHF antenna, and Rafaello Logistics Module. Rominger then discusses his views about space exploration as it becomes an international collaboration.

  8. STS-100 Crew Interview: Scott Parazynski

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-100 Mission Specialist Scott Parazynski is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, the rendezvous and docking of Endeavour with the International Space Station (ISS), the mission's spacewalks, and installation and capabilities of the Space Station robotic arm, UHF antenna, and Rafaello Logistics Module. Parazynski then discusses his views about space exploration as it becomes an international collaboration.

  9. Transcript of Interview: Mark K. Craig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCurdy, Howard E.

    1992-01-01

    This document is a transcript of an interview given by Howard E. McCurdy to Mark K. Craig. Craig gives details on his background including information on his family, education, and career path, his reaction to the news that America was planning to put a man on the Moon, why he thinks we should go to Mars, and the political speeches made at the time of early human space exploration planning.

  10. STS-93: Crew Interview - Steve Hawley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley is presented. The interview addresses many different questions including why Hawley wanted to be an astronaut, his career path, and how this historic flight (first female Commander of a mission) draws attention from the media. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is the deployment of the Chandra satellite, why people care about x ray energy, whether or not Chandra will compliment the other X Ray Observatories currently in operation, and his responsibilities during the major events of this mission. Hawley mentions the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) rocket that will deployed the Chandra Telescope, and the design configuration of Chandra to gather and transfer information. The Southwest Research Ultraviolet Imaging System (SWUIS) Telescope on board Columbia, the Plant Growth Investigation in Microgravity (PGIM) and Gelation of Sols: Applied Microgravity Research (GOSAMR) experiments, and the two observatories presently in orbit (Gamma Ray Observatory, and Hubble Space Telescope) are also discussed.

  11. Healthcare architects' professional autonomy: interview case studies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duk-Su; Shepley, Mardelle McCuskey

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to understand the nature of an architect's professional power. The central questions were: (1) What is the impact of specialized knowledge on the professional autonomy of architects in general? and (2) What are the relationships between task complexity, specialized knowledge, and the professional autonomy of healthcare architects in particular? To answer these questions, this research utilized interviews and focus groups. Focus groups provided in-depth knowledge on a sub-question: How do real-world situations restrict or reinforce the professional autonomy of healthcare architects? The interviews on this sub-question were project-specific to help gain an understanding of the impact that healthcare design complexity and research utilization have on practice and professional autonomy. Two main relationships were discovered from the interviews and focus groups. One was the relationship between the context of healthcare design complexity and the culture of healthcare design practice. The other was the relationship between changing professional attitudes and the consequences of changes in the profession.

  12. Multimodal Detection of Depression in Clinical Interviews

    PubMed Central

    Dibeklioğlu, Hamdi; Hammal, Zakia; Yang, Ying; Cohn, Jeffrey F.

    2016-01-01

    Current methods for depression assessment depend almost entirely on clinical interview or self-report ratings. Such measures lack systematic and efficient ways of incorporating behavioral observations that are strong indicators of psychological disorder. We compared a clinical interview of depression severity with automatic measurement in 48 participants undergoing treatment for depression. Interviews were obtained at 7-week intervals on up to four occasions. Following standard cut-offs, participants at each session were classified as remitted, intermediate, or depressed. Logistic regression classifiers using leave-one-out validation were compared for facial movement dynamics, head movement dynamics, and vocal prosody individually and in combination. Accuracy (remitted versus depressed) for facial movement dynamics was higher than that for head movement dynamics; and each was substantially higher than that for vocal prosody. Accuracy for all three modalities together reached 88.93%, exceeding that for any single modality or pair of modalities. These findings suggest that automatic detection of depression from behavioral indicators is feasible and that multimodal measures afford most powerful detection. PMID:27213186

  13. Impact of in-depth interviews on the interviewer: roller coaster ride.

    PubMed

    Beale, Barbara; Cole, Rose; Hillege, Sharon; McMaster, Rose; Nagy, Sue

    2004-06-01

    The authors investigated the experiences of parents with children/adult children in metropolitan Sydney, Australia who were living with, or had recovered from, an eating disorder. During regular team meetings, the research assistant who conducted the interviews had described her reactions which led the research team to investigate her experience in more depth. The aim of the present paper was to explore the impact on the research assistant who conducted 22 in-depth interviews with the parents. One of the members of the research team interviewed the research assistant to elicit her reactions. The interview was content analyzed and the following themes were identified: (i). appreciation of an egalitarian model of research; (ii). the emotions expressed by the research assistant; (iii). making sense of the inexplicable and (iv). reflections and comparison to her own life role. The research team would like to advance the theory that the adoption of a formal debriefing mechanism be integrated into the qualitative research process.

  14. Measuring Client Experiences of Motivational Interviewing during a Lifestyle Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madson, Michael B.; Mohn, Richard S.; Schumacher, Julie A.; Landry, Alicia S.

    2015-01-01

    The Client Evaluation of Motivational Interviewing was used to assess motivational interviewing experiences in a predominantly female, African American sample from the Southeastern United States who received motivational interviewing-based feedback during a multicomponent lifestyle intervention. Motivational interviewing was experienced…

  15. Classroom Interviews. A World of Learning. Teacher to Teacher Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogovin, Paula

    Interviews are the central focus of inquiry studies in the elementary school classroom described by an experienced teacher. The interview is the major source of new information and concepts. Through questions, discussions, role playing, and note taking, children make interviews a very active part of learning. Interviews help children see the…

  16. Examining Medical Interview Asymmetry Using the Expectation States Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Timothy J.; Gregory, Stanford W., Jr.; Bianchi, Alison J.; Hartung, Paul J.; Harkness, Sarah

    2005-01-01

    In this study we examine medical interview asymmetry using the expectation states approach. Physicians lead clinical interviews because of a feature inherent in those interviews, namely the status difference between doctor and patient. This power differential varies: it is greatest when the biomedical aspects of the interview are emphasized. These…

  17. Best Practices in Preparing Students for Mock Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Katharine; Oliphant, Gary C.; Oliphant, Becky J.; Hansen, Randall S.

    2009-01-01

    Studies have shown the importance of employment interview preparation in boosting the confidence and performance of students and jobseekers when they interview. This article reviews several techniques for preparing students for mock job interviews and, hence, actual job interviews. For instructors who would like to enhance the learning value of…

  18. Postgraduate career intentions of medical students and recent graduates in Malawi: a qualitative interview study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In 2004, the Malawian Ministry of Health declared a human resource crisis and launched a six year Emergency Human Resources Programme. This included salary supplements for key health workers and a tripling of doctors in training. By 2010, the number of medical graduates had doubled and significantly more doctors were working in rural district hospitals. Yet there has been little research into the views of this next generation of doctors in Malawi, who are crucial to the continuing success of the programme. The aim of this study was to explore the factors influencing the career plans of medical students and recent graduates with regard to four policy-relevant aspects: emigration outside Malawi; working at district level; private sector employment and postgraduate specialisation. Methods Twelve semi-structured interviews were conducted with fourth year medical students and first year graduates, recruited through purposive and snowball sampling. Key informant interviews were also carried out with medical school faculty. Recordings were transcribed and analysed using a framework approach. Results Opportunities for postgraduate training emerged as the most important factor in participants’ career choices, with specialisation seen as vital to career progression. All participants intended to work in Malawi in the long term, after a period of time outside the country. For nearly all participants, this was in the pursuit of postgraduate study rather than higher salaries. In general, medical students and young doctors were enthusiastic about working at district level, although this is curtailed by their desire for specialist training and frustration with resource shortages. There is currently little intention to move into the private sector. Conclusions Future resourcing of postgraduate training opportunities is crucial to preventing emigration as graduate numbers increase. The lesser importance put on salary by younger doctors may be an indicator of the success

  19. The Heritability of Cluster B Personality Disorders Assessed both by Personal Interview and Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Torgersen, Svenn; Myers, John; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Røysamb, Espen; Kubarych, Thomas S.; Kendler, Kenneth S.

    2013-01-01

    Whereas the heritability of common personality traits has been firmly established, the results of the few published studies on personality disorders (PDs) are highly divergent, with some studies finding high heredity and others very low. A problem with assessing personality disorders by means of interview is errors connected with interviewer bias. A way to overcome the problem is to use self-report questionnaires in addition to interviews. This study used both interview and questionnaire for assessing DSM-IV Cluster B personality disorders: antisocial personality disorder (APD), borderline (BPD), narcissistic (NPD), and histrionic (HPD). We assessed close to 2,800 twins from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health Twin Panel using a self-report questionnaire and, a few years later, the Structured Interview for DSM-IV Personality (SIDP-IV). Items from the self-report questionnaire that best predicted the PDs captured by the interview were then selected. Measurement models combining questionnaire and interview information were applied and were fitted using Mx. Whereas the heritability of Cluster B PDs assessed by interview was around .30, and around .40–.50 when assessed by self-report questionnaire, the heritability of the convergent latent factor, including information from both interview and self-report questionnaire was .69 for APD, .67 for BPD, .71 for NPD, and .63 for HPD. As is usually found for personality, the effect of shared-in families (familial) environment was zero. In conclusion, when both interview and self-report questionnaire are taken into account, the heritability of Cluster B PD appears to be in the upper range of previous findings for mental disorders. PMID:23281671

  20. Unmarried women’s ways of facing single motherhood in Sri Lanka – a qualitative interview study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Sri Lanka, motherhood within marriage is highly valued. Sex out of wedlock is socially unacceptable and can create serious public health problems such as illegal abortions, suicide and infanticide, and single motherhood as a result of premarital sex is considered shameful. The way unmarried women facing single motherhood reflect on and make use of their agency in their social environments characterised by limited social and financial support has consequences for the health and well-being of both themselves and their children. The aim of this study was to explore and describe how unmarried women facing single motherhood in Sri Lanka handle their situation. Methods This qualitative study comprised semi-structured interviews with 28 unmarried pregnant women or single mothers. The data were analysed by qualitative content analysis and the results related to the conceptual framework of social navigation. Results The women facing single motherhood expressed awareness of having trespassed norms of sexuality through self-blame, victimhood and obedience, and by considering or attempting suicide. They demonstrated willingness to take responsibility for becoming pregnant before marriage by giving the child up for adoption, bringing up the child themselves, claiming a father for their child, refraining from marriage in the future, permanently leave their home environment, and taking up employment. Throughout the interviews, the women expressed fear of shame, and striving for familial and societal acceptance and financial survival. Conclusions A social environment highly condemning of unmarried motherhood hindered these women from making strategic choices on how to handle their situation. However, to achieve acceptance and survival, the women tactically navigated norms of femininity, strong family dependence, a limited work market, and different sources of support. Limited access to resources restricted the women’s sexual and reproductive health and rights

  1. Combining the Power of Statistical Analyses and Community Interviews to Identify Adoption Barriers for Stormwater Best-Management Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, F. A.; Bowling, L. C.; Prokopy, L. S.

    2015-12-01

    Urban stormwater is an on-going management concern in municipalities of all sizes. In both combined or separated sewer systems, pollutants from stormwater runoff enter the natural waterway system during heavy rain events. Urban flooding during frequent and more intense storms are also a growing concern. Therefore, stormwater best-management practices (BMPs) are being implemented in efforts to reduce and manage stormwater pollution and overflow. The majority of BMP water quality studies focus on the small-scale, individual effects of the BMP, and the change in water quality directly from the runoff of these infrastructures. At the watershed scale, it is difficult to establish statistically whether or not these BMPs are making a difference in water quality, given that watershed scale monitoring is often costly and time consuming, relying on significant sources of funds, which a city may not have. Hence, there is a need to quantify the level of sampling needed to detect the water quality impact of BMPs at the watershed scale. In this study, a power analysis was performed on data from an urban watershed in Lafayette, Indiana, to determine the frequency of sampling required to detect a significant change in water quality measurements. Using the R platform, results indicate that detecting a significant change in watershed level water quality would require hundreds of weekly measurements, even when improvement is present. The second part of this study investigates whether the difficulty in demonstrating water quality change represents a barrier to adoption of stormwater BMPs. Semi-structured interviews of community residents and organizations in Chicago, IL are being used to investigate residents understanding of water quality and best management practices and identify their attitudes and perceptions towards stormwater BMPs. Second round interviews will examine how information on uncertainty in water quality improvements influences their BMP attitudes and perceptions.

  2. Ethics Issues Arising in the Transition to Learning Health Care Systems: Results from Interviews with Leaders from 25 Health Systems

    PubMed Central

    Morain, Stephanie R.; Kass, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: There is increased interest in transitioning to a “learning health care system” (LHCS). While this transition brings the potential for significant benefits, it also presents several ethical considerations. Identifying the ethical issues faced by institutions in this transition is critical for realizing the goals of learning health care so that these issues can be anticipated and, where possible, resolved. Methods: 29 semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with leaders within 25 health care institutions. Respondents were recruiting using purposive sampling, targeting institutions considered as LHCS leaders. All interviews were audiorecorded and transcribed. NVIVO10 software was used to support qualitative analysis. Results: Respondents described seven ethical challenges: (1) ethical oversight of learning activities; (2) transparency of learning activities to patients; (3) potential tensions between improving quality and reducing costs; (4) data sharing and data management; (5) lag time between discovery and implementation; (6) transparency to patients about quality; and (7) randomization for quality improvement initiatives. Discussion: To move towards LHCS, several ethical considerations require further attention, including: the continued appropriateness of the research-treatment distinction; policy frameworks for privacy and data sharing; informing patients about learning activities; obligations to share data on quality; and the potential for trade-offs between quality improvement and cost control. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first project to ask leaders from health care systems committed to ongoing learning about the ethical issues they have faced in this effort. Their experiences can provide guidance on relevant ethical issues, and what might be done to resolve them. PMID:27141521

  3. Thinking ahead – the need for early Advance Care Planning for people on haemodialysis: A qualitative interview study

    PubMed Central

    Horsley, Helen L; Shepherd, Kate; Brown, Heather; Carey, Irene; Matthews, Beverley; O’Donoghue, Donal; Vinen, Katie; Murtagh, Felicity EM

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is a need to improve end-of-life care for people with end-stage kidney disease, particularly due to the increasingly elderly, frail and co-morbid end-stage kidney disease population. Timely, sensitive and individualised Advance Care Planning discussions are acceptable and beneficial for people with end-stage kidney disease and can help foster realistic hopes and goals. Aim: To explore the experiences of people with end-stage kidney disease regarding starting haemodialysis, its impact on quality of life and their preferences for future care and to explore the Advance Care Planning needs of this population and the timing of this support. Study design: Semi-structured qualitative interview study of people receiving haemodialysis. Interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. Recruitment ceased once data saturation was achieved. Setting/participants: A total of 20 patients at two UK National Health Service hospitals, purposively sampled by age, time on haemodialysis and symptom burden. Results: Themes emerged around: Looking Back, emotions of commencing haemodialysis; Current Experiences, illness and treatment burdens; and Looking Ahead, facing the realities. Challenges throughout the trajectory included getting information, communicating with staff and the ‘conveyor belt’ culture of haemodialysis units. Participants reported a lack of opportunity to discuss their future, particularly if their health deteriorated, and variable involvement in treatment decisions. However, discussion of these sensitive issues was more acceptable to some than others. Conclusion: Renal patients have considerable unmet Advance Care Planning needs. There is a need to normalise discussions about preferences and priorities in renal and haemodialysis units earlier in the disease trajectory. However, an individualised approach is essential – one size does not fit all. PMID:25527527

  4. Use of profanity in the counseling interview.

    PubMed

    Kottke, J L; MacLeod, C D

    1989-10-01

    Although profane language is used in the counseling interview by both clients and counselors, past research has focused on the counselor's use of profanity without considering whether the counselor is matching the language of the client. This research examined 160 college students' impressions of an audiotape of a female counselor who used profanity with either a male or female client who did or did not use profanity. In general, when the female counselor swore she was less likely to be sought for help. Further research is recommended.

  5. STS-105 Crew Interview: Rick Sturckow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-105 Pilot Rick Sturckow is seen during a prelaunch interview. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut, his career path, training for the mission, and his role in the mission's activities. He gives details on the mission's goals, which include the transfer of supplies from the Discovery Orbiter to the International Space Station (ISS) and the change-over of the Expedition 2 and Expedition 3 crews (the resident crews of ISS). Sturckow discusses the importance of the ISS in the future of human spaceflight.

  6. STS-104 Crew Interview: Charlie Hobaugh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-104 Pilot Charlie Hobaugh is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, its payload (the Joint Airlock and the external gas tanks), and the usefulness of the newly installed Canadian Robotic Arm (installed by STS-100 crew). Hobaugh describes his role in the rendezvous, docking, undocking, and flyaround of the Atlantis Orbiter and the International Space Station (ISS) and discusses the mission's planned spacewalks.

  7. STS-105 Crew Interview: Scott Horowitz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-105 Commander Scott Horowitz is seen during a prelaunch interview. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut, his career path, training for the mission, and his role in the mission's activities. He gives details on the mission's goals, which include the transfer of supplies from the Discovery Orbiter to the International Space Station (ISS) and the change-over of the Expedition 2 and Expedition 3 crews (the resident crews of ISS). Horowitz discusses the importance of the ISS in the future of human spaceflight.

  8. STS-104 Crew Interview: Steve Lindsey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-104 Commander Steve Lindsey is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, its payload (the Joint Airlock and the external gas tanks), and the usefulness of the newly installed Canadian Robotic Arm (installed by STS-100 crew). Lindsey describes his role in the rendezvous, docking, undocking, and flyaround of the Atlantis Orbiter and the International Space Station (ISS) and discusses the mission's planned spacewalks.

  9. Expedition 8 Crew Interview: Pedro Duque

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Pedro Duque is interviewed in preparation for his flight to and eight day stay on the International Space Station (ISS) as part of the Cervantes mission. Duque arrived on the ISS with the Expedition 8 crew onboard a Soyuz TMA-3, the seventh Soyuz flight to the station. He departed from the ISS on a Soyuz TMA-2 with the Expedition 7 crew of the ISS. In the video, Duque answers questions on: the goals of his flight; his life and career path; the Columbus Module, which ESA will contribute to the ISS, the ride onboard a Soyuz, and the importance of the ISS.

  10. STS-105 Crew Interview: Dan Barry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-105 Mission Specialist Dan Barry is seen during a prelaunch interview. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut, his career path, training for the mission, and his role in the mission's activities. He gives details on the mission's goals, which include the transfer of supplies from the Discovery Orbiter to the International Space Station (ISS) and the change-over of the Expedition 2 and Expedition 3 crews (the resident crews of ISS). Barry discusses the importance of the ISS in the future of human spaceflight.

  11. STS-105 Crew Interview: Pat Forrester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-105 Mission Specialist Pat Forrester is seen during a prelaunch interview. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut, his career path, training for the mission, and his role in the mission's activities. He gives details on the mission's goals, which include the transfer of supplies from the Discovery Orbiter to the International Space Station (ISS) and the change-over of the Expedition 2 and Expedition 3 crews (the resident crews of ISS). Forrester discusses the importance of the ISS in the future of human spaceflight.

  12. Expedition 4 Crew Interviews: Yury I. Onufrienko

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Expedition 4 Commander Yury Onufrienko is seen during a prelaunch interview. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, his role in the mission, what his responsibilities will be, what the crew exchange will be like (transferring the Expedition 4 crew in place of the Expedition 3 crew on the International Space Station (ISS)), the day-to-day life on an extended stay mission, the experiments he will be conducting on board, and what the S0 truss will mean to ISS. Onufrienko ends with his thoughts on the short-term and long-term future of the International Space Station.

  13. STS-104 Crew Interview: Jim Reilly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-104 Mission Specialist Jim Reilly is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, its payload (the Joint Airlock and the external gas tanks), and the usefulness of the newly installed Canadian Robotic Arm (installed by STS-100 crew). Reilly describes his role in the rendezvous, docking, undocking, and flyaround of the Atlantis Orbiter and the International Space Station (ISS) and discusses the mission's planned spacewalks.

  14. STS-104 Crew Interview: Janet Kavandi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-104 Mission Specialist Janet Kavandi is seen being interviewed. She answers questions about her inspiration to become an astronaut and her career path. She gives details on the mission's goals and significance, its payload (the Joint Airlock and the external gas tanks), and the usefulness of the newly installed Canadian Robotic Arm (installed by STS-100 crew). Kavandi describes her role in the rendezvous, docking, undocking, and flyaround of the Atlantis Orbiter and the International Space Station (ISS) and discusses the mission's planned spacewalks.

  15. STS-104 Crew Interview: Mike Gernhardt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-104 Mission Specialist Mike Gernhardt is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, its payload (the Joint Airlock and the external gas tanks), and the usefulness of the newly installed Canadian Robotic Arm (installed by STS-100 crew). Gernhardt describes his role in the rendezvous, docking, undocking, and flyaround of the Atlantis Orbiter and the International Space Station (ISS) and discusses the mission's planned spacewalks.

  16. Expedition 4 Crew Interviews: Carl Walz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Expedition 4 Flight Engineer Carl Walz is seen during a prelaunch interview. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, his role in the mission, what his responsibilities will be, what the crew exchange will be like (transferring the Expedition 4 crew in place of the Expedition 3 crew on the International Space Station (ISS)), the day-to-day life on an extended stay mission, the experiments he will be conducting on board, and what the S0 truss will mean to ISS. Walz ends with his thoughts on the short-term and long-term future of the International Space Station.

  17. Expedition 4 Crew Interviews: Dan Bursch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Expedition 4 Flight Engineer Dan Bursch is seen during a prelaunch interview. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, his role in the mission, what his responsibilities will be, what the crew exchange will be like (transferring the Expedition 4 crew in place of the Expedition 3 crew on the International Space Station (ISS)), the day-to-day life on an extended stay mission, the experiments he will be conducting on board, and what the S0 truss will mean to ISS. Bursch ends with his thoughts on the short-term and long-term future of the International Space Station.

  18. Expedition 3 Crew Interview: Frank Culbertson, Jr.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Expedition 3 Commander Frank Culbertson is seen being interviewed before leaving to become part of the third resident crew on the International Space Station (ISS). He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He discusses his expectations for life on the ISS and the experiments he will be performing while on board. Culbertson gives details on the spacewalks that will take place during the STS-105 mission (the mission carrying the Expedition 3 crew up to the ISS) and the unloading operations for the Multipurpose Logistics Module.

  19. Expedition 3 Crew Interview: Vladimir Dezhurov

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Expedition 3 Pilot Vladimir Dezhurov is seen being interviewed before leaving to become part of the third resident crew on the International Space Station (ISS). He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He discusses his expectations for life on the ISS and the experiments he will be performing while on board. Dezhurov gives details on the spacewalks that will take place during the STS-105 mission (the mission carrying the Expedition 3 crew up to the ISS) and the unloading operations for the Multipurpose Logistics Module.

  20. Expedition 3 Crew Interview: Mikhail Turin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Expedition 3 Flight Engineer Mikhail Turin is seen being interviewed before leaving to become part of the third resident crew on the International Space Station (ISS). He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He discusses his expectations for life on the ISS and the experiments he will be performing while on board. Turin gives details on the spacewalks that will take place during the STS-105 mission (the mission carrying the Expedition 3 crew up to the ISS) and the unloading operations for the Multipurpose Logistics Module.

  1. Expedition 2 Crew Interview: Susan Helms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Expedition 2 (the second resident crew of the International Space Station) Flight Engineer Susan Helms is seen being interviewed. She answers questions about her inspiration to become an astronaut and her career path. She gives details on the Space Shuttle mission and goals, including information on the spacewalks and transfer of Expedition crews, and discusses her upcoming stay on the International Space Station (ISS). Helms gives her thoughts on the international cooperation needed to successfully construct the ISS and some of the scientific experiments that will take place on the station.

  2. STS-106 Crew Interviews: Daniel Burbank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) video production presents an STS-106 pre-launch interview with Mission Specialist Daniel C. Burbank, Lt. Commander, United States Coast Guard (USCG). Among other topics, Burbank discusses how his Coast Guard career evolved into spaceflight, his experiences flying helicopters for the Coast Guard, and his chief duties on the upcoming spaceflight. STS-106 is International Space Station assembly flight ISS-2A.2b and will utilize the SPACEHAB Double Module and the Integrated Cargo Carrier (ICC) to take supplies to the station. The mission will also include 2 spacewalks.

  3. Adapting cognitive interviewing for nursing research.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Shigeko; Vandermause, Roxanne; Benavides-Vaello, Sandra

    2013-12-01

    Cognitive interviewing (CI) has been used by instrument developers to examine how well an instrument generates the intended data when tested with prospective respondents. In using CI to test a new instrument to measure patients' perceptions of the quality of nursing care, the authors found challenges in applying a theory-based traditional CI approach derived from experimental psychology to more clinically oriented nursing research. The purposes of this article are to describe these challenges and the modifications of CI to capture the nursing care perspectives of hospitalized participants, and to present interpretive phenomenology as a theoretical orientation for clinically situated CI.

  4. Strategic Interviewing to Detect Deception: Cues to Deception across Repeated Interviews

    PubMed Central

    Masip, Jaume; Blandón-Gitlin, Iris; Martínez, Carmen; Herrero, Carmen; Ibabe, Izaskun

    2016-01-01

    Previous deception research on repeated interviews found that liars are not less consistent than truth tellers, presumably because liars use a “repeat strategy” to be consistent across interviews. The goal of this study was to design an interview procedure to overcome this strategy. Innocent participants (truth tellers) and guilty participants (liars) had to convince an interviewer that they had performed several innocent activities rather than committing a mock crime. The interview focused on the innocent activities (alibi), contained specific central and peripheral questions, and was repeated after 1 week without forewarning. Cognitive load was increased by asking participants to reply quickly. The liars’ answers in replying to both central and peripheral questions were significantly less accurate, less consistent, and more evasive than the truth tellers’ answers. Logistic regression analyses yielded classification rates ranging from around 70% (with consistency as the predictor variable), 85% (with evasive answers as the predictor variable), to over 90% (with an improved measure of consistency that incorporated evasive answers as the predictor variable, as well as with response accuracy as the predictor variable). These classification rates were higher than the interviewers’ accuracy rate (54%). PMID:27847493

  5. An interview with Hyeon-Shik Hwang

    PubMed Central

    Thiesen, Guilherme; de Araújo, Telma Martins; Freitas, Maria Perpétua Mota; da Motta, Alexandre Trindade Simões

    2016-01-01

    It gives me great pleasure to interview Dr. Hyeon-Shik Hwang, an innovative orthodontist who has developed many creative techniques over his career. Dr. Hwang was born in Korea and received his DDS and PhD degrees from Yonsei University in Seoul. He is professor and chairman of the Department of Orthodontics at Chonnam National University School of Dentistry, Gwangju, Korea. Dr. Hwang, as a faculty at the university hospital, has maintained a successful clinical practice for more than 25 years. He has treated many adult patients focusing on esthetics and periodontal health and has developed many clinical techniques to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of treatment to the benefit of both the patient and practitioner. Dr. Hwang is also interested in the evaluation of facial asymmetry two- and three-dimensionally. As one of the early adopters of cone-beam volume imaging, he has given special emphasis on the management of surgical cases. He is married to Jung-Un Park with whom he has two sons. His favorite hobbies are photography and listening to music. When I was presented to him in a congress, it was a great pleasure meeting someone who I already admired for his singular work. Later on, his humbleness and knowledge made me marvel at him even more. I hope that all readers of Dental Press Journal of Orthodontics also enjoy the teachings from this brilliant Korean orthodontist! Guilherme Thiesen - interview coordinator PMID:27007758

  6. Prevalence of lower gastrointestinal symptoms and associated consultation behaviour in a British elderly population determined by face-to-face interview.

    PubMed Central

    Chaplin, A; Curless, R; Thomson, R; Barton, R

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of organic lower gastrointestinal disease increases with age. However, the prevalence of lower gastrointestinal symptoms in a British elderly population is unclear, with previous epidemiological studies focusing on younger populations. Furthermore, there is little information about consultation behaviour associated with lower gastrointestinal symptoms. AIM: To determine the prevalence of lower gastrointestinal symptoms reported by randomly selected, elderly community subjects. METHODS: An age- and sex-stratified random sample of patients aged 65 years and over was drawn from a general practice register (n = 842). Those who had not refused to participate in an initial postal survey were invited to participate in a semi-structured physician interview at their own home to assess lower gastrointestinal symptomatology (n = 745). Non-participation bias and service use of all subjects were assessed from practice records. RESULTS: Five hundred and ninety-six (71%) patients were interviewed. Fifty-seven per cent of all participants had at least one lower gastrointestinal symptom. Individual symptoms and symptom complexes were common, affecting up to 32% of subjects. Only 24% of subjects with lower gastrointestinal symptoms consulted their general practitioner (GP) with such symptoms in the previous year. As few as 31% of subjects with new onset of the significant symptoms of rectal bleeding, abdominal pain, and a change in bowel habit consulted their GP. CONCLUSION: Lower gastrointestinal symptoms are common in a British elderly population and an important reason for GP consultation. PMID:11127169

  7. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Childhood Diagnoses (Kid-SCID): first psychometric evaluation in a Dutch sample of clinically referred youths.

    PubMed

    Roelofs, Jeffrey; Muris, Peter; Braet, Caroline; Arntz, Arnoud; Beelen, Imke

    2015-06-01

    The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Childhood Disorders (Kid-SCID) is a semi-structured interview for the classification of psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents. This study presents a first evaluation of the psychometric properties of the Kid-SCID in a Dutch sample of children and adolescents who had been referred to an outpatient treatment centre for mental health problems. Results indicated that the inter-rater reliability of the Kid-SCID classifications and the internal consistency of various (dimensional) criteria of the diagnoses were moderate to good. Further, for most Kid-SCID diagnoses, reasonable agreement between children and parents was found. Finally, the correspondence between the Kid-SCID and the final clinical diagnosis as established after the full intake procedure, which included the information as provided by the Kid-SCID, ranged from poor to good. Results are discussed in the light of methodological issues pertaining to the assessment of psychiatric disorders in youths. The Kid-SCID can generally be seen as a reliable and useful tool that can assist clinicians in carrying out clinical evaluations of children and adolescents.

  8. Conversation analysis as a technique for exploring the dynamics of a mediated interview.

    PubMed

    Friedland, Deborah; Penn, Claire

    2003-01-01

    The study analysed the dynamics of a mediated medico-legal interview using conversation analysis (CA) as a key methodology. The aim of using CA was to identify both facilitators and inhibitors of a successfully mediated interview, using a detailed microscopic analysis of the dynamics involved. A 45-minute interview with the client's parents, the speech pathologist and the interpreter was tape recorded and analysed according to CA principles. Results revealed several facilitators, including equal and active roles, use of code switching, familiarity between the interviewer and interpreter, and use of repetition. Inhibitors included different agendas, complicated repair trajectories and interruptions. In addition, aspects such as cultural brokerage were identified that could be considered neither as facilitators nor as inhibitors. Each area is discussed in detail using extracts from the transcription.

  9. Assessment and training of clinical interviewing skills: analogue analysis and field replication.

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, B A; Wong, S E; Riordan, M M; Dorsey, M F; Lau, M M

    1982-01-01

    Two studies were conducted to assess the train clinical interviewing skills. In Experiment 1, eight university practicum students ("therapists") and either role played or volunteer "clients" were audiotaped during simulated interviews. Following the collection of baseline data on both therapist and client responses, training was provided by way of written materials, classroom instruction and practice, and quizzes. Results of a multiple baseline design across subjects showed improvements in therapists' interviewing skills and subsequent increases in client responding. Experiment 2 replicated and extended the research to a hospital outpatient clinic, in which therapists interviewed the parents of children with behavior problems. In addition, four months following the completion of Experiment 2, follow-up data collected during a maintenance condition showed continued high levels of therapist and client behavior. Finally, a panel of expert peers indicated that each response category was judged highly relevant to the behavioral assessment process. PMID:7118753

  10. Impact of asylum interviews on the mental health of traumatized asylum seekers

    PubMed Central

    Schock, Katrin; Rosner, Rita; Knaevelsrud, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Background Asylum interviews within the asylum procedure are associated with psychological stress for traumatized asylum seekers. This study investigates the impact of asylum interviews on the mental health in a sample of 40 traumatized asylum seekers. The comparison group consisted of refugees (N=10) that had not been invited to an asylum interview. Additionally, the moderating effects of trial-related variables such as perceived justice of the trial, stress of giving testimony, and stress of waiting for the asylum interview were examined. Method Participants were assessed on average 10 days before (t1) and 16 days after (t2) the asylum interview. Chi-square tests for dichotomous and categorical variables were used to compare the descriptive statistics of the two groups. To investigate symptom changes from t1 to t2, paired t-tests were calculated. The magnitude of effects was measured by Cohen's effect size d within groups. Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted for demographic and trial variables predicting posttraumatic intrusions, avoidance, and hyperarousal. Results Data showed a significant increase in posttraumatic intrusions and a significant decrease in posttraumatic avoidance and hyperarousal symptoms from t1 to t2. No significant symptom changes in the posttraumatic stress disorder subscales were found in the comparison group. The results of hierarchical regression analyses revealed perceived justice of the interview to predict the increase of intrusions and the number of experienced traumata and testimony stress to predict posttraumatic avoidance. Conclusions The present findings underline the stressful impact of asylum interviews on traumatized refugees. They indicate that the asylum interview might decrease posttraumatic avoidance and trigger posttraumatic intrusions, thus highlight the importance of ensuring that the already vulnerable group of traumatized refugees needs to be treated with empathy during their asylum interview. PMID:26333540

  11. Religion in child sexual abuse forensic interviews.

    PubMed

    Tishelman, Amy C; Fontes, Lisa A

    2017-01-01

    Religion is an under-studied factor affecting children's sexual victimization and their willingness to discuss such experiences. In this qualitative study, 39 child forensic interviewers and child advocacy center (CAC) directors in the United States discussed religious influences on children's sexual abuse experiences, their relationships to CACs, and their disclosures in the forensic setting. Participants reported both harmonious and dissonant interactions between religiously observant children and families on one hand and child advocacy centers on the other. Themes emerged related to abuse in religious contexts and religious justifications for abuse; clergy and religious supports for disclosures as well as suppression of disclosures; and the ways CACS accommodate religious diversity and forge collaborations with clergy. Participants discussed a wide range of religions. Recommendations for practice and research are included.

  12. STS-114 Crew Interview: Stephen Robinson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    Stephen Robinson, Mission Specialist 2 (MS2), of the STS-114 space mission is seen during a prelaunch interview. He discusses his duties as flight engineer, Extravehicular Activity 2 (EVA 2) spacewalker, and medical officer. Robinson answers questions about his interests in spaceflight and the specific goals of the mission. He identifies this mission as the International Space Station Resupply Mission because supplies and experiments are brought to the International Space Station and Expedition 6 crew of Commander Kenneth Bowersox, and Flight Engineers Donald Pettit and Nikolai Budarin are returning to Earth. Lastly, he talks about the docking of the Space Shuttle Atlantis with the International Space Station. He looks forward to this experience in space.

  13. STS-111 Crew Interviews: Ken Cockrell, Commander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-111 Mission Commander Ken Cockrell is seen during this preflight interview, answering questions about his inspiration in becoming an astronaut and provides an overview of the mission. He discusses the following topics: the docking of the Endeavour Orbiter to the International Space Station (ISS), the delivery of the Mobile Base System (MBS) to the ISS, the crew transfer activities (the Expedition 5 crew is replacing the Expedition 4 crew on the ISS), the planned extravehicular activities (EVAs), and the installation of the MBS onto the ISS. Cockrell provides a detailed description of the MBS and its significance for the ISS. He also describes prelaunch activities, mission training and international cooperation during the mission.

  14. STS-111 Crew Interviews: Paul Lockhart, Pilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-111 Pilot Paul Lockhart is seen during this preflight interview, where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He discusses the following mission goals: the crew transfer activities (the Expedition 5 crew is replacing the Expedition 4 crew on the International Space Station (ISS)), the delivery of the payloads which includes the Mobile Remote Servicer Base System (MBS), and the planned extravehicular activities (EVAs) which include attaching the MBS to the ISS and repairing the station's robot arm. He describes in-flight procedures for launch, reentry and docking with the ISS. He ends with his thoughts on the role of international cooperation in building and maintaining ISS.

  15. PEOPLE IN PHYSICS: Interview with Charles Taylor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pople, Conducted by Stephen

    1996-07-01

    Charles Taylor started his university teaching career at UMIST in 1948. In 1965 he became Professor and Head of the Department of Physics at University College, Cardiff. He was a Vice-President of the Institute of Physics from 1970 to 1975, and Professor of Experimental Physics at the Royal Institution from 1977 until 1989. Over the years, Professor Taylor has delighted audiences of all ages with his demonstration lectures, including the Royal Institution Christmas Lectures televised in 1971 and 1989. In 1986 he became the first recipient of the Royal Society's Michael Faraday Award for contributions to the public understanding of science. His many books include Exploring Music, The Art and Science of the Lecture Demonstration, and also the Oxford Children's Book of Science, co-written with interviewer Stephen Pople.

  16. STS-114 Crew Interview: Soichi Noguchi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Soichi Noguchi, Mission Specialist 1 (MS1) representing Japan's National Space Development Agency (NASDA) is seen during a prelaunch interview. He discusses the main goals of this flight which are to take expedition 7 to the International Space Station and bring back expedition 6 to the Earth. He is also responsible for all Extravehicular (EVA) work on this mission. Expedition seven includes: Mission Specialist and Commander Yuri Malenchenko; NASA ISS Science Officer Edward Lu; and Flight Engineer Alexander Kaleri. Expedition Six includes: Commander Kenneth Bowersox; NASA ISS Science Officer Donald Petit; and Flight Engineer Nikolai Budarin. Noguchi explains the Utilization and Logistics Flight 1 (ULF1) Mission which entails the exchange of crewmembers, various supplies and experiments and the replacement of a control component on the International Space Station. This is also will be Soichi Noguchi's first spacewalk.

  17. Expedition 7 Crew Interview: Yuri Malenchenko

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko of Expedition Seven is seen during a pre-launch interview. He begins by telling why he wanted to become a cosmonaut. Malenchenko expresses his reaction about the news of the Space Shuttle Columbia accident, and how this mission will be different from other missions. He also expresses the challenges that face Malenchenko and Ed Lu such as the crew reduction from three to two, less supplies and no space shuttle flights. Malenchenko says that he will have to work on a compressed schedule, which will make the mission even more challenging. A description of the handover of Expedition Six is given. Malenchenko and Ed Lu will be cramped in a confined space on the Soyuz Spacecraft for two days before docking, and he talks about this experience. Lastly, Malenchenko gives his thoughts on how it will be to work with Ed Lu in space, and tells of Lu's trustworthiness and reliability as a fellow crew member.

  18. Expedition 5 Crew Interviews: Valery Korzun, Commander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Expedition 5 Commander Valery Kozun is seen during a prelaunch interview. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, his role in the mission and what his responsibilities will be as commander, what the crew exchange will be like (the Expedition 5 crew will replace the Expedition 4 crew on the International Space Station (ISS)), the daily life on an extended stay mission, the loading operations that will take place, the experiments he will be conducting on board, and the planned extravehicular activities (EVAs) scheduled for the mission. Kozun discusses the EVAs in greater detail and explains the significance of the Mobile Base System and the Crew Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart for the ISS. He also explains at some length the science experiments which will be conducted on board by the Expedition 5 crew members. Korzun also touches on how his previous space experience on Mir (including dealing with a very serious fire) will benefit the Expedition 5 mission.

  19. Expedition 5 Crew Interviews: Peggy Whitson

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Expedition 5 Flight Engineer Peggy Whitson is seen during a prelaunch interview. She gives details on the mission's goals and significance, her role in the mission, what her responsibilities will be, what the crew activities will be like (docking and undocking of two Progress unpiloted supply vehicles, normal space station maintenance tasks, conducting science experiments, installing the CETA (Crew and Equipment Translation) cart, and supporting the installation of the International Truss Structure S1 segment), the day-to-day life on an extended stay mission, the experiments she will be conducting on board, and what the S1 truss will mean to the International Space Station (ISS). Whitson ends with her thoughts on the short-term and long-term future of the ISS.

  20. STS-110 Crew Interview: Stephen Frick

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-110 Pilot Stephen Frick is seen during this preflight interview, where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. Frick outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically during the docking and extravehicular activities (EVAs). He describes the payload (S0 Truss and Mobile Transporter) and the dry run installation of the S0 truss that will take place the day before the EVA for the actual installation. Frick discusses the planned EVAs in detail and outlines what supplies will be left for the resident crew of the International Space Station (ISS). He ends with his thoughts on the most valuable aspect of the ISS.

  1. STS-110 Crew Interviews: Ellen Ochoa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-110 Mission Specialist Ellen Ochoa is seen during this preflight interview, where she gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about her inspiration to become an astronaut and her career path. Ochoa outlines her role in the mission in general, and specifically her use of the robotic arm during the extravehicular activities (EVAs). She describes the payload (S0 Truss and Mobile Transporter) and the dry run installation of the S0 truss that will take place the day before the EVA for the actual installation. Ochoa discusses the planned EVAs in detail and outlines what supplies will be left for the resident crew of the International Space Station (ISS). She ends with thoughts on the most valuable aspect of the ISS.

  2. STS-113 Crew Interviews: Paul Lockhart, Pilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-113 Pilot Paul Lockhart is seen during this preflight interview, where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. Lockhart outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically during the docking and extravehicular activities (EVAs). He describes the primary mission payload (the P1 truss) and the crew transfer activities (Expedition 6 crew will replace the Expedition 5 Crew). Lockhart discusses the planned EVAs in detail and mentions what supplies will be left for the resident crew of the International Space Station (ISS). He ends with his thoughts about the importance of the ISS as the second anniversary of continuous human occupation of the space station approaches.

  3. STS-110 Crew Interviews: Lee Morin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-110 Mission Specialist Lee Morin is seen during this preflight interview, where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. Morin outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically during the docking and extravehicular activities (EVAs). He describes the payload (S0 Truss and Mobile Transporter) and the dry run installation of the S0 truss that will take place the day before the EVA for the actual installation. Morin discusses the planned EVAs in detail and outlines what supplies will be left for the resident crew of the International Space Station (ISS). He ends with his thoughts on the most valuable aspect of the ISS.

  4. Expedition 6 Crew Interviews: Ken Bowersox CDR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Expedition 6 Commander Ken Bowersox is seen during a prelaunch interview. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, his role in the mission, what his responsibilities will be as commander, what the crew exchange will be like (transferring the Expedition 6 crew in place of the Expedition 5 crew on the International Space Station (ISS)) and what day-to-day life on an extended stay mission is like. Bowersox also discusses in some detail the planned extravehicular activities (EVAs), the anticipated use of the robot arms in installing the P1 truss and the on-going science experiments which will be conducted by the Expedition 6 crew. He touches on challenges posed by a late change in the crew roster. Bowersox ends with his thoughts on the value on the ISS in fostering international cooperation.

  5. STS-110 Crew Interview: Mike Bloomfield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-110 Commander Mike Bloomfield is seen during this preflight interview, where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. Bloomfield outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically during the docking and extravehicular activities (EVAs). He describes the payload (S0 Truss and Mobile Transporter) and the dry run installation of the S0 truss that will take place the day before the EVA for the actual installation. Bloomfield discusses the planned EVAs in detail and outlines what supplies will be left for the resident crew of the International Space Station (ISS). He ends with his thoughts on the most valuable aspect of the ISS.

  6. STS-110 Crew Interview: Rex Walheim

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-110 Mission Specialist Rex Walheim is seen during this preflight interview, where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. Walheim outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically during the docking and extravehicular activities (EVAs). He describes the payload (S0 Truss and Mobile Transporter) and the dry run installation of the S0 truss that will take place the day before the EVA for the actual installation. Walheim discusses the planned EVAs in detail and outlines what supplies will be left for the resident crew of the International Space Station (ISS). He ends with his thoughts on the most valuable aspect of the ISS.

  7. Interview with Gaetano Benedetti, M.D.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Gaetano

    2003-01-01

    Professor Gaetano Benedetti has been working as a psychoanalyst with individuals with a schizophrenic disorder for over 50 years in his capacity as psychotherapist, supervisor, and teacher. In this interview Professor Benedetti defines the basic psychological problems in schizophrenia. He and his younger colleague in the field of schizophrenia, Dr. Maurizio Peciccia, understand the illness to be the result of an interaction between possible neurobiological vulnerabilities, overwhelming affects, and a self lacking cohesion and integration. Specifically, they characterize the core psychological deficit in schizophrenia to be a deintegration of the separate and symbiotic selves of the patient, resulting in the oscillation between pathological symbiosis with the world and a defensive autistic-like retreat from object relations. Other topics discussed include: the therapeutic symbiosis; the transitional subject; progressive psychopathology; therapeutic counteridentification; the origins of schizophrenia; therapeutic images and psychotherapeutic transformation.

  8. Expedition 7 Crew Interview: Ed Lu

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Ed Lu of Expedition Seven is seen during a pre-launch interview. He explains why he became interested in space flight. He states that this is a different type of mission and gives his reaction to the Columbia Space Shuttle tragedy. The handover of Expedition six is explained by Ed Lu. The challenges of this mission are also described by Lu. These challenges include working with a crew member reduction from three to two, and the conservation of clothing and consumables. Ed Lu talks about what it is like to work with commander Yuri Malenchenko in space. Finally, Ed Lu states that he will continue scientific experiments in space on calcium loss in bones.

  9. STS-110 Crew Interview: Jerry Ross

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-110 Mission Specialist Jerry Ross is seen during this preflight interview, where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. Ross outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically during the docking and extravehicular activities (EVAs). He describes the payload (S0 Truss and Mobile Transporter) and the dry run installation of the S0 truss that will take place the day before the EVA for the actual installation. Ross discusses the planned EVAs in detail and outlines what supplies will be left for the resident crew of the International Space Station (ISS). He ends with his thoughts on the most valuable aspect of the ISS.

  10. STS-108 Crew Interviews: Linda Godwin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-108 Mission Specialist Linda Godwin is seen during a prelaunch interview. She answers questions about the mission's goals and significance, explaining the meaning of 'utilization flight 1' (UF-1) as opposed to an 'assembly flight'. She gives details on the payload (Starshine Satellite, Avian Development Facility, and Rafaello Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM)), her role in the rendezvous, docking, and undocking of the Endeavour Orbiter to the International Space Station (ISS), how she will participate in the unloading and reloading of the MPLM, and the way in which the old and new resident crews of ISS will exchanged. Godwin ends with her thoughts on the short-term and long-term future of the International Space Station.

  11. STS-110 Crew Interviews: Steve Smith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-110 Mission Specialist Steve Smith is seen during this preflight interview, where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. Smith outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically during the docking and extravehicular activities (EVAs). He describes the payload (S0 Truss and Mobile Transporter) and the dry run installation of the S0 truss that will take place the day before the EVA for the actual installation. Smith discusses the planned EVAs in detail and outlines what supplies will be left for the resident crew of the International Space Station (ISS). He ends with his thoughts on the most valuable aspect of the ISS.

  12. STS-108 Crew Interviews: Dom Gorie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-108 Commander Dom Gorie is seen during a prelaunch interview. He answers questions about the mission's goals and significance, explaining the meaning of 'utilization flight 1' (UF-1) as opposed to an 'assembly flight'. He gives details on the payload (Starshine Satellite, Avian Development Facility, and Rafaello Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM)), his role in the rendezvous, docking, and undocking of the Endeavour Orbiter to the International Space Station (ISS), how he will participate in the unloading and reloading of the MPLM, and the way in which the old and new resident crews of ISS will exchanged. Gorie ends with his thoughts on the short-term and long-term future of the International Space Station.

  13. STS-108 Crew Interviews: Mark Kelly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-108 Pilot Mark Kelly is seen during a prelaunch interview. He answers questions about the mission's goals and significance, explaining the meaning of 'utilization flight 1' (UF-1) as opposed to an 'assembly flight'. He gives details on the payload (Starshine Satellite, Avian Development Facility, and Rafaello Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM)), his role in the rendezvous, docking, and undocking of the Endeavour Orbiter to the International Space Station (ISS), how he will participate in the unloading and reloading of the MPLM, and the way in which the old and new resident crews of ISS will exchanged. Kelly ends with his thoughts on the short-term and long-term future of the International Space Station.

  14. STS-108 Crew Interviews: Dan Tani

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    STS-108 Mission Specialist Dan Tani is seen during a prelaunch interview. He answers questions about the mission's goals and significance, explaining the meaning of 'utilization flight 1' (UF-1) as opposed to an 'assembly flight'. He gives details on the payload (Starshine Satellite, Avian Development Facility, and Rafaello Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM)), his role in the rendezvous, docking, and undocking of the Endeavour Orbiter to the International Space Station (ISS), how he will participate in the unloading and reloading of the MPLM, and the way in which the old and new resident crews of ISS will exchanged. Tani ends with his thoughts on the short-term and long-term future of the International Space Station.

  15. Toward a Theory of Motivational Interviewing

    PubMed Central

    Miller, William R.; Rose, Gary S.

    2009-01-01

    The widely-disseminated clinical method of motivational interviewing (MI) arose through a convergence of science and practice. Beyond a large base of clinical trials, advances have been made toward “looking under the hood” of MI to understand the underlying mechanisms by which it affects behavior change. Such specification of outcome-relevant aspects of practice is vital to theory development, and can inform both treatment delivery and clinical training. An emergent theory of MI is proposed, emphasizing two specific active components: a relational component focused on empathy and the interpersonal spirit of MI, and a technical component involving the differential evocation and reinforcement of client change talk A resulting causal chain model links therapist training, therapist and client responses during treatment sessions, and post-treatment outcomes. PMID:19739882

  16. A practical guide to the e-mail interview.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Nigel; McHale, Sue

    2007-12-01

    The e-mail interview is a novel technique that has a number of advantages over traditional interviewing, but there are also some disadvantages. In this methodological article, the authors review the issues surrounding the use of the e-mail interview, providing a concrete example of its use, that of interviewing people with alopecia areata regarding psychological issues associated with the disorder. The authors show in the article that the e-mail interview is an effective interview technique but that users must take account of a number of sensitive issues, and there are a number of serious disadvantages that limit its use to specific areas. The e-mail interview cannot be used simply as a cheap alternative to face-to-face interviews in all circumstances.

  17. Assessment and Next Generation Standards: An Interview with Olivia Gude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeny, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a transcript of an interview with Olivia Gude, member of the National Coalition for Core Arts Standards Writing Team. In the interview, Gude provides an overview of the process for writing the new visual arts standards.

  18. Setting up Targeted Research Interviews: A Primer for Students and New Interviewers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noy, Darren

    2009-01-01

    This article analyzes key strategic considerations for setting up targeted research interviews, including human subjects and Institutional Review Board requirements, approaching respondents, the medium of contact, using technology, cultural conceptions of time and commitment, using networks, wading through bureaucracies, and watching for warning…

  19. Influencing collaborative leadership: an interview with Dean Terry Fulmer. Interview by Jeffrey M. Adams.

    PubMed

    Fulmer, Terry

    2013-02-01

    This department highlights nursing leaders who have demonstrated a commitment to innovation and patient care leadership in practice, policy, research, education and theory. This interview profiles Terry Fulmer, PhD, RN, FAAN, chairperson of the Robert Wood Johnson Executive Nurse Fellows Advisory Committee and dean of the Bouvé College of Health Sciences at Northeastern University.

  20. (Inter)Active Interviewing in Childhood Research: On Children's Identity Work in Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernqvist, Stina

    2010-01-01

    Seeing identity as work produced in interaction is a starting point in this current study, were analyzing interviews with children living in economic hardship, and how everyday life in economic hardship in one way or another becomes significant for their identity work, is the main empirical material. This article is intended to illustrate how to…

  1. Getting More out of Your Interview Data: Toward a Framework for Debriefing the Transcriber of Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinbaum, Rebecca K.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    In most qualitative research studies involving the creation of interview transcriptions, researchers seldom demonstrate much reflexivity about the transcription process, rarely making mention of transcription processes as part of their reporting of data collection and analysis procedures beyond a simple statement that audio- or videotaped data…

  2. Identifying blues: an interview with lesbian blues musician and lyricist Gaye Adegbalola. Interview by Carmen Phelps.

    PubMed

    Adegbalola, Gaye

    2011-01-01

    In this interview, blues lyricist and musician Gaye Adegbalola shares with audiences how various political, social, and artistic influences have inspired her work since her activist years during the Black Arts Movement leading up to the present day. As a lesbian blues artist, Adegbalola's personal and artistic development implicates the often inextricable and intimate relationships between artistic production, political involvement, and individual fulfillment.

  3. Interview with a quality leader: Dr. David Nash. Interviewed by Kathleen Tornow Chai.

    PubMed

    Nash, David B

    2013-01-01

    Dr. David Nash, founder of the original Office of Health Policy in 1990 at Thomas Jefferson University and later the Founding Dean of the Jefferson School of Population Health, is known for his emphasis on measurement and variation in Medical Education. His knowledge and understanding of healthcare policy make this interview timely and relevant.

  4. Precision and Disclosure in Text and Voice Interviews on Smartphones.

    PubMed

    Schober, Michael F; Conrad, Frederick G; Antoun, Christopher; Ehlen, Patrick; Fail, Stefanie; Hupp, Andrew L; Johnston, Michael; Vickers, Lucas; Yan, H Yanna; Zhang, Chan

    2015-01-01

    As people increasingly communicate via asynchronous non-spoken modes on mobile devices, particularly text messaging (e.g., SMS), longstanding assumptions and practices of social measurement via telephone survey interviewing are being challenged. In the study reported here, 634 people who had agreed to participate in an interview on their iPhone were randomly assigned to answer 32 questions from US social surveys via text messaging or speech, administered either by a human interviewer or by an automated interviewing system. 10 interviewers from the University of Michigan Survey Research Center administered voice and text interviews; automated systems launched parallel text and voice interviews at the same time as the human interviews were launched. The key question was how the interview mode affected the quality of the response data, in particular the precision of numerical answers (how many were not rounded), variation in answers to multiple questions with the same response scale (differentiation), and disclosure of socially undesirable information. Texting led to higher quality data-fewer rounded numerical answers, more differentiated answers to a battery of questions, and more disclosure of sensitive information-than voice interviews, both with human and automated interviewers. Text respondents also reported a strong preference for future interviews by text. The findings suggest that people interviewed on mobile devices at a time and place that is convenient for them, even when they are multitasking, can give more trustworthy and accurate answers than those in more traditional spoken interviews. The findings also suggest that answers from text interviews, when aggregated across a sample, can tell a different story about a population than answers from voice interviews, potentially altering the policy implications from a survey.

  5. Precision and Disclosure in Text and Voice Interviews on Smartphones

    PubMed Central

    Antoun, Christopher; Ehlen, Patrick; Fail, Stefanie; Hupp, Andrew L.; Johnston, Michael; Vickers, Lucas; Yan, H. Yanna; Zhang, Chan

    2015-01-01

    As people increasingly communicate via asynchronous non-spoken modes on mobile devices, particularly text messaging (e.g., SMS), longstanding assumptions and practices of social measurement via telephone survey interviewing are being challenged. In the study reported here, 634 people who had agreed to participate in an interview on their iPhone were randomly assigned to answer 32 questions from US social surveys via text messaging or speech, administered either by a human interviewer or by an automated interviewing system. 10 interviewers from the University of Michigan Survey Research Center administered voice and text interviews; automated systems launched parallel text and voice interviews at the same time as the human interviews were launched. The key question was how the interview mode affected the quality of the response data, in particular the precision of numerical answers (how many were not rounded), variation in answers to multiple questions with the same response scale (differentiation), and disclosure of socially undesirable information. Texting led to higher quality data—fewer rounded numerical answers, more differentiated answers to a battery of questions, and more disclosure of sensitive information—than voice interviews, both with human and automated interviewers. Text respondents also reported a strong preference for future interviews by text. The findings suggest that people interviewed on mobile devices at a time and place that is convenient for them, even when they are multitasking, can give more trustworthy and accurate answers than those in more traditional spoken interviews. The findings also suggest that answers from text interviews, when aggregated across a sample, can tell a different story about a population than answers from voice interviews, potentially altering the policy implications from a survey. PMID:26060991

  6. What Not to Do during a Presidential Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulliams, Preston

    2016-01-01

    As a presidential search consultant, Preston Pulliams has had the opportunity to observe and participate in many presidential search interviews and the meetings where hiring decisions are made. He has observed how some interview candidates simply knocked themselves out of contention by employing one or more of five poor interview strategies. In…

  7. Setting Course: The Case for the Credentialing of Forensic Interviewers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haney, Mike; Vieth, Victor I.; Campos, Hector M.

    2010-01-01

    The article provides a history of efforts to develop a credentialing or certification process for forensic interviewers and reviews the multitiered credentialing process offered by the National Association of Certified Child Forensic Interviewers. The authors argue the benefits of a credentialing process for forensic interviewers and respond to…

  8. School Nurses' Experiences with Motivational Interviewing for Preventing Childhood Obesity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonde, Ane Høstgaard; Bentsen, Peter; Hindhede, Anette Lykke

    2014-01-01

    Motivational interviewing is a counseling method used to bring about behavior change; its application by school nurses for preventing obesity in children is still new. This study, based on in-depth interviews with 12 school nurses, shows how school nurses adapted motivational interviewing and integrated it into their daily practice along with…

  9. Weekly Community Interviews With High-Risk Participants: Operational Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, Carol A.; Mulvey, Edward P.; Lidz, Charles W.; Gardner, William P.; Skeem, Jennifer L.

    2005-01-01

    To address several key questions in social science research, repeated interviews of individuals drawn from difficult populations are required. This article describes an approach for addressing the challenges associated with longitudinal interview studies, including locating research participants, obtaining reliable and valid interview data over…

  10. Twenty Minutes to Impress: Keys to a Successful Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tougaw, Paul W.

    2009-01-01

    An interview is a multifaceted and complex process that begins long before and can end many days after the actual face-to-face interview. The process can be quite intimidating for recent graduates or young teachers with little job search experience. This article offers suggestions that can demystify the interview process and provide an opportunity…

  11. Investigating the Reliability of the Medical School Admissions Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreiter, Clarence D.; Yin, Ping; Solow, Catherine; Brennan, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Determining the valid and fair use of the interview for medical school admissions is contingent upon a demonstration of the reproducibility of interview scores. This study seeks to establish the generalizability of interview scores, first assessing the existing research evidence, and then analyzing data from a non-experimental independent…

  12. Dyadic Interviews as a Tool for Qualitative Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, David L.; Eliot, Susan; Lowe, Robert A.; Gorman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Although evaluation researchers frequently make use of focus groups and individual interviews as sources of qualitative data, there has been far less attention to dyadic interviews that create a conversation between two research participants. This article describes dyadic interviews as a format that shares many of the advantages of focus groups,…

  13. An Exploration of Prospective Teachers' Learning of Clinical Interview Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groth, Randall E.; Bergner, Jennifer A.; Burgess, Claudia R.

    2016-01-01

    The present study followed four prospective teachers through the process of learning to interview during an undergraduate research project experience. Participants conducted and video recorded a series of interviews with children. They also carried out guided analyses of the videos and written artefacts from the interviews to formulate conjectures…

  14. 45 CFR 1801.22 - Interview of Finalists with panel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interview of Finalists with panel. 1801.22 Section... FOUNDATION HARRY S. TRUMAN SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM The Competition § 1801.22 Interview of Finalists with panel. The Foundation invites each Finalist to an interview with a regional review panel. Panels...

  15. 28 CFR 2.48 - Revocation: Preliminary interview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Revocation: Preliminary interview. 2.48....48 Revocation: Preliminary interview. (a) Interviewing officer. A parolee who is retaken on a warrant... violated his parole as charged, and if so, whether a revocation hearing should be conducted. The...

  16. Author Support for the Design of Automated Medical Interviews

    PubMed Central

    Maccabe, A.B.; Underwood, W.E.; Brunjes, Shannon

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes a prototype system that provides interactive author support for an automated medical interviewing system. An on-line users manual enables health care professionals to use the system without prior knowledge or experience. The approach taken was to make the author support programs interviews in the underlying interviewing system.

  17. Using Student Interviews for becoming a Reflective Geographer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine; Madsen, Lene Møller

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a case for interviewing students as an effective yet complex way to integrate reflexive practice into teaching and research. Even though many human geographers are accustomed to conducting qualitative interviews in various contexts, it is not straightforward to interview one's own students. This paper addresses three…

  18. Levels of Use Interviews: A Successful Formative Evaluation Tool [Revised].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roecks, Alan L.; Andrews, John H.

    Levels of Use (LOU) interviews can be used for formative evaluation purposes in an intermediate education agency. Programs and services for training teachers provided to districts are evaluated. LOU interviews give program staff unique information for improving programs. Program improvement is aided by LOU interviews because information is…

  19. Teaching Employment Interview Skills through Interactive Video Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulman, Gary M.; And Others

    An interactive video program, "The Screening Interview," has been developed at Miami University (Ohio) to help prepare college and university students for on-campus employment interviews with corporate recruiters. Within the context of the simulated interview situation provided by the program, students function as the alter ego of either…

  20. How Interviewers' Nonverbal Behaviors Can Affect Children's Perceptions and Suggestibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almerigogna, Jehanne; Ost, James; Akehurst, Lucy; Fluck, Mike

    2008-01-01

    We conducted two studies to examine how interviewers' nonverbal behaviors affect children's perceptions and suggestibility. In the first study, 42 8- to 10-year-olds watched video clips showing an interviewer displaying combinations of supportive and nonsupportive nonverbal behaviors and were asked to rate the interviewer on six attributes (e.g.,…

  1. Self-Construction through Conversation and Narrative in Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Jean

    2001-01-01

    Examines the role of interviews in educational research using the example of interviews with bilingual mothers and children. Describes interviews as process and product, conversation and narrative and the parties engaged in it as mutually constructing meaning. (Contains 40 references.) (SK)

  2. Psychiatric Diagnostic Interviews for Children and Adolescents: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angold, Adrian; Erkanli, Alaattin; Copeland, William; Goodman, Robert; Fisher, Prudence W.; Costello, E. Jane

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare examples of three styles of psychiatric interviews for youth: the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC) ("respondent-based"), the Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Assessment (CAPA) ("interviewer-based"), and the Development and Well-Being Assessment (DAWBA) ("expert judgment"). Method: Roughly equal numbers of…

  3. STS-107 Crew Interviews: Laurel Clark, Mission Specialist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-107 Mission Specialist 4 Laurel Clark is seen during this preflight interview, where she gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about her inspiration to become an astronaut and her career path. Clark outlines her role in the mission in general, and specifically in conducting onboard science experiments. She discusses the following suite of experiments and instruments in detail: ARMS (Advanced Respiratory Monitoring System) and the European Space Agency's Biopack. Clark also mentions on-board activities and responsibilities during launch and reentry, mission training, and microgravity research. In addition, she touches on the use of crew members as research subjects including pre and postflight monitoring activities, the emphasis on crew safety and the value of international cooperation.

  4. STS-107 Crew Interviews: Michael Anderson, Mission Specialist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-107 Mission Specialist 3 and Payload Commander Michael Anderson is seen during this preflight interview, where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically in conducting onboard science experiments. He discusses the following instruments and sets of experiments in detail: CM2 (Combustion Module 2), FREESTAR (Fast Reaction Enabling Science Technology and Research, MEIDEX (Mediterranean Israeli Dust Experiment) and MGM (Mechanics of Granular Materials). Anderson also mentions on-board activities and responsibilities during launch and reentry, mission training, and microgravity research. In addition, he touches on the dual work-shift nature of the mission, the use of crew members as research subjects including pre and postflight monitoring activities, the emphasis on crew safety during training and the value of international cooperation.

  5. STS-107 Crew Interviews: Ilan Ramon, Mission Specialist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    STS-107 Mission Specialist Ilan Ramon is seen during this preflight interview, where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically in conducting on-board science experiments. He discusses the following instruments and sets of experiments in detail: CM2 (Combustion Module 2), FREESTAR (Fast Reaction Enabling Science Technology and Research), MEIDEX (Mediterranean Israeli Dust Experiment) and MGM (Mechanics of Granular Materials). Ramon also mentions on-board activities during launch and reentry, mission training and microgravity research. In addition, he touches on the dual work-shift nature of the mission, the use of crew members as research subjects including pre and postflight monitoring activities, the emphasis on crew safety during training and the value of international cooperation.

  6. STS-107 Crew Interviews: Michael Anderson, Mission Specialist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-06-01

    STS-107 Mission Specialist 3 and Payload Commander Michael Anderson is seen during this preflight interview, where he gives a quick overview of the mission before answering questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He outlines his role in the mission in general, and specifically in conducting onboard science experiments. He discusses the following instruments and sets of experiments in detail: CM2 (Combustion Module 2), FREESTAR (Fast Reaction Enabling Science Technology and Research, MEIDEX (Mediterranean Israeli Dust Experiment) and MGM (Mechanics of Granular Materials). Anderson also mentions on-board activities and responsibilities during launch and reentry, mission training, and microgravity research. In addition, he touches on the dual work-shift nature of the mission, the use of crew members as research subjects including pre and postflight monitoring activities, the emphasis on crew safety during training and the value of international cooperation.

  7. Event history calendars and question list surveys: a direct comparison of interviewing methods.

    PubMed

    Belli, R F; Shay, W L; Stafford, F P

    2001-01-01

    The research reported in this article provides the first direct experimental comparison between Event History Calendar (EHC; N=309; 84.4 percent response rate) and standardized state-of-the-art question list (Q-list; N=307; 84.1 percent response rate) interviewing methodologies. Respondents and 20 interviewers were randomly assigned to EHC and Q-list interviews that were conducted via telephone in the spring of 1998. All interviews asked for retrospective reports on social and economic behaviors that occurred during the calendar years of 1996 and 1997. Using data from the same respondents collected 1 year earlier on events reported during 1996 as a standard of comparison, the quality of retrospective reports on 1996 events from the 1998 administration of EHC and Q-list interviews was assessed. In comparison to the Q-list, the EHC condition led to better-quality retrospective reports on moves, income, weeks unemployed, and weeks missing work resulting from self illness, the illness of another, or missing work for these reasons in combination with other ones. For reports of household members entering the residence, and number of jobs, the EHC led to significantly more overreporting than the Q-list. Contingent on additional research that examines a wider range of reference periods and different modes of interviewing, the EHC may become a viable and potentially superior method to the Q-list in the collection of self-reported retrospective information.

  8. The Child Attachment Interview: A Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    Privizzini, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    Attachment theory promoted an impressive body of research on the psychic developmental processes, resulting in studies on both typical and atypical development. Much of the diffusion of the attachment theory in the clinical field was related to the design of reliable instruments to evaluate the organization of attachment in infancy as well as in adulthood. Until recently, the lack of a suitable instrument to assess attachment in middle childhood as well as in adolescence hindered the expansion of research in these developmental phases during which the parent-child relationship takes on a different, albeit still crucial, role. The Child Attachment Interview (CAI), a measure that was recently designed to assess attachment at a representational level in middle childhood and adolescence, filled the measurement gap. The aim of the current review was to summarize previous empirical investigations concerning CAI in order to (a) provide an overview of the state of current research, (b) identify unanswered questions, and (c) propose future research directions. A narrative review was conducted to map the current research findings by searching for the term "Child Attachment Interview" in the Medline, Scopus, Web of Science, and PsychINFO databases, followed by a search in Mendeley. Limits were set to exclude dissertations, chapters in books, and qualitative or theoretical papers, while empirical studies were included if they used the CAI and were published in English language, peer-reviewed journals by July, 2016. The review, which ultimately included 39 studies meeting the criteria, showed that the CAI is a reliable instrument to assess attachment organization in clinical and non-clinical samples, thus providing a worthwhile contribution to the investigation of the influence of the parent-child relationship beyond infancy and early childhood. Nevertheless, the review pointed out a number of relevant open issues, the most critical of which concerned the CAI coding and

  9. Information Architecture Practice: An Interview with Vivian Bliss, Microsoft [and] An Interview with Gayle Curtis, Modem Media [and] An Interview with Seth Gordon, ZEFER [and] An Interview with Steven Ritchey, Sapient [and] an Interview with Lou Rosenfeld, Argus Associates, Inc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Examines the role of information architects through five interviews with information architects who responded by email to a series of questions. Topics include developing and implementing information systems to enable decision-making; knowledge architecture; Web page design; organizing information; users' information needs; Internet strategies;…

  10. Expressions of shame in investigative interviews with Australian Aboriginal children.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Gemma; Brubacher, Sonja P; Powell, Martine B

    2016-01-01

    This study inspected a sample of 70 interview transcripts with Australian Aboriginal children to gain a sense of how frequently verbal shame responses were occurring in investigative interviews regarding alleged sexual abuse. Transcripts were examined to determine how children articulated shame, how interviewers reacted to these responses, and how shame related to children's accounts. Examination of frequencies revealed that verbal shame responses occurred in just over one-quarter of the interviews. One-way analyses of variance indicated that children who expressed shame within the interview spoke the same amount as children who did not express shame, however, they required more interviewer prompts before a disclosure was made. Interviews where children expressed shame also included a greater number of interviewer reminders compared to interviews without shame responses. Results emphasize the importance of interviewer awareness of shame, and also point to the value of reassurance, patience, and persistence with non-leading narrative prompting when interviewing children who express shame during discussions of sexual abuse.

  11. Meta-Inquiry: An Approach to Interview Success

    SciTech Connect

    McCaslin, Mark L.; Carlson, Nancy Margaret

    2003-12-01

    Developing an effective interview strategy presents unique challenges for the novice and master researcher for if the questions one asks are not crucial, then differences in responses are not crucial either (Creswell, 1998, p. 335). To focus qualitative research in the human ecology of the study, our strategy uses an initial interview protocol and preanalysis process, called meta-inquiry, prior to developing our formal interview protocol. Meta-inquiry of initial interview data, obtained in dialogue with key informants in the researched culture, provides us with an inductive tool to assess, modify, enhance, and focus the formal interview protocol. Thus, preparing for the research journey requires a human ecology-based interview protocol to acquire data from which concepts, categories, properties, and theory can emerge. Key words: Meta-Inquiry, Interview Protocol, and Grounded Theory

  12. Introducing dyadic interviews as a method for collecting qualitative data.

    PubMed

    Morgan, David L; Ataie, Jutta; Carder, Paula; Hoffman, Kim

    2013-09-01

    In dyadic interviews, two participants interact in response to open-ended research questions. There are few precedents for using dyadic interviews as a technique for qualitative research. We introduce this method largely in comparison to focus groups, because both represent forms of interactive interviewing. We do not, however, view dyadic interviews as miniature focus groups, and treat them as generating their own opportunities and issues. To illustrate the nature of dyadic interviewing, we present summaries of three studies using this method. In the first study, we used dyadic interviews and photovoice techniques to examine experiences of people with early-stage dementia. In the second study, we explored the experiences of staff who provided services to elderly housing residents. In the third study, we examined barriers and facilitators to substance abuse treatment among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in Hawaii. We conclude with a discussion of directions for future research using dyadic interviews.

  13. Language competence in forensic interviews for suspected child sexual abuse.

    PubMed

    Fontes, Lisa A; Tishelman, Amy C

    2016-08-01

    Forensic interviews with children for suspected child sexual abuse require meeting children "where they are" in terms of their developmental level, readiness to disclose, culture, and language. The field lacks research indicating how to accommodate children's diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds. This article focuses on language competence, defined here as the ability of an organization and its personnel (in this case, Child Advocacy Centers and forensic interviewers) to communicate effectively with clients regardless of their preferred language(s). In this qualitative study, 39 U.S. child forensic interviewers and child advocacy center directors discussed their experiences, practices, and opinions regarding interviews with children and families who are not native speakers of English. Topics include the importance of interviewing children in their preferred language, problems in interpreted interviews, bilingual interviews, and current and recommended procedures. Recommendations for practice and further research are included.

  14. STS-114 Crew Interviews Eileen Collins, CDR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Commander Eileen Collins of the STS-114 space mission is seen during a pre-launch interview. She answers questions about the primary goals of the mission which are to exchange the expedition six and expedition seven crews. Also, she says that a large amount of logistics will be taken up to the International Space Station. The primary payload on this mission include: 1) The Utilization and Logistics Flight-1 (ULF-1); 2) Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM); and 3) External Stowage Platform (ESP-2) which are all explained in detail by the Commander. The Window Observational Research Facility (WORF) rack, Human Research Facility (HRF) rack, Minus Eighty Degree Laboratory Freezer (MELF) and EXPRESS rack are the Space Station equipment to be installed on the International Space Station (I.S.S.). Collins is the Intravehicular Activity (IVA) specialist for this mission who oversees the three Extravehicular Activity (EVA)'s performed by Mission Specialists Soichi Noguchi and Stephen Robinson. The three EVA's include an external camera installation, positioning devices for an ammonia system and the installation of Floating Potential Measuring Unit (FPMU). Commander Collins expresses that she wants to have a successful mission, and also wants to see the Earth from space.

  15. Ideas as art. Interview by Dane Cutu.

    PubMed

    March, James G

    2006-10-01

    Three years ago, consultants Laurence Prusak and Thomas H. Davenport asked prominent management thinkers to name their gurus and reported the results in HBR. James G. March appeared on more lists than any other person except Peter Drucker. A professor emeritus in management, sociology, political science, and education at Stanford University, March has taught courses in subjects as diverse as organizational psychology, behavioral economics, leadership, rules for killing people, friendship, computer simulation, and statistics. He is perhaps best known for his pioneering contributions to organization and management theory. March's accomplishments in that field, and in many others, have conferred on him an almost unprecedented reputation as a rigorous scholar and a deep source of wisdom. As University of Chicago professor John Padgett wrote in the journal Contemporary Sociology, "March's influence, unlike that of any of his peers, is not limited to any possible subset of the social science disciplines; it is pervasive." March approaches thought aesthetically; he cares that ideas have "some form of elegance or grace or surprise." His poetic sensibility can be felt in the metaphors he has created over the years--the "garbage can theory" of organizational choice, for instance, and the "hot-stove effect" in learning. In this edited interview with HBR senior editor Diane Coutu, March shares his thinking on aesthetics, leadership, the role of folly, and the irrelevance of relevance when it comes to the pursuit of ideas. He also comments on the fundamental differences between academic and experiential knowledge, underscoring the need for both.

  16. The JIM interview. David Korn, MD.

    PubMed

    Korn, D

    1995-04-01

    When David Korn, MD, was named dean of the Stanford University School of Medicine on October 9, 1984, he assumed leadership of a world class research institution. Stanford was at the forefront of medicine in the areas of transplantation and oncology, and the steady influx of privately insured patients had generated a net operating surplus of $17 million in that year alone. However, in the same issue of the Stanford University Hospital newsletter which announced the selection of Korn as Dean, a small article appeared on a new prospective payment system based on diagnosis-related groups (DRGs). The article stated that the new system had begun smoothly, though some payments for cost outliers had been delayed. Other cost containment measures soon followed, most notably the implementation of managed care, and by 1990, Stanford was $14 million in the red. Buffeted by changes in medical reimbursement, competition with less costly hospitals, and a nasty squabble with Congress over indirect research costs, Stanford has been on the frontlines of a struggle now confronting many academic medical centers. After successfully consolidating the university's clinical services into a unified Stanford Health System, Korn announced that he would be stepping down as Dean on April 1. Interviewed in his office in Palo Alto, Korn reflected on the difficulties of dealing with managed care, the current financial state of the institution, and what Stanford's experience may predict for other academic medical centers.

  17. Understanding experience through Gadamerian hermeneutics: an interview with Brian Phillips. Interview by Pamela Wood & Lynne Giddings.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Brian

    2005-07-01

    Hermeneutic approaches to research focus on understanding and interpretation of experience but differ in process and emphasis. Gadamerian hermeneutics concentrates on expanding horizons of understanding through dialogue, between people or between a researcher and texts, in which taken-for-granted assumptions are examined and opinions willingly put at risk. This article is the fourteenth in a series of articles based on interviews with nursing and midwifery researchers, designed to offer the beginning researcher a first-hand account of the experience of using particular methodologies. It considers a Gadamerian hermeneutic research approach as interpreted by Brian Phillips (RN, PhD) in interview. Brian is Research Fellow in the Graduate School of Nursing and Midwifery at Victoria University of Wellington. For his PhD research Brian used Gadamerian hermeneutics to interpret four men's experiences of suicidality and the ideas of masculinity that might have shaped their understandings.

  18. Nursing's new paradigm is transcultural nursing: an interview with Madeleine Leininger. Interview by Susan Cummings.

    PubMed

    Leininger, M

    1996-01-01

    Around the world, transcultural nursing is being developed to provide culturally competent, congruent, humanistic health care. In this article, Susan Cummings, Associate Editor of Advanced Practice Nursing Quarterly, interviews Madeleine Leininger, founder of transcultural nursing and leader in human care nursing research. For the past 40 years Dr. Leininger has been instrumental in developing concepts, definitions, and a theoretical and research base for the development of transcultural nursing with a human care focus.

  19. Parent-youth agreement on symptoms and diagnosis: assessment with a diagnostic interview in an adolescent inpatient clinical population.

    PubMed

    Lauth, Bertrand; Arnkelsson, Guðmundur B; Magnússon, Páll; Skarphéðinsson, Guðmundur Á; Ferrari, Pierre; Pétursson, Hannes

    2010-12-01

    Diagnostic information on adolescents may be elicited from both youths and their parents, especially for depressive and suicidal symptomatology. The objective of this study was to examine the degree of agreement between parent and adolescent reports of major psychiatric disorders, at the diagnostic and at the symptom level, in a severely affected inpatient clinical population. 64 parent-adolescent pairs were interviewed separately with the semi-structured diagnostic interview Kiddie-SADS-PL. Symptomatology was also assessed with 11 self-report and parent-report scales, all translated, adapted and in most cases validated in Iceland. A total of 25 subscales were included to assess emotional dimensions such as depression or anxiety and cognitive dimensions such as attention deficit or self-concept. Good agreement was found for social phobia and fair agreement for generalized anxiety disorder. Although parent-youth agreement was poor in most cases at the symptoms level, significant correlations indicated consistency for most severity scores, except those related to depressive symptomatology, attention deficit, separation anxiety or conduct disorder. The low agreement between reports of suicidal ideation is in line with results from previous studies and suggests that parents might under- or over-estimate this symptomatology. The combination of data obtained with diagnostic interviews and rating-scales confirmed results from prior empirical work, giving greater weight to parents' reports of observable behavior and to adolescents' reports of subjective experiences, especially depressive symptomatology. Our findings suggest that both parent and child informants are necessary to obtain adequate assessments in adolescents. Further research should explore the correspondence between discrepant diagnoses and external criteria such as parental psychopathology or parent-child relationships and attachment. Psychoanalysis could benefit from cognitive neuroscience and use cognitive

  20. Candidates' and interviewers' perceptions of multiple-mini interviews for admission to an occupational therapy professional program.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Aliki; Young, Meredith E; Mazer, Barbara L; Lubarsky, Stuart E; Razack, Saleem I

    2015-04-01

    Multiple-Mini Interviews (MMIs) were used to assess professional attributes of candidates seeking admission to an occupational therapy professional entry-level master's program. Candidates and interviewers were invited to complete a questionnaire comprised of quantitative and open-ended questions following the MMIs. The MMIs were perceived to be fair, enjoyable, and capable of capturing professional attributes. Descriptive analysis of candidates' data revealed perceptions regarding logistics, interview station content, process, and interviewers. Interviewers commented on the positive and challenging aspects of the scenarios and the MMI process. Admissions committees need to consider several logistical, content, and process issues when designing and implementing MMIs as a selection tool.