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Sample records for additive brominated flame

  1. Brominated Flame Retardants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) belong to a large class of compounds known as organohalogens. BFRs are currently the largest marketed flame retardant group due to their high performance efficiency and low cost. In the commercial market, more than 75 different BFRs are recogniz...

  2. A new brominated polymeric additive for flame retardant glass-filled polybutylene terephthalate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, Z.; Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.; Bar-Yaacov, Y.; Minke, R.; Touval, I.

    1982-01-01

    Attention is called to the undesirable effects (poor ultraviolet light stability and blooming) sometimes introduced by brominated flame retarders. A brominated polymeric additive (BPA) with little or none of these undesirable side effects is compared with decabromobiphenyl oxide (DBBPO). The additive bears the product name F-2300. It is found to be more easily dispersed than DBBPO. The F-2300 is as effective as the DBBPO in the oxygen index test. The improved efficiency of the F-2300 may be explained by its better dispersion in polybutylene terephthalate (PBT). Glass-filled PBT containing F-2300 is found to be more resistant to UV degradation than DBBPO-containing formulas. Formulations with F-2300 therefore have a longer useful outdoor life. F-2300 is a diglycidyl-type polymer containing 50 percent aromatically bound bromine. Its melting point is 112 C, and it is stable up to 372 C. It is pointed out that since its melts at a relatively low temperature, it can be introduced into the formulation as a large agglomerate and still be dispersed evenly throughout the polymer.

  3. INTRODUCTION TO BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are a large and diverse class of major industrial products used to provide fire safety. Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), Hexabromocylocodecane (HBCD), and Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) are the major commercial compounds. TBBPA is a react...

  4. Brominated Flame Retardants and Perfluorinated Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) belong to a large class of chemicals known as organohalogens. It is believed that both BFRs and PFCs saved lives by reducing flammability of materials commonly used and bactericidal (biocidal) properties. Thes...

  5. PCBs, PBBs and Brominated Flame Retardants

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter introduces selected organohalogen chemicals such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB5), polychiorinated biphenyls (PBBs), and brominated flame retardants (BFRs) with emphasis on the background, physicochemical properties, environmental levels, health effects and possib...

  6. Biodegradation of brominated and organophosphorus flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Waaijers, Susanne L; Parsons, John R

    2016-04-01

    Brominated flame retardants account for about 21% of the total production of flame retardants and many of these have been identified as persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic. Nevertheless, debromination of these chemicals under anaerobic conditions is well established, although this can increase their toxicity. Consequently, the production and use of these chemicals has been restricted and alternative products have been developed. Many of these are brominated compounds and share some of the disadvantages of the chemicals they are meant to replace. Therefore, other, nonbrominated, flame retardants such as organophosphorus compounds are also being used in increasing quantities, despite the fact that knowledge of their biodegradation and environmental fate is often lacking. PMID:26748263

  7. Brominated flame retardants as food contaminants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter reviews analytical methods for the three major brominated flame retardant (BFR) classes in use today, tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBP-A), hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), a "legacy" BFR no longer in use, polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs), and a...

  8. BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS: CAUSE FOR CONCERN?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have routinely been added to consumer products for several decades in a successful effort to reduce fire-related injury and property damage. Recently, concern for this emerging class of chemicals has risen due to the occurrence of several class...

  9. BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS: WHY DO WE CARE?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) save lives and property by preventing the spread of fires or delaying the time of flashover, enhancing the time people have to escape. The worldwide production of BFRs exceeded 200,000 metric tons in 2003 placing them in the high production vol...

  10. HEALTH ASPECTS OF BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS (BFRS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to reduce the societal costs of fires, flammability standards have been set for consumer products and equipment. Flame retardants containing bromine have constituted the largest share of this market due both to their efficiency and cost. While there are at least 75 dif...

  11. HEALTH EFFECTS OF BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS (BFRS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Brominated flame retardant use has increased dramatically in order to provide fire safety to consumers. However, there is growing concern about widespread environmental contamination and potential health risks from some of these products. The most used products...

  12. Neurotoxicity of brominated flame retardants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been commonly used as commercial flame retardants in a variety of products including plastics and textiles. Despite their decreasing usage worldwide, congeners continue to accumulate in the environment, including soil, dust, food, anima...

  13. Brominated flame retardants: cause for concern?

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, Linda S; Staskal, Daniele F

    2004-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have routinely been added to consumer products for several decades in a successful effort to reduce fire-related injury and property damage. Recently, concern for this emerging class of chemicals has risen because of the occurrence of several classes of BFRs in the environment and in human biota. The widespread production and use of BFRs; strong evidence of increasing contamination of the environment, wildlife, and people; and limited knowledge of potential effects heighten the importance of identifying emerging issues associated with the use of BFRs. In this article, we briefly review scientific issues associated with the use of tetrabromobisphenol A, hexabromocyclododecane, and three commercial mixtures of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and discuss data gaps. Overall, the toxicology database is very limited; the current literature is incomplete and often conflicting. Available data, however, raise concern over the use of certain classes of brominated flame retardants. PMID:14698924

  14. Occurrence of additive brominated flame retardants in aquatic organisms from Tai Lake and Yangtze River in Eastern China, 2009-2012.

    PubMed

    Su, Guanyong; Saunders, David; Yu, Yijun; Yu, Hongxia; Zhang, Xiaowei; Liu, Hongling; Giesy, John P

    2014-11-01

    Since the phase-out of PBDEs, reports regarding occurrences of these compounds in the environment have become less frequent. To characterize potential influences of the phase-out of PBDEs' on concentrations in the environment, trends in concentrations as a function of time were investigated for two additive brominated flame retardants, PBDEs and HBCDs. Three aquatic species, including shrimp, common carp, and yellow catfish, were collected from Meiliang Bay of Tai Lake, 2009-2012. The analysis of PBDEs in three aquatic organisms has shown a downward-trend in the first three years but a significant upward-trend in the final year. Concentrations of HBCDs have not shown temporal increases in the investigated environments. Concentrations of both PBDEs and HBCDs in the three studied organisms increased as a function of trophic level, which suggested that these additive flame retardants can be biomagnified through the food web of Tai Lake. In accordance with previous publications, PBDE-47 contributed the greatest proportion of ∑PBDEs and had a detection frequency of 100%. α-HBCD was the predominate isomer that contributed to ∑HBCDs. Both β-HBCD and γ-HBCD were likely detected at lesser concentrations than the α-isomer due to differences in bioavailability. Concentrations of ∑PBDEs in the three aquatic organisms from Tai Lake ranged from 1.13 to 97.59 ng g(-1) lipid. These concentrations were generally less than those in biota from other countries, but equal to those found at other locations in China. Specimens from the Yangtze River had greater concentrations of ∑HBCDs (169.6-316.5 ng g(-1) lipid) than those collected at Tai Lake, which were comparatively greater than many reported concentrations in freshwater organisms from other countries. PMID:25038592

  15. Brominated flame retardant exposure of aircraft personnel.

    PubMed

    Strid, Anna; Smedje, Greta; Athanassiadis, Ioannis; Lindgren, Torsten; Lundgren, Håkan; Jakobsson, Kristina; Bergman, Åke

    2014-12-01

    The use of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in aircraft is the result of high fire safety demands. Personnel working in or with aircraft might therefore be exposed to several BFRs. Previous studies have reported PBDE exposure in flight attendants and in passengers. One other group that may be subjected to significant BFR exposure via inhalation, are the aircraft maintenance workers. Personnel exposure both during flights and maintenance of aircraft, are investigated in the present study. Several BFRs were present in air and dust sampled during both the exposure scenarios; PBDEs, hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis (2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane. PBDEs were also analyzed in serum from pilots/cabin crew, maintenance workers and from a control group of individuals without any occupational aircraft exposure. Significantly higher concentrations of PBDEs were found in maintenance workers compared to pilots/cabin crew and control subjects with median total PBDE concentrations of 19, 6.8 and 6.6 pmol g(-1) lipids, respectively. Pilots and cabin crew had similar concentrations of most PBDEs as the control group, except for BDE-153 and BDE-154 which were significantly higher. Results indicate higher concentrations among some of the pilots compared to the cabin crew. It is however, evident that the cabin personnel have lower BFR exposures compared to maintenance workers that are exposed to such a degree that their blood levels are significantly different from the control group. PMID:24745557

  16. Environmental monitoring of brominated flame retardants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagula, Mary C.; Kubeldis, Nathan; Nelatury, Charles F.

    2011-06-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are synthetic organobromide compounds which inhibit ignition and combustion processes. Because of their immense ability to retard fire and save life and property, they have been extensively used in many products such as TVs, computers, foam, plastics etc. The five major classes of BFRs are tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), pentabromodiphenyl ether, octabromodiphenyl ether, and decabromodiphenyl ether. The last three are also commonly called PBDEs. BDE-85 and BDE-209 are the two prominent congeners of PBDEs and this study reports the adverse effects of these congeners in rodents. Exposure of rat sciatic nerves to 5 μg/mL and 20 μg/mL of BDE-85 and BDE-209 respectively lead to significant, concentration dependent reduction in nerve conduction function. Glucose absorption in the rat intestinal segments exposed to 5 μg/mL of BDE-85 and BDE-209 was significantly reduced for both the compounds tested. Lastly, mice when exposed to 0.25 mg/kg body weight for four days showed a disruption in oxidant and antioxidant equilibrium. The tissues namely liver and brain have shown increase in the levels of lipid hydroperoxides indicating oxidative stress. Moreover, all the protective enzymes namely superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase, and glutathione S transferase (GST) have shown tissue specific alterations indicating the induction of damaging oxidative stress and setting in of lipid peroxidation in exposed animals. The results indicate monitoring of PBDEs in the environment is essential because levels as low as 5 μg/mL and 0.25 mg/kg body weight were able to cause damage to the functions of rodents.

  17. Polymeric brominated flame retardants: are they a relevant source of emerging brominated aromatic compounds in the environment?

    PubMed

    Gouteux, Bruno; Alaee, Mehran; Mabury, Scott A; Pacepavicius, Grazina; Muir, Derek C G

    2008-12-15

    A purge and trap method was used to study the release of brominated organic compounds from polymeric brominated flame retardants (BFRs), a relatively unknown class of flame retardant materials. Among the volatile brominated organics released, pentabromotoluene (PBTo), pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB), and hexabromobenzene (HBB) were of particular interest because of their high potential to persist in the environment The impact of a thermal stress on the release of these compounds was assessed by applying different constant temperatures for one hour to a polymeric BFR sample. Release rates ranged between 22 +/- 2.1 ng g(-1) h(-1) for PBEB to 2480 +/- 500 ng g(-1) h(-1) for PBTo at room temperature. These rates of release reached 65 +/- 11 ng g(-1) h(-1) for PBEB and 42400 +/- 4700 ng g(-1) h(-1) for PBTo at 100 degrees C. This suggests that the compounding of thermoplastic polyesters done at high temperatures, up to 290 degrees C, could lead to the release of significant amounts of volatile brominated compounds in the environment when crude polymeric BFRs are used as flame retardants. To assess if this unsuspected source of volatile brominated compounds to the environment was relevant to support air concentrations in the Great Lakes area, air samples collected at Egbert (ON, Canada) were analyzed and PBTo, PBEB, and HBB were detected at low levels in some air samples (<0.01 to 0.09 pg/m3). As a second step, a Level III fugacity model was run using release rates of PBTo, PBEB, and HBB determined in this study. Results of the model indicated that prevailing PBEB and HBB air concentrations were not supported by their release from polymeric BFRs but by the use of these compounds as additive BFRs. However, these model predictions suffered from a lack of information on the actual use of polymeric BFRs. Hence, further work is needed to assess the release of potentially persistent brominated aromatic compounds from polymeric BFRs. PMID:19174868

  18. Brominated flame retardants in Canadian chicken egg yolks

    PubMed Central

    Rawn, D.F.K.; Sadler, A.; Quade, S.C.; Sun, W.-F.; Lau, B.P.-Y.; Kosarac, I.; Hayward, S.; Ryan, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Chicken eggs categorised as conventional, omega-3 enriched, free range and organic were collected at grading stations in three regions of Canada between 2005 and 2006. Free run eggs, which were only available for collection from two regions, were also sampled during this time frame. Egg yolks from each of these egg types (n = 162) were analysed to determine brominated flame retardant levels, specifically polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD). PBDEs were detected in 100% of the 162 samples tested, while HBCD was observed in 85% of the egg yolks. Total PBDE concentrations in egg yolks ranged from 0.018 to 20.9 ng g−1 lipid (median = 3.03 ng g−1 lipid), with PBDE 209 identified as being the major contributor to ΣPBDE concentrations. In addition to PBDE 209, PBDE 99, 47, 100, 183 and 153 were important contributors to ΣPBDE concentrations. Total HBCD concentrations ranged from below the limit of detection to a maximum concentration of 71.9 ng g−1 lipid (median = 0.053 ng g−1 lipid). The α-isomer was the dominant contributor to ΣHBCD levels in Canadian egg yolks and was the most frequently detected HBCD isomer. ΣPBDE levels exhibited large differences in variability between combinations of region and type. ΣHBCD concentrations were not significantly different among regions, although differences were observed between the different types of egg yolks analysed in the present study. PMID:21623506

  19. Catalytic degradation of brominated flame retardants by copper oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yecheskel, Yinon; Dror, Ishai; Berkowitz, Brian

    2013-09-01

    The catalytic degradation of two brominated flame retardants (BFRs), tribromoneopentyl alcohol (TBNPA) and 2,4 dibromophenol (2,4-DBP) by copper oxide nanoparticles (nCuO) was investigated. The degradation kinetics, the debromination, and the formation of intermediates by nCuO catalysis were also compared to Fenton oxidation and nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) reduction methods. BFRs have been added to various products like plastic, textile, electronics and synthetic polymers at growing rates. In spite of the clear advantages of reducing fire damages, many of these BFRs may be released to the environment after their beneficial use and become contaminants. The two studied BFRs were fully degraded with sufficient time (hours to days) and oxidation agent (H2O2). Shorter reaction times showed differences in reaction pathway and kinetics. The 2,4-DBP showed faster degradation than TBNPA, by nCuO catalysis. Relatively high resistance to degradation was recorded for 2,4-DBP with nZVI, yielding 20% degradation after 24h, while the TBNPA was degraded by 85% within 12h. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) measurements show generation of both hydroxyl and superoxide radicals. In addition, inhibition of 2,4-DBP degradation in the presence of spin traps implies a radical degradation mechanism. A catalytic mechanism for radical generation and BFR degradation by nCuO is proposed. It is further suggested that H2O2 plays an essential role in the activation of the catalyst. PMID:23786809

  20. Discrimination of hexabromocyclododecane from new polymeric brominated flame retardant in polystyrene foam by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Jeannerat, Damien; Pupier, Marion; Schweizer, Sébastien; Mitrev, Yavor Nikolaev; Favreau, Philippe; Kohler, Marcel

    2016-02-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD) is a brominated flame retardant (BFR) and major additive to polystyrene foam thermal insulation that has recently been listed as a persistent organic pollutant by the Stockholm Convention. During a 2013/2014 field analytical survey, we measured HBCDD content ranging from 0.2 to 2.4% by weight in 98 polystyrene samples. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analyses indicated that expandable (EPS) and extruded (XPS) polystyrene foams significantly differed in the α/γ HBCDD isomer ratio, with a majority of α and γ isomers in XPS and EPS, respectively. Interestingly, this technique indicated that some recent materials did not contain HBCDD, but demonstrated bromine content when analysed with X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Further investigation by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) was able to discriminate between the BFRs present. In addition to confirming the absence or presence of HBCDD in polystyrene samples, high-field NMR spectroscopy provided evidence of the use of brominated butadiene styrene (BBS) as copolymer in the production of polystyrene. Use of this alternative flame retardant is expected to cause fewer health and environmental concerns. Our results highlight a trend towards the use of copolymerized BFRs as an alternative to HBCDD in polystyrene foam boards. In addition to providing a rapid NMR method to identify polymeric BFR, our analytical approach is a simple method to discriminate between flame-retardants in polystyrene foam insulating materials. PMID:26492426

  1. Brominated flame retardants in fish of Lake Geneva (Switzerland).

    PubMed

    Cheaib, Zeinab; Grandjean, Dominique; Kupper, Thomas; de Alencastro, Luiz F

    2009-04-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) were determined in fish (Salmo trutta forma lacustris) from Lake Geneva. Brominated flame retardants were detected in all nine samples with an average concentration for the sum of BDE-28, BDE-47, BDE-49, BDE-66, BDE-99, BDE-100, BDE-119, BDE-153, BDE-154 and BDE-209 of 207 ng per g lipid weight (ng g lw(-1)). The congener patterns were dominated by BDE-47. The average concentration of HBCD was 168 ng g lw(-1). PMID:19142559

  2. Human health risk associated with brominated flame-retardants (BFRs).

    PubMed

    Lyche, Jan L; Rosseland, Carola; Berge, Gunnar; Polder, Anuschka

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this review are to assess the human exposure and human and experimental evidence for adverse effects of brominated flame-retardants (BFRs) with specific focus on intake from seafood. The leakage of BFRs from consumer products leads to exposure of humans from fetal life to adulthood. Fish and fish products contain the highest levels of BFRs and dominate the dietary intake of frequent fish eaters in Europe, while meat, followed by seafood and dairy products accounted for the highest US dietary intake. House dust is also reported as an important source of exposure for children as well as adults. The levels of BFRs in the general North American populations are higher than those in Europe and Japan and the highest levels are detected in infants and toddlers. The daily intake via breast milk exceeds the RfD in 10% of US infants. BFRs including PBDEs, HBCDs and TBBP-A have induced endocrine-, reproductive- and behavior effects in laboratory animals. Furthermore, recent human epidemiological data demonstrated association between exposure to BFRs and similar adverse effects as observed in animal studies. Fish including farmed fish and crude fish oil for human consumption may contain substantial levels of BFRs and infants and toddlers consuming these products on a daily basis may exceed the tolerable daily intake suggesting that fish and fish oil alone represent a risk to human health. This intake comes in addition to exposure from other sources (breast milk, other food, house dust). Because potential harmful concentrations of BFRs and other toxicants occur in fish and fish products, research on a wider range of products is warranted, to assess health hazard related to the contamination of fish and fish products for human consumption. PMID:25454234

  3. Catalytic degradation of brominated flame retardants by copper oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dror, I.; Yecheskel, Y.; Berkowitz, B.

    2013-12-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have been added to various products like plastic, textile, electronics and synthetic polymers at growing rates. In spite of the clear advantages of reducing fire damages, many of these BFRs may be released to the environment after their beneficial use which may lead to contamination of water resources. In this work we present the catalytic degradation of two brominated flame retardants (BFRs), tribromoneopentyl alcohol (TBNPA) and 2,4 dibromophenol (2,4-DBP) by copper oxide nanoparticles (nCuO) in aqueous solution. The degradation kinetics, the debromination, and the formation of intermediates by nCuO catalysis are compared to Fenton oxidation and to reduction by nano zero-valent iron (nZVI). The two studied BFRs are shown to degrade fully by the nCuO system within hours to days. Shorter reaction times showed differences in reaction pathways and kinetics for the two compounds. The 2,4-DBP showed faster degradation than TBNPA, by nCuO catalysis. Relatively high resistance to degradation was recorded for 2,4-DBP with nZVI, yielding 20% degradation after 24 h, while the TBNPA was degraded by 85% within 12 hours. A catalytic mechanism for radical generation and BFR degradation by nCuO is proposed. It is further suggested that H2O2 plays an essential role in the activation of the catalyst.

  4. Bromine content and brominated flame retardants in food and animal feed from the UK.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, A R; Mortimer, D; Rose, M; Smith, F; Panton, S; Garcia-Lopez, M

    2016-05-01

    Current occurrence data for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) and hexa-bromocyclododecane (HBCD) measured in most commonly consumed foods (n = 156) and animal feeds (n = 51) sampled in the UK, demonstrates an ongoing ubiquity of these contaminants in human and animal diets. PBDE concentrations for the sum of 17 measured congeners ranged from 0.02 ng/g to 8.91 ng/g whole weight for food, and 0.11 ng/g to 9.63 ng/g whole weight for animal feeds. The highest concentration ranges, and mean values were detected in fish, processed foods and fish feeds. HBCD diastereomers (alpha-HBCD was the most commonly detected) generally occurred at lower concentrations (from <0.01 ng/g to 10.1 ng/g for food and <0.01 ng/g to 0.66 ng/g for animal feed) and less frequently than PBDEs, but tetrabromobisphenol A which was also measured, was rarely detected. The total bromine content of the samples was also determined in an attempt to use a mass balance approach to investigate some of these samples for the occurrence of novel and emerging BFRs. Although the approach was further refined by measuring organic bromine content, the concentrations of bromine were too high (in most cases by orders of magnitude) to allow use of the approach. A selected sub-set of samples was screened by GC-MS, for the presence of novel/emerging brominated flame retardants (PBT, TBX, PBEB, DBHCTD, HCTBPH and OBTMPI) but these were not detected at the higher limits of detection that result from full scan (GC-MS) screening. This data will contribute to the EU wide risk assessment on these contaminants. PMID:26733012

  5. Neurotoxicity and risk assessment of brominated and alternative flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Hester S; Westerink, Remco H S

    2015-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are widely used chemicals that prevent or slow the onset and spreading of fire. Unfortunately, many of these compounds pose serious threats for human health and the environment, indicating an urgent need for safe(r) and less persistent alternative flame retardants (AFRs). As previous research identified the nervous system as a sensitive target organ, the neurotoxicity of past and present flame retardants is reviewed. First, an overview of the neurotoxicity of BFRs in humans and experimental animals is provided, and some common in vitro neurotoxic mechanisms of action are discussed. The combined epidemiological and toxicological studies clearly underline the need for replacing BFRs. Many potentially suitable AFRs are already in use, despite the absence of a full profile of their environmental behavior and toxicological properties. To prioritize the suitability of some selected halogenated and non-halogenated organophosphorous flame retardants and inorganic halogen-free flame retardants, the available neurotoxic data of these AFRs are discussed. The suitability of the AFRs is rank-ordered and combined with human exposure data (serum concentrations, breast milk concentrations and house dust concentrations) and physicochemical properties (useful to predict e.g. bioavailability and persistence in the environment) for a first semi-quantitative risk assessment of the AFRs. As can be concluded from the reviewed data, several BFRs and AFRs share some neurotoxic effects and modes of action. Moreover, the available neurotoxicity data indicate that some AFRs may be suitable substitutes for BFRs. However, proper risk assessment is hampered by an overall scarcity of data, particularly regarding environmental persistence, human exposure levels, and the formation of breakdown products and possible metabolites as well as their toxicity. Until these data gaps in environmental behavioral and toxicological profiles are filled, large scale use of

  6. Brominated flame retardants and the formation of dioxins and furans in fires and combustion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengmei; Buekens, Alfons; Li, Xiaodong

    2016-03-01

    The widespread use and increasing inventory of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have caused considerable concern, as a result of BFRs emissions to the environment and of the formation of both polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PBDD/Fs) and mixed polybromochloro-dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PBCDD/Fs or PXDD/Fs). Structural similarities between PBDD/Fs and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) suggest the existence of comparable formation pathways of both PBDD/Fs and PCDD/Fs, yet BFRs also act as specific precursors to form additional PBDD/Fs. Moreover, elementary bromine (Br2) seems to facilitate chlorination by bromination of organics, followed by Br/Cl-exchange based on displacement through the more reactive halogen. Overall, PBDD/Fs form through three possible pathways: precursor formation, de novo formation, and dispersion of parts containing BFRs as impurities and surviving a fire or other events. The present review summarises the formation mechanisms of both brominated (PBDD/Fs) and mixed dioxins (PXDD/Fs with X=Br or Cl) from BFRs, recaps available emissions data of PBDD/Fs and mixed PXDD/Fs from controlled waste incineration, uncontrolled combustion sources and accidental fires, and identifies and analyses the effects of several local factors of influence, affecting the formation of PBDD/Fs and mixed PXDD/Fs during BFRs combustion. PMID:26546701

  7. BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS: WHAT WE KNOW, AND WHAT WE DON’T

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) represent a large and diverse class of high volume industrial chemicals which have been developed to provide fire safety. There are many other BFRs which have been used and are under development. Historically, polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) ...

  8. Shuttle Environmental Assurance: Brominated Flame Retardants - Concerns, Drivers, Potential Impacts and Mitigation Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark-Ingram, Marceia

    2010-01-01

    Brominated Flame Retardants (BFRs) are widely used in the manufacture of electrical and electronic components and as additives in formulations for foams, plastics and rubbers. The United States (US) and the European Union (EU)have increased regulation and monitoring of of targeted BFRs, such as Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) due to the bioaccumulative effects in humans and animals. In response, manufacturers and vendors of BFR-containing materials are changing flame-retardant additives, sometimes without notifying BFR users. In some instances, Deca-bromodiphenylether (Deca-BDE) and other families of flame retardants are being used as replacement flame retardants for penta-BDE and octa-BDE. The reformulation of the BFR-containing material typically results in the removal of the targeted PBDE and replacement with a non-PBDE chemical or non-targeted PBDE. Many users of PBDE -based materials are concerned that vendors will perform reformulation and not inform the end user. Materials performance such as flammability, adhesion , and tensile strength may be altered due to reformulation. The requalification of newly formulated materials may be required, or replacement materials may have to be identified and qualified. The Shuttle Enviornmental Assurance (SEA) team indentified a risk to the Space Shuttle Program associated with the possibility that targeted PBDEs may be replaced without notification. Resultant decreases in flame retardancy, Liquid Oxygen (LOX) compatibility, or material performance could have serious consequences.

  9. Aerobic biodegradation of the brominated flame retardants, dibromoneopentyl glycol and tribromoneopentyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Segev, Osnat; Meusel, Wolfram; Friedenberger, Melanie; Brenner, Asher; Kushmaro, Ariel

    2009-09-01

    Halogenated organic compounds constitute one of the largest and most diverse groups of chemicals in the environment. Many of these compounds are toxic, persistent and, as a result of their often limited biodegradability, tend to bioaccumulate in the environment. Dibromoneopentyl glycol (DBNPG) and tribromoneopentyl alcohol (TBNPA) are brominated flame retardants commonly used as additives during the manufacture of plastic polymers and as chemical intermediates in the synthesis of other flame retardants. Both are classified as not readily biodegradable. In this paper, we demonstrate the biodegradation of both DBNPG and TBNPA by a common bacterial consortium under aerobic conditions in enrichment cultures containing yeast extract. DBNPG and TBNPA biodegradation is accompanied by a release of bromide into the medium, due to a biological debromination reaction. Molecular analysis of the clone library PCR amplified 16S rRNA gene was used to characterize the bacterial consortium involved in the biodegradation. PMID:19205903

  10. Existence state of bromine as an indicator of the source of brominated flame retardants in indoor dust.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Go; Kida, Akiko; Sakai, Shin-ichi; Takigami, Hidetaka

    2009-03-01

    Indoor dust is an important medium for human exposure to brominated flame retardants (BFRs) such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). In this study, we used micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRFS), digital optical microscopy, and gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry to investigate the existence state of bromine as an indicator of the source of BFRs in indoor dusts and in dusts from the interior of televisions collected in Japan. By means of micro XRFS bromine mapping conducted at a 0.5-s dwell time, we were able to detect bromine levels as low as about 0.1% at each point of about a beam diameter of 50 microm across. The presence of fragments containing 1.0% or more bromine was confirmed in 27 of the 48 dust samples tested. Using magnified images of the fragments, we classified them roughly into particulates and fibrous substances. We analyzed PBDEs in the fragments containing high concentrations of bromine (> or = 0.1%) and confirmed that the fragments contained PBDEs, mainly BDE 209. Furthermore, to detect bromine concentrations < or = 0.1% in the dust samples, we analyzed the samples at a dwell time of 100 s to enhance the detection sensitivity of mapping; atthis dwell time, we confirmed the presence of bromine in the dust coating. Our results suggest that bromine is transferred from products to dust matrixes not only through miniaturization and subsequent direct migration into dust as plastic and textile fragments but also through other pathways such as vaporization and airborne transfer of microparticulates. PMID:19350916

  11. Brominated flame retardants and seafood safety: a review.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Rebeca; Cunha, Sara C; Casal, Susana

    2015-04-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs), frequently applied to industrial and household products to make them less flammable, are highly persistent in the environment and cause multi-organ toxicity in human and wildlife. Based on the review of BFRs presence in seafood published from 2004 to 2014, it is clear that such pollutants are not ideally controlled as the surveys are too restricted, legislation inexistent for some classes, the analytical methodologies diversified, and several factors as food processing and eating habits are generally overlooked. Indeed, while a seafood rich diet presents plenty of nutritional benefits, it can also represent a potential source of these environmental contaminants. Since recent studies have shown that dietary intake constitutes a main route of human exposure to BFRs, it is of major importance to review and enhance these features, since seafood constitutes a chief pathway for human exposure and biomagnification of priority environmental contaminants. In particular, more objective studies focused on the variability factors behind contamination levels, and subsequent human exposure, are necessary to support the necessity for more restricted legislation worldwide. PMID:25700249

  12. Brominated and chlorinated flame retardants in San Francisco Bay sediments and wildlife.

    PubMed

    Klosterhaus, Susan L; Stapleton, Heather M; La Guardia, Mark J; Greig, Denise J

    2012-10-15

    Restrictions on the use of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have resulted in the use of alternative flame retardants in consumer products to comply with flammability standards. In contrast to PBDEs, information on the occurrence and fate of these alternative compounds in the environment is limited, particularly in the United States. In this study, a survey of flame retardants in San Francisco Bay was conducted to evaluate whether PBDE replacement chemicals and other current use flame retardants were accumulating in the Bay food web. In addition to PBDEs, brominated and chlorinated flame retardants (hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and Dechlorane Plus (DP)) were detected in Bay sediments and wildlife. Median concentrations of PBDEs, HBCD, and DP, respectively, were 4.3, 0.3, and 0.2 ng g⁻¹ dry weight (dw) in sediments; 1670, <6.0, and 0.5 ng g⁻¹ lipid weight (lw) in white croaker (Genyonemus lineatus); 1860, 6.5, and 1.3 ng g⁻¹ lw in shiner surfperch (Cymatogaster aggregata); 5500, 37.4, and 0.9 ng g⁻¹ lw in eggs of double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus); 770, 7.1, and 0.9 ng g⁻¹ lw in harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) adults; and 330, 3.5, and <0.1 ng g⁻¹ lw in harbor seal (P. vitulina) pups. Two additional flame retardants, pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6 tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) were detected in sediments but with less frequency and at lower concentrations (median concentrations of 0.01 and 0.02 ng g⁻¹ dw, respectively) compared to the other flame retardants. PBEB was also detected in each of the adult harbor seals and in 83% of the pups (median concentrations 0.2 and 0.07 ng g⁻¹ lw, respectively). The flame retardants hexabromobenzene (HBB), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE), bis(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (TBPH), and 2-ethylhexyl 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (TBB), were not detected in sediments and BTBPE, HBB and TBB were not detected in wildlife samples. Elevated concentrations of some flame retardants

  13. Thermal Recycling of Brominated Flame Retardants with Fe2O3.

    PubMed

    Altarawneh, Mohammednoor; Ahmed, Oday H; Jiang, Zhong-Tao; Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z

    2016-08-01

    Plastics containing brominated flame retardants (BFRs) constitute the major fraction of nonmetallic content in e-waste. Co-pyrolysis of BFRs with hematite (Fe2O3) represents a viable option for the thermal recycling of BFRs. Consensus of experimental findings confirms the excellent bromine fixation ability of Fe2O3 and the subsequent formation of iron bromides. This contribution provides a comprehensive mechanistic account of the primary reactions between a cluster model of Fe2O3 and major bromine-bearing products from the decomposition of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBA), the most commonly deployed BFR. We estimate the thermo-kinetic parameters for interactions of Fe2O3 with HBr, brominated alkanes and alkenes, bromobenzene, and bromophenol. Dissociative addition of HBr at a Fe-O bond proceeds through a trivial barrier of 8.2 kcal/mol with fitted parameters in the Arrhenius equation of k(T) = 7.96 × 10(11) exp(-6400/RT) s(-1). The facile and irreversible nature for HBr addition to Fe2O3 accords with the experimentally reported 90% reduction in HBr emission when Fe2O3 interacts with TBBA pyrolysates. A detailed kinetic analysis indicates that, transformation of Fe2O3 into iron bromides and oxybromides occurs via successive addition of HBr to Fe(Br)-O(H) entities. Elimination of a water molecule proceeds through an intramolecular H transfer. A direct elimination one-step mechanism operates in the dehydrohalogenation of bromoethane into ethene over Fe2O3. Dissociative decomposition and direct elimination channels assume comparable reaction rates in formation of acetylene from vinyl bromide. Results from this study provide an atomic-based insight into a promising thermal recycling route of e-waste. PMID:27366936

  14. Brominated flame retardants in offices in Michigan, USA.

    PubMed

    Batterman, Stuart; Godwin, Christopher; Chernyak, Sergei; Jia, Chunrong; Charles, Simone

    2010-08-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are now ubiquitous contaminants with large reservoirs and high concentrations in buildings. Most of the information documenting BFR levels has been obtained in residences, and other environments that can lead to exposure have received relatively little attention, including offices that contain numerous BFR sources and where individuals spend considerable time. The aim of this study is to characterize BFR concentrations, potential emission sources, and migration pathways in office environments. We measure BFR levels in floor dust, indoor air, ventilation filter dust, and carpets in ten commercial and institutional buildings in Michigan, U.S.A. The median concentration of total BDEs in settled dust was 8754 ng g(-1), at the upper range of levels previously reported. Especially elevated levels were found in offices in buildings that contained known or likely BFR sources, e.g., computer servers. A trends analysis in a newly constructed building showed remarkable increases in concentrations of BFRs in settled dust and indoor air, and apparent steady-state levels were reached 5 to 8 months after building completion, a particularly striking finding given that the building was constructed and furnished several years after the voluntary phase-out of the penta- and octa-mixtures. Airborne particulate matter collected in a building's HVAC system filters contained PBDEs, including BDE-209, at levels exceeding the concentration of floor dust. In conjunction with estimates of building air flow rates, filter efficiency and other parameters, mass balance calculations for this building were used to estimate the emission rates and reservoirs of PBDEs. The widespread distribution of BFRs found in offices in both new and old buildings suggests the significance of workplace exposures, the need for controls to minimize human exposure, intra-building migration, and environmental releases of these chemicals, and the need for monitoring in new buildings

  15. Photochemical degradation of a brominated flame retardant (tetrabromobisphenol A) in ice under field and laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waligroski, G.; Grannas, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Studies of brominated flame retardants have raised awareness of their potential environmental impact as toxic compounds. Because these compounds are now globally distributed, including in the Polar Regions, it is important to assess their potential fate in the environment. It has been shown that active photochemistry occurs in sunlit snow and ice, but there is little information regarding potential photochemical degradation of brominated flame retardants in snow and ice. The purpose of this research is to investigate the direct and indirect photochemical transformation pathways of a widely used brominated flame retardant, tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA). We have conducted field-based experiments in Barrow, Alaska to investigate the potential photochemical degradation of TBBPA in snow and ice under environmentally-relevant conditions. Field-based results show that TBBPA is efficiently degraded under direct photolysis conditions in frozen aqueous samples under natural Barrow sunlight. In aqueous solution the light absorption properties of TBBPA are pH dependent. Therefore, the photodegradation of TBBPA in snow and ice will be highly pH dependent. Reactions that are pH dependent may be affected by the nature of the liquid-like layers in snow/ice as well as the presence of other solutes that may indirectly affect the local pH experienced by TBBPA in snow and ice samples. In order to establish how the effective pH of liquid-like regions in ice might impact the degradation of TBBPA, various salts (sodium chloride, sodium fluoride, sodium bromide, ammonium chloride, ammonium acetate and ammonium sulfate) were added to aqueous solutions of TBBPA. Upon freezing, these different salts will induce pH differences in the liquid-like regions of the sample due to a phenomenon known as the freezing potential. Observed reactivity differences upon addition of these salts will be evaluated and discussed. Additionally, the presence of natural dissolved organic matter (DOM), an effective

  16. [Brominated flame retardants: environmental contamination, exposure sources and potential negative health effects].

    PubMed

    Fiore, Maria; Floridia, Adriana; Oliveri Conti, Gea; Ledda, Caterina; Mauceri, Cristina; Ferrante, Margherita

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes recent evidence regarding brominated flame retardants. These represent the most common type of flame retardants used and recent studies have highlighted their presence in various concentrations in different environmental matrices, including areas distant from production areas, and in human biological samples. Many doubts persist regarding exposure sources, toxicity, metabolism and transformation processes once these products are released into the environment. PMID:26722829

  17. BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS: WHAT WE KNOW, AND WHAT WE DON�T

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) represent a large and diverse class of high volume industrial chemicals which have been developed to provide fire safety. There are many other BFRs which have been used and are under development. Historically, polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) w...

  18. Chicago's Sanitary and Ship Canal sediment: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, brominated flame retardants, and organophosphate esters.

    PubMed

    Peverly, Angela A; O'Sullivan, Colin; Liu, Liang-Ying; Venier, Marta; Martinez, Andres; Hornbuckle, Keri C; Hites, Ronald A

    2015-09-01

    The Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) links the Great Lakes to the Mississippi River starting in downtown Chicago. In addition to storm water, the CSSC receives water from Chicago's wastewater treatment plants (WWTP). Such effluents are known to be sources of organic pollutants to water and sediment. Therefore in 2013, we collected 10 sediment samples from the CSSC and measured the concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), brominated flame retardants, and organophosphate esters (OPEs). Geometric mean concentrations of the summed concentrations of 16 PAHs ranged from 11,000 to 420,000 ng/g dw, with the highest concentrations located at each end of the canal. Total PCB concentrations had a geometric mean of 1,400 ± 500 ng/g dw. Brominated flame retardants were separated into two groups: polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and non-PBDEs. Concentrations of PBDEs and those of the non-PBDE flame retardants had a geometric average of 83 ± 19 and 7.0 ± 5.8 ng/g dw, respectively. The summed concentrations of 8 OPEs ranged from 470 to 2,800 ng/g dw, with the highest concentration detected at a site located downstream of the Stickney water reclamation plant. Using ANOVA results, some hypotheses on sources to the CSSC could be formulated: downtown Chicago is probably a source of PAHs, the Cal-Sag Channel may be a source of PCBs, and neither the WWTP nor the Cal-Sag Channel seem to be significant sources of brominated flame retardants or OPEs. PMID:25981316

  19. Bromine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, Joyce A.

    2011-01-01

    All U.S. production of bromine in 2010 came from underground brines in Arkansas. It was the leading mineral commodity produced in the state in terms of value. Albemarle Corp. and Chemtura Corp. recovered bromine.

  20. Bromine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, Joyce A.

    2012-01-01

    The element bromine is found principally as a dissolved species in seawater, evaporitic (salt) lakes and underground brines associated with petroleum deposits. Seawater contains about 65 parts per million of bromine or an estimated 100 Tt (110 trillion st). In the Middle East, the highly saline waters of the Dead Sea are estimated to contain 1 Gt (1.1billion st) of bromine. Bromine is also recovered from seawater as a coproduct during evaporation to produce salt.

  1. Bromine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    The element bromine is found principally as a dissolved species in seawater, evaporitic (salt) lakes and underground brines associated with petroleum deposits. Seawater contains about 65 parts per million of bromine or an estimated 907 Gt (100 trillion st). In the Middle East, the highly saline waters of the Dead Sea are estimated to contain 907 Mt (1 billion st) of bromine. Bromine also may be recovered from seawater as a coproduct during evaporation to produce salt.

  2. Synthesis of brominated acenaphthylenes and their flame-retardant effects on ethylene-propylene-diene terpolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Y.; Hagiwara, M.

    1982-09-01

    Bromoacenaphthylenes and their condensates as flame-retardant reagents were synthesized by bromination of acenaphthylene using ZnCl/sub 2/ - CF/sub 3/COOH or FeCl/sub 3/ as catalysts and subsequent dehydrobromination. The chief components were identified as bromoacenaphthylene monomers when ZnCl/sub 2/ - CF/sub 3/COOH were used, and as their condensates (mostly trimers) in the case of FeCl/sub 3/. Their performance as flame-retardant reagents for ethylene-propylene-diene terpolymer (EPDM) was evaluated by measuring the oxygen index of finished compounds, and flammability by a vertical flammability test based on UL-94-VO. Both the monomers and the condensates demonstrated high flame-retardant effectiveness. The high efficiency was attributed to their excellent dispersity in the base polymer and their characteristic thermal decomposition behavior. In thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), they decomposed in a very wide range of temperature (ca.200-560/sup 0/C), which covers the decomposition range of EPDM. This was attributed to the existence of bromines of different thermal stabilities in one molecule. This paper is a part of a series of studies to develop new flame retardants which can give high flame retardancy as well as stabilty against ionizing radiation to EPDM.

  3. In vitro profiling of the endocrine-disrupting potency of brominated flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Hamers, Timo; Kamstra, Jorke H; Sonneveld, Edwin; Murk, Albertinka J; Kester, Monique H A; Andersson, Patrik L; Legler, Juliette; Brouwer, Abraham

    2006-07-01

    Over the last few years, increasing evidence has become available that some brominated flame retardants (BFRs) may have endocrine-disrupting (ED) potencies. The goal of the current study was to perform a systematic in vitro screening of the ED potencies of BFRs (1) to elucidate possible modes of action of BFRs in man and wildlife and (2) to classify BFRs with similar profiles of ED potencies. A test set of 27 individual BFRs were selected, consisting of 19 polybrominated diphenyl ether congeners, tetrabromobisphenol-A, hexabromocyclododecane, 2,4,6-tribromophenol, ortho-hydroxylated brominated diphenyl ether 47, and tetrabromobisphenol-A-bis(2,3)dibromopropyl ether. All BFRs were tested for their potency to interact with the arylhydrocarbon receptor, androgen receptor (AR), progesterone receptor (PR), and estrogen receptor. In addition, all BFRs were tested for their potency to inhibit estradiol (sulfation by estradiol sulfotransferase (E2SULT), to interfere with thyroid hormone 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T3)-mediated cell proliferation, and to compete with T3-precursor thyroxine for binding to the plasma transport protein transthyretin (TTR). The results of the in vitro screening indicated that BFRs have ED potencies, some of which had not or only marginally been described before (AR antagonism, PR antagonism, E2SULT inhibition, and potentiation of T3-mediated effects). For some BFRs, the potency to induce AR antagonism, E2SULT inhibition, and TTR competition was higher than for natural ligands or clinical drugs used as positive controls. Based on their similarity in ED profiles, BFRs were classified into five different clusters. These findings support further investigation of the potential ED effects of these environmentally relevant BFRs in man and wildlife. PMID:16601080

  4. Bromine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, Lori E.

    2010-01-01

    The entire U.S. production of bromine in 2009 came from underground brines in Arkansas, where it was the leading mineral commodity produced in terms of value. Two companies, Albermarle Corp. and Chemtura Corp., were responsible for bromine recovery. Worldwide, the United States is still the leading producer. However, U.S. dominance has decreased, as countries like China, Israel, Japan and Jordan have strengthened their positions as world producers of elemental bromine.

  5. Neurobehavioral function and low-level exposure to brominated flame retardants in adolescents: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Animal and in vitro studies demonstrated a neurotoxic potential of brominated flame retardants, a group of chemicals used in many household and commercial products to prevent fire. Although the first reports of detrimental neurobehavioral effects in rodents appeared more than ten years ago, human data are sparse. Methods As a part of a biomonitoring program for environmental health surveillance in Flanders, Belgium, we assessed the neurobehavioral function with the Neurobehavioral Evaluation System (NES-3), and collected blood samples in a group of high school students. Cross-sectional data on 515 adolescents (13.6-17 years of age) was available for the analysis. Multiple regression models accounting for potential confounders were used to investigate the associations between biomarkers of internal exposure to brominated flame retardants [serum levels of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners 47, 99, 100, 153, 209, hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA)] and cognitive performance. In addition, we investigated the association between brominated flame retardants and serum levels of FT3, FT4, and TSH. Results A two-fold increase of the sum of serum PBDE’s was associated with a decrease of the number of taps with the preferred-hand in the Finger Tapping test by 5.31 (95% CI: 0.56 to 10.05, p = 0.029). The effects of the individual PBDE congeners on the motor speed were consistent. Serum levels above the level of quantification were associated with an average decrease of FT3 level by 0.18 pg/mL (95% CI: 0.03 to 0.34, p = 0.020) for PBDE-99 and by 0.15 pg/mL (95% CI: 0.004 to 0.29, p = 0.045) for PBDE-100, compared with concentrations below the level of quantification. PBDE-47 level above the level of quantification was associated with an average increase of TSH levels by 10.1% (95% CI: 0.8% to 20.2%, p = 0.033), compared with concentrations below the level of quantification. We did not observe effects of

  6. Distribution of copper, silver and gold during thermal treatment with brominated flame retardants

    SciTech Connect

    Oleszek, Sylwia; Grabda, Mariusz; Shibata, Etsuro; Nakamura, Takashi

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Copper, silver and gold during thermal treatment with brominated flame retardants. • Distribution of copper, silver and gold during thermal processing. • Thermodynamic considerations of the bromination reactions. - Abstract: The growing consumption of electric and electronic equipment results in creating an increasing amount of electronic waste. The most economically and environmentally advantageous methods for the treatment and recycling of waste electric and electronic equipment (WEEE) are the thermal techniques such as direct combustion, co-combustion with plastic wastes, pyrolysis and gasification. Nowadays, this kind of waste is mainly thermally treated in incinerators (e.g. rotary kilns) to decompose the plastics present, and to concentrate metals in bottom ash. The concentrated metals (e.g. copper, precious metals) can be supplied as a secondary raw material to metal smelters, while the pyrolysis of plastics allows the recovery of fuel gases, volatilising agents and, eventually, energy. Indeed, WEEE, such as a printed circuit boards (PCBs) usually contains brominated flame retardants (BFRs). From these materials, hydrobromic acid (HBr) is formed as a product of their thermal decomposition. In the present work, the bromination was studied of copper, silver and gold by HBr, originating from BFRs, such as Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) and Tetrabromobisphenol A-Tetrabromobisophenol A diglycidyl ether (TTDE) polymer; possible volatilization of the bromides formed was monitored using a thermo-gravimetric analyzer (TGA) and a laboratory-scale furnace for treating samples of metals and BFRs under an inert atmosphere and at a wide range of temperatures. The results obtained indicate that up to about 50% of copper and silver can evolve from sample residues in the form of volatile CuBr and AgBr above 600 and 1000 °C, respectively. The reactions occur in the molten resin phase simultaneously with the decomposition of the brominated resin. Gold is

  7. Novel brominated flame retardants: a review of their analysis, environmental fate and behaviour.

    PubMed

    Covaci, Adrian; Harrad, Stuart; Abdallah, Mohamed A-E; Ali, Nadeem; Law, Robin J; Herzke, Dorte; de Wit, Cynthia A

    2011-02-01

    This review summarises current knowledge about production volumes, physico-chemical properties, analysis, environmental occurrence, fate and behaviour and human exposure to the "novel" brominated flame retardants (NBFRs). We define the term NBFRs as relating to BFRs which are new to the market or newly/recently observed in the environment. Restrictions and bans on the use of some polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) formulations, in many jurisdictions, have created a market for the use of NBFRs. To date, most data on NBFRs have arisen as additional information generated by research designed principally to study more "traditional" BFRs, such as PBDEs. This has led to a wide variety of analytical approaches for sample extraction, extract purification and instrumental analysis of NBFRs. An overview of environmental occurrence in abiotic matrices, aquatic biota, terrestrial biota and birds is presented. Evidence concerning the metabolism and absorption of different NBFRs is reviewed. Human exposure to NBFRs via different exposure pathways is discussed, and research gaps related to analysis, environmental sources, fate, and behaviour and human exposure are identified. PMID:21168217

  8. Extent and mechanisms of brominated flame retardant emissions from waste soft furnishings and fabrics: A critical review.

    PubMed

    Stubbings, William A; Harrad, Stuart

    2014-10-01

    Use of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in soft furnishings has occurred for over thirty years with the phase out of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) only relatively recently begun. As products treated with BFRs reach the end of their lifecycle they enter the waste stream, thereby constituting an important and increasing reservoir of these chemicals. This review highlights the dearth of data on the extent and potential mechanisms of BFR emissions from waste soft furnishings. However, insights into what may occur are provided by scrutiny of the larger (though still incomplete) database related to BFR emissions from electronic waste (e-waste). In many countries, municipal landfills have historically been the primary disposal method of waste consumer products and therefore represent a substantial reservoir of BFRs. Published data for BFR emissions to both air and water from landfill and other waste disposal routes are collated, presented and reviewed. Reported concentrations of PBDEs in landfill leachate range considerably from <1ngL(-1) to 133,000ngΣPBDEL(-1). In addition to direct migration of BFRs from waste materials; there is evidence that some higher brominated flame retardants are able to undergo degradation and debromination during waste treatment, that in some instances may lead to the formation of more toxic and bioavailable compounds. We propose that waste soft furnishings be treated with the same concern as e-waste, given its potential as a reservoir and source of environmental contamination with BFRs. PMID:25042535

  9. Microbial degradation of the brominated flame retardant TBNPA by groundwater bacteria: laboratory and field study.

    PubMed

    Balaban, Noa; Bernstein, Anat; Gelman, Faina; Ronen, Zeev

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, the biodegradation of the brominated flame retardant tribromoneopentylalcohol (TBNPA) by a groundwater enrichment culture was investigated using a dual carbon ((13)C/(12)C)- bromine ((81)Br/(79)Br) stable isotope analysis. An indigenous aerobic bacterial consortium was enriched from the polluted groundwater underlying an industrial site in the northern Negev Desert, Israel, where TBNPA is an abundant pollutant. Aerobic biodegradation was shown to be rapid, with complete debromination within a few days, whereas anaerobic biodegradation was not observed. Biodegradation under aerobic conditions was accompanied by a significant carbon isotope effect with an isotopic enrichment factor of ɛCbulk = -8.8‰ ± 1.5‰, without any detectable bromine isotope fractionation. It was found that molecular oxygen is necessary for biodegradation to occur, suggesting an initial oxidative step. Based on these results, it was proposed that H abstraction from the C-H bond is the first step of TBNPA biodegradation under aerobic conditions, and that the C-H bond cleavage results in the formation of unstable intermediates, which are rapidly debrominated. A preliminary isotopic analysis of TBNPA in the groundwater underlying the industrial area revealed that there are no changes in the carbon and bromine isotope ratio values downstream of the contamination source. Considering that anoxic conditions prevail in the groundwater of the contaminated site, the lack of isotope shifts in TBNPA indicates the lack of TBNPA biodegradation in the groundwater, in accordance with our findings. PMID:27183339

  10. Advances in Instrumental Analysis of Brominated Flame Retardants: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This review aims to highlight the recent advances and methodological improvements in instrumental techniques applied for the analysis of different brominated flame retardants (BFRs). The literature search strategy was based on the recent analytical reviews published on BFRs. The main selection criteria involved the successful development and application of analytical methods for determination of the target compounds in various environmental matrices. Different factors affecting chromatographic separation and mass spectrometric detection of brominated analytes were evaluated and discussed. Techniques using advanced instrumentation to achieve outstanding results in quantification of different BFRs and their metabolites/degradation products were highlighted. Finally, research gaps in the field of BFR analysis were identified and recommendations for future research were proposed. PMID:27433482

  11. Brominated flame retardants and dechloranes in eels from German Rivers.

    PubMed

    Sühring, Roxana; Möller, Axel; Freese, Marko; Pohlmann, Jan-Dag; Wolschke, Hendrik; Sturm, Renate; Xie, Zhiyong; Hanel, Reinhold; Ebinghaus, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    The levels of PBDEs, alternate BFRs and dechloranes in European Eel (Anguilla anguilla) samples (elvers, yellow and silver eels) were investigated to compare the contamination of eels from the rivers Elbe and Rhine and to estimate the BFR contamination throughout the eel's life cycle. PBDEs were the dominating flame retardants (FRs) in muscle tissues of yellow and silver eels, while the alternate BFR 2,3-dibromopropyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (DPTE) and the Dechlorane 602 were the dominating FRs in elvers (juvenile eels). Concentrations of FRs in silver eels from river Rhine were generally higher than concentrations in other eels analysed with up to 46 ng g(-1) wet weight (ww) ∑PBDEs. The concentrations in yellow and silver eels from river Elbe were similar with an average of 9.0±5.1 ng g(-1)ww and 8.1±3.7 ng g(-1)ww respectively. PBDE concentrations in elvers were comparably low (0.02 (BDE-100) to 0.1 (BDE-183) ng g(-1)ww), which lead to the conclusion that these contaminants were mostly ingested within the rivers. Among the alternate BFRs and dechloranes, DPTE as well as the Dechlorane 602 and Dechlorane Plus (DP) were found in all life cycle stages and rivers with concentrations between 0.01 ng g(-1)ww and 0.7 ng g(-1)ww. Dechlorane 603 could only be detected in silver eels from river Rhine. Pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB) was only found in yellow and silver eels and bis(2-ethylhexyl)tetrabromophthalate (BEHTBP) could only be detected in elvers. These are the first reports of Dec-602 and 603 in aquatic organisms from Europe. The results of this study show the lasting relevance of PBDEs as contaminants in rivers and river-dwelling species but also the growing relevance of emerging contaminants such as alternate BFRs and dechloranes. PMID:22985592

  12. Monitoring of WEEE plastics in regards to brominated flame retardants using handheld XRF

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrian, Alexia; Ledersteger, Alfred; Pomberger, Roland

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Specification of an empirical factor for conversion from bromine to PBB and PBDE. • The handheld XRF device was validated for this particular application. • A very large number of over 4600 pieces of monitor housings was analysed. • The recyclable fraction mounts up to 85% for TV but only 53% of PC waste plastics. • A high percentage of pieces with bromine contents of over 50,000 ppm was obtained. - Abstract: This contribution is focused on the on-site determination of the bromine content in waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), in particular waste plastics from television sets (TV) and personal computer monitors (PC) using a handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF) device. The described approach allows the examination of samples in regards to the compliance with legal specifications for polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) directly after disassembling and facilitates the sorting out of plastics with high contents of brominated flame retardants (BFRs). In all, over 3000 pieces of black (TV) and 1600 pieces of grey (PC) plastic waste were analysed with handheld XRF technique for this study. Especially noticeable was the high percentage of pieces with a bromine content of over 50,000 ppm for TV (7%) and PC (39%) waste plastics. The applied method was validated by comparing the data of handheld XRF with results obtained by GC–MS. The results showed the expected and sufficiently accurate correlation between these two methods. It is shown that handheld XRF technique is an effective tool for fast monitoring of large volumes of WEEE plastics in regards to BFRs for on-site measurements.

  13. Fabric phase sorptive extraction: Two practical sample pretreatment techniques for brominated flame retardants in water.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guiqi; Dong, Sheying; Zhang, Mengfei; Zhang, Haihan; Huang, Tinglin

    2016-09-15

    Sample pretreatment is the critical section for residue monitoring of hazardous pollutants. In this paper, using the cellulose fabric as host matrix, three extraction sorbents such as poly (tetrahydrofuran) (PTHF), poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly (dimethyldiphenylsiloxane) (PDMDPS), were prepared on the surface of the cellulose fabric. Two practical extraction techniques including stir bar fabric phase sorptive extraction (stir bar-FPSE) and magnetic stir fabric phase sorptive extraction (magnetic stir-FPSE) have been designed, which allow stirring of fabric phase sorbent during the whole extraction process. In the meantime, three brominated flame retardants (BFRs) [tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), tetrabromobisphenol A bisallylether (TBBPA-BAE), tetrabromobisphenol A bis(2,3-dibromopropyl)ether (TBBPA-BDBPE)] in the water sample were selected as model analytes for the practical evaluation of the proposed two techniques using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Moreover, various experimental conditions affecting extraction process such as the type of fabric phase, extraction time, the amount of salt and elution conditions were also investigated. Due to the large sorbent loading capacity and unique stirring performance, both techniques possessed high extraction capability and fast extraction equilibrium. Under the optimized conditions, high recoveries (90-99%) and low limits of detection (LODs) (0.01-0.05 μg L(-1)) were achieved. In addition, the reproducibility was obtained by evaluating the intraday and interday precisions with relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 5.1% and 6.8%, respectively. The results indicated that two pretreatment techniques were promising and practical for monitoring of hazardous pollutants in the water sample. Due to low solvent consumption and high repeated use performance, proposed techniques also could meet green analytical criteria. PMID:27300591

  14. Associations between brominated flame retardants in human milk and Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH) in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Eggesbø, Merete; Thomsen, Cathrine; Jørgensen, Jens V.; Becher, Georg; Odland, Jon Øyvind; Longnecker, Matthew P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have been in widespread use in a vast array of consumer products since the 1970s. The metabolites of some BFRs show a structural similarity to thyroid hormones and experimental animal studies have confirmed that they may interfere with thyroid hormone homeostasis. A major concern has been whether intrauterine exposure to BFRs may disturb thyroid homeostasis since the fetal brain is particularly susceptible to alterations in thyroid hormones. However, few reports on newborns have been published to date. Objectives To evaluate the association between BFRs and neonatal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). Methods We studied six polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) measured in milk samples from 239 women who were part of the “Norwegian Human Milk Study” (HUMIS), 2003–2006. Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and BDE-209 were measured in a subset of the women (193 and 46 milk samples, respectively). The milk was sampled at a median of 33 days after delivery. TSH was measured in babies three days after delivery as part of the routine national screening program for early detection of congenital hypothyroidism. Additional information was obtained through the Medical Birth Registry and questionnaires to the mothers. Results The PBDE concentrations in human milk in Norway were comparable to concentrations reported from other European countries and Asia, but not the US and Canada where levels are approximately one order of magnitude higher. We observed no statistically significant associations between BDE-47, 99, 153, 154, 209 and HBCD in human milk and TSH in models adjusted for possible confounders and other environmental toxicants including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Conclusions We did not observe an association between TSH and exposure to HBCD and PBDEs within the exposure levels observed. PMID:21601188

  15. Monitoring of WEEE plastics in regards to brominated flame retardants using handheld XRF.

    PubMed

    Aldrian, Alexia; Ledersteger, Alfred; Pomberger, Roland

    2015-02-01

    This contribution is focused on the on-site determination of the bromine content in waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), in particular waste plastics from television sets (TV) and personal computer monitors (PC) using a handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF) device. The described approach allows the examination of samples in regards to the compliance with legal specifications for polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) directly after disassembling and facilitates the sorting out of plastics with high contents of brominated flame retardants (BFRs). In all, over 3000 pieces of black (TV) and 1600 pieces of grey (PC) plastic waste were analysed with handheld XRF technique for this study. Especially noticeable was the high percentage of pieces with a bromine content of over 50,000ppm for TV (7%) and PC (39%) waste plastics. The applied method was validated by comparing the data of handheld XRF with results obtained by GC-MS. The results showed the expected and sufficiently accurate correlation between these two methods. It is shown that handheld XRF technique is an effective tool for fast monitoring of large volumes of WEEE plastics in regards to BFRs for on-site measurements. PMID:25464945

  16. Maternal transfer of emerging brominated and chlorinated flame retardants in European eels.

    PubMed

    Sühring, Roxana; Freese, Marko; Schneider, Mandy; Schubert, Sophia; Pohlmann, Jan-Dag; Alaee, Mehran; Wolschke, Hendrik; Hanel, Reinhold; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Marohn, Lasse

    2015-10-15

    The European eel (Anguilla anguilla) is regarded as a critically endangered species. Scientists are in agreement that the "quality of spawners" is a vital factor for the survival of the species. This quality can be impaired by parasites, disease and pollution. Especially endocrine disrupting organic chemicals pose a potential threat to reproduction and development of offspring. To our knowledge, the findings in this publication for the first time describe maternal transfer of contaminants in eels. We analysed the concentrations of in total 53 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and their halogenated substitutes in muscle, gonads and eggs of artificially matured European eels and in muscle and gonads of untreated European eels that were used for comparison. We found evidence that persistent organic pollutants such as PBDEs, as well as their brominated and chlorinated substitutes are redistributed from muscle tissue to gonads and eggs. Concentrations ranged from 0.001 ng g(-1)ww for sum Dechlorane metabolites (DPMA, aCL10DP, aCl11DP) to 2.1 ng g(-1)ww for TBA in eggs, 0.001 ng g(-1)ww for Dechlorane metabolites to 9.4 ng g(-1)ww for TBA in gonads and 0.002 ng g(-1)ww for Dechlorane metabolites to 54 ng g(-1)ww for TBA in muscle tissue. Average egg muscle ratios (EMRs) for compounds detectable in artificially matured eels from both Schlei Fjord and Ems River ranged from 0.01 for Dechlorane 602 (DDC-DBF) to 10.4 for PBEB. Strong correlations were found between flame retardant concentrations and lipid content in the analysed tissue types, as well as transfer rates and octanol-water partitioning coefficient, indicating that these parameters were the driving factors for the observed maternal transfer. Furthermore, indications were found, that TBP-DBPE, TBP-AE, BATE and TBA have a significant uptake from the surrounding water, rather than just food and might additionally be formed by metabolism or biotransformation processes. Dechloranes seem to be of increasing

  17. Accumulation of organochlorines and brominated flame retardants in estuarine and marine food chains: field measurements and model calculations.

    PubMed

    Veltman, Karin; Hendriks, Jan; Huijbregts, Mark; Leonards, Pim; van den Heuvel-Greve, Martine; Vethaak, Dick

    2005-10-01

    Food chain accumulation of organochlorines and brominated flame retardants in estuarine and marine environments is compared to model estimations and fresh water field data. The food chain consists of herbivores, detritivores and primary and secondary carnivores i.e. fish, fish-eating birds and marine mammals. Accumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls is predicted well by OMEGA for herbi-detritivores and primary and secondary carnivorous fish. Ratios are similar to those found for fresh water species. Accumulation ratios for fish-eating birds and mammals are overestimated by the model, which is attributed partly to biotransformation of meta-para unsubstituted congeners. Additionally, birds may feed in other less polluted areas. For brominated diphenylethers (BDE) accumulation patterns are highly species and congener specific. Accumulation depends on both K(ow) and metabolization capacities. BDE47 is the predominant congener in lower trophic levels. For marine birds and mammals accumulation ratios of BDE99 and 100 are similar to or higher than ratios of persistent PCBs. PMID:15893330

  18. The Addition of Bromine to 1,2-Diphenylethene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amburgey-Peters, Judith C.; Haynes, Leroy W.

    2005-01-01

    The bromination of 1,2-diphenylethene, using a variety of solvents and brominating agents, can be used in both introductory and advanced organic chemistry courses. The reactions can be used to illustrate the effects of changing solvents and reagents, as well as to reveal interesting aspects of organic reaction mechanisms.

  19. Legacy and current-use brominated flame retardants in the Barn Owl.

    PubMed

    Eulaers, Igor; Jaspers, Veerle L B; Pinxten, Rianne; Covaci, Adrian; Eens, Marcel

    2014-02-15

    The present study investigated the current-use brominated flame retardants (BFRs) tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), simultaneously with legacy polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), in Barn Owls (Tyto alba) collected from two regions with a contrasting degree of urbanisation and vicinity to point sources (Flanders in Belgium versus Normandy in France). Both tissues (muscle, liver, adipose and preen gland) and feathers (primary, tail and body feathers) showed elevated HBCD concentrations in Flanders, close to Europe's sole HBCD production plant in the Netherlands, and identified Normandy as a historical source region for PBDEs. In sharp contrast, the reactive BFR TBBPA bioaccumulated poorly (2.3%) in tissue samples, but was present in 96% of all body feather samples (0.36-7.07ngg(-1)dw), equally in both regions. PBDE concentrations in tissues (7.46-903 ng g(-1)lw) were considerably lower in the investigated Flemish Barn Owls, collected in 2008/2009, compared to specimens collected in 2003/2004 (46-11,000 ng g(-1)lw), possibly suggesting the effectiveness of the 2004 European ban of Penta- and Octa-BDE mixtures. Feathers showed a similar trend and additionally exhibited HBCD concentrations (0.02-333 ng g(-1)dw) surpassing those of PBDEs (0.50-10.4 ng g(-1)dw). While body feathers were a reliable matrix to predict both internal PBDE (0.21 ≤ R(2)≤ 0.67) and HBCD body burdens (0.20 ≤ R(2) ≤ 0.37), the suitability of primary and tail feathers appeared to be confounded by external contamination and moult. In conclusion, the present study clearly showed that the reactive versus additive use of BFRs results in contrasting exposure scenarios in a species higher up the food chain, and therefore may have profound implications for environmental health. In addition, the presented results extend the promising use of feathers as a non-destructive sampling strategy for current-use BFRs, and show that birds of prey are valid early

  20. Brominated flame retardants and organochlorine compounds in duplicate diet samples from a Portuguese academic community.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Sónia D; Sousa, Ana C A; Isobe, Tomohiko; Kunisue, Tatsuya; Nogueira, António J A; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2016-10-01

    Concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDDs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCHs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), chlordane compounds (CHLs) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs), were measured in duplicate diet samples from 21 volunteers at a Portuguese academic community (University of Aveiro). Overall, the levels of the target compounds were low, with detection frequencies varying widely depending on the compounds and with brominated flame retardants (BFRs) registering the lowest detection frequencies. Among PCB congeners, nondioxin-like PCBs were predominant and detected in the majority of the samples. Organochlorine pesticides were also detected in the majority of the samples, with 100% detection for DDTs and HCHs. Estimated daily intakes (EDIs) were calculated using lower and upper bound estimations, and in both cases values were far below the currently established tolerable daily intakes for PCBs and OCs and the reference doses for PBDEs and HBCDDs. PMID:27367176

  1. Distribution of copper, silver and gold during thermal treatment with brominated flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Oleszek, Sylwia; Grabda, Mariusz; Shibata, Etsuro; Nakamura, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    The growing consumption of electric and electronic equipment results in creating an increasing amount of electronic waste. The most economically and environmentally advantageous methods for the treatment and recycling of waste electric and electronic equipment (WEEE) are the thermal techniques such as direct combustion, co-combustion with plastic wastes, pyrolysis and gasification. Nowadays, this kind of waste is mainly thermally treated in incinerators (e.g. rotary kilns) to decompose the plastics present, and to concentrate metals in bottom ash. The concentrated metals (e.g. copper, precious metals) can be supplied as a secondary raw material to metal smelters, while the pyrolysis of plastics allows the recovery of fuel gases, volatilising agents and, eventually, energy. Indeed, WEEE, such as a printed circuit boards (PCBs) usually contains brominated flame retardants (BFRs). From these materials, hydrobromic acid (HBr) is formed as a product of their thermal decomposition. In the present work, the bromination was studied of copper, silver and gold by HBr, originating from BFRs, such as Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) and Tetrabromobisphenol A-Tetrabromobisophenol A diglycidyl ether (TTDE) polymer; possible volatilization of the bromides formed was monitored using a thermo-gravimetric analyzer (TGA) and a laboratory-scale furnace for treating samples of metals and BFRs under an inert atmosphere and at a wide range of temperatures. The results obtained indicate that up to about 50% of copper and silver can evolve from sample residues in the form of volatile CuBr and AgBr above 600 and 1000°C, respectively. The reactions occur in the molten resin phase simultaneously with the decomposition of the brominated resin. Gold is resistant to HBr and remains unchanged in the residue. PMID:23746984

  2. Breast cancer among women in Michigan following exposure to brominated flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Terrell, Metrecia L; Rosenblatt, Karin A; Wirth, Julie; Cameron, Lorraine L; Marcus, Michele

    2016-08-01

    In this updated follow-up, we investigated the breast cancer experience among women in Michigan exposed to brominated flame retardants, some 30 years following exposure. Michigan residents were enrolled in a study cohort after exposure to polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) through the consumption of contaminated food products. PBB concentrations were measured in serum at the time of enrolment. Cancer experience was determined by linkage to the Michigan Cancer Registry. We conducted a nested case-control study that included 51 women diagnosed with breast cancer during 1974-2004 and 202 age-matched controls. While the data suggest an increase in breast cancer risk with higher PBB exposure, this did not reach statistical significance. The OR of having breast cancer among women with PBB concentrations ≥10 ng/mL compared to women with PBB concentrations at or below the limit of detection of 1 ng/mL was 2.60, 95% CI 0.93 to 7.27, (p=0.07), when adjusted for age and family history of cancer in a first-degree female relative. It remains important to examine exposure to brominated chemicals and possible health effects, and to continue following the cancer experience of participants in this study. PMID:27312402

  3. Determination of brominated flame retardants in Jukskei River catchment area in Gauteng, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Olukunle, O I; Okonkwo, O J; Kefeni, K K; Lupankwa, M

    2012-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are considered to be environmental pollutants due to their toxicity, persistence and ubiquity in the environment. Little information is known about the presence of brominated flame retardants in South Africa's water systems. Therefore, this study examined and compared different extraction methods (liquid-liquid (LL) vs. solid phase (SP) for water, Soxhlet extraction (SE) vs. ultrasonic for sediment) for extraction efficiencies in the determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) in water and sediment from Jukskei River. Clean-up of sample extracts was performed using disposable Pasteur pipettes containing neutral, acidified and basic silica gel. Final extracts, after concentration and dilution to 200 μL were analyzed by injecting 1 μL in the GC-ECD and GC-MS. Results obtained showed good recoveries for most of the tested analytes in water; for LLE, values ranged between 80.5 ± 10.22% and 126.6 ± 1.94%; SPE, 70.41 ± 2.01%-124.78 ± 3.78% (n = 3) and for sediment (73-114%, with an RSD <17%) using SE. The ultrasonic extraction method gave less than 50% recovery for most of the congeners. The concentrations of the BFRs in water samples were less than the detection limit while the concentrations in sediment ranged from 1.95 to 36.61 ng g(-1) dry weight for Σ(11) BFRs. Dichloromethane and n-hexane : acetone (2 : 1, v/v) gave optimum value of recovery for water and sediment respectively. PMID:22277235

  4. Exposure of Female Rats to an Environmentally Relevant Mixture of Brominated Flame Retardants Targets the Ovary, Affecting Folliculogenesis and Steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Pavine L C; Berger, Robert G; Ernest, Sheila R; Gaertner, Dean W; Rawn, Dorothea F K; Wade, Michael G; Robaire, Bernard; Hales, Barbara F

    2016-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are incorporated into various consumer products to prevent flame propagation. These compounds leach into the domestic environment, resulting in chronic exposure and contamination. Pregnancy failure is associated with high levels of BFRs in human follicular fluid, raising serious questions regarding their impact on female reproductive health. The goal of this study is to elucidate the effects of an environmentally relevant BFR mixture on female rat ovarian functions (i.e., folliculogenesis and steroidogenesis). A BFR dietary mixture formulated to mimic the relative BFR congener levels in North American house dust was administered to adult female Sprague-Dawley rats from 2 to 3 wk before mating until Gestational Day 20; these diets were designed to deliver nominal doses of 0, 0.06, 20, or 60 mg/kg/day of the BFR mixture. Exposure to BFRs triggered an approximately 50% increase in the numbers of preantral and antral follicles and an enlargement of the antral follicles in the ovaries of the dams. A significant reduction in the expression of catalase, an antioxidant enzyme, and downregulation of the expression of insulin-like factor 3 (Insl3) and 17alpha-hydroxylase (Cyp17a1) were observed in the ovary. In addition, BFR exposure affected steroidogenesis; we observed a significant decrease in circulating 17-hydroxypregnenolone and an increase in testosterone concentrations in BFR-exposed dams. Thus, BFRs target ovarian function in the rat, adversely affecting both folliculogenesis and steroidogenesis. PMID:26607716

  5. A polymeric flame retardant additive for rubbers

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.N.; Maiti, S.

    1993-12-31

    Synthesis of a polyphosphonate by the interfacial polymerization of bisphenol-A (BPA) and dichloro-phenyl phosphine oxide (DCPO) using cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (TMAC) as phase transfer catalyst (PTC) was reported. The polyphosphonate was characterized by elemental analysis, IR, TGA, DSC and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. The flame retardancy of the polymer was done by OI study. The polymer was used as a fire retardant additive to rubbers such as natural rubber (NR), styrene-butadiene rubber(SBR), nitrile rubber (NBR) and chloroprene rubber (CR). The efficiency of the fire retardant property of this additive was determined by LOI measurements of the various rubber samples.

  6. Brominated flame retardants in the indoor environment - Comparative study of indoor contamination from three countries.

    PubMed

    Venier, Marta; Audy, Ondřej; Vojta, Šimon; Bečanová, Jitka; Romanak, Kevin; Melymuk, Lisa; Krátká, Martina; Kukučka, Petr; Okeme, Joseph; Saini, Amandeep; Diamond, Miriam L; Klánová, Jana

    2016-09-01

    Concentrations of more than 20 brominated flame retardants (FRs), including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and emerging FRs, were measured in air, dust and window wipes from 63 homes in Canada, the Czech Republic and the United States in the spring and summer of 2013. Among the PBDEs, the highest concentrations were generally BDE-209 in all three matrices, followed by Penta-BDEs. Among alternative FRs, EHTBB and BEHTBP were detected at the highest concentrations. DBDPE was also a major alternative FR detected in dust and air. Bromobenzenes were detected at lower levels than PBDEs and other alternative FRs; among the bromobenzenes, HBB and PBEB were the most abundant compounds. In general, FR levels were highest in the US and lowest in the Czech Republic - a geographic trend that reflects the flame retardants' market. No statistically significant differences were detected between bedroom and living room FR concentrations in the same house (n=10), suggesting that sources of FRs are widespread indoors and mixing between rooms. The concentrations of FRs in air, dust, and window film were significantly correlated, especially for PBDEs. We found a significant relationship between the concentrations in dust and window film and in the gas phase for FRs with log KOA values <14, suggesting that equilibrium was reached for these but not compounds with log KOA values >14. This hypothesis was confirmed by a large discrepancy between values predicted using a partitioning model and the measured values for FRs with log KOA values >14. PMID:27248661

  7. Brominated flame retardants in Chinese air before and after the phase out of polybrominated diphenyl ethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen-Long; Qi, Hong; Ma, Wan-Li; Liu, Li-Yan; Zhang, Zhi; Mohammed, Mohammed O. A.; Song, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Zifeng; Li, Yi-Fan

    2015-09-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs), including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and novel non-BDE flame retardants (NBFRs), were analyzed in Chinese air during China's POPs Soil and Air Monitoring Program Phase I (SAMP-I) and Phase II (SAMP-II). The levels of Σ12PBDEs and Σ6NBFRs in urban sites were significantly higher than those in rural sites and background sites. The higher detection rate and concentrations of high molecular weight PBDEs and NBFRs in Phase II indicated the changing of the commercial pattern of BFRs after the phase out of PBDEs in China. Temperature was the major factor affecting the seasonal variations of molecular weight BFRs in atmosphere. A significant correlation between BFRs concentration and gross domestic product (GDP) was observed, with the GDP parameter explained 59.4% and 72.7% of the total variability for Octa-BDEs and low molecular weight NBFRs, respectively. Our findings indicated an evolving commercial usage of BFRs from SAMP-I to SAMP-II, i.e. shifting from lower molecular weight to higher molecular weight congeners in China.

  8. Brominated flame retardants in matched serum samples from Swedish first-time mothers and their toddlers.

    PubMed

    Sahlström, Leena M O; Sellström, Ulla; de Wit, Cynthia A; Lignell, Sanna; Darnerud, Per Ola

    2014-07-01

    Tri-decabrominated diphenyl ethers and 21 other flame retardants were determined in matched serum samples from 24 Swedish mothers (Uppsala county) and their toddlers (11-15 months of age). The median concentrations of individual polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) ranged from 0.036 to 0.95 ng/g lipid in mothers and from 0.057 to 1.5 ng/g lipid in toddlers. BDE-209 was detected in all but one sample. BDE-153 was the predominant congener in the mothers while in toddlers, BDE-209 was found in the highest concentrations. The levels of BDE-47, -100, -207, -208, and -209 in toddlers were significantly higher (p < 0.05) than those in their mothers. Dechlorane Plus (anti- and syn-) and α- and β-tetrabromoethylcyclohexane were detected in a few (2-4) serum samples from both mothers and toddlers. This study also reports concentrations of α-HBCD and eight emerging brominated flame retardants (EBFRs) in the standard reference material serum (SRM 1958, NIST). Lack of correlations between the matched serum samples indicate different exposure routes for octa-decaBDEs in mothers versus toddlers. Congener-to-congener correlations within the mother or toddler cohorts suggest diet as an important exposure pathway for tetra-nonaBDEs for mothers, breastfeeding as a predominant exposure pathway for tetra-hexaBDEs, and dust for octa-decaBDEs for toddlers. PMID:24927135

  9. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and "novel" brominated flame retardants in house dust in Germany.

    PubMed

    Fromme, H; Hilger, B; Kopp, E; Miserok, M; Völkel, W

    2014-03-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are used in a wide variety of products such as electronic devices, upholstery and carpets and in insulation boards. The study presented here aimed to quantify the amounts of BFRs in house dust in Germany. For this purpose 20 residences' dust samples were collected from vacuum cleaner bags and analysed with LC-MS/MS and simultaneously with GC/MS. Using GC/MS, the median (95th percentile) concentrations of PBDEs (sum of tetra- to hepta-congeners), BDE 209, Σ-HBCD (sum of three congeners), and decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE) were 42ng/g (230ng/g), 950ng/g (3426ng/g), 335ng/g (1545ng/g), and 146ng/g (1059ng/g), respectively. Using LC-MS/MS some "novel" flame retardants were found in median concentrations of 343ng/g (bis(2-ethyl-1-hexyl)tetrabromophthalate, TBPH), and 28ng/g (tetrabromobisphenol A, TBBPA). Whilst 1,2-bis-(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) and 2-ethyl-1-hexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EH-TBB) could not be detected. Based on these measurements an exposure assessment for the sum of tetra- to heptabrominated congeners, BDE 209, and Σ-HBCD resulted in a "high" daily intake for toddlers (based on 95th percentiles) of 1.2ng/kg b.w., 0.69ng/kg b.w., and 8.9ng/kg b.w., respectively. For TBPH the "high" intake was calculated at 4.1ng/kg b.w. and for DBDPE at 5.3ng/kg b.w. A clear tendency was observed to apply "novel" BFRs in Germany. Moreover, the results suggest that the recent exposure to PBDEs and HBCD via house dust in Germany is well below the levels that are associated with health effects. For the "novel" brominated flame retardants such an assessment is not possible due to limited toxicological information. PMID:24368294

  10. Multi-residue method for the determination of brominated and organophosphate flame retardants in indoor dust.

    PubMed

    Van den Eede, Nele; Dirtu, Alin C; Ali, Nadeem; Neels, Hugo; Covaci, Adrian

    2012-01-30

    A new method was optimized for the simultaneous determination of several flame retardants (FRs) in indoor dust, namely polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs), novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) and organophosphate ester flame retardants (OPFRs). The method was based on two previously validated analytical methods for NBFRs and OPFRs, which were combined in order to include even a large number of FRs. An ultrasonic extraction method and two-stage clean-up by adsorption chromatography was optimized using an indoor dust standard reference material (SRM 2584). The 1st cleanup step was essential for fractionation of analytes in the dust extracts, while the 2nd step was important for the further removal of interferences. Analysis of cleaned dust extracts was performed with gas chromatography electron impact ionization mass spectrometry for OPFRs, gas chromatography electron capture negative ionization mass spectrometry for PBDEs and NBFRs and liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry for HBCDs. Method validation by matrix spiking demonstrated good accuracy ranging from 81 to 130%. Matrix effects were investigated by spiking sodium sulfate and dust with analyte standards. Typical recoveries ranged between 80 and 110% at both spiking levels, though occasional deviations were observed at low spiking concentrations. Precision between different days was generally below 24% relative standard deviation (RSD) at low concentrations and below 11% RSD at high concentrations. Method limits of quantification for BFRs ranged between 0.04 (BDE 28) and 17 ng/g (BDE 209), 6 ng/g for sum HBCDs, and for OPFRs between 10 (triphenyl phosphate) and 370 ng/g (tri-isobutyl phosphate). The method was applied to SRM 2585 and to a set of indoor dust samples from various countries. The newly developed method will be employed for the monitoring of human exposure via dust ingestion to phased-out and alternate FRs. PMID:22284495

  11. Associations between brominated flame retardants in house dust and hormone levels in men.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Paula I; Stapleton, Heather M; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Hauser, Russ; Meeker, John D

    2013-02-15

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are used in the manufacture of a variety of materials and consumer products in order to meet fire safety standards. BFRs may persist in the environment and have been detected in wildlife, humans and indoor dust and air. Some BFRs have demonstrated endocrine and reproductive effects in animals, but human studies are limited. In this exploratory study, we measured serum hormone levels and flame retardant concentrations [31 polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners and 6 alternate flame retardants] in house dust from men recruited through a US infertility clinic. PBDE congeners in dust were grouped by commercial mixtures (i.e. penta-, octa- and deca-BDE). In multivariable linear regression models adjusted by age and body mass index (BMI), significant positive associations were found between house dust concentrations of pentaBDEs and serum levels of free T4, total T3, estradiol, and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), along with an inverse association with follicle stimulating hormone (FSH). There were also positive associations of octaBDE concentrations with serum free T4, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone and an inverse association of decaBDE concentrations with testosterone. Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) was associated with decreased SHBG and increased free androgen index. Dust concentrations of bis-tribromophenoxyethane (BTBPE) and tetrabromo-diethylhexylphthalate (TBPH) were positively associated with total T3. These findings are consistent with our previous report of associations between PBDEs (BDE 47, 99 and 100) in house dust and hormone levels in men, and further suggest that exposure to contaminants in indoor dust may be leading to endocrine disruption in men. PMID:23333513

  12. Quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling on in vitro endocrine effects and metabolic stability involving 26 selected brominated flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Harju, Mikael; Hamers, Timo; Kamstra, Jorke H; Sonneveld, Edwin; Boon, Jan P; Tysklind, Mats; Andersson, Patrik L

    2007-04-01

    In this work, quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) were developed to aid human and environmental risk assessment processes for brominated flame retardants (BFRs). Brominated flame retardants, such as the high-production-volume chemicals polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), tetrabromobisphenol A, and hexabromocyclododecane, have been identified as potential endocrine disruptors. Quantitative structure-activity relationship models were built based on the in vitro potencies of 26 selected BFRs. The in vitro assays included interactions with, for example, androgen, progesterone, estrogen, and dioxin (aryl hydrocarbon) receptor, plus competition with thyroxine for its plasma carrier protein (transthyretin), inhibition of estradiol sulfation via sulfotransferase, and finally, rate of metabolization. The QSAR modeling, a number of physicochemical parameters were calculated describing the electronic, lipophilic, and structural characteristics of the molecules. These include frontier molecular orbitals, molecular charges, polarities, log octanol/water partitioning coefficient, and two- and three-dimensional molecularproperties. Experimental properties were included and measured for PBDEs, such as their individual ultraviolet spectra (200-320 nm) and retention times on three different high-performance liquid chromatography columns and one nonpolar gas chromatography column. Quantitative structure-activity relationship models based on androgen antagonism and metabolic degradation rates generally gave similar results, suggesting that lower-brominated PBDEs with bromine substitutions in ortho positions and bromine-free meta- and para positions had the highest potencies and metabolic degradation rates. Predictions made for the constituents of the technical flame retardant Bromkal 70-5DE found BDE 17 to be a potent androgen antagonist and BDE 66, which is a relevant PBDE in environmental samples, to be only a weak antagonist. PMID:17447568

  13. In vitro effects of brominated flame retardants and metabolites on CYP17 catalytic activity: A novel mechanism of action?

    SciTech Connect

    Canton, Rocio F. . E-mail: r.Fernandezcanton@iras.uu.nl; Sanderson, J. Thomas; Nijmeijer, Sandra; Bergman, Ake; Letcher, Robert J.; Berg, Martin van den

    2006-10-15

    Fire incidents have decreased significantly over the last 20 years due, in part, to regulations requiring addition of flame retardants (FRs) to consumer products. Five major classes of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are hexabromocyclododecane isomers (HBCDs), tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA) and three commercial mixtures of penta-, octa- and deca-polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners, which are used extensively as commercial FR additives. Furthermore, concentrations of PBDEs have been rapidly increasing during the 1999s in human breast milk and a number of endocrine effects have been reported. We used the H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cell line to assess possible effects of some of these BFRs (PBDEs and several of their hydroxylated (OH) and methoxylated (CH{sub 3}O) metabolites or analogues), TBBPA and brominated phenols (BPs) on the combined 17{alpha}-hydroxylase and 17,20-lyase activities of CYP17. CYP17 enzyme catalyzes an important step in sex steroidogenesis and is responsible for the biosynthesis of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and androstenedione in the adrenals. In order to study possible interactions with BFRs, a novel enzymatic method was developed. The precursor substrate of CYP17, pregnenolone, was added to control and exposed H295R cells, and enzymatic production of DHEA was measured using a radioimmunoassay. In order to avoid pregnenolone metabolism via different pathways, specific chemical inhibitor compounds were used. None of the parent/precursor BFRs had a significant effect (P < 0.05) on CYP17 activity except for BDE-183, which showed significant inhibition of CYP17 activity at the highest concentration tested (10 {mu}M), with no signs of cytotoxicity as measured by mitochondrial toxicity tests (MTT). A strong inhibition of CYP17 activity was found for 6-OH-2,2',4,4'-tetrabromoDE (6-OH-BDE47) with a concentration-dependent decrease of almost 90% at 10 {mu}M, but with a concurrent decrease in cell viability at the higher

  14. ENHANCED FORMATION OF CHLORINATED PICS BY THE ADDITION OF BROMINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A systematic series of experiments were performed on a pilot-scale rotary kiln incinerator simulator in which liquid surrogate wastes containing varied levels of chlorine and bromine were burned. The surrogate wastes used were a series of mixtures of methylene chloride and methyl...

  15. Brominated flame retardants and Dechloranes in European and American eels from glass to silver life stages.

    PubMed

    Sühring, Roxana; Byer, Jonathan; Freese, Marko; Pohlmann, Jan-Dag; Wolschke, Hendrik; Möller, Axel; Hodson, Peter V; Alaee, Mehran; Hanel, Reinhold; Ebinghaus, Ralf

    2014-12-01

    The populations of American (Anguilla rostrata) and European eels (Anguilla anguilla) have been declining rapidly in the last decades. Organic contaminants are suspected to be one of the possible causes for the decline; however, so far there have been few investigations of the uptake of specific compounds by different life cycle stages (e.g. freshwater or marine stage) and how the contamination patterns develop throughout the eel's life cycle. In the present study we measured concentrations of polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs), alternate brominated flame retardants (alternate BFRs) and Dechloranes (Decs) in different life stages of European and American eels to compare the contamination patterns and their development throughout the eel's life cycle. In general, concentrations of flame retardants (FRs) were similar to or higher in American than in European eels, and a greater number of FRs were detected. PBDE congeners that are characteristic of the Penta-PBDE formulation were the most abundant FRs in all adult eels as well as American glass eels. In European glass eels the alternate BFR 2,3-dibromopropyl-2,4,6-tribromophenylether (DPTE) and Dechlorane Plus were the dominating FRs, with average concentrations of 1.1±0.31 ng g(-1) ww and up to 0.32 ng g(-1) ww respectively. Of the PBDEs BDE-183 was the most abundant congener in European glass eels. Low concentrations (less than 10% of the total contamination) of Tetra and Penta-PBDEs in juvenile European eels indicated that bans of technical Penta-PBDE in the European Union are effective. Enrichment of PBDEs was observed over the life stages of both European and American eels. However, a greater relative contribution of PBDEs to the sum FR contamination in American eels indicated an on-going exposure to these substances. High contributions of alternate BFRs in juvenile eels indicated an increased use of these substances in recent years. Concentrations seemed to be driven primarily by location, rather than life

  16. IN VITRO EFFECTS OF BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANS ON CALCIUM BUFFERING MECHANISMS IN RAT BRAINS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely used as additive flame-retardants and have been detected in human blood, adipose tissue, and breast milk. Developmental and long-term exposures to these chemicals may pose a human health risk, especially to children. It has been d...

  17. Effects of brominated flame retardants on calcium buffering mechanisms in rat brain in vitro.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs; used as additive flame-retardants) have been detected in human blood, adipose tissue, and breast milk. Developmental and long-term exposures to these chemicals may pose a human health risk, especially to children. It has been demonstrated th...

  18. ENHANCED FORMATION OF DIOXINS AND FURANS FROM COMBUSTION DEVICES BY ADDITION OF TRACE QUANTITIES OF BROMINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Past pilot-scale experimental studies have shown a dramatic increase in the formation of certain chlorinated products of incomplete combustion (PICs) caused by the addition of trace amounts of bromine (Br). Emissions of trichloroethylene and tetrachloorethylene, generated as PICs...

  19. Brominated flame retardants (BFRs): A review on environmental contamination in China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Gang; Bu, Qingwei; Cao, Zhiguo; Du, Xinming; Xia, Jing; Wu, Min; Huang, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) which were detected extensively in environmental and biota samples worldwide, have raised significant concerns during past decades for their persistence, bioaccumulation and potential toxicity to ecological environment and human health. In this paper, we have compiled and reviewed existing literature on the contamination status of BFRs in abiotic and biotic environments in China, including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecane, tetrabromobisphenol A and new BFRs. Temporal trends were also summarized and evaluated. Based on this review, it has been concluded that (1) high concentrations of PBDEs were generally related to the e-waste disposal processing, while the spatial distribution pattern of other BFRs was not necessarily in accordance with this; (2) extremely high concentrations of BFRs in indoor dust emphasized the importance of indoor contamination to human body burdens, while more work need to be done to confirm its contribution; (3) PBDEs in electronics dismantling workers were higher compared to the general population, indicating the occupational exposure should be of particular concern; (4) more data are now becoming available for BFRs in aquatic and terrestrial organisms not previously studied, while studies that consider the occurrence of BFRs in organisms of different trophic levels are still of urgent need for evaluating the fate of BFRs in the food web; and (5) limited data showed a decreasing trend for PBDEs, while more data on time trends of BFR contamination in various matrices and locations are still needed before the impact of regulation of BFRs can be assessed. PMID:26725304

  20. Toxicity of brominated flame retardants, BDE-47 and BDE-99 stems from impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Pazin, Murilo; Pereira, Lilian Cristina; Dorta, Daniel Junqueira

    2015-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are used as flame retardants, and they have been detected in human blood, adipose tissue and breast milk, a consequence of their physicochemical and bioaccumulative properties, as well as their high environmental persistence. Many studies report liver toxicity related to exposure to PBDEs. In the present study, we investigated the toxicity of BDE-47 and BDE-99 at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 50 µM in isolated rat liver mitochondria. We evaluated how incubation of a mitochondrial suspension with the PBDEs affected the mitochondrial inner membrane, membrane potential, oxygen consumption, calcium release, mitochondrial swelling, and ATP levels to find out whether the tested compound interfered with the bioenergetics of this organelle. Both PBDEs were toxic to mitochondria: BDE-47 and BDE-99 concentrations equal to or higher than 25 and 50 µM, respectively, modified all the parameters used to assess mitochondrial bioenergetics, which culminated in ATP depletion. These effects stemmed from the ability of both PBDEs to cause Membrane Permeability Transition (MPT) in mitochondria, which impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics. In particular, BDE-47, which has fewer bromine atoms in the molecule, can easily overcome biological membranes what would be responsible for the major negative effects exerted by this congener when compared with BDE-99. PMID:25299509

  1. Determinants of brominated flame retardants in breast milk from a large scale Norwegian study.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Cathrine; Stigum, Hein; Frøshaug, May; Broadwell, Sharon L; Becher, Georg; Eggesbø, Merete

    2010-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs), particularly polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), are widely present in human populations. In order to investigate human exposure pathways and associations with socioeconomic and lifestyle factors, 393 breast milk samples from mothers living in various regions throughout Norway were analyzed. Up to ten PBDE congeners were measured in all the samples, hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and BDE-209 in subsets of 310 and 46, respectively. The median concentrations of the sum of the seven most prominent PBDEs (BDE-28, 47, 99, 100, 153, 154 and 183), BDE-209 and HBCD were 2.1, 0.32 and 0.86ng/g lipids, respectively. These concentrations are comparable to the levels generally observed in human populations in Europe. The frequency distributions were quite skewed with long tails towards higher concentrations. Maternal age, parity, education, having a cohabitant employed as electrician, and ventilation were factors significantly associated with some of the BFRs, although these factors only explained a small amount of the variability (R(2) 0.04-0.16). The mothers' diet was not found to influence the breast milk PBDE and HBCD levels. Our results show that sources other than the diet are important for the variability seen in breast milk BFR concentrations and that exposure from the indoor atmosphere should be emphasized in future studies. PMID:19889457

  2. Advances in enantioselective analysis of chiral brominated flame retardants. Current status, limitations and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Badea, Silviu-Laurentiu; Niculescu, Violeta Carolina; Ionete, Roxana-Elena; Eljarrat, Ethel

    2016-10-01

    Enantioselective analysis is a powerful tool for the discrimination of biotic and abiotic transformation processes of chiral environmental contaminants because their environmental biodegradation is mostly stereospecific. However, it is challenging when applied to new contaminants since enantioselective analysis methods are currently available only for a limited number of compounds. The enantioselective analysis of chiral novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) either using gas chromatography (GC) or liquid chromatography (LC) with various chiral stationary phases (CSP) coupled with various mass spectrometric techniques was extensively discussed. The elution order of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) enantiomers in chiral LC was reviewed using the experimental LC data combined also with predictions from a multi-mode Hamiltonian dynamics simulation model based on interaction energies of HBCD enantiomers with β-permethylated cyclodextrin. The further development of analytical methodologies for new chiral BFRs using advanced hyphenated analytical techniques, but also the next generation mass spectrometer analyzers (i.e. GC-Qrbitrap MS-MS, LC-Qrbitrap MS-MS), will contribute to a better characterization of the transformation pathways of chiral BFRs. PMID:27265736

  3. From Clothing to Laundry Water: Investigating the Fate of Phthalates, Brominated Flame Retardants, and Organophosphate Esters.

    PubMed

    Saini, Amandeep; Thaysen, Clara; Jantunen, Liisa; McQueen, Rachel H; Diamond, Miriam L

    2016-09-01

    The accumulation of phthalate esters, brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and organophosphate esters (OPEs) by clothing from indoor air and transfer via laundering to outdoors were investigated. Over 30 days cotton and polyester fabrics accumulated 3475 and 1950 ng/dm(2) ∑5phthalates, 65 and 78 ng/dm(2) ∑10BFRs, and 1200 and 310 ng/dm(2) ∑8OPEs, respectively. Planar surface area concentrations of OPEs and low molecular weight phthalates were significantly greater in cotton than polyester and similar for BFRs and high molecular weight phthalates. This difference was significantly and inversely correlated with KOW, suggesting greater sorption of polar compounds to polar cotton. Chemical release from cotton and polyester to laundry water was >80% of aliphatic OPEs (log KOW < 4), < 50% of OPEs with an aromatic structure, 50-100% of low molecular weight phthalates (log KOW 4-6), and < detection-35% of higher molecular weight phthalates (log KOW > 8) and BFRs (log KOW > 6). These results support the hypothesis that clothing acts an efficient conveyer of soluble semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) from indoors to outdoors through accumulation from air and then release during laundering. Clothes drying could as well contribute to the release of chemicals emitted by electric dryers. The results also have implications for dermal exposure. PMID:27507188

  4. Photochemical transformation of five novel brominated flame retardants: Kinetics and photoproducts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-Nan; Chen, Jingwen; Xie, Qing; Li, Yingjie; Zhou, Chengzhi

    2016-05-01

    Many novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) are used as substitutes of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in recent years. However, little is known about their phototransformation behavior, which may influence the environmental fate of these chemicals. In this study, photochemical behavior of five NBFRs, allyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (ATE), 2-bromoallyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (BATE), 2,3-dibromopropyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (DPTE), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), and 2,4,6-tris(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)-1,3,5-triazine (TTBP-TAZ) was investigated. Results show all the five NBFRs can undergo photochemical transformation under simulated sunlight irradiation. Quantum yields (Φ) of the five NBFRs varied from 0.012 of TTBP-TAZ in hexane to 0.091 of BTBPE in methanol. Half-lives (t1/2) relevant with solar irradiation of these NBFRs were estimated using the determined Φ, and the values are 1.5-12.0 d in summer and 17.1-165.0 d in winter. Debrominated and ether bond cleavage products were identified in the phototransformation of DPTE and BTBPE. Debromination on the phenyl is a main phototransformation pathway for DPTE, and both debromination and ether bond cleavage are main phototransformation pathways for BTBPE. This study is helpful to better understand the phototransformation behavior of the NBFRs. PMID:26796587

  5. Chemical characterization of brominated flame retardants and identification of structurally representative compounds.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Patrik L; Oberg, Kjell; Orn, Ulrika

    2006-05-01

    Three training sets were selected, each consisting of 10 structurally diverse compounds representative of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) that are either in use or have been used. Just three compounds account for nearly all the total production volume of BFRs. In the present study, however, the physicochemical characteristics of a far more structurally diverse set of 65 BFRs was explored using 15 molecular descriptors (including log P, constitutional counts, and semiempirical quantum mechanical parameters) and principal component analysis (PCA). The PCA generated an overview of the structural variation among BFRs, and certain compounds with unique physicochemical properties and specific clusters of compounds with distinct properties were identified. The training-set compounds were selected by applying the condensed information obtained from the PCA and statistical experimental design. The three training sets, which were designated as optimal, practical, and alternative, were selected either to maximize the structural variation (optimal) or to combine structural variation with practical advantages, such as ease of experimental handling and commercial availability (practical and alternative). Inclusion of the suggested compounds in assessments of the persistence, bioaccumulation, and toxicity properties of BFRs and related programs should help to increase our understanding of the effects and environmental fate of these compounds. PMID:16704058

  6. Occurrence of brominated flame retardants in household and car dust from the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Kalachova, K; Hradkova, P; Lankova, D; Hajslova, J; Pulkrabova, J

    2012-12-15

    The levels and profiles of 16 polybrominated diphenyl ethers congeners (PBDEs), three isomers of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and other six "alternative" brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in dust collected in 25 Czech households and 27 car interiors were investigated. The Σ16 PBDEs contents varied widely with maximum concentrations reaching up to 5896 and 33728 μg/kg in house and car dust, respectively. The highest concentrations of PBDEs were observed for BDE 209, which was found almost in all samples and exceeded concentrations of other PBDEs even by one order of magnitude. The profile and levels of Penta-, Octa-, and DecaBDE obtained within this study were comparable to those presented in other studies worldwide and confirmed lower contamination of dust from Europe compared to North America. From the group of "alternative" BFRs, suitable for commercial applications as an alternative to banned PBDEs, mainly decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and HBCD were detected in the concentration ranges <20-3567 and <0.3-950 μg/kg, respectively. γ-HBCD was dominating, forming up to 70% of ΣHBCD. Using the measured concentrations and estimates of dust ingestion rates it was estimated that toddlers had a higher exposure than adults for all compounds investigated. PMID:23137984

  7. Brominated Flame Retardants, Tetrabromobisphenol A and Hexabromocyclododecane, Activate Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs) in Human Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cato, Anita; Celada, Lindsay; Kibakaya, Esther Caroline; Simmons, Nadia; Whalen, Margaret M.

    2014-01-01

    NK cells provide a vital surveillance against virally infected cells, tumor cells, and antibody-coated cells through the release of cytolytic mediators and gamma interferon (IFN-γ). Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is a brominated flame retardant used primarily in expanded (EPS) and extruded (XPS) polystyrene foams for thermal insulation in the building and construction industry. Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is used both as a reactive and an additive flame retardant in a variety of materials. HBCD and TBBPA contaminate the environment and are found in human blood samples. In previous studies, we have shown that other environmental contaminants, such as the dibutyltin (DBT) and tributyltin (TBT), decrease NK lytic function by activating mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in the NK cells. HBCD and TBBPA also interfere with NK cell(s) lytic function. The current study evaluates whether HBCD and/or TBBPA have the capacity to activate MAPKs and MAPK kinases (MAP2Ks). The effects of concentrations of HBCD and TBBPA that inhibited lytic function on the phosphorylation state and total levels of the MAPKs (p44/42, p38, and JNK) and the phosphorylation and total levels of the MAP2Ks (MEK1/2 and MKK3/6) were examined. Results indicate that exposure of human NK cells to 10-0.5 µM HBCD or TBBPA activate MAPKs and MAP2Ks. This HBCD and TBBPA-induced activation of MAPKs may leave them unavailable for activation by virally infected or tumor target cells and thus contributes to the observed decreases in lytic function seen in NK cells exposed to HBCD and TBBPA. PMID:25341744

  8. Brominated flame retardants in the surrounding soil of two manufacturing plants in China: Occurrence, composition profiles and spatial distribution.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Long; Liu, Li-Yan; Zhang, Zi-Feng; Song, Wei-Wei; Huo, Chun-Yan; Qiao, Li-Na; Ma, Wan-Li; Li, Yi-Fan

    2016-06-01

    Surface soil samples were collected surrounding two brominated flame retardants (BFRs) manufacturing plants in China in August 2014 and analyzed for 23 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and 8 novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs). BDE209 and decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE) were the predominant compounds in soil with the median levels of 1600 and 560 ng/g dw, respectively. The PBDEs profiles in soil samples were consistent with that of commercial product (comDecaBDE). The percentage contributions to total PBDEs decreased from higher to lower brominated homologues. Lower concentrations of NBFRs (excluding DBDPE) were detected in soil surrounding the two plants, suggesting they are byproducts or degradation products of the manufacturing activities. The concentrations of most BFRs dropped exponentially within 3-5 km of the manufacturing plants, suggesting recent deposition of these compounds to the soil. Directional distribution indicated that PBDEs and DBDPE concentrations were highest in the north direction of Plants 1. Three-day air parcel forward trajectories confirmed that the air parcel was responsible for the higher concentration of BFRs in the soil of north direction of the plant. PMID:26874313

  9. Thermal decomposition of 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), a novel brominated flame retardant.

    PubMed

    Altarawneh, Mohammednoor; Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z

    2014-12-16

    1,2-Bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) is currently one of the most commonly applied novel brominated flame retardants. In this contribution, we analyze in detail the mechanisms pertinent to its thermal decomposition in view of analogous experimental findings. We demonstrate that a 1,3-hydrogen shift, leading to 2,4,6-tribromophenol (M9) and 1,3,5-tribromo-2-(vinyloxy)benzene (M10) molecules, dominates direct scission of O-CH2 bonds up to a temperature of ∼ 680 K. H atom abstraction from CH2 sites, followed by a fission of a C-C bond, produce a 2,4,6-tribromophenoxy radical (M2) and a M10 molecule. Bimolecular condensation reactions involving M2, M9, and M10 generate several congeners of brominated diphenyl ethers and their OH/OCHCH2 substituents, which serve as direct precursors for the formation of polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins. Reaction of M9 with a model compound of a hydrocarbon chain preferentially yields M2. Strong adsorption energy of the latter on a radical site of a hydrocarbon chain suggests that mechanisms such as Langmuir-Hinshelwood, Eley-Rideal, and Diels-Alder might be operating during the formation of PBDD/Fs from brominated flame retardants (BFRs). Reactions of alkyl primary/secondary radicals and diradical with the BTBPE molecule proceed via H abstraction from a -CH2- moiety. PMID:25340709

  10. Emissions of brominated flame retardants in Asia: consideration of its potential risk form the view point of the Norwegian regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Ryunosuke; Gerardo, Romeu; Gorbacheva, Tamara

    2010-05-01

    Flame retardants can be divided into two broad categories: additive or reactive, which can be further more divided into brominated or non-brominated sub-categories. These retardants are found in many commercial products such as computers, television sets, furniture, carpets, etc. They are of environmental concern due to their persistence, potential for bioaccumulation and widespread distribution via atmospheric transport, and possible adverse effects in wildlife and humans. Tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA) is mainly used in electrical and electronic appliances (circuit board in particular), and the application of TBBPA accounts for about two thirds of the global production of brominated flame retardant (BFR). The European Union Risk Assessment does not support the restriction of TBBPA: i.e. no risk is identified for the reactive use of TBBPA such as in epoxy resin used in circuit boards. By contrast, in 2007 Norway notified the World Trade Organization of its intention to prohibit 18 substances from consumer goods (Notification No. 2007/9016/N), called the Prohibition on Certain Hazardous Substances in Consumer Products (PoHS). TBBPA is listed in this prohibition list. Marine conservation is recognized as a key issue in Norwegian fishery management e.g. wastewater management in the framework of the North Sea Declarations. TBBPA is very water-soluble, and dimethyl-TBBPA is lipophilic and may accumulate in fat. TBBPA is not readily biodegradable and can have long-term effects in the aquatic environment. Norwegian examples are summarized: TBBPA was found in marine sediment samples from Tromsø harbor (northern Norway) and in Atlantic cod from Lofoten and Varanger; TBBPA has been detected in Norwegian peregrine falcon and golden eagle eggs; and TBBPA has been detected in the blood in the general population of Norway. From these viewpoints, it can be considered that Norway needs to strictly control TBBPA emissions. In recent times, Asia has emerged as one of the leading

  11. Selective pressurized liquid extraction of replacement and legacy brominated flame retardants from soil.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Thomas J; Morrison, Paul D; Ball, Andrew S; Clarke, Bradley O

    2016-08-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are a class of flame retardant registered as UN POPs due to their persistence in the environment, bioaccumulation potential and toxicity. Replacement novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) have exhibited similar health hazards and environmental distribution, becoming recognized as significant contaminants. This work describes the development and validation of a sensitive and reliable method for the simultaneous quantitation of PBDEs and NBFRs in environmental soil samples using selective pressurized liquid extraction (S-PLE) and gas chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-(EI)-MS/MS). Under optimal conditions, extraction of eight PBDEs (-28, -47, -99, -100, -153, -154, -183 and -209) and five NBFRs; pentabromotoluene (PBT), pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB), hexabromobenzene (HBB), 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EH-TBB) and bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) was performed at 100°C and 1500psi using a 1:1 mixture of hexane and dichloromethane. The method utilized 33mL capacity PLE cells containing, from bottom to top, a single cellulose filter, 3g activated Florisil, 6g acid silica (10% w/w), 3g Na2SO4, another cellulose filter, 2g activated copper powder and 3g soil sample dispersed in 2g Na2SO4 and 1g of Hydromatrix. The method was evaluated by repeated extraction and analysis of all analytes from 3g soil at three spike concentrations. Good recoveries were observed for most analytes at each of the spiking levels with RSD values generally below 20%. MDLs ranged from 0.01 to 4.8ng/g dw for PBDEs and 0.01-0.55ng/g dw for NBFRs. The described one-step combined extraction and cleanup method reduces sample processing times compared with traditional procedures, while delivering comparable analytical performance. The method was successfully applied to environmental soil samples (n=5), detecting PBDEs in each sample and providing the first account of NBFR contamination in Australian soils

  12. Brominated flame retardants in offices in Michigan, U.S.A.

    PubMed Central

    Batterman, Stuart; Godwin, Christopher; Chernyak, Sergei; Jia, Chunrong; Charles, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are now ubiquitous contaminants with large reservoirs and high concentrations in buildings. Most of the information documenting BFR levels has been obtained in residences, and other environments that can lead to exposure have received relatively little attention, including offices that contain numerous BFR sources and where individuals spend considerable time. The aim of this study is to characterize BFR concentrations, potential emission sources, and migration pathways in office environments. We measure BFR levels in floor dust, indoor air, ventilation filter dust, and carpets in ten commercial and institutional buildings in Michigan, U.S.A. The median concentration of total BDEs in settled dust was 8754 ng g−1, at the upper range of levels previously reported. Especially elevated levels were found in offices in buildings that contained known or likely BFR sources, e.g., computer servers. A trends analysis in a newly constructed building showed remarkable increases in concentrations of BFRs in settled dust and indoor air, and apparent steady-state levels were reached 5 to 8 months after building completion, a particularly striking finding given that the building was constructed and furnished several years after the voluntary phase-out of the penta- and octa-mixtures. Airborne particulate matter collected in a building's HVAC system filters contained PBDEs, including BDE-209, at levels exceeding the concentration of floor dust. In conjunction with estimates of building air flow rates, filter efficiency and other parameters, mass balance calculations for this building were used to estimate the emission rates and reservoirs of PBDEs. The widespread distribution of BFRs found in offices in both new and old buildings suggests the significance of workplace exposures, the need for controls to minimize human exposure, intra-building migration, and environmental releases of these chemicals, and the need for monitoring in new buildings

  13. Measurements of Selected Brominated Flame Retardants in Nursing Women: Implications for Human Exposure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We have examined several emerging brominated flame retardants (BFRs) including 2-ethyl-1-hexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (TBB), bis(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (TBPH), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane (BTBPE), 4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1,1,3-trimethyl-3-(2,3,4,5-tetrabromophenyl)-indane (OBIND), and decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) in paired human maternal serum (n = 102) and breast milk (n = 105) collected in 2008–2009 in the Sherbrooke region in Canada. Three legacy BFRs were also included in the study for comparison: decabromobiphenyl (BB-209), 2,2′,4,4′,5,5′-hexabromobiphenyl (BB-153), and 2,2′,4,4′,5,5′-hexabromodiphenyl ethers (BDE-153). TBB, BB-153, and BDE-153 had detection frequencies greater than 55% in both serum and milk samples. Their lipid weight (lw) adjusted median concentrations (ng g–1 lw) in serum and milk were 1.6 and 0.41 for TBB, 0.48 and 0.31 for BB-153, and 1.5 and 4.4 for BDE-153, respectively. The detection frequencies for the other BFRs measured in serum and milk were 16.7% and 32.4% for TBPH, 3.9% and 0.0% for BTBPE, 2.0% and 0.0% for BB-209, 9.8% and 1.0% for OBIND, and 5.9% and 8.6% for DBDPE. The ratio of TBB over the sum of TBB and TBPH (fTBB) in serum (0.23) was lower than that in milk (0.46), indicating TBB has a larger tendency than TBPH to be redistributed from blood to milk. Overall, these data confirm the presence of non-PBDE BFRs in humans, and the need to better understand their sources, routes of exposure, and potential human health effects. PMID:24992303

  14. Inhibition of thyroid hormone sulfotransferase activity by brominated flame retardants and halogenated phenolics.

    PubMed

    Butt, Craig M; Stapleton, Heather M

    2013-11-18

    Many halogenated organic contaminants (HOCs) are considered endocrine disruptors and affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, often by interfering with circulating levels of thyroid hormones (THs). We investigated one potential mechanism for TH disruption, inhibition of sulfotransferase activity. One of the primary roles of TH sulfation is to support the regulation of biologically active T3 through the formation of inactive THs. We investigated TH sulfotransferase inhibition by 14 hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH BDEs), BDE 47, triclosan, and fluorinated, chlorinated, brominated, and iodinated analogues of 2,4,6-trihalogenated phenol and bisphenol A (BPA). A new mass spectrometry-based method was also developed to measure the formation rates of 3,3'-T2 sulfate (3,3'-T2S). Using pooled human liver cytosol, we investigated the influence of these HOCs on the sulfation of 3,3'-T2, a major substrate for TH sulfation. For the formation of 3,3'-T2S, the Michaelis constant (Km) was 1070 ± 120 nM and the Vmax was 153 ± 6.6 pmol min(-1) (mg of protein)(-1). All chemicals investigated inhibited sulfotransferase activity with the exception of BDE 47. The 2,4,6-trihalogenated phenols were the most potent inhibitors followed by the OH BDEs and then halogenated BPAs. The IC50 values for the OH BDEs were primarily in the low nanomolar range, which may be environmentally relevant. In silico molecular modeling techniques were also used to simulate the binding of OH BDE to SULT1A1. This study suggests that some HOCs, including antimicrobial chemicals and metabolites of flame retardants, may interfere with TH regulation through inhibition of sulfotransferase activity. PMID:24089703

  15. Brominated flame retardants - Exposure and risk assessment for the general population.

    PubMed

    Fromme, H; Becher, G; Hilger, B; Völkel, W

    2016-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are a large group of different substances used in numerous products to prevent fire hazards. Some of them are persistent in the environment, accumulate in the food chain and are of toxicological concern, while for others current data are limited. Meanwhile, BFRs have been found in many environmental media, foods, and biota including humans. This review presents recent findings obtained from monitoring data in environmental media relevant for human exposure, as well as dietary exposure. In this context, concentrations in indoor and ambient air and in house dust are outlined. Furthermore, we summarize human biomonitoring data on BFR levels in blood and breast milk. Current estimates of the overall exposure of the general population using different relevant subsets are also addressed. All of these data are discussed in relation to currently available toxicological reference values used for risk assessment purposes. Obviously, the exposure of the general population varies considerably in different parts of the world and even within countries. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) show the highest intake during infancy. While the highest intake for BDE 47 for all groups was observed in the US, the total BDE 209 and HBCD intake was highest in the UK. For HBCD and all PBDEs except BDE 209, diet accounts for a large proportion of the total intake during infancy in all countries. With regard to toddlers and adults, the contribution of diet to total intake is high in Germany and the UK, while in the US, the high concentrations of PBDE in dust resulted in a notably smaller proportion of the intake being attributed to diet. PMID:26412400

  16. Emerging and historical brominated flame retardants in peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus) eggs from Canada and Spain.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Paula; Alaee, Mehran; Jiménez, Begoña; Pacepavicius, Grazina; Marvin, Chris; MacInnis, Gordia; Eljarrat, Ethel; Barceló, Damià; Champoux, Louise; Fernie, Kim

    2012-04-01

    Comparisons of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in the eggs of peregrine falcons (Falco peregrinus) recently collected (2003-2007), are made between Canada (N=12) and Spain (N=13). Overall, concentrations of sum (Σ) polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs; 16 di-deca-BDE congeners) exceeded Σhexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and were an order of magnitude higher than 2,2'4,4',5,5'-hexabromobiphenyl (BB-153)>hexachlorocyclopentenyl-dibromocyclooctane (HCBDCO)>1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE)>decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE)>octabromotrimethylphenyllindane (OBIND)>hexabromobenzene (HBB)>bis(2-ethyl-1hexyl)tetrabromophthalate (BEHTBP). This is the first report of detectable HBCDCO and BEHTBP concentrations in biota, and the highest in ovo concentration of ∑HBCD (14,617 ng/glw; Montreal, Canada) to date. There were significantly greater egg concentrations of BB-153, ΣHBCD, and ΣPBDE including BDE-153, -99, -100 and -183, in Canadian than Spanish peregrines with a terrestrial diet. HBB, BTBPE, and OBIND were detected in eggs from both countries, but only Canadian peregrine eggs had detectable levels of HCDBCO (25%) and DBDPE (N=1). The in ovo PBDE congener profile was dominated by BDE-153>BDE-99>BDE-47>BDE-183>BDE-100>BDE-209, with the isomeric HBCD pattern being α-HBCD>γ-HBCD (β-HBCD undetected). The Canadian peregrine eggs had lower enantiomeric HBCD values consistent with their higher fractions of (-) α-HBCD, suggesting selective enantiomeric enrichment or that the (+) α-isomer is more readily metabolized and so deposited in the egg through maternal transfer. Continental differences in egg burdens of peregrines are discussed relative to BFR usage patterns and exposure of peregrines on their breeding grounds. PMID:21862134

  17. Geographical distribution of non-PBDE-brominated flame retardants in mussels from Asian coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Tomohiko; Ogawa, Shohei P; Ramu, Karri; Sudaryanto, Agus; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2012-09-01

    Hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane (BTBPE), and decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) used as alternatives for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are also persistent in the environment as PBDEs. Limited information on these non-PBDE brominated flame retardants (BFRs) is available; in particular, there are only few publications on environmental pollution by these contaminants in the coastal waters of Asia. In this regard, we investigated the contamination status of HBCDs, BTBPE, and DBDPE in the coastal waters of Asia using mussels as a bioindicator. Concentrations of HBCDs, BTBPE, and DBDPE were determined in green (Perna viridis) and blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) collected from the coastal areas in Cambodia, China (mainland), SAR China (Hong Kong), India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, and Vietnam on 2003-2008. BTBPE and DBDPE were analyzed using GC-MS, whereas HBCDs were determined by LC-MS/MS. HBCDs, BTBPE, and DBDPE were found in mussels at levels ranging from <0.01 to 1,400, <0.1 to 13, and <0.3 to 22 ng/g lipid wt, respectively. Among the three HBCD diastereoisomers, α-HBCD was the dominant isomer followed by γ- and β-HBCDs. Concentrations of HBCDs and DBDPE in mussels from Japan and Korea were higher compared to those from the other Asian countries, indicating extensive usage of these non-PBDE BFRs in Japan and Korea. Higher levels of HBCDs and DBDPE than PBDEs were detected in some mussel samples from Japan. The results suggest that environmental pollution by non-PBDE BFRs, especially HBCDs in Japan, is ubiquitous. This study provides baseline information on the contamination status of these non-PBDE BFRs in the coastal waters of Asia. PMID:22875421

  18. Fate and metabolism of the brominated flame retardant tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) in rice cell suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Songfeng; Cao, Siqi; Wang, Yongfeng; Jiang, Bingqi; Wang, Lianhong; Sun, Feifei; Ji, Rong

    2016-07-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is the brominated flame retardant with the highest production volume and its bioaccumulation in environment has caused both human health and environmental concerns, however the fate and metabolism of TBBPA in plants is unknown. We studied the fate, metabolites, and transformation of (14)C-labeled TBBPA in rice cell suspension culture. During the incubation for 14 days, TBBPA degradation occurred continuously in the culture, accompanied by formation of one anisolic metabolite [2,6-dibromo-4-(2-(2-hydroxy)-propyl)-anisole] (DBHPA) (50% of the degraded TBBPA) and cellular debris-bound residues (46.4%) as well as mineralization (3.6%). The cells continuously accumulated TBBPA in the cytoplasm, while a small amount of DBHPA (2.1% of the initially applied TBBPA) was detectable inside the cells only at the end of incubation. The majority of the accumulated residues in the cells was attributed to the cellular debris-bound residues, accounting for 70-79% of the accumulation after the first incubation day. About 5.4% of the accumulation was associated with cell organelles, which contributed 7.5% to the cellular debris-bound residues. Based on the fate and metabolism of TBBPA in the rice cell suspension culture, a type II ipso-substitution pathway was proposed to describe the initial step for TBBPA degradation in the culture and balance the fate of TBBPA in the cells. To the best of our knowledge, our study provides for the first time the insights into the fate and metabolism of TBBPA in plants and points out the potential role of type II ipso-hydroxylation substitution in degradation of alkylphenols in plants. Further studies are required to reveal the mechanisms for the bound-residue formation (e.g., binding of residues to specific cell wall components), nature of the binding, and toxicological effects of the bound residues and DBHPA. PMID:27105166

  19. Occurrence of PBDEs and other alternative brominated flame retardants in sludge from wastewater treatment plants in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunggyu; Song, Geum-Ju; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Moon, Hyo-Bang

    2014-02-01

    Studies on the occurrence of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and other alternative brominated flame retardants in the environment are scarce. In this study, PBDEs and non-PBDE brominated flame retardants (NBFRs), including decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), were measured in sludge collected from three types of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Korea. Total concentrations of PBDEs (∑PBDE) in sludge ranged from 298 to 48,000 (mean: 3240) ng/g dry weight. Among 10 NBFRs analyzed, DBDPE and BTBPE were the only ones detected in sludge samples. Concentrations of DBDPE and BTBPE ranged from 1) of DBDPE/BDE 209 were found in sludge from I-WWTPs, reflecting a shift in the usage pattern of BFRs by the Korean industry. The nationwide annual emission fluxes of ∑PBDE, DBDPE and BTBPE via WWTPs to the environment were estimated to be 7400, 480, and 3.7 kg/year, respectively. This is the first study on the occurrence of alternative brominated flame retardants in sludge from Korea. PMID:23993837

  20. Novel analytical approach for brominated flame retardants based on the use of gas chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry with emphasis in highly brominated congeners.

    PubMed

    Portolés, Tania; Sales, Carlos; Gómara, Belén; Sancho, Juan Vicente; Beltrán, Joaquim; Herrero, Laura; González, María José; Hernández, Félix

    2015-10-01

    The analysis of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) commonly relies on the use of gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) operating in electron ionization (EI) and electron capture negative ionization (ECNI) modes using quadrupole, triple quadrupole, ion trap, and magnetic sector analyzers. However, these brominated contaminants are examples of compounds for which a soft and robust ionization technique might be favorable since they show high fragmentation in EI and low specificity in ECNI. In addition, the low limits of quantification (0.01 ng/g) required by European Commission Recommendation 2014/118/EU on the monitoring of traces of BFRs in food put stress on the use of highly sensitive techniques/methods. In this work, a new approach for the extremely sensitive determination of BFRs taking profit of the potential of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) combined with GC and triple quadrupole (QqQ) mass analyzer is proposed. The objective was to explore the potential of this approach for the BFRs determination in samples at pg/g levels, taking marine samples and a cream sample as a model. Ionization and fragmentation behavior of 14 PBDEs (congeners 28, 47, 66, 85, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183, 184, 191, 196, 197, and 209) and two novel BFRs, decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), in the GC-APCI-MS system has been investigated. The formation of highly abundant (quasi) molecular ion was the main advantage observed in relation to EI. Thus, a notable improvement in sensitivity and specificity was observed when using it as precursor ion in tandem MS. The improved detectability (LODs < 10 fg) achieved when using APCI compared to EI has been demonstrated, which is especially relevant for highly brominated congeners. Analysis of samples from an intercomparison exercise and samples from the marine field showed the potential of this approach for the reliable identification and quantification at very low

  1. Optimization and development of analytical methods for the determination of new brominated flame retardants and polybrominated diphenyl ethers in sediments and suspended particulate matter.

    PubMed

    López, P; Brandsma, S A; Leonards, P E G; de Boer, J

    2011-05-01

    With more stringent legislation on brominated flame retardants, it is expected that increasing amounts of substitutes would replace polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs). Therefore, the development and optimization of analytical methodologies that allow their identification and quantification are of paramount relevance. This work describes the optimization of an analytical procedure to determine pentabromochlorocyclohexane, tetrabromo-o-chlorotoluene, 2,3,5,6-tetrabromo-p-xylene, tetrabromophthalic anhydride, 2,3,4,5,6-pentabromotoluene, tris(2,3-dibromopropyl)phosphate, decabromodiphenylethane and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane together with PBDEs in sediments and in suspended particulate matter. This method comprises a pressurized liquid extraction followed by three cleanup steps (gel permeation chromatography and solid phase extraction on Oasis™ HLB and on silica cartridges). Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, using electron capture negative chemical ionization, is used for the final analysis. The proposed method provides recoveries >85%. The method was applied to sediment and suspended particulate matter samples from different locations in the Western Scheldt estuary (the Netherlands). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the occurrence of the additive flame retardants 2,3,5,6-tetrabromo-p-xylene, 3,4,5,6-tetrabromo-o-chlorotoluene and 2,3,4,5,6-pentabromochlorocyclohexane is reported in the literature. The concentrations of these new flame retardants ranged from 0.05 to 0.30 μg/kg dry weight. PMID:21369755

  2. Physical-chemical properties and evaluative fate modelling of 'emerging' and 'novel' brominated and organophosphorus flame retardants in the indoor and outdoor environment.

    PubMed

    Liagkouridis, Ioannis; Cousins, Anna Palm; Cousins, Ian T

    2015-08-15

    Several groups of flame retardants (FRs) have entered the market in recent years as replacements for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), but little is known about their physical-chemical properties or their environmental transport and fate. Here we make best estimates of the physical-chemical properties and undertake evaluative modelling assessments (indoors and outdoors) for 35 so-called 'novel' and 'emerging' brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and 22 organophosphorus flame retardants (OPFRs). A QSPR (Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship) based technique is used to reduce uncertainty in physical-chemical properties and to aid property selection for modelling, but it is evident that more, high quality property data are required for improving future assessments. Evaluative modelling results show that many of the alternative FRs, mainly alternative BFRs and some of the halogenated OPFRs, behave similarly to the PBDEs both indoors and outdoors. These alternative FRs exhibit high overall persistence (Pov), long-range transport potential (LRTP) and POP-like behaviour and on that basis cannot be regarded as suitable replacements to PBDEs. A group of low molecular weight alternative BFRs and non-halogenated OPFRs show a potentially better environmental performance based on Pov and LRTP metrics. Results must be interpreted with caution though since there are significant uncertainties and limited data to allow for thorough model evaluation. Additional environmental parameters such as toxicity and bioaccumulative potential as well as functionality issues should be considered in an industrial substitution strategy. PMID:25933174

  3. Estimation of human percutaneous uptake for two novel brominated flame retardants, 2-ethylhexyl tetrabromobenzoate (TBB) and bis(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (TBPH) using the parallelogram method

    EPA Science Inventory

    2-ethylhexyl- tetrabromobenzoate (TBB) and bis(2-ethylhexyl)-tetrabromobenzoate (TBPH) are novel brominated flame retardants (FRs). TBPH is used as a plasticizer or with TBB in polyurethane foam FRs. TBB & TBPH have been detected in both indoor and outdoor environmental sampl...

  4. Brominated flame retardant levels in human milk and serum from MAMA study participants: Correlations over time, matrix, and with questionnaire results

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are synthetic, lipophilic, and bioaccumulative compounds used to prevent the combustion of a variety of items including electronics and furniture. There are 75 classes of BFRs, two of which are the polybrominated biphenyls (PBB) and the polybrom...

  5. The NBS Reaction: A Simple Explanation for the Predominance of Allylic Substitution over Olefin Addition by Bromine at Low Concentrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wamser, Carl C.; Scott, Lawrence T.

    1985-01-01

    Examines mechanisms related to use of N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) for bromination at an allylic position. Also presents derived rate laws for three possible reactions of molecular bromine with an alkene: (1) free radical substitution; (2) free radical addition; and (3) electrophilic addition. (JN)

  6. Occurrence and sources of brominated and organophosphorus flame retardants in dust from different indoor environments in Barcelona, Spain.

    PubMed

    Cristale, Joyce; Hurtado, Alba; Gómez-Canela, Cristian; Lacorte, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the simultaneous presence of eight polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), nine new brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) and ten organophosphorus flame retardants (OPFRs) was investigated in dust samples collected from different indoor environments (homes, schools, theatres, a university and a Research Institute) in Barcelona, Spain. OPFRs were detected at the highest concentrations followed by PBDEs. ∑OPFRs ranged from 2053 to 72,090ngg(-1) and tris(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCIPP) was the most abundant compound. BDE-209 was the main PBDE congener detected (up to 14,990ngg(-1)), while other PBDEs ranged from 2.6 to 118ngg(-1). Among the studied NBFRs, decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE - up to 4432ngg(-1)) followed by bis(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (BEH-TEBP - up to 508ngg(-1)) were detected at the highest concentration, whereas a lower detection frequency was observed for 2-ethylhexyl 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EH-TBB), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), pentabromotoluene (PBT) and hexabromobenzene (HBB). The levels and profile of flame retardants (FRs) were characteristic of each environment, where theatres followed by homes presented the highest concentrations and schools had the lowest levels. Principal Component Analysis permitted to identify the main sources and distribution of all FRs, according to specific uses in each environment. The simultaneous presence of all FR families in indoor dust points to the need to monitor these compounds to minimize human exposure. PMID:27179204

  7. Rapid identification of polystyrene foam wastes containing hexabromocyclododecane or its alternative polymeric brominated flame retardant by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schlummer, Martin; Vogelsang, Jörg; Fiedler, Dominik; Gruber, Ludwig; Wolz, Gerd

    2015-07-01

    The brominated flame retardant hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD) was added to Annex A of the list of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) of the Stockholm Convention. Thus, production and use of HBCDD will be banned, and the recycling of HBCDD-containing foam waste will be restricted. In reaction a special polymeric brominated flame retardant (PolyFR) was developed to replace HBCDD in expanded and extruded polystyrene foams for building and construction applications. A decision has to be made at some future time whether expanded and extruded polystyrene foam waste is to be subjected to incineration (with HBCDD) or to recycling (without HBCDD). Therefore, an appropriate and rapid field method is required to distinguish between foams containing HBCDD and foams free from HBCDD. Here we present a screening method for identifying HBCDD containing expanded and extruded polystyrene foams. The test principle is based on the fact that PolyFR (a brominated polymeric macromolecule) is not extractable whereas HBCDD (a low molecular weight substance) is extractable. Following rapid extraction of HBCDD the brominated flame retardant is identified and quantified via bromine analysis using a handheld X-ray fluorescence instrument. The method was applied successfully to 27 expanded and extruded polystyrene foam samples (foams and extruded polystyrene foam raw materials), which were provided without any information about the applied flame retardant. The presence of HBCDD was confirmed for all HBCDD-positive samples in the test. A robustness test revealed a high degree of correctness and a high repeatability for the test system: samples containing HBCDD and HBCDD-free samples were identified correctly with relative standard deviations of quantitative results below 14%. Moreover, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy test results agree well with HBCDD determinations performed in a laboratory with a gas chromatograph coupled to a flame ionisation detector. PMID:26123348

  8. Toughening reinforced epoxy composites with brominated polymeric additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, Z. (Inventor); Gilwee, W. J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Cured polyfunctional epoxy resins including tris(hydroxyphenyl)methane triglycidyl ether are toughened by addition of polybrominated polymeric additives having an EE below 1500 to the pre-cure composition. Carboxy-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber is optionally present in the pre-cure mixture as such or as a pre-formed copolymer with other reactants. Reinforced composites, particularly carbon-reinforced composites, of these resins are disclosed and shown to have improved toughness.

  9. Toughening reinforced epoxy composites with brominated polymeric additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, Z.; Gilwee, W. J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Cured polyfunctional epoxy resins including tris (hydroxyphenyl) methane triglycidyl ether are toughened by addition of polybrominated polymeric additives having an EE below 1500 to the pre-cure composition. Carboxy terminated butadiene acrylonitrile rubber is optionally present in the precure mixture as such or as a pre-formed copolymer with other reactants. Reinforced composites, particularly carbon reinforced composites, of these resins are disclosed and shown to have improved toughness.

  10. Variation in concentrations of organochlorines and brominated flame retardants among eggs in abandoned clutches of a terrestrial raptor.

    PubMed

    Bustnes, Jan O; Bangjord, Georg; Yoccoz, Nigel G

    2015-01-01

    Bird eggs are often used to measure various pollutants in monitoring programs. In protected species, however, it might only be possible to collect eggs abandoned by the parent birds. In order to assess the appropriateness of abandoned eggs for contaminant monitoring we examined intra-clutch variation in concentrations of 24 halogenated organic pollutants (16 organochlorines [OCs] and 8 brominated flame retardants) in six abandoned tawny owl (Strix aluco) clutches from central Norway. The variation among eggs within a clutch was low for nearly all compounds (intra-class correlation >0.9 both for lipid- and wet weight). This study suggests that abandoned eggs provide a relatively reliable measurement of lipophilic pollutants in clutches of terrestrial raptors such as the tawny owl. PMID:25463262

  11. METABOLISM OF BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS IN HUMAN ASTROCYTES AND EFFECTS ON THYROID HORMONE HOMEOSTASIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this proposed study, hydroxylated PBDEs and brominated phenols likely will be formed in astrocytes as a result of cytochrome p450-mediated metabolism. Previous studies have shown that polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) affect the regulation of thyroid hormones at the bloo...

  12. Effects of the brominated flame retardant TBCO on fecundity and profiles of transcripts of the HPGL-axis in Japanese medaka.

    PubMed

    Saunders, David M V; Podaima, Michelle; Wiseman, Steve; Giesy, John P

    2015-03-01

    The novel brominated flame retardant, 1,2,5,6-tetrabromocyclooctane (TBCO) is an additive flame retardant which is marketed under the trade name Saytex BCL-48. TBCO has recently been investigated as a potential alternative to the major use brominated flame retardant, hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), which could have major implications for significant increases in amounts of TBCO used. Yet there is a lack of information regarding potential toxicities of TBCO. Recently, results of in vitro experiments have demonstrated the potential of TBCO to modulate endocrine function through interaction with estrogen and androgen receptors and via alterations to the synthesis of 17-β-estradiol and testosterone. Further research is required to determine potential endocrine disrupting effects of TBCO in vivo. In this experiment a 21-day fecundity assay with Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) was conducted to examine endocrine disrupting effects of TBCO in vivo. Medaka were fed a diet containing either 607 or 58μg TBCO/g food, wet mass (wm). Fecundity, measured as cumulative deposition of eggs and fertilization of eggs, as well as abundances of transcripts of 34 genes along the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal-liver (HPGL) axis were measured as indicators of holistic endocrine disruption and to determine mechanisms of effects, respectively. Cumulative fecundity was 18% lesser by medaka exposed to 58μg TBCO/g, wm food. However, fecundity of medaka exposed to 607μg TBCO/g, wm food was not significantly different from that of controls. Organ-specific and dose-dependent alterations to abundances of transcripts were observed in male and female medaka. A pattern of down-regulation of expression of genes involved in steroidogenesis, metabolism of cholesterol, and regulatory feedback mechanisms was observed in gonads from male and female medaka which had been exposed to the greater concentration of TBCO. However, these effects on expression of genes were not manifested in effects on

  13. A novel brominated triazine-based flame retardant (TTBP-TAZ) in plastic consumer products and indoor dust.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros-Gómez, Ana; de Boer, Jacob; Leonards, Pim E G

    2014-04-15

    The presence of a novel brominated flame retardant named 2,4,6-tris(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)-1,3,5-triazine (TTBP-TAZ) is reported for the first time in plastic parts of consumer products and indoor dust samples. TTBP-TAZ was identified by untargeted screening and can be a replacement of the banned polybrominated diphenyl ethers. Analysis techniques based on ambient mass spectrometry and on liquid chromatography with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization combined with high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry were developed for the screening, detection and quantification of this low volatility and high molecular weight compound. TTBP-TAZ was present in 8 of 13 plastic parts of consumer products (from mainly electric and electronic equipment acquired in 2012) at estimated concentrations of 0.01-1.9% by weight of the product (%, w/w). It was not present in any of the older 13 plastic samples that were collected in a recycling park (manufacture date before 2006), this suggests a recent use of TTBP-TAZ. It was also found in 9 of 17 house dust samples in the range of 160-22150 ng g(-1), with the highest levels being found in samples collected on electronic and electrical equipment. These preliminary results highlight the need for further research on TTBP-TAZ and the potential of using alternative analysis methods for the identification of new flame retardants. PMID:24666318

  14. Brominated and organophosphate flame retardants in indoor dust of Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia: Implications for human exposure.

    PubMed

    Ali, Nadeem; Eqani, Syed Ali Musstjab Akber Shah; Ismail, Iqbal Mohammad Ibrahim; Malarvannan, Govindan; Kadi, Mohammad W; Albar, Hussain Mohammed Salem; Rehan, Mohammad; Covaci, Adrian

    2016-11-01

    Different flame retardants (FRs) namely polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), emerging brominated/chlorinated flame retardants (Br/Cl FRs), and organophosphate FRs (OPFRs) were analyzed in cars, air conditioner (AC) filters and floor dust of different households from Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). To the best of our knowledge, this is first study in literature reporting emerging Br/Cl FRs and OPFRs in AC filter dust and also first to report on their occurrence in dust from KSA. Chlorinated alkyl phosphate, penta-BDEs, BDE-209, and decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE) were the major chemicals in dust samples from all microenvironments. ΣOPFRs occurred at median concentrations (ng/g dust) of 15,400, 10,500, and 3750 in AC filter, car and house floor dust, respectively. For all analyzed chemicals, relatively lower levels were observed in floor dust than car and AC filter dust. The profiles of FRs in car dust were different from AC filter and floor dust, which reflected their wider application as FR and plasticizer in variety of household and commercial products. For toddlers, assuming high dust intake and 95th percentile concentrations, the computed exposure estimation for BDE-99 was higher than RfD values. PMID:27343946

  15. Field evaluation of a flow-through sampler for measuring pesticides and brominated flame retardants in the arctic atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hang; Hung, Hayley; Wania, Frank; Lao, Randy; Sabljic, Edwin; Sverko, Ed; Lei, Ying Duan; Fellin, Phil; Barresi, Enzo

    2012-07-17

    A flow-through sampler (FTS) was codeployed with a super high volume active sampler (SHV) between October 2007 and November 2008 to evaluate its ability to determine the ambient concentrations of pesticides and brominated flame retardants in the Canadian High Arctic atmosphere. Nine pesticides and eight flame retardants, including three polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) replacement chemicals, were frequently detected. Atmospheric concentrations determined by the two systems showed good agreement when compared on monthly and annually integrated time scales. Pesticide concentrations were normally within a factor of 3 of each other. The FTS tended to generate higher PBDE concentrations than the SHV presumably because of the entrainment of blowing snow/ice crystals or large particles. Taking into account uncertainties in analytical bias, sample volume, and breakthrough estimations, the FTS is shown to be a reliable and cost-effective method, which derives seasonally variable concentrations of semivolatile organic trace compounds at extremely remote locations that are comparable to those obtained by conventional high volume air sampling. Moreover, the large sampling volumes captured by the FTS make it suitable for the screening of new and emerging chemicals in the remote atmosphere where concentrations are usually low. PMID:22702375

  16. Brominated flame retardants and halogenated phenolic compounds in North American west coast bald eaglet (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) plasma.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Melissa A; Cesh, Lillian S; Elliott, John E; Williams, Tony D; Garcelon, David K; Letcher, Robert J

    2006-10-15

    We report on the identity, characterization, and spatial trends of several brominated flame retardants and hydroxylated (OH-) and methoxylated (MeO-) organohalogen contaminants in bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nestling plasma collected from sites along the west coast of North America. Samples were from four southwestern British Columbia (BC) locations, a reference site in northern BC (Fort St. James; FSJ), and from Santa Catalina Island, CA (SCI), an area of high DDT and PCB contamination. Mean concentrations of sigma polybrominated diphenyl ether (sigma PBDE (8 congeners monitored); 1.78-8.49 ng/g), sigma OH-polychlorinated biphenyl (sigma OH-PCB (30 congeners monitored); 0.44-0.87 ng/g), and sigma OH-PBDE (14 congeners monitored; 0.31-0.92 ng/g) were similar in eaglets from southwestern BC yet lower than for SCl and significantly higher than for FSJ. Dominant PBDE congeners were BDE47, BDE99, and BDE100, but SCl eaglets also contained low levels of higher brominated congeners. 4-OH-CB187 and 4'-OH-CB202 accounted for 65-100% of sigma OH-PCB in all BC eaglets, with 4'-OH-CB202 as well as 3'-OH-CB138 and 4-OH-CB146 dominating in SCl eaglets. Ostensibly of biogenic origin, 6'-OH-BDE49 and 6-OH-BDE47 were found in BC nestlings. Only 4'-OH-BDE49 (2.10 ng/g) was found in SCl eaglets. MeO-PBDEs and total hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) were not found in any birds, but the polybrominated biphenyl BB101 was detected in southwestern BC samples. This study demonstrates that west coast North American bald eagles contain previously unreported organohalogens, which have the potential to impact the health and survival of these raptors. PMID:17120553

  17. Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in indoor and outdoor air in a community in Guangzhou, a megacity of southern China.

    PubMed

    Ding, Nan; Wang, Tao; Chen, She-Jun; Yu, Mei; Zhu, Zhi-Cheng; Tian, Mi; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Mai, Bi-Xian

    2016-05-01

    Indoor environments contribute a significant portion of human exposure to brominated flame retardants (BFRs) because of their extensive use in various household products. This study investigates the occurrence of a number of BFRs in the indoor and outdoor air in a megacity in southern China, in which little information on indoor BFRs contamination is available. The estimated total PBDE concentrations ranged from 1.43 to 57 pg/m(3) indoors and from 1.21 to 1522 pg/m(3) outdoors. The indoor concentrations of lower brominated PBDEs that are mainly derived from the technical penta- and octa-BDE mixtures were higher than or comparable to the outdoors, while the indoor levels of DecaBDEs and decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) were apparently lower than the outdoors. The seasonal variations of BFR concentrations indicated that evaporation from old indoor products is the primary source of Penta- and OctaBDEs in the air, whereas most DecaBDEs and DBDPE concentrations showing weak temperature-dependence are largely released from industrial activities. The PBDE congener profiles in the air were generally similar, which were dominated by BDE209, 28, and 47; whereas the appreciable indoor-outdoor differences in the compositions are possibly due to emission sources, photochemical degradation, or congener-specific transport of BFRs in the indoor and outdoor air. Significant correlations between the indoor and outdoor BFRs were observed suggesting the exchange of BFRs between the two compartments, which are more noticeable for PentaBDEs and DecaBDEs with strong indoor and outdoor emission sources, respectively. This study provides significant insights into the sources of BFRs in urban air in China. PMID:26952274

  18. Brominated flame retardants in aquatic organisms from the North Sea in comparison with biota from the high Arctic marine environment.

    PubMed

    Sørmo, Eugen G; Jenssen, Bjørn M; Lie, Elisabeth; Skaare, Janneche U

    2009-10-01

    The extent of trophic transfer of brominated flame retardants (BFRs), including hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and seven polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), were examined in pelagic and benthic aquatic animals (invertebrates and fish) in a near-shore estuary environment of the southeastern North Sea (Norway; 59 degrees N). Whole-body burdens of HBCD and several of the most abundant PBDEs biomagnified with increasing trophic position in the food web. Biomagnification of HBCD was particularly strong, resulting in whole-body burdens of this compound comparable to those of total PBDEs in the higher-trophic-level species. Body burdens of PBDEs were higher in pelagic than in benthic aquatic organisms. This was particularly evident for the lesser-brominated and volatile PBDE congeners. Atmospheric gas-water-phytoplankton exchange of these volatile compounds over the water surface may account for this observation. The PBDE burdens in pelagic zooplankton from the North Sea were more than 60-fold greater than those in corresponding pelagic zooplankton from the colder high Arctic latitudes (>78 degrees N) of Norway (Svalbard). This great difference may relate to reduced chemical gas-water exchange over open waters at the colder Arctic latitudes. However, previously measured whole-body burdens of BFRs in other aquatic marine organisms from the high Arctic were comparable or even exceeded those in the North Sea samples of the present study. These include sympagic (sea ice-associated) invertebrates and fish accumulating high burdens of particle-associated BFRs. The present study provides new insight regarding the distribution of BFRs in ecologically different compartments of marine ecosystems, essential information for understanding the food-web transfer and geographical dispersal of these compounds. PMID:19459721

  19. A CASE STUDY ON THE RISKS AND BENEFITS OF DECABDE, A MAJOR BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a proposal for a roundtable presentation at the 2008 Society of Toxicology Annual Meeting. ABSTRACT BODY: Decabromodiphenyl ether (DecaBDE) is a high production volume chemical used as a flame retardant in a variety of consumer applications; examples of uses in h...

  20. Ecotoxicity of a brominated flame retardant (tetrabromobisphenol A) and its derivatives to aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Debenest, T; Gagné, F; Petit, A-N; André, C; Kohli, M; Blaise, C

    2010-11-01

    The large use of tetrabromobisphenol A (B(4)BPA) in common products (plastics, electric and electronic equipments) has raised concern about its ecotoxicity. Physical and bio-degradations may lead to the formation of tetrabromobisphenol A derivatives like tri- (B(3)BPA), di- (B(2)BPA), monobromobisphenol A (B(1)BPA) and bisphenol A (BPA). However, little is known about the toxicity of these brominated derivatives. An appraisal on the ecotoxicity of B(4)BPA and its derivatives was carried out with several bioassays representing organisms (bacteria, algae, micro-invertebrates and fish) of different taxonomic groups present in aquatic ecosystems. Endpoint values showed that B(4)BPA was significantly less toxic than the other chemicals when tested with the Microtox and algal asssays. A similar trend was observed with other bioassays for BPA. One of the brominated derivatives was particularly toxic: B(2)BPA. The LuminoTox assay and the rainbow trout hepatocytes assay reported the most significant toxicity for this derivative. Its toxicity was also significantly higher than the other compounds barring B(3)BPA when tested with the micro-crustacean test. PMID:20601118

  1. Phosphate flame retardants and novel brominated flame retardants in home-produced eggs from an e-waste recycling region in China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaobo; Xu, Fuchao; Luo, Xiaojun; Mai, Bixian; Covaci, Adrian

    2016-05-01

    Phosphate flame retardants (PFRs) and novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) (2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromo-benzoate (EH-TBB) and bis-(2-ethylhexyl)-3,4,5,6-tetrabromo-phthalate (BEH-TEBP)) were measured in free-range chicken eggs from three e-waste recycling sites and a negative control site located in Guangdong province, Southern China. BEH-TEBP, tris-(chloroethyl)-phosphate (TCEP), tris-(chloropropyl)-phosphate (∑TCPP, two isomers) and tris-(1,3-dichloroisopropyl)-phosphate (TDCIPP) were detected in more than 50% of eggs samples with low concentrations. The median values of BEH-TEBP and total PFRs were 0.17-0.46 ng/g ww (wet weight) and 1.62-2.59 ng/g ww in eggs from the e-waste sites, respectively. The results indicate that EH-TBB, BEH-TEBP and PFRs are less persistent and bioaccumulative than polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in chicken eggs, and possibly also in other bio-matrices. Triphenyl phosphate (TPHP) were identified in albumen with higher frequencies, but at similar concentrations compared to yolk, while BEH-TEBP was mainly detected in yolk. The estimated daily intake (EDI) of BEH-TEBP and total PFRs from consumption of chicken eggs ranged from 0.03 to 0.09 and 0.32-0.52 ng/kg bw/day for adults, and 0.20-0.54 and 1.89-3.02 ng/kg bw/day for children in e-waste sites, respectively. Indoor dust ingestion seems to be a more important pathway for the intake of these FRs, while egg consumption is probably a more important exposure pathway for PBDEs. PMID:26460270

  2. In vitro endocrine disruption and TCDD-like effects of three novel brominated flame retardants: TBPH, TBB, & TBCO.

    PubMed

    Saunders, David M V; Higley, Eric B; Hecker, Markus; Mankidy, Rishikesh; Giesy, John P

    2013-11-25

    The novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs), 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (TBB), Bis(2-ethylhexyl)-2,3,4,5-tetrabromophtalate (TBPH), and 1,2,5,6-tetrabromocyclooctane (TBCO) are components of flame retardant mixtures including Firemaster 550 and Saytex BC-48. Despite the detection of these NBFRs in environmental and biotic matrices, studies regarding their toxicological effects are poorly represented in the literature. The present study examined endocrine disruption by these three NBFRs using the yeast YES/YAS reporter assay and the mammalian H295R steroidogenesis assay. Activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) was also assessed using the H4IIE reporter assay. The NBFRs produced no TCDD-like effects in the H4IIE assay or agonistic effects in the YES/YAS assays. TBB produced a maximal antiestrogenic effect of 62% at 0.5mgL(-1) in the YES assay while TBPH and TBCO produced maximal antiandrogenic effects of 74% and 59% at 300mgL(-1) and 1500mgL(-1), respectively, in the YAS assay. Significant effects were also observed in the H295R assay. At 0.05mgL(-1), 15mgL(-1), and 15mgL(-1) TBB, TBPH, and TBCO exposures, respectively resulted in a 2.8-fold, 5.4-fold, and 3.3-fold increase in concentrations of E2. This is one of the first studies to demonstrate the in vitro endocrine disrupting potentials of TBB, TBPH, and TBCO. PMID:24064184

  3. Characterization of organochlorine pesticides, brominated flame retardants and dioxin-like compounds in shellfish and eel from Fiji.

    PubMed

    Lal, Vincent; Bridgen, Phil; Votadroka, Waisea; Raju, Rupantri; Aalbersberg, William

    2014-09-01

    This article gives an overview of a range of persistent organic pollutant chemical levels in shellfish (Batissa violacea and Anadara antiquata) species and eel (Gymnothorax flavimarginatus) from Fiji. As there is limited data in published literature to date, this paper reports first data on a range of persistent organic pollutants and highlights the more prominent POP chemicals present in marine biota in Fiji. A significant number of POP chemicals were detected (e.g. 17 PCDD/PCDF, 12dl-PCBs, organochlorine pesticides and brominated flame retardants), the concentrations found were generally low (e.g. parts per billion level). The low levels of contamination are indicative of a low input from long range and short-range transport as well as few local point sources. Also concentrations of POPs in eel and shellfish from Fiji are low in comparison to wild species in other regions and are within acceptable limits for POP chemicals in fish and fishery products set by the European Union. It describes also results of early studies on basic POPs levels in shellfish in several Pacific Island Countries, which generally show relatively low levels. PMID:24568747

  4. Three decades (1983-2010) of contaminant trends in East Greenland polar bears (Ursus maritimus). Part 2: brominated flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Rune; Rigét, Frank F; Sonne, Christian; Born, Erik W; Bechshøft, Thea; McKinney, Melissa A; Drimmie, Robert J; Muir, Derek C G; Letcher, Robert J

    2013-09-01

    Brominated flame retardants were determined in adipose tissues from 294 polar bears (Ursus maritimus) sampled in East Greenland in 23 of the 28years between 1983 and 2010. Significant linear increases were found for sum polybrominated diphenyl ether (ΣPBDE), BDE100, BDE153, and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD). Average increases of 5.0% per year (range: 2.9-7.6%/year) were found for the subadult polar bears. BDE47 and BDE99 concentrations did not show a significant linear trend over time, but rather a significant non-linear trend peaking between 2000 and 2004. The average ΣPBDE concentrations increased 2.3 fold from 25.0ng/g lw (95% C.I.: 15.3-34.7ng/g lw) in 1983-1986 to 58.5ng/g lw (95% C.I.: 43.6-73.4ng/g lw) in 2006-2010. Similar but fewer statistically significant trends were found for adult females and adult males likely due to smaller sample size and years. Analyses of δ(15)N and δ(13)C stable isotopes in hair revealed no clear linear temporal trends in trophic level or carbon source, respectively, and non-linear trends differed among sex and age groups. These increasing concentrations of organobromine contaminants contribute to complex organohalogen mixture, already causing health effects to the East Greenland polar bears. PMID:23137556

  5. Selected chlorobornanes, polychlorinated naphthalenes and brominated flame retardants in Bjørnøya (Bear Island) freshwater biota.

    PubMed

    Evenset, Anita; Christensen, Guttorm N; Kallenborn, Roland

    2005-08-01

    Levels of selected sparsely investigated persistent organic pollutants (POPs) have been measured in organisms from two Arctic lakes on Bjørnøya (Bear Island). Elevated levels of chlorobornanes (CHBs) (up to 46.7 ng/g wet weight=ww), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) (up to 27.2 ng/g ww), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) (up to 1.1 ng/g ww) and polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs, only 4 congeners) (up to 62.7 pg/g ww), were measured in biota from Lake Ellasjøen. In Lake Øyangen, located only 5 km north of Ellasjøen, levels of these contaminants were significantly lower. delta(15)N-values were 7-10 per thousand higher in organisms from Ellasjøen as compared to Øyangen. This is attributed to biological inputs related to seabird activities. The present study illustrates that contaminants such as CHBs, brominated flame retardants and PCNs accumulate in the Ellasjøen food web in a manner similar to PCBs and conventional organochlorine pesticides. Transport mechanisms that control PCB and DDT distributions, i.e. atmospheric long-range transport and biotransport by seabirds, are also relevant for the contaminants investigated in the present study. PMID:15862396

  6. Occurrences and inventories of heavy metals and brominated flame retardants in wastes from printed circuit board production.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoyu; Guo, Jie; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Peng; Deng, Jingjing; Lin, Kuangfei

    2014-09-01

    Pollutants including heavy metals and brominated flame retardant were detected in 10 types of production wastes from a typical printed circuit board manufacturing plant, and their inventories were estimated. Rinsing water from etching process had the highest concentrations of copper (665.51 mg/L), lead (1.02 mg/L), nickel (3.60 mg/L), chromium (0.97 mg/L), and tin (1.79 mg/L). Powdered solid waste (SW) from the cut lamination process contained the highest tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA) levels (49.86 mg/kg). Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were absent in this plant, in agreement with the international regulations of PBDE phase out. The pollutant inventories in the wastes exhibited in the order of copper > > zinc > tin ≈ nickel > lead > chromium > > TBBPA. The potential environmental impact of pollutants in SW during production and disposal were further investigated. A high partitioning of pollutant concentration between the total suspended particle and SW (-0.10 < log K TS < 2.12) was observed for most pollutants, indicating the emission pathway from SW to the airborne atmosphere in the workshop. Although SW met the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure, drilling powder with the smallest particle diameter still showed high leachabilities of lead and tin which may lead to a negative environmental impact during disposal. PMID:24777328

  7. Calibration of two passive air samplers for monitoring phthalates and brominated flame-retardants in indoor air.

    PubMed

    Saini, Amandeep; Okeme, Joseph O; Goosey, Emma; Diamond, Miriam L

    2015-10-01

    Two passive air samplers (PAS), polyurethane foam (PUF) disks and Sorbent Impregnated PUF (SIP) disks, were characterized for uptake of phthalates and brominated flame-retardants (BFRs) indoors using fully and partially sheltered housings. Based on calibration against an active low-volume air sampler for gas- and particle-phase compounds, we recommend generic sampling rates of 3.5±0.9 and 1.0±0.4 m(3)/day for partially and fully sheltered housing, respectively, which applies to gas-phase phthalates and BFRs as well as particle-phase DEHP (the later for the partially sheltered PAS). For phthalates, partially sheltered SIPs are recommended. Further, we recommend the use of partially sheltered PAS indoors and a deployment period of one month. The sampling rate for the partially sheltered PUF and SIP of 3.5±0.9 m(3)/day is indistinguishable from that reported for fully sheltered PAS deployed outdoors, indicating the role of the housing outdoors to minimize the effect of variable wind velocities on chemical uptake, versus the partially sheltered PAS deployed indoors to maximize chemical uptake where air flow rates are low. PMID:26189099

  8. Occurrence and Distribution Pattern of Alkylphenol Ethoxylates and Brominated Flame Retardants in Sediment Samples from Vaal River, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Chokwe, T B; Okonkwo, O J; Sibali, L L; Mporetji, S M

    2016-09-01

    High environmental concentrations for alkylphenol ethoxylates (APEs) and brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have been observed near cities than in rural environment. This is due, in part, to sewage systems receiving effluents from many industrial processes along with domestic wastewater. While these classes of compounds are being phased out in most developed countries, there is still widespread use in low to middle income countries. To better understand the extent of APEs and BFRs contamination in the environment, this study reports on the concentration and distribution of APEs and BFRs in sediments samples collected from Vaal River, South Africa. Measurable concentrations of these contaminants were obtained using GC-MS after heptafluorobutyric derivatization. The concentrations range (ng g(-1)) for these pollutants were as follows: nd-46, 20-127, 24-38, 3-5, 14-28, 16-54 for octylphenol penta ethoxylates, nonylphenol ethoxylates (mono- di), nonylphenol penta ethoxylates, PBB101, PBDEs, and HBCD; respectively. The distribution observed in this study indicated higher levels of sediment contamination by APEs relative to BFRs. These results underline the need to further investigate the burden and risks associated with chemical contamination in developing countries. PMID:27443342

  9. Brominated flame retardants in mangrove sediments of the Pearl River Estuary, South China: spatial distribution, temporal trend and mass inventory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zai-Wang; Sun, Yu-Xin; Sun, Kai-Feng; Xu, Xiang-Rong; Yu, Shen; Zheng, Tian-Ling; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Tian, Yun; Hu, Yong-Xia; Diao, Zeng-Hui; Mai, Bi-Xian

    2015-03-01

    Sediments were collected from three mangrove wetlands in the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) of South China to investigate spatial and temporal distributions of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE). Concentrations of ΣPBDEs, DBDPE and BTBPE in mangrove sediments of the PRE ranged from 1.25-206, 0.364-34.9, and not detected-0.794 ng g(-1) dry weight, respectively. The highest concentrations of ΣPBDEs, DBDPE and BTBPE were found at the mangrove wetland from Shenzhen, followed by Zhuhai and Guangzhou, showing the dependence on the proximity to urban areas. PBDEs were the predominant brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in mangrove sediments. The concentrations of ΣPBDEs, DBDPE and BTBPE in sediment cores showed an increasing trend from the bottom to top layers, reflecting the increasing usage of these BFRs. The inventories of ΣPBDEs, DBDPE and BTBPE in mangrove sediments were 1962, 245, and 4.10 ng cm(-2), respectively. This is the first study to report the occurrence of DBDPE and BTBPE in mangrove ecosystems. PMID:25482977

  10. Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in breast milk and associated health risks to nursing infants in Northern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Müller, M H B; Polder, A; Brynildsrud, O B; Lie, E; Løken, K B; Manyilizu, W B; Mdegela, R H; Mokiti, F; Murtadha, M; Nonga, H E; Skaare, J U; Lyche, J L

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to assess brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in breast milk in the Northern parts of Tanzania. Ninety-five colostrum samples from healthy, primiparous mothers at Mount Meru Regional Referral Hospital (MMRRH), Arusha Tanzania, were analyzed for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane (BTBPE), hexabromobenzene (HBB), (2,3-dibromopropyl) (2,4,6-tribromophenyl) ether (DPTE), pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB) and 2,3,4,5,6-pentabromotoluene (PBT). The Ʃ7PBDE (BDE 28, 47, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183) ranged from below level of detection (

  11. Evaluation of 3D-human skin equivalents for assessment of human dermal absorption of some brominated flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Mohamed Abou-Elwafa; Pawar, Gopal; Harrad, Stuart

    2015-11-01

    Ethical and technical difficulties inherent to studies in human tissues are impeding assessment of the dermal bioavailability of brominated flame retardants (BFRs). This is further complicated by increasing restrictions on the use of animals in toxicity testing, and the uncertainties associated with extrapolating data from animal studies to humans due to inter-species variations. To overcome these difficulties, we evaluate 3D-human skin equivalents (3D-HSE) as a novel in vitro alternative to human and animal testing for assessment of dermal absorption of BFRs. The percutaneous penetration of hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCD) and tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBP-A) through two commercially available 3D-HSE models was studied and compared to data obtained for human ex vivo skin according to a standard protocol. No statistically significant differences were observed between the results obtained using 3D-HSE and human ex vivo skin at two exposure levels. The absorbed dose was low (less than 7%) and was significantly correlated with log Kow of the tested BFR. Permeability coefficient values showed increasing dermal resistance to the penetration of γ-HBCD>β-HBCD>α-HBCD>TBBPA. The estimated long lag times (>30 min) suggests that frequent hand washing may reduce human exposure to HBCDs and TBBPA via dermal contact. PMID:26232142

  12. Brominated flame retardants and related chlorinated persistent organic pollutants in fish from river Elbe and its main tributary Vltava.

    PubMed

    Hajslová, Jana; Pulkrabová, Jana; Poustka, Jan; Cajka, Tomás; Randák, Tomás

    2007-10-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are widely used industrial chemicals, residues of which can be nowadays found in all environmental compartments. The widespread presence of BFRs in various environmental compartments and food chain is a consequence of both their broad application area and physico-chemical properties, such as resistance to degradation and high lipophilicity. Alike in the case of other halogenated persistent organic pollutants (POPs), fish can be used as a bioindicator of aquatic environment pollution. In presented study, conducted in the year 2005, altogether 80 samples representing the most abundant fresh water fish species, viz. chub (Leuciscus cephalus), bream (Abramis brama), and perch (Perca fluviatilis) collected in 11 sampling sites located at Elbe and Vltava (Moldau) rivers were examined for levels of major BFRs. Without any exception, BFRs were detected in all fish samples. BDE 47 was the dominating congener in all fish species. This fact was not surprising, since it used to be the main component in various kinds of technical mixtures. With regard to relatively high levels of BDE 47 in fish tissue, as compared to other BFRs, and considering strong correlation with the total PBDEs content, simplified laboratory examination and, consequently, increased samples throughput can be obtained when only this congener is monitored. The potential of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-TOFMS), to provide more comprehensive information on the bioaccumulating chemicals occurring in fish samples, has been demonstrated in this study. PMID:17673273

  13. Concentrations of "legacy" and novel brominated flame retardants in matched samples of UK kitchen and living room/bedroom dust.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Jiangmeng; Ma, Yuning; Harrad, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    Concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDDs) and 5 novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) were measured in paired samples of kitchen and living room/bedroom dust sampled in 2015 from 30 UK homes. BDE-209 was most abundant (22-170,000 ng/g), followed by γ-HBCDD (1.7-21,000 ng/g), α-HBCDD (5.2-4,900 ng/g), β-HBCDD (2.3-1,600 ng/g), BDE-99 (2.6-1,440 ng/g), BDE-47 (0.4-940 ng/g), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) (nd-680 ng/g) and bis(2-ethylhexyl)-3,4,5,6-tetrabromo-phthalate (BEH-TEBP) (2.7-630 ng/g). The concentrations in kitchens and living rooms/bedrooms are moderate compared with previous studies. Concentrations of BDE-209 in living room/bedroom dust were significantly lower and those of DBDPE significantly higher (p < 0.05) compared to concentrations recorded in UK house dust in 2006 and 2007. This may reflect changes in UK usage of these BFRs. All target BFRs were present at higher concentrations in living rooms/bedrooms than kitchens. With the exception of BDE-28, pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB) and DBDPE, these differences were significant (p < 0.05). No specific source was found that could account for the higher concentrations in living rooms/bedrooms. PMID:26859606

  14. Simultaneous determination of 16 brominated flame retardants in food and feed of animal origin by fast gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry using atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation.

    PubMed

    Bichon, E; Guiffard, I; Vénisseau, A; Lesquin, E; Vaccher, V; Brosseaud, A; Marchand, P; Le Bizec, B

    2016-08-12

    A gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method using atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation was developed for the monitoring of 16 brominated flame retardants (7 usually monitored polybromodiphenylethers (PBDEs) and BDE #209 and 8 additional emerging and novel BFRs) in food and feed of animal origin. The developed analytical method has decreased the run time by three compared to conventional strategies, using a 2.5m column length (5% phenyl stationary phase, 0.1mm i.d., 0.1μmf.t.), a pulsed split injection (1:5) with carrier gas helium flow rate at 0.48mLmin(-1) in one run of 20 min. For most BFRs, analytical data were compared with the current analytical strategy relying on GC/EI/HRMS (double sector, R=10000 at 10% valley). Performances in terms of sensitivity were found to meet the Commission recommendation (118/2014/EC) for nBFRs. GC/APCI/MS/MS represents a promising alternative for multi-BFRs analysis in complex matrices, in that it allows the monitoring of a wider list of contaminants in a single injection and a shorter run time. PMID:27425757

  15. The brominated flame retardants TBP-AE and TBP-DBPE antagonize the chicken androgen receptor and act as potential endocrine disrupters in chicken LMH cells.

    PubMed

    Asnake, Solomon; Pradhan, Ajay; Kharlyngdoh, Joubert Banjop; Modig, Carina; Olsson, Per-Erik

    2015-12-01

    Increased exposure of birds to endocrine disrupting compounds has resulted in developmental and reproductive dysfunctions. We have recently identified the flame retardants, allyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (TBP-AE), 2-3-dibromopropyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (TBP-DBPE) and the TBP-DBPE metabolite 2-bromoallyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (TBP-BAE) as antagonists to both the human androgen receptor (AR) and the zebrafish AR. In the present study, we aimed at determining whether these compounds also interact with the chicken AR. In silico modeling studies showed that TBP-AE, TBP-BAE and TBP-DBPE were able to dock into to the chicken AR ligand-binding pocket. In vitro transfection assays revealed that all three brominated compounds acted as chicken AR antagonists, inhibiting testosterone induced AR activation. In addition, qRT-PCR studies confirmed that they act as AR antagonists and demonstrated that they also alter gene expression patterns of apoptotic, anti-apoptotic, drug metabolizing and amino acid transporter genes. These studies, using chicken LMH cells, suggest that TBP-AE, TBP-BAE and TBP-DBPE are potential endocrine disrupters in chicken. PMID:26318274

  16. Some Commonly Used Brominated Flame Retardants Cause Ca2+-ATPase Inhibition, Beta-Amyloid Peptide Release and Apoptosis in SH-SY5Y Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mousa, Fawaz; Michelangeli, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are chemicals commonly used to reduce the flammability of consumer products and are considered pollutants since they have become widely dispersed throughout the environment and have also been shown to bio-accumulate within animals and man. This study investigated the cytotoxicity of some of the most commonly used groups of BFRs on SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. The results showed that of the BFRs tested, hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA) and decabromodiphenyl ether (DBPE), all are cytotoxic at low micromolar concentrations (LC50 being 2.7±0.7µM, 15±4µM and 28±7µM, respectively). They induced cell death, at least in part, by apoptosis through activation of caspases. They also increased intracellular [Ca2+] levels and reactive-oxygen-species within these neuronal cells. Furthermore, these BFRs also caused rapid depolarization of the mitochondria and cytochrome c release in these neuronal cells. Elevated intracellular [Ca2+] levels appear to occur through a mechanism involving microsomal Ca2+-ATPase inhibition and this maybe responsible for Ca2+-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, µM levels of these BFRs caused β-amyloid peptide (Aβ-42) processing and release from these cells with a few hours of exposure. These results therefore shows that these pollutants are both neurotoxic and amyloidogenic in-vitro. PMID:22485137

  17. Transcriptomic responses of European flounder (Platichthys flesus) liver to a brominated flame retardant mixture.

    PubMed

    Williams, Tim D; Diab, Amer M; Gubbins, Matt; Collins, Catherine; Matejusova, Iveta; Kerr, Rose; Chipman, James K; Kuiper, Raoul; Vethaak, A Dick; George, Stephen G

    2013-10-15

    Male European flounder (Platichthys flesus) were exposed to a technical mixture of brominated diphenyl ethers (PDBEs, DE-71, Pentamix) that had been purified to remove contaminating dioxins. Controls were exposed to carrier solvent alone. Fish were exposed to decadally increasing concentrations of Pentamix via both sediment and spiked food. The GENIPOL P. flesus cDNA microarray, differentially expressed gene profiling (DEG) and quantitative PCR were employed to detect hepatic transcriptional differences between exposed fish and controls. Gene transcriptional changes were more sensitive to Pentamix exposure than biomarkers measured previously. Pentamix exposure induced transcripts coding for enzymes of xenobiotic metabolism (CYP1A, aldo-keto reductases) and elicited endocrine disruption (vitellogenin and thyroid hormone receptor alpha), with effects on CYP1A and VTG occurring at the highest exposure. Ontology analysis clearly showed dose-responsive changes indicative of oxidative stress, induction of mitochondrial dysfunction, and apoptosis. We conclude that exposure to PBDEs in both sediment and food has a significant adverse effect on a broad range of crucial biochemical processes in the livers of this widely distributed estuarine fish species, the flounder. PMID:23948077

  18. Brominated flame retardant emissions from the open burning of five plastic wastes and implications for environmental exposure in China.

    PubMed

    Ni, Hong-Gang; Lu, Shao-You; Mo, Ting; Zeng, Hui

    2016-07-01

    Based on the most widely used plastics in China, five plastic wastes were selected for investigation of brominated flame retardant (BFR) emission behaviors during open burning. Considerable variations were observed in the emission factors (EF) of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) from the combustion of different plastic wastes. Distribution of BFR output mass showed that ΣPBDE was emitted mainly by the airborne particle (51%), followed by residual ash (44%) and the gas phase (5.1%); these values for ΣHBCD were 62%, 24%, and 14%, respectively. A lack of mass balance after the burning of the plastic wastes for some congeners (output/input mass ratios>1) suggested that formation and survival exceeded PBDE decomposition during the burns. However, that was not the case for HBCD. A comparison with literature data showed that the open burning of plastic waste is major source of PBDE compared to regulated combustion activities. Even for state-of-the-art waste incinerators equipped with sophisticated complex air pollution control technologies, BFRs are released on a small scale to the environment. According to our estimate, ΣPBDE release to the air and land from municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration plants in China in 2015 were 105 kg/year and 7124 kg/year. These data for ΣHBCD were 25.5 and 71.7 kg/year, respectively. Considering the fact that a growing number of cities in China are switching to incineration as the preferred method for MSW treatment, our estimate is especially important. This study provides the first data on the environmental exposure of BFRs emitted from MSW incineration in China. PMID:27064612

  19. Leaching of brominated flame retardants from mixed wastes in lysimeters under conditions simulating landfills in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Natsuko; Hirata, Osamu; Takigami, Hidetaka; Noma, Yukio; Tachifuji, Ayako; Matsufuji, Yasushi

    2014-12-01

    In developing countries, wastes are usually not separated before being disposed of in solid-waste landfills, most of which are open dumps without adequate measures to prevent environmental pollution. To understand the leaching behavior of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) from waste consumer products in landfills, we have been conducting a long-term landfill lysimeter experiment since 2006 under conditions designed to mimic three types of landfill conditions in developing countries: aerobic, semi-aerobic, and anaerobic. Pilot-scale lysimeters (60-cm i.d.) were filled with a 400-cm layer of mixed wastes consisting of 35 wt% food, 20 wt% paper, 20 wt% paper pulp, 13 wt% plastic, 10 wt% wood chips, 1 wt% glass, and 1 wt% metals, proportions that are typical of unsorted municipal solid waste in Asian developing countries. In the present study, we determined the concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers, tetrabromobisphenol A, tribromophenols, and hexabromocyclododecanes in leachate samples collected from the lysimeters during the first 3.5 years of the experiment, to evaluate BFR elution behavior in early-stage landfills. Under all three conditions, BFR elution started at the beginning of the experiment. The BFR concentrations in the leachates from the aerobic lysimeter tended to be lower than those from the anaerobic lysimeter, suggesting that the presence of air inside landfills considerably reduces BFR elution to the surrounding environment. During the 3.5-year experiment, BFR outflow from the lysimeters was only 0.001-0.58% of the total BFRs in the loaded waste; that is, most of the BFRs in the waste remained in the lysimeters. PMID:24560282

  20. Brominated flame retardants in Korean river sediments, including changes in polybrominated diphenyl ether concentrations between 2006 and 2009.

    PubMed

    Lee, In-Seok; Kang, Hee-Hyung; Kim, Un-Jung; Oh, Jeong-Eun

    2015-05-01

    Brominated flame retardants were analyzed in sediment samples from the Nakdong River basin, Korea. The total concentrations of the 27 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), including decabrominated diphenyl ether (BDE 209), analyzed were 0.55-300 ng g(-1) dry weight (dw), the BDE 209 concentrations were 0.39-190 ng g(-1) dw, the tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) concentrations were 0.05-150 ng g(-1) dw, and the total hexabromocyclododecane (sum of α-, β-, γ-HBCDs) concentrations were 0.11-19 ng g(-1) dw. The PBDE and HBCD concentrations were comparable to or lower than the concentrations found in sediments from other countries, whereas the TBBPA concentrations were comparable to or higher than the concentrations found in other countries. The TBBPA concentrations were similar to or lower than the PBDE concentrations, even though more than twice as much TBBPA as total PBDEs is consumed in Korea, and this phenomenon was probably caused by TBBPA and PBDEs being used differently during the manufacture of products, and their different half-lives in sediment and affinities for the particle phase in aquatic environments. Sediment samples from several sampling sites close to facilities where expandable polystyrene, epoxy, and polycarbonate resins are manufactured and handled had relatively high TBBPA and HBCD concentrations. Temporal changes in the PBDE concentration strongly correlated with temporal variations in the geochemical compositions such as total organic carbon content and grain size value of the sediment. The PBDE and HBCD distribution profiles in the sediment samples indicated that commercial PBDE and HBCD products were released locally. PMID:25655576

  1. Trophodynamics of hexabromocyclododecanes and several other non-PBDE brominated flame retardants in a freshwater food web.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiang-Ping; Guan, Yun-Tao; Zhang, Ying; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Zhi, Hui; Chen, She-Jun; Mai, Bi-Xian

    2010-07-15

    Several currently used non-polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) brominated flame retardants (BFRs), including hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE), hexabromobenzene (HBB), pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB), and pentabromotoluene (PBT), are examined in the components of a freshwater food web from an electronic waste recycling site, South China. All these BFRs are detectable in the food web, with average concentrations of 13.9-868, 1.71-518, < 3.8-338, 197-3099, 3.98-25.6, and 1.20-3.60 ng/g lipid wt for HBCDs, BTBPE, DBDPE, HBB, PBEB, and PBT, respectively. Food web magnification is observed for (+)-alpha-, (-)-alpha-, (+/-)-alpha-, and total HBCDs, and HBB, with trophic magnification factors (TMFs) of 2.22, 2.18, 2.19, 1.82, and 1.46, respectively; whereas there is trophic dilution of BTBPE and PBT through the food web. The TMFs for (+)-alpha-, (-)-alpha-, and (+/-)-alpha-HBCDs are comparable to those of PBDEs detected previously in the same food web. Biota samples show a shift from gamma- toward alpha-HBCD compared with the suspended particles, sediment, and HBCD technical mixtures, with a significant increase of alpha-HBCD on ascending trophic levels. Except for alpha-HBCD in suspended particles and sediment, all the HBCD enantiomers detected are nonracemic in the environmental matrix. In biota, nonracemic residues of alpha-HBCD were observed in mud carp and crucian carp; beta-HBCD in prawn, mud carp, and crucian carp; and gamma-HBCD in water snake, with preferences for (+)-alpha-, (-)-beta-, and (+)-gamma-HBCDs. PMID:20575536

  2. Gestational and Early Postnatal Exposure to an Environmentally Relevant Mixture of Brominated Flame Retardants: General Toxicity and Skeletal Variations.

    PubMed

    Tung, Emily W Y; Yan, Han; Lefèvre, Pavine L C; Berger, Robert G; Rawn, Dorothea F K; Gaertner, Dean W; Kawata, Alice; Rigden, Marc; Robaire, Bernard; Hales, Barbara F; Wade, Michael G

    2016-06-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are stable environmental contaminants known to exert endocrine-disrupting effects. Developmental exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) is correlated with impaired thyroid hormone signaling, as well as estrogenic and anti-androgenic effects. As previous studies have focused on a single congener or technical mixture, the purpose of the current study was to examine the effects of gestational and early postnatal exposure to an environmentally relevant mixture of BFRs designed to reflect house dust levels of PBDEs and hexabromocyclododecane on postnatal developmental outcomes. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to the PBDE mixture from preconception to weaning (PND 21) through the diet containing 0, 0.75, 250, and 750 mg mixture/kg diet. BFR exposure induced transient reductions in body weight at PND 35 in male and from PND 30-45 in female offspring (250 and 750 mg/kg). Liver weights (PND 21) and xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme activities (PND 21 and 46) were increased in both male and female offspring exposed to 250 and 750 mg/kg diets. Furthermore, serum T4 levels were reduced at PND 21 in both,male and female offspring (250 and 750 mg/kg). At PND 21, Serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was decreased in males exposed to 750 mg/kg dietat, and females exposed to 250 and 750 mg/kg diets. At PND 46 ALP was significantly elevated in males (250 and 750 mg/kg). Variations in the cervical vertebrae and phalanges were observed in pups at PND 4 (250 and 750 mg/kg). Therefore, BFR exposure during gestation through to weaning alters developmental programming in the offspring. The persistence of BFRs in the environment remains a cause for concern with regards to developmental toxicity. PMID:27286044

  3. The widely utilized brominated flame retardant tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is a potent inhibitor of the SERCA Ca2+ pump

    PubMed Central

    Ogunbayo, Oluseye A.; Michelangeli, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    TBBPA (tetrabromobisphenol A) is currently the most widely used type of BFR (brominated flame retardant) employed to reduce the combustibility of a large variety of electronic and other manufactured products. Recent studies have indicated that BFRs, including TBBPA, are bio-accumulating within animal and humans. BFRs including TBBPA have also been shown to be cytotoxic and potentially endocrine-disrupting to a variety of cells in culture. Furthermore, TBBPA has specifically been shown to cause disruption of Ca2+ homoeostasis within cells, which may be the underlying cause of its cytotoxicity. In this study, we have demonstrated that TBBPA is a potent non-isoform-specific inhibitor of the SERCA (sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase) (apparent Ki 0.46–2.3 μM), thus we propose that TBBPA inhibition of SERCA contributes in some degree to Ca2+ signalling disruption. TBBPA binds directly to the SERCA without the need to partition into the phospholipid bilayer. From activity results and Ca2+-induced conformational results, it appears that the major effect of TBBPA is to decrease the SERCA affinity for Ca2+ (increasing the Kd from approx. 1 μM to 30 μM in the presence of 10 μM TBBPA). Low concentrations of TBBPA can quench the tryptophan fluorescence of the SERCA and this quenching can be reversed by BHQ [2,5-di-(t-butyl)-1,4-hydroquinone] and 4-n-nonylphenol, but not thapsigargin, indicating that TBBPA and BHQ may be binding to similar regions in the SERCA. PMID:17784851

  4. Effects of dietary exposure to brominated flame retardant BDE-47 on thyroid condition, gonadal development and growth of zebrafish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torres, Leticia; Orazio, Carl E.; Peterman, Paul H.; Patino, Reynaldo

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of brominated flame retardants in teleosts and some of the information currently available is inconsistent. This study examined effects of dietary exposure to 2,2′,4,4′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) on thyroid condition, body mass and size, and gonadal development of zebrafish. Pubertal, 49-day-old (posthatch) fish were fed diets without BDE-47 (control) or with 1, 5 or 25 μg/g BDE-47/diet. Treatments were conducted in triplicate 30-L tanks each containing 50 zebrafish, and 15 fish per treatment (5 per tank) were sampled at days 40, 80 and 120 of exposure. Measurements were taken of body mass, standard length, head depth and head length. Sex (at 40–120 days of exposure), germ cell stage (at 40 days) and thyroid condition (at 120 days; follicular cell height, colloid depletion, angiogenesis) were histologically determined. Whole-body BDE-47 levels at study completion were within the high end of levels reported in environmentally exposed (wild) fishes. Analysis of variance was used to determine differences among treatments at each sampling time. No effects were observed on thyroid condition or germ cell stage in either sex. Reduced head length was observed in females exposed to BDE-47 at 80 days but not at 40 or 120 days. In males, no apparent effects of BDE-47 were observed at 40 and 80 days, but fish exposed to 25 μg/g had lower body mass at 120 days compared to control fish. These observations suggest that BDE-47 at environmentally relevant whole-body concentrations does not affect thyroid condition or pubertal development of zebrafish but does affect growth during the juvenile-to-adult transition, especially in males.

  5. Effects of dietary exposure to brominated flame retardant BDE-47 on thyroid condition, gonadal development and growth of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Torres, Leticia; Orazio, Carl E; Peterman, Paul H; Patiño, Reynaldo

    2013-10-01

    Little is known about the effects of brominated flame retardants in teleosts and some of the information currently available is inconsistent. This study examined effects of dietary exposure to 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) on thyroid condition, body mass and size, and gonadal development of zebrafish. Pubertal, 49-day-old (posthatch) fish were fed diets without BDE-47 (control) or with 1, 5 or 25 μg/g BDE-47/diet. Treatments were conducted in triplicate 30-L tanks each containing 50 zebrafish, and 15 fish per treatment (5 per tank) were sampled at days 40, 80 and 120 of exposure. Measurements were taken of body mass, standard length, head depth and head length. Sex (at 40-120 days of exposure), germ cell stage (at 40 days) and thyroid condition (at 120 days; follicular cell height, colloid depletion, angiogenesis) were histologically determined. Whole-body BDE-47 levels at study completion were within the high end of levels reported in environmentally exposed (wild) fishes. Analysis of variance was used to determine differences among treatments at each sampling time. No effects were observed on thyroid condition or germ cell stage in either sex. Reduced head length was observed in females exposed to BDE-47 at 80 days but not at 40 or 120 days. In males, no apparent effects of BDE-47 were observed at 40 and 80 days, but fish exposed to 25 μg/g had lower body mass at 120 days compared to control fish. These observations suggest that BDE-47 at environmentally relevant whole-body concentrations does not affect thyroid condition or pubertal development of zebrafish but does affect growth during the juvenile-to-adult transition, especially in males. PMID:23334565

  6. Transient aberration of neuronal development in the hippocampal dentate gyrus after developmental exposure to brominated flame retardants in rats.

    PubMed

    Saegusa, Yukie; Fujimoto, Hitoshi; Woo, Gye-Hyeong; Ohishi, Takumi; Wang, Liyun; Mitsumori, Kunitoshi; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Shibutani, Makoto

    2012-09-01

    We immunohistochemically investigated the impact and reversibility of three brominated flame retardants (BFRs) known to be weak thyroid hormone disruptors on neuronal development in the hippocampal formation and apoptosis in the dentate subgranular zone. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 10, 100, or 1,000 ppm decabromodiphenyl ether (DBDE); 100, 1,000 or 10,000 ppm tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) or 1,2,5,6,9,10-hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) in the diet from gestational day 10 through to day 20 after delivery (weaning). On postnatal day (PND) 20, interneurons in the dentate hilus-expressing reelin increased with all chemicals, suggestive of aberration of neuronal migration. However, this increase had disappeared by PND 77. NeuN-positive mature neurons increased in the hilus on PND 77 with all chemicals. In the subgranular zone on PND 20, an increase in apoptotic bodies suggestive of impaired neurogenesis was observed after exposure to TBBPA or HBCD. The effects on neuronal development were detected at doses of ≥100 ppm DBDE; ≥1,000 ppm TBBPA; and at least at 10,000 ppm HBCD. On PND 20, the highest dose of DBDE and HBCD revealed mild fluctuations in the serum concentrations of thyroid-related hormones suggestive of weak developmental hypothyroidism, while TBBPA did not. Thus, DBDE and TBBPA may exert direct effect on neuronal development in the brain, but hypothyroidism may be operated for DBDE and HBCD at high doses. An excess of mature neurons in the hilus at later stages may be the signature of the developmental effects of BFRs. However, the effect itself was reversible. PMID:22415764

  7. Effects of tetrabromobisphenol A, a brominated flame retardant, on the immune response to respiratory syncytial virus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Wataru; Shimizu, Tomomi; Sawamura, Rie; Hino, Akane; Konno, Katsuhiko; Hirose, Akihiko; Kurokawa, Masahiko

    2010-04-01

    Effects of the brominated flame retardants (BFRs), decabrominated diphenyl ether (DBDE), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), on host immunity of mice were evaluated using respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. Five-week-old female mice were fed a diet containing 1% BFRs for 28days, and subsequently infected with RSV. No toxicological sign was observed in BFR-treated mice before infection. TBBPA significantly increased the pulmonary viral titer in the infected mice on day 5 post-infection, but DBDE and HBCD did not. Slight histological changes were observed in lung tissues of TBBPA-treated mice with mock infection. These changes due to TBBPA were much exacerbated by RSV infection. Cytokine analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from RSV-infected mice treated with or without TBBPA revealed that TBBPA significantly increased the levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-6 and interferon (IFN)-gamma at each time point after virus infection, but no change was observed for IL-1beta and IL-12. The levels of IL-4 and IL-10, Th2 cytokines, significantly decreased. Thus, TBBPA caused unusual production of the various cytokines in RSV-infected mice. Flow cytometry revealed that the percentage of double-positive CD4+CD8+ cells, immature T lymphocytes, in the cell populations in BALF from RSV-infected mice increased due to TBBPA treatment. The change was not observed in spleen cells of TBBPA-treated mice. The response to RSV infection verified that TBBPA treatment affected the host immunity of mice. Irregular changes in cytokine production and immune cell populations due to TBBPA treatment were suggested to cause exacerbation of pneumonia in RSV-infected mice. PMID:20074668

  8. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers listed as Stockholm Convention POPs, other brominated flame retardants and heavy metals in e-waste polymers in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Sindiku, Omotayo; Babayemi, Joshua; Osibanjo, Oladele; Schlummer, Martin; Schluep, Mathias; Watson, Alan; Weber, Roland

    2015-10-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were the first brominated persistent organic pollutants (POPs) listed in the Stockholm Convention. Parties to the convention are currently establishing inventories for developing action plans for the environmentally sound management of PBDE-containing materials. The major use of commercial octabromodiphenyl ether (c-OctaBDE) has been in casings from cathode ray tube (CRT) TVs and computer monitors. Large quantities of used e-waste and electronic equipment have been exported to developing countries with Nigeria being a major importer in Africa. The casings from 382 TVs and computers imported from major world regions to Nigeria were sampled in backyards and waste dumps. The samples were screened with X-ray flourescence (XRF) for bromine and analysed by gas chromatography/ electron capture detection (GC/ECD) for brominated flame retardants (BFRs). A high proportion of the CRT casings (61 %) contained more than 10,000 ppm bromine from BFRs. Decabromodiphenyl ether (DecaBDE) was the major flame retardant used in TV sets and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) for computer CRTs.The screening suggests that average PBDE levels (of c-OctaBDE + DecaBDE) in Nigerian-stockpiled CRT casings were 1.1 % for TV and 0.13 % for PC CRTs. These are above the Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) limit and should be separated for RoHS compliant recycling. The Nigerian e-waste inventory of 237,000 t of CRT plastic would therefore contain approx. 594 t c-OctaBDE and 1,880 t of DecaBDE. In Nigeria, as for most developing countries, there is currently no adequate e-waste management, plastic separation or destruction capacity. The data highlight the urgent need to develop environmentally sound management for this large material flow. PMID:25062546

  9. Bioaccumulation kinetics of brominated flame retardants (polybrominated diphenyl ethers) in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis)

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafsson, K.; Bjoerk, M.; Burreau, S.; Gilek, M. )

    1999-06-01

    Baltic Sea blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, were exposed to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs, IUPAC congeners 47, 99, and 153) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, congeners 31, 52, 77, 118, and 153) in a flow-through experimental setup for 44 d. After the exposure phase, the mussels were allowed to depurate in natural brackish water for 26 d. After analyses, uptake clearance rate coefficients (k[sub u]), depuration rate coefficients (k[sub d]), and bioaccumulation factors (BAF) were calculated. A rapid uptake of all PBDEs and PCBs was observed, especially for PBDE congeners 47 and 99. The depuration rate decreased with increasing hydrophobicity as expected for the PCBs, but for the PBDEs, depuration rate coefficients appeared to be of the same magnitude for all three congeners independently of log K[sub OW]. The BAFs obtained for PBDE 47 and PBDE 99 were higher than for all other substances in the study, severalfold higher than for PCBs of similar hydrophobicity. The presented data indicate that the bioaccumulation potential of PBDEs, extensively used as flame retardants, is similar or higher than that of PCBs for filter feeding organisms such as blue mussels.

  10. Temporal trends and spatial distributions of brominated flame retardants in archived fishes from the Great Lakes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ling Yan; Hites, Ronald A

    2004-05-15

    To explore the geographical distribution and temporal trends of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in the Great Lakes, lake trout from Lakes Superior, Michigan, Huron, and Ontario and walleye from Lake Erie, collected during the period of 1980-2000, were analyzed. The concentrations of fifteen PBDE congeners and one polybrominated biphenyl (PBB-153) were determined in each fish sample. Lake trout from Lakes Michigan and Ontario had the highest sigmaPBDE concentrations during the years investigated. The sigmaPBDE concentrations in fishes from the five lakes increased exponentially with time, doubling every 3-4 years. The relative proportion of BDEs-47, -99, and -100 compared to BDEs-153 and -154 increased significantly as a function of time. Over the period 1980-2000, the concentrations of PBB-153, which was a component of a flame retardant banned in the 1970s, generally remained the same in these Great Lakes fishes, except for lake trout from Lake Huron, where the PBB-153 concentrations decreased significantly, but slowly. PMID:15212250

  11. Novel brominated flame retardants and dechlorane plus in Greenland air and biota.

    PubMed

    Vorkamp, Katrin; Bossi, Rossana; Riget, Frank F; Skov, Henrik; Sonne, Christian; Dietz, Rune

    2015-01-01

    Following the ban of polybrominated diphenyl ethers, other halogenated flame retardants (FRs) might be used increasingly. This study has analyzed hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)-ethane (BTBPE), 2,3-dibromopropyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (DPTE) and dechloraneplus (DP) in Greenland air over the course of a year. Moreover, BTBPE, DPTE, DP, 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (TBB), bis(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (TBPH) and decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE) were analyzed in samples of polar bear, ringed seal, black guillemot and glaucous gull from Greenland. HBCD in air appeared low, while mean concentrations of syn- and anti-DP were 2.3 and 5.2 pg/m(3), respectively. BTBPE and DPTE were undetectable in air. Detection frequencies in biota were <50% for BTBPE, TBPH and DBDPE, but near 100% for the remaining compounds. Ringed seals from East Greenland had highest mean concentrations of TBB, DPTE, syn- and anti-DP (1.02, 0.078, 0.096 and 0.42 ng/g wet weight, respectively). Our study documents the long-range transport and, to some extent, bioaccumulation of these novel FRs. PMID:25463724

  12. Accumulation and DNA damage in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to 2 brominated flame-retardant mixtures, Firemaster 550 and Firemaster BZ-54.

    PubMed

    Bearr, Jonathan S; Stapleton, Heather M; Mitchelmore, Carys L

    2010-03-01

    Firemaster 550 and Firemaster BZ-54 are two brominated formulations that are in use as replacements for polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants. Two major components of these mixtures are 2,3,4,5-tetrabromo-ethylhexylbenzoate (TBB) and 2,3,4,5-tetrabromo-bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (TBPH). Both have been measured in environmental matrices; however, scant toxicological information exists. The present study aimed to determine if these brominated flame-retardant formulations are bioavailable and adversely affect DNA integrity in fish. Fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were orally exposed to either FM 550, FM BZ54, or the nonbrominated form of TBPH, di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) for 56 d and depurated (e.g., fed clean food) for 22 d. At several time points, liver and blood cells were collected and assessed for DNA damage. Homogenized fish tissues were extracted and analyzed on day 0 and day 56 to determine the residue of TBB and TBPH and the appearance of any metabolites using gas chromatography-electron-capture negative ion mass spectrometry (GC/ECNI-MS). Significant increases (p < 0.05) in DNA strand breaks from liver cells (but not blood cells) were observed during the exposure period compared with controls, although during depuration these levels returned to control. Both parent compounds, TBB and TBPH, were detected in tissues at approximately 1% of daily dosage along with brominated metabolites. The present study provides evidence for accumulation, metabolism, and genotoxicity of these new formulation flame retardants in fish and highlights the potential adverse effects of TBB- and TBPH-formulated fire retardants to aquatic species. PMID:20821500

  13. Contamination of indoor dust and air by polychlorinated biphenyls and brominated flame retardants and relevance of non-dietary exposure in Vietnamese informal e-waste recycling sites.

    PubMed

    Tue, Nguyen Minh; Takahashi, Shin; Suzuki, Go; Isobe, Tomohiko; Viet, Pham Hung; Kobara, Yuso; Seike, Nobuyasu; Zhang, Gan; Sudaryanto, Agus; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and several additive brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in indoor dust and air from two Vietnamese informal e-waste recycling sites (EWRSs) and an urban site in order to assess the relevance of these media for human exposure. The levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), 1,2-bis-(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) and decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) in settled house dust from the EWRSs (130-12,000, 5.4-400, 5.2-620 and 31-1400 ng g(-1), respectively) were significantly higher than in urban house dust but the levels of PCBs (4.8-320 ng g(-1)) were not higher. The levels of PCBs and PBDEs in air at e-waste recycling houses (1000-1800 and 620-720 pg m(-3), respectively), determined using passive sampling, were also higher compared with non-e-waste houses. The composition of BFRs in EWRS samples suggests the influence from high-temperature processes and occurrence of waste materials containing older BFR formulations. Results of daily intake estimation for e-waste recycling workers are in good agreement with the accumulation patterns previously observed in human milk and indicate that dust ingestion contributes a large portion of the PBDE intake (60%-88%), and air inhalation to the low-chlorinated PCB intake (>80% for triCBs) due to their high levels in dust and air, respectively. Further investigation of both indoor dust and air as the exposure media for other e-waste recycling-related contaminants and assessment of health risk associated with exposure to these contaminant mixtures is necessary. PMID:23228866

  14. Brominated flame retardants in U.S. biosolids from the EPA national sewage sludge survey and chemical persistence in outdoor soil mesocosms.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Arjun K; Halden, Rolf U

    2014-05-15

    We determined national baseline levels and release inventories of 77 traditional and novel brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in biosolids composites (prepared from 110 samples) from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's 2001 national sewage sludge survey (NSSS). Additionally, analyses were performed on archived samples from a 3-year outdoor mesocosm study to determine the environmental persistence of BFRs in biosolids-amended soil. The total polybrominated diphenylether (PBDE) concentration detected in biosolids composites was 9400 ± 960 μg/kg dry weight, of which deca-BDE constituted 57% followed by nona- and penta-BDE at 18 and 13%, respectively. The annual mean loading rate estimated from the detected concentrations and approximate annual biosolids production and disposal numbers in the U.S., of the sum of PBDEs and non-BDE BFRs was calculated to be 47,900-60,100 and 12,900-16,200 kg/year, of which 24,000-36,000 and 6400-9700 kg/year are applied on land, respectively. Mean concentration of PBDEs were higher in the 2001 samples compared to levels reported in EPA's 2006/7 Targeted NSSS, reflecting on-going efforts in phasing-out PBDEs in the U.S. In outdoor soil mesocosms, >99% of the initial BFRs mass in the biosolids/soil mixtures (1:2) persisted over the monitoring duration of three years. Estimates of environmental releases may be refined in the future by analyzing individual rather than composited samples, and by integrating currently unavailable data on disposal of biosolids on a plant-specific basis. This study informs the risk assessment of BFRs by furnishing national inventories of BFR occurrence and environmental release via biosolids application on land. PMID:24607311

  15. Magnetic solid phase extraction of brominated flame retardants and pentachlorophenol from environmental waters with carbon doped Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jing; Li, Jia-yuan; Qiao, Jun-qin; Cui, Shi-hai; Lian, Hong-zhen; Chen, Hong-yuan

    2014-12-01

    Carbon doped Fe3O4 nanoparticles (Fe3O4/C) prepared by a facile hydrothermal reaction of glucose with iron resource have been applied as magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) sorbent, for the first time, to extract trace brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and pentachlorophenol (PCP) from environmental waters. Various MSPE parameters were optimized including amount of Fe3O4/C nanoparticles, pH of sample solution, enrichment factor of analytes and reusability of Fe3O4/C sorbent. The reliability of the MSPE method was evaluated by the recoveries of BFRs and PCP in spiked water samples. Good recoveries (80.0-110.0%) were achieved with the relative standard deviations range from 0.3% to 6.8%. In this paper, the extraction characteristics of Fe3O4/C sorbent were further elucidated. It is found that the adsorption process of Fe3O4/C to analytes predominates the MSPE efficiency. There is hybrid hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bonding or dipole-dipole attraction between Fe3O4/C and analytes. Notably, the chemical components of carbon layer on the surface of Fe3O4 nanoparticles were identified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermogravimetry-mass spectrometry, and in consequence the covalent bonds between Fe3O4 and the coated carbon have been observed. In addition, the straight influence of synthesis condition of Fe3O4/C nanoparticles including glucose concentration and hydrothermal reaction time on extraction performance for BFRs and PCP has been investigated. It is confirmed that the existence of organic carbon containing functional groups over Fe3O4/C sorbent is responsible for the MSPE extraction.

  16. Brominated flame retardants in U.S. biosolids from the EPA national sewage sludge survey and chemical persistence in outdoor soil mesocosms

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Arjun K.; Halden, Rolf U.

    2014-01-01

    We determined national baseline levels and release inventories of 77 traditional and novel brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in biosolids composites (prepared from 110 samples) from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s 2001 national sewage sludge survey (NSSS). Additionally, analyses were performed on archived samples from a 3-year outdoor mesocosm study to determine the environmental persistence of BFRs in biosolids-amended soil. The total polybrominated diphenylether (PBDE) concentration detected in biosolids composites was 9,400±960 μg/kg dry weight, of which deca-BDE constituted 57% followed by nona- and penta-BDE at 18 and 13%, respectively. The annual mean loading rate estimated from the detected concentrations and approximate annual biosolids production and disposal numbers in the U.S., of the sum of PBDEs and non-BDE BFRs was calculated to be 47,900–60,100 and 12,900–16,200 kg/year, of which 24,000–36,000 and 6,400–9,700 kg/year are applied on land, respectively. Mean concentration of PBDEs were higher in the 2001 samples compared to levels reported in EPA’s 2006/7 Targeted NSSS, reflecting on-going efforts in phasing-out PBDEs in the U.S. In outdoor soil mesocosms, >99% of the initial BFRs mass in the biosolids/soil mixtures (1:2) persisted over the monitoring duration of three years. Estimates of environmental releases may be refined in the future by analyzing individual rather than composited samples, and by integrating currently unavailable data on disposal of biosolids on a plant-specific basis. This study informs the risk assessment of BFRs by furnishing national inventories of BFR occurrence and environmental release via biosolids application on land. PMID:24607311

  17. PILOT-SCALE STUDIES ON THE EFFECT OF BROMINE ADDITION ON THE EMISSIONS OF CHLORINATED ORGANIC COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The addition of brominated organic compounds to the feed of a pilot-scale incinerator burning chlorinated waste has been found previously, under some circumstances, to enhance emissions of volatile and semivolatile organic chlorinated products of incomplete combustion (PiCs) incl...

  18. Body burdens of brominated flame retardants and other persistent organo-halogenated compounds and their descriptors in US girls

    SciTech Connect

    Windham, Gayle C.; Pinney, Susan M.; Sjodin, Andreas; Lum, Raymond; Jones, Richard S.; Needham, Larry L.; Biro, Frank M.; Hiatt, Robert A.; Kushi, Lawrence H.

    2010-04-15

    Background: Levels of brominated flame retardants are increasing in US populations, yet little data are available on body burdens of these and other persistent hormonally active agents (HAAs) in school-aged children. Exposures to such chemicals may affect a number of health outcomes related to development and reproductive function. Objective: Determine the distribution of biomarkers of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and organo-chlorinated pesticides (OCPs), such as DDT/DDE, in children, and their variation by key descriptor variables. Methods: Ethnically diverse cohorts of girls 6-8 y old at baseline are being followed for growth and pubertal development in a multi-site, longitudinal study. Nearly 600 serum samples from the California and Ohio sites were analyzed for lipids, 35 PCB congeners, 11 PBDE congeners, and 9 OCPs. The biomarker distributions were examined and geometric means compared for selected analytes across categories of age, race, site, body mass index (BMI), parental education, maternal age at delivery, and breast feeding in adjusted models. Results: Six PBDE congeners were detected among greater than 70% of samples, with BDE-47 having the highest concentration (median 42.2, range 4.9-855 ng/g lipid). Girls in California had adjusted geometric mean (GM) PBDE levels significantly higher than girls in Ohio. Furthermore, Blacks had significantly higher adjusted GMs of all six PBDE congeners than Whites, and Hispanics had intermediate values. GMs tended to be lower among more obese girls, while other variables were not strongly associated. In contrast, GMs of the six PCB congeners most frequently detected were significantly lower among Blacks and Hispanics than Whites. PCBs and the three pesticides most frequently detected were also consistently lower among girls with high BMI, who were not breast-fed, whose mothers were younger, or whose care-givers (usually parents) were less educated. Girls in California had

  19. Brominated Flame Retardants and Other Persistent Organohalogenated Compounds in Relation to Timing of Puberty in a Longitudinal Study of Girls

    PubMed Central

    Pinney, Susan M.; Voss, Robert W.; Sjödin, Andreas; Biro, Frank M.; Greenspan, Louise C.; Stewart, Susan; Hiatt, Robert A.; Kushi, Lawrence H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exposure to hormonally active chemicals could plausibly affect pubertal timing, so we are investigating this in the Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program. Objectives Our goal was to examine persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in relation to pubertal onset. Methods Ethnically diverse cohorts of 6- to 8-year-old girls (n = 645) provided serum for measure of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), and lipids. Tanner stages [breast (B) and pubic hair (PH)], and body mass index (BMI) were measured at up to seven annual clinic visits. Using accelerated failure time models, we calculated time ratios (TRs) for age at Tanner stages 2 or higher (2+) and POPs quartiles (Q1–4), adjusting for confounders (race/ethnicity, site, caregiver education, and income). We also calculated prevalence ratios (PRs) of Tanner stages 2+ at time of blood sampling. Results Cross-sectionally, the prevalence of B2+ and PH2+ was inversely related to chemical serum concentrations; but after adjustment for confounders, only the associations with B2+, not PH2+, were statistically significant. Longitudinally, the age at pubertal transition was consistently older with greater chemical concentrations; for example: adjusted TR for B2+ and Q4 for ΣPBDE = 1.05; 95% CI: 1.02, 1.08, for ΣPCB = 1.05; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.08, and for ΣOCP = 1.10; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.14, indicating median ages of about 6 and 11 months older than least exposed, and with similar effect estimates for PH2+. Adjusting for BMI attenuated associations for PCBs and OCPs but not for PBDEs. Conclusions This first longitudinal study of puberty in girls with serum POPs measurements (to our knowledge) reveals a delay in onset with higher concentrations. Citation Windham GC, Pinney SM, Voss RW, SjÖdin A, Biro FM, Greenspan LC, Stewart S, Hiatt RA, Kushi LH. 2015. Brominated flame retardants and other persistent organohalogenated compounds in relation to

  20. Identification of a group of brominated flame retardants as novel androgen receptor antagonists and potential neuronal and endocrine disrupters.

    PubMed

    Kharlyngdoh, Joubert Banjop; Pradhan, Ajay; Asnake, Solomon; Walstad, Anders; Ivarsson, Per; Olsson, Per-Erik

    2015-01-01

    Brominated flame-retardants (BFRs) are used in industrial products to reduce the risk of fire. However, their continuous release into the environment is a concern as they are often persistent, bioaccumulating and toxic. Information on the impact these compounds have on human health and wildlife is limited and only a few of them have been identified to disrupt hormone receptor functions. In the present study we used in silico modeling to determine the interactions of selected BFRs with the human androgen receptor (AR). Three compounds were found to dock into the ligand-binding domain of the human AR and these were further tested using in vitro analysis. Allyl 2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (ATE), 2-bromoallyl 2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (BATE) and 2,3-dibromopropyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (DPTE) were observed to act as AR antagonists. These BFRs have recently been detected in the environment, in house dust and in aquatic animals. The compounds have been detected at high concentrations in both blubber and brain of seals and we therefore also assessed their impact on the expression of L-type amino acid transporter system (LAT) genes, that are needed for amino acid uptake across the blood-brain barrier, as disruption of LAT gene function has been implicated in several brain disorders. The three BFRs down-regulated the expression of AR target genes that encode for prostate specific antigen (PSA), 5α-reductases and β-microseminoprotein. The potency of PSA inhibition was of the same magnitude as the common prostate cancer drugs, demonstrating that these compounds are strong AR antagonists. Western blot analysis of AR protein showed that ATE, BATE and DPTE decreased the 5α-dihydrotestosterone-induced AR protein levels, further confirming that these BFRs act as AR antagonists. The transcription of the LAT genes was altered by the three BFRs, indicating an effect on amino-acid uptake across cellular membranes and blood-brain barrier. This study demonstrated that ATE, BATE

  1. Radiation of nitrogen molecules in a dielectric barrier discharge with small additives of chlorine and bromine

    SciTech Connect

    Avtaeva, S. V.; Avdeev, S. M.; Sosnin, E. A.

    2010-08-15

    Spectral and energy characteristics of nitrogen molecule radiation in dielectric barrier discharges in Ar-N{sub 2}, Ar-N{sub 2}-Cl{sub 2}, and Ar-N{sub 2}-Br{sub 2} mixtures were investigated experimentally. Small additives of molecular chlorine or bromine to an Ar-N{sub 2} mixture are found to increase the radiation intensity of the second positive system of nitrogen. The conditions at which the radiation spectrum predominantly consists of vibronic bands of this system are determined. Using a numerical model of plasmachemical processes, it is shown that, at electron temperatures typical of gas discharges (2-4 eV), a minor additive of molecular chlorine to an Ar-N{sub 2} mixture leads to an increase in the concentrations of electrons, positive ions, and metastable argon atoms. In turn, collisional energy transfer from metastable argon atoms to nitrogen molecules results in the excitation of the N{sub 2}(C{sup 3{Pi}}{sub u}) state.

  2. Maternal transfer of organochlorines and brominated flame retardants in blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus).

    PubMed

    Van den Steen, Evi; Jaspers, Veerle L B; Covaci, Adrian; Neels, Hugo; Eens, Marcel; Pinxten, Rianne

    2009-01-01

    Although eggs have frequently been used as a biomonitoring tool for contamination with organohalogenated pollutants (OHPs), few studies have investigated the processes of maternal transfer in birds. Here, maternal transfer of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) was investigated through comparison of the concentrations and profiles between whole homogenised female blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) and their eggs. In addition, we examined if there was an effect of laying order on the concentrations of PCBs, OCPs and PBDEs. PCBs were the most abundant contaminants in female blue tits and their eggs, followed by OCPs and PBDEs. Among the OCPs, p,p'-DDE was the most dominant compound and accounted for more than 80% of the sum OCPs. Egg concentrations decreased significantly in relation to the laying order from 1623+/-148 ng/g lipid weight (lw) to 1040+/-47 ng/g lw for the sum PCBs, from 342+/-24 ng/g lw to 235+/-17 ng/g lw for the sum OCPs and from 49+/-5 ng/g lw to 27+/-5 ng/g lw for the sum PBDEs. When reviewing all studies investigating laying order effects of OHPs in birds, no clear patterns emerged, which may be due to differences in study species and methodology among studies. Despite the fact that there were laying order effects in blue tit clutches, the variance in concentrations of PCBs and PBDEs was larger among clutches than within clutches. Variance in OCP concentrations among clutches was similar to the variance within clutches. These results suggest that one randomly collected blue tit egg from a clutch is useful as biomonitoring tool for PCBs and PBDEs, while for OCPs it is recommended to consistently use the same egg from the laying sequence as a biomonitoring tool. Lipid-normalized concentrations of sum PCBs, sum OCPs and sum PBDEs in female blue tits after clutch completion were comparable to the concentrations in the first-laid eggs. The egg/female lipid concentration ratios for

  3. Levels and trends of organochlorines and brominated flame retardants in ivory gull eggs from the Canadian Arctic, 1976 to 2004.

    PubMed

    Braune, Birgit M; Mallory, Mark L; Grant Gilchrist, H; Letcher, Robert J; Drouillard, Ken G

    2007-06-01

    The ivory gull (Pagophila eburnea) is a circumpolar marine bird which has recently been listed as an endangered species in Canada. To determine whether contaminants may be playing a role in the population decline of this species, ivory gull eggs collected in 1976, 1987 and 2004 from Seymour Island in the Canadian Arctic were analyzed for organochlorines, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and non-ortho PCBs. This study also provides the first account of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) and polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) in ivory gulls. The most quantitatively abundant legacy organochlorines found in the ivory gull eggs were p,p'-DDE, SigmaPCB and oxychlordane. Concentrations of the organochlorines analyzed either decreased or showed little change between 1976 and 2004. Concentrations of SigmaPCDD in ivory gull eggs were greater than SigmaPCDF, and the non-ortho PCBs (primarily PCB-126) contributed the largest fraction to the total TEQ value in all years sampled. Concentrations of PCDDs, PCDFs and SigmaTEQ decreased from 1976 to 2004. In contrast, concentrations of the PBDEs steadily increased between 1976 and 2004 driven primarily by increases in BDE-47. Although concentrations of the persistent chlorinated compounds (i.e. organochlorine pesticides, PCBs, PCDDs, PCDFs) reported in this study were below published toxicological threshold values for eggs of wild birds, we cannot rule out the possibility of synergistic/additive, sublethal effects. Very few studies have been carried out to evaluate the exposure-effect relationship of the persistent brominated compounds in avian species. Given the scarcity of information on toxicity threshold levels for PBBs and PBDEs in avian species, coupled with the trend toward increasing concentrations in ivory gulls, continued monitoring and further toxicological studies of these compounds are warranted. PMID:17412396

  4. Towards development of a rapid and effective non-destructive testing strategy to identify brominated flame retardants in the plastics of consumer products.

    PubMed

    Gallen, Christie; Banks, Andrew; Brandsma, Sicco; Baduel, Christine; Thai, Phong; Eaglesham, Geoff; Heffernan, Amy; Leonards, Pim; Bainton, Paul; Mueller, Jochen F

    2014-09-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are a class of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) once extensively used in the plastics of a wide range of consumer products. The listing of certain congeners that are constituents of commercial PBDE mixtures (including c-octaBDE) in the Stockholm Convention and tightening regulation of many other BFRs in recent years have created the need for a rapid and effective method of identifying BFR-containing plastics. A three-tiered testing strategy comparing results from non-destructive testing (X-ray fluorescence (XRF)) (n=1714), a surface wipe test (n=137) and destructive chemical analysis (n=48) was undertaken to systematically identify BFRs in a wide range of consumer products. XRF rapidly identified bromine in 92% of products later confirmed to contain BFRs. Surface wipes of products identified tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), c-octaBDE congeners and BDE-209 with relatively high accuracy (>75%) when confirmed by destructive chemical analysis. A relationship between the amounts of BFRs detected in surface wipes and subsequent destructive testing shows promise in predicting not only the types of BFRs present but also estimating the concentrations present. Information about the types of products that may contain persistent BFRs will assist regulators in implementing policies to further reduce the occurrence of these chemicals in consumer products. PMID:24529451

  5. Estrogenic and androgenic activities of TBBA and TBMEPH, metabolites of novel brominated flame retardants, and selected bisphenols, using the XenoScreen XL YES/YAS assay.

    PubMed

    Fic, Anja; Žegura, Bojana; Gramec, Darja; Mašič, Lucija Peterlin

    2014-10-01

    The present study investigated and compared the estrogenic and androgenic activities of the three different classes of environmental pollutants and their metabolites using the XenoScreen XL YES/YAS assay, which has advantages compared with the original YES/YAS protocol. Contrary to the parent brominated flame retardants TBB and TBPH, which demonstrated no or very weak (anti)estrogenic or (anti)androgenic activities, their metabolites, TBBA and TBMEPH, exhibited anti-estrogenic (IC50 for TBBA=31.75 μM and IC50 for TBMEPH=0.265 μM) and anti-androgenic (IC50 for TBBA=73.95 μM and IC50 for TBMEPH=2.92 μM) activities. These results reveal that metabolism can enhance the anti-estrogenic and anti-androgenic effects of these two novel brominated flame retardants. Based on the activities of BPAF, BPF, BPA and MBP, we can conclude that the XenoScreen XL YES/YAS assay gives comparable results to the (anti)estrogenic or (anti)androgenic assays that are reported in the literature. For BPA, it was confirmed previously that the metabolite formed after an ipso-reaction (hydroxycumyl alcohol) exhibited higher estrogenic activity compared with the parent BPA, but this was not confirmed for BPAF and BPF ipso-metabolites, which were not active in the XenoScreen YES/YAS assay. Among the substituted BPA analogues, bis-GMA exhibited weak anti-estrogenic activity, BADGE demonstrated weak anti-estrogenic and anti-androgenic activities (IC50=13.73 μM), and the hydrolysed product BADGE·2H2O demonstrated no (anti)estrogenic or (anti)androgenic activities. PMID:25048928

  6. Preparation of poly(trimethyl-2-methacroyloxyethylammonium chloride-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) monolith and its application in solid phase microextraction of brominated flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ting-ting; Zhou, Lin-feng; Qiao, Jun-qin; Lian, Hong-zhen; Ge, Xin; Chen, Hong-yuan

    2013-05-24

    A capillary poly(trimethyl-2-methacroyloxyethylammonium chloride-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) monolith was in situ synthesized by thermally initiated free radical co-polymerization using trimethyl-2-methacroyloxyethylammonium chloride (MATE) and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as functional monomer and cross-linker, respectively. N,N-dimethylformamide and polyethylene glycol 6000 were used as solvent and porogen, respectively. The morphology and porous structure of the resulting monoliths were assessed by scanning electron microscope. In order to prepare practically useful poly(MATE-co-EGDMA) monoliths with low flow resistance and good mechanical strength, some parameters such as PEG-6000 to DMF ratio, total monomer to porogen ratio, and crosslinker to monomer ratio were optimized systematically. Moreover, the extraction mechanism was evaluated using two series of compounds, alkylbenzenes and weak acids, as model compounds on poly(MATE-co-EGDMA) monoliths as liquid chromatographic stationary phase. Finally, the monoliths were applied as the solid phase microextraction medium, and a simple off-line method for simultaneous determination of three brominated flame retardants, 2,4,6-tribromophenol (TBP), tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) and 4,4'-dibrominated diphenyl ether (DBDPE), in environmental waters was developed by coupling the polymer monolith microextraction to HPLC with UV detection. The regression equations for these three brominated flame retardants showed good linearity from their limit of quantification to 5000ng/mL. The limits of detection were 0.20, 0.15 and 0.10ng/mL for TBP, TBBPA and DBDPE, respectively. The recovery of the proposed method was 78.7-106.1% with intra-day relative standard deviation of 1.3-4.4%. PMID:23602644

  7. Occurrence of brominated flame retardants in black thermo cups and selected kitchen utensils purchased on the European market.

    PubMed

    Samsonek, J; Puype, F

    2013-01-01

    In order to screen for the presence of a recycled polymer waste stream from waste electric and electronic equipment (WEEE), a market survey was conducted on black plastic food-contact articles (FCA). An analytical method was applied combining X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) with thermal desorption gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (thermal desorption GC-MS). Firstly, XRF spectrometry was applied to distinguish bromine-positive samples. Secondly, bromine-positive samples were submitted for identification by thermal desorption GC-MS. Generally, the bromine-positive samples contained mainly technical decabromodiphenyl ether (decaBDE). Newer types of BFRs such as tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), tetrabromobisphenol A bis(2,3-dibromopropyl), ether (TBBPA-BDBPE) and decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE), replacing the polybrominated diphenyleters (PBDEs) and polybrominated diphenyls (PBBs), were also identified. In none of the tested samples were PBBs or hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) found. Polymer identification was carried out using Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy measurement (FTIR) on all samples. The results indicate that polypropylene-polyethylene copolymers (PP-PE) and mainly styrene-based food-contact materials, such as acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) have the highest risk of containing BFRs. PMID:24040839

  8. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and alternative brominated flame retardants (aBFRs) in sediments from four bays of the Yellow Sea, North China.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Xiaomei; Tang, Jianhui; Xie, Zhiyong; Wang, Runmei; Huang, Guopei; Zheng, Qian; Zhang, Kai; Sun, Yongge; Tian, Chongguo; Pan, Xiaohui; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan

    2016-06-01

    The distribution characteristics and potential sources of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and alternative brominated flame retardants (aBFRs) were investigated in 54 surface sediment samples from four bays (Taozi Bay, Sishili Bay, Dalian Bay, and Jiaozhou Bay) of North China's Yellow Sea. Of the 54 samples studied, 51 were collected from within the four bays and 3 were from rivers emptying into Jiaozhou Bay. Decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE) was the predominant flame retardant found, and concentration ranged from 0.16 to 39.7 ng g(-1) dw and 1.13-49.9 ng g(-1) dw in coastal and riverine sediments, respectively; these levels were followed by those of BDE 209, and its concentrations ranged from n.d. to 10.2 ng g(-1) dw and 0.05-7.82 ng g(-1) dw in coastal and riverine sediments, respectively. The levels of DBDPE exceeded those of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 209) in most of the samples in the study region, whereas the ratio of DBDPE/BDE 209 varied among the four bays. This is indicative of different usage patterns of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and also different hydrodynamic conditions among these bay areas. The spatial distribution and composition profile analysis indicated that BFRs in Jiaozhou Bay and Dalian Bay were mainly from local sources, whereas transport from Laizhou Bay by coastal currents was the major source of BFRs in Taozi Bay and Sishili Bay. Both the ∑PBDEs and ∑aBFRs (sum of pentabromotoluene (PBT), 2,3-diphenylpropyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (DPTE), pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB), and hexabromobenzene (HBB)) were at low concentrations in all the sediments. This is probably attributable to a combination of factors such as low regional usage of these products, atmospheric deposition patterns, coastal currents transportation patterns, and degradation processes for higher BDE congeners. This paper is the first study that has investigated the levels of DBDPE in the coastal sediments of China's Yellow Sea. PMID:26942686

  9. Relevance of BFRs and thermal conditions on the formation pathways of brominated and brominated-chlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans.

    PubMed

    Weber, Roland; Kuch, Bertram

    2003-09-01

    The widespread use of brominated flame-retarded products in the last two decades has resulted in an increasing presence of bromine in thermal processes such as waste combustion and accidental fires. Brominated and brominated-chlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans (PBDDs/PBDFs, PXDDs/PXDFs) are micropollutants of concern arising from such processes. The present review aims to evaluate the relevance of these compound classes in actual thermal processes. Four categories of thermal processes are discussed in this respect according to their potential for PBDD/PBDF and PXDD/PXDF generation: thermal stress, pyrolysis/gasification, insufficient combustion conditions and controlled combustion conditions. Under thermal stress situations, as they may occur in production or recycling processes, PBDDs/PBDFs precursors like polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDE) can have a relevant potential for PBDD/PBDF formation via a simple elimination. Under insufficient combustion conditions as they are present in, e.g. accidental fires and uncontrolled burning as well as gasification/pyrolysis processes, considerable amounts of PBDDs/PBDFs can be formed from BFRs, preferably via the precursor pathway. In contrast, under controlled combustion conditions, BFRs and PBDDs/PBDFs can be destroyed with high efficiency. The relevance of de novo synthesis of PXDDs/PXDFs is discussed for this condition. Providing a basis for the understanding of PXDD/PXDF formation in actual thermal processes, the present paper also summarises the formation pathways of brominated and brominated-chlorinated PXDDs/PXDFs from brominated flame retardants (BFRs) investigated during laboratory thermolysis experiments. Relevant mechanistic steps for PBDD/PBDF formation from brominated precursors are discussed including elimination reactions, condensation steps and debromination/hydrogenation reactions. In addition, chlorination/bromination and halogen exchange reactions are briefly discussed with respect for their

  10. The brominated flame retardant BDE-47 causes oxidative stress and apoptotic cell death in vitro and in vivo in mice

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Lucio G.; Pellacani, Claudia; Dao, Khoi; Kavanagh, Terrance J.; Roque, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), used for decades as flame retardants, have become widespread environmental contaminants. Exposure is believed to occur primarily through diet and dust, and infants and toddlers have the highest body burden, raising concern for potential developmental neurotoxicity. The exact mechanisms of PBDE neurotoxicity have not been elucidated, but two relevant modes of action relate to impairment of thyroid hormone homeostasis and to direct effects on brain cells causing alterations in signal transduction, oxidative stress and apoptotic cell death. The present study shows that BDE-47 (2,2′,4,4′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether) induces oxidative stress and ensuing apoptotic cell death in mouse cerebellar granule neurons in vitro. Similarly, in vivo administration of BDE-47, according to an exposure protocol shown to induce behavioral and biochemical alterations (10 mg/kg, per os on post-natal day 10), induces oxidative stress and apoptosis, without altering serum levels of thyroid hormones. The effects of BDE-47 both in vitro and in vivo were more pronounced in a mouse model lacking the modifier subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLM) which results in reduced anti-oxidant capability due to low levels of GSH. Concentrations of BDE-47 in brain were in the mid-nanomolar range. These findings indicate that effects observed with BDE-47 in vitro are also present after in vivo administration, suggesting that in addition to potential endocrine effects, which were not seen here, direct interactions with brain cells should be considered as a potential mechanism of BDE-47 neurotoxicity. PMID:25797475

  11. Effects of Chronic Exposure to an Environmentally Relevant Mixture of Brominated Flame Retardants on the Reproductive and Thyroid System in Adult Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ernest, Sheila R.; Wade, Michael G.; Lalancette, Claudia; Ma, Yi-Qian; Berger, Robert G.; Robaire, Bernard; Hales, Barbara F.

    2012-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are incorporated into a wide variety of consumer products, are readily released into home and work environments, and are present in house dust. Studies using animal models have revealed that exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) may impair adult male reproductive function and thyroid hormone physiology. Such studies have generally characterized the outcome of acute or chronic exposure to a single BFR technical mixture or congener but not the impact of environmentally relevant BFR mixtures. We tested whether exposure to the BFRs found in house dust would have an adverse impact on the adult male rat reproductive system and thyroid function. Adult male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to a complex BFR mixture composed of three commercial brominated diphenyl ethers (52.1% DE-71, 0.4% DE-79, and 44.2% decaBDE-209) and hexabromocyclododecane (3.3%), formulated to mimic the relative congener levels in house dust. BFRs were delivered in the diet at target doses of 0, 0.02, 0.2, 2, or 20 mg/kg/day for 70 days. Compared with controls, males exposed to the highest dose of BFRs displayed a significant increase in the weights of the kidneys and liver, which was accompanied by induction of CYP1A and CYP2B P450 hepatic drug–metabolizing enzymes. BFR exposure did not affect reproductive organ weights, serum testosterone levels, testicular function, or sperm DNA integrity. The highest dose caused thyroid toxicity as indicated by decreased serum thyroxine (T4) and hypertrophy of the thyroid gland epithelium. At lower doses, the thickness of the thyroid gland epithelium was reduced, but no changes in hormone levels (T4 and thyroid-stimulating hormone) were observed. Thus, exposure to BFRs affected liver and thyroid physiology but not male reproductive parameters. PMID:22387749

  12. Patterns and trends in brominated flame retardants in bald eagle nestlings from the upper midwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Route, William T; Dykstra, Cheryl R; Rasmussen, Paul W; Key, Rebecca L; Meyer, Michael W; Mathew, John

    2014-11-01

    We report on patterns and trends in polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in the plasma of 284 bald eagle nestlings sampled between 1995 and 2011 at six study areas in the upper Midwestern United States. Geometric mean concentrations of total PBDEs (Σ of nine congeners) ranged from 1.78 ng/mL in the upper St. Croix River watershed to 12.0 ng/mL on the Mississippi River. Lake Superior nestlings fell between these two extremes. Between 2006 and 2011, trends differed among study areas with three declining, two remaining stable, and one increasing. Variation in ΣPBDE trends among study areas was linked to trends in individual congeners. The lower brominated PBDEs (BDE-47, -99, and -100) declined 4-10% while the higher brominated congeners (BDE-153 and -154) increased by about 7.0% annually from 2006 to 2011. This increase was the greatest in nestlings from the St. Croix River and below its confluence with the Mississippi River. Region-wide, our data suggest ΣPBDEs increased in bald eagle nestlings from 1995 through the mid-2000s and then declined by 5.5% annually from 2006 to 2011. These regional trends are consistent with the removal of penta- and octa-PBDEs from the global market. PMID:25272197

  13. FLame

    1995-03-03

    FLAME is data processing software explicitly written to support the ACAP software of DSP Technologies, Inc., of Fremont, CA. ACAP acquires and processes in-cylinder pressure data for reciprocating engines. However, it also has the capability to acquire data for two Sandia-developed technologies, ionization-probe instrumented head gaskets and fiber-optic instrumented spark plugs. FLAME post processes measurements of flame arrival from data files aquired with ACAP. Flame arrival time is determined from analog ionization-probe or visible-emission signals.more » The resulting data files are integrated with the standard ACAP files, providing a common data base for engine development.« less

  14. effect of hydrogen addition and burner diameter on the stability and structure of lean, premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Kelsey Leigh

    Low swirl burners (LSBs) have gained popularity in heating and gas power generation industries, in part due to their proven capacity for reducing the production of NOx, which in addition to reacting to form smog and acid rain, plays a central role in the formation of the tropospheric ozone layer. With lean operating conditions, LSBs are susceptible to combustion instability, which can result in flame extinction or equipment failure. Extensive work has been performed to understand the nature of LSB combustion, but scaling trends between laboratory- and industrial-sized burners have not been established. Using hydrogen addition as the primary method of flame stabilization, the current work presents results for a 2.54 cm LSB to investigate potential effects of burner outlet diameter on the nature of flame stability, with focus on flashback and lean blowout conditions. In the lean regime, the onset of instability and flame extinction have been shown to occur at similar equivalence ratios for both the 2.54 cm and a 3.81 cm LSB and depend on the resolution of equivalence ratios incremented. Investigations into flame structures are also performed. Discussion begins with a derivation for properties in a multicomponent gas mixture used to determine the Reynolds number (Re) to develop a condition for turbulent intensity similarity in differently-sized LSBs. Based on this requirement, operating conditions are chosen such that the global Reynolds number for the 2.54 cm LSB is within 2% of the Re for the 3.81 cm burner. With similarity obtained, flame structure investigations focus on flame front curvature and flame surface density (FSD). As flame structure results of the current 2.54 cm LSB work are compared to results for the 3.81 cm LSB, no apparent relationship is shown to exist between burner diameter and the distribution of flame surface density. However, burner diameter is shown to have a definite effect on the flame front curvature. In corresponding flow conditions, a

  15. Brominated flame retardants and polychlorinated biphenyls in human breast milk from several locations in India: potential contaminant sources in a municipal dumping site.

    PubMed

    Devanathan, Gnanasekaran; Subramanian, Annamalai; Sudaryanto, Agus; Takahashi, Shin; Isobe, Tomohiko; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2012-02-01

    This study investigated the status of contamination of organohalogen compounds (OCs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and brominated flame retardant (BFRs), including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) in human milk samples from several locations in India. The levels of OCs were significantly higher in the milk of mothers living in and near municipal dumping site than other locations indicating that the open dumping sites for municipal wastes act as potential sources of these contaminants in India. The PCB concentrations observed in this study tended to decrease compared to those in the matched locations reported previously, probably due to the restriction of technical PCB usage in India. PBDE levels in human milk were two to three folds lower than those of PCBs in all the sampling locations investigated. Congener profiles of PCBs and PBDEs were different between samples from the dumping site mothers and general populations in other areas suggesting the presence of region-specific sources and pathways. HBCDs were detected in human milk from only two sites, with much lower concentrations and detection frequencies compared to PCBs and PBDEs. When hazard quotients (HQs) of PCBs and PBDEs were estimated for infant health risk, the HQs in some milk samples from the dumping site exceeded the threshold value (HQ>1) of PCBs, indicating the potential risk for infants in the specific site. PMID:22208746

  16. Brominated flame retardants, hexabromocyclododecane and tetrabromobisphenol A, affect proinflammatory protein expression in human bronchial epithelial cells via disruption of intracellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Koike, Eiko; Yanagisawa, Rie; Takano, Hirohisa

    2016-04-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) are widely used as brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in consumer products. Because humans can be exposed to BFRs mainly through air or dust, the effects of the BFRs on the respiratory system and the underlying mechanisms were investigated. HBCD exposure significantly increased the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and the production of interleukin (IL)-6 and -8 in human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B). TBBPA exposure significantly increased the expression of ICAM-1 and IL-6, but not IL-8. HBCD and TBBPA stimulated epidermal growth factor (EGF) production and EGF receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation. Inhibitors of EGFR-selective tyrosine kinase and the subsequent mitogen-activated protein kinase effectively blocked the increase in the expression of proinflammatory proteins. The activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (p50, p65) and activator protein 1 (c-Jun) was also observed following HBCD exposure. Furthermore, the modulation for nuclear receptors was investigated. TBBPA but not HBCD showed ligand activity for thyroid hormone receptor (TR) and TR antagonist significantly suppressed the TBBPA-induced increase of the expression of ICAM-1 and IL-6. In conclusion, HBCD and TBBPA can disrupt the expression of proinflammatory proteins in bronchial epithelial cells, possibly via the modulation of EGFR-related pathways and/or nuclear receptors. PMID:26718265

  17. Use of the SPARC software program to calculate hydrolysis rate constants for the polymeric brominated flame retardants BC-58 and FR-1025.

    PubMed

    Rayne, Sierra; Forest, Kaya

    2016-01-01

    The SPARC software program was used to estimate the acid-catalyzed, neutral, and base-catalyzed hydrolysis rate constants for the polymeric brominated flame retardants BC-58 and FR-1025. Relatively rapid hydrolysis of BC-58, producing 2,4,6-tribromophenol-and ultimately tetrabromobisphenol A-as the hydrolytically stable end products from all potential hydrolysis reactions, is expected in both environmental and biological systems with starting material hydrolytic half-lives (t(1/2,hydr)) ranging from less than 1 h in marine systems, several hours in cellular environments, and up to several weeks in slightly acid fresh waters. Hydrolysis of FR-1025 to give 2,3,4,5,6-pentabromobenzyl alcohol is expected to be slower (t(1/2,hydr) less than 0.5 years in marine systems up to several years in fresh waters) than BC-58, but is also expected to occur at rates that will contribute significantly to environmental and in vivo loadings of this compound. PMID:26889790

  18. Are individual NOEC levels safe for mixtures? A study on mixture toxicity of brominated flame-retardants in the copepod Nitocra spinipes.

    PubMed

    Breitholtz, Magnus; Nyholm, Jenny Rattfelt; Karlsson, Jenny; Andersson, Patrik L

    2008-07-01

    In aquatic ecosystems organisms are exposed to mixtures of pollutants. Still, risk assessment focuses almost exclusively on effect characterization of individual substances. The main objective of the current study was therefore to study mixture toxicity of a common group of industrial substances, i.e., brominated flame-retardants (BFRs), in the harpacticoid copepod Nitocra spinipes. Initially, 10 BFRs with high hydrophobicity but otherwise varying chemical characteristics were selected based on multivariate chemical characterization and tested individually for effects on mortality and development using a partial life cycle test (six days) where silica gel is used as a carrier of the hydrophobic substances. Based on these findings, six of the 10 BFRs were mixed in a series of NOEC proportions (which were set to 0.008, 0.04, 0.2, 1, and five times the NOEC concentrations for each individual BFR), loaded on silica gel and tested in a full life cycle test (26 days). Significantly increased mortality was observed in N. spinipes after six and 26 days exposure at a NOEC proportion that equals the NOEC LDR value (x1) for each BFR in the mixture (p=0.0015 and p=0.0105, respectively). At the NOECx5 proportion all animals were dead. None of the other NOEC proportions caused significant negative responses related to development and reproduction. This shows that low concentrations of individual substances can cause toxicity if exposed in mixtures, which highlights the need to consider mixture toxicity to a greater extent in regulatory work. PMID:18561976

  19. Concentrations and trophic interactions of novel brominated flame retardants, HBCD, and PBDEs in zooplankton and fish from Lake Maggiore (Northern Italy).

    PubMed

    Poma, Giulia; Volta, Pietro; Roscioli, Claudio; Bettinetti, Roberta; Guzzella, Licia

    2014-05-15

    Following the release of the international regulations on PBDEs and HBCD, the aim of this study is to evaluate the concentrations of novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs), including 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane (BTBPE), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE), hexabromobenzene (HBB), and pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB), in an Italian subalpine lake located in a populated and industrial area. The study investigated specifically the potential BFR biomagnification in a particular lake's pelagic food web, whose structure and dynamics were evaluated using the Stable Isotope Analysis. The potential BFR biomagnification was investigated by using the trophic-level adjusted BMFs and Trophic Magnification Factors (TMFs), confirming that HBCD and some PBDE congeners are able to biomagnify within food webs. Comparing the calculated values of BMFTL and TMF, a significant positive correlation was observed between the two factors, suggesting that the use of BMFTL to investigate the biomagnification potential of organic chemical compounds might be an appropriate approach when a simple food web is considered. PMID:24614155

  20. Modification and calibration of a passive air sampler for monitoring vapor and particulate phase brominated flame retardants in indoor air: application to car interiors.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Mohamed Abou-Elwafa; Harrad, Stuart

    2010-04-15

    A passive air sampler was modified to monitor both vapor and particulate phase brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in indoor air using polyurethane foam disks and glass fiber filters (GFF). Significant correlation (p < 0.01) was observed between passive (ng day(-1)) and active sampler (ng m(-3)) derived BFR concentrations in an office microenvironment (r = 0.94 and 0.89 for vapor and particulate phase BFRs, respectively). A calibration experiment was performed where concentrations of target BFRs were obtained for an office using a low volume active sampler operated over a 50 day period alongside passive samplers. The passive uptake rates of each studied BFR ranged between (0.558-1.509 ng day(-1)) and (0.448-0.579 ng day(-1)) for vapor and particulate phases, respectively. The passive entrapment of particles by the GFF was investigated using environmental scanning electron microscopy which revealed gravitational deposition of particles as the main mechanism involved. The developed sampler was applied to monitor BFR concentrations in 21 cars. Average concentrations of SigmaHBCDs, TBBP-A, and Sigmatetra-deca BDEs were 400, 3, and 2200 pg m(-3) in cabins and 400, 1, and 1600 pg m(-3) in trunks. No significant differences (p < 0.05) were observed between levels of SigmaHBCDs and Sigmatrito hexa- BDEs in cabins and trunks. However, TBBP-A, BDE-209, and SigmaPBDEs concentrations were significantly higher in vehicle cabins. PMID:20230020

  1. Concentrations and distributions of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and novel brominated flame retardants in tree bark and human hair from Yunnan Province, China.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Haodong; Jin, Jun; Bai, Yao; Li, Qiuxu; Wang, Ying; Hu, Jicheng

    2016-07-01

    The concentrations and distributions of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) in tree bark and hair samples from the same area in Yunnan Province, China, were determined. The total PBDE and NBFR concentrations in the tree bark samples were 3.8 ng/g lipid weight to 91 ng/g lipid weight and 0.23 ng/g lipid weight to 5.0 ng/g lipid weight, respectively. The total PBDE and NBFR concentrations in the hair samples were 2.1 ng/g dry weight to 14 ng/g dry weight and 0.083 ng/g dry weight to 0.29 ng/g dry weight, respectively. Decabromodiphenyl ether had similar distributions in the tree bark and hair samples, but other PBDE congeners and NBFRs had different distributions in the tree bark and hair samples. External exposure was found to be mainly responsible for the total PBDE and pentabromotoluene concentrations in hair, but both external and internal exposure were responsible for the pentabromophenyl and hexabromobenzene concentrations in hair. PMID:27060640

  2. In vitro assessment of human nuclear hormone receptor activity and cytotoxicity of the flame retardant mixture FM 550 and its triarylphosphate and brominated components

    PubMed Central

    Belcher, Scott M.; Cookman, Clifford J.; Patisaul, Heather B.; Stapleton, Heather M.

    2014-01-01

    Firemaster® 550 (FM 550) is a mixture of brominated and triarylphosphate flame retardants used in polyurethane foam-based products. The primary components are also used in numerous other applications and are thus common household and industrial contaminants. Our previous animal studies suggested that FM 550 exposure may alter metabolism and cause weight gain. Employing human nuclear receptor (NR) luciferase reporter assays, the goal of this study was to evaluate the agonist actions of FM 550 and its constituent compounds at NRs with known roles in establishing or regulating energy balance. FM 550 was found to have significant agonist activity only at the master regulator of adipocyte differentiation PPARγ. As a result, the concentration response relationships and relative activities of FM 550 at PPARγ were investigated in more detail with the contribution of each chemical component defined and compared to the activities of the prototypical PPARγ environmental ligands triphenyltin and tributylytin. The resulting data indicated that the primary metabolic disruptive effects of FM 550 were likely mediated by the activity of the triarylphosphates at PPARγ, and have identified TPP as a candidate metabolic disruptor that also acts as a cytotoxicant. PMID:24786373

  3. Comparative antioxidant status in freshwater fish Carassius auratus exposed to six current-use brominated flame retardants: a combined experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Feng, Mingbao; Qu, Ruijuan; Wang, Chao; Wang, Liansheng; Wang, Zunyao

    2013-09-15

    Decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) and several non-polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) brominated flame retardants (BFRs), such as tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE), hexabromobenzene (HBB) and pentabromotoluene (PBT), are persistent halogenated contaminants ubiquitously detected in aquatic systems. However, data on comparative toxicological effects of these BFRs are lacking for fish. In this study, a combined experimental and theoretical approach was used to compare and analyze the effects of these BFRs on biochemical biomarkers in liver of Carassius auratus injected intraperitoneally with different doses (10 and 100mg/kg) for 7, 14 and 30 days. Oxidative stress was evoked evidently for the prolonged exposure, represented by the significantly altered indices (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, reduced glutathione, and malondialdehyde). The integrated biomarker response (IBR) index ranked biotoxicity as: PBT>HBB>HBCD>TBBPA>BDE-209>DBDPE. Quantum chemical calculations (electronic parameters, frontier molecular orbitals, and Wiberg bond order) were performed for theoretical analysis. Notably, some descriptors were correlated with the toxicity order, probably implying the existence of a potential structure-activity relationship when more BFRs were included. Besides, theoretical calculations also provided some valuable information regarding the molecular characteristics and metabolic pathways of these current-use BFRs, which may facilitate the understanding on their environmental behavior and fate. Overall, this study adopted a combined experimental and theoretical method for the toxicological determination and analysis of the BFRs, which may also be considered in future ecotoxicological studies. PMID:23880106

  4. Brominated flame retardants and organochlorine contaminants in winter flounder, harp and hooded seals, and North Atlantic right whales from the Northwest Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Montie, Eric W; Letcher, Robert J; Reddy, Christopher M; Moore, Michael J; Rubinstein, Belinda; Hahn, Mark E

    2010-08-01

    Various brominated flame retardants (BFRs), including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and current-use, non-PBDE BFRs, as well as organochlorine (OC) pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), were measured in winter flounder, harp and hooded seals, and North Atlantic right whales from the Eastern United States and Canada. The concentrations of PBDEs in winter flounder and right whales were similar in magnitude to the levels of PCBs, which was unlike the pattern observed in seals. In these marine mammals, the levels of PBDEs were orders of magnitude lower than the levels of OCs and PCBs detected. Evidence existed for the accumulation of methoxylated (MeO)-PBDEs of natural origin in seals and right whales. Current-use, non-PBDE BFRs (including hexabromocyclododecane, pentabromoethylbenzene, hexabromobenzene, and pentabromotoluene) were detected in winter flounder and marine mammals. Future research should focus on monitoring PBDEs, current-use, non-PBDE BFRs, and MeO-BDEs of natural origin in marine organisms from Massachusetts and Cape Cod Bays. PMID:20434733

  5. Liquid chromatographic enantioseparation of the brominated flame retardant 2,3-dibromopropyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (DPTE) and enantiomer fractions in seal blubber.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Walter; Recke, Roland von der; Ostrowicz, Patrizia; Rosenfelder, Natalie

    2010-01-01

    Enantioselective analyses of the chiral brominated flame retardant 2,3-dibromopropyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (DPTE) are the focus of this work. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) equipped with a column that had a chiral stationary phase consisting of a modified cellulose derivative allowed for the fractionation of the enantiomers of DPTE. The enantiomeric excess was 98.2% for enantiomer 1 and 99% for enantiomer 2. Polarimetric measurements verified that the first eluting enantiomer originated from (-)-DPTE and the second peak originated from (+)-DPTE. Two gas chromatographic columns allowed for the direct enantioresolution of DPTE. The elution order of DPTE enantiomers was the same as observed in the chiral HPLC system ((-)-DPTE before (+)-DPTE). The best enantioseparation was achieved on a Chirasil-DEX CB column, which was used to analyze the enantiomer fractions of DPTE in blubber and brain samples of hooded seals (Cystophora cristata) and harp seals (Phoca groenlandica) from the Barents and Greenland Seas. Analyses were carried out by means of gas chromatography/electron capture negative ion mass spectrometry operated in the selected ion monitoring (GC/ECNI-MS-SIM) mode. In both matrices, only minute deviations from the racemate were observed (maximum +/-3% excess of (-)-DPTE). However, the samples from the Barents Sea were either racemic or showed a slight excess of (+)-DPTE (up to 2.5%), whereas all samples from the Greenland Sea contained a slight excess (up to 4%) of (-)-DPTE. PMID:19863996

  6. Estimation of physicochemical properties of 52 non-PBDE brominated flame retardants and evaluation of their overall persistence and long-range transport potential.

    PubMed

    Kuramochi, Hidetoshi; Takigami, Hidetaka; Scheringer, Martin; Sakai, Shin-Ichi

    2014-09-01

    Non-PBDE (polybromodiphenyl ether) brominated flame retardants (BFRs) used as alternatives to PBDEs should be evaluated in terms of their environmental contamination potential. We first used two well-known estimation tools, EPI Suite and SPARC, to estimate the physicochemical properties of 52 non-PBDE BFRs. We assessed the dependence of the properties on the molecular weight and chemical structure of the compounds. The accuracy of the estimates was evaluated by comparing results with previous experimental data. In the case of EPI Suite, we have recommended an appropriate calculation method for the air-water partition coefficient. Half-lives in each environmental medium were also estimated with EPI Suite. Based on the estimated properties and half-lives, the overall persistence (Pov) and long-range transport potential (LRTP) of the BFRs were calculated using the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Pov and LRTP Screening Tool. We selected some POP-like chemicals from among the non-PBDE BFRs on the basis of their Pov and LRTP. From a Monte Carlo analysis of the calculated results for the selected BFRs, we suggest physicochemical properties to be measured in the future. PMID:24802073

  7. Magnetic solid-phase extraction of brominated flame retardants from environmental waters with graphene-doped Fe3O4 nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Qiao, Jun-qin; Cui, Shi-hai; Li, Jia-yuan; Zhu, Jin-jin; Yin, He-xing; Zhan, Cheng-yan; Lian, Hong-zhen

    2015-06-01

    Graphene-doped Fe3O4 nanocomposites were prepared by a solvothermal reaction of an iron source with graphene. The nanocomposites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, superconducting quantum interference, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This nanomaterial has been used as a magnetic solid-phase extraction sorbent to extract trace brominated flame retardants from environmental waters. Various extraction parameters were optimized including dosage and reusability of the nanocomposites, and pH of sample matrix. The reliability of the magnetic solid-phase extraction protocol based on graphene-doped Fe3O4 nanocomposites was evaluated by investigating the recoveries of 2,4,6-tribromophenol, tetrabromobisphenol A, 4-bromodiphenyl ether, and 4,4'-dibromodiphenyl ether in water samples. Good recoveries (85.0-105.0%) were achieved with the relative standard deviation ranging from 1.1-7.1%. Moreover, it is speculated from characterization and magnetic solid-phase extraction experiment that there is not only π-π stacking but also possible hydrophobic interaction between the graphene-doped Fe3O4 nanocomposites and analytes. PMID:25820830

  8. A mixture of the novel brominated flame retardants TBPH and TBB affects fecundity and transcript profiles of the HPGL-axis in Japanese medaka.

    PubMed

    Saunders, David M V; Podaima, Michelle; Codling, Garry; Giesy, John P; Wiseman, Steve

    2015-01-01

    The novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs), bis(2-ethylhexyl)-2,3,4,5-tetrabromophthalate (TBPH) and 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5 tetrabromobenzoate (TBB) are components of the flame retardant mixture Firemaster 550 and both TBPH and TBB have recently been listed as high production volume chemicals by the US EPA. These NBFRs have been detected in several environmental matrices but very little is known about their toxic effects or potencies. Results of in vitro assays demonstrated potentials of these NBFRs to modulate endocrine function through interactions with estrogen (ER) and androgen receptors (AR) and via alterations to synthesis of 17-β-estradiol (E2) and testosterone (T), but in vivo effects of these chemicals on organisms are not known. Therefore a 21-day short term fish fecundity assay with Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) was conducted to investigate if these NBFRs affect endocrine function in vivo. Medaka were fed a diet containing either 1422 TBPH:1474 TBB or 138:144 μg/g food, wet weight (w/w). Cumulative production of eggs was used as a measure of fecundity and abundances of transcripts of 34 genes along the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal-liver (HPGL) axis were quantified to determine mechanisms of observed effects. Cumulative fecundity was impaired by 32% in medaka exposed to the greatest dose of the mixture of TBPH/TBB. A pattern of global down-regulation of gene transcription at all levels of the HPGL axis was observed, but effects were sex-specific. In female medaka the abundance of transcripts of ERβ was lesser in livers, while abundances of transcripts of VTG II and CHG H were greater. In male medaka, abundances of transcripts of ERα, ERβ, and ARα were lesser in gonads and abundances of transcripts of ERβ and ARα were lesser in brain. Abundances of transcripts of genes encoding proteins for synthesis of cholesterol (HMGR), transport of cholesterol (HDLR), and sex hormone steroidogenesis (CYP 17 and 3β-HSD) were significantly lesser in male

  9. Lithium-Ion Electrolytes Containing Flame Retardant Additives for Increased Safety Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C. (Inventor); Smith, Kiah A. (Inventor); Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor); Prakash, Surya G. (Inventor); Krause, Frederick Charles (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The invention discloses various embodiments of Li-ion electrolytes containing flame retardant additives that have delivered good performance over a wide temperature range, good cycle life characteristics, and improved safety characteristics, namely, reduced flammability. In one embodiment of the invention there is provided an electrolyte for use in a lithium-ion electrochemical cell, the electrolyte comprising a mixture of an ethylene carbonate (EC), an ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), a fluorinated co-solvent, a flame retardant additive, and a lithium salt. In another embodiment of the invention there is provided an electrolyte for use in a lithium-ion electrochemical cell, the electrolyte comprising a mixture of an ethylene carbonate (EC), an ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), a flame retardant additive, a solid electrolyte interface (SEI) film forming agent, and a lithium salt.

  10. PILOT-SCALE STUDIES ON THE EFFECT OF BROMINE ADDITION ON THE EMISSIONS OF CHLORINATED ORGANIC COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper reports on a study to evaluate organic combustion by-product emissions while feeding varying amounts of bromine (Br) and chlorine (Cl) into a pilot-scale incinerator burning surrogate waste materials. (NOTE: Adding brominated organic compounds to a pilot-scale incinerat...

  11. Improving the accuracy of hand-held X-ray fluorescence spectrometers as a tool for monitoring brominated flame retardants in waste polymers.

    PubMed

    Guzzonato, A; Puype, F; Harrad, S J

    2016-09-01

    An optimised method for Br quantification as a metric of brominated flame retardant (BFR) concentrations present in Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) polymers is proposed as an alternative to the sophisticated, yet time consuming GC-MS methods currently preferred. A hand-held X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer was validated with Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Customized standard materials of specific BFRs in a styrenic polymer were used to perform an external calibration for hand-held XRF ranging from 0.08 to 12 wt% of Br, and cross-checking with LA-ICP-MS having similar LODs (0.0004 wt% for LA-ICP-MS and 0.0011 wt% for XRF). The "thickness calibration" developed here for hand-held XRF and the resulting correction, was applied to 28 real samples and showed excellent (R(2) = 0.9926) accordance with measurements obtained via LA-ICP-MS. This confirms the validity of hand-held XRF as an accurate technique for the determination of Br in WEEE plastics. This is the first use of solid standards to develop a thickness-corrected quantitative XRF measurement of Br in polymers using LA-ICP-MS for method evaluation. Thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) was used to confirm the presence of specific BFRs in WEEE polymer samples. We propose that expressing limit values for BFRs in waste materials in terms of Br rather than BFR concentration (based on a conservative assumption about the BFR present), presents a practical solution to the need for an accurate, yet rapid and inexpensive technique capable of monitoring compliance with limit values in situ. PMID:27281541

  12. Optimization and Simultaneous Determination of Alkyl Phenol Ethoxylates and Brominated Flame Retardants in Water after SPE and Heptafluorobutyric Anhydride Derivatization followed by GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Chokwe, Tlou B; Okonkwo, Jonathan O; Sibali, Linda L; Ncube, Esper J

    2012-10-01

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was investigated for the simultaneous analysis of two types of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), i.e., alkylphenol ethoxylates and brominated flame retardants (BFRs), by extraction and derivatization followed by GC-MS. Different solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridges (Cleanert PestiCarb, C18, Cleanert-SAX and Florosil), solvents (toluene, tetrahydrofuran, acetone, acetonitrile and ethyl acetate) and bases (NaHCO3, triethylamine and pyridine) were tested and the best chromatographic analysis was achieved by extraction with Strata-X (33 μm, Reverse Phase) cartridge and derivatization with heptafluorobutyric anhydride at 55 °C under Na2CO3 base in hexane. It was observed that APE together with lower substituted PBBs (PBB1, PBB10, PBB18 and PBB49), HBCD and TBBPA can be determined simultaneously under the same GC conditions. This simple and reliable analytical method was applied to determining trace amounts of these compounds from wastewater treatment plant samples. The recoveries of the target compounds from simulated water were above 60 %. The limit of detection ranged from 0.01 to 0.15 μg L(-1) and the limit of quantification ranged from 0.05 to 0.66 μg L(-1). There were no appreciable differences between filtered and unfiltered wastewater samples from Leeuwkil treatment plant although concentration of target analytes in filtered influent was slightly lower than the concentration of target analytes in unfiltered influent water. The concentrations of the target compounds from the wastewater treatment were determined from LOQ upwards. PMID:23864736

  13. Exposure to the androgenic brominated flame retardant 1,2-dibromo-4-(1,2-dibromoethyl)-cyclohexane alters reproductive and aggressive behaviors in birds.

    PubMed

    Marteinson, Sarah C; Letcher, Robert J; Fernie, Kimberly J

    2015-10-01

    Detected in environmental samples, 1,2-dibromo-4-(1,2-dibromoethyl) cyclohexane (DBE-DBCH) is a bioaccumulative isomer of a current-use brominated flame retardant. All 4 structural isomers are androgen agonists; however, little toxicological information exists for this compound. The objective of the present study was to determine if β-DBE-DBCH, the isomer found most prominently in animal tissue, affects androgen-dependent behavior of breeding American kestrels (Falco sparverius). The authors hypothesized that if β-DBE-DBCH acts as an androgen agonist in kestrels, androgen-dependent behaviors (i.e., copulation, courtship, aggression) would increase and behaviors inhibited by androgens (i.e., parental care behaviors) would decrease. Sixteen captive experimental kestrel pairs were exposed to 0.239 ng β-DBE-DBCH/g kestrel/d by diet from 4 wk prior to pairing until their nestlings hatched (mean 82 d) and compared with vehicle only-exposed control pairs (n = 15). Androgen-dependent behaviors were significantly increased in β-DBE-DBCH-exposed birds, consistent with the authors' hypothesis. These behavioral changes included copulation and other sexual behaviors in males and females and aggression in males, suggesting that β-DBE-DBCH may have acted like an androgen agonist in these birds. Parental behaviors were not reduced in exposed birds as predicted, although dietary exposure had ceased before chicks hatched. Further assessment of β-DBE-DBCH is recommended given these behavioral changes and the previously reported reproductive changes in the same birds. PMID:26013366

  14. In silico and biological analysis of anti-androgen activity of the brominated flame retardants ATE, BATE and DPTE in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Ajay; Asnake, Solomon; Kharlyngdoh, Joubert Banjop; Modig, Carina; Olsson, Per-Erik

    2015-05-25

    The brominated flame retardants (BFRs) 1,2-dibromo-4-(1,2-dibromoethyl)cyclohexane (TBECH or DBE-DCBH) and allyl 2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (ATE or TBP-AE) are alternative BFRs that have been introduced to replace banned BFRs. TBECH is a potential endocrine disrupter in human, chicken and zebrafish and in a recent study we showed that ATE, along with the structurally similar BFR 2,3-dibromopropyl 2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (DPTE or TBP-DBPE) and its metabolite 2-bromoallyl 2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (BATE or TBP-BAE) are potential endocrine and neuronal disrupters in human. In this study we analyzed ATE, BATE and DPTE for zebrafish androgen receptor (zAR) modulating properties. In silico analysis with two softwares, Molecular Operating Environment (MOE) and Internal Coordinate Mechanics (ICM), showed that ATE, BATE and DPTE bind to zAR. In vitro AR activation assay revealed that these three BFRs down-regulate 11-ketotestosterone (KT) mediated zAR activation. Exposure to 10 μM DPTE resulted in reduced hatching success and like TBECH, BATE and DPTE at 10 μM also had teratogenic properties with 20% and 50% back-bone curvature respectively. Gene transcription analysis in zebrafish embryos as well as in juveniles showed down-regulation of the androgen receptor and androgen response genes, which further support that these BFRs are androgen antagonists and potential endocrine disrupting compounds. Genes involved in steroidogenesis were also down-regulated by these BFRs. In view of this, the impact of these BFRs on humans and wildlife needs further analysis. PMID:25818047

  15. Carry-over of dietary organochlorine pesticides, PCDD/Fs, PCBs, and brominated flame retardants to Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) fillets.

    PubMed

    Berntssen, Marc H G; Maage, A; Julshamn, K; Oeye, B E; Lundebye, A-K

    2011-03-01

    Information on carry-over of contaminants from feed to animal food products is essential for appropriate human risk assessment of feed contaminants. The carry-over of potentially hazardous persistent organic pollutants (POPs) from feed to fillet was assessed in consumption sized Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). Relative carry-over (defined as the fraction of a certain dietary POP retained in the fillet) was assessed in a controlled feeding trial, which provided fillet retention of dietary organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), dioxins (PCDD/Fs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and brominated flame retardants (BFRs). Highest retention was found for OCPs, BFRs and PCBs (31-58%), and the lowest retentions were observed for PCDD/Fs congeners (10-34%). National monitoring data on commercial fish feed and farmed Atlantic salmon on the Norwegian market were used to provide commercially relevant feed-to-fillet transfer factors (calculated as fillet POP level divided by feed POP level), which ranged from 0.4 to 0.5, which is a factor 5-10 times higher than reported for terrestrial meat products. For the OCP with one of the highest relative carry-over, toxaphene, uptake and elimination kinetics were established. Model simulations that are based on the uptake and elimination kinetics gave predicted levels that were in agreement with the measured values. Application of the model to the current EU upper limit for toxaphene in feed (50 μg kg(-1)) gave maximum fillet levels of 22 μg kg(-1), which exceeds the estimated permissible level (21 μg kg(-1)) for toxaphene in fish food samples in Norway. PMID:21284993

  16. Test chamber and forensic microscopy investigation of the transfer of brominated flame retardants into indoor dust via abrasion of source materials.

    PubMed

    Rauert, C; Harrad, S; Suzuki, G; Takigami, H; Uchida, N; Takata, K

    2014-09-15

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have been detected in indoor dust in many studies, at concentrations spanning several orders of magnitude. Limited information is available on the pathways via which BFRs migrate from treated products into dust, yet the different mechanisms hypothesized to date may provide an explanation for the range of reported concentrations. In particular, transfer of BFRs to dust via abrasion of particles or fibers from treated products may explain elevated concentrations (up to 210 mg g(-1)) of low volatility BFRs like decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209). In this study, an indoor dust sample containing a low concentration of hexabromocyclododecane, or HBCD, (110 ng g(-1) ΣHBCDs) was placed on the floor of an in-house test chamber. A fabric curtain treated with HBCDs was placed on a mesh shelf 3 cm above the chamber floor and abrasion induced using a stirrer bar. This induced abrasion generated fibers of the curtain, which contaminated the dust, and ΣHBCD concentrations in the dust increased to between 4020 and 52 500 ng g(-1) for four different abrasion experiment times. The highly contaminated dust (ΣHBCD at 52 500 ng g(-1)) together with three archived dust samples from various UK microenvironments, were investigated with forensic microscopy techniques. These techniques included Micro X-ray fluorescent spectroscopy, scanning emission microscopy coupled with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with further BFR analysis on LC-MS/MS. Using these techniques, fibers or particles abraded from a product treated with BFRs were identified in all dust samples, thereby accounting for the elevated concentrations detected in the original dust (3500 to 88 800 ng g(-1) ΣHBCD and 24 000 to 1,438 000 ng g(-1) for BDE-209). This study shows how test chamber experiments alongside forensic microscopy techniques, can provide valuable insights into the pathways via which BFRs contaminate indoor dust. PMID:24984234

  17. Evaluation of spatial distribution and accumulation of novel brominated flame retardants, HBCD and PBDEs in an Italian subalpine lake using zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha).

    PubMed

    Poma, Giulia; Binelli, Andrea; Volta, Pietro; Roscioli, Claudio; Guzzella, Licia

    2014-01-01

    Because of the reduction in the use of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs), including 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane (BTBPE), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE), hexabromobenzene (HBB), and pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB), started to be marketed as alternatives to the banned formulations. In this study, the spatial distribution and accumulation of NBFRs, PBDEs, and HBCD in the biota have been investigated in the littoral compartment of a large and deep subalpine lake (Lake Maggiore, Northern Italy), using zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha and roach (Rutilus rutilus) as bioindicators. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the contamination of NBFRs in the freshwater invertebrate D. polymorpha. Contamination of zebra mussel due to PBEB, HBB, and BTBPE was low, ranging from 0.9 to 2.9 ng/g lipid weight, from 1.1 to 2.9 ng/g l.w., and from 3.5 to 9.5 ng/g l.w., respectively. PBEB and BTBPE in roach were always below the detection limit, while the contamination of HBB ranged from < limits of detection (LOD) to 1.74 ng/g l.w., indicating a weak contamination. DBDPE was < LOD in all the considered biological samples. Finally, HBCD was detected in all organic tissues with mean concentrations up to 74.4 ng/g l.w. PBDE results, supported by principal component analysis elaboration, suggested a possible contamination due to the congeners composing the penta- and deca-BDE technical formulations, which are present in the Lake Maggiore basin. The biomagnification factor values showed that tetra- and penta-BDE biomagnified, while octa-, nona-, and deca-BDE were still bioavailable and detectable in the fish muscles, but they do not biomagnified. Considering the other BFRs, only HBCD showed a moderate biomagnification potential. PMID:24756669

  18. Estimated intakes of brominated flame retardants via diet and dust compared to internal concentrations in a Swedish mother-toddler cohort.

    PubMed

    Sahlström, Leena M O; Sellström, Ulla; de Wit, Cynthia A; Lignell, Sanna; Darnerud, Per Ola

    2015-06-01

    Tri-decabrominated diphenyl ethers (tri-decaBDEs), isomer-specific hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) and 14 emerging brominated flame retardants (EBFRs) were determined in Swedish market basket samples, two pooled breast milk samples and house dust collected in homes of first-time mothers. Daily dietary and dust intakes were estimated for the mothers and their toddlers and compared to previously reported levels in serum of both the mothers and toddlers and in feces of the toddlers (n=20). Diet was the main contributor for intake of ΣpentaBDE and α-tetrabromoethylcyclohexane (DBE-DBCH) for both mothers and toddlers. For ΣoctaBDE, ΣHBCD and pentabromobenzene (PBBz), dietary intake was more important for mothers while house dust ingestion was more important for toddlers. House dust was the main exposure route for ΣdecaBDE, decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE), 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EH-TBB), bis(2-ethylhexyl)tetrabromophthalate (BEH-TEBP), bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane (BTBPE) and pentabromotoluene (PBT) for both mothers and toddlers. Significant correlations (Spearmans, α<0.05) were found between the mothers' BDE serum concentrations and their consumption of meat and fish while no correlations were found between BFR dietary intake and serum or feces concentrations in toddlers. Octa-decaBDE congener concentrations in serum and feces of toddlers were significantly correlated to those in house dust. BDE-207 and -208 concentrations in serum of mothers were significantly correlated with the nonaBDEs in house dust. The correlations between house dust and internal concentrations and comparison of the house dust and dietary contributions to the estimated daily intakes suggest that dust exposure plays a larger role for the octa-decaBDE body burden in toddlers than in their mothers. PMID:25850971

  19. Spatial and temporal trends in brominated flame retardants in seabirds from the Pacific coast of Canada.

    PubMed

    Miller, Aroha; Elliott, John E; Elliott, Kyle H; Guigueno, Mélanie F; Wilson, Laurie K; Lee, Sandi; Idrissi, Abde

    2014-12-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD) are bioaccumulative flame retardants. PBDEs increased in many ecosystems during the late 20th century, but recently have declined in some environments. To examine trends in the northern Pacific, we analysed PBDEs, HBCDD and carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes (δ13C and δ15N) to account for dietary effects in archived eggs of three seabird species from British Columbia, Canada, 1990-2011 (rhinoceros auklets, Cerorhinca monocerata; Leach's storm-petrels, Oceanodroma leucorhoa; ancient murrelets, Synthliboramphus antiquus, 2009 only). PBDEs increased until approximately 2000 and then decreased, while HBCDD increased exponentially throughout the examined period. No significant changes in dietary tracers were observed. HBCDD and ΣPBDE levels varied among species; ΣPBDE also varied among sites. Temporal changes in contaminant concentrations are unlikely to have been caused by dietary changes, and likely reflect the build-up followed by decreases associated with voluntary phase-outs and regulations implemented in North America to control PBDEs. PMID:25194271

  20. Transcriptional and Epigenetic Mechanisms Underlying Enhanced in Vitro Adipocyte Differentiation by the Brominated Flame Retardant BDE-47

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that exposure to endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) may play a role in the development of obesity. EDCs such as the flame retardant 2,2′,4,4′-tetrabrominated diphenyl ether (BDE-47) have been shown to enhance adipocyte differentiation in the murine 3T3-L1 model. The mechanisms by which EDCs direct preadipocytes to form adipocytes are poorly understood. Here, we examined transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms underlying the induction of in vitro adipocyte differentiation by BDE-47. Quantitative high content microscopy revealed concentration-dependent enhanced adipocyte differentiation following exposure to BDE-47 or the antidiabetic drug troglitazone (TROG). BDE-47 modestly activated the key adipogenic transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) in COS7 cells, transiently transfected with a GAL4 reporter construct. Increased gene expression was observed for Pparγ2, leptin (Lep), and glucose-6-phophatase catalytic subunit (G6pc) in differentiated 3T3-L1 cells after BDE-47 exposure compared to TROG. Methylation-sensitive high resolution melting (MS-HRM) revealed significant demethylation of three CpG sites in the Pparγ2 promoter after exposure to both BDE-47 and TROG in differentiated 3T3-L1 cells. This study shows the potential of BDE-47 to induce adipocyte differentiation through various mechanisms that include Pparγ2 gene induction and promoter demethylation accompanied by activation of PPARγ, and possible disruption of glucose homeostasis and IGF1 signaling. PMID:24559133

  1. Comparative toxicity of a brominated flame retardant (tetrabromobisphenol A) on microalgae with single and multi-species bioassays.

    PubMed

    Debenest, Timothée; Petit, Anne-Nöelle; Gagné, François; Kohli, Mohan; Nguyen, Nien; Blaise, Christian

    2011-09-01

    The potential threat of emerging chemicals to the aquatic flora is a major issue. The purpose of the study was to develop a multispecies microalgae test in order to determine the impact of species interactions on the cytoxicity of an emergent toxic contaminant: the tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA). Single and multi-species tests were thus performed to study the effects of this flame retardant on two microalgae (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Nitzschia palea) commonly observed in freshwater. A synthetic medium was designed to allow the growth of both species. The algae were exposed to 1.8, 4.8, 9.2, 12.9 and 16.5 μM of TBBPA for 72 h. After staining with fluorescein diacetate (FDA), viable cells of each alga species were analyzed by flow cytometry based on chlorophyll autofluorescence and intracellular esterase activity. Density and abundance of viable cells were assessed to follow the population growth and the cell viability. In TBBPA treated samples, the growth of the two microalgae was significantly inhibited at the three highest concentrations (9.2, 12.9 and 16.5 μM) in the two tests. At the end of the experiment (t=72 h), the cell viability was also significantly smaller at these concentrations. The decreases of growth rate and viable cell abundance in TBBPA treated populations of N. palea were significantly higher in multi-species test in comparison with the single-species test. No significant differences were noticed between the two tests for P. subcapitata populations exposed to TBBPA. PMID:21723583

  2. Releasing-addition method for the flame-photometric determination of calcium in thermal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowe, J.J.

    1963-01-01

    Study of the interferences of silica and sulfate in the flame-photometric determination of calcium in thermal waters has led to the development of a method requiring no prior chemical separations. The interference effects of silica, sulfate, potassium, sodium, aluminum, and phosphate are overcome by an addition technique coupled with the use of magnesium as a releasing agent. ?? 1963.

  3. Teaching about Flame Retardants. A Joint Israeli-Dutch Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesner, Miri; de Vos, Wobbe

    2001-01-01

    Flame retardants make interesting chemistry and moreover, the chemistry is highly relevant from an everyday life point of view. This article reports on a joint Israeli-Dutch project aimed at teaching the production, properties, and applications of some bromine-containing flame retardants, including their environmental aspects, in secondary education. We provide information on the nature of flame retardants in general and the mechanisms of flame retardation. In addition, we offer a complete pedagogical presentation of the topic, including the use of video and some simple laboratory experiments, that was developed and successfully implemented in both countries.

    Featured on the Cover

  4. Mineral resource of the month: bromine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2009-01-01

    The article offers information on bromine, a natural element considered as a dissolved species in seawater, saltwater lakes and underground brines linked with petroleum deposits. Bromine belongs to the halogen group of elements and is characterized with brownish-red color and beach-like odor. It is commonly used in flame retardants, agriculture and drilling.

  5. Variation, levels and profiles of organochlorines and brominated flame retardants in great tit (Parus major) eggs from different types of sampling locations in Flanders (Belgium).

    PubMed

    Van den Steen, Evi; Jaspers, Veerle L B; Covaci, Adrian; Dauwe, Tom; Pinxten, Rianne; Neels, Hugo; Eens, Marcel

    2008-02-01

    Small-scale geographical variation in the occurrence of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) was investigated using the eggs of a terrestrial residential songbird species, the great tit (Parus major). In addition, we investigated the influence of the type of sampling location on the presence of these pollutants. To achieve this, 10 different sampling locations in Flanders (Belgium) were classified into 3 groups based on the extent of urbanisation, industrialisation and agriculture. The higher variance among sampling locations for the levels and profiles of PCBs and OCPs, suggests that local contamination sources are more important for the PCBs and OCPs compared to the PBDEs. Levels of PCBs and PBDEs were significantly higher in the industrialised sampling locations compared to the other locations. Sum PCB and sum PBDE levels reached up to 6050 and 79 ng/g lipid weight, respectively. PCBs and PBDEs were highly positively correlated for all groups, suggesting similar exposure pathways and/or mechanisms of accumulation. Significantly higher levels of OCPs (sum OCPs up to 2683 ng/g lipid weight) were detected in the rural sampling locations situated in a residential area. This suggests that local historical usage of OCPs by inhabitants may be an important source of contamination in Flanders. Contamination profiles differed also among the sampling locations. The rural sampling locations had a higher contribution of lower brominated BDE congeners, whereas the industrialised locations had a higher contribution of higher brominated congeners. The differences in contamination profiles among the sampling locations are probably due to differences in exposure. In conclusion, our results showed that the characteristics of a sampling location influence both the levels and profiles of PCBs, OCPs and PBDEs. PMID:17765970

  6. Distribution pattern of legacy and "novel" brominated flame retardants in different particle size fractions of indoor dust in Birmingham, United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Al-Omran, Layla Salih; Harrad, Stuart

    2016-08-01

    This study investigates the particle size distribution of eight polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and five "novel" brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) in settled house dust. Elevated surface dust (ESD) and floor dust (FD) were collected from 5 homes in Birmingham, UK, yielding a total of 10 samples. Each sample was fractionated into three different particle sizes: 125-250 μm (P1), 63-125 μm (P2) and 25-63 μm (P3). Non-fractionated bulk dust samples (BD) were also analysed. BDE-209 predominated, comprising an average 74.3%, 77.3%, 69.2%, and 62.7% ΣBFRs of BD, P1, P2 and P3 respectively. Σ5NBFRs contributed 24.2%, 21.5%, 29.0% and 35.3% ΣBFRs, while Σ7tri-hepta-BDEs represented 1.5%, 1.2%, 1.7%, and 2.0% ΣBFRs. BEH-TEBP was the predominant NBFR contributing 76.9%, 75.1%, 83.1%, and 83.9% ΣNBFRs in BD, P1, P2 and P3 respectively; followed by DBDPE which contributed 20.1%, 21.9%, 14.1% and 13.9% ΣNBFRs. EH-TBB, BTBPE and PBEB were the least abundant NBFRs. Concentrations of Σ7tri-hepta-BDEs and BEH-TEBP in P3 exceeded significantly (P < 0.05) those in P2, with those in P2 exceeding significantly those in P1. In contrast, no significant differences were found between concentrations of BDE-209, EH-TBB, BTBPE, and DBDPE in different particle size fractions. Concentrations of Σ7tri-hepta-BDEs, BDE-209, and BEH-TEBP in ESD exceeded significantly those in FD (P < 0.05). Normalising BFR concentrations to organic carbon content, did not alter these findings. This suggests that differences in BFR concentrations between different particle size fractions are caused by variations in particle surface area to volume ratio, rather than by variations in organic carbon content. PMID:27213241

  7. Examining the relationship between brominated flame retardants (BFR) exposure and changes of thyroid hormone levels around e-waste dismantling sites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongmei; Zhang, Yuan; Liu, Qian; Wang, Feifei; Nie, Jing; Qian, Yan

    2010-09-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) released from e-waste related activities may affect the health of local people. Assessing the impact of e-waste exposure during recycling and dismantling activities on local people's thyroid hormone levels is an area of ongoing research. During November and December 2008, the process of e-waste recycling and dismantling was investigated, and 236 occupation-exposed people and 89 non-occupation-exposed people approximate to the e-waste recycling sites were surveyed; their thyroid hormone levels (THs), thyrotropins (TSH) and BFRs levels in serum were assayed. Multiple regression models were constructed to analyze the changes of serum THs and TSH in the people living in the exposure area (exposure group) and the people in the control group. Covariates known to be or likely to be associated with THs, TSH and BFRs levels were analyzed. Lower level of Triiodothyronine (T(3)) in both occupation-exposed and non-occupation-exposed group were observed (p<0.01), when compared with the control group, and the same trend was obtained for free triiodothyronine (fT(3)) and free thyroxine (fT4) (p<0.01). However, no significant difference in thyroxine (T(4)) was found between the two groups. The level of TSH in the e-waste recycling occupational-exposed group ranged from 0.00 to 5.00microIU/ml with a mean of 1.26microIU/ml, whereas the level of TSH in the control group was from 0.03 to 5.54microIU/ml with a mean of 1.57microIU/ml. This study revealed that people having worked on e-waste recycling and dismantling had significantly lower TSH compared with the control group (p<0.01). Moreover, the level of BDE-205 is positively associated with the level of T4, as confirmed by the linear regression model (unstandardized regression coefficient, beta=0.25, rho=0.001) and a weaker positive relation was also found between the levels of BDE-126 and T4. Meanwhile, a weak negative relation was found between the levels of PBB 103 and T3, and between the levels

  8. Dioxins, PCBs, chlorinated pesticides and brominated flame retardants in free-range chicken eggs from peri-urban areas in Arusha, Tanzania: Levels and implications for human health.

    PubMed

    Polder, A; Müller, M B; Brynildsrud, O B; de Boer, J; Hamers, T; Kamstra, J H; Lie, E; Mdegela, R H; Moberg, H; Nonga, H E; Sandvik, M; Skaare, J U; Lyche, J L

    2016-05-01

    The environment in the northern part of Tanzania is influenced by rapid population growth, and increased urbanization. Urban agriculture is common and of economic value for low income families. In Arusha, many households sell eggs from free-ranging backyard chicken. In 2011, 159 eggs from different households in five different locations in Arusha were collected, homogenized, pooled into 28 composite samples and analyzed for a wide selection of POPs. Levels of POPs varied widely within and between the locations. The levels of dieldrin and ΣDDT ranged between 2 and 98,791 and 2 and 324ng/g lipid weight (lw), respectively. EU MRLs of 0.02mg/kg dieldrin for eggs were exceeded in 4/28 samples. PCBs, HCHs, chlordanes, toxaphenes and endosulfanes were found at lower frequency and levels. Brominated flame retardants (BFRs), e.g polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromphenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) were present in 100%, 60% and 46% of the composite samples, respectively. Octa-and deca-BDEs were the dominating PBDEs and BDE 209 levels ranged between

  9. Levels of Non-Polybrominated Diphenyl Ether Brominated Flame Retardants in Residential House Dust Samples and Fire Station Dust Samples in California

    PubMed Central

    Brown, F Reber; Whitehead, Todd P; Park, June-Soo; Metayer, Catherine; Petreas, Myrto X

    2014-01-01

    Eleven novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) were analyzed in dust samples from California homes as a part of the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study (NCCLS) and from the living quarters of California fire stations as a part of the Firefighter Occupational Exposure (FOX) study using high resolution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The eleven NBFRs, were: α- and β-1,2-dibromo-4-(1,2-dibromoethyl)cyclohexane (α- and β-DBE-DBCH), 2-bromoallyl 2,3,6-tribromophenylether (BATE), pentabromotoluene (PBT), pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB), 2,3-dibromopropyl 2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (TBP-DBPE), hexabromobenzene (HBB), 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EH-TBB), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane (BTBPE), bis(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (BEH-TEBP), and decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE). Six of the seven NBFRs that are produced in relatively small quantities (i.e., α−, β−DBE-DBCH, BATE, PBEB, PBT, TBP-DBPE) were measured close to or below the limit of quantitation (0.64 ng/g) in both the NCCLS and FOX samples, and the seventh, HBB, was measured at median concentrations of 1.85 ng/g and 9.40 ng/g in the NCCLS and FOX samples, respectively. The remaining four NBFRs, EH-TBB, BEH-TEBP, BTBPE, and DBDPE, are produced in higher quantities, and were detected at median concentrations of 337 ng/g, 186 ng/g, 22.3, ng/g, and 82.8 ng/g, respectively in the NCCLS samples, and at median concentrations of 2687 ng/g, 2076 ng/g, 28.4 ng/g, and 161 ng/g, respectively, in the FOX samples. Concentrations of NBFRs in the NCCLS and FOX dust samples were several times lower than concentrations of PBDEs previously measured in the same samples. Concentrations of NBFRs in the NCCLS and FOX dust samples were generally comparable to concentrations of NBFRs in other studies of house dust from the US and Canada. PMID:25261858

  10. Levels of non-polybrominated diphenyl ether brominated flame retardants in residential house dust samples and fire station dust samples in California.

    PubMed

    Brown, F Reber; Whitehead, Todd P; Park, June-Soo; Metayer, Catherine; Petreas, Myrto X

    2014-11-01

    Eleven novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) were analyzed in dust samples from California homes as a part of the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study (NCCLS) and from the living quarters of California fire stations as a part of the Firefighter Occupational Exposure (FOX) study using high resolution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The eleven NBFRs were α- and β-1,2-dibromo-4-(1,2-dibromoethyl)cyclohexane (α- and β-DBE-DBCH), 2-bromoallyl 2,3,6-tribromophenylether (BATE), pentabromotoluene (PBT), pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB), 2,3-dibromopropyl 2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (TBP-DBPE), hexabromobenzene (HBB), 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EH-TBB), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane (BTBPE), bis(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (BEH-TEBP), and decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE). Six of the seven NBFRs that are produced in relatively small quantities (i.e., α-, β-DBE-DBCH, BATE, PBEB, PBT, TBP-DBPE) were measured close to or below the limit of quantitation (0.64 ng/g) in both the NCCLS and FOX samples, and the seventh, HBB, was measured at median concentrations of 1.85 ng/g and 9.40 ng/g in the NCCLS and FOX samples, respectively. The remaining four NBFRs, EH-TBB, BEH-TEBP, BTBPE, and DBDPE, are produced in higher quantities, and were detected at median concentrations of 337 ng/g, 186 ng/g, 22.3 ng/g, and 82.8 ng/g, respectively in the NCCLS samples, and at median concentrations of 2687 ng/g, 2076 ng/g, 28.4 ng/g, and 161 ng/g, respectively, in the FOX samples. Concentrations of NBFRs in the NCCLS and FOX dust samples were several times lower than concentrations of PBDEs previously measured in the same samples. Concentrations of NBFRs in the NCCLS and FOX dust samples were generally comparable to concentrations of NBFRs in other studies of house dust from the US and Canada. PMID:25261858

  11. Pollution profiles and risk assessment of PBDEs and phenolic brominated flame retardants in water environments within a typical electronic waste dismantling region.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jukun; An, Taicheng; Zhang, Chaosheng; Li, Guiying

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the pollution profiles of various typical brominated flame retardants in water and surface sediment near a typical electronic waste dismantling region in southern China. We found that polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), 2,4,6-tribromophenol (TBP), pentabromophenol (PeBP), tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), and bisphenol A (BPA) were ubiquitous in the water and sediment samples collected in the study region. In water, Σ19PBDEs (sum of all 20 PBDE congeners studied except BDE-209, which was below the detection limit) levels ranged from 0.31 to 8.9 × 10(2) ng L(-1). TBP, PeBP, TBBPA, and BPA concentrations in the water samples ranged from not being detectable (nd-under the detection limit) to 3.2 × 10(2) (TBP), from nd to 37 (PeBP), from nd to 9.2 × 10(2) (TBBPA) and from nd-8.6 × 10(2) ng L(-1) (BPA). In sediment, Σ19PBDEs ranged from nd to 5.6 × 10(3) ng g(-1), while BDE-209 was the predominant congener, with a range of nd to 3.5 × 10(3) ng g(-1). Tri- to hepta-BDE concentrations were significantly (p < 0.01) correlated with each other, except for BDE-71 and BDE-183, and octa- to nona-BDEs concentrations were significantly (p < 0.05) correlated with each other, except for BDE-208. BDE-209 was not significantly correlated with tri- to nona-BDEs. Risk assessments indicated that the water and sediment across the sampling sites posed no estrogenic risk. However, different eco-toxicity risk degrees at three trophic levels did exist at most sampling sites. PMID:25503846

  12. Persistent organic pollutants, brominated flame retardants and synthetic musks in fish from remote alpine lakes in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Peter; Kohler, Martin; Gujer, Erika; Zennegg, Markus; Lanfranchi, Marco

    2007-04-01

    Remote alpine lakes do not receive any direct aquatic inputs from anthropogenic activities. Therefore, these ecosystems may receive persistent organic compounds (POPs) by direct atmospheric deposition, only. Consequently, fish dwelling in these ecosystems represent an excellent indicator for the long-term atmospheric input of bioaccumulating and persistent contaminants. In the present study, fish from seven remote alpine lakes, located between 2062 and 2637 m above sea level in south eastern Switzerland (Grisons), were investigated. Lipid-based fish tissue concentrations of pesticides including dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its transformation products (2,4'-DDT, 4,4'-DDT, 2,4'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDD), 4,4'-DDD, 2,4'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethene (DDE), 4,4'-DDE), as well as dieldrin, heptachlor exo-epoxide (HPEX), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCH), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/F), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) were measured. In addition, seven synthetic musk compounds (Crysolide (ADBI), Phantolide (AHMI), Fixolide (AHTN), Traseolide (ATII), Galaxolide (HHCB), musk ketone (MK), and musk xylene (MX)) were determined. Concentrations of PCB, PCDD/F, and PBDE were in the same range as in fish from the major lakes situated in the Swiss plateau, indicating mainly atmospheric input of these persistent compounds. In contrast, concentrations of synthetic musks which are used as fragrances in laundry detergents and cosmetic products were distinctly lower than concentrations in fish from Swiss plateau lakes which receive inputs from waste water treatment plants. PMID:17207835

  13. Electrophilic Anti Addition of Bromine to 2-Methylbut-2-Ene with the N-Methylpyrrolidin-2-One Hydrotribromide Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berrien, Jean-Francois; Provot, Olivier; Joseph, Delphine; Bekaert, Alain

    2004-01-01

    The N-methylpyrrolidin-2-one hydrotribromide complex (MPHT) is a stable solid that can be stored several months at room temperature. The MPHT is not corrosive, not necrosing, less toxic and easier to handle for students as compared to the molecular bromine.

  14. Halogenated flame retardants in the Great Lakes environment.

    PubMed

    Venier, Marta; Salamova, Amina; Hites, Ronald A

    2015-07-21

    Flame retardants are widely used industrial chemicals that are added to polymers, such as polyurethane foam, to prevent them from rapidly burning if exposed to a small flame or a smoldering cigarette. Flame retardants, especially brominated flame retardants, are added to many polymeric products at percent levels and are present in most upholstered furniture and mattresses. Most of these chemicals are so-called "additive" flame retardants and are not chemically bound to the polymer; thus, they migrate from the polymeric materials into the environment and into people. As a result, some of these chemicals have become widespread pollutants, which is a concern given their possible adverse health effects. Perhaps because of their environmental ubiquity, the most heavily used group of brominated flame retardants, the polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), was withdrawn from production and use during the 2004-2013 period. This led to an increasing demand for other flame retardants, including other brominated aromatics and organophosphate esters. Although little is known about the use or production volumes of these newer flame retardants, it is evident that some of these chemicals are also becoming pervasive in the environment and in humans. In this Account, we describe our research on the occurrence of halogenated and organophosphate flame retardants in the environment, with a specific focus on the Great Lakes region. This Account starts with a short introduction to the first generation of brominated flame retardants, the polybrominated biphenyls, and then presents our measurements of their replacement, the PBDEs. We summarize our data on PBDE levels in babies, bald eagles, and in air. Once these compounds came off the market, we began to measure several of the newer flame retardants in air collected on the shores of the Great Lakes once every 12 days. These new measurements focus on a tetrabrominated benzoate, a tetrabrominated phthalate, a hexabrominated diphenoxyethane

  15. On the effect of carbon monoxide addition on soot formation in a laminar ethylene/air coflow diffusion flame

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Hongsheng; Thomson, Kevin A.; Smallwood, Gregory J.

    2009-06-15

    The effect of carbon monoxide addition on soot formation in an ethylene/air diffusion flame is investigated by experiment and detailed numerical simulation. The paper focuses on the chemical effect of carbon monoxide addition by comparing the results of carbon monoxide and nitrogen diluted flames. Both experiment and simulation show that although overall the addition of carbon monoxide monotonically reduces the formation of soot, the chemical effect promotes the formation of soot in an ethylene/air diffusion flame. The further analysis of the details of the numerical result suggests that the chemical effect of carbon monoxide addition may be caused by the modifications to the flame temperature, soot surface growth and oxidation reactions. Flame temperature increases relative to a nitrogen diluted flame, which results in a higher surface growth rate, when carbon monoxide is added. Furthermore, the addition of carbon monoxide increases the concentration of H radical owing to the intensified forward rate of the reaction CO + OH = CO{sub 2} + H and therefore increases the surface growth reaction rates. The addition of carbon monoxide also slows the oxidation rate of soot because the same reaction CO + OH = CO{sub 2} + H results in a lower concentration of OH. (author)

  16. Flame retardant brominated styrene-based polymers. V. Synthesis and characterization of dibromostyrene and butyl acrylate latices with and without itaconic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.L.; Favstritsky, N.A.; Hemmerly, D.M.

    1995-12-01

    Dibranostyrene and butyl acrylate lattices with and without itaconic acid having desirable physical properties in combination with flame retardancy are prepared by an emulsion polymerization techniques Both lattices were characterized in terms of glass transition temperature (Tg), residual monomer, solids, Brookfield viscosity, UV stability and flame retardancy.

  17. Towards graphene bromide: bromination of graphite oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankovský, O.; Šimek, P.; Klimová, K.; Sedmidubský, D.; Matějková, S.; Pumera, M.; Sofer, Z.

    2014-05-01

    Halogenated graphene derivatives are interesting for their outstanding physical and chemical properties. In this paper, we present various methods for the synthesis of brominated graphene derivatives by the bromination of graphite oxides. Graphite oxides, prepared according to either the Hummers or Hofmann method, were brominated using bromine or hydrobromic acid under reflux or in an autoclave at elevated temperatures and pressures. The influence of both graphite oxide precursors on the resulting brominated graphenes was investigated by characterization of the graphenes, which was carried out using various techniques, including SEM, SEM-EDS, high-resolution XPS, FTIR, STA and Raman spectroscopy. In addition, the resistivity of the brominated graphenes was measured and the electrochemical properties were investigated by cyclic voltammetry. Although the brominated graphenes were structurally similar, they had remarkably different bromine concentrations. The most highly brominated graphene (bromine concentration above 26 wt%) exhibited a C/O ratio above 44 and partial hydrogenation. Brominated graphenes with such properties could be used for reversible bromine storage or as a starting material for further chemical modifications.Halogenated graphene derivatives are interesting for their outstanding physical and chemical properties. In this paper, we present various methods for the synthesis of brominated graphene derivatives by the bromination of graphite oxides. Graphite oxides, prepared according to either the Hummers or Hofmann method, were brominated using bromine or hydrobromic acid under reflux or in an autoclave at elevated temperatures and pressures. The influence of both graphite oxide precursors on the resulting brominated graphenes was investigated by characterization of the graphenes, which was carried out using various techniques, including SEM, SEM-EDS, high-resolution XPS, FTIR, STA and Raman spectroscopy. In addition, the resistivity of the brominated

  18. Effect of Nitrogen Additives on Flame Retardant Action of Tributyl Phosphate: Phosphorus – Nitrogen Synergism

    SciTech Connect

    Gaan, Sabyasachi; Sun, Gang; Hutches, Katherine; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of nitrogen additives like urea, guanidine carbonate and melamine formaldehyde on the flame retardant efficacy of tributyl phosphate (TBP) has been investigated. From the LOI tests on treated cotton it is clear that the nitrogen additives have synergistic action. Estimation of activation energy of decomposition of treated cotton indicated that nitrogen additives enhance the thermal stability during the burning process. SEM pictures of chars formed after LOI test showed the formation of protective polymeric coating on the surface. The surface of chars formed were evaluated using FTIR-ATR and XPS analysis which showed that the coating was composed of Phosphorus-Nitrogen-Oxygen containing species. Formation of this coating during the burning process could lead to the synergistic interaction of phosphorus and nitrogen. Based on the experimental data we have further proposed several reaction mechanisms which could contribute to synergistic action and formation of protective coating on the surface of char.

  19. Lithium-Ion Electrolytes Containing Phosphorous-Based, Flame-Retardant Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Smith, Kiah A.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Prakash, G. K. Surya

    2010-01-01

    Future NASA missions aimed at exploring Mars, the Moon, and the outer planets require rechargeable batteries that can operate over a wide temperature range (-60 to +60 C) to satisfy the requirements of various applications. In addition, many of these applications will require improved safety, due to their use by humans. Currently, the state-of-the-art lithium-ion (Li-ion) system has been demonstrated to operate over a wide range of temperatures (-40 to +40 C); however, abuse conditions can often lead to cell rupture and fire. The nature of the electrolyte can greatly affect the propensity of the cell/battery to catch fire, given the flammability of the organic solvents used within. Li-ion electrolytes have been developed that contain a flame-retardant additive in conjunction with fluorinated co-solvents to provide a safe system with a wide operating temperature range. Previous work incorporated fluorinated esters into multi-component electrolyte formulations, which were demonstrated to cover a temperature range from 60 to +60 C. This work was described in Fluoroester Co-Solvents for Low-Temperature Li+ Cells (NPO-44626), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 33, No. 9 (September 2009), p. 37; and Optimized Li-Ion Electrolytes Con tain ing Fluorinated Ester Co-Solvents (NPO-45824), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 3 (March 2010), p. 48. Other previous work improved the safety characteristics of the electrolytes by adding flame-retardant additives such as triphenyl phosphate (TPhPh), tri-butyl phosphate (TBuPh), triethyl phosphate (TEtPh), and bis(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) methyl phosphonate (TFMPo). The current work involves further investigation of other types of flame-retardant additives, including tris(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) phosphate, tris(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) phosphite, triphenylphosphite, diethyl ethylphosphonate, and diethyl phenylphosphonate added to an electrolyte composition intended for wide operating temperatures. In general, many of the formulations investigated in this

  20. Alkaline reforming of brominated fire-retardant plastics: fate of bromine and antimony.

    PubMed

    Onwudili, Jude A; Williams, Paul T

    2009-02-01

    High-impact polystyrene (HIPS) flame retarded with decabromodiphenyl ether (DDE), has been reacted in supercritical water from 380 to 450 degrees C and 21.5 to 31.0 MPa pressure in a batch reactor. Different concentrations of sodium hydroxide additive were used in situ to neutralize the corrosive inorganic bromine species released during the reactions. It appeared that supercritical water conditions lowered the decomposition temperature of both the fire-retardant DDE and HIPS. The reaction products included oils (up to 76 wt%), char (up to 18 wt%) and gas (up to 2.4 wt%) which was mainly methane. The presence of the alkaline water led to up to 97 wt% debromination of the product oil, producing virtually bromine-free oil feedstock. The removal of antimony from the oil product during processing was of the order of 98 wt%. The oil consisted of many single- and multiple-ringed aromatic compounds, many of which had alkyl substituents and/or aliphatic C(n)-bridges (n=1-4). The major single-ringed compounds included toluene, xylenes, ethylbenzene, propylbenzene and alpha-methylstyrene. Bibenzyl (diphenylethane), stilbene, diphenylmethane, diphenylpropane, diphenylcyclopropane, diphenylpropene, diphenylbutane, diphenylbutene and diphenylbuta-1,3-diene were the major C(n)-bridged compounds. Diphenyl ether and acetophenone were the major oxygenated compounds found. The process thus has the potential to produce bromine-free and antimony-free oils from fire-retardant plastics. PMID:19054543

  1. Experimental evaluation of water mist with metal chloride additives for suppressing CH4/air cup-burner flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianghong; Cong, Beihua

    2013-06-01

    In order to investigate the fire suppression effectiveness of water mist with metal chloride additives, ultrafine water mists of these salts with diameters about 10μm were introduced into CH4/air non-premixed flame in the cup burner. Results showed that these droplets hard to make itself to the flame front under the cup burner flow conditions functioned as a carrier of the vaporized solid particles or its decomposed materials. The metal chloride improved fire suppression efficacy of water mist which were affected by the type and concentration of metal chloride. On a mass basis, there is a fire suppression effectiveness relationship of MgCl2flame suppression ability of water solution/metal chlorides improves as the concentration of metal chlorides increase. However, upper additive limits exist due to the associated limiting vapour pressure of the additive.

  2. Brominated dibenzofurans

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Brominated dibenzofurans ; no CASRN Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  3. Effect of urea additive on the thermal decomposition kinetics of flame retardant greige cotton nonwoven fabric

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Urea is well known to have a synergistic action with phosphorus-based flame retardants such as diammonium phosphate (DAP) in enhancing the flame retardant performance of cellulosic materials, but its effect on their thermal decomposition kinetics has not been thoroughly studied. In this study, the ...

  4. EFFECT OF ORGANOPHOSPHORUS FLAME RETARDANTS ON NEURONAL DEVELOPMENT IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increased use of organophosphorus compounds as alternatives to brominated flame retardants (BFRs) has led to widespread human exposure, There is, however, limited information on their potential health effects. This study compared the effects of nii ne organophosphorus flame...

  5. Bromine Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, B

    2001-04-09

    The production and handling in 1999 of about 200 million kilograms of bromine plus substantial derivatives thereof by Great Lakes Chemical Corp. and Albemarle Corporation in their southern Arkansas refineries gave OSHA Occupational Injury/Illness Rates (OIIR) in the range of 0.74 to 1.60 reportable OIIRs per 200,000 man hours. OIIRs for similar industries and a wide selection of other U.S. industries range from 1.6 to 23.9 in the most recent OSHA report. Occupational fatalities for the two companies in 1999 were zero compared to a range in the U.S.of zero for all computer manufacturing to 0.0445 percent for all of agriculture, forestry and fishing in the most recent OSHA report. These results show that bromine and its compounds can be considered as safe chemicals as a result of the bromine safety standards and practices at the two companies. The use of hydrobromic acid as an electrical energy storage medium in reversible PEM fuel cells is discussed. A study in 1979 of 20 megawatt halogen working fluid power plants by Oronzio de Nora Group found such energy to cost 2 to 2.5 times the prevailing base rate at that time. New conditions may reduce this relative cost. The energy storage aspect allows energy delivery at maximum demand times where the energy commands premium rates. The study also found marginal cost and performance advantages for hydrobromic acid over hydrochloric acid working fluid. Separate studies in the late 70s by General Electric also showed marginal performance advantages for hydrobromic acid.

  6. Distribution of brominated flame retardants and dechloranes between sediments and benthic fish--A comparison of a freshwater and marine habitat.

    PubMed

    Sühring, Roxana; Busch, Friederike; Fricke, Nicolai; Kötke, Danijela; Wolschke, Hendrik; Ebinghaus, Ralf

    2016-01-15

    A total of 53 halogenated flame retardants (HFRs) were analysed in sediments, European eels and dabs from both freshwater and marine sampling stations in the German Bight and the river Elbe. Classic HFRs, such as polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs), were the highest concentrated HFRs in eels as well as in most dabs (apart from 1,2,5,6-tetrabromocyclooctane (TBCO)). In sediments, on the other hand, alternate BFRs and especially dechloranes dominated the contamination pattern. Dabs were still found to be statistically representative for the contamination patterns and relative magnitude in sediments from their respective habitats. Contamination patterns in eels seemed to be more driven by the contamination situation in the food chain or historical contamination of their habitat. Unsuspectedly the alternate flame retardant TBCO was found in comparably high concentrations (up to 12 ng g(-1) ww) in dabs from two sampling stations as well as in sediments from these stations (up to 1.2 ng g(-1) dw). It could not be detected in any other analysed fish or sediment samples, indicating a localised contamination source in the area. This study provides information on HFR contamination patterns and behaviour in both marine and freshwater sediments and their potential role as contamination source for benthic fish. PMID:26544886

  7. Bromination of Phenol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This "Science note" examines the bromination of phenol, a reaction that is commonly taught at A-level and IB (International Baccalaureate) as an example of electrophilic substitution. Phenol undergoes bromination with bromine or bromine water at room temperature. A white precipitate of 2,4,6-tribromophenol is rapidly formed. This…

  8. Optimized Li-Ion Electrolytes Containing Triphenyl Phosphate as a Flame-Retardant Additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Krause, Frederick C.

    2011-01-01

    A number of future NASA missions involving the exploration of the Moon and Mars will be human-rated and thus require high-specific-energy rechargeable batteries that possess enhanced safety characteristics. Given that Li-ion technology is the most viable rechargeable energy storage device for near-term applications, effort has been devoted to improving the safety characteristics of this system. There is also a strong desire to develop Li-ion batteries with improved safety characteristics for terrestrial applications, most notably for hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) automotive applications. Therefore, extensive effort has been devoted recently to developing non-flammable electrolytes to reduce the flammability of the cells/battery. A number of electrolyte formulations have been developed, including systems that (1) incorporate greater concentrations of the flame-retardant additive (FRA); (2) use di-2,2,2-trifluoroethyl carbonate (DTFEC) as a co-solvent; (3) use 2,2,2- trifluoroethyl methyl carbonate (TFEMC); (4) use mono-fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) as a co-solvent and/or a replacement for ethylene carbonate in the electrolyte mixture; and (5) utilize vinylene carbonate as a "SEI promoting" electrolyte additive, to build on the favorable results previously obtained. To extend the family of electrolytes developed under previous work, a number of additional electrolyte formulations containing FRAs, most notably triphenyl phosphate (TPP), were investigated and demonstrated in experimental MCMB (mesocarbon micro beads) carbon- LiNi(0.8)Co(0.2)O2 cells. The use of higher concentrations of the FRA is known to reduce the flammability of the electrolyte solution, thus, a concentration range was investigated (i.e., 5 to 20 percent by volume). The desired concentration of the FRA is the highest amount tolerable without adversely affecting the performance in terms of reversibility, ability to operate over a wide temperature range, and

  9. Infrared spectral analysis of MCF-7 cells treated with serum-lipid extracts segregates predominantly brominated flame retardant-exposed subjects from those with mainly organochlorine exposures.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xinhui; Walsh, Michael J; Wei, Xiaomin; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L; Thomas, Gareth O; Jones, Kevin C; Martin, Francis L

    2007-08-15

    We set out to determine whether infrared (IR) spectra of treated MCF-7 cells derived using attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform IR (ATR) microspectroscopy could be used to signature different exposures. Serum-lipid samples from residents living in an electronics waste (e-waste) dismantling region (Region E, n = 26) in the south of P.R. China or from a nearby region (Region S, n = 20) associated with the fishing industry were obtained. Following extraction, estrogen receptor-positive MCF-7 cells were treated for 24 h with < or = 5-mg lipid equivalent of individual extracts prior to ethanol fixation; subsequently, IR spectra of treated-cell populations were obtained using ATR microspectroscopy. Levels of organochlorinated and brominated compounds in parallel extracts were also determined. Principal component analysis (PCA) was employed to ascertain whether IR-spectral scores would cluster according to particular cohort. Scores plots following PCA highlighted significant clustering dependent on with which set of extracts MCF-7 cells were treated. This suggests marked differences in the cell-biochemical modulating effects induced by either set of extracts. Analysis of contaminant profiles in the extracts showed that polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) accounted for 46.0% of total organohalogens and were higher than dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethanes (DDTs) in Region E; DDTs were the major contaminants (85.2% of total contaminant load) compared to PBDEs (8.7%) in Region S. These results suggest that ATR microspectroscopy can segregate cell-biochemical effects as a consequence of very different exposure paradigms. PMID:17874806

  10. Numerical study on the influence of hydrogen addition on soot formation in a laminar ethylene-air diffusion flame

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Hongsheng; Liu, Fengshan; Smallwood, Gregory J.; Guelder, OEmer L.

    2006-04-15

    The influence of hydrogen addition to the fuel of an atmosphere pressure coflow laminar ethylene-air diffusion flame on soot formation was studied by numerical simulation. A detailed gas-phase reaction mechanism, which includes aromatic chemistry up to four rings, and complex thermal and transport properties were used. The fully coupled elliptic governing equations were solved. The interactions between soot and gas-phase chemistry were taken into account. Radiation heat transfer from CO{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2}O, and soot was calculated using the discrete-ordinates method coupled to a statistical narrow-band-correlated K-based wide-band model. The predicted results were compared with the available experimental data and analyzed. It is indicated that the addition of hydrogen to the fuel in an ethylene-air diffusion flame suppresses soot formation through the effects of dilution and chemistry. This result is in agreement with available experiments. The simulations further suggest that the chemically inhibiting effect of hydrogen addition on soot formation is due to the decrease of hydrogen atom concentration in soot surface growth regions and higher concentration of molecular hydrogen in the lower flame region. (author)

  11. Formation of dioxin-like compounds from the pyrolysis of some halogenated flame retardants

    SciTech Connect

    Alsabbagh, A.M.

    1990-01-01

    Polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polybrominated dibenzofurans as well as polyhalogenated phenazines have been shown to form from the pyrolysis of some flame retardants. In addition, chlorine-bromine exchange was shown to occur in the formation of halogenated dibenzo-p-dioxins and halogenated phenazines when both chlorine and bromine sources are present in the pyrolysis mixture. There was no chlorine-hydrogen exchange observed in the formation of chloro-bromo-dibenzo-dioxins, chloro-bromo-dibenzofurans and chloro-bromophenazines. At high temperatures, the amino-group of the halogenated anilines may be replaced by oxygen and yield halogenated dibenzo-pdioxins and halogenated dibenzofurans, in addition to the halogenated phenazines. The complete substitution of bromine with chlorine was demonstrated to occur, which is probably why chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and chlorinated dibenzofurans are more widely spread than the brominated analogs, since chlorinated compounds are used in much larger quantities than the brominated compounds. The addition of antimony (III) oxide to the flame-retardant formulations showed initial increase in the formation of the halogenated dibenzo-p-dioxins and the halogenated phenazines. The mass spectra of bromo-phenazines, chloro-phenazines and chloro-bromo-phenazines have been presented. The similarity in the structure of the halogenated phenazines and the halogenated dibenzo-p-dioxins may be of interest to be used in the search of compounds with breast cancer therapeutic use, although the toxicity of the halogenated phenazines should be thoroughly investigated.

  12. Levels of brominated diphenylether, dibenzo-P-dioxin, and dibenzofuran in flue gases of a municipal waste combustor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to the extensive use of brominated flame retardants (BFRs), including brominated diphenylether (BDE) formulations, for various domestic and industrial applications, the presence of brominated chemicals in the waste stream is to be expected for decades. As much as 40% to 50% o...

  13. 21 CFR 180.30 - Brominated vegetable oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Brominated vegetable oil. 180.30 Section 180.30... Requirements for Certain Food Additives § 180.30 Brominated vegetable oil. The food additive brominated vegetable oil may be safely used in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The...

  14. Developmental toxicity of brominated flame retardants, tetrabromobisphenol A and 1,2,5,6,9,10-hexabromocyclododecane, in rat offspring after maternal exposure from mid-gestation through lactation.

    PubMed

    Saegusa, Yukie; Fujimoto, Hitoshi; Woo, Gye-Hyeong; Inoue, Kaoru; Takahashi, Miwa; Mitsumori, Kunitoshi; Hirose, Masao; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Shibutani, Makoto

    2009-12-01

    To evaluate developmental exposure effects of two brominated flame retardants, tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) and 1,2,5,6,9,10-hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were administered either chemical at doses of 100, 1000 or 10,000 ppm in a soy-free diet from gestation day 10 until the day 20 after delivery. Offspring exposed to TBBPA showed dose-unrelated slight decreases of serum triiodothyronine (T(3)) concentration at postnatal day 20, and there was no evidence of hypothyroidism-related neuronal mismigration and impaired oligodendroglial development as judged by morphometric analyses of NeuN-immunoreactive neuronal distribution in the hippocampal CA1, and area of corpus callosum as well as density of 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase)-immunoreactive oligodendrocytes in the cingulate deep cortex at the adult stage. On the other hand, HBCD exerted a weak hypothyroidism evident with increases in thyroid weight, thyroid follicular cell hypertrophy and serum concentrations of thyroid-stimulating hormone as well as decreases of serum T(3) concentrations in offspring at 10,000 ppm at weaning. Increased thyroid weights and decreased serum T(3) concentrations were also observed in the adult stage from 1000 ppm. With regard to the effect on brain development, HBCD reduced density of CNPase-positive oligodendrocytes at 10,000 ppm, suggesting an impaired oligodendroglial development. Results thus suggest that TBBPA did not exert developmental brain effects, while HBCD did, and 100 ppm was determined to be the no-observed-adverse-effect level of HBCD from changes in thyroid parameters at the adult stage by maternal exposure, translating into 8.1-21.3mg/kg-d. PMID:19577631

  15. Low concentrations of the brominated flame retardants BDE-47 and BDE-99 induce synergistic oxidative stress-mediated neurotoxicity in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tagliaferri, Sara; Caglieri, Andrea; Goldoni, Matteo; Pinelli, Silvana; Alinovi, Rossella; Poli, Diana; Pellacani, Claudia; Giordano, Gennaro; Mutti, Antonio; Costa, Lucio G

    2010-02-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants have become widespread environmental contaminants. The highest body burden has been found in toddlers and infants, due to their exposure through breast milk and house dust, and the current concern for potential adverse health effects of PBDEs relates to their developmental neurotoxicity. The mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity of PBDEs are largely not understood, though there is evidence that PBDEs may elicit oxidative stress. In this study, two different mathematical models were used to evaluate the interaction between BDE-47 and BDE-99 on viability of neuronal cells. The combined exposure to these compounds induced synergistic effects at concentrations of BDE-47 below its threshold doses, and in a wide range of BDE-99 concentrations below its IC(50). In contrast, at concentrations of BDE-47 near its IC(50) value, and in a wide range of BDE-99 concentrations, antagonistic effects were observed. The interactions observed on cell viability were confirmed by an assessment of induction of oxidative stress. The finding that co-exposure to BDE-47 and BDE-99 could induce synergistic neurotoxic effects, in particular at low doses of BDE-47, is of much toxicological interest, as humans are exposed to mixtures of PBDEs, most notably tetra- and penta-BDE congeners. PMID:19720130

  16. Flame retardancy and thermal stability of polyurethane foam composites containing carbon additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Pyoung-Chan; Kim, Bo-Ram; Jeoung, Sun Kyoung; Lee, Geesoo; Han, San Wook; Kim, Hyunchul; Lee, Ki-Dong; Han, Joo-Kwon

    2016-03-01

    Polyurethane (PU) is an important class of polymers that have wide application in a number of different industrial sectors. The goal of this work was the synthesis of flame-retarded PU foam with expandable graphite (EG) or commercial graphene. The flame retardancy and thermal stability of the foams has been studied through cone calorimeter analysis, the limited oxygen index and thermal conductivity. The presence of expandable graphite brings an improvement in fire behavior. In particular, the limited oxygen index increases in a linear way and the highest limited oxygen index values are obtained for EG-PU foams. The results from the cone calorimeter are in agreement with those of oxygen index; EG filled foams show a considerable decrease of maximum-heat release rate (M-HRR) with respect to unfilled foams. The results of thermal conductivity show that an increase in expandable graphite amount in PU foams lead to an increased conductivity.

  17. 49 CFR 173.228 - Bromine pentafluoride or bromine trifluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Bromine pentafluoride or bromine trifluoride. 173... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.228 Bromine pentafluoride or bromine trifluoride. (a) Bromine pentafluoride and bromine trifluoride are authorized in packagings as follows: (1) Specification 3A150,...

  18. 49 CFR 173.228 - Bromine pentafluoride or bromine trifluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Bromine pentafluoride or bromine trifluoride. 173... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.228 Bromine pentafluoride or bromine trifluoride. (a) Bromine pentafluoride and bromine trifluoride are authorized in packagings as follows: (1) Specification 3A150,...

  19. 49 CFR 173.228 - Bromine pentafluoride or bromine trifluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bromine pentafluoride or bromine trifluoride. 173... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.228 Bromine pentafluoride or bromine trifluoride. (a) Bromine pentafluoride and bromine trifluoride are authorized in packagings as follows: (1) Specification 3A150,...

  20. 49 CFR 173.228 - Bromine pentafluoride or bromine trifluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Bromine pentafluoride or bromine trifluoride. 173... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.228 Bromine pentafluoride or bromine trifluoride. (a) Bromine pentafluoride and bromine trifluoride are authorized in packagings as follows: (1) Specification 3A150,...

  1. 49 CFR 173.228 - Bromine pentafluoride or bromine trifluoride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Bromine pentafluoride or bromine trifluoride. 173... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.228 Bromine pentafluoride or bromine trifluoride. (a) Bromine pentafluoride and bromine trifluoride are authorized in packagings as follows: (1) Specification 3A150,...

  2. Brominated-chlorinated diphenyl ethers formed by thermolysis of polybrominated diphenyl ethers at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Silke; Metzger, Jörg W

    2005-09-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are a group of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) used mainly as additives in different kinds of plastic material. Various PBDEs are found in all environmental compartments as well as in tissue and blood serum of animals and humans due to their persistence and tendency to bioaccumulate. Emission of PBDEs into the environment can occur during recycling of PBDE-containing plastic material or during their uncontrolled or insufficient combustion as e.g. in accidental fires or landfill fires. Under these circumstances, PBDEs can also function as precursor molecules for the formation of polybrominated dibenzodioxins (PBDDs) and dibenzofurans (PBDFs). In this study, we qualitatively investigated the reaction of two PBDE congeners, 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromo diphenyl ether (BDE 47) and 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexabromo diphenyl ether (BDE 153), as well as hexabromobenzene (HBB), a flame retardant used in the past, when exposed to temperatures between 250 degrees C and 500 degrees C. The formed reaction products were analysed by high resolution gas chromatography-low resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC-LRMS). Among others brominated-chlorinated diphenyl ethers were formed by chlorodebromination of the PBDEs. In addition, thermolysis of BDE 47 and BDE 153 in the presence of tetrachloromethane as model substance for an organic chlorine source was studied. Thermal treatment of HBB resulted in the formation of brominated-chlorinated benzenes. PMID:16083771

  3. 21 CFR 180.30 - Brominated vegetable oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Brominated vegetable oil. 180.30 Section 180.30 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Brominated vegetable oil. The food additive brominated vegetable oil may be safely used in accordance...

  4. 21 CFR 180.30 - Brominated vegetable oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Brominated vegetable oil. 180.30 Section 180.30 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Brominated vegetable oil. The food additive brominated vegetable oil may be safely used in accordance...

  5. 21 CFR 180.30 - Brominated vegetable oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Brominated vegetable oil. 180.30 Section 180.30 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Brominated vegetable oil. The food additive brominated vegetable oil may be safely used in accordance...

  6. Use of nanoclay as an environmentally friendly flame retardant synergist in polyamide-6.

    PubMed

    Kaynak, Cevdet; Gunduz, Huseyin Ozgur; Isitman, Nihat Ali

    2010-11-01

    Due to their very high levels of flame retardancy, chlorinated and brominated flame retardants had been the most widely used flame retardant additives in plastics industry. However, these flame retardants lead to formation of very toxic volatiles and by-products during fire. Therefore, the recent trend is to replace all of them with non-halogenated flame retardants. In this respect, the use of nanoclays as a synergist flame retardant is becoming more and more important. Thus, the main aim of this work was to investigate the synergistic flame retardant effect of nanoclays with phosphorous compounds in polyamide-6 composites. For this purpose, exfoliated clay nanocomposites of flame retarded/glass fiber reinforced polyamide-6 were prepared by melt compounding. A flame retardant based on phosphorus compounds was used at various levels in glass fiber reinforced polyamide-6 and nanocomposites. Flammability and fire behaviors were evaluated by limiting oxygen index, UL94 and cone calorimeter tests. Substitution of a certain fraction of the flame retardant with nanoclays was found to significantly reduce the peak heat release rate and delay the ignition in cone calorimeter. Moreover, remarkable improvements were obtained in limiting oxygen index along with maintained UL94 ratings. PMID:21137938

  7. NOx reduction in diesel fuel flames by additions of water and CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.C.

    1997-12-31

    Natural gas has the highest heating value per unit mass (50.1 MJ/kg, LHV) of any of the hydrocarbon fuels (e.g., butane, liquid diesel fuel, gasoline, etc.). Since it has the lowest carbon content per unit mass, combustion of natural gas produces much less carbon dioxide, soot particles, and oxide of nitrogen than combustion of liquid diesel fuel. In view of anticipated strengthening of regulations on pollutant emissions from diesel engines, alternative fuels, such as compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied natural gas (LNG) have been experimentally introduced to replace the traditional diesel fuels in heavy-duty trucks, transit buses, off-road vehicles, locomotives, and stationary engines. To help in applying natural gas in Diesel engines and increasing combustion efficiency, the emphasis of the present paper is placed on the detailed flame chemistry of methane-air combustion. The present work is the continued effort in finding better methods to reduce NO{sub x}. The goal is to identify a reliable chemical reaction mechanism for natural gas in both premixed and diffusion flames and to establish a systematic reduced mechanism which may be useful for large-scale numerical modeling of combustion behavior in natural gas engines.

  8. Identification of Flame Retardants in Polyurethane Foam Collected from Baby Products

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    With the phase-out of PentaBDE in 2004, alternative flame retardants are being used in polyurethane foam to meet flammability standards. However, insufficient information is available on the identity of the flame retardants currently in use. Baby products containing polyurethane foam must meet California state furniture flammability standards, which likely affects the use of flame retardants in baby products throughout the U.S. However, it is unclear which products contain flame retardants and at what concentrations. In this study we surveyed baby products containing polyurethane foam to investigate how often flame retardants were used in these products. Information on when the products were purchased and whether they contained a label indicating that the product meets requirements for a California flammability standard were recorded. When possible, we identified the flame retardants being used and their concentrations in the foam. Foam samples collected from 101 commonly used baby products were analyzed. Eighty samples contained an identifiable flame retardant additive, and all but one of these was either chlorinated or brominated. The most common flame retardant detected was tris(1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate (TDCPP; detection frequency 36%), followed by components typically found in the Firemaster550 commercial mixture (detection frequency 17%). Five samples contained PBDE congeners commonly associated with PentaBDE, suggesting products with PentaBDE are still in-use. Two chlorinated organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) not previously documented in the environment were also identified, one of which is commercially sold as V6 (detection frequency 15%) and contains tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) as an impurity. As an addition to this study, we used a portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer to estimate the bromine and chlorine content of the foam and investigate whether XRF is a useful method for predicting the presence of halogenated flame

  9. Identification of flame retardants in polyurethane foam collected from baby products.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Heather M; Klosterhaus, Susan; Keller, Alex; Ferguson, P Lee; van Bergen, Saskia; Cooper, Ellen; Webster, Thomas F; Blum, Arlene

    2011-06-15

    With the phase-out of PentaBDE in 2004, alternative flame retardants are being used in polyurethane foam to meet flammability standards. However, insufficient information is available on the identity of the flame retardants currently in use. Baby products containing polyurethane foam must meet California state furniture flammability standards, which likely affects the use of flame retardants in baby products throughout the U.S. However, it is unclear which products contain flame retardants and at what concentrations. In this study we surveyed baby products containing polyurethane foam to investigate how often flame retardants were used in these products. Information on when the products were purchased and whether they contained a label indicating that the product meets requirements for a California flammability standard were recorded. When possible, we identified the flame retardants being used and their concentrations in the foam. Foam samples collected from 101 commonly used baby products were analyzed. Eighty samples contained an identifiable flame retardant additive, and all but one of these was either chlorinated or brominated. The most common flame retardant detected was tris(1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate (TDCPP; detection frequency 36%), followed by components typically found in the Firemaster550 commercial mixture (detection frequency 17%). Five samples contained PBDE congeners commonly associated with PentaBDE, suggesting products with PentaBDE are still in-use. Two chlorinated organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) not previously documented in the environment were also identified, one of which is commercially sold as V6 (detection frequency 15%) and contains tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) as an impurity. As an addition to this study, we used a portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer to estimate the bromine and chlorine content of the foam and investigate whether XRF is a useful method for predicting the presence of halogenated flame

  10. Numerical analysis of the effect of acetylene and benzene addition to low-pressure benzene-rich flat flames on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon formation

    SciTech Connect

    Kunioshi, Nilson; Komori, Seisaku; Fukutani, Seishiro

    2006-10-15

    A modification of the CHEMKIN II package has been proposed for modeling addition of an arbitrary species at an arbitrary temperature to an arbitrary distance from the burner along a flat flame. The modified program was applied to the problem of addition of acetylene or benzene to different positions of a 40-Torr, {phi}=2.4 benzene/O{sub 2}/40%-N{sub 2} premixed flame to reach final equivalence ratios of {phi}=2.5 and 2.681. The results obtained showed that acetylene addition to early positions of the flame led to significant increase in pyrene production rates, but pyrene concentrations were lower in the flames with acetylene addition in both the {phi}=2.5 and 2.681 cases. Addition of benzene to the flame did not alter pyrene production rates in either the {phi}=2.5 or 2.681 cases; however, for {phi}=2.5, pyrene concentrations increased with benzene addition, while for {phi}=2.681, pyrene contents decreased in comparison to the correspondent flames with no addition. Acetylene addition led to a significant increase in pyrene production rates, but the pyrene levels dropped due to increase in the flow velocity. Pyrene production rates were not sensitive to benzene addition, but pyrene contents increased with benzene addition when the flow velocity decreased. These results show that PAH concentration changes accompanying species addition to flames should be interpreted carefully, because an increase or decrease in the content of a PAH species does not necessarily reflect an effect on its formation rate or mechanism. (author)

  11. Triple flame structure and diffusion flame stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veynante, D.; Vervisch, L.; Poinsot, T.; Linan, A.; Ruetsch, G.

    1994-01-01

    The stabilization of diffusion flames is studied using asymptotic techniques and numerical tools. The configuration studied corresponds to parallel streams of cold oxidizer and fuel initially separated by a splitter plate. It is shown that stabilization of a diffusion flame may only occur in this situation by two processes. First, the flame may be stabilized behind the flame holder in the wake of the splitter plate. For this case, numerical simulations confirm scalings previously predicted by asymptotic analysis. Second, the flame may be lifted. In this case a triple flame is found at longer distances downstream of the flame holder. The structure and propagation speed of this flame are studied by using an actively controlled numerical technique in which the triple flame is tracked in its own reference frame. It is then possible to investigate the triple flame structure and velocity. It is shown, as suggested from asymptotic analysis, that heat release may induce displacement speeds of the triple flame larger than the laminar flame speed corresponding to the stoichiometric conditions prevailing in the mixture approaching the triple flame. In addition to studying the characteristics of triple flames in a uniform flow, their resistance to turbulence is investigated by subjecting triple flames to different vortical configurations.

  12. Toxic effects of brominated indoles and phenols on zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Kammann, U; Vobach, M; Wosniok, W

    2006-07-01

    Organobromine compounds in the marine environment have been the focus of growing attention in past years. In contrast to anthropogenic brominated flame retardants, other brominated compounds are produced naturally, e.g., by common polychaete worms and algae. Brominated phenols and indoles assumed to be of biogenic origin have been detected in water and sediment extracts from the German Bight. These substances as well as some of their isomers have been tested with the zebrafish embryo test and were found to cause lethal as well as nonlethal malformations. The zebrafish test was able to detect a log K(OW)-related toxicity for bromophenols, suggesting nonpolar narcosis as a major mode of action. Different effect patterns could be observed for brominated indoles and bromophenols. The comparison of effective concentrations in the zebrafish embryo test with the concentrations determined in water samples suggests the possibility that brominated indoles may affect early life stages of marine fish species in the North Sea. PMID:16418895

  13. Enhanced water management using bromine chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Sergent, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    This paper focuses on bromine chemistry and some of its unique properties, with regard to providing solutions to new and changing problems. Bromine Chemistry offers many unique properties for enhancing a water management program. Regardless of the method used to generate a residual, hypobromous acid delivers faster kill rates than an equimolar concentration of hypochlorous acid at an elevated pH or in the presence of ammonia or nitrogenous materials. In addition, the faster degradation of most bromine compounds relative to their chlorinated analogs increases the environmental acceptability of most brominated effluents relative to chlorination. Based on these advantages, the application of bromine chemistry to water treatment requirements has moved out of the speculative research phase and has moved into the sphere of a practical, commercial reality.

  14. Plastics additives in the indoor environment--flame retardants and plasticizers.

    PubMed

    Wensing, M; Uhde, E; Salthammer, T

    2005-03-01

    Phthalic acid esters and phosphororganic compounds (POC) are generally known as semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) and are frequently utilized as plasticizers and flame retardants in commercial products. In the indoor environment, both compound groups are released from a number of sources under normal living conditions and accumulate in air and dust. Therefore, inhalation of air and ingestion of house dust have to be considered as important pathways for the assessment of exposure in living habitats. Especially in the case of very young children, the oral and dermal uptake from house dust might be of relevance for risk assessment. A critical evaluation of indoor exposure to phthalates and POC requires the determination of the target compounds in indoor air and house dust as well as emission studies. The latter are usually carried out under controlled conditions in emission test chambers or cells. Furthermore, chamber testing enables the determination of condensable compounds by fogging sampling. In the case of automobiles, specific scenarios have been developed to study material emissions on a test stand or to evaluate the exposure of users while the vehicle is driving. In this review, results from several studies are summarized and compared for seven phthalic esters and eight POC. The available data for room air and dust differ widely depending on investigated compound and compartment. Room air studies mostly include only a limited number of measurements, which makes a statistical evaluation difficult. The situation is much better for house dust measurements. However, the composition of house dust is very inhomogeneous and the result is strongly dependent on the particle size distribution used for analysis. Results of emission studies are presented for building products, electronic equipment, and automobiles. Daily rates for inhalation and dust ingestion of phthalic esters and POC were calculated from 95-percentiles or maximum values. A comparison of the data

  15. HEALTH EFFECTS OF BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS (BFRS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    BFRs are a broad class of compounds providing fire safety. Because of high production and usage and recent findings that they are ubiquitous in environmental samples and biota, concerns exist about potential health effects. Some of the major commercial products, such as tetrabr...

  16. Catalytic and electrocatalytic hydrogenolysis of brominated diphenyl ethers.

    PubMed

    Bonin, Pascale M L; Edwards, Patrick; Bejan, Dorin; Lo, Chun Chi; Bunce, Nigel J; Konstantinov, Alexandre D

    2005-02-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants due to their use as additive flame-retardants. Conventional catalytic hydrogenolysis in methanol solution and electrocatalytic hydrogenolysis in aqueous methanol were examined as methods for debrominating mono- and di-bromodiphenyl ethers, as well as a commercial penta-PBDE mixture, in each case using palladium on alumina as the catalyst. Electrocatalytic hydrogenolysis employed a divided flow-through batch cell, with reticulated vitreous carbon cathodes and IrO2/Ti dimensionally stable anodes. Both methods gave efficient sequential debromination, with essentially complete removal of bromine from the PBDEs, but the electrocatalytic method was limited by the poor solubility of PBDEs in aqueous methanol. PMID:15639268

  17. Hydrogen/bromine cell

    SciTech Connect

    Hohne, K.; Starbeck, G.

    1985-05-28

    Described herein is an energy storage device which utilizes a hydrogen/bromine cell. The cell includes a bromine electrode and a hydrogen electrode. The cell is light weight, resists corrosion caused by bromine or hydrobromic acid and uses both an electrolysis and a fuel cell reaction to store or discharge electrical energy. The cell frame is made of graphite and has a pyrographite coating on at least the portion facing the bromine electrode. This cell is therefore very useful in matching varying energy supplies with varying energy demands and allows for decentralization of energy storage.

  18. Effect of flame-retarding additives on surface chemistry in Li-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, N.D.; Park, I.J.; Kim, J.G.; Kim, H.S.

    2012-10-15

    This study examined the properties of 1 wt.% vinylene carbonate (VC), vinyl ethylene carbonate (VEC), and diphenyl octyl phosphate (DPOF) additive electrolytes as a promising way of beneficially improving the surface and cell resistance of Li-ion batteries. Surface film formation on the negative and positive electrodes was analyzed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In conclusion, EIS, FT-IR spectroscopy and SEM results confirmed that DPOF is an excellent additive to the electrolyte in the Li-ion batteries due to the improved co-intercalation of the solvent molecules.

  19. Polyfunctional epoxies. I - Rubber-toughened brominated and nonbrominated formulations for graphite composites. II - Nonrubber versus rubber-toughened brominated formulations for graphite composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, Z.; Gilwee, W. J.; Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    A new trifunctional epoxy resin, Tris-(hydroxyphenyl) methane triglycidyl ether, is compared to a state-of-the-art tetraglycidyl 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl methane (TGDDM), in graphite composites. Rubber-toughened brominated formulations of the epoxy resin are compared to nonbrominated ones in terms of their mechanical performance, environmental stability, thermochemical behavior, and flame retardancy. It is shown that the new resin performs almost the same way as the TGDDM does, but has improved glass transition temperature and environmental properties. Brominated polymeric additives (BPA) of different molecular weights are tested as a Br source to flame retardant graphite epoxy composites. The optimal molecular weight of the BPA and its polymeric backbone length are derived and compared with a 10 percent rubber-toughened formulation of the epoxy resin. Results indicate that when the Br content in the graphite composite is increased without the use of rubber, the mechanical properties improved. The use of BPAs as tougheners for graphite composites is also considered.

  20. The Evaluation of Triphenyl Phosphate as a Flame Retardant Additive to Improve the Safety of Lithium-Ion Battery Electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, M. C.; Krause, F. C.; Hwang, C.; West, W. C.; Soler, J.; Prakash, G. K. S.; Ratnakumar, B. V.

    2011-01-01

    With the intent of improving the safety characteristics of lithium ion cells, electrolytes containing flame retardant additives have been investigated. A number of triphenyl phosphate-containing electrolytes were evaluated in both coin cells and experimental three electrode lithium-ion cells (containing reference electrodes). A number of chemistries were investigated, including MCMB carbon/LiNi(0.8)Co(0.2)O2 (NCO), graphite/LiNi(0.8)Co(0.15)Al(0.05)O2 (NCA), Li/Li(Li(0.17)Ni(0.25)Mn(0.58))O2, Li/LiNiMnCoO2 (NMC) and graphite/LiNiMnCoO2 (NMC), to study the effect that different electrolyte compositions have upon performance. A wide range of TPP-containing electrolytes were demonstrated to have good compatibility with the C/NCO, C/NCA, and Li/NMC systems, however, poor performance was initially observed with the high voltage C/NMC system. This necessitated the development of improved electrolytes with stabilizing additives, leading to formulations containing lithium bis(oxalato)borate (LiBOB) that displayed substantially improved performance.

  1. EFFECT OF OXYGEN ADDITION ON POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON FORMATION IN 1,3 BUTADIENE COUNTER-FLOW DIFFUSION FLAMES. (R828193)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of 3% O2 addition to the fuel on detailed chemical structure of a 1,3 butadiene counter-flow diffusion flame has been investigated by using heated microprobe sampling and online gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Centerline gas temperature and species ...

  2. Non-halogen Flame retardant High Impact Polystyrene Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafailovich, Miriam; Si, Mayu; Sokolov, Jonathan; Otaigbe, Joshia; Yudin, Vladimir E.

    2006-03-01

    In recent years, driven by the health issues and the incurred banning policy of bromine compounds, it is a great demand to find an alternate to replace brominated compounds in polymer flame retardant industry. High impact polystyrene (HIPS), a popular materials widely used for electrical appliances and electronic instruments, attracts extensive attention for its dominant flame retardant agent, decabromodiphenyl ether. Here we propose a novel idea to prepare non-halogen HIPS self-extinguishing composites based on the combination of phosphorus compounds and clay. The combustion behavior was thoroughly investigated by UL 94 V-0, LOI, and cone calorimeter measurements. The addition of Cloisite 20A dramatically decreases the value of LOI and the resulted HIPS composites could not pass UL 94 V-0. On the other hand, the introduction of thermal stable clay significantly increases the value of LOI and the corresponding HIPS composites can successfully self-extinguish. These results strongly demonstrate that the thermal stability of clay is the key factor to determine the final flame retardant performance. The synergy between the clay and phosphorus compounds is further studied.

  3. Course of bromination of thiazole and 2-methylthiazole

    SciTech Connect

    Gol'dfarb, Ya. L.; Belen'kii, L.I.; Gromova, G.P.

    1986-12-01

    Bromination of thiazole by bromine in the presence of aluminum chloride in neutral solvent or without solvent takes place at the 2-position. Such an orientation contradicts the traditional addition-cleavage mechanism, and agrees with the ylid mechanism of electrophilic substitution. 2-Methylthiazole brominates at the 5-position, and the reaction is impeded in the presence of aluminum chloride; this is due to heterocycle deactivation by complexation with the Lewis acid at the nitrogen atom.

  4. Exposure to flame retardant chemicals on commercial airplanes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Flame retardant chemicals are used in materials on airplanes to slow the propagation of fire. These chemicals migrate from their source products and can be found in the dust of airplanes, creating the potential for exposure. Methods To characterize exposure to flame retardant chemicals in airplane dust, we collected dust samples from locations inside 19 commercial airplanes parked overnight at airport gates. In addition, hand-wipe samples were also collected from 9 flight attendants and 1 passenger who had just taken a cross-country (USA) flight. The samples were analyzed for a suite of flame retardant chemicals. To identify the possible sources for the brominated flame retardants, we used a portable XRF analyzer to quantify bromine concentrations in materials inside the airplanes. Results A wide range of flame retardant compounds were detected in 100% of the dust samples collected from airplanes, including BDEs 47, 99, 153, 183 and 209, tris(1,3-dichloro-isopropyl)phosphate (TDCPP), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and bis-(2-ethylhexyl)-tetrabromo-phthalate (TBPH). Airplane dust contained elevated concentrations of BDE 209 (GM: 500 ug/g; range: 2,600 ug/g) relative to other indoor environments, such as residential and commercial buildings, and the hands of participants after a cross-country flight contained elevated BDE 209 concentrations relative to the general population. TDCPP, a known carcinogen that was removed from use in children’s pajamas in the 1970’s although still used today in other consumer products, was detected on 100% of airplanes in concentrations similar to those found in residential and commercial locations. Conclusion This study adds to the limited body of knowledge regarding exposure to flame retardants on commercial aircraft, an environment long hypothesized to be at risk for maximum exposures due to strict flame retardant standards for aircraft materials. Our findings indicate that flame retardants are widely used in many

  5. Measurements of stratospheric bromine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedlacek, W. A.; Lazrus, A. L.; Gandrud, B. W.

    1984-01-01

    From 1974 to 1977, molecules containing acidic bromine were sampled in the stratosphere by using tetrabutyl ammonium hydroxide impregnated filters. Sampling was accomplished by WB-57F aircraft and high-altitude balloons, spanning latitudes from the equator to 75 deg N and altitudes up to 36.6 km. Analytical results are reported for 4 years of measurements and for laboratory simulations that determined the filter collection efficiencies for a number of brominated species. Mass mixing ratios for the collected bromine species in air average about 27 pptm in the stratosphere. Seasonal variability seems to be small.

  6. Flame Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Heidi L. (Inventor); Smith, Harvey S. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A system for imaging a flame and the background scene is discussed. The flame imaging system consists of two charge-coupled-device (CCD) cameras. One camera uses a 800 nm long pass filter which during overcast conditions blocks sufficient background light so the hydrogen flame is brighter than the background light, and the second CCD camera uses a 1100 nm long pass filter, which blocks the solar background in full sunshine conditions such that the hydrogen flame is brighter than the solar background. Two electronic viewfinders convert the signal from the cameras into a visible image. The operator can select the appropriate filtered camera to use depending on the current light conditions. In addition, a narrow band pass filtered InGaAs sensor at 1360 nm triggers an audible alarm and a flashing LED if the sensor detects a flame, providing additional flame detection so the operator does not overlook a small flame.

  7. Candle Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, Daniel L.; Ross, Howard D.; Frate, David T.; Tien, James S.; Shu, Yong

    1997-01-01

    This work is a study of a candle flame in a microgravity environment. The purpose of the work is to determine if a steady (or quasi-steady) flame can exist in a microgravity environment, study the characteristics of the steady flame, investigate the pre-extinction flame oscillations observed in a previous experiment in more detail, and finally, determine the nature of the interactions between two closely spaced candle flames. The candle flame is used as a model combustion system, in that in microgravity it is one of the only examples of a non-propagating, steady-state, pure diffusion flame. Others have used the candle to study a number of combustion phenomena including flame flicker, flame oscillations, electric field effects and enhanced and reduced gravitational effects in flames. The present work is a continuation of a small-scale Shuttle experiment on candle flames. That study showed that the candle flame lifetimes were on the order of 40 seconds, the flames were dim blue after a transient ignition period, and that just prior to extinction the flames oscillated spontaneously for about five seconds at a frequency of 1 Hz. The authors postulated that the gas phase in the immediate vicinity of the flame was quasi-steady. Further away from the flame, however, the assertion of a quasi-steady flame was less certain, thus the authors did not prove that a steady flame could exist. They also speculated that the short lifetime of the candle flame was due to the presence of the small, weakly perforated box that surrounded the candle. The Candle Flames in Microgravity (CFM) experiment, with revised hardware, was recently flown aboard the Mir orbiting station, and conducted inside the glovebox facility by Dr. Shannon Lucid. In addition to the purposes described above, the experiments were NASA's first ability to ascertain the merits of the Mir environment for combustion science studies. In this article, we present the results of that experiment. We are also in the process

  8. Analysis of Flame Retardancy in Polymer Blends by Synchrotron X-ray K-edge Tomography and Interferometric Phase Contrast Movies.

    PubMed

    Olatinwo, Mutairu B; Ham, Kyungmin; McCarney, Jonathan; Marathe, Shashidhara; Ge, Jinghua; Knapp, Gerry; Butler, Leslie G

    2016-03-10

    Underwriters Laboratories 94 test bars have been imaged with X-ray K-edge tomography between 12 and 32 keV to assess the bromine and antimony concentration gradient across char layers of partially burnt samples. Phase contrast tomography on partially burnt samples showed gas bubbles and dark-field scattering ascribed to residual blend inhomogeneity. In addition, single-shot grating interferometry was used to record X-ray movies of test samples during heating (IR and flame) intended to mimic the UL 94 plastics flammability test. The UL 94 test bars were formulated with varying concentrations of a brominated flame retardant, Saytex 8010, and a synergist, Sb2O3, blended into high-impact polystyrene (HIPS). Depending on the sample composition, samples will pass or fail the UL 94 plastics flammability test. Tomography and interferometry imaging show differences that correlate with UL 94 performance. Key features such as char layer, gas bubble formation, microcracks, and dissolution of the flame retardant in the char layer regions are used in understanding the efficiency of the flame retardant and synergist. The samples that pass the UL 94 test have a thick, highly visible char layer as well as an interior rich in gas bubbles. Growth of gas bubbles from flame-retardant thermal decomposition is noted in the X-ray phase contrast movies. Also noteworthy is an absence of bubbles near the burning surface of the polymer; dark-field images after burning suggest a microcrack structure between interior bubbles and the surface. The accepted mechanism for flame retardant activity includes free radical quenching in the flame by bromine and antimony species. The imaging supports this as well as provides a fast inspection of other parameters, such as viscosity and surface tension. PMID:26846254

  9. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food additives, bromide ion and residual bromine, may be present in water, potable in accordance with...

  10. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food additives, bromide ion and residual bromine, may be present in water, potable in accordance with...

  11. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food additives, bromide ion and residual bromine, may be present in water, potable in accordance with...

  12. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food additives, bromide ion and residual bromine, may be present in water, potable in accordance with...

  13. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food additives, bromide ion and residual bromine, may be present in water, potable in accordance with...

  14. Application of Shear Plate Interferometry to Jet Diffusion Flame Temperature Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDerWege, Brad A.; OBrien, Chris J.; Hochgreb, Simone

    1997-01-01

    The recent ban on the production of bromotrifluoromethane (CF3Br) because of its high stratospheric ozone depletion potential has led to interest in finding alternative agents for fire extinguishing applications. Some of the promising alternatives are fluorinated hydrocarbons. A clear understanding of the effects of CF3Br and alternative chemical suppressants on diffusion flames is therefore necessary in the selection of alternative suppressants for use in normal and microgravity. The flame inhibition effects of halogen compounds have been studied extensively in premixed systems. The effect of addition of halocarbons (carbon-halogen compounds) to diffusion flames has been studied experimentally in coflow configurations and in counterflow gaseous and liquid-pool flames. Halogenated compounds are believed to inhibit combustion by scavenging hydrogen radicals to form the relatively unreactive compound HF, or through a catalytic recombination cycle involving HBr to form H2. Comparisons between halogens show that bromine inhibition is significantly more effective than chlorine or fluorine. Although fluorinated compounds are only slightly more effective inhibitors on a mass basis than nitrogen, they are more effective on a volume basis and are easily stored in liquid form. The objectives of this study are (a) to determine the stability limits of laminar jet diffusion flames with respect to inhibitor concentration in both normal and microgravity, and (b) to investigate the structure of halocarbon-inhibited flames. In the initial phase of this project, visual diagnostics were used to observe the structure and behavior of normal and microgravity flames. The initial observations showed significant changes in the structure of the flames with the addition of halocarbons to the surrounding environment, as discussed below. Furthermore, the study established that the flames are more stable relative to the addition of halocarbons in microgravity than in normal gravity. Visual

  15. Development of Flame Retardants for Engineering Polymers and Polyurethanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desikan, Anantha

    2013-03-01

    With a broad portfolio of brominated, organophosphorus and inorganic flame retardants, ICL Industrial Products (ICL-IP) is engaged in the development of new flame retardants by exploiting the synergism between bromine based, phosphorus based and other halogen-free flame retardants. ICL-IP is also focusing on the development of polymeric and reactive flame retardants. This presentation will give examples of existing and new polymeric and reactive products for applications in thermoplastics, thermosets and polyurethane foam. This presentation will also show examples of phosphorus-bromine synergism allowing partial or complete elimination of antimony trioxide in many thermoplastics for electronic applications. New synergistic combinations of magnesium hydroxide with phosphorus and other halogen-free FRs will be presented. Work done in collaboration with S. Levchik, ICL-IP America, 430 Saw Mill Rriver Rd., Ardsley, NY, 10502, USA and M. Leifer, ICL-IP, P. O. Box 180, Beer Sheva 84101, Israel.

  16. Solid bromine complexers

    DOEpatents

    Grimes, Patrick G.

    1987-01-20

    The cell of the invention comprises a housing, a zinc or cadmium anode, a chemically non-reactive counterelectrode and cathodic halogen. The cathodic halogen is selected from chlorine and bromine, and preferably is bromine. The cell also is provided with an aqueous metal halide containing electrolyte in which the metal ions are of the same metal as the metal of the anode and halide anions are of the same halogen as the cathodic halogen material. Importantly, in the present invention, anion exchange resins provide a convenient means for storing the halogen generated during charging of the cell and providing a source of halogen to be used in the discharge of the cell.

  17. Flame resistant elastic elastomeric fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howarth, J. T.; Massucco, A. A.

    1972-01-01

    Development of materials to improve flame resistance of elastic elastomeric fibers is discussed. Two approaches, synthesis of polyether based urethanes and modification of synthesized urethanes with flame ratardant additives, are described. Specific applications of both techniques are presented.

  18. Combustion and inorganic bromine emission of waste printed circuit boards in a high temperature furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Ni Mingjiang; Xiao Hanxi; Chi Yong; Yan Jianhua; Buekens, Alfons; Jin Yuqi; Lu Shengyong

    2012-03-15

    bromine from flame retardants into HBr and Br{sub 2} depends on temperature and EAF. Temperature has crucial influence over the ratio of HBr to Br{sub 2}, whereas oxygen partial pressure plays a minor role. The two forms of inorganic bromine seem substantially to reach thermodynamic equilibrium within 0.25 s. High temperature is required to improve the combustion performance: at 1200 Degree-Sign C or higher, an EAF of 1.3 or more, and a RT{sub HT} exceeding 0.75 s, combustion is quite complete, the CO concentration in flue gas and remained carbon in ash are sufficiently low, and organobrominated compounds are successfully decomposed (more than 99.9%). According to these results, incineration of waste PCBs without preliminary separation and without additives would perform very well under certain conditions; the potential precursors for brominated dioxins formation could be destroyed efficiently. Increasing temperature could decrease the volume percentage ratio of Br{sub 2}/HBr in flue gas greatly.

  19. A Substitute Foe "Bromine in Carbon Tetrachloride"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daley, Joshua M.; Landolt, Robert G.

    2005-01-01

    The addition of a dilute solution of bromine in carbon tetrachloride to a compound to test for carbon-carbon multiple bonds, which is one of the widely cited qualitative tests employed in organic chemistry is presented. Major advantages of this approach include the ease and rapidness of the procedure, the stability of the test solution over time,…

  20. Flame retardant spandex type polyurethanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howarth, J. T.; Sheth, S.; Sidman, K. R.; Massucco, A. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Flame retardant elastomeric compositions were developed, comprised of: (1) spandex type polyurethane having incorporated into the polymer chain, halogen containing polyols; (2) conventional spandex type polyurethanes in physical admixture flame retardant additives; and (3) fluoroelastomeric resins in physical admixture with flame retardant additives. Methods of preparing fibers of the flame retardant elastomeric materials are presented and articles of manufacture comprised of the elastomeric materials are mentioned.

  1. Triple flames and flame stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broadwell, James E.

    1994-01-01

    It is now well established that when turbulent jet flames are lifted, combustion begins, i.e., the flame is stabilized, at an axial station where the fuel and air are partially premixed. One might expect, therefore, that the beginning of the combustion zone would be a triple flame. Such flames have been described; however, other experiments provide data that are difficult to reconcile with the presence of triple flames. In particular, laser images of CH and OH, marking combustion zones, do not exhibit shapes typical of triple flames, and, more significantly, the lifted flame appears to have a propagation speed that is an order of magnitude higher than the laminar flame speed. The speed of triple flames studied thus far exceeds the laminar value by a factor less than two. The objective of the present task is the resolution of the apparent conflict between the experiments and the triple flame characteristics, and the clarification of the mechanisms controlling flame stability. Being investigated are the resolution achieved in the experiments, the flow field in the neighborhood of the stabilization point, propagation speeds of triple flames, laboratory flame unsteadiness, and the importance of flame ignition limits in the calculation of triple flames that resemble lifted flames.

  2. Impact of the flame retardant additive triphenyl phosphate (TPP) on the performance of graphite/LiFePO4 cells in high power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciosek Högström, Katarzyna; Lundgren, Henrik; Wilken, Susanne; Zavalis, Tommy G.; Behm, Mårten; Edström, Kristina; Jacobsson, Per; Johansson, Patrik; Lindbergh, Göran

    2014-06-01

    This study presents an extensive characterization of a standard Li-ion battery (LiB) electrolyte containing different concentrations of the flame retardant triphenyl phosphate (TPP) in the context of high power applications. Electrolyte characterization shows only a minor decrease in the electrolyte flammability for low TPP concentrations. The addition of TPP to the electrolyte leads to increased viscosity and decreased conductivity. The solvation of the lithium ion charge carriers seem to be directly affected by the TPP addition - as evidenced by Raman spectroscopy and increased mass-transport resistivity. Graphite/LiFePO4 full cell tests show the energy efficiency to decrease with the addition of TPP. Specifically, diffusion resistivity is observed to be the main source of increased losses. Furthermore, TPP influences the interface chemistry on both the positive and the negative electrode. Higher concentrations of TPP lead to thicker interface layers on LiFePO4. Even though TPP is not electrochemically reduced on graphite, it does participate in SEI formation. TPP cannot be considered a suitable flame retardant for high power applications as there is only a minor impact of TPP on the flammability of the electrolyte for low concentrations of TPP, and a significant increase in polarization is observed for higher concentrations of TPP.

  3. Cool Flame Quenching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Howard; Chapek, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Cool flame quenching distances are generally presumed to be larger than those associated with hot flames, because the quenching distance scales with the inverse of the flame propagation speed, and cool flame propagation speeds are often times slower than those associated with hot flames. To date, this presumption has never been put to a rigorous test, because unstirred, non-isothermal cool flame studies on Earth are complicated by natural convection. Moreover, the critical Peclet number (Pe) for quenching of cool flames has never been established and may not be the same as that associated with wall quenching due to conduction heat loss in hot flames, Pe approx. = 40-60. The objectives of this ground-based study are to: (1) better understand the role of conduction heat loss and species diffusion on cool flame quenching (i.e., Lewis number effects), (2) determine cool flame quenching distances (i.e, critical Peclet number, Pe) for different experimental parameters and vessel surface pretreatments, and (3) understand the mechanisms that govern the quenching distances in premixtures that support cool flames as well as hot flames induced by spark-ignition. Objective (3) poses a unique fire safety hazard if conditions exist where cool flame quenching distances are smaller than those associated with hot flames. For example, a significant, yet unexplored risk, can occur if a multi-stage ignition (a cool flame that transitions to a hot flame) occurs in a vessel size that is smaller than that associated with the hot quenching distance. To accomplish the above objectives, a variety of hydrocarbon-air mixtures will be tested in a static reactor at elevated temperature in the laboratory (1g). In addition, reactions with chemical induction times that are sufficiently short will be tested aboard NASA's KC-135 microgravity (mu-g) aircraft. The mu-g results will be compared to a numerical model that includes species diffusion, heat conduction, and a skeletal kinetic mechanism

  4. Flame resistant elastic elastomeric fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howarth, J. T.; Sheth, S.; Massucco, A. A.; Sidman, K. R.

    1974-01-01

    Compositions exhibit elastomeric properties and possess various degrees of flame resistance. First material polyurethane, incorporates halogen containing polyol and is flame resistant in air; second contains spandex elastomer with flame retardant additives; and third material is prepared from fluorelastomer composition of copolymer of vinylidene fluoride and hexafluoropropylene.

  5. Properties and potential applications of brominated P-100 carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Gaier, J. R.; Hung, C. C.; Banks, B. A.

    1986-01-01

    A review of the properties and potential applications of bromine-intercalated pitch-based carbon fibers is presented. The dynamics of the intercalation reaction are summarized, and characteristics, such as resistivity, density, and stability, are discussed. In addition, the mechanical and electrical properties of bromine-intercalated fiber-epoxy conposites will be addressed. With conductivities comparable to stainless steel, these brominated carbon fibers may be used in a number of composite applications, such as electromagnetic interference shielding containers, large conductive space structures, lightning strike-tolerant aircraft surfaces, and aircraft deicing applications.

  6. ACUTE POSTNATAL EXPOSURE TO BROMINATED DIPHENYLETHER 47 DELAYS NEUROMOTOR ONTOGENY AND ALTERS MOTOR ACTIVITY IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely used commercial flame retardants that are accumulating in the environment. 2,2’,4,4’-Brominated diphenyl ether (BDE 47) is a very stable congener of this group and has been shown to accumulate in humans. PBDEs may interfere with...

  7. A study of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBA) as a flame retardant additive for Li-ion battery electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, Dmitry G.; Shieh, D. T.

    2014-02-01

    Electrochemical behavior and flammability of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBA)-mixed electrolyte solutions are investigated using 1 mol L-1 LiPF6-EC:EMC (1:2 vol.%) with 0 wt.% (reference electrolyte) and 1-3 wt.% of TBBA. The cycling performance (at room and elevated temperature) and rate capability of the 18650 cell (LiMn2O4:Li(Ni1/3Co1/3Mn1/3)O2 (8:2)/Li4Ti5O12) cell containing TBBA-mixed electrolyte is similar to that of cell containing the reference electrolyte. A detailed analysis of the surface on both the anode and the cathode electrodes via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicated that the cathode electrode contains more Br components than the anode electrode. Within the first few cycles, on the positive electrode, we observe competing redox processes between the cathode material containing Mn and TBBA, which generate hydroxy radicals and other by-products. This process and the electrochemical reductive decomposition of TBBA to HBr, Br2 and bisphenole A are responsible for the increased flame retardant properties of the electrolyte containing TBBA. Safety tests were performed using an 18650 cell showed that even 1 wt.% of TBBA in the electrolyte significantly reduces cell flammability.

  8. Trophic transfer of naturally produced brominated aromatic compounds in a Baltic Sea food chain.

    PubMed

    Dahlgren, Elin; Lindqvist, Dennis; Dahlgren, Henrik; Asplund, Lillemor; Lehtilä, Kari

    2016-02-01

    Brominated aromatic compounds (BACs) are widely distributed in the marine environment. Some of these compounds are highly toxic, such as certain hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-PBDEs). In addition to anthropogenic emissions through use of BACs as e.g. flame retardants, BACs are natural products formed by marine organisms such as algae, sponges, and cyanobacteria. Little is known of the transfer of BACs from natural producers and further up in the trophic food chain. In this study it was observed that total sum of methoxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (MeO-PBDEs) and OH-PBDEs increased in concentration from the filamentous red alga Ceramium tenuicorne, via Gammarus sp. and three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) to perch (Perca fluviatilis). The MeO-PBDEs, which were expected to bioaccumulate, increased in concentration accordingly up to perch, where the levels suddenly dropped dramatically. The opposite pattern was observed for OH-PBDEs, where the concentration exhibited a general trend of decline up the food web, but increased in perch, indicating metabolic demethylation of MeO-PBDEs. Debromination was also indicated to occur when progressing through the food chain resulting in high levels of tetra-brominated MeO-PBDE and OH-PBDE congeners in fish, while some penta- and hexa-brominated congeners were observed to be the dominant products in the alga. As it has been shown that OH-PBDEs are potent disruptors of oxidative phosphorylation and that mixtures of different congener may act synergistically in terms of this toxic mode of action, the high levels of OH-PBDEs detected in perch in this study warrants further investigation into potential effects of these compounds on Baltic wildlife, and monitoring of their levels. PMID:26517387

  9. Brominated flame retardant trends in aquatic birds from the Salish Sea region of the west coast of North America, including a mini-review of recent trends in marine and estuarine birds.

    PubMed

    Miller, Aroha; Elliott, John E; Elliott, Kyle H; Guigueno, Mélanie F; Wilson, Laurie K; Lee, Sandi; Idrissi, Abde

    2015-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) increased in many matrices during the 1990s and early 2000s. Since voluntary restrictions and regulations on PBDEs were implemented in North America circa early 2000s, decreases in PBDEs have occurred in many of these same matrices. To examine temporal trends in the North Pacific, we retrospectively analysed PBDEs and eight non-PBDE flame retardants (FR) in eggs of two aquatic bird species, great blue herons, Ardea herodias, and double-crested cormorants, Phalacrocorax auritus, collected along the British Columbia coast, Canada from 1979 to 2012. Increasing PBDE concentrations were observed in both species followed by significant decreases post-2000 for all dominant congeners and ΣPBDE. Non-PBDE FRs were generally undetected in cormorant eggs, or detected at very low levels in heron eggs, except for hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD). HBCDD, currently unregulated in North America, was not detected in early sampling years; however low concentrations were observed in both species in recent sampling years (2003-2012). Dietary tracers (δ(13)C and δ(15)N) did not change significantly over time, indicating that temporal changes in PBDEs are likely caused by implemented regulations. A comparison with recently published temporal trends of ΣPBDE in marine birds from North America and Europe is given. PMID:25241209

  10. Development of Bromine-77 from the LAMPF facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mettler, F.A. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of the work is to conduct the necessary studies required to evaluate the efficacy, potential benefit and role of bromine-77 labelled steroids in the detection and evaluation of treatment for hormone-dependent tumors. The synthetic goals of the project are to prepose estradiol derivatives which are labelled with bromine-77 at specific positions in the steroid nucleus. In addition, animal studies imaging studies, and cooperative studies are being conducted. (KJD)

  11. The Effect of CeO2 Addition on the Microstructure and Properties of Ni-Based Flame-Spray Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Liang, Bunv; Guo, Hongjian

    2014-04-01

    Ni-based alloy with different amount of CeO2 powders were flame sprayed and melted onto 1045 carbon steel substrate. Microstructure and properties of the coatings were studied by XRD, field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEGSEM) and SEM analyses. The wear behavior of the coatings was investigated under dry sliding wear conditions, and was compared with that of the coatings without CeO2, The results show that the microstructure of the coating with CeO2 differs widely from the coating without CeO2, the novel microstructure is beneficial for wear resistance. Abrasive wear tests without lubricant and analysis of the worn surfaces revealed that the Ni-based alloy coatings with the addition of 0.8% CeO2 exhibit higher wear resistance.

  12. Strain-induced extinction of hydrogen-air counterflow diffusion flames - Effects of steam, CO2, N2, and O2 additives to air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Northam, G. B.; Wilson, L. G.

    1992-01-01

    A fundamental study was performed using axisymmetric nozzle and tubular opposed jet burners to measure the effects of laminar plug flow and parabolic input velocity profiles on the extinction limits of H2-air counterflow diffusion flames. Extinction limits were quantified by 'flame strength', (average axial air jet velocity) at blowoff of the central flame. The effects of key air contaminants, on the extinction limits, are characterized and analyzed relative to utilization of combustion contaminated vitiated air in high enthalpy supersonic test facilities.

  13. Synthesis of Novel Flame Retardant Organophosphorus Compounds for the Application to Cotton Textile

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flame retardancy of textiles is an important property in apparel, bedding, curtains, and other household items. Chemical treatment is one method to increase flame retardancy of textile such as cotton, linenes, and silks. Halogenated compounds (containing chlorine or bromine atoms) have been shown to...

  14. Triaxial Burke-Schumann Flames with Applications to Flame Synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. H.; Axelbaum, R. L.; Gokoglu, Suleyman (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The problem of a flame generated by three coaxial flows is solved by extending the Burke-Schumann methodology to include a third stream. The solution is particularly relevant to flame synthesis wherein multiple tubes are often employed either to introduce inert as a diffusion barrier or to introduce more than two reactants. The general problem is solved where the inner and outer tubes contain reactants and the middle tube contains either an inert or a third reactant. Relevant examples are considered and the results show that the triaxial Burke-Schumann flame can be substantially more complicated than the traditional Burke-Schumann flame. When the middle flow is inert the flame temperature is no longer constant but increases axially, reaching a maximum at the flame centerline. At the exit the flame does not sit on the tube exit but instead resides between the inner and outer tubes, resulting in an effective barrier for particle build-up on the burner rim. For the case of a third reactant in the middle flow, synthesis chemistry where the inner reaction is endothermic and the outer reaction is exothermic is considered. In addition to showing the flame temperature and flame shape, the results identify conditions wherein reaction is not possible due to insufficient heat transfer from the outer flame to support the inner flame reaction.

  15. Bromine function in halite geochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Billo, S.M. )

    1991-06-01

    Of the halogens or salt formers, bromine is the only nonmetal which occurs naturally as a poisonous liquid much denser than water. The power of its atoms, expressed by a valence of 1 and 5, makes it unite directly with a large number of metallic elements to form salts. As a rare and strongly electronegative element of group VII in the periodic table, bromine exists in seawater and evaporitic brines as bromide with a ratio to chlorinity of 0.00348. Most water detains only about 1 ppm bromide for each 300 ppm of chloride. The most abundant source of bromine is ocean water (65 ppm Br), but richer peps occur in salt deposits and primarily in mineral brines. Atomic absorption spectrophotometric resolutions of Permian Castile halites exposed low values of bromine compared with its higher quantities in modern oceans like the Mediterranean. Bromine analyses of the two petrographically distinct forms of halite that characterize many ancient evaporite deposits, as in the Elk Point basin fields of Alberta, imply they crystallized from brines of noticeably different concentrations. Bromine in halite has been used as a paleosalinity indicator and a stratigraphic marker. Bromine liquid, with an atomic weight of 79.904 and atomic number 35, is used in producing gasoline antiknock mixtures, fumigants, photographic chemicals, drilling fluids, and fire retardants. It is also highly toxic and corrosive as bromine gas. Bromine contents greater than 1 ppm may be unsafe in the atmosphere, and a dose of 500 ppm can lead to death in less than an hour.

  16. Changes of accumulation profiles from PBDEs to brominated and chlorinated alternatives in marine mammals from the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bingqing; Lai, Nelson L S; Wai, Tak-Cheung; Chan, Leo L; Lam, James C W; Lam, Paul K S

    2014-05-01

    The present study investigated the composition profiles and levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and five PBDE alternatives in the blubber of two species of marine mammals, Indo-Pacific humpback dolphins (Sousa chinensis) and finless porpoises (Neophocaena phocaenoides) from the South China Sea. Despite the fact that PBDEs were the most predominant brominated flame retardants in the samples analyzed, decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE), 1,2-bis (2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane (BTBPE), bis- (2-ethylhexyl) -tetrabromophthalate (TBPH), 2-ethylhexyl 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (TBB) and Dechlorane Plus (DP) were all detected in both cetacean species. In addition, significantly increasing temporal shifting trends of Deca-BDE to DBDPE, Octa-BDE to BTBPE, and Deca-BDE to DP were observed in porpoise samples between 2003 and 2012 and dolphin samples between 2003 and 2011. These patterns may be attributed to the replacement of PBDEs by alternative halogenated flame retardants (HFRs) and the increasing usage of these alternatives following the restriction/voluntary withdrawal of the production and use of PBDE commercial mixtures. Our findings suggest that the study region may be a source of contamination by PBDE alternative flame retardants due to the high detection frequencies and levels of these compounds in marine mammals. PMID:24530800

  17. Bromination of marine particulate organic matter through oxidative mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leri, Alessandra C.; Mayer, Lawrence M.; Thornton, Kathleen R.; Ravel, Bruce

    2014-10-01

    Although bromine (Br) is considered conservative in seawater, it exhibits a well established correlation with organic carbon in marine sediments. This carbon-bromine association was recently attributed to covalent bonding, with organobromine in sinking particulates providing a putative link between sedimentary organobromine and organic matter cycling in surface waters. We hypothesized that phytoplankton detritus, a major precursor of sedimentary organic matter, would be susceptible to bromination through oxidative attack. Through a series of model experiments, we demonstrate incorporation of Br into algal particulate detritus through peroxidative and photochemical mechanisms. Peroxidative bromination was enhanced by addition of exogenous bromoperoxidase, but the enzyme was not required for the reaction. Fenton-like reaction conditions also promoted bromination, especially under solar irradiation, implicating radical mechanisms in the euphotic zone as another abiotic source of brominated particulates. These reactions produced aliphatic and aromatic forms of organobromine, suggesting that lipid- and protein-rich components of algal membranes provide suitable substrates for bromination. Biogenic organobromines in certain genera of phytoplankton also appeared in both aliphatic and aromatic forms. Experimental evidence and samples from oceanic midwater sediment traps imply that the aromatic fraction is more stable than the aliphatic. These experiments establish Br as a versatile oxidant in the transformation of planktonic organic matter through both enzymatic and abiotic mechanisms. Organobromine may serve as a marker of oxidative breakdown of marine organic detritus, with the metastable component providing a short-lived indicator of early-stage oxidation. By altering the stability of aliphatic and aromatic moieties, bromination may affect the availability of organic matter to organisms, with consequences for the preservation and degradation of marine organic carbon.

  18. Rapid methodology to screen flame retardants in upholstered furniture for compliance with new California labeling law (SB 1019).

    PubMed

    Petreas, Myrto; Gill, Ranjit; Takaku-Pugh, Sayaka; Lytle, Eric; Parry, Emily; Wang, Miaomiao; Quinn, John; Park, June-Soo

    2016-06-01

    In response to concerns regarding the widespread use of flame retardants, the California Legislature passed a law (SB1019) requiring labels on furniture products to indicate whether they do or do not contain flame retardants. To support the enforcement of the new law, our laboratory developed a step-wise, screening approach to test for brominated (BFR) and phosphorus-based flame retardants (OPFRs) in several types of furniture components (foam, fabric, batting, plumage, etc.). We used X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) to screen for the presence of Br (and other elements) and Inductively Coupled Plasma - Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) to identify and measure the concentration of P (and other elements). The same samples were also extracted by dichloromethane using sonication and analyzed by a single injection into a Gas Chromatograph - Tandem Mass Spectrometer to obtain concentrations of specific BFRs and OPFRs. Our approach showed excellent screening potential for Br and Sb by XRF and for P by ICP-OES, with both tests having predictive values of a negative equal to 1. To explore and screen for flame retardants in products not included in our current list of target chemicals, we used Liquid Chromatography/Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry operated with electrospray ionization, to identify additional flame retardants to be incorporated in quantitative methods. We are making all our methodologies public to facilitate simple and low cost methods that can help manufacturers and suppliers have their products tested and correctly labeled, ultimately benefitting the consumer. PMID:26991383

  19. Evaluation of Flame Retardancy, Mechanical Properties, and Bicompatibility of HIPS/PBrS Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liudi; Pack, Seongchan; Beaulieu, Coralie; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2012-02-01

    Our research focused on thermal and mechanical properties of High Impact Polystyrene (HIPS) system. Brominated Polystyrene (PBrS) was incorporated to replace halogenated Flame Retardant (DB) in HIPS blends. We have previously shown that ditallow functionalized clays could become nearly universal class of compatiblizers [si-2006]. Here we show that a new type of surface with Resorcinol bis (biphenyl phosphate) (RDP) could achieve the same goals. We demonstrate the strong compatibilization on the highly immiscible systems of HIPS/PBrS. Furthermore, we show that this system also works well, when a third component, Antimony Trioxide (AO) is added to provide flame retardant properties. Tensile test, dynamic mechanical analysis, and UL-94 flame test were applied to investigate this system. We found that the amount of AO used in flame retardant formulations could be minimized by addition of RDP clay, which could also increase some mechanical properties that Cloisite 20A clay couldn't. Besides, we evaluated the toxicity of Cloiste 20A and RDP clay. Langmuir-Blodgett trough and atomic force microscopy were used to make and check monolayer clay. Confocal Microscopy was used to assess cell morphology. The results showed RDP clay has potential for biomaterial applications.

  20. Flame Spectra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cromer, Alan

    1983-01-01

    When salt (NaCl) is introduced into a colorless flame, a bright yellow light (characteristic of sodium) is produced. Why doesn't the chlorine produce a characteristic color of light? The answer to this question is provided, indicating that the flame does not excite the appropriate energy levels in chlorine. (JN)

  1. Candle Flames in Microgravity Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This video of a candle flame burning in space was taken by the Candle Flames in Microgravity (CFM) experiment on the Russian Mir space station. It is actually a composite of still photos from a 35mm camera since the video images were too dim. The images show a hemispherically shaped flame, primarily blue in color, with some yellow early int the flame lifetime. The actual flame is quite dim and difficult to see with the naked eye. Nearly 80 candles were burned in this experiment aboard Mir. NASA scientists have also studied how flames spread in space and how to detect fire in microgravity. Researchers hope that what they learn about fire and combustion from the flame ball experiments will help out here on Earth. Their research could help create things such as better engines for cars and airplanes. Since they use very weak flames, flame balls require little fuel. By studying how this works, engineers may be able to design engines that use far less fuel. In addition, microgravity flame research is an important step in creating new safety precautions for astronauts living in space. By understanding how fire works in space, the astronauts can be better prepared to fight it.

  2. Turbulent flame propagation in partially premixed flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poinsot, T.; Veynante, D.; Trouve, A.; Ruetsch, G.

    1996-01-01

    Turbulent premixed flame propagation is essential in many practical devices. In the past, fundamental and modeling studies of propagating flames have generally focused on turbulent flame propagation in mixtures of homogeneous composition, i.e. a mixture where the fuel-oxidizer mass ratio, or equivalence ratio, is uniform. This situation corresponds to the ideal case of perfect premixing between fuel and oxidizer. In practical situations, however, deviations from this ideal case occur frequently. In stratified reciprocating engines, fuel injection and large-scale flow motions are fine-tuned to create a mean gradient of equivalence ratio in the combustion chamber which provides additional control on combustion performance. In aircraft engines, combustion occurs with fuel and secondary air injected at various locations resulting in a nonuniform equivalence ratio. In both examples, mean values of the equivalence ratio can exhibit strong spatial and temporal variations. These variations in mixture composition are particularly significant in engines that use direct fuel injection into the combustion chamber. In this case, the liquid fuel does not always completely vaporize and mix before combustion occurs, resulting in persistent rich and lean pockets into which the turbulent flame propagates. From a practical point of view, there are several basic and important issues regarding partially premixed combustion that need to be resolved. Two such issues are how reactant composition inhomogeneities affect the laminar and turbulent flame speeds, and how the burnt gas temperature varies as a function of these inhomogeneities. Knowledge of the flame speed is critical in optimizing combustion performance, and the minimization of pollutant emissions relies heavily on the temperature in the burnt gases. Another application of partially premixed combustion is found in the field of active control of turbulent combustion. One possible technique of active control consists of pulsating

  3. Substrate Directed Regioselective Monobromination of Aralkyl Ketones Using N-Bromosuccinimide Catalysed by Active Aluminium Oxide: α-Bromination versus Ring Bromination

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Reddy Bodireddy; Reddy, G. Trivikram; Gangi Reddy, N. C.

    2014-01-01

    Bromination of aralkyl ketones using N-bromosuccinimide in presence of active Al2O3 provided either α-monobrominated products in methanol at reflux or mononuclear brominated products in acetonitrile at reflux temperature with excellent isolated yields depending on the nature of substrate employed. The α-bromination was an exclusive process when aralkyl ketones containing moderate activating/deactivating groups were subjected to bromination under acidic Al2O3 conditions in methanol at reflux while nuclear functionalization was predominant when aralkyl ketones containing high activating groups were utilized for bromination in presence of neutral Al2O3 conditions in acetonitrile at reflux temperature. In addition, easy isolation of products, use of inexpensive catalyst, short reaction time (10–20 min), and safe operational practice are the major benefits in the present protocol. PMID:24955257

  4. Obtaining the Iodine Value of Various Oils via Bromination with Pyridinium Tribromide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simurdiak, Michael; Olukoga, Olushola; Hedberg, Kirk

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory exercise was devised that allows students to rapidly and fairly accurately determine the iodine value of oleic acid. This method utilizes the addition of elemental bromine to the unsaturated bonds in oleic acid, due to bromine's relatively fast reaction rate compared to that of the traditional Wijs solution method. This method also…

  5. 21 CFR 180.30 - Brominated vegetable oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Brominated vegetable oil. 180.30 Section 180.30 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD OR IN CONTACT WITH FOOD ON AN INTERIM BASIS PENDING ADDITIONAL STUDY...

  6. Bromine heterogenous chemistry in the troposhere

    SciTech Connect

    Abbatt, J.P.D.

    1996-10-01

    Motivated by the observations of boundary layer ozone loss which is correlated with high levels of bromine in the Arctic springtime, we have studied a number of heterogeneous interactions of tropospheric bromine species. The goal of this work is both to better define the source of inorganic bromine during this time of year and to determine the primary mechanism which keeps bromine in a photochemically active form.

  7. Flame Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Scientific Instruments, Inc. has now developed a second generation, commercially available instrument to detect flames in hazardous environments, typically refineries, chemical plants and offshore drilling platforms. The Model 74000 detector incorporates a sensing circuit that detects UV radiation in a 100 degree conical field of view extending as far as 250 feet from the instrument. It operates in a bandwidth that makes it virtually 'blind' to solar radiation while affording extremely high sensitivity to ultraviolet flame detection. A 'windowing' technique accurately discriminates between background UV radiation and ultraviolet emitted from an actual flame, hence the user is assured of no false alarms. Model 7410CP is a combination controller and annunciator panel designed to monitor and control as many as 24 flame detectors. *Model 74000 is no longer being manufactured.

  8. Detection of bromine monoxide in a volcanic plume.

    PubMed

    Bobrowski, N; Hönninger, G; Galle, B; Platt, U

    2003-05-15

    The emission of volcanic gases usually precedes eruptive activity, providing both a warning signal and an indication of the nature of the lava soon to be erupted. Additionally, volcanic emissions are a significant source of gases and particles to the atmosphere, influencing tropospheric and stratospheric trace-gas budgets. Despite some halogen species having been measured in volcanic plumes (mainly HCl and HF), little is known about bromine compounds and, in particular, gas-phase reactive bromine species. Such species are especially important in the stratosphere, as reactive bromine-despite being two orders of magnitude less abundant than chlorine-accounts for about one-third of halogen-catalysed ozone depletion. In the troposphere, bromine-catalysed complete ozone destruction has been observed to occur regularly during spring in the polar boundary layers as well as in the troposphere above the Dead Sea basin. Here we report observations of BrO and SO2 abundances in the plume of the Soufrière Hills volcano (Montserrat) in May 2002 by ground-based multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy. Our estimate of BrO emission leads us to conclude that local ozone depletion and small ozone 'holes' may occur in the vicinity of active volcanoes, and that the amount of bromine emitted from volcanoes might be sufficiently large to play a role not only in the stratosphere, but also in tropospheric chemistry. PMID:12748638

  9. Bayesian statistical modeling of disinfection byproduct (DBP) bromine incorporation in the ICR database.

    PubMed

    Francis, Royce A; Vanbriesen, Jeanne M; Small, Mitchell J

    2010-02-15

    Statistical models are developed for bromine incorporation in the trihalomethane (THM), trihaloacetic acids (THAA), dihaloacetic acid (DHAA), and dihaloacetonitrile (DHAN) subclasses of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) using distribution system samples from plants applying only free chlorine as a primary or residual disinfectant in the Information Collection Rule (ICR) database. The objective of this study is to characterize the effect of water quality conditions before, during, and post-treatment on distribution system bromine incorporation into DBP mixtures. Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods are used to model individual DBP concentrations and estimate the coefficients of the linear models used to predict the bromine incorporation fraction for distribution system DBP mixtures in each of the four priority DBP classes. The bromine incorporation models achieve good agreement with the data. The most important predictors of bromine incorporation fraction across DBP classes are alkalinity, specific UV absorption (SUVA), and the bromide to total organic carbon ratio (Br:TOC) at the first point of chlorine addition. Free chlorine residual in the distribution system, distribution system residence time, distribution system pH, turbidity, and temperature only slightly influence bromine incorporation. The bromide to applied chlorine (Br:Cl) ratio is not a significant predictor of the bromine incorporation fraction (BIF) in any of the four classes studied. These results indicate that removal of natural organic matter and the location of chlorine addition are important treatment decisions that have substantial implications for bromine incorporation into disinfection byproduct in drinking waters. PMID:20095529

  10. Flame Hair

    PubMed Central

    Miteva, Mariya; Tosti, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Background ‘Flame hairs’ is a trichoscopic feature described as hair residue from pulling anagen hairs in trichotillomania. Objective: To detect whether flame hairs are present in other hair loss disorders. Methods We retrospectively, independently and blindly reviewed the trichoscopic images of 454 consecutive patients with alopecia areata (99 cases), trichotillomania (n = 20), acute chemotherapy-induced alopecia (n = 6), acute radiotherapy-induced alopecia (n = 2), tinea capitis (n = 13), lichen planopilaris (n = 33), frontal fibrosing alopecia (n = 60), discoid lupus erythematosus (n = 30), dissecting cellulitis (n = 11), central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (n = 94) and traction alopecia (n = 86) for the presence of flame hairs. We prospectively obtained trichoscopy-guided scalp biopsies from flame hairs in trichotillomania, alopecia areata, traction alopecia and central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (1 case each). Results Flame hairs were detected in 100% of the acute chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-induced alopecias, where they were the predominant hair abnormality. They were also found in trichotillomania (55%), alopecia areata (21%), traction alopecia (4%) and central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (3%). On pathology, they corresponded to distorted hair shafts. Conclusion The flame hair is a type of broken hair which can be seen in various hair loss disorders. It results from traumatic pulling of anagen hairs or from anagen arrest due to inflammation or drugs. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel PMID:27171360

  11. The chemistry of atmospheric bromine. [catalyst for ozone destruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wofsy, S. C.; Mcelroy, M. B.; Yung, Y. L.

    1975-01-01

    Bromine may act as a catalyst for recombination of ozone and could be more efficient than either nitric oxide or chlorine. The lower atmosphere contains small concentrations of gaseous bromine produced in part by marine activity and volatilization of particulate material released during the combustion of leaded gasoline, with an additional contribution due to the use of methyl bromide as an agricultural fumigant. Observations by Lazrus et al., (1975) indicate small concentrations of bromine, about 10 to the -11th power (v/v), in the contemporary stratosphere and appear to imply a reduction of approximately 0.3% in the global budget of O3. Estimates are given for future reductions in O3 which might occur if the use of CH3Br as an agricultural fumigant were to continue to grow at present rates.

  12. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  13. Computational Studies of Flame Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Vaishali

    This thesis is concerned with computational studies of laminar flame structures using detailed and skeletal chemical kinetic mechanisms. Elementary reactions in these mechanisms control the observable combustion properties such as flame speed, autoignition temperature, ignition delay time, and extinction characteristics in nonpremixed and premixed flame phenomena. First part of thesis deals with computational investigations of influence of carbon monoxide and hydrogen addition on methane flames stabilized in counterflow configuration. Computations were performed employing detailed chemical kinetic mechanism---the San Diego mechanism. In case of nonpremixed flames, effect of carbon xvi monoxide addition on structure and critical condition of extinction were examined. Differences between addition on fuel and oxidizer sides were investigated and plausible explanation given for the differences. For premixed flames, effect of addition of hydrogen and carbon monoxide to reactant mixture was studied. Critical conditions of extinction were predicted using computations for various compositions. Rates of production and consumption of various species were calculated and flame structure was analyzed for nonpremixed and premixed flames. It was found that moderate amount of carbon monoxide addition to methane enhances flame reactivity. However, with large amount of carbon monoxide addition, additive chemistry dominates. Addition of increasing amounts of hydrogen in premixed reactant stream enhances methane flame reactivity. In second part of thesis, kinetic modeling was performed to elucidate the structure and mechanism of extinction and autoignition of nonpremixed toluene flames in counterflow configuration. Computations were performed using detailed chemistry to determine flame structure and to obtain values for critical conditions of extinction and autoignition. Sensitivity analysis of rate parameters, reaction pathway analysis, and spatial reaction rate profiles were used to

  14. Effects of Flame Structure and Hydrodynamics on Soot Particle Inception and Flame Extinction in Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelbaum, R. L.; Chen, R.; Sunderland, P. B.; Urban, D. L.; Liu, S.; Chao, B. H.

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes recent studies of the effects of stoichiometric mixture fraction (structure) and hydrodynamics on soot particle inception and flame extinction in diffusion flames. Microgravity experiments are uniquely suited for these studies because, unlike normal gravity experiments, they allow structural and hydrodynamic effects to be independently studied. As part of this recent flight definition program, microgravity studies have been performed in the 2.2 second drop tower. Normal gravity counterflow studies also have been employed and analytical and numerical models have been developed. A goal of this program is to develop sufficient understanding of the effects of flame structure that flames can be "designed" to specifications - consequently, the program name Flame Design. In other words, if a soot-free, strong, low temperature flame is required, can one produce such a flame by designing its structure? Certainly, as in any design, there will be constraints imposed by the properties of the available "materials." For hydrocarbon combustion, the base materials are fuel and air. Additives could be considered, but for this work only fuel, oxygen and nitrogen are considered. Also, the structure of these flames is "designed" by varying the stoichiometric mixture fraction. Following this line of reasoning, the studies described are aimed at developing the understanding of flame structure that is needed to allow for optimum design.

  15. Advanced Morphological — Behavioral Test Platform Reveals Neurodevelopmental Defects in Embryonic Zebrafish Exposed to Comprehensive Suite of Halogenated and Organophosphate Flame Retardants

    PubMed Central

    Noyes, Pamela D.; Haggard, Derik E.; Gonnerman, Greg D.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    The increased use of flammable plastics and electronic devices along with stricter fire safety standards has led to the heavy use of flame retardant chemicals in many consumer, commercial, and industrial products. Although flame retardant use has increased, a great deal of uncertainty surrounds their safety with some evidence showing toxicity and risk to human and environmental health. Recent efforts have focused on designing high-throughput biological platforms with nonmammalian models to evaluate and prioritize chemicals with limited hazard information. To complement these efforts, this study used a new morphological and behavioral testing platform with embryonic zebrafish to characterize the developmental toxicity of 44 halogenated and organophosphate flame retardants, including several of their known metabolites. Zebrafish were exposed to flame retardants from 6 to 120 h post fertilization (hpf) across concentrations spanning 4 orders of magnitude (eg, 6.4 nM to 64 µM). Flame retardant effects on survival and development were evaluated at 24 and 120 hpf, and neurobehavioral changes were measured using 2 photomotor response (PMR) assays. Compared to controls, 93% (41/44) of flame retardants studied elicited adverse effects among one or more of the bioassays and concentrations tested with the aryl phosphate ester (APE)-based mono-isopropylated triaryl phosphate and the brominated-bisphenol-A analog tetrabromobisphenol-A producing the greatest array of malformations. Hierarchical clustering showed that APE flame retardants with isopropyl, butyl, and cresyl substituents on phenyl rings clustered tightly and were particularly potent. Both PMR assays were highly predictive of morphological defects supporting their use as nonlethal means of evaluating teratogenicity that could allow for additional evaluations of long-term or delayed effects in older animals. Taken together, evidence presented here indicates that zebrafish neurodevelopment is highly sensitive to

  16. Advanced morphological - behavioral test platform reveals neurodevelopmental defects in embryonic zebrafish exposed to comprehensive suite of halogenated and organophosphate flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Noyes, Pamela D; Haggard, Derik E; Gonnerman, Greg D; Tanguay, Robert L

    2015-05-01

    The increased use of flammable plastics and electronic devices along with stricter fire safety standards has led to the heavy use of flame retardant chemicals in many consumer, commercial, and industrial products. Although flame retardant use has increased, a great deal of uncertainty surrounds their safety with some evidence showing toxicity and risk to human and environmental health. Recent efforts have focused on designing high-throughput biological platforms with nonmammalian models to evaluate and prioritize chemicals with limited hazard information. To complement these efforts, this study used a new morphological and behavioral testing platform with embryonic zebrafish to characterize the developmental toxicity of 44 halogenated and organophosphate flame retardants, including several of their known metabolites. Zebrafish were exposed to flame retardants from 6 to 120 h post fertilization (hpf) across concentrations spanning 4 orders of magnitude (eg, 6.4 nM to 64 µM). Flame retardant effects on survival and development were evaluated at 24 and 120 hpf, and neurobehavioral changes were measured using 2 photomotor response (PMR) assays. Compared to controls, 93% (41/44) of flame retardants studied elicited adverse effects among one or more of the bioassays and concentrations tested with the aryl phosphate ester (APE)-based mono-isopropylated triaryl phosphate and the brominated-bisphenol-A analog tetrabromobisphenol-A producing the greatest array of malformations. Hierarchical clustering showed that APE flame retardants with isopropyl, butyl, and cresyl substituents on phenyl rings clustered tightly and were particularly potent. Both PMR assays were highly predictive of morphological defects supporting their use as nonlethal means of evaluating teratogenicity that could allow for additional evaluations of long-term or delayed effects in older animals. Taken together, evidence presented here indicates that zebrafish neurodevelopment is highly sensitive to

  17. Electrolyte additive for improved battery performance

    DOEpatents

    Bellows, Richard J.; Kantner, Edward

    1989-04-04

    In one embodiment of the present invention, there is provided an electrochemical cell having a metal bromine couple. The cell includes an electrode structure on which to deposit the metal of the couple and a counterelectrode at which to generate bromine. A microporous membrane separates the electrode and counterelectrode. Importantly, the aqueous electrolyte comprises an aqueous metal bromide solution containing a water soluble bromine complexing agent capable of forming a water immiscible complex with bromine and an additive capable of decreasing the wettability of the microporous separators employed in such cells by such water immiscible bromine complexes.

  18. The toxicity of brominated and mixed-halogenated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, L.W.D. |; Greim, H.

    1997-02-21

    Brominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans can be formed under laboratory conditions by pyrolysis of flame retardants based on polybrominated biphenyls and biphenyl ethers. Their occurrence in the environment, however, is due to combustion processes such as municipal waste incineration and internal combustion engines. As these processes generally take place in the presence of an excess of chlorine, predominantly mixed brominated and chlorinated compounds have been identified so far in environmental samples. Brominated dibenzo-p-dioxins or dibenzofurans bind to the cytosolic Ah receptor about as avidly as their chlorinated congeners and induce hepatic microsomal enzymes with comparable potency. The same holds true for mixed brominated-chlorinated compounds. Gross pathologic symptoms-hypothyroidism, thymic atrophy, wasting of body mass, lethality-also occur at doses that, on a molar concentration basis, are virtually identical to those seen with the chlorinated compounds. Their potency to induce malformations in mice following prenatal exposure is equivalent to that of chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans. Possible activities as (co)carcinogens and endocrine disrupters have not been evaluated, but are likely to exist. Considering the overall similarity in action of chlorinated and brominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans, environmental and health assessment should be based on molar body burdens without discrimination for the nature of the halogen. 107 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  19. Flame retardants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troitzsch, J.

    1988-01-01

    The use of flame retardants in plastics has grown only slightly in recent years and will probably grow slowly in the future. The reasons for this are slow economic growth and the absence of fundamentally new requirements for future fire prevention. The trends are toward the increasing use of easily handled, dust-free and well-dispersed flame retardant compounds and master batches; there are no spectacular new developments. In the future, questions of smoke evolution, toxicity and corrosiveness of combustion gases will become increasingly important, especially due to new regulations and rising requirements for environmental protection.

  20. Brominated and fluorinated organic pollutants in the breast milk of first-time Irish mothers: is there a relationship to levels in food?

    PubMed

    Pratt, Iona; Anderson, Wayne; Crowley, Dominique; Daly, Sean; Evans, Rhodri; Fernandes, Alwyn; Fitzgerald, Margaret; Geary, Michael; Keane, Declan; Morrison, John J; Reilly, Alan; Tlustos, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants - polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and others - have been measured in 11 pooled breast milk samples from 109 first-time mothers in Ireland. Additionally, the study has measured levels of polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PBDD/Fs), mixed halogenated dioxins (PXCC/Fs) and biphenyls (PXBs), polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) and perfluoroalkylated substances (PFAS) in these samples. The mean sum of 19 PBDEs including BDE-209 was 4.85 ng g(-1) fat, which is comparable with that found in other European countries. BDE-47, BDE-153, BDE-209, BDE-99 and BDE-100 were found at the highest concentrations. The only PBBs detected consistently were BB-77, BB-126 and BB-153, with highest concentrations being found for BB-153 (mean = 0.13 ng g(-1) fat). The mean sum of HBCD enantiomers was 3.52 ng g(-1) fat, with α-HBCD representing over 70% of the total. Of the other brominated flame retardants - tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBP-A), hexabromobenzene (HBB), decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE) and bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxyethane) (BTBPE) - examined, only TBBP-A was detected above the limit of detection (LOD), in two of the 11 pools analysed. All measured PBDF congeners were observed (at 0.02-0.91 pg g(-1) fat), but 2,3,7,8-tetrabromo-dibenzodioxin (TeBDD) was the only PBDD detected, with a mean concentration of 0.09 pg g(-1) fat. The occurrence of the mixed chlorinated/brominated dibenzodioxins, dibenzofurans and biphenyls, 2-B-3,7,8-CDD, 2,3-B-7,8-CDF, 4-B-2,3,7,8-CDF, PXB 105, PXB 118, PXB 126 and PCB 156 in breast milk in the current study may indicate that levels of these contaminants are increasing in the environment. Polychlorinated naphthalenes were detected in all samples, but not perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and other PFAS. The pattern of occurrence of these brominated and fluorinated persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in Irish breast milk shows a general relationship

  1. Electronic properties of bromine-doped carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Louie, Steven G.; Cohen, Marvin L.

    2002-07-15

    Intercalation of bromine molecules (Br2) into single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) ropes is studied using the ab initio pseudopotential density functional method. Electronic and vibrational properties of the SWNT and Br2 are studied for various bromine concentrations. A drastic change in the charge transfer, bromine stretching-mode, and bromine bond-length is observed when the bromine-bromine distance decreases. Calculated electronic structures show that, at high bromine concentrations, the bromine ppsigma level broadens due to the interbromine interaction. These states overlap with the electronic bands of the SWNT near the Fermi level which results in a substantial charge transfer from carbon to bromine.

  2. Rayleigh-Taylor Unstable Flames -- Fast or Faster?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, E. P.

    2015-04-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) unstable flames play a key role in the explosions of supernovae Ia. However, the dynamics of these flames are still not well understood. RT unstable flames are affected by both the RT instability of the flame front and by RT-generated turbulence. The coexistence of these factors complicates the choice of flame speed subgrid models for full-star Type Ia simulations. Both processes can stretch and wrinkle the flame surface, increasing its area and, therefore, the burning rate. In past research, subgrid models have been based on either the RT instability or turbulence setting the flame speed. We evaluate both models, checking their assumptions and their ability to correctly predict the turbulent flame speed. Specifically, we analyze a large parameter study of 3D direct numerical simulations of RT unstable model flames. This study varies both the simulation domain width and the gravity in order to probe a wide range of flame behaviors. We show that RT unstable flames are different from traditional turbulent flames: they are thinner rather than thicker when turbulence is stronger. We also show that none of the several different types of turbulent flame speed models accurately predicts measured flame speeds. In addition, we find that the RT flame speed model only correctly predicts the measured flame speed in a certain parameter regime. Finally, we propose that the formation of cusps may be the factor causing the flame to propagate more quickly than predicted by the RT model.

  3. The chemistry of dimethacrylate-styrene networks, and, Development of flame retardant, halogen-free fiber reinforced vinyl ester composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosario, Astrid Christa

    One of the major classes of polymer matrix resins under consideration for structural composite applications in the infrastructure and construction industries is vinyl ester resin. Vinyl ester resin is comprised of low molecular weight poly(hydroxyether) oligomers with methacrylate endgroups diluted with styrene monomer. The methacrylate endgroups cure with styrene via free radical copolymerization to yield thermoset networks. The copolymerization behavior of these networks was monitored by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) at various cure conditions. Reactions of the carbon-carbon double bonds of the methacrylate (943 cm-1) and styrene (910 cm-1 ) were followed independently. Oligomers possessing number average molecular weights of 700 g/mole were studied with systematically increasing levels of styrene. The Mortimer-Tidwell reactivity ratios indicated that at low conversion more styrene was incorporated into the network at lower cure temperatures. The experimental vinyl ester-styrene network compositions deviated significantly from those predicted by the Meyer-Lowry integrated copolymer equation at higher conversion, implying that the reactivity ratios for these networks may change with conversion. The kinetic data were used to provide additional insight into the physical and mechanical properties of these materials. In addition to establishing the copolymerization kinetics of these materials, the development of halogen free fiber reinforced vinyl ester composites exhibiting good flame properties was of interest. Flame retardant vinyl ester resins are used by many industries for applications requiring good thermal resistance. The current flame-retardant technology is dependent on brominated vinyl esters, which generate high levels of smoke and carbon monoxide. A series of halogen free binder systems has been developed and dispersed in the vinyl ester to improve flame retardance. The binder approach enables the vinyl ester resin to maintain its low

  4. Flames in vortices & tulip-flame inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dold, J. W.

    This article summarises two areas of research regarding the propagation of flames in flows which involve significant fluid-dynamical motion [1]-[3]. The major difference between the two is that in the first study the fluid motion is present before the arrival of any flame and remains unaffected by the flame [1, 2] while, in the second study it is the flame that is responsible for all of the fluid dynamical effects [3]. It is currently very difficult to study flame-motion in which the medium is both highly disturbed before the arrival of a flame and is further influenced by the passage of the flame.

  5. Hydrogen-Bromine Secondary Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A secondary battery is described utilizing hydrogen and halogen as primary reactants. It comprises inert anode and cathode initially contacting an aqueous solution of an acid and an alkali metal bromide. The hydrogen generated during charging of the cell is stored as gas, while the bromine becomes dissolved predominantly in the lower layers of the acid electrolyte. Preferred components are phosphoric acid and lithium bromide.

  6. Soot Formation in Purely-Curved Premixed Flames and Laminar Flame Speeds of Soot-Forming Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, Thomas; Wang, Hai

    2005-01-01

    The research addressed here is a collaborative project between University of Delaware and Case Western Reserve University. There are two basic and related scientific objectives. First, we wish to demonstrate the suitability of spherical/cylindrical, laminar, premixed flames in the fundamental study of the chemical and physical processes of soot formation. Our reasoning is that the flame standoff distance in spherical/cylindrical flames under microgravity can be substantially larger than that in a flat burner-stabilized flame. Therefore the spherical/cylindrical flame is expected to give better spatial resolution to probe the soot inception and growth chemistry than flat flames. Second, we wish to examine the feasibility of determining the laminar flame speed of soot forming flames. Our basic assumption is that under the adiabatic condition (in the absence of conductive heat loss), the amount and dynamics of soot formed in the flame is unique for a given fuel/air mixture. The laminar flame speed can be rigorously defined as long as the radiative heat loss can be determined. This laminar flame speed characterizes the flame soot formation and dynamics in addition to the heat release rate. The research involves two integral parts: experiments of spherical and cylindrical sooting flames in microgravity (CWRU), and the computational counterpart (UD) that aims to simulate sooting laminar flames, and the sooting limits of near adiabatic flames. The computations work is described in this report, followed by a summary of the accomplishments achieved to date. Details of the microgra+ experiments will be discussed in a separate, final report prepared by the co-PI, Professor C-J. Sung of CWRU. Here only a brief discussion of these experiments will be given.

  7. Detection of halogenated flame retardants in polyurethane foam by particle induced X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maley, Adam M.; Falk, Kyle A.; Hoover, Luke; Earlywine, Elly B.; Seymour, Michael D.; DeYoung, Paul A.; Blum, Arlene; Stapleton, Heather M.; Peaslee, Graham F.

    2015-09-01

    A novel application of particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) has been developed to detect the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardant chemicals in polyurethane foams. Traditional Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) methods for the detection and identification of halogenated flame retardants in foams require extensive sample preparation and data acquisition time. The elemental analysis of the halogens in polyurethane foam performed by PIXE offers the opportunity to identify the presence of halogenated flame retardants in a fraction of the time and sample preparation cost. Through comparative GC-MS and PIXE analysis of 215 foam samples, excellent agreement between the two methods was obtained. These results suggest that PIXE could be an ideal rapid screening method for the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardants in polyurethane foams.

  8. Soot Formation in Laminar Premixed Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Krishnan, S. S.; Faeth, G. M.

    1999-01-01

    Soot processes within hydrocarbon-fueled flames affect emissions of pollutant soot, thermal loads on combustors, hazards of unwanted fires and capabilities for computational combustion. In view of these observations, the present study is considering processes of soot formation in both burner-stabilized and freely-propagating laminar premixed flames. These flames are being studied in order to simplify the interpretation of measurements and to enhance computational tractability compared to the diffusion flame environments of greatest interest for soot processes. In addition, earlier studies of soot formation in laminar premixed flames used approximations of soot optical and structure properties that have not been effective during recent evaluations, as well as questionable estimates of flow residence times). The objective of present work was to exploit methods of avoiding these difficulties developed for laminar diffusion flames to study soot growth in laminar premixed flames. The following description of these studies is brief.

  9. Stability of Bromine Intercalated Graphite Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Previous evidence suggested that bromine intercalation compounds of crystalline graphite spontaneously deintercalate when the bromine atmosphere is removed. However, results show that bromine intercalated P-100 graphite fibers are stable for long periods of time. They are stable under vacuum conditions, high humidity, and current densities up to 24,000 A/sq cm. They are thermally stable to 200 C, and at temperatures as high as 400 C still retain 80 percent of the conductivity gained by intercalation. At temperatures greater than 300 C, there is significant oxidative degradation of the fibers. The environmental stability shown by the bromine compound makes it a promising candidate for practical applications in aerospace technology.

  10. A method to remove intercalates from bromine and iodine intercalated carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh

    1993-01-01

    Upon exposure to room-temperature fluorine, intercalated carbon fibers (containing either bromine alone or iodine and bromine together) become heavier and less stable. For Amoco P-100 graphitized carbon fibers which were intercalated with 18 percent bromine by weight, 1 hr of fluorine exposure results in a large weight increase, but causes only a small decrease in thermal stability. More than l hr of fluorine exposure time results in small additional increases in fiber weight, but significant further decreases in fiber thermal stability. Such phenomena do not occur if the fluorine exposure is at 250 C. These observations suggest the mechanism that at room temperature, fluorine is absorbed quickly by the intercalated fibers and intercalated slowly into the fibers. Most of the original intercalates are replaced by fluorine in the process of fluorine intercalation. Under an inert environment, the bromine intercalated fibers are much more thermally stable. After 800 C vacuum heating for two weeks, the brominated fibers lost about 45 percent of their bromine, and their resistivity increased from 64 omega-cm to a range of 95 to 170 micro omega-cm. This is still much lower than the 300 micro omega-cm value for pristine P-100. For practical purposes, in order to preserve their thermal stability, brominated fibers need to be protected from exposure to fluorine at room temperature, or to any intercalate at a temperature where, upon direct contact to graphite, an intercalation compound can easily be formed.

  11. DEVELOPMENTAL EVALUATIONS OF C57BL/6 MICE EXPOSED TO 2,2',4,4'-BROMINATED DIPHENYL ETHER (DE47) ON POSTNATAL DAY 10.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely used commercial flame retardants that are accumulating in the environment. 2,2',4,4'-Brominated diphenyl ether (DE47) is the most stable congener of this group and is undergoing the most rapid accumulation in humans, despite the ...

  12. Highly asymmetric bromocyclization of tryptophol: unexpected accelerating effect of DABCO-derived bromine complex.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Jiang, Guangde; Pan, Xixian; Wan, Xiaolong; Lai, Yisheng; Ma, Dawei; Xie, Weiqing

    2014-04-01

    Highly asymmetric bromocyclization of tryptophol by using chiral anionic phase-transfer catalyst and DABCO-derived brominating reagent is described. Optimization of the reaction conditions revealed that the reaction rate was accelerated together with improvement of enantioselectivity by addition of catalytic DABCO-derived brominating reagent. From tryptophol, 3-bromofuroindoline could be directly obtained in excellent enantioselectivities by employing this novel methodology. PMID:24666363

  13. Brominated carbon black: An EDXD study

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, Marilena; Gontrani, Lorenzo

    2014-06-19

    An energy dispersive X-Ray study of pure and brominated carbon black was carried out. The analysis of the diffraction patterns reveals that the low bromine load (ca.1% mol) is trapped into the structure, without significantly modifying it. This allows the application of the difference methods, widely tested for electrolyte solutions, inorganic matrices containing metals and isomorphic substitutions.

  14. Candle Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, D. L.; Ross, H. D.; T'ien, J. S.; Chang, P.; Shu, Y.

    1999-01-01

    This work is a study of a candle flame in a microgravity environment. The purpose of the work is to determine if a steady (or quasi-steady) flame can exist in a microgravity environment, study the characteristics of the steady flame, investigate the pre-extinction flame oscillations observed in a previous experiment in more detail, and finally, determine the nature of the interactions between two closely spaced candle flames. The candle flame in microgravity is used as a model of a non-propagating, steady-state, pure diffusion flame. The present work is a continuation of two small-scale, space-based experiments on candle flames, one on the Shuttle and the other on the Mir OS. The previous studies showed nearly steady dim blue flames with flame lifetimes as high as 45 minutes, and 1 Hz spontaneous flame oscillations prior to extinction. The present paper summarizes the results of the modeling efforts to date.

  15. Persistence, bioaccumulation, and toxicity of halogen-free flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Waaijers, Susanne L; Kong, Deguo; Hendriks, Hester S; de Wit, Cynthia A; Cousins, Ian T; Westerink, Remco H S; Leonards, Pim E G; Kraak, Michiel H S; Admiraal, Wim; de Voogt, Pim; Parsons, John R

    2013-01-01

    Polymers are synthetic organic materials having a high carbon and hydrogen content, which make them readily combustible. Polymers have many indoor uses and their flammability makes them a fire hazard. Therefore, flame retardants (FRs) are incorporated into these materials as a safety measure. Brominated flame retardants (BFRs), which accounted for about 21% of the total world market of FRs, have several unintended negative effects on the environment and human health. Hence, there is growing interest in finding appropriate alternative halogen-free flame retardants (HFFRs). Many of these HFFRs are marketed already, although their environ- mental behavior and toxicological properties are often only known to a limited extent, and their potential impact on the environment cannot yet be properly assessed. Therefore, we undertook this review to make an inventory of the available data that exists (up to September 2011) on the physical-chemical properties, pro- duction volumes, persistence, bioaccumulation, and toxicity (PBT) of a selection of HFFRs that are potential replacements for BFRs in polymers. Large data gaps were identified for the physical-chemical and the PBT properties of the reviewed HFFRs. Because these HFFRs are currently on the market, there is an urgent need to fill these data gaps. Enhanced transparency of methodology and data are needed to reevaluate certain test results that appear contradictory, and, if this does not provide new insights, further research should be performed. TPP has been studied quite extensively and it is clearly persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic. So far, RDP and BDP have demonstrated low to high ecotoxicity and persistence. The compounds ATH and ZB exerted high toxicity to some species and ALPI appeared to be persistent and has low to moderate reported ecotoxicity. DOPO and MPP may be persistent, but this view is based merely on one or two studies, clearly indicating a lack of information. Many degradation studies have been

  16. Electrical Aspects of Impinging Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Yu-Chien

    from the flame to the plate can be controlled using the electric field are the two main goals of this research. Multiple diagnostic techniques are employed such as OH chemiluminescence to identify the reaction zone, OH PLIF to characterize the location of this radical species, CO released from the flame, IR imaging and OH PLIF thermometry to understand the surface and gas temperature distribution, respectively. The principal finding is that carbon monoxide release from an impinging diffusion flame results from the escape of carbon monoxide created on the fuel side of the flame along the boundary layer near the surface where it avoids oxidation by OH, which sits to the air side of the reaction sheet interface. In addition, the plate proximity to the flame has a stronger influence on the emission of toxic carbon monoxide than does the electric field strength. There is, however, a narrow region of burner to surface distance where the electric field is most effective. The results also show that heat transfer can be spatially concentrated effectively using an electric field driven ion wind, particularly at some burner to surface distances.

  17. Flame Retardant Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Lyon, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial aircraft, flame retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured epoxies were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis and microscale combustion calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness of plaques of several cured formulations was determined on single-edge notched bend specimens. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  18. Sensitivity of Ozone to Bromine in the Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salawitch, R. J.; Weisenstein, D. K.; Kovalenko, L. J.; Sioris, C. E.; Wennberg, P. O.; Chance, K.; Ko, M. K. W.; McLinden, C. A.

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of BrO suggest that inorganic bromine (Br(sub y)) at and above the tropopause is 4 to 8 ppt greater than assumed in models used in past ozone trend assessment studies. This additional bromine is likely carried to the stratosphere by short-lived biogenic compounds and their decomposition products, including tropospheric BrO. Including this additional bromine in an ozone trend simulation increases the computed ozone depletion over the past approx.25 years, leading to better agreement between measured and modeled ozone trends. This additional Br(sub y) (assumed constant over time) causes more ozone depletion because associated BrO provides a reaction partner for ClO, which increases due to anthropogenic sources. Enhanced Br(sub y) causes photochemical loss of ozone below approx.14 km to change from being controlled by HO(sub x) catalytic cycles (primarily HO2+O3) to a situation where loss by the BrO+HO2 cycle is also important.

  19. Laminar Diffusion Flame Studies (Ground- and Space-Based Studies)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Lin, K.-C.; Sunderland, P. B.; Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Laminar diffusion flames are of interest because they provide model flame systems that are far more tractable for analysis and experiments than more practical turbulent diffusion flames. Certainly, understanding flame processes within laminar diffusion flames must precede understanding these processes in more complex turbulent diffusion flames. In addition, many properties of laminar diffusion flames are directly relevant to turbulent diffusion flames using laminar flamelet concepts. Laminar jet diffusion flame shapes (luminous flame boundaries) have been of particular interest since the classical study of Burke and Schumann because they are a simple nonintrusive measurement that is convenient for evaluating flame structure predictions. Thus, consideration of laminar flame shapes is undertaken in the following, emphasizing conditions where effects of gravity are small, due to the importance of such conditions to practical applications. Another class of interesting properties of laminar diffusion flames are their laminar soot and smoke point properties (i.e., the flame length, fuel flow rate, characteristic residence time, etc., at the onset of soot appearance in the flame (the soot point) and the onset of soot emissions from the flame (the smoke point)). These are useful observable soot properties of nonpremixed flames because they provide a convenient means to rate several aspects of flame sooting properties: the relative propensity of various fuels to produce soot in flames; the relative effects of fuel structure, fuel dilution, flame temperature and ambient pressure on the soot appearance and emission properties of flames; the relative levels of continuum radiation from soot in flames; and effects of the intrusion of gravity (or buoyant motion) on emissions of soot from flames. An important motivation to define conditions for soot emissions is that observations of laminar jet diffusion flames in critical environments, e.g., space shuttle and space station

  20. Additivity of detector responses of a portable direct-reading 10. 2 eV photoionization detector and a flame ionization gas chromatograph for atmospheres of multicomponent organics: use of PID/FID ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, I.N.; Hee, S.S.Q.; Clark, C.S.

    1987-05-01

    The H-Nu PI-101 with a photoionization detector (PID) of 10.2 eV and Century OVA-128 equipped with a flame ionization detector (FID) were evaluated for the additivity of their responses to a defined mixtures of dissimilar organic vapors at a 0 and 90% relative humidity (RH). The responses of both instruments were additive as long as the effect of RH was accounted for the PID. The PI-101 was not as precise as the Century OVA-128 for 90% RH atmospheres. PID/FID ratios did not change in the presence of 90% RH as long as the effect of RH also was accounted for in the PID reading. The compounds investigated included: toluene, benzaldehyde; 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, methyl chloroform, methylene dichloride, methyl ethyl ketone, ethanol and acetonitrile.

  1. Gravitational effects on the structure and propagation of premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamins, A.; Heitor, M.; Libby, P. A.

    The influence of gravity on the propagation velocity and shape of premixed laminar flames is studied experimentally over the entire flammability range of methane-air mixtures. In the experiments reported here a vertical tube 10 cm dia, closed on both ends and open in the middle is filled with reactants and ignited in its central plane so that flames propagate in both the upward and downward directions. Additional experiments are made in a vertical tube 5 cm dia with flames propagating from an open towards a closed end. Steady flame propagation is achieved over the entire range of equivalence ratios by locating a series of holes along the length of the tubes covered with a thin film which is vaporized by the passage of the flame. Measurements in the larger tube indicate that gravity affects both rich and lean laminar flames in that upward propagating flames are faster than downward. The shape of the flames is complex with the former roughly hemispherical, the latter flat but with a cellular structure. In near stoichiometric mixtures the flames are oscillatory, are unaffected by gravity and correspond to weakly turbulent flames. The results in the smaller tube indicate that upward moving flames propagate faster than downward moving flames over the entire range of equivalence ratios studied and that the flame shape is always hemispherical. The preliminary results for turbulent premixed flames propagating upward and downward are discussed.

  2. Isoselenazolones as catalysts for the activation of bromine: bromolactonization of alkenoic acids and oxidation of alcohols.

    PubMed

    Balkrishna, Shah Jaimin; Prasad, Ch Durga; Panini, Piyush; Detty, Michael R; Chopra, Deepak; Kumar, Sangit

    2012-11-01

    Isoselenazolones were synthesized by a copper-catalyzed Se-N bond forming reaction between 2-halobenzamides and selenium powder. The catalytic activity of the various isoselenazolones was studied in the bromolactonization of pent-4-enoic acid. Isoselenazolone 9 was studied as a catalyst in several reactions: the bromolactonization of a series of alkenoic acids with bromine or N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) in the presence of potassium carbonate as base, the bromoesterification of a series of alkenes using NBS and a variety of carboxylic acids, and the oxidation of secondary alcohols to ketones using bromine as an oxidizing reagent. Mechanistic details of the isoselenazolone-catalyzed bromination reaction were revealed by (77)Se NMR spectroscopic and ES-MS studies. The oxidative addition of bromine to the isoselenazolone gives the isoselenazolone(IV) dibromide, which could be responsible for the activation of bromine under the reaction conditions. Steric effects from an N-phenylethyl group on the amide of the isoselenazolone and electron-withdrawing fluoro substituents on the benzo fused-ring of the isoselenazolone appear to enhance the stability of the isoselenazolone as a catalyst for the bromination reaction. PMID:23046286

  3. Effects of neonatal exposure to the flame retardant tetrabromobisphenol-A, aluminum diethylphosphinate or zinc stannate on long-term potentiation and synaptic protein levels in mice.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Hester S; Koolen, Lucas A E; Dingemans, Milou M L; Viberg, Henrik; Lee, Iwa; Leonards, Pim E G; Ramakers, Geert M J; Westerink, Remco H S

    2015-12-01

    Brominated flame retardants such as tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA) may exert (developmental) neurotoxic effects. However, data on (neuro)toxicity of halogen-free flame retardants (HFFRs) are scarce. Recent in vitro studies indicated a high neurotoxic potential for some HFFRs, e.g., zinc stannate (ZS), whereas the neurotoxic potential of other HFFRs, such as aluminum diethylphosphinate (Alpi), appears low. However, the in vivo (neuro)toxicity of these compounds is largely unknown. We therefore investigated effects of neonatal exposure to TBBPA, Alpi or ZS on synaptic plasticity in mouse hippocampus. Male C57bl/6 mice received a single oral dose of 211 µmol/kg bw TBBPA, Alpi or ZS on postnatal day (PND) 10. On PND 17-19, effects on hippocampal synaptic plasticity were investigated using ex vivo extracellular field recordings. Additionally, we measured levels of postsynaptic proteins involved in long-term potentiation (LTP) as well as flame retardant concentrations in brain, muscle and liver tissues. All three flame retardants induced minor, but insignificant, effects on LTP. Additionally, TBBPA induced a minor decrease in post-tetanic potentiation. Despite these minor effects, expression of selected synaptic proteins involved in LTP was not affected. The flame retardants could not be measured in significant amounts in the brains, suggesting low bioavailability and/or rapid elimination/metabolism. We therefore conclude that a single neonatal exposure on PND 10 to TBBPA, Alpi or ZS does affect neurodevelopment and synaptic plasticity only to a small extent in mice. Additional data, in particular on persistence, bioaccumulation and (in vivo) toxicity, following prolonged (developmental) exposure are required for further (human) risk assessment. PMID:25253649

  4. Analytical and environmental aspects of the flame retardant tetrabromobisphenol-A and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Covaci, Adrian; Voorspoels, Stefan; Abdallah, Mohamed Abou-Elwafa; Geens, Tinne; Harrad, Stuart; Law, Robin J

    2009-01-16

    The present article reviews the available literature on the analytical and environmental aspects of tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBP-A), a currently intensively used brominated flame retardant (BFR). Analytical methods, including sample preparation, chromatographic separation, detection techniques, and quality control are discussed. An important recent development in the analysis of TBBP-A is the growing tendency for liquid chromatographic techniques. At the detection stage, mass-spectrometry is a well-established and reliable technology in the identification and quantification of TBBP-A. Although interlaboratory exercises for BFRs have grown in popularity in the last 10 years, only a few participating laboratories report concentrations for TBBP-A. Environmental levels of TBBP-A in abiotic and biotic matrices are low, probably due to the major use of TBBP-A as reactive FR. As a consequence, the expected human exposure is low. This is in agreement with the EU risk assessment that concluded that there is no risk for humans concerning TBBP-A exposure. Much less analytical and environmental information exists for the various groups of TBBP-A derivatives which are largely used as additive flame retardants. PMID:18760795

  5. Room-Temperature Fluorine-Induced Decrease in the Stability of Bromine and Iodine Intercalated Carbon Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh

    1995-01-01

    Upon exposure to room-temperature fluorine, intercalated carbon fibers (containing either bromine alone or iodine and bromine together) become heavier and less stable. For Amoco P-100 graphitized carbon fibers, which were intercalated with 18 wt percent bromine, 1 hour of fluorine exposure resulted in a large weight increase but caused only a small decrease in thermal stability. An additional 89 hours of fluorine exposure time resulted in small additional increases in fiber weight, but significant further decreases in fiber thermal stability. Such phenomena of weight increase and stability decrease do not occur if the intercalated fibers are exposed to 250 C fluorine. These observations suggest that, at room temperature, fluorine is absorbed quickly by the intercalated fibers and is intercalated slowly into the fibers. Most of the original intercalates are replaced by fluorine in the process of fluorine intercalation. In an inert environment, the bromine intercalated fibers are much more thermally stable. After 800 C vacuum heating for 2 weeks, the brominated fibers lost about 45% of their bromine, and their resistivity increased from 64 mu(Omega)-cm to a range of 95-170 mu(Omega)-cm. This is still much lower than the value of 300 mu(Omega)-cm for pristine P-100. For practical purposes, to preserve their thermal stability, brominated fibers need to be protected from exposure to fluorine at room temperature or to any intercalate at a temperature where, upon direct contact with graphite, an intercalation compound can easily be formed.

  6. The effect of bromination of carbon fibers on the coefficient of thermal expansion of graphite fiber-epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Maciag, C.

    1987-01-01

    To examine the effect of bromination of carbon fibers on the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of carbon fiber epoxy composites, several pristine and brominated carbon fiber-epoxy composite samples were subjected to thermomechanical analysis. The CTE's of these samples were measured in the uniaxial and transverse directions. The CTE was dominated by the fibers in the uniaxial direction, while it was dominated by the matrix in the transverse directions. Bromination had no effect on the CTE of any of the composites. In addition, the CTE of fiber tow was measured in the absence of a polymer matrix, using an extension probe. The results from this technique were inconclusive.

  7. Amines and ammonium compounds. CXCVIII. Reaction of ammonium salts containing a 2-alkynyl group with bromine and iodine

    SciTech Connect

    Gyul'nazaryan, A.K.; Khachatryan, N.G.; Saakyan, T.A.; Kinoyan, F.S.; Panosyan, G.A.; Babayan, A.T.

    1988-08-10

    The reactions of monoammonium, 1,4-and 1,5-bistertiaryammonium, and bisquaternary ammonium salts containing a 2-alkynyl group with bromine and iodine were studied. It was shown that these salts form molecular complexes with iodine and that addition of iodine at the triple bond does not occur. In reaction with bromine in all cases except 1,4-bistrimethylammonio-2-butyne dihalides one molecule of the halogen adds at the triple bond with the formation of salts containing the 2,3-dibromo-2-alkenyl group, which then form a 1:1 complex with bromine.

  8. Understanding flame rods

    SciTech Connect

    McAuley, J.A. Jr.

    1995-11-01

    The flame rod is probably the least understood method of flame detection. Although it is not recommended for oilfired equipment, it is very common on atmospheric, or {open_quotes}in-shot,{close_quotes} gas burners. It is also possible, although not common, to have an application with a constant gas pilot, monitored by a flame rod, and maintaining an oil main flame. Regardless of the application, chances are that flame rods will be encountered during the course of servicing. The technician today must be versatile and able to work on many different types of equipment. One must understand the basic principles of flame rods, and how to correct potential problems. The purpose of a flame detection system is two-fold: (1) to prove there is no flame when there shouldn`t be one, and (2) to prove there is a flame when there should be one. Flame failure response time is very important. This is the amount of time it takes to realize there is a loss of flame, two to four seconds is typical today. Prior to flame rods, either bi-metal or thermocouple type flame detectors were common. The response time for these detectors was up to three minutes, seldom less than one minute.

  9. Non-flammable elastomeric fiber from a fluorinated elastomer and containing an halogenated flame retardant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howarth, J. T.; Sheth, S. G.; Sidman, K. R.; Massucco, A. A. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Flame retardant elastomeric compositions are described comprised of either spandex type polyurethane having incorporated into the polymer chain halogen containing polyols, conventional spandex type polyurethanes in physical admixture with flame retardant additives, or fluoroelastomeric resins in physical admixture with flame retardant additives. Methods are described for preparing fibers of the flame retardant elastomeric materials and articles of manufacture comprised of the flame retardant clastomeric materials and non elastic materials such as polybenzimidazoles, fiberglass, nylons, etc.

  10. Toxicokinetics of the Sterioisomer Specific Flame Retardant Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) Gamma: Effect of Dose, Time, and Repeated Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) are high production volume brominated aliphatic cyclic hydrocarbons used as flame-retardants in foams, plastics and textiles. Commercial HBCD is a mixture of three main stereoisomers, alpha (α), beta (β) and gamma (γ). A shift from the high percent...

  11. Manganese dioxide causes spurious gold values in flame atomic-absorption readings from HBr-Br2 digestions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.L.

    1981-01-01

    False readings, apparently caused by the presence of high concentrations of manganese dioxide, have been observed in our current flame atomic-absorption procedure for the determination of gold. After a hydrobromic acid (HBr)-bromine (Br2) leach, simply heating the sample to boiling to remove excess Br2 prior to extraction with methyl-isobutyl-ketone (MIBK) eliminates these false readings. ?? 1981.

  12. Flame-in-gas-shield and miniature diffusion flame hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: optimization and comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschner, Karel; Musil, Stanislav; Dědina, Jiří

    2015-07-01

    A detailed optimization of relevant experimental parameters of two hydride atomizers for atomic fluorescence spectrometry: flame-in-gas-shield atomizer with a two-channel shielding unit and a standard atomizer for atomic fluorescence spectrometry, miniature diffusion flame, was performed. Arsine, generated by the reaction with NaBH4 in a flow injection arrangement, was chosen as the model hydride. Analytical characteristics of both the atomizers (sensitivity, noise, limits of detection) were compared. Under optimum conditions sensitivity obtained with flame-in-gas-shield atomizer was approximately twice higher than with miniature diffusion flame. The additional advantage of flame-in-gas-shield atomizer is significantly lower flame emission resulting in a better signal to noise ratio. The resulting arsenic limits of detection for miniature diffusion flame and flame-in-gas-shield atomizer were 3.8 ng l- 1 and 1.0 ng l- 1, respectively.

  13. The Transition to Turbulence of Rayleigh-Taylor Unstable Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Elizabeth P.; Rosner, R.

    2011-01-01

    Part of the uncertainty surrounding the explosion mechanism of Type 1A supernovae is the extent to which the turbulence created by the flame front can speed the flame up. A premixed flame moving against a sufficiently strong gravitational field becomes deformed and creates vorticity. If gravity is strong enough, this vorticity is shed and deposited behind the flame front. We have completed some two-dimensional direct numerical simulations of this shedding process for various values of the gravitational force. If gravity is weak enough, the flame front remains flat and no vorticity is created. If gravity is slightly stronger, the flame front becomes cusped and creates vorticity; long vortices attach to the flame front and extend behind it. For even larger values of gravity, the far end of these vortices becomes unstable and sheds more vortices. For simulations with increased gravity, the position of the shedding instability moves closer to the flame front. Next, the vortex shedding disturbs the flame front, causing the flame to pulsate. These pulsations lose their left/right symmetry and the period of oscillation doubles. For even higher values of gravity, an additional frequency is introduced into the system as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability begins to dominate over burning. Eventually, the pulsations of the flame become quite complex and the interaction between the flame front and the vortices can't be simply described. We have measured the subsequent wrinkling of the flame front by computing its fractal dimension and the energy spectra behind the flame front. Measurements of the fractal dimension suggest that it saturates, implying that any additional speed up of the flame must be due to large-scale stretching or disruption of the flame front. Our simulations were performed at NERSC which is supported by the Department of Energy.

  14. Bromine accumulation in acidic black colluvial soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortizas, Antonio Martínez; Vázquez, Cruz Ferro; Kaal, Joeri; Biester, Harald; Casais, Manuela Costa; Rodríguez, Teresa Taboada; Lado, Luis Rodríguez

    2016-02-01

    Recent investigations showed that bromine is incorporated to soil organic matter (SOM), its content increasing with humification. But few research was done on its long-term accumulation and the role played by pedogenetic processes, as those involved in organic matter stabilization. We investigated bromine content and distribution in four deep, acidic, organic-rich, Holocene soils from an oceanic area of Western Europe. Bromine concentrations (93-778 μg g-1) in the silt + clay (<50 μm) fraction were on average 3-times higher than those (17-250 μg g-1) in the fine earth (<2 mm), the former containing almost all bromine (90 ± 5%). Inventories were between 148 and 314 g m-2, indicating a rather large variability in a small area, and total estimated retention was low (6-16%). The degree of SOM bromination, expressed as the Br/C molar ratio, varied between 0.03 and 1.20 mmol Br/mol C. The ratio was highly correlated (n = 23, r2 0.88, p < 0.01) with the age of the SOM for the last ∼12 ka. Partial least squares modeling indicates that bromine concentration depends on the amount of organic matter stabilized as aluminium-OM associations, and to a lesser extent on soil acidity (pH) and iron-OM associations. Thus, at scales of thousands of years, bromine accumulation in acidic soils is linked to the pool of metal-clay-stabilized organic matter.

  15. The Science of Flames.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornia, Ray

    1991-01-01

    Describes an exercise using flames that allows students to explore the complexities of a seemingly simple phenomenon, the lighting of a candle. Contains a foldout that provides facts about natural gas flames and suggestions for classroom use. (ZWH)

  16. A sensitive spectrophotometric method for the determination of propranolol HCl based on oxidation bromination reactions.

    PubMed

    El-Didamony, Akram M

    2010-03-01

    Three new, simple, sensitive, rapid and economical spectrophotometric methods (A, B and C) have been developed for the determination of propranolol hydrochloride (PRO) in bulk drug and dosage forms. These methods are based on oxidation-bromination reaction of PRO by bromine, generated in situ by the action of acid on a bromate-bromide mixture, followed by determination of unreacted bromine by three different reaction schemes. In method A, the determination of the residual bromine is based on its ability to bleach the indigo carmine dye and by measuring the absorbance at 610 nm. The residual bromine (in method B), is treated with excess of iron(II) and the resulting iron(III) is complexed with thiocyanate and the absorbance is measured at 480 nm. Method C involves treating the unreacted bromine with a measured excess of iron(II) and the remaining iron(II) is complexed with 1,10-phenanthroline and the increase in absorbance is measured at 510 nm. In all three methods, the amount of bromine reacted corresponds to the drug content. The different experimental parameters affecting the development and stability of the colour are carefully studied and optimized. Beer's Law is valid within a concentration range of 1-13, 4-12 and 2-9 µg ml⁻¹ for methods A, B, and C, respectively. The molar absorptivity, Sandell's sensitivity, detection and quantification limits are calculated. Common excipients used as additives in pharmaceutical preparations do not interfere in the proposed methods. The proposed methods have been successfully applied to the determination of PRO in pharmaceutical preparations and the results were statistically compared with those of the official method by applying the Student's t-test and F-test. PMID:20878893

  17. Non-polar halogenated natural products bioaccumulated in marine samples. II. Brominated and mixed halogenated compounds.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Walter; Jun, Wu

    2003-07-01

    Several identified and potential natural brominated bioaccumulative compounds were studied in this work. 4,6-dibromo-2-(2('),4(')-dibromo)phenoxyanisole (BC-2) previously detected in Australian marine mammals and isolated from sponges, was synthesized. Two byproducts (a tetrabromo isomer and a tribromo congener) were investigated as well. The byproducts of the synthesis were not identified in the environmental samples investigated. Previously described natural brominated compounds (BC-1, BC-2, BC-3, BC-10, BC-11, MHC-1) and anthropogenic brominated diphenyl ethers (BDE-47, BDE-99, BDE-100, BDE-154) were detected in a sample of human milk. The sample was from a woman from the Faeroe Islands who frequently consumed fish as well as whale blubber and meat. The most abundant compound originated from the natural tetrabromo phenoxyanisole BC-3 which may have a 3:1 distribution of bromine on the two phenyl units. This sample also accumulated a dibromochloroanisole, as well as a previously unknown mixed halogenated compound (MHC-X) and an unknown, most likely aromatic brominated compound. Co-elutions on a DB-5 column were found for BDE-99 and BC-11 as well as BDE-154 and the unknown brominated compound. This suggests that quantification of these two compounds has to be carried out carefully.Two samples of lower trophic level, namely Baltic cod liver and Mexican mussel tissue, were investigated as well. The cod liver samples contained BDE congeners but also abundant signals for the natural 2,3,3('),4,4('),5,5(')-heptachloro-1(')-methyl-1,2(')-bipyrrole Q1 and tribromoanisole (TBA). The mussel sample contained Q1, TBA, another halogenated anisole, BC-1, BC-2, and BC-3, as well as additional, potential natural brominated compounds in the elution range of tribromophenoxyanisoles. PMID:12738265

  18. Quantification of tetrabromo benzoic acid and tetrabromo phthalic acid in rats exposed to the flame retardant Uniplex FPR-45.

    PubMed

    Silva, Manori J; Hilton, Donald; Furr, Johnathan; Gray, L Earl; Preau, James L; Calafat, Antonia M; Ye, Xiaoyun

    2016-03-01

    The first withdrawal of certain polybrominated diphenyl ethers flame retardants from the US market occurred in 2004. Since then, use of brominated non-PBDE compounds such as bis(2-ethylhexyl)-2,3,4,5-tetrabromophthalate (BEH-TEBP) and 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EH-TBB) in commercial formulations has increased. Assessing human exposure to these chemicals requires identifying metabolites that can potentially serve as their biomarkers of exposure. We administered by gavage a dose of 500 mg/Kg bw of Uniplex FRP-45 (>95 % BEH-TEBP) to nine adult female Sprague-Dawley rats. Using authentic standards and mass spectrometry, we positively identified and quantified 2,3,4,5-tetrabromo benzoic acid (TBBA) and 2,3,4,5-tetrabromo phthalic acid (TBPA) in 24-h urine samples collected 1 day after dosing the rats and in serum at necropsy, 2 days post-exposure. Interestingly, TBBA and TBPA concentrations correlated well (R (2) = 0.92). The levels of TBBA, a known metabolite of EH-TBB, were much higher than the levels of TBPA both in urine and serum. Because Uniplex FRP-45 was technical grade and EH-TBB was present in the formulation, TBBA likely resulted from the metabolism of EH-TBB. Taken together, our data suggest that TBBA and TBPA may serve as biomarkers of exposure to non-PBDE brominated flame retardant mixtures. Additional research can provide useful information to better understand the composition and in vivo toxicokinetics of these commercial mixtures. PMID:25804200

  19. Mimicking of Estradiol Binding by Flame Retardants and Their Metabolites: A Crystallographic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gosavi, Rajendrakumar A.; Knudsen, Gabriel A.; Birnbaum, Linda S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Brominated flame retardants (BFRs), used in many types of consumer goods, are being studied because of concerns about possible health effects related to endocrine disruption, immunotoxicity, reproductive toxicity, and neurotoxicity. Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), the most widely used BFR, and human metabolites of certain congeners of polybrominated diphenyl ether (e.g., 3-OH-BDE-47) have been suggested to inhibit estrogen sulfotransferase, potentially affecting estrogen metabolism. Objectives: Our primary goal was to understand the structural mechanism for inhibition of the hormone-metabolizing enzyme estrogen sulfotransferase by certain BFRs. We also sought to understand various factors that facilitate the binding of flame retardants in the enzyme binding pocket. Methods: We used X-ray crystallography to obtain atomic detail of the binding modes of TBBPA and 3-OH-BDE-47 to estrogen sulfotransferase for comparison with binding of the endogenous substrate estradiol. Results: The crystal structures reveal how BFRs mimic estradiol binding as well as the various interactions between the compounds and protein residues that facilitate its binding. In addition, the structures provide insights into the ability of the sulfotransferase substrate binding pocket to accommodate a range of halogenated compounds that satisfy minimal structural criteria. Conclusions: Our results show how BFRs or their metabolites can bind to and inhibit a key hormone-metabolizing enzyme, potentially causing endocrine disruption. Citation: Gosavi RA, Knudsen GA, Birnbaum LS, Pedersen LC. 2013. Mimicking of estradiol binding by flame retardants and their metabolites: a crystallographic analysis. Environ Health Perspect 121:1194–1199; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1306902 PMID:23959441

  20. Flame front configuration of turbulent premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Junichi; Maruta, Kaoru; Hirano, Toshisuke

    1998-02-01

    The present study is performed to explore dependence of the wrinkle scale of propane-air turbulent premixed flames on the characteristics of turbulence in the nonreacting flow, burner size, and mixture ratio. The wrinkle scales are examined and expressed in the frequency distribution of the radii of flame front curvatures. The average wrinkle scale depends not only on the characteristics of turbulence in the nonreacting flow but also on burner diameter and mixture ratio. The average wrinkle scale of a lean propane-air flame is larger than those of the near stoichiometric and rich flames. The smallest wrinkle scale of turbulent premixed flame is in the range of 0.75--1.0 mm, which is much larger than the Kolmogorov scale of turbulence in the nonreacting flow.

  1. Abiotic Bromination of Soil Organic Matter.

    PubMed

    Leri, Alessandra C; Ravel, Bruce

    2015-11-17

    Biogeochemical transformations of plant-derived soil organic matter (SOM) involve complex abiotic and microbially mediated reactions. One such reaction is halogenation, which occurs naturally in the soil environment and has been associated with enzymatic activity of decomposer organisms. Building on a recent finding that naturally produced organobromine is ubiquitous in SOM, we hypothesized that inorganic bromide could be subject to abiotic oxidations resulting in bromination of SOM. Through lab-based degradation treatments of plant material and soil humus, we have shown that abiotic bromination of particulate organic matter occurs in the presence of a range of inorganic oxidants, including hydrogen peroxide and assorted forms of ferric iron, producing both aliphatic and aromatic forms of organobromine. Bromination of oak and pine litter is limited primarily by bromide concentration. Fresh plant material is more susceptible to bromination than decayed litter and soil humus, due to a labile pool of mainly aliphatic compounds that break down during early stages of SOM formation. As the first evidence of abiotic bromination of particulate SOM, this study identifies a mechanistic source of the natural organobromine in humic substances and the soil organic horizon. Formation of organobromine through oxidative treatments of plant material also provides insights into the relative stability of aromatic and aliphatic components of SOM. PMID:26468620

  2. The milling of pristine and brominated P-100 graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillehay, M. E.; Gaier, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques were developed for the ball milling of pristine and brominated P-100 graphite fibers. Because of the lubrication properties of graphite, large ball loads (50 percent by volume) were required. Use of 2-propanol as a milling medium enhanced the efficiency of the process. Milled brominated P-100 fibers had resistivities which were indistinguishable from milled pristine P-100 fibers. Apparent loss of bromine from the brominated fibers suggests that bromine would not be the intercalate of choice in applications where milled fibers of this type are required. Other intercalates which do not degas may be more appropriate for a milled fiber application. These same results, however, do provide evidence that bromine molecules leave the fiber surface when removed from overpressure of bromine. While exploring possible solvent media for milling purposes, it was found that brominated fibers are stable in a wide variety of organic solvents.

  3. Toxicity of new generation flame retardants to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Waaijers, Susanne L; Hartmann, Julia; Soeter, A Marieke; Helmus, Rick; Kools, Stefan A E; de Voogt, Pim; Admiraal, Wim; Parsons, John R; Kraak, Michiel H S

    2013-10-01

    There is a tendency to substitute frequently used, but relatively hazardous brominated flame retardants (BFRs) with halogen-free flame retardants (HFFRs). Consequently, information on the persistence, bioaccumulation and toxicity (PBT) of these HFFRs is urgently needed, but large data gaps and inconsistencies exist. Therefore, in the present study the toxicity of a wide range of HFFRs to the water flea Daphnia magna was investigated. Our results revealed that four HFFRs were showing no effect at their Sw (saturated water concentration) and three had a low toxicity (EC50>10 mg L(-1)), suggesting that these compounds are not hazardous. Antimony trioxide had a moderate toxicity (EC50=3.01 mg L(-1), 95% CL: 2.76-3.25) and triphenyl phosphate and the brominated reference compound tetra bromobisphenol A were highly toxic to D. magna (EC50=0.55 mg L(-1), 95% CL: 0.53-0.55 and EC50=0.60 mg L(-1), 95% CL: 0.24-0.97 respectively). Aluminum trihydroxide and bisphenol A bis(diphenyl phosphate) caused limited mortality at Sw (26 and 25% respectively) and have a low solubility (<10 mg L(-1)). Hence, increased toxicity of these compounds may be observed when for instance decreasing pH could increase solubility. By testing all compounds under identical conditions we provided missing insights in the environmental hazards of new generation flame retardants and propose as best candidates for BFR replacements: APP, ALPI, DOPO, MHO, MPP, ZHS and ZS. PMID:23886749

  4. Analytical Study of Gravity Effects on Laminar Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelman, R. B.; Fortune, O.; Weilerstein, G.

    1972-01-01

    A mathematical model is presented for the description of axisymmetric laminar-jet diffusion flames. The analysis includes the effects of inertia, viscosity, diffusion, gravity and combustion. These mechanisms are coupled in a boundary layer type formulation and solutions are obtained by an explicit finite difference technique. A dimensional analysis shows that the maximum flame width radius, velocity and thermodynamic state characterize the flame structure. Comparisons with experimental data showed excellent agreement for normal gravity flames and fair agreement for steady state low Reynolds number zero gravity flames. Kinetics effects and radiation are shown to be the primary mechanisms responsible for this discrepancy. Additional factors are discussed including elipticity and transient effects.

  5. Highly brominated antimicrobial metabolites from a marine Pseudoalteromonas sp.

    PubMed

    Fehér, Domonkos; Barlow, Russell; McAtee, Jesse; Hemscheidt, Thomas K

    2010-11-29

    Extracts of a marine Pseudoalteromonas sp. (CMMED 290) isolated from the surface of a nudibranch collected in Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, displayed significant antimicrobial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the lipophilic extract led to the isolation and structure elucidation of two new highly brominated compounds, 2,3,5,7-tetrabromobenzofuro[3,2-b]pyrrole (1) and 4,4',6-tribromo-2,2'-biphenol (2). In addition, we have identified the known compounds pentabromopseudilin and bromophene. We describe the isolation and structure elucidation of the compounds 1 and 2 together with their antimicrobial activities against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:20973551

  6. Plasma bromination of HOPG surfaces: A NEXAFS and synchrotron XPS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippitz, Andreas; Friedrich, Jörg F.; Unger, Wolfgang E. S.

    2013-05-01

    Br bonding on plasma brominated graphite surfaces has been studied by using Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Br2 and bromoform were used as plasma gases in an r.f. cw low pressure plasma process. Kr plasma had been used to study separately the physical and chemical plasma etching effects. At early steps of plasma bromination which lead to only small XPS Br surface concentration values a quick decay of aromaticity has been observed. At low Br surface concentration radical or even electrophilic addition of bromine onto sp2 carbon atoms is discussed as the dominating reaction pathway. At higher Br surface concentrations the inherent formation of sp3 defects in the graphene network by chemical etching processes promotes nucleophilic substitution of bromine at sp3 carbons as a competing reaction pathway. Both reaction pathways lead to C-Br species characterized by the same Br 3d XPS binding energy. However more than one Br 3d component in XP spectra has been found at lower Br2 plasma induced Br surface concentrations and complexation of bromine at HOPG is assumed as a third way of interaction with Br2 plasma.

  7. 40 CFR 721.10124 - Brominated polyaromatic compound (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Brominated polyaromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10124 Brominated polyaromatic compound (generic). (a) Chemical substance... brominated polyaromatic compound (PMN P-06-617) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10124 - Brominated polyaromatic compound (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Brominated polyaromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10124 Brominated polyaromatic compound (generic). (a) Chemical substance... brominated polyaromatic compound (PMN P-06-617) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10124 - Brominated polyaromatic compound (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Brominated polyaromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10124 Brominated polyaromatic compound (generic). (a) Chemical substance... brominated polyaromatic compound (PMN P-06-617) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10124 - Brominated polyaromatic compound (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Brominated polyaromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10124 Brominated polyaromatic compound (generic). (a) Chemical substance... brominated polyaromatic compound (PMN P-06-617) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10124 - Brominated polyaromatic compound (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Brominated polyaromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10124 Brominated polyaromatic compound (generic). (a) Chemical substance... brominated polyaromatic compound (PMN P-06-617) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  12. 40 CFR 721.3420 - Brominated arylalkyl ether.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Brominated arylalkyl ether. 721.3420... Substances § 721.3420 Brominated arylalkyl ether. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as brominated arylalkyl ether (P-83-906)...

  13. 40 CFR 721.2925 - Brominated aromatic ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Brominated aromatic ester. 721.2925... Substances § 721.2925 Brominated aromatic ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a brominated aromatic ester (PMN...

  14. 40 CFR 721.3085 - Brominated phthalate ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Brominated phthalate ester. 721.3085... Substances § 721.3085 Brominated phthalate ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as brominated phthalate ester (PMN P-90-581)...

  15. 40 CFR 721.2925 - Brominated aromatic ester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Brominated aromatic ester. 721.2925... Substances § 721.2925 Brominated aromatic ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a brominated aromatic ester (PMN...

  16. Optically pumped molecular bromine laser. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J.W.

    1990-12-01

    An optically pumped molecular bromine laser was studied to investigate the quenching kinetics state of Br2. This included characterization of the pressure dependence of the laser output power. The approach was to excite molecular bromine in a sealed cell with a Nd:YAG pumped dye laser. Unresolved side fluorescence and amplified stimulated emission (ASE) spectra were recorded. ASE offered the advantage of a simpler optical system with no externally induced wavelength dependencies. Stimulated emission as a signal monitor offered greater resolution than side fluorescence spectra and facilitated spectroscopic assignment. (JS)

  17. Bromine and Chlorine Go Separate Ways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This graph shows the relative concentrations of bromine and chlorine at various locations on Earth and Mars. Typically, bromine and chlorine stick together in a fixed ratio, as in martian meteorites and Earth seawater. But sometimes the elements split apart and their relative quantities diverge. This separation is usually caused by evaporation processes, as in the Dead Sea on Earth. On Mars, at Meridiani Planum and Gusev Crater, this split has been observed to an even greater degree than seen on Earth. This puzzling result is currently being further explored by Mars Exploration Rover scientists. Data for the Mars locations were taken by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

  18. Utilization of oxidation reactions for the spectrophotometric determination of captopril using brominating agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Didamony, Akram M.; Erfan, Eman A. H.

    2010-03-01

    Three simple, accurate and sensitive methods (A-C) for the spectrophotometric assay of captopril (CPL) in bulk drug, in dosage forms and in the presence of its oxidative degradates have been described. The methods are based on the bromination of captopril with a solution of excess brominating mixture in hydrochloric acid medium. After bromination, the excess brominating mixture is followed by the estimation of surplus bromine by three different reaction schemes. In the first method (A), the determination of the residual bromine is based on its ability to bleach the indigo carmine dye and measuring the absorbance at 610 nm. Method B, involves treating the unreacted bromine with a measured excess of iron(II) and the remaining iron(II) is complexed with 1,10-phenanthroline and the increase in absorbance is measured at 510 nm. In method (C), the surplus bromine is treated with excess of iron(II) and the resulting iron(III) is complexed with thiocyanate and the absorbance is measured at 478 nm. In all the methods, the amount of bromine reacted corresponds to the drug content. The different experimental parameters affecting the development and stability of the color are carefully studied and optimized. Beer's law is valid within a concentration range of 0.4-6.0, 0.4-2.8 and 1.2-4.8 μg mL -1 for methods A, B and C, respectively. The calculated apparent molar absorptivity was found to be 5.16 × 10 4, 9.95 × 10 4 and 1.74 × 10 5 L mol -1 cm -1, for methods A, B and C, respectively. Sandell's sensitivity, correlation coefficients, detection and quantification limits are also reported. No interference was observed from common additives found in pharmaceutical preparations. The proposed methods are successfully applied to the determination of CPL in the tablet formulations with mean recoveries of 99.94-100.11% and the results were statistically compared with those of a reference method by applying Student's t- and F-test.

  19. Utilization of oxidation reactions for the spectrophotometric determination of captopril using brominating agents.

    PubMed

    El-Didamony, Akram M; Erfan, Eman A H

    2010-03-01

    Three simple, accurate and sensitive methods (A-C) for the spectrophotometric assay of captopril (CPL) in bulk drug, in dosage forms and in the presence of its oxidative degradates have been described. The methods are based on the bromination of captopril with a solution of excess brominating mixture in hydrochloric acid medium. After bromination, the excess brominating mixture is followed by the estimation of surplus bromine by three different reaction schemes. In the first method (A), the determination of the residual bromine is based on its ability to bleach the indigo carmine dye and measuring the absorbance at 610 nm. Method B, involves treating the unreacted bromine with a measured excess of iron(II) and the remaining iron(II) is complexed with 1,10-phenanthroline and the increase in absorbance is measured at 510 nm. In method (C), the surplus bromine is treated with excess of iron(II) and the resulting iron(III) is complexed with thiocyanate and the absorbance is measured at 478 nm. In all the methods, the amount of bromine reacted corresponds to the drug content. The different experimental parameters affecting the development and stability of the color are carefully studied and optimized. Beer's law is valid within a concentration range of 0.4-6.0, 0.4-2.8 and 1.2-4.8 microg mL(-1) for methods A, B and C, respectively. The calculated apparent molar absorptivity was found to be 5.16x10(4), 9.95x10(4) and 1.74x10(5)L mol(-1) cm(-1), for methods A, B and C, respectively. Sandell's sensitivity, correlation coefficients, detection and quantification limits are also reported. No interference was observed from common additives found in pharmaceutical preparations. The proposed methods are successfully applied to the determination of CPL in the tablet formulations with mean recoveries of 99.94-100.11% and the results were statistically compared with those of a reference method by applying Student's t- and F-test. PMID:20080436

  20. Prediction of flame velocities of hydrocarbon flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugger, Gordon L; Simon, Dorothy M

    1954-01-01

    The laminar-flame-velocity data previously reported by the Lewis Laboratory are surveyed with respect to the correspondence between experimental flame velocities and values predicted by semitheoretical and empirical methods. The combustible mixture variables covered are hydrocarbon structure (56 hydrocarbons), equivalence ratio of fuel-air mixture, mole fraction of oxygen in the primary oxygen-nitrogen mixture (0.17 to 0.50), and initial mixture temperature (200 degrees to 615 degrees k). The semitheoretical method of prediction considered are based on three approximate theoretical equations for flame velocity: the Semenov equation, the Tanford-Pease equation, and the Manson equation.

  1. Chemistry of OClO in the Antarctic stratosphere - Implications for bromine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salawitch, Ross J.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Mcelroy, Michael B.

    1988-01-01

    Previous observations of OClO over the Antarctic obtained in 1986 are used to constrain the stratospheric abundance of bromine. The observed diurnal variation is consistent with the production of OClO via the reaction of ClO with BrO if the branching ratio to the BrCl channel is between 3.5 and 14 percent. Otherwise, an additional source in twilight is indicated. The present results suggest a stratospheric bromine concentration of 16 + or - 4 pptv, a value which is consistent with independent measurements.

  2. A new flame monitor with triple photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, L.J.; Yan, Y.

    2006-08-15

    In this paper, we present a new flame monitor that uses three photovoltaic cells covering the ultraviolet (UV), visible, and infrared (IR) spectral bands. A gain-adjustable amplifier is incorporated into the monitor so that it is applicable to the coal-, oil-, or gas-fired flames. Self-checking of the monitor is implemented through cross correlation of the signals from the three cells, and hence, no additional self-checking hardware is required. Both the oscillation frequency and the brightness of the flame are used to monitor flame stability and to detect flame presence as well as sighting-tube blockage. Unlike conventional single-cell flame detectors, the new multicell devices can still be in operation before being repaired, after a cell-failure alarm has gone off. Experiments were carried out on an industrial-scale combustion test facility in order to demonstrate the operability and efficacy of the new flame monitor.

  3. Candle flames in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, D. L.; Ross, H. D.; Tien, J. S.

    1995-01-01

    The candle flame in both normal and microgravity is non-propagating. In microgravity, however, the candle flame is also non-convective where (excepting Stefan flow) pure diffusion is the only transport mode. It also shares many characteristics with another classical problem, that of isolated droplet combustion. Given their qualitatively similar flame shapes and the required heat feedback to condensed-phase fuels, the gas-phase flow and temperature fields should be relatively similar for a droplet and a candle in reduced gravity. Unless the droplet diameter is maintained somehow through non-intrusive replenishment of fuel, the quasi-steady burning characteristics of a droplet can be maintained for only a few seconds. In contrast, the candle flame in microgravity may achieve a nearly steady state over a much longer time and is therefore ideal for examining a number of combustion-related phenomena. In this paper, we examine candle flame behavior in both short-duration and long-duration, quiescent, microgravity environments. Interest in this type of flame, especially 'candle flames in weightlessness', is demonstrated by very frequent public inquiries. The question is usually posed as 'will a candle flame burn in zero gravity', or, 'will a candle burn indefinitely (or steadily) in zero gravity in a large volume of quiescent air'. Intuitive speculation suggests to some that, in the absence of buoyancy, the accumulation of products in the vicinity of the flame will cause flame extinction. The classical theory for droplet combustion with its spherically-shaped diffusion flame, however, shows that steady combustion is possible in the absence of buoyancy if the chemical kinetics are fast enough. Previous experimental studies of candle flames in reduced and microgravity environments showed the flame could survive for at least 5 seconds, but did not reach a steady state in the available test time.

  4. Flame and flameless atomic-absorption determination of tellurium in geological materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.; Hubert, A.E.

    1978-01-01

    The sample is digested with a solution of hydrobromic acid and bromine and the excess of bromine is expelled. After dilution of the solution to approximately 3 M in hydrobromic acid, ascorbic acid is added to reduce iron(III) before extraction of tellurium into methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). An oxidizing air-acetylene flame is used to determine tellurium in the 0.1-20 ppm range. For samples containing 4-200 ppb of tellurium, a carbon-rod atomizer is used after the MIBK extract has been washed with 0.5 M hydrobromic acid to remove the residual iron. The flame procedure is useful for rapid preliminary monitoring, and the flameless procedure can determine tellurium at very low concentrations. ?? 1978.

  5. Structure and functionality of bromine doped graphite.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Rashid; Kemper, A F; Cao, Chao; Cheng, H P

    2013-04-28

    First-principles calculations are used to study the enhanced in-plane conductivity observed experimentally in Br-doped graphite, and to study the effect of external stress on the structure and functionality of such systems. The model used in the numerical calculations is that of stage two doped graphite. The band structure near the Fermi surface of the doped systems with different bromine concentrations is compared to that of pure graphite, and the charge transfer between carbon and bromine atoms is analyzed to understand the conductivity change along different high symmetry directions. Our calculations show that, for large interlayer separation between doped graphite layers, bromine is stable in the molecular form (Br2). However, with increased compression (decreased layer-layer separation) Br2 molecules tend to dissociate. While in both forms, bromine is an electron acceptor. The charge exchange between the graphite layers and Br atoms is higher than that with Br2 molecules. Electron transfer to the Br atoms increases the number of hole carriers in the graphite sheets, resulting in an increase of conductivity. PMID:23635160

  6. Brominated organic species in the arctic atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, W. W.; Heidt, L. E.; Pollock, W.; Sperry, P. D.; Cicerone, R. J.; Gladney, E. S.

    1984-01-01

    Measurements are reported of four gas-phase, brominated organic species found in the Arctic atmosphere during March and April 1983. Volume mixing ratios for CH3Br, CH2BrCH2Br, CHBr3, and CH2Br2 were determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis from samples taken Arctic wide, including at the geographic North Pole and during a tropopause folding event over Baffin Bay near Thule, Greenland. Methyl bromide mixing ratios were reasonably constant at 11 plus or minus 4 pptv, while the other three brominated organics showed a high degree of variability. Bromoform (2 to 46 pptv) was found to be the dominant contributor to gaseous organic bromine to the Arctic troposphere at 38 plus or minus 10 percent followed by CH2Br2 (3 to 60 pptv) at 29 plus or minus 6 percent. Both CH3Br and CH2BrCH2Br (1 to 37 pptv) reservoirs contained less than 20 percent of the organically bound bromine. Stratospheric samples, taken during a tropopause folding event, showed mixing ratios for all four species at levels high enough to support a stratospheric total volume mixing ratio of 249 pptv Br (888 ngBr/SCM).

  7. Structure and functionality of bromine doped graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdan, Rashid; Kemper, A. F.; Cao Chao; Cheng, H. P.

    2013-04-28

    First-principles calculations are used to study the enhanced in-plane conductivity observed experimentally in Br-doped graphite, and to study the effect of external stress on the structure and functionality of such systems. The model used in the numerical calculations is that of stage two doped graphite. The band structure near the Fermi surface of the doped systems with different bromine concentrations is compared to that of pure graphite, and the charge transfer between carbon and bromine atoms is analyzed to understand the conductivity change along different high symmetry directions. Our calculations show that, for large interlayer separation between doped graphite layers, bromine is stable in the molecular form (Br{sub 2}). However, with increased compression (decreased layer-layer separation) Br{sub 2} molecules tend to dissociate. While in both forms, bromine is an electron acceptor. The charge exchange between the graphite layers and Br atoms is higher than that with Br{sub 2} molecules. Electron transfer to the Br atoms increases the number of hole carriers in the graphite sheets, resulting in an increase of conductivity.

  8. Bromination of selected pharmaceuticals in water matrices.

    PubMed

    Benitez, F Javier; Acero, Juan L; Real, Francisco J; Roldan, Gloria; Casas, Francisco

    2011-11-01

    The bromination of five selected pharmaceuticals (metoprolol, naproxen, amoxicillin, phenacetin, and hydrochlorothiazide) was studied with these compounds individually dissolved in ultra-pure water. The apparent rate constants for the bromination reaction were determined as a function of the pH, obtaining the sequence amoxicillin>naproxen>hydrochlorothiazide≈phenacetin≈metoprolol. A kinetic mechanism specifying the dissociation reactions and the species formed for each compound according to its pK(a) value and the pH allowed the intrinsic rate constants to be determined for each elementary reaction. There was fairly good agreement between the experimental and calculated values of the apparent rate constants, confirming the goodness of the proposed reaction mechanism. In a second stage, the bromination of the selected pharmaceuticals simultaneously dissolved in three water matrices (a groundwater, a surface water from a public reservoir, and a secondary effluent from a WWTP) was investigated. The pharmaceutical elimination trend agreed with the previously determined rate constants. The influence of the main operating conditions (pH, initial bromine dose, and characteristics of the water matrix) on the degradation of the pharmaceuticals was established. An elimination concentration profile for each pharmaceutical in the water matrices was proposed based on the use of the previously evaluated apparent rate constants, and the theoretical results agreed satisfactorily with experiment. Finally, chlorination experiments performed in the presence of bromide showed that low bromide concentrations slightly accelerate the oxidation of the selected pharmaceuticals during chlorine disinfection. PMID:21906777

  9. Flame front geometry in premixed turbulent flames

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, I.G.; Ashurst, W.T.

    1991-12-01

    Experimental and numerical determinations of flame front curvature and orientation in premixed turbulent flames are presented. The experimental data is obtained from planar, cross sectional images of stagnation point flames at high Damkoehler number. A direct numerical simulation of a constant energy flow is combined with a zero-thickness, constant density flame model to provide the numerical results. The computational domain is a 32{sup 3} cube with periodic boundary conditions. The two-dimensional curvature distributions of the experiments and numerical simulations compare well at similar q{prime}/S{sub L} values with means close to zero and marked negative skewness. At higher turbulence levels the simulations show that the distributions become symmetric about zero. These features are also found in the three dimensional distributions of curvature. The simulations support assumptions which make it possible to determine the mean direction cosines from the experimental data. This leads to a reduction of 12% in the estimated flame surface area density in the middle of the flame brush. 18 refs.

  10. Preparation of ionic membranes for zinc/bromine storage batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assink, R. A.; Arnold, C., Jr.

    Zinc/bromine flow batteries are being developed for vehicular and utility load leveling applications. During charge, an aqueous zinc bromide salt is electrolyzed to zinc metal and molecular bromine. During discharge, the zinc and bromine react to again form the zinc bromide salt. One serious disadvantage of the microporous separators presently used in the zinc/bromine battery is that modest amounts of bromine and negatively charged bromine moieties permeate through these materials and react with the zinc anode. This results in partial self-discharge of the battery and low coulombic efficiencies. Our approach to this problem is to impregnate the microporous separators with a soluble cationic polyelectrolyte. In laboratory screening tests a sulfonated polysulfone resin and fully fluorinated sulfonic acid polymer substantially reduced bromine permeation with only modest increases in the area resistance.

  11. Graphite fiber intercalation: Dynamics of the bromine intercalation process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Zinolabedini, R.

    1985-01-01

    The resistance of pitch-based graphite fibers was monitored, in situ, during a series of bromine intercalation experiments. The threshold pressure for the bromine intercalation of pitch-based fibers was estimated to be 102 torr. When the bromine atmosphere was removed from the reaction chamber, the resistivity of the intercalated graphite fibers increased consistently. This increase was attributed to loss of bromine from the perimeter of the fiber. The loss was confirmed by mapping the bromine concentration across the diameter of single intercalated fibers with either energy dispersive spectroscopy or scanning Auger microscopy. A statistical study comparing fibers intercalated in bromine vapor with fibers intercalated in bromine liquid showed that similar products were obtained with both methods of intercalation.

  12. Plant selective uptake of halogenated flame retardants at an e-waste recycling site in southern China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaorui; Wang, Yan; Luo, Chunling; Li, Jun; Yin, Hua; Zhang, Gan

    2016-07-01

    The concentrations and homolog patterns of halogenated flame retardants (HFRs) in vegetables grown at an e-waste contaminated site were investigated. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were the dominant HFRs in vegetable tissues, with concentrations ranging from 10.3 to 164 ng g(-1) and 1.16-107 ng g(-1) in shoots and roots, respectively, followed by novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) and dechlorane plus (DPs). This is an indication that PBDE contamination in vegetables grown around e-waste recycling sites may pose a risk to the local terrestrial ecosystem and residents. In addition, this is the first report on the concentrations and compositions of NBFRs in vegetables around e-waste recycling sites. The HFRs concentrations in vegetables varied greatly with the vegetable species, with the highest concentrations observed in Brassica oleracea var. capitata. Root concentration factors (RCF) decreased with increasing log Kow of HFRs, which indicated that the uptake of HFRs was controlled mainly by log Kow. Dissimilar HFRs profiles in shoots and roots suggested that the uptake and translocation of HFRs by plants were selective, with lower halogenated congeners prone to accumulation in vegetable tissues. Positive relationships between PBDEs and their substitutes were observed in vegetable tissues, suggesting that the replacement of PBDEs by NBFRs has not resulted in an obvious transition in plants within the study area. PMID:27149147

  13. The Cool Flames Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Howard; Chapek, Richard; Neville, Donna; Sheredy, William; Wu, Ming-Shin; Tornabene, Robert

    2001-01-01

    volume ratio, and (T(bar) - Tw ) is the spatially averaged temperature excess. This Newtonian form has been validated in spatially-uniform, well-stirred reactors, provided the effective heat transfer coefficient associated with the unsteady process is properly evaluated. Unfortunately, it is not a valid assumption for spatially-nonuniform temperature distributions induced by natural convection in unstirred reactors. "This is why the analysis of such a system is so difficult." Historically, the complexities associated with natural convection were perhaps recognized as early as 1938 when thermal ignition theory was first developed. In the 1955 text "Diffusion and Heat Exchange in Chemical Kinetics", Frank-Kamenetskii recognized that "the purely conductive theory can be applied at sufficiently low pressure and small dimensions of the vessel when the influence of natural convection can be disregarded." This was reiterated by Tyler in 1966 and further emphasized by Barnard and Harwood in 1974. Specifically, they state: "It is generally assumed that heat losses are purely conductive. While this may be valid for certain low pressure slow combustion regimes, it is unlikely to be true for the cool flame and ignition regimes." While this statement is true for terrestrial experiments, the purely conductive heat transport assumption is valid at microgravity (mu-g). Specifically, buoyant complexities are suppressed at mu-g and the reaction-diffusion structure associated with low temperature oxidation reactions, cool flames and auto-ignitions can be studied. Without natural convection, the system is simpler, does not require determination of the effective heat transfer coefficient, and is a testbed for analytic and numerical models that assume pure diffusive transport. In addition, mu-g experiments will provide baseline data that will improve our understanding of the effects of natural convection on Earth.

  14. Occurrence of chlorinated and brominated dioxins/furans, PCBs, and brominated flame retardants in blood of German adults.

    PubMed

    Fromme, Hermann; Hilger, Bettina; Albrecht, Michael; Gries, Wolfgang; Leng, Gabriele; Völkel, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    Persistent organic pollutants are widespread in the environment, and are associated with a particular health and ecological concern. The human body burden of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDDs/Fs), polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PBDDs/Fs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenylether (PBDEs), and hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) was determined. Blood samples were collected in Germany, originating from 42 randomly selected subjects between 20 and 68 years old. The median (95th percentile) concentrations, expressed as WHO2005-TEQ for PCDD/PCDFs and dioxin-like PCBs, were 6.2 (19.1) pg/g l.w. and 4.1 (8.8) pg/g l.w., respectively. PBDDs/Fs were found with a median of 2.8 pgTEQ/g l.w. and a 95th percentile of 8.7 pgTEQ/g l.w. (using similar interim TEF values as for PCDDs/Fs) On a median basis, the contribution of PCDD/Fs, dioxin-like PCBs, and PBDDs/Fs to total TEQ were 47%, 31%, and 21%, respectively. The sum of the 6 non-dioxin-like PCBs exhibited a median of 267ng/g l.w. and a 95th percentile of 834ng/g l.w. The median value for the sum of six tetra- to hepta-PBDE congeners was 1.7ng/g l.w. (95th percentile: 4.9ng/g l.w.). BDE 209 was the most abundant congener with a median of 1.8ng/g l.w. HBCDs were only found in some samples, and concentrations ranged between the limit of detection (5ng/g l.w.) and the limit of quantification (16ng/g l.w.). Results for PBDEs and HBCDs are comparable to other European studies. Our study demonstrated that the body burden of PCDD/Fs and PCBs declined continously since the last three decades, but exposure may exceed precautionary guideline levels. PMID:27067547

  15. Flame Holder System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskin, Henry H. (Inventor); Vasquez, Peter (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A flame holder system includes a modified torch body and a ceramic flame holder. Catch pin(s) are coupled to and extend radially out from the torch body. The ceramic flame holder has groove(s) formed in its inner wall that correspond in number and positioning to the catch pin(s). Each groove starts at one end of the flame holder and can be shaped to define at least two 90.degree.turns. Each groove is sized to receive one catch pin therein when the flame holder is fitted over the end of the torch body. The flame holder is then manipulated until the catch pin(s) butt up against the end of the groove(s).

  16. Suppression of Soot Formation and Shapes of Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Dai, Z.; Faeth, G. M.

    2001-01-01

    Laminar nonpremixed (diffusion) flames are of interest because they provide model flame systems that are far more tractable for analysis and experiments than practical turbulent flames. In addition, many properties of laminar diffusion flames are directly relevant to turbulent diffusion flames using laminar flamelet concepts. Finally, laminar diffusion flame shapes have been of interest since the classical study of Burke and Schumann because they involve a simple nonintrusive measurement that is convenient for evaluating flame shape predictions. Motivated by these observations, the shapes of round hydrocarbon-fueled laminar jet diffusion flames were considered, emphasizing conditions where effects of buoyancy are small because most practical flames are not buoyant. Earlier studies of shapes of hydrocarbon-fueled nonbuoyant laminar jet diffusion flames considered combustion in still air and have shown that flames at the laminar smoke point are roughly twice as long as corresponding soot-free (blue) flames and have developed simple ways to estimate their shapes. Corresponding studies of hydrocarbon-fueled weakly-buoyant laminar jet diffusion flames in coflowing air have also been reported. These studies were limited to soot-containing flames at laminar smoke point conditions and also developed simple ways to estimate their shapes but the behavior of corresponding soot-free flames has not been addressed. This is unfortunate because ways of selecting flame flow properties to reduce soot concentrations are of great interest; in addition, soot-free flames are fundamentally important because they are much more computationally tractable than corresponding soot-containing flames. Thus, the objectives of the present investigation were to observe the shapes of weakly-buoyant laminar jet diffusion flames at both soot-free and smoke point conditions and to use the results to evaluate simplified flame shape models. The present discussion is brief.

  17. Probing the debromination of the flame retardant decabromodiphenyl ether in sediments of a boreal lake.

    PubMed

    Orihel, Diane M; Bisbicos, Tommy; Darling, Colin T R; Dupuis, Alain P; Williamson, Mary; Muir, Derek C G

    2016-03-01

    After decades of use of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) as flame retardants, a large reservoir of these toxins has accumulated in ecosystems worldwide. The present study used an innovative approach to examine whether the fully brominated PBDE decabromodiphenyl ether (decaBDE) degrades to more toxic congeners in aquatic environments. The authors incubated intact sediment microcosms with high-purity [(13)C]decaBDE in a remote boreal lake to assess its debromination under ambient conditions. Although the addition of [(13)C]decaBDE increased total PBDE concentrations in sediment more than 10-fold, the relative amount of [(13)C]decaBDE in sediment did not change significantly over a 1-mo incubation. However, observation of small quantities of lower-brominated [(13)C]BDEs lent support to the hypothesis that decaBDE is slowly debrominated. The authors observed a significant increase in octaBDEs and nonaBDEs in profundal, but not littoral, sediment over 30 d. A second experiment in which sediment was incubated under different light and oxygen regimes yielded a surprising result-oxygen significantly stimulated the formation of octaBDEs and nonaBDEs. The authors also conducted a large-scale in situ enclosure experiment in which they followed the fate of experimentally added decaBDE in sediment over 26 mo, but that study yielded little evidence of decaBDE debromination. Overall, the authors suggest that the debromination of decaBDE occurs very slowly, if at all, in natural sediment of boreal lakes, in contrast to the rapid degradation kinetics reported by most laboratory-based studies, which are usually conducted by dissolving decaBDE in organic solvents. The findings reinforce the need for field studies on contaminant fate to inform environmental policy decisions. PMID:26332257

  18. Turbulent Flames in Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhlov, A. M.

    1994-05-01

    First results of three-dimensional simulations of a thermonuclear flame in Type Ia supernovae are obtained using a new flame-capturing algorithm, and a PPM hydrodynamical code. In the absence of gravity, the flame is stabilized with respect to the Landau (1944) instability due to the difference in the behaviour of convex and concave portions of the perturbed flame front. The transition to turbulence in supernovae occurs on scales =~ 0.1 - 10 km in agreement with the non-linear estimate lambda =~ 2pi D(2_l/geff) based on the Zeldovich (1966) model for a perturbed flame when the gravity acceleration increases; D_l is the normal speed of the laminar flame, and geff is the effective acceleration. The turbulent flame is mainly spread by large scale motions driven by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Small scale turbulence facilitates rapid incineration of the fuel left behind the front. The turbulent flame speed D_t approaches D_t =~ U', where U' is the root mean square velocity of turbulent motions, when the turbulent flame forgets initial conditions and reaches a steady state. The results indicate that in a steady state the turbulent flame speed should be independent of the normal laminar flame speed D_l. The three-dimensional results are in sharp contrast with the results of previous two-dimensional simulations which underestimate flame speed due to the lack of turbulent cascade directed in three dimensions from big to small spatial scales. The work was supported by the NSF grants AST 92-18035 and AST 93-005P.

  19. Diffusion Flame Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, V. R.

    2006-01-01

    Diffusion flames are commonly used for industrial burners in furnaces and flares. Oxygen/fuel burners are usually diffusion burners, primarily for safety reasons, to prevent flashback and explosion in a potentially dangerous system. Furthermore, in most fires, condensed materials pyrolyze, vaporize, and burn in air as diffusion flames. As a result of the interaction of a diffusion flame with burner or condensed-fuel surfaces, a quenched space is formed, thus leaving a diffusion flame edge, which plays an important role in flame holding in combustion systems and fire spread through condensed fuels. Despite a long history of jet diffusion flame studies, lifting/blowoff mechanisms have not yet been fully understood, compared to those of premixed flames. In this study, the structure and stability of diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels in coflowing air at normal earth gravity have been investigated experimentally and computationally. Measurements of the critical mean jet velocity (U(sub jc)) of methane, ethane, or propane at lifting or blowoff were made as a function of the coflowing air velocity (U(sub a)) using a tube burner (i.d.: 2.87 mm). By using a computational fluid dynamics code with 33 species and 112 elementary reaction steps, the internal chemical-kinetic structures of the stabilizing region of methane and propane flames were investigated. A peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, is formed in the flame stabilizing region due to back-diffusion of heat and radical species against an oxygen-rich incoming flow, thus holding the trailing diffusion flame. The simulated flame base moved downstream under flow conditions close to the measured stability limit.

  20. Diffusion Flame Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, Viswanath R.

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion flames are commonly used for industrial burners in furnaces and flares. Oxygen/fuel burners are usually diffusion burners, primarily for safety reasons, to prevent flashback and explosion in a potentially dangerous system. Furthermore, in most fires, condensed materials pyrolyze, vaporize, and burn in air as diffusion flames. As a result of the interaction of a diffusion flame with burner or condensed-fuel surfaces, a quenched space is formed, thus leaving a diffusion flame edge, which plays an important role in flame holding in combustion systems and fire spread through condensed fuels. Despite a long history of jet diffusion flame studies, lifting/blowoff mechanisms have not yet been fully understood, compared to those of premixed flames. In this study, the structure and stability of diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels in coflowing air at normal earth gravity have been investigated experimentally and computationally. Measurements of the critical mean jet velocity (U(sub jc)) of methane, ethane, or propane at lifting or blowoff were made as a function of the coflowing air velocity (U(sub a)) using a tube burner (i.d.: 2.87 mm) (Fig. 1, left). By using a computational fluid dynamics code with 33 species and 112 elementary reaction steps, the internal chemical-kinetic structures of the stabilizing region of methane and propane flames were investigated (Fig. 1, right). A peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, is formed in the flame stabilizing region due to back-diffusion of heat and radical species against an oxygen-rich incoming flow, thus holding the trailing diffusion flame. The simulated flame base moved downstream under flow conditions close to the measured stability limit.

  1. Environmental Impact of Flame Retardants (Persistence and Biodegradability)

    PubMed Central

    Segev, Osnat; Kushmaro, Ariel; Brenner, Asher

    2009-01-01

    Flame-retardants (FR) are a group of anthropogenic environmental contaminants used at relatively high concentrations in many applications. Currently, the largest market group of FRs is the brominated flame retardants (BFRs). Many of the BFRs are considered toxic, persistent and bioaccumulative. Bioremediation of contaminated water, soil and sediments is a possible solution for the problem. However, the main problem with this approach is the lack of knowledge concerning appropriate microorganisms, biochemical pathways and operational conditions facilitating degradation of these chemicals at an acceptable rate. This paper reviews and discusses current knowledge and recent developments related to the environmental fate and impact of FRs in natural systems and in engineered treatment processes. PMID:19440395

  2. Bromination of Marine Dissolved Organic Matter following Full Scale Electrochemical Ballast Water Disinfection.

    PubMed

    Gonsior, Michael; Mitchelmore, Carys; Heyes, Andrew; Harir, Mourad; Richardson, Susan D; Petty, William Tyler; Wright, David A; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2015-08-01

    An extensively diverse array of brominated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) were generated following electrochemical disinfection of natural coastal/estuarine water, which is one of the main treatment methods currently under consideration for ballast water treatment. Ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry revealed 462 distinct brominated DBPs at a relative abundance in the mass spectra of more than 1%. A brominated DBP with a relative abundance of almost 22% was identified as 2,2,4-tribromo-5-hydroxy-4-cyclopentene-1,3-dione, which is an analogue to several previously described 2,2,4-trihalo-5-hydroxy-4-cyclopentene-1,3-diones in drinking water. Several other brominated molecular formulas matched those of other known brominated DBPs, such as dibromomethane, which could be generated by decarboxylation of dibromoacetic acid during ionization, dibromophenol, dibromopropanoic acid, dibromobutanoic acid, bromohydroxybenzoic acid, bromophenylacetic acid, bromooxopentenoic acid, and dibromopentenedioic acid. Via comparison to previously described chlorine-containing analogues, bromophenylacetic acid, dibromooxopentenoic acid, and dibromopentenedioic acid were also identified. A novel compound at a 4% relative abundance was identified as tribromoethenesulfonate. This compound has not been previously described as a DBP, and its core structure of tribromoethene has been demonstrated to show toxicological implications. Here we show that electrochemical disinfection, suggested as a candidate for successful ballast water treatment, caused considerable production of some previously characterized DBPs in addition to novel brominated DBPs, although several hundred compounds remain structurally uncharacterized. Our results clearly demonstrate that electrochemical and potentially direct chlorination of ballast water in estuarine and marine systems should be approached with caution and the concentrations, fate, and toxicity of DBP need to be further characterized. PMID:26168359

  3. Search for Possible Stratospheric Bromine Reservoir Species: Theoretical Study of the Photostability of Mono-, Tri-, and Pentacoordinated Bromine Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, TImothy J.; Mejia, Cesar N.; Beran, J. O.; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Previous work has shown that pentacoordinated bromine compounds have their lowest excited electronic states shifted to the blue relative to monocoordinated bromine molecules, and that this shift may be large enough to render them photostable in the lower stratosphere. Our earlier work has also shown that certain pentacoordinated bromine compounds are thermodynamically stable relative to their mono- or tricoordinated isomers, suggesting that if a bromine stratospheric reservoir species exists, then it is most likely a pentacoordinated compound. In this study we have examined the singlet excited electronic states of several bromine compounds in order to assess their photostability excited states in mono-, tri-, and pentacoordinated bromine molecules. Due to the strong spin-orbit mixing in bromine, we have also examined the lowest triplet excited state.

  4. In vitro estrogenicity of polybrominated flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Nakari, Tarja; Pessala, Piia

    2005-09-10

    Estrogenicity of five brominated flame retardants (BFRs), namely BDE-47, BDE-99, BDE-205, PBB-153 and technical Firemaster BP-6, were assessed by in vitro assays developed to detect chemicals with estrogenic properties. Recombinant yeast cells containing a human estrogen receptor gene failed to give any response to the chemicals tested. However, the positive control compound, estradiol-17beta, showed that the yeast cell assays had worked properly. The freshly separated fish hepatocyte assay based on the synthesis and secretion of vitellogenin from the isolated liver cells produced a clear dose-response curve in the presence of all tested flame retardants except Firemaster BP-6. The toxicity of the BFRs was detected by determining the cell ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity (EROD). The BFRs tested induced hepatic EROD activity at low test concentrations, but started to inhibit activity at higher concentrations. The decreased detoxification capacity of the hepatocytes resulted in a decrease in the vitellogenin production of the cells. The capability of in vitro assays to detect estrogenic properties of chemicals seems to vary. Thus, further work is needed to understand the mechanisms responsible for these reactions. PMID:16024102

  5. Field Effects of Buoyancy on Lean Premixed Turbulent Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, R. K.; Johnson, M. R.; Greenberg, P. S.; Wernet, M. P.

    2003-01-01

    The study of field effects of buoyancy on premixed turbulent flames is directed towards the advancement of turbulent combustion theory and the development of cleaner combustion technologies. Turbulent combustion is considered the most important unsolved problem in combustion science and laboratory studies of turbulence flame processes are vital to theoretical development. Although buoyancy is dominant in laboratory flames, most combustion models are not yet capable to consider buoyancy effects. This inconsistency has impeded the validation of theories and numerical simulations with experiments. Conversely, the understanding of buoyancy effects is far too limited to help develop buoyant flame models. Our research is also relevant to combustion technology because lean premixed combustion is a proven method to reduce the formation of oxides of nitrogen (NOx). In industrial lean premixed combustion systems, their operating conditions make them susceptible to buoyancy thus affecting heat distribution, emissions, stability, flashback and blowoff. But little knowledge is available to guide combustion engineers as to how to avoid or overcome these problems. Our hypothesis is that through its influence on the mean pressure field, buoyancy has direct and indirect effects on local flame/turbulence interactions. Although buoyancy acts on the hot products in the farfield the effect is also felt in the nearfield region upstream of the flame. These changes also influence the generation and dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy inside the flame brush and throughout the flowfield. Moreover, the plume of an open flame is unstable and the periodic fluctuations make additional contributions to flame front dynamics in the farfield. Therefore, processes such as flame wrinkling, flow acceleration due to heat release and flame- generated vorticity are all affected. Other global flame properties (e.g. flame stabilization limits and flame speed) may all be coupled to buoyancy. This

  6. Treasure of the Past VIII: Molecular Basis of Flame Inhibition*

    PubMed Central

    Hastie, J. W.

    2001-01-01

    The role played by inorganic chemical additives in fire retardancy and flame inhibition is considered. Particular attention is given to the molecular level aspects of commercially important systems containing compounds of antimony, halogens, and phosphorus. The flame inhibiting function of metal containing additives is also discussed. PMID:27500045

  7. Distribution and speciation of bromine in mammalian tissue and fluids by X-ray fluorescence imaging and X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ceko, Melanie J; Hummitzsch, Katja; Hatzirodos, Nicholas; Bonner, Wendy; James, Simon A; Kirby, Jason K; Rodgers, Raymond J; Harris, Hugh H

    2015-05-01

    Bromine is one of the most abundant and ubiquitous trace elements in the biosphere and until recently had not been shown to perform any essential biological function in animals. A recent study demonstrated that bromine is required as a cofactor for peroxidasin-catalysed formation of sulfilimine crosslinks in Drosophila. In addition, bromine dietary deficiency is lethal in Drosophila, whereas bromine replenishment restores viability. The aim of this study was to examine the distribution and speciation of bromine in mammalian tissues and fluids to provide further insights into the role and function of this element in biological systems. In this study we used X-ray fluorescence (XRF) imaging and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to examine the distribution of bromine in bovine ovarian tissue samples, follicular fluid and aortic serum, as well as human whole blood and serum and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to identify the chemical species of bromine in a range of mammalian tissue (bovine, ovine, porcine and murine), whole blood and serum samples (bovine, ovine, porcine, murine and human), and marine samples (salmon (Salmo salar), kingfish (Seriola lalandi) and Scleractinian coral). Bromine was found to be widely distributed across all tissues and fluids examined. In the bovine ovary in particular it was more concentrated in the sub-endothelial regions of arterioles. Statistical comparison of the near-edge region of the X-ray absorption spectra with a library of bromine standards led to the conclusion that the major form of bromine in all samples analysed was bromide. PMID:25675086

  8. Brominated dioxins and dibenzofurans in human adipose tissue. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, P.H.; Stanley, J.S.; Bauer, K.; Ayling, R.E.; Thornburg, K.R.

    1990-04-11

    The report describes the analytical efforts for the determination of polybrominated dioxins (PBDDs) and furans (PBDFs) in human adipose tissues. Data on the precision and accuracy of the method for three tetra- through hexabrominated dioxins and three tetra- through hexabrominated furans (specific 2,3,7,8-substituted isomers) were generated from the analysis of 5 unspiked and 10 spiked (5 replicates at 2 spike levels) adipose tissue samples that were included with the analysis of the FY 1987 samples. In addition, data are presented on the results of the analysis of 48 composite samples for the six specific PBDD and PBDF compounds. The targeted 2,3,7,8-substituted PBDDs and PBDFs were not detected in any of the samples except those prepared as spiked QC materials. The detection limits calculated for the tetrabromo congeners in the samples ranged from 0.46 to 8.9 pg/g (lipid basis). The detection limits for the higher brominated congeners were typically greater than that observed for the tetrabrominated compounds. There is some evidence for the presence of other brominated compounds in the adipose tissue samples. Specifically, responses were noted that correspond to the qualitative criteria for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (hexa through octabromo).

  9. Styrofoam Debris as a Source of Hazardous Additives for Marine Organisms.

    PubMed

    Jang, Mi; Shim, Won Joon; Han, Gi Myung; Rani, Manviri; Song, Young Kyoung; Hong, Sang Hee

    2016-05-17

    There is growing concern over plastic debris and their fragments as a carrier for hazardous substances in marine ecosystem. The present study was conducted to provide field evidence for the transfer of plastic-associated chemicals to marine organisms. Hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs), brominated flame retardants, were recently detected in expanded polystyrene (styrofoam) marine debris. We hypothesized that if styrofoam debris acts as a source of the additives in the marine environment, organisms inhabiting such debris might be directly influenced by them. Here we investigated the characteristics of HBCD accumulation by mussels inhabiting styrofoam. For comparison, mussels inhabiting different substrates, such as high-density polyethylene (HDPE), metal, and rock, were also studied. The high HBCD levels up to 5160 ng/g lipid weight and the γ-HBCD dominated isomeric profiles in mussels inhabiting styrofoam strongly supports the transfer of HBCDs from styrofoam substrate to mussels. Furthermore, microsized styrofoam particles were identified inside mussels, probably originating from their substrates. PMID:27100560

  10. Properties of plasma flames sustained by microwaves and burning hydrocarbon fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Uhm, Han Sup

    2006-11-15

    Plasma flames made of atmospheric microwave plasma and a fuel-burning flame were presented and their properties were investigated experimentally. The plasma flame generator consists of a fuel injector and a plasma flame exit connected in series to a microwave plasma torch. The plasma flames are sustained by injecting hydrocarbon fuels into a microwave plasma torch in air discharge. The microwave plasma torch in the plasma flame system can burn a hydrocarbon fuel by high-temperature plasma and high atomic oxygen density, decomposing the hydrogen and carbon containing fuel. We present the visual observations of the sustained plasma flames and measure the gas temperature using a thermocouple device in terms of the gas-fuel mixture and flow rate. The plasma flame volume of the hydrocarbon fuel burners was more than approximately 30-50 times that of the torch plasma. While the temperature of the torch plasma flame was only 868 K at a measurement point, that of the diesel microwave plasma flame with the addition of 0.019 lpm diesel and 30 lpm oxygen increased drastically to about 2280 K. Preliminary experiments for methane plasma flame were also carried out, measuring the temperature profiles of flames along the radial and axial directions. Finally, we investigated the influence of the microwave plasma on combustion flame by observing and comparing OH molecular spectra for the methane plasma flame and methane flame only.

  11. Exposure to flame retardants in electronics recycling sites.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Christina; Hämeilä, Mervi; Tornaeus, Jarkko; Säkkinen, Kirsi; Puttonen, Katriina; Korpi, Anne; Kiilunen, Mirja; Linnainmaa, Markku; Hesso, Antti

    2011-07-01

    Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) contains various hazardous substances such as flame retardants (FRs). Inhalation exposures to many FRs simultaneously among WEEE recycling site workers have been little studied previously. The breathing zone airborne concentrations of five brominated FR compounds tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBP-A), decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE), hexabromocyclododecane, 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane, hexabromobenzene, and one chlorinated FR (Dechlorane Plus®) were measured at four electronics recycling sites in two consecutive years. In addition, concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polybrominated biphenyls were measured. The three most abundant FRs in personal air samples were PBDEs (comprising mostly of deca-BDE), TBBP-A, and DBDPE, with mean concentrations ranging from 21 to 2320 ng m(-)(3), from 8.7 to 430 ng m(-3), and from 3.5 to 360 ng m(-3), respectively. At two of the sites, the emission control actions (such as improvements in ventilation and its maintenance and changes in cleaning habits) proved successful, the mean levels of FRs in personal samples being 10-68 and 14-79% of those from the previous year or alternatively below the limit of quantification. At the two remaining sites, the reductions in FR exposures were less consistent. The concentrations reported may pose a health hazard to the workers, although evaluation of the association between FR exposure and adverse health effects is hampered by lacking occupational exposure limits. Therefore, the exposures should be minimized by adequate control measures and maintaining good occupational hygiene practice. PMID:21742626

  12. Effect of Intense Sound Waves on a Stationary Gas Flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahnemann, H; Ehret, L

    1950-01-01

    Intense sound waves with a resonant frequency of 5000 cycles per second were imposed on a stationary propane-air flame issuing from a nozzle. In addition to a slight increase of the flame velocity, a fundamental change both in the shape of the burning zone and in the flow pattern could be observed. An attempt is made to explain the origin of the variations in the flame configuration on the basis of transition at the nozzle from jet flow to potential flow.

  13. The Flame Tree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Lewis's own experiences living in Indonesia are fertile ground for telling "a ripping good story," one found in "The Flame Tree." He hopes people will enjoy the tale and appreciate the differences of an unfamiliar culture. The excerpt from "The Flame Tree" will reel readers in quickly.

  14. Candle Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, D. L.; Ross, H. D.; Chang, P.; T'ien, J. S.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this work is to study both experimentally and numerically the behavior of a candle flame burning in a microgravity environment. Two space experiments (Shuttle and Mir) have shown the candle flame in microgravity to be small (approximately 1.5 cm diameter), dim blue, and hemispherical. Near steady flames with very long flame lifetimes (up to 45 minutes in some tests) existed for many of the tests. Most of the flames spontaneously oscillated with a period of approximately 1 Hz just prior to extinction). In a previous model of candle flame in microgravity, a porous sphere wetted with liquid fuel simulated the evaporating wick. The sphere, with a temperature equal to the boiling temperature of the fuel, was at the end of an inert cone that had a prescribed temperature. This inert cone produces the quenching effect of the candle wax in the real configuration. Although the computed flame shape resembled that observed in the microgravity experiment, the model was not able to differentiate the effect of wick geometry, e.g., a long vs. a short wick. This paper presents recent developments in the numerical model of the candle flame. The primary focus has been to more realistically account for the actual shape of the candle.

  15. Bromine-containing source gases during EASOE

    SciTech Connect

    Fabian, P. ); Borchers, R.; Kourtidis, K. )

    1994-06-22

    The authors report three different vertical profile measurements of three bromine containing gases which are thought to be the major sources of active bromine in the stratosphere. These gases are CBrClF[sub 2] (Halon-1211), CBrF[sub 3] (Halon-1301) and methyl bromide (CH[sub 3]Br). They were sampled using cryogenic samplers from balloon borne flights from Kiruna during January, February and March 1992. The two halons are of anthropogenic origin, while methyl bromide is thought to have a relatively large natural origin. Consistent with the decrease in concentration of these gases with altitude was an increase in the density of BrO[sub x] with altitude.

  16. Structure of Microgravity Transitional and Pulsed Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadori, M. Yousef; Hegde, Uday; Stocker, Dennis P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes results obtained in a study of pulsed gas jet diffusion flames to better characterize the recently observed vortex/flame interactions in microgravity transitional and turbulent diffusion flames, and to improve the understanding of large-scale structures in corresponding normal-gravity flames. In preparation for a space experiment, tests were conducted in the 5.18-Second Zero-Gravity Facility of the NASA Lewis Research Center. Both unpulsed and pulsed laminar flames were studied and numerical modeling of these flames was carried out for data comparison and model validation. In addition, complementary tests for a series of unpulsed flames were conducted on-board the NASA KC-135 research aircraft. The microgravity transitional and turbulent gas-jet diffusion flames have been observed to be dominated by large-scale disturbances, or structures. These structures first appear intermittently in the flame at Reynolds numbers (based on the cold jet injection properties) of about 2100. With increase in injection Reynolds number, the rate of intermittent disturbances increases until the generation becomes continuous at Reynolds numbers of 3000 and higher. The behavior of these structures depends upon the velocity and temperature characteristics of the jet/flame shear layer. These characteristics are different in normal gravity and microgravity.

  17. Suppression and Structure of Low Strain Rate Nonpremixed Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamins, Anthony; Bundy, Matthew; Park, Woe Chul; Lee, Ki Yong; Logue, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    The agent concentration required to achieve suppression of low strain rate nonpremixed flames is an important fire safety consideration. In a microgravity environment such as a space platform, unwanted fires will likely occur in near quiescent conditions where strain rates are very low. Diffusion flames typically become more robust as the strain rate is decreased. When designing a fire suppression system for worst-case conditions, low strain rates should be considered. The objective of this study is to investigate the impact of radiative emission, flame strain, agent addition, and buoyancy on the structure and extinction of low strain rate nonpremixed flames through measurements and comparison with flame simulations. The suppression effectiveness of a suppressant (N2) added to the fuel stream of low strain rate methane-air diffusion flames was measured. Flame temperature measurements were attained in the high temperature region of the flame (T greater than 1200 K) by measurement of thin filament emission intensity. The time varying temperature was measured and simulated as the flame made the transition from normal to microgravity conditions and as the flame extinguished.

  18. Process for spinning flame retardant elastomeric compositions. [fabricating synthetic fibers for high oxygen environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howarth, J. T.; Sheth, S.; Sidman, K. R.; Massucco, A. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Flame retardant elastomeric compositions comprised of either spandex type polyurethane having halogen containing polyols incorporated into the polymer chain, conventional spandex type polyurethanes in physical admixture with flame retardant additives, or fluoroelastomeric resins in physical admixture with flame retardant additives were developed. Methods are described for preparing fibers of the flame retardant elastomeric materials and manufactured articles as well as nonelastic materials such as polybenzimidazoles, fiberglass, and nylons, for high oxygen environments.

  19. [Flame retardants--use and hazards for human].

    PubMed

    Góralczyk, Katarzyna; Struciński, Paweł; Czaja, Katarzyna; Hernik, Agnieszka; Ludwicki, Jan K

    2002-01-01

    Flame retardants (FRs) are chemicals which added to materials during or after manufacture, inhibit or even suppress the combustion process due to their thermal stability. Large quantities of FRs are added to the plastic material (resins) in variety of electrical and electronic appliances including television and computer casing. The other uses of these compounds include production of building materials, upholstered furniture, textiles, wall covering, carpets, hydraulic fluids as well as vehicles and aircraft. Taking into account the chemical structure, there are five main groups of FRs: brominated, chlorinated, phosphorous-containing, nitrogen-containing (i.e. melamines) and inorganic compounds. Halogenated compounds, especially polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), a class of brominated flame retardants, due to their lipophilic characteristics and persistence have become ubiquitous environmental contaminants. There are indications that PBDEs may affect hormone function acting as endocrine disruption and may be toxic for developing brain. These compounds have been associated with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in humans, a variety of cancers in rodents and disruption of thyroid hormones balance. Similarly to other persistent halogenated compounds they are also able to affect the xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes activity. PBDEs are now found as residues in sediments, wildlife and human (milk, serum adipose tissue) samples. The predominant congeners in environmental samples, including human specimens are two congeners: 47 and 99. Currently, the estimated daily intake of PBDEs by adult humans is equal 51 ng x day-1 while by breast-fed infants equals 110 ng x day-1. PMID:12621885

  20. Marine bacterial degradation of brominated methanes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodwin, K.D.; Lidstrom, M.E.; Oremland, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    Brominated methanes are ozone-depleting compounds whose natural sources include marine algae such as kelp. Brominated methane degradation by bacteria was investigated to address whether bacterial processes might effect net emission of these compounds to the atmosphere. Bacteria in seawater collected from California kelp beds degraded CH2Br2 but not CHBr3. Specific inhibitors showed that methanotrophs and nitrifiers did not significantly contribute to CH2Br2 removal. A seawater enrichment culture oxidized 14CH2Br2 to 14CO2 as well as 14CH3Br to 14CO2. The rates of CH2Br2 degradation in laboratory experiments suggest that bacterial degradation of CH2Br2 in a kelp bed accounts for <1% of the CH2Br2 produced by the kelp. However, the half-life of CH2Br2 due to bacterial removal appears faster than hydrolysis and within an order of magnitude of volatilization to the atmosphere.Brominated methanes are ozone-depleting compounds whose natural sources include marine algae such as kelp. Brominated methane degradation by bacteria was investigated to address whether bacterial processes might effect net emission of these compounds to the atmosphere. Bacteria in seawater collected from California kelp beds degraded CH2Br2 but not CHBr3. Specific inhibitors showed that methanotrophs and nitrifiers did not significantly contribute to CH2Br2 removal. A seawater enrichment culture oxidized 14CH2Br2 to 14CO2 as well as 14CH3Br to 14CO2. The rates of CH2Br2 degradation in laboratory experiments suggest that bacterial degradation of CH2Br2 in a kelp bed accounts for <1% of the CH2Br2 produced by the kelp. However, the half-life of CH2Br2 due to bacterial removal appears faster than hydrolysis and within an order of magnitude of volatilization to the atmosphere.

  1. Microwave plasma burner and temperature measurements in its flames

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Cho, Soon Cheon; Bang, Chan Uk; Shin, Dong Hun; Kim, Jong Hun; Uhm, Han Sup; Yi, Won Ju

    2006-05-15

    An apparatus for generating flames and more particularly the microwave plasma burner for generating high-temperature large-volume plasma flame was presented. The plasma burner is operated by injecting liquid hydrocarbon fuels into a microwave plasma torch in air discharge and by mixing the resultant gaseous hydrogen and carbon compounds with air or oxygen gas. The microwave plasma torch can instantaneously vaporize and decompose the hydrogen and carbon containing fuels. It was observed that the flame volume of the burner was more than 50 times that of the torch plasma. While the temperature of the torch plasma flame was only 550 K at a measurement point, that of the plasma-burner flame with the addition of 0.025 lpm (liters per minute) kerosene and 20 lpm oxygen drastically increased to about 1850 K. A preliminary experiment was carried out, measuring the temperature profiles of flames along the radial and axial directions.

  2. Coherent structure dynamics during turbulence-flame interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haffner, Eileen; Green, Melissa; Hamlington, Peter; Poludnenko, Alexi; Oran, Elaine

    2015-11-01

    Several studies have been conducted to characterize the turbulence-flame interaction in reacting flows quantitatively. It has been observed that increased turbulence intensity both wrinkles and broadens the flame front throughout the preheat zone and reaction zone. In addition, previous studies showed that interaction with the flame changes the orientation of turbulent structures and and in some cases incites loss of vorticity, but the physical mechanism of this interaction was still unclear. An Eulerian analysis (Q criterion) is preformed to track structures through the flow, and to visualize the vortex transformation as it encounters the flame. This is coupled with the contours of the fuel-mass fraction, density, and pressure throughout the flame brush to provide insight into the physical interaction between turbulent structures and the flame. A complete description of the physical mechanism could provide insight into ways to design engine inlets for efficient mixing in combustion applications.

  3. Quantitative Species Measurements In Microgravity Combustion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shin-Juh; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Silver, Joel A.; Piltch, Nancy D.

    2003-01-01

    The capability of models and theories to accurately predict and describe the behavior of low gravity flames can only be verified by quantitative measurements. Although video imaging, simple temperature measurements, and velocimetry methods have provided useful information in many cases, there is still a need for quantitative species measurements. Over the past decade, we have been developing high sensitivity optical absorption techniques to permit in situ, non-intrusive, absolute concentration measurements for both major and minor flames species using diode lasers. This work has helped to establish wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) as an important method for species detection within the restrictions of microgravity-based measurements. More recently, in collaboration with Prof. Dahm at the University of Michigan, a new methodology combining computed flame libraries with a single experimental measurement has allowed us to determine the concentration profiles for all species in a flame. This method, termed ITAC (Iterative Temperature with Assumed Chemistry) was demonstrated for a simple laminar nonpremixed methane-air flame at both 1-g and at 0-g in a vortex ring flame. In this paper, we report additional normal and microgravity experiments which further confirm the usefulness of this approach. We also present the development of a new type of laser. This is an external cavity diode laser (ECDL) which has the unique capability of high frequency modulation as well as a very wide tuning range. This will permit the detection of multiple species with one laser while using WMS detection.

  4. Flame Shapes of Nonbuoyant Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames. Appendix K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The shapes (flame-sheet and luminous-flame boundaries) of steady nonbuoyant round hydrocarbon-fueled laminar-jet diffusion flames in still and coflowing air were studied both experimentally and theoretically. Flame-sheet shapes were measured from photographs using a CH optical filter to distinguish flame-sheet boundaries in the presence of blue C02 and OH emissions and yellow continuum radiation from soot. Present experimental conditions included acetylene-, methane-, propane-, and ethylene-fueled flames having initial reactant temperatures of 300 K, ambient pressures of 4-50 kPa, jet exit Reynolds number of 3-54, initial air/fuel velocity ratios of 0-9 and luminous flame lengths of 5-55 mm; earlier measurements for propylene- and 1,3-butadiene-fueled flames for similar conditions were considered as well. Nonbuoyant flames in still air were observed at micro-gravity conditions; essentially nonbuoyant flames in coflowing air were observed at small pressures to control effects of buoyancy. Predictions of luminous flame boundaries from soot luminosity were limited to laminar smoke-point conditions, whereas predictions of flame-sheet boundaries ranged from soot-free to smoke-point conditions. Flame-shape predictions were based on simplified analyses using the boundary layer approximations along with empirical parameters to distinguish flame-sheet and luminous-flame (at the laminar smoke point) boundaries. The comparison between measurements and predictions was remarkably good and showed that both flame-sheet and luminous-flame lengths are primarily controlled by fuel flow rates with lengths in coflowing air approaching 2/3 lengths in still air as coflowing air velocities are increased. Finally, luminous flame lengths at laminar smoke-point conditions were roughly twice as long as flame-sheet lengths at comparable conditions due to the presence of luminous soot particles in the fuel-lean region of the flames.

  5. Flame Shapes of Nonbuoyant Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Dai, Z.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z. G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The shapes (flame-sheet and luminous-flame boundaries) of steady nonbuoyant round hydrocarbon-fueled laminar-jet diffusion flames in still and coflowing air were studied both experimentally and theoretically. Flame-sheet shapes were measured from photographs using a CH optical filter to distinguish flame-sheet boundaries in the presence of blue CO2 and OH emissions and yellow continuum radiation from soot. Present experimental conditions included acetylene-, methane-, propane-, and ethylene-fueled flames having initial reactant temperatures of 300 K, ambient pressures of 4-50 kPa, jet exit Reynolds number of 3-54, initial air/fuel velocity ratios of 0-9 and luminous flame lengths of 5-55 mm; earlier measurements for propylene- and 1,3-butadiene-fueled flames for similar conditions were considered as well. Nonbuoyant flames in still air were observed at micro-gravity conditions; essentially nonbuoyant flames in coflowing air were observed at small pressures to control effects of buoyancy. Predictions of luminous flame boundaries from soot luminosity were limited to laminar smokepoint conditions, whereas predictions of flame-sheet boundaries ranged from soot-free to smokepoint conditions. Flame-shape predictions were based on simplified analyses using the boundary layer approximations along with empirical parameters to distinguish flame-sheet and luminous flame (at the laminar smoke point) boundaries. The comparison between measurements and predictions was remarkably good and showed that both flame-sheet and luminous-flame lengths are primarily controlled by fuel flow rates with lengths in coflowing air approaching 2/3 lengths in still air as coflowing air velocities are increased. Finally, luminous flame lengths at laminar smoke-point conditions were roughly twice as long as flame-sheet lengths at comparable conditions due to the presence of luminous soot particles in the fuel-lean region of the flames.

  6. TG-FTIR characterization of flame retardant polyurethane foams materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Tang, Y.; Li, F.; Ge, X. G.; Zhang, Z. J.

    2016-07-01

    Dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) and trichloroethyl phosphtate (TCEP) have been used to enhance the flame retardancy of polyurethane foams materials (PUF). Flame retardancy and thermal degradation of PUF samples have been investigated by the LOI tests and thermal analysis. The results indicate that the excellent flame retardancy can be achieved due to the presence of the flame retardant system containing DMMP and TCEP. TG-FTIR reveals that the addition of DMMP/TCEP can not only improve the thermal stability of PUF samples but can also affect the gaseous phase at high temperature.

  7. Hydrogen-bromine fuel cell advance component development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charleston, Joann; Reed, James

    1988-01-01

    Advanced cell component development is performed by NASA Lewis to achieve improved performance and longer life for the hydrogen-bromine fuel cells system. The state-of-the-art hydrogen-bromine system utilizes the solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) technology, similar to the SPE technology developed for the hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell system. These studies are directed at exploring the potential for this system by assessing and evaluating various types of materials for cell parts and electrode materials for Bromine-hydrogen bromine environment and fabricating experimental membrane/electrode-catalysts by chemical deposition.

  8. Non-premixed acoustically perturbed swirling flame dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Idahosa, Uyi; Saha, Abhishek; Xu, Chengying; Basu, Saptarshi

    2010-09-15

    An investigation into the response of non-premixed swirling flames to acoustic perturbations at various frequencies (f{sub p}=0-315 Hz) and swirl intensities (S=0.09 and 0.34) is carried out. Perturbations are generated using a loudspeaker at the base of an atmospheric co-flow burner with resulting velocity oscillation amplitudes vertical stroke u'/U{sub avg} vertical stroke in the 0.03-0.30 range. The dependence of flame dynamics on the relative richness of the flame is investigated by studying various constant fuel flow rate flame configurations. Flame heat release rate is quantitatively measured using a photomultiplier with a 430 nm bandpass filter for observing CH* chemiluminescence which is simultaneously imaged with a phase-locked CCD camera. The flame response is observed to exhibit a low-pass filter characteristic with minimal flame response beyond pulsing frequencies of 200 Hz. Flames at lower fuel flow rates are observed to remain attached to the central fuel pipe at all acoustic pulsing frequencies. PIV imaging of the associated isothermal fields show the amplification in flame aspect ratio is caused by the narrowing of the inner recirculation zone (IRZ). Good correlation is observed between the estimated flame surface area and the heat release rate signature at higher swirl intensity flame configurations. A flame response index analogous to the Rayleigh criterion in non-forced flames is used to assess the potential for a strong flame response at specific perturbation configurations and is found to be a good predictor of highly responsive modes. Phase conditioned analysis of the flame dynamics yield additional criteria in highly responsive modes to include the effective amplitude of velocity oscillations induced by the acoustic pulsing. In addition, highly responsive modes were characterized by velocity to heat release rate phase differences in the {+-}{pi}/2 range. A final observed characteristic in highly responsive flames is a Strouhal number between

  9. Effects of buoyancy on gas jet diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadori, M. Yousef; Edelman, Raymond B.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this effort was to gain a better understanding of the fundamental phenomena involved in laminar gas jet diffusion flames in the absence of buoyancy by studying the transient phenomena of ignition and flame development, (quasi-) steady-state flame characteristics, soot effects, radiation, and, if any, extinction phenomena. This involved measurements of flame size and development, as well as temperature and radiation. Additionally, flame behavior, color, and luminosity were observed and recorded. The tests quantified the effects of Reynolds number, nozzle size, fuel reactivity and type, oxygen concentration, and pressure on flame characteristics. Analytical and numerical modeling efforts were also performed. Methane and propane flames were studied in the 2.2 Second Drop Tower and the 5.18-Second Zero-Gravity Facility of NASA LeRC. In addition, a preliminary series of tests were conducted in the KC-135 research aircraft. Both micro-gravity and normal-gravity flames were studied in this program. The results have provided unique and new information on the behavior and characteristics of gas jet diffusion flames in micro-gravity environments.

  10. On Soot Inception in Nonpremixed Flames and the Effects of Flame Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. H.; Liu, S.; Axelbaum, R. L.; Gokoglu, Suleyman (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A simplified three-step model of soot inception has been employed with high activation energy asymptotics to study soot inception in nonpremixed counterflow systems with emphasis on understanding the effects of hydrodynamics and transport. The resulting scheme yields three zones: (1) a fuel oxidation zone wherein the fuel and oxidizer react to form product as well as a radical R, (e.g., H), (2) a soot/precursor formation zone where the radical R reacts with fuel to form "soot/precursor" S, and (3) a soot/precursor consumption zone where S reacts with the oxidizer to form product. The kinetic scheme, although greatly simplified, allows the coupling between soot inception and flame structure to be assessed. The results yield flame temperature, flame location, and a soot/precursor index S(sub I) as functions of Damkohler number for S formation. The soot/precursor index indicates the amount of S at the boundary of the formation region. The flame temperature indirectly indicates the total amount of S integrated over the formation region because as S is formed less heat release is available. The results show that unlike oxidation reactions, an extinction turning-point behavior does not exist for soot. Instead, the total amount of S slowly decreases with decreasing Damkohler number (increasing strain rate), which is consistent with counterflow flame experiments. When the Lewis number of the radical is decreased from unity, the total S reduces due to reduced residence time for the radical in the soot formation region. Similarly, when the Lewis number of the soot/precursor is increased from unity the amount of S increases for all Damkohler numbers. In addition to studying fuel-air (low stoichiometric mixture fraction) flames, the air-side nitrogen was substituted into the fuel, yielding diluted fuel-oxygen (high stoichiometric mixture fraction) flames with the same flame temperature as the fuel - air flames. The relative flame locations were different however, and

  11. Characteristics Of Turbulent Nonpremixed Jet-Flames And Jet-Flames In Crossflow In Normal- And Low-Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemens, N. T.; Boxx, I. G.; Idicheria, C. A.

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that buoyancy has a major influence on the flow structure of turbulent nonpremixed jet flames. For example, previous studies have shown that transitional and turbulent jet flames exhibit flame lengths that are as much as a factor of two longer in microgravity than in normal gravity. The objective of this study is to extend these previous studies by investigating both mean and fluctuating characteristics of turbulent nonpremixed jet flames under three different gravity levels (1 g, 20 mg and 100 micrograms). This work is described in more detail elsewhere. In addition, we have recently initiated a new study into the effects of buoyancy on turbulent nonpremixed jet flames in cross-flow (JFICF). Buoyancy has been observed to play a key role in determining the centerline trajectories of such flames.6 The objective of this study is to use the low gravity environment to study the effects of buoyancy on the turbulent characteristics of JFICF.

  12. Structure of low-stretch methane nonpremixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Bai; Ibarreta, Alfonso F.; Sung, Chih-Jen; T'ien, James S.

    2007-04-15

    The present study experimentally and numerically investigates the structure associated with extremely low-stretch ({proportional_to}2 s{sup -1}) gaseous nonpremixed flames. The study of low-stretch flames aims to improve our fundamental understanding of the flame radiation effects on flame response and extinction limits. Low-stretch flames are also relevant to fire safety in reduced-gravity environments and to large buoyant fires, where localized areas of low stretch are attainable. In this work, ultra-low-stretch flames are established in normal gravity by bottom burning of a methane/nitrogen mixture discharged from a porous spherically symmetric burner of large radius of curvature. The large thickness of the resulting nonpremixed flame allows detailed mapping of the flame structure. Several advanced nonintrusive optical diagnostics are used to study the flame structure. Gas phase temperatures are measured by Raman scattering, while the burner surface temperatures are obtained by IR imaging. In addition, OH-PLIF and chemiluminescence imaging techniques are used to help characterize the extent of the flame reaction zone. These experimental results allow direct comparison with a quasi-one-dimensional numerical model including detailed chemistry, thermodynamic/transport properties, and radiation treatment. In addition, the radiative interactions between the flame and porous burner (modeled as a gray surface) are accounted for in the present model. The numerical modeling is demonstrated to be able to simulate the low-stretch flame structure. Using the current model, the extinction limits under different conditions are also examined. The computational results are consistent with experimental observations. (author)

  13. Extremely weak hydrogen flames

    SciTech Connect

    Lecoustre, V.R.; Sunderland, P.B.; Chao, B.H.; Axelbaum, R.L.

    2010-11-15

    Hydrogen jet diffusion flames were observed near their quenching limits. These involved downward laminar flow of hydrogen from a stainless steel hypodermic tube with an inside diameter of 0.15 mm. Near their quenching limits these flames had hydrogen flow rates of 3.9 and 2.1 {mu}g/s in air and oxygen, respectively. Assuming complete combustion, the associated heat release rates are 0.46 and 0.25 W. To the authors' knowledge, these are the weakest self-sustaining steady flames ever observed. (author)

  14. Development of a noncompetitive phage anti-immunocomplex assay for brominated diphenyl ether 47.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Joo; Rossotti, Martin A; Ahn, Ki Chang; González-Sapienza, Gualberto G; Gee, Shirley J; Musker, Ruthie; Hammock, Bruce D

    2010-06-01

    We present a new application of the noncompetitive phage anti-immunocomplex assay (PHAIA) by converting an existing competitive assay to a versatile noncompetitive sandwich-type format using immunocomplex binding phage-borne peptides to detect the brominated flame retardant, brominated diphenyl ether 47 (BDE 47). Three phage-displayed 9-mer disulfide-constrained peptides that recognize the BDE 47-polyclonal antibody immunocomplex were isolated. The resulting PHAIAs showed variable sensitivities, and the most sensitive peptide had a dose-response curve with an SC(50) (concentration of analyte producing 50% saturation of the signal) of 0.7ng/ml BDE 47 and a linear range of 0.3-2ng/ml, which was nearly identical to the best heterologous competitive format (IC(50) of 1.8ng/ml, linear range of 0.4-8.5/ml). However, the PHAIA was 1400-fold better than homologous competitive assay. The validation of the PHAIA with extracts of house furniture foam as well as human and calf sera spiked with BDE 47 showed overall recovery of 80-113%. The PHAIA was adapted to a dipstick format (limit of detection of 3.0ng/ml), and a blind test with six random extracts of local house furniture foams showed that the results of the PHAIA and dipstick assay were consistent, giving the same positive and negative detection. PMID:20152791

  15. Characterization of Three Tetrabromobisphenol-S Derivatives in Mollusks from Chinese Bohai Sea: A Strategy for Novel Brominated Contaminants Identification

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ai-feng; Tian, Yong; Yin, Nuo-ya; Yu, Miao; Qu, Guang-bo; Shi, Jian-bo; Du, Yu-guo; Jiang, Gui-bin

    2015-01-01

    Identification of novel brominated contaminants in the environment, especially the derivatives and byproducts of brominated flame retardants (BFRs), has become a wide concern because of their adverse effects on human health. Herein, we qualitatively and quantitatively identified three byproducts of tetrabromobisphenol-S bis(2,3-dibromopropyl ether) (TBBPS-BDBPE), including TBBPS mono(allyl ether) (TBBPS-MAE), TBBPS mono(2-bromoallyl ether) (TBBPS-MBAE) and TBBPS mono(2,3-dibromopropyl ether) (TBBPS-MDBPE) as novel brominated contaminants. Meanwhile, the mass spectra and analytical method for determination of TBBPS-BDBPE byproducts were presented for the first time. The detectable concentrations (dry weight) of TBBPS-MAE, TBBPS-MBAE and TBBPS-MDBPE were in the ranges 28–394 μg/g in technical TBBPS-BDBPE and 0.1–4.1 ng/g in mollusks collected from the Chinese Bohai Sea. The detection frequencies in mollusk samples were 5%, 39%, 95% for TBBPS-MAE, TBBPS-MBAE and TBBPS-MDBPE, respectively, indicating their prevailing in the environment. The results showed that they could be co-produced and leaked into the environment with production process, and might be more bioaccumulative and toxic than TBBPS-BDBPE. Therefore, the production and use of TBBPS derivatives lead to unexpected contamination to the surrounding environment. This study also provided an effective approach for identification of novel contaminants in the environment with synthesized standards and Orbitrap high resolution mass spectrometry. PMID:26130450

  16. Characterization of Three Tetrabromobisphenol-S Derivatives in Mollusks from Chinese Bohai Sea: A Strategy for Novel Brominated Contaminants Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ai-Feng; Tian, Yong; Yin, Nuo-Ya; Yu, Miao; Qu, Guang-Bo; Shi, Jian-Bo; Du, Yu-Guo; Jiang, Gui-Bin

    2015-07-01

    Identification of novel brominated contaminants in the environment, especially the derivatives and byproducts of brominated flame retardants (BFRs), has become a wide concern because of their adverse effects on human health. Herein, we qualitatively and quantitatively identified three byproducts of tetrabromobisphenol-S bis(2,3-dibromopropyl ether) (TBBPS-BDBPE), including TBBPS mono(allyl ether) (TBBPS-MAE), TBBPS mono(2-bromoallyl ether) (TBBPS-MBAE) and TBBPS mono(2,3-dibromopropyl ether) (TBBPS-MDBPE) as novel brominated contaminants. Meanwhile, the mass spectra and analytical method for determination of TBBPS-BDBPE byproducts were presented for the first time. The detectable concentrations (dry weight) of TBBPS-MAE, TBBPS-MBAE and TBBPS-MDBPE were in the ranges 28-394 μg/g in technical TBBPS-BDBPE and 0.1-4.1 ng/g in mollusks collected from the Chinese Bohai Sea. The detection frequencies in mollusk samples were 5%, 39%, 95% for TBBPS-MAE, TBBPS-MBAE and TBBPS-MDBPE, respectively, indicating their prevailing in the environment. The results showed that they could be co-produced and leaked into the environment with production process, and might be more bioaccumulative and toxic than TBBPS-BDBPE. Therefore, the production and use of TBBPS derivatives lead to unexpected contamination to the surrounding environment. This study also provided an effective approach for identification of novel contaminants in the environment with synthesized standards and Orbitrap high resolution mass spectrometry.

  17. Modeling Candle Flame Behavior In Variable Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alsairafi, A.; Tien, J. S.; Lee, S. T.; Dietrich, D. L.; Ross, H. D.

    2003-01-01

    The burning of a candle, as typical non-propagating diffusion flame, has been used by a number of researchers to study the effects of electric fields on flame, spontaneous flame oscillation and flickering phenomena, and flame extinction. In normal gravity, the heat released from combustion creates buoyant convection that draws oxygen into the flame. The strength of the buoyant flow depends on the gravitational level and it is expected that the flame shape, size and candle burning rate will vary with gravity. Experimentally, there exist studies of candle burning in enhanced gravity (i.e. higher than normal earth gravity, g(sub e)), and in microgravity in drop towers and space-based facilities. There are, however, no reported experimental data on candle burning in partial gravity (g < g(sub e)). In a previous numerical model of the candle flame, buoyant forces were neglected. The treatment of momentum equation was simplified using a potential flow approximation. Although the predicted flame characteristics agreed well with the experimental results, the model cannot be extended to cases with buoyant flows. In addition, because of the use of potential flow, no-slip boundary condition is not satisfied on the wick surface. So there is some uncertainty on the accuracy of the predicted flow field. In the present modeling effort, the full Navier-Stokes momentum equations with body force term is included. This enables us to study the effect of gravity on candle flames (with zero gravity as the limiting case). In addition, we consider radiation effects in more detail by solving the radiation transfer equation. In the previous study, flame radiation is treated as a simple loss term in the energy equation. Emphasis of the present model is on the gas-phase processes. Therefore, the detailed heat and mass transfer phenomena inside the porous wick are not treated. Instead, it is assumed that a thin layer of liquid fuel coated the entire wick surface during the burning process

  18. Highly Brominated Antimicrobial Metabolites from a Marine Pseudoalteromonas sp

    PubMed Central

    Fehér, Domonkos; Barlow, Russell; McAtee, Jesse; Hemscheidt, Thomas K.

    2010-01-01

    Extracts of a marine Pseudoalteromonas. sp (CMMED 290) isolated from the surface of a nudibranch collected in Kaneohe Bay, Oahu displayed significant antimicrobial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the lipophilic extract led to the isolation and structure elucidation of two new highly brominated compounds, 2,3,5,7-tetrabromobenzofuro[3,2-b]pyrrole 1 and 4,4′,6- tribromo-2,2′-biphenol 2. In addition, we have identified the known compounds pentabromopseudilin and bromophene. We describe the isolation and structure elucidation of the compounds 1 and 2 together with their antimicrobial activities against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:20973551

  19. Enhancement of the carbon electrode capacitance by brominated hydroquinones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastol, Dominika; Walkowiak, Jedrzej; Fic, Krzysztof; Frackowiak, Elzbieta

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents supercapacitors utilizing new redox-active electrolytes with bromine species. Two sources of Br specimen were investigated, i.e. dibromodihydroxybenzene dissolved in KOH and potassium bromide dissolved in KOH with hydroxybenzene additive. KOH-activated carbon, exhibiting a well-developed porosity, was incorporated as an electrode material. The tested systems revealed a capacitance enhancement explained by Br- and partial BrO3- redox activity. The optimisation of the electrolyte concentration resulted in a capacitance value of 314 F g-1 achieved at 1.1 V voltage range. Good cyclability performance (11% capacitance loss) combined with a high capacitance value (244 F g-1) were obtained for the system operating in 0.2 mol L- 1 C6H4Br2O2 in 2 mol L-1 KOH electrolytic solution.

  20. Bioavailability of classical and novel flame retardants: Effect of fullerene presence.

    PubMed

    Santín, Giselle; Eljarrat, Ethel; Barceló, Damià

    2016-09-15

    To understand the behavior of some emerging flame retardants (FRs) in the environment, a nonexhaustive extraction using Tenax was applied to study their behavior in aquatic ecosystems. Desorption of 8 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), 8 methoxylated PBDEs, 3 emerging brominated FRs and 6 halogenated norbornenes from sediments spiked in the laboratory was studied. Results showed that emerging FRs have a similar bioavailability than that of legacy FRs, already banned. In addition, some parameters such as sediment total organic carbon (TOC), aging or nanomaterial (NMs) presence in the sediment were modified in order to study their effects on the bioavailability of FRs. Bioavailability increases with a diminution of sediment TOC, while diminishes with an increase of aging. The study of effect of NM presence was performed at three different pH (acidic, neutral and basic), and for the three scenarios, FR bioavailability decreased with NM presence. The retention of pollutants in the sediment seems to be favoured by NM presence, minimizing their impact on living organisms. PMID:27177136

  1. Flame-resistant textiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogg, L. C.; Stringham, R. S.; Toy, M. S.

    1980-01-01

    Flame resistance treatment for acid resistant polyamide fibers involving photoaddition of fluorocarbons to surface has been scaled up to treat 10 yards of commercial width (41 in.) fabric. Process may be applicable to other low cost polyamides, polyesters, and textiles.

  2. Flame spread across liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Howard D.; Miller, Fletcher; Schiller, David; Sirignano, William

    1995-01-01

    Recent reviews of our understanding of flame spread across liquids show that there are many unresolved issues regarding the phenomenology and causal mechanisms affecting ignition susceptibility, flame spread characteristics, and flame spread rates. One area of discrepancy is the effect of buoyancy in both the uniform and pulsating spread regimes. The approach we have taken to resolving the importance of buoyancy for these flames is: (1) normal gravity (1g) and microgravity (micro g) experiments; and (2) numerical modeling at different gravitational levels. Of special interest to this work, as discussed at the previous workshop, is the determination of whether, and under what conditions, pulsating spread occurs in micro g. Microgravity offers a unique ability to modify and control the gas-phase flow pattern by utilizing a forced air flow over the pool surface.

  3. "Magic Eraser" Flame Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landis, Arthur M.; Davies, Malonne I.; Landis, Linda

    2009-05-01

    Cleaning erasers are used to support methanol-fueled flame tests. This safe demonstration technique requires only small quantities of materials, provides clean colors for up to 45 seconds, and can be used in the classroom or the auditorium.

  4. Interactions of bromine, chlorine, and iodine photochemistry during ozone depletions in Barrow, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, C. R.; Shepson, P. B.; Liao, J.; Huey, L. G.; Apel, E. C.; Cantrell, C. A.; Flocke, F.; Orlando, J.; Fried, A.; Hall, S. R.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Knapp, D. J.; Mauldin, R. L., III; Montzka, D. D.; Sive, B. C.; Ullmann, K.; Weibring, P.; Weinheimer, A.

    2014-11-01

    The springtime depletion of tropospheric ozone in the Arctic is known to be caused by active halogen photochemistry resulting from halogen atom precursors emitted from snow, ice, or aerosol surfaces. The role of bromine in driving ozone depletion events (ODEs) has been generally accepted, but much less is known about the role of chlorine radicals in ozone depletion chemistry. While the potential impact of iodine in the High Arctic is more uncertain, there have been indications of active iodine chemistry through observed enhancements in filterable iodide, probable detection of tropospheric IO, and recently, detection of atmospheric I2. Despite decades of research, significant uncertainty remains regarding the chemical mechanisms associated with the bromine-catalyzed depletion of ozone, as well as the complex interactions that occur in the polar boundary layer due to halogen chemistry. To investigate this, we developed a zero-dimensional photochemical model, constrained with measurements from the 2009 OASIS field campaign in Barrow, Alaska. We simulated a 7 day period during late March that included a full ozone depletion event lasting 3 days and subsequent ozone recovery to study the interactions of halogen radicals under these different conditions. In addition, the effects of iodine added to our base model were investigated. While bromine atoms were primarily responsible for ODEs, chlorine and iodine were found to enhance the depletion rates and iodine was found to be more efficient per atom at depleting ozone than Br. The interaction between chlorine and bromine is complex, as the presence of chlorine can increase the recycling and production of Br atoms, while also increasing reactive bromine sinks under certain conditions. Chlorine chemistry was also found to have significant impacts on both HO2 and RO2. The results of this work highlight the need for future studies on the production mechanisms of Br2 and Cl2, as well as on the potential impact of iodine in the

  5. Interactions of bromine, chlorine, and iodine photochemistry during ozone depletions in Barrow, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, C. R.; Shepson, P. B.; Liao, J.; Huey, L. G.; Apel, E. C.; Cantrell, C. A.; Flocke, F.; Orlando, J.; Fried, A.; Hall, S. R.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Knapp, D. J.; Mauldin, R. L., III; Montzka, D. D.; Sive, B. C.; Ullmann, K.; Weibring, P.; Weinheimer, A.

    2015-08-01

    The springtime depletion of tropospheric ozone in the Arctic is known to be caused by active halogen photochemistry resulting from halogen atom precursors emitted from snow, ice, or aerosol surfaces. The role of bromine in driving ozone depletion events (ODEs) has been generally accepted, but much less is known about the role of chlorine radicals in ozone depletion chemistry. While the potential impact of iodine in the High Arctic is more uncertain, there have been indications of active iodine chemistry through observed enhancements in filterable iodide, probable detection of tropospheric IO, and recently, observation of snowpack photochemical production of I2. Despite decades of research, significant uncertainty remains regarding the chemical mechanisms associated with the bromine-catalyzed depletion of ozone, as well as the complex interactions that occur in the polar boundary layer due to halogen chemistry. To investigate this, we developed a zero-dimensional photochemical model, constrained with measurements from the 2009 OASIS field campaign in Barrow, Alaska. We simulated a 7-day period during late March that included a full ozone depletion event lasting 3 days and subsequent ozone recovery to study the interactions of halogen radicals under these different conditions. In addition, the effects of iodine added to our Base Model were investigated. While bromine atoms were primarily responsible for ODEs, chlorine and iodine were found to enhance the depletion rates and iodine was found to be more efficient per atom at depleting ozone than Br. The interaction between chlorine and bromine is complex, as the presence of chlorine can increase the recycling and production of Br atoms, while also increasing reactive bromine sinks under certain conditions. Chlorine chemistry was also found to have significant impacts on both HO2 and RO2, with organic compounds serving as the primary reaction partner for Cl atoms. The results of this work highlight the need for future

  6. An experimental study of the effect of a pilot flame on technically pre-mixed, self-excited combustion instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Meara, Bridget C.

    Combustion instabilities are a problem facing the gas turbine industry in the operation of lean, pre-mixed combustors. Secondary flames known as "pilot flames" are a common passive control strategy for eliminating combustion instabilities in industrial gas turbines, but the underlying mechanisms responsible for the pilot flame's stabilizing effect are not well understood. This dissertation presents an experimental study of a pilot flame in a single-nozzle, swirl-stabilized, variable length atmospheric combustion test facility and the effect of the pilot on combustion instabilities. A variable length combustor tuned the acoustics of the system to excite instabilities over a range of operating conditions without a pilot flame. The inlet velocity was varied from 25 -- 50 m/s and the equivalence ratio was varied from 0.525 -- 0.65. This range of operating conditions was determined by the operating range of the combustion test facility. Stability at each operating condition and combustor length was characterized by measurements of pressure oscillations in the combustor. The effect of the pilot flame on the magnitude and frequency of combustor stability was then investigated. The mechanisms responsible for the pilot flame effect were studied using chemiluminescence flame images of both stable and unstable flames. Stable flame structure was investigated using stable flame images of CH* chemiluminescence emission. The effect of the pilot on stable flame metrics such as flame length, flame angle, and flame width was investigated. In addition, a new flame metric, flame base distance, was defined to characterize the effect of the pilot flame on stable flame anchoring of the flame base to the centerbody. The effect of the pilot flame on flame base anchoring was investigated because the improved stability with a pilot flame is usually attributed to improved flame anchoring through the recirculation of hot products from the pilot to the main flame base. Chemiluminescence images

  7. Brominated thiophenes as precursors in the preparation of brominated and arylated anthraquinones.

    PubMed

    Thiemann, Thies; Tanaka, Yasuko; Iniesta, Jesus

    2009-01-01

    Brominated anthraquinones can be synthesized directly from bromothiophenes when these are reacted with 1,4-naphthoquinones in the presence of meta-chloroperoxybenzoic acid. The bromoanthraquinones are versatile building blocks in the preparation of arylated anthraquinones and of extended pi-systems with interspersed anthraquinone units. PMID:19305356

  8. Effects Of Electric Field On Hydrocarbon-Fueled Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Z.-G.; Hegde, U.

    2003-01-01

    It has been observed that flames are susceptible to electric fields that are much weaker than the breakdown field strength of the flame gases. When an external electric field is imposed on a flame, the ions generated in the flame reaction zone drift in the direction of the electric forces exerted on them. The moving ions collide with the neutral species and change the velocity distribution in the affected region. This is often referred to as ionic wind effect. In addition, the removal of ions from the flame reaction zone can alter the chemical reaction pathway of the flame. On the other hand, the presence of space charges carried by moving ions affects the electric field distribution. As a result, the flame often changes its shape, location and color once an external electric field is applied. The interplay between the flame movement and the change of electric field makes it difficult to determine the flame location for a given configuration of electrodes and fuel source. In normal gravity, the buoyancy-induced flow often complicates the problem and hinders detailed study of the interaction between the flame and the electric field. In this work, the microgravity environment established at the 2.2 Second Drop Tower at the NASA Glenn Research Center is utilized to effectively remove the buoyant acceleration. The interaction between the flame and the electric field is studied in a one-dimensional domain. A specially designed electrode makes flame current measurements possible; thus, the mobility of ions, ion density, and ionic wind effect can be evaluated.

  9. Oscillating edge-flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckmaster, J.; Zhang, Yi

    1999-09-01

    It has been known for some years that when a near-limit flame spreads over a liquid pool of fuel, the edge of the flame can oscillate. It is also known that when a near-asphyxiated candle-flame burns in zero gravity, the edge of the (hemispherical) flame can oscillate violently prior to extinction. We propose that these oscillations are nothing more than a manifestation of the large Lewis number instability well known in chemical reactor studies and in combustion studies, one that is exacerbated by heat losses. As evidence of this we examine an edge-flame confined within a fuel-supply boundary and an oxygen-supply boundary, anchored by a discontinuity in data at the fuel-supply boundary. We show that when the Lewis number of the fuel is 2, and the Lewis number of the oxidizer is 1, oscillations of the edge occur when the Damköhler number is reduced below a critical value. During a single oscillation period there is a short premixed propagation stage and a long diffusion stage, behaviour that has been observed in flame spread experiments. Oscillations do not occur when both Lewis numbers are equal to 1.

  10. Cellular Instabilities and Self-Acceleration of Expanding Spherical Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, C. K.; Kwon, O. C.

    2003-01-01

    In the present investigation we aim to provide experimental information on and thereby understanding of the generation and propagation of spark-ignited, outwardly propagating cellular flames, with three major focuses. The first is to unambiguously demonstrate the influence of the four most important parameters in inducing hydrodynamic and diffusional-thermal cellularities, namely thermal expansion, flame thickness, non-unity Lewis number, and global activation energy. The second is to investigate the critical state for the onset of cellularity for the stretch-affected, expanding flame. The third is to identify and consequently quantify the phenomena of self-acceleration and possibly auto-turbulization of cellular flames. Due to space limitation the effects of activation energy and the critical state for the onset of cellularity will not be discussed herein. Experiments were conducted using C3H8-air and H2-O2-N2 mixtures for their opposite influences of non-equidiffusivity. The additional system parameters varied were the chamber pressure (p) and the mixture composition including the equivalence ratio (phi). From a sequence of the flame images we can assess the propensity of cell formation, and determine the instantaneous flame radius (R), the flame propagation rate, the global stretch rate experienced by the flame, the critical flame radius at which cells start to grow, and the average cell size.

  11. 40 CFR 721.10534 - Brominated aliphatic alcohol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Brominated aliphatic alcohol (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10534 Brominated aliphatic alcohol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... aliphatic alcohol (PMN P-12-260) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10534 - Brominated aliphatic alcohol (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Brominated aliphatic alcohol (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10534 Brominated aliphatic alcohol (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... aliphatic alcohol (PMN P-12-260) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  13. Triple flames in microgravity flame spread

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichman, Indrek S.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to examine in detail the influence of the triple flame structure on the flame spread problem. It is with an eye to the practical implications that this fundamental research project must be carried out. The microgravity configuration is preferable because buoyancy-induced stratification and vorticity generation are suppressed. A more convincing case can be made for comparing our predictions, which are zero-g, and any projected experiments. Our research into the basic aspects will employ two models. In one, flows of fuel and oxidizer from the lower wall are not considered. In the other, a convective flow is allowed. The non-flow model allows us to develop combined analytical and numerical solution methods that may be used in the more complicated convective-flow model.

  14. The BRomine, Ozone, and Mercury EXperiment (BROMEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Shepson, P. B.; Simpson, W. R.; Perovich, D. K.; Sturm, M.; Douglas, T. A.; Rigor, I. G.; Clemente-Colon, P.; Burrows, J. P.; Richter, A.; Bottenheim, J. W.; Steffen, A.; Barber, D. G.; Kaleschke, L.; Hall, D. K.; Markus, T.; Eicken, H.; Neumann, G.

    2011-12-01

    In the decade of the 2000s, Arctic perennial (multi-year) sea ice has diminished drastically, whereas seasonal (first-year) sea ice has become the dominant ice class. This change effectively increases the overall surface salinity of the sea ice cover and in the overlying snowpack. Satellite results in 2010 and 2011 show the extent of perennial sea ice remains minimal with significant bromine explosions in the springtime. Key science questions still remain to be answered to understand the impact of the Arctic perennial sea ice reduction on low-atmospheric physical and chemical processes. Of the highest priority is to investigate the impact on bromine explosion events that lead to depletion of ozone and gaseous elementary mercury in the atmosphere. With that objective, we present the development of the BRomine, Ozone, and Mercury EXperiment in (BROMEX) in spring 2012 around Barrow, extending out to 200 km offshore and inland. In BROMEX, chemical, sea ice, snow, and ocean measurements will be made across sea ice leads both upwind and downwind areas of newly opened leads. Chemical-measurement buoys and other types of buoys will be deployed with helicopter flights to both sides of the leads. Various flight patterns of aircraft carrying ozone and bromine-measuring sensors will be used to characterize the chemical distribution over sea ice, land, and mountainous regions. Our approach will use data from multiple satellite instruments including MODIS, AMSR-E, QuikSCAT, GOME-2, SCIAMACHY, OMI, RADARSAT-2, Envisat ASAR, TerraSAR-X, TanDEM-X, SMOS, CryoSat-2 altimeter, and Oceansat-2 scatterometer. Moreover, results from recent field campaigns such as the IPY OASIS, INCATPA, CFL, SALT, and IceBridge, from sea ice and snow products generated by the U.S. Naval and National Ice Center, from NASA cryospheric observations, and from surface observation networks such as SIZONet will be utilized together with new measurements from BROMEX. Further collaborations with the international

  15. Effects of milling brominated P-100 graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Dillehay, Michael E.; Hambourger, Paul D.

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary procedures have been developed for the ball milling of pristine and brominated P-100 graphite fibers. Because of the lubricative properties of graphite, large ball loads (50 percent by volume) are required. Use of 2-propanol as a milling medium enhances the efficiency of the process. The fibers, when allowed to settle from the milling medium, tend to be preferentially aligned with rather few fibers standing up. Milled, brominated P-100 fibers have resistivities that are indistinguishable from their pristine counterparts, apparently because of loss of bromine. This suggests that bromine would not be the intercalate of choice in applications where milled fibers of this type are required. It was found that brominated graphite fibers are stable in a wide variety of organic solvents.

  16. Laminar Flame Speed of Primary Reference Fuels and Gasoline Surrogates at Elevated Temperatures Measured with the Flat Flame Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ying-Hao; Roberts, William

    2013-11-01

    The laminar flame speed is a key target data for validating relevant kinetic mechanisms of the combustion of future fuel formulations since this fundamental parameter contains information for the reactivity, diffusivity, and exothermicity of the fuel mixture. The current work presents the flat flame method, which produces a one-dimensional flat flame free of stretch, to measure laminar flame speeds of the Primary Reference Fuels (PRFs), PRF blends, and gasoline surrogates at elevated temperatures. The flat flame is produced by a McKenna porous plug burner. The laminar flame speed was measured experimentally at atmospheric pressure over a range of equivalence ratios and a range of unburned gas temperatures up to 470 K. To determine the laminar flame speed, a technique with heat extraction through the cooling water, similar to that described by Botha and Spalding (1954), was employed and the adiabatic laminar flame speed was obtained by extrapolation. In addition, the experimental data is compared to simulations using kinetic mechanisms available in the literature. Preliminary results of laminar flame speeds for methane/air and n-heptane/air mixtures at room temperature show good agreement with both of experimental and numerical data available in the literature. Clean Combustion Research Center.

  17. Flame hole dynamics simulation of Sandia Flame F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaus, Robert; Hewson, John; Domino, Stefan; Pantano, Carlos

    2014-11-01

    The Sandia Flame ``F'' is a piloted methane/air diffusion flame containing high levels of local extinction. These regions of local extinction reduce the efficiency of combustion and can increase the production of certain pollutants (e.g. carbon monoxide) as well as limit the overall stability of the flame. We present a flame hole dynamics model describing evolution of local extinction zones (flame holes) in a turbulent diffusion flame and apply it to perform a direct numerical simulation of the Sandia Flame F using Sandia's ``SIERRA low Mach Module, Nalu.'' The flame hole dynamics model is a phase-field model that describes the state of the flame (burning or extinguished) through a surface partial differential equation modeling extinction, reignition and advection of the flame state on the moving stoichiometric surface using edge flame properties. The solution of the surface equation is then extended away from the surface and used for state evaluations using a flamelet library with steady flamelets in the burning region and a transient solution in the quenched regions. The flame hole dynamics approach allows tracking extinction and reignition in turbulent diffusion flames without using the computationally costly detailed chemistry explicitly.

  18. OMI observations of bromine monoxide emissions from salt lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleiman, R. M.; Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Gonzalez Abad, G.; Kurosu, T. P.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we analyze bromine monoxide (BrO) data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) over various salt lakes. We used OMI data from 2005 to 2014 to investigate BrO signatures from salt lakes. The salt lakes regions we cover include Dead Sea; Salt Lake City, US; Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia; and Namtso, Tibet. Elevated signatures of BrO was found in July and August BrO monthly averages over the Dead Sea. Similar results were found in the BrO monthly averages for August 2006 for the Bolivian Salt Flats. We present a detailed description of the retrieval algorithm for the OMI operational bromine monoxide (BrO) product. The algorithm is based on direct fitting of radiances from 319.0-347.5 nm, within the UV-2 channel of OMI. Radiances are modeled from the solar irradiance, attenuated by contributions from the target gas and interfering gases, rotational Raman scattering, additive and multiplicative closure polynomials and a common mode spectrum. The common mode spectra (one per cross-track position, computed on-line) are the average of several hundred fitting residuals. They include any instrument effects that are unrelated to molecular scattering and absorption cross sections. The BrO retrieval uses albedo- and wavelength-dependent air mass factors (AMFs), which have been pre-computed using climatological BrO profiles. The wavelength-dependent AMF is applied pre-fit to the BrO cross-sections so that vertical column densities are retrieved directly. We validate OMI BrO with ground-based measurements from three stations (Harestua, Lauder, and Barrow) and with chemical transport model simulations. We analyze the global distribution and seasonal variation of BrO and investigate BrO emissions from volcanoes and salt lakes.

  19. Effects of H{sub 2} enrichment on the propagation characteristics of CH{sub 4}-air triple flames

    SciTech Connect

    Briones, Alejandro M.; Aggarwal, Suresh K.; Katta, Viswanath R.

    2008-05-15

    The effects of H{sub 2} enrichment on the propagation of laminar CH{sub 4}-air triple flames in axisymmetric coflowing jets are numerically investigated. A comprehensive, time-dependent computational model, which employs a detailed description of chemistry and transport, is used to simulate the transient ignition and flame propagation phenomena. Flames are ignited in a jet-mixing layer far downstream of the burner. Following ignition, a well-defined triple flame is formed that propagates upstream along the stoichiometric mixture fraction line with a nearly constant displacement velocity. As the flame approaches the burner, it transitions to a double flame, and subsequently to a burner-stabilized nonpremixed flame. Predictions are validated using measurements of the displacement flame velocity. As the H{sub 2} concentration in the fuel blend is increased, the displacement flame velocity and local triple flame speed increase progressively due to the enhanced chemical reactivity, diffusivity, and preferential diffusion caused by H{sub 2} addition. In addition, the flammability limits associated with the triple flames are progressively extended with the increase in H{sub 2} concentration. The flame structure and flame dynamics are also markedly modified by H{sub 2} enrichment, which substantially increases the flame curvature and mixture fraction gradient, as well as the hydrodynamic and curvature-induced stretch near the triple point. For all the H{sub 2}-enriched methane-air flames investigated in this study, there is a negative correlation between flame speed and stretch, with the flame speed decreasing almost linearly with stretch, consistent with previous studies. The H{sub 2} addition also modifies the flame sensitivity to stretch, as it decreases the Markstein number (Ma), implying an increased tendency toward diffusive-thermal instability (i.e. Ma {yields} 0). These results are consistent with the previously reported experimental results for outwardly

  20. Another hot tub hazard. Toxicity secondary to bromine and hydrobromic acid exposure.

    PubMed

    Burns, M J; Linden, C H

    1997-03-01

    We describe the clinical course of two patients who developed acute pneumonitis followed by reactive airways dysfunction syndrome after bathing in a hot tub. Additional findings were present and suggested that exposure to a corrosive agent was responsible. Bromine and hydrobromic acid generated from a widely used water disinfectant were implicated as the underlying cause. Physicians should be alert to the possibility that such exposures may initiate or exacerbate inflammatory pulmonary disease. PMID:9118727

  1. DETAIL VIEW IN THE FLAME TRENCH LOOKING NORTH, FLAME DEFLECTOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW IN THE FLAME TRENCH LOOKING NORTH, FLAME DEFLECTOR IN THE FOREGROUND, WATER PIPES AND VALVE ASSEMBLIES ON THE FOREGROUND. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  2. New infrared spectroscopic database for bromine nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Georg; Birk, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    Fourier transform infrared measurements of bromine nitrate have been performed in the spectral region 675-1400 cm-1 at 0.014 cm-1 spectral resolution. Absorption cross sections were derived from 38 spectra covering the temperature range from 203 to 296 K and air pressure range from 0 to 190 mbar. For line-by-line analysis, further spectra were recorded at 0.00094 cm-1 spectral resolution at 223 and 293 K. The sample was synthesized from ClONO2 and Br2. Band strengths of the bands ν3 around 803 cm-1 and ν2 around 1286 cm-1 were determined from three pure BrONO2 measurements at different temperatures and pressures. Number densities in the absorption cell were derived from pressure measurements of the purified sample taking into account small amounts of impurities determined spectroscopically. Resulting band strengths are Sν3 = 2.872(52) × 10-17 cm2 molec-1 cm-1 and Sν2 = 3.63(15) × 10-17 cm2 molec-1 cm-1. Absorption cross sections of all measurements were scaled to these band strengths. Further data reduction was achieved with an interpolation scheme based on two-dimensional polynomials in ln(pressure) and temperature. The database is well-suited for remote-sensing application and should reduce the atmospheric bromine nitrate error budget substantially.

  3. Investigation of H2 Concentration and Combustion Instability Effects on the Kinetics of Strained Syngas Flames

    SciTech Connect

    Ahsan R. Choudhuri

    2006-08-07

    The flame extinction limits of syngas (H{sub 2}-CO) flames were measured using a twin-flame-counter-flow burner. Plots of Extinction limits vs. global stretch rates were generated at different mixture compositions and an extrapolation method was used to calculate the flame extinction limit corresponding to an experimentally unattainable zero-stretch condition. The zero-stretch extinction limit of H{sub 2}-CO mixtures decreases (from rich to lean) with the increase in H{sub 2} concentration in the mixture. The average difference between the measured flame extinction limit and the Le Chatelier's calculation is around {approx} 7%. The measured OH{sup -} chemiluminescent data indicates that regardless of mixture compositions the OH radical concentration reduces (within the experimental uncertainties) to an extinction value prior to the flame extinction. Flame extinction limits of H{sub 2}-CO mixtures measured in a flat-flame burner configuration also show a similar relation. Additionally, the measured laminar flame velocity close to the extinction indicates that regardless of fuel composition the premixed flame of hydrogen fuel blends extinguishes when the mixture laminar flame velocity falls below a critical value. The critical laminar flame velocity at extinction for H{sub 2}-CO premixed flames (measured in the flat flame burner configuration) is found to be 3.77({+-}0.38) cm/s. An externally perturbed H{sub 2}-CO twin flame was not experimentally achievable for the mixture conditions used in the present investigation. A slightest perturbation in the flow-field distorts the H{sub 2}-CO twin-flame. The flame becomes highly unstable with the introduction of an externally excited flow oscillation.

  4. Flame retardants: Dust - And not food - Might be the risk.

    PubMed

    de Boer, J; Ballesteros-Gómez, A; Leslie, H A; Brandsma, S H; Leonards, P E G

    2016-05-01

    Flame retardants (FRs) are used to delay ignition of materials such as furniture and electric and electronic instruments. Many FRs are persistent and end up in the environment. Environmental studies on flame retardants (FRs) took off in the late 1990s. Polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) appeared to be bioaccumulative and were found in many organisms all over the world. When PBDEs were banned or their production voluntarily terminated, alternatives appeared on the market that often had similar properties or were of more concern due to their toxicity such as halogenated phosphorus-based FRs. Here we show that in spite of the ban on PBDEs more brominated FRs are being produced, an increasing number of other FRs is being applied and FR levels in our homes are much higher than in the outdoor environment. While nowadays we live in better isolated houses and sit in front of the computer or television, on flame retarded upholstery, we are at risk due to the toxic effects of a suite of FRs. The high exposure to these substances indoors calls for better risk assessments that include mixture effects. PMID:26765313

  5. 40 CFR 415.290 - Applicability; description of the bromine production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... bromine production subcategory. 415.290 Section 415.290 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Bromine Production Subcategory § 415.290 Applicability; description of the bromine production... bromine by the brine-mining process and by the Trona process....

  6. 40 CFR 415.290 - Applicability; description of the bromine production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... bromine production subcategory. 415.290 Section 415.290 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Bromine Production Subcategory § 415.290 Applicability; description of the bromine production... bromine by the brine-mining process and by the Trona process....

  7. 40 CFR 415.290 - Applicability; description of the bromine production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... bromine production subcategory. 415.290 Section 415.290 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Bromine Production Subcategory § 415.290 Applicability; description of the bromine production... bromine by the brine-mining process and by the Trona process....

  8. 40 CFR 415.290 - Applicability; description of the bromine production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... bromine production subcategory. 415.290 Section 415.290 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Bromine Production Subcategory § 415.290 Applicability; description of the bromine production... bromine by the brine-mining process and by the Trona process....

  9. 40 CFR 415.290 - Applicability; description of the bromine production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... bromine production subcategory. 415.290 Section 415.290 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Bromine Production Subcategory § 415.290 Applicability; description of the bromine production... bromine by the brine-mining process and by the Trona process....

  10. A Dramatic Flame Test Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Kristin A.; Schreiner, Rodney

    2001-01-01

    Flame tests are used for demonstration of atomic structure. Describes a demonstration that uses spray bottles filled with methanol and a variety of salts to produce a brilliantly colored flame. (Contains 11 references.) (ASK)

  11. Flame propagation through periodic vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Dold, J.W.; Kerr, O.S.; Nikolova, I.P.

    1995-02-01

    The discovery of a new class of Navier-Stokes solutions representing steady periodic stretched vortices offers a useful test-bed for examining interactions between flames and complex flow-fields. After briefly describing these vortex solutions and their wide-ranging parameterization in terms of wavelength and amplitude, this article examines their effect on flames of constant normal propagation speed as observed through numerical solutions of an eikonal equation. Over certain ranges of vortex amplitude and flame-speed, a corridor of enhanced flame passage is seen to be created as a leading flame-tip managers to leap-frog between successive vortices. However, for large enough amplitudes of vorticity or small enough flame-speeds, the flame fails to be able to benefit from the advection due to the vortices. It is shown that the leading tips of such flames are effectively trapped by the stretched vortices.

  12. Use of Bromine and Bromo-Organic Compounds in Organic Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Indranirekha; Borah, Arun Jyoti; Phukan, Prodeep

    2016-06-22

    Bromination is one of the most important transformations in organic synthesis and can be carried out using bromine and many other bromo compounds. Use of molecular bromine in organic synthesis is well-known. However, due to the hazardous nature of bromine, enormous growth has been witnessed in the past several decades for the development of solid bromine carriers. This review outlines the use of bromine and different bromo-organic compounds in organic synthesis. The applications of bromine, a total of 107 bromo-organic compounds, 11 other brominating agents, and a few natural bromine sources were incorporated. The scope of these reagents for various organic transformations such as bromination, cohalogenation, oxidation, cyclization, ring-opening reactions, substitution, rearrangement, hydrolysis, catalysis, etc. has been described briefly to highlight important aspects of the bromo-organic compounds in organic synthesis. PMID:27199233

  13. Hydrogen-Bromine Flow Battery: Hydrogen Bromine Flow Batteries for Grid Scale Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-01

    GRIDS Project: LBNL is designing a flow battery for grid storage that relies on a hydrogen-bromine chemistry which could be more efficient, last longer and cost less than today’s lead-acid batteries. Flow batteries are fundamentally different from traditional lead-acid batteries because the chemical reactants that provide their energy are stored in external tanks instead of inside the battery. A flow battery can provide more energy because all that is required to increase its storage capacity is to increase the size of the external tanks. The hydrogen-bromine reactants used by LBNL in its flow battery are inexpensive, long lasting, and provide power quickly. The cost of the design could be well below $100 per kilowatt hour, which would rival conventional grid-scale battery technologies.

  14. Investigations of two-phase flame propagation under microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokalp, Iskender

    2016-07-01

    Investigations of two-phase flame propagation under microgravity conditions R. Thimothée, C. Chauveau, F. Halter, I Gökalp Institut de Combustion, Aérothermique, Réactivité et Environnement (ICARE), CNRS, 1C Avenue de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orléans Cedex 2, France This paper presents and discusses recent results on two-phase flame propagation experiments we carried out with mono-sized ethanol droplet aerosols under microgravity conditions. Fundamental studies on the flame propagation in fuel droplet clouds or sprays are essential for a better understanding of the combustion processes in many practical applications including internal combustion engines for cars, modern aircraft and liquid rocket engines. Compared to homogeneous gas phase combustion, the presence of a liquid phase considerably complicates the physico-chemical processes that make up combustion phenomena by coupling liquid atomization, droplet vaporization, mixing and heterogeneous combustion processes giving rise to various combustion regimes where ignition problems and flame instabilities become crucial to understand and control. Almost all applications of spray combustion occur under high pressure conditions. When a high pressure two-phase flame propagation is investigated under normal gravity conditions, sedimentation effects and strong buoyancy flows complicate the picture by inducing additional phenomena and obscuring the proper effect of the presence of the liquid droplets on flame propagation compared to gas phase flame propagation. Conducting such experiments under reduced gravity conditions is therefore helpful for the fundamental understanding of two-phase combustion. We are considering spherically propagating two-phase flames where the fuel aerosol is generated from a gaseous air-fuel mixture using the condensation technique of expansion cooling, based on the Wilson cloud chamber principle. This technique is widely recognized to create well-defined mono-size droplets

  15. Bromine-Chlorine Coupling in the Antarctic Ozone Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, Michael Y.; Sze, Nien-Dak; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Rodriquez, Jose M.; Prather, Michael J.

    1996-01-01

    The contribution from the chlorine and bromine species in the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole is evaluated. Since chlorine and bromine compounds are of different industrial origin, it is desirable, from a policy point of view, to be able to attribute chlorine-catalyzed loss of ozone with those reactions directly involving chlorine species, and likewise for bromine-catalyzed loss. In the stratosphere, however, most of the chemical families are highly coupled, and, for example, changes in the chlorine abundance will alter the partitioninig in other families and thus the rate of ozone loss. This modeling study examines formation of the Antarctic ozone hole for a wide range of bromine concentrations (5 - 25 pptv) and for chlorine concentrations typical of the last two decades (1.5, 2.5 and 3.5 ppbv). We follow the photochemical evolution of a single parcel of air, typical of the inner Antarctic vortex (50 mbar, 70 deg. S, NO(sub y) = 2 ppbv, with Polar Stratospheric Clouds(PSC)) from August 1 to November 1. For all of these ranges of chlorine and bromine loading, we would predict a substantial ozone hole (local depletion greater than 90%) within the de-nitrified, PSC- perturbed vortex. The contributions of the different catalytic cycles responsible for ozone loss are tabulated. The deep minimum in ozone is driven primarily by the chlorine abundance. As bromine levels decrease, the magnitude of the chlorine-catalyzed ozone loss increases to take up the slack. This is because bromine suppresses ClO by accelerating the conversion of ClO an Cl2O2 back to HCI. For this range of conditions, the local relative efficiency of ozone destruction per bromine atom to that per chlorine atom (alpha-factor) ranges from 33 to 55, decreasing with increase of bromine.

  16. NOX FORMATION IN CO FLAMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an experimental study to determine if early NO and NO2 can be observed in CO flames, since prompt NO is not anticipated and since HO2 levels might be expected to be lower in CO flames. (Previous studies of NO and NO2 production in methane flames with a...

  17. Modeling the Formation of Tropical Rings of Atomic Bromine and Iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiz-Lopez, A.; Fernandez, R.; Salawitch, R. J.; Kinnison, D. E.; Lamarque, J. F.; Ordoñez, C.; Gomez Martin, J. C.; Tilmes, S.

    2014-12-01

    Very short-lived (VSL) bromo- and iodocarbons are produced at a prodigious rate by ocean biology and these source compounds (SGVSL), together with their degradation inorganic products (PGVSL), are lofted by vigorous convection to the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). Using a state-of-the-art photochemical mechanism within a global model, we investigate the partitioning and loading of reactive inorganic halogens within the TTL. The specific low ozone and low temperature conditions of this region of the atmosphere changes the steady-state between halogen atoms and oxides, making the atoms the dominant species. We suggest that this leads to the formation of two daytime "tropical rings" of both atomic bromine and iodine that circle the tropics with the sun. In addition to a description of this photochemical phenomenon, this communication the partitioning of inorganic halogen reservoirs within the TTL and assess its relevance for the injection of bromine to stratosphere.

  18. Modeling the formation of tropical rings of atomic bromine and iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; Fernandez, Rafael; Gomez Martin, Juan Carlos; Salawitch, Ross; Kinnison, Douglas; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Tilmes, Simone

    2015-04-01

    Very short-lived (VSL) bromo- and iodocarbons are produced at a prodigious rate by ocean biology and these source compounds (SGVSL), together with their degradation inorganic products (PGVSL), are lofted by vigorous convection to the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). Using a state-of-the-art photochemical mechanism within a global model, we investigate the partitioning and loading of reactive inorganic halogens within the TTL. The specific low ozone and low temperature conditions of this region of the atmosphere changes the steady-state between halogen atoms and oxides, making the atoms the dominant species. We suggest that this leads to the formation of two daytime "tropical rings" of both atomic bromine and iodine that circle the tropics with the sun. In addition to a description of this photochemical phenomenon, this communication the partitioning of inorganic halogen reservoirs within the TTL and assess its relevance for the injection of bromine to stratosphere.

  19. Development of rechargeable lithium-bromine batteries with lithium ion conducting solid electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemoto, Koshin; Yamada, Hirotoshi

    2015-05-01

    Electrochemical performances of a prototype lithium-bromine battery (LBB) employing a solid electrolyte is investigated. The discharge capacity decreases with repeating charge/discharge cycles. Electrochemical impedance analysis reveals that the capacity fading is mainly due to increase in the interfacial resistance between an aqueous active material solution and a solid electrolyte. Based on the results of symmetric cells and structural analysis of the surface of the solid electrolyte immersed in Br2 solutions, it is suggested that a Li+-depletion layer is formed on the surface of the solid electrolyte as a result of contact with bromine. Addition of tetraethylammonium bromide (TEABr) depresses the interfacial resistance, which results in improved cycleability. LBB with 1.0 M LiBr and 0.25 M TEABr shows discharge capacity of 139 mAh/g-LiBr and Coulombic efficiency of 99.6% at 5th cycle.

  20. Launch Pad Flame Trench Refractory Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.; Hintze, Paul E.; Parlier, Christopher R.; Bucherl, Cori; Sampson, Jeffrey W.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark; Perusich, Steve; Whitten, Mary

    2010-01-01

    The launch complexes at NASA's John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) are critical support facilities for the successful launch of space-based vehicles. These facilities include a flame trench that bisects the pad at ground level. This trench includes a flame deflector system that consists of an inverted, V-shaped steel structure covered with a high temperature concrete material five inches thick that extends across the center of the flame trench. One side of the "V11 receives and deflects the flames from the orbiter main engines; the opposite side deflects the flames from the solid rocket boosters. There are also two movable deflectors at the top of the trench to provide additional protection to shuttle hardware from the solid rocket booster flames. These facilities are over 40 years old and are experiencing constant deterioration from launch heat/blast effects and environmental exposure. The refractory material currently used in launch pad flame deflectors has become susceptible to failure, resulting in large sections of the material breaking away from the steel base structure and creating high-speed projectiles during launch. These projectiles jeopardize the safety of the launch complex, crew, and vehicle. Post launch inspections have revealed that the number and frequency of repairs, as well as the area and size of the damage, is increasing with the number of launches. The Space Shuttle Program has accepted the extensive ground processing costs for post launch repair of damaged areas and investigations of future launch related failures for the remainder of the program. There currently are no long term solutions available for Constellation Program ground operations to address the poor performance and subsequent failures of the refractory materials. Over the last three years, significant liberation of refractory material in the flame trench and fire bricks along the adjacent trench walls following Space Shuttle launches have resulted in extensive investigations of

  1. First insight into the levels and distribution of flame retardants in potable water in Pakistan: An underestimated problem with an associated health risk diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Usman; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan; Malik, Riffat Naseem

    2016-09-15

    To date, very little is known about the occurrence of flame retardants (FRs) in potable water and its associated health risk to the exposed human population. The current study was designed to investigate the differences in the contamination levels of selected FRs in the potable water of industrial, rural and background zones of Pakistan. In addition, the health risk assessment for the exposed human population was estimated. For this purpose, the concentrations of the selected FRs: polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs), dechlorane plus (DP), novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) and organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs), were analyzed in a total of 39 samples of potable water from the above mentioned three zones. We found elevated concentrations of ∑OPFRs (BDL-71.05ng/L), ∑PBDEs (BDL-0.82pg/L), ∑NBFRs (BDL-1.39pg/L) and ∑DP (BDL-0.29pg/L) in the potable water samples from industrial zones, smaller concentrations in the samples from rural zones, and negligible concentrations in the samples from background zones. Among all the FRs analyzed, Tris-(2-chloroisopropyl)-phosphate (∑TCPP), anti-DP, BDE-47 and 1.2-bis(pentabromodiphenyl)ethane (DBDPE) were the dominant compounds in all three selected zones. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that most of the FRs are associated with the industrial zones. The estimated daily intake (EDI) for all selected FRs was found to be higher in children than adults. However, both children and adults were found to be at low risk (i.e., Hazard quotient (HQ)<1) of FRs exposure through potable water consumption. We predict that FRs might be leached out from wastewater bodies and subsequently mixed with nearby potable water facilities. FRs may also spill out from the aluminum or plastic pipes and tanks most commonly used for potable water storage in Pakistan. The present study suggests initiating measures to minimize human exposure to FRs in the future. PMID:27177141

  2. Flame-retardants and other organohalogens detected in sewage sludge by electron capture negative ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    La Guardia, Mark J; Hale, Robert C; Harvey, Ellen; Chen, Da

    2010-06-15

    Numerous halogenated organic compounds have been identified as pollutants of concern. Those with high persistence and hydrophobicity may concentrate in biota, sediments, and wastewater sludge. Nonetheless, the release to the environment of many remains largely unrecognized. Stabilized sewage sludge (biosolids) is increasingly being land-applied as a soil amendment. However, understanding the risks of land application has been hampered by the compositional complexity of biosolids. Compound specific analytical approaches may also underestimate environmental impact of land application by overlooking additional contaminants. However, utilizing an alternative analytical approach based on compound functional group (i.e., alkyl halides) enhanced the information content of the analysis. To illustrate, 49 organohalogens were observed by gas chromatography with electron capture negative ionization mass spectrometry in sewage sludge; 23 identified as flame-retardants: that is, PBDEs, hexabromocyclododecane, 2-ethylhexyl 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (TBB), 2-ethylhexyl tetrabromophthalate, decabromodiphenyl ethane, 1,2-bis (2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane and Dechlorane Plus. Concentrations ranged from 25 to 1,600,000 ng g(-1) total organic carbon. An additional 16 compounds were tentatively identified as triclosan, chlorinated-methoxy triclosan, chlorinated pesticides, hexachlorobiphenyl, TBB degradation products, brominated furans and nonabromochlorodiphenyl ethers. Such an analytical approach may enhance evaluations of the risks associated with biosolids land-application and assist in prioritizing specific chemicals for future environmental fate and toxicology studies. PMID:20486701

  3. Ruthenium-Catalyzed meta-Selective C—H Bromination

    PubMed Central

    Teskey, Christopher J; Lui, Andrew Y W; Greaney, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    The first example of a transition-metal-catalyzed, meta-selective C–H bromination procedure is reported. In the presence of catalytic [{Ru(p-cymene)Cl2}2], tetrabutylammonium tribromide can be used to functionalize the meta C–H bond of 2-phenylpyridine derivatives, thus affording difficult to access products which are highly predisposed to further derivatization. We demonstrate this utility with one-pot bromination/arylation and bromination/alkenylation procedures to deliver meta-arylated and meta-alkenylated products, respectively, in a single step. PMID:26288217

  4. Field Effects of Buoyancy on Lean Premixed Turbulent Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, R. K.; Dimalanta, R.; Wernet, M. P.; Greenberg, P. S.

    2001-01-01

    Buoyancy affects the entire flowfield of steady turbulent flames and this aspect of flame buoyancy coupling is largely unexplored by experiments or by theory. Open flames and flames within large confinements are free to expand and interact with the surrounding environment. In addition to fluid and combustion conditions, their aerodynamic flowfields are determined by the flame brush orientation and geometry, wake of the stabilizer, enclosure size, and of course, the gravitational field. Because the flowfield consists mainly of cold reactants (mostly in the nearfield) and hot products (mostly in the farfield), buoyancy effects are manifested in the farfield region. In upward pointing flames, an obvious effect is a favorable axial pressure gradient that accelerates the products thereby increasing the axial aerodynamic stretch rate. Intrinsic to turbulent flows, changes in mean aerodynamic stretch also couple to the fluctuating pressure field. Consequently, buoyancy can influence the turbulence intensities upstream and downstream of the flame. Flame wrinkling process, and heat release rate are also directly affected. This backward coupling mechanism is the so-called elliptic problem. To resolve the field effects of buoyancy would require the solution of three-dimensional non-linear Navier Stokes equations with full specification of the upstream, wall and downstream boundary conditions.

  5. Flow/Soot-Formation Interactions in Nonbuoyant Laminar Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z.; Faeth, G. M.

    1999-01-01

    Nonpremixed (diffusion) flames are attractive for practical applications because they avoid the stability, autoignition, flashback, etc. problems of premixed flames. Unfortunately, soot formation in practical hydrocarbon-fueled diffusion flames reduces their attractiveness due to widely-recognized public health and combustor durability problems of soot emissions. For example, more deaths are attributed to the emission of soot (15,000-60,000 deaths annually in the U.S. alone) than any other combustion-generated pollutant. In addition, continuum radiation from soot-containing flames is the principle heat load to combustor components and is mainly responsible for engine durability problems of aircraft and gas turbine engines. As a result, there is considerable interest in controlling both soot concentrations within flames and soot emissions from flames. Thus, the objective of the present investigation is to study ways to control soot formation in diffusion flames by manipulating the mixing process between the fuel and oxidant streams. In order to prevent the intrusion of gravity from masking flow properties that reduce soot formation in practical flames (where effects of gravity are small), methods developed during past work will be exploited to minimize effects of buoyant motion.

  6. Experimental and Numerical Study of Ammonium Perchlorate Counterflow Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smooke, M. D.; Yetter, R. A.; Parr, T. P.; Hanson-Parr, D. M.; Tanoff, M. A.

    1999-01-01

    Many solid rocket propellants are based on a composite mixture of ammonium perchlorate (AP) oxidizer and polymeric binder fuels. In these propellants, complex three-dimensional diffusion flame structures between the AP and binder decomposition products, dependent upon the length scales of the heterogeneous mixture, drive the combustion via heat transfer back to the surface. Changing the AP crystal size changes the burn rate of such propellants. Large AP crystals are governed by the cooler AP self-deflagration flame and burn slowly, while small AP crystals are governed more by the hot diffusion flame with the binder and burn faster. This allows control of composite propellant ballistic properties via particle size variation. Previous measurements on these diffusion flames in the planar two-dimensional sandwich configuration yielded insight into controlling flame structure, but there are several drawbacks that make comparison with modeling difficult. First, the flames are two-dimensional and this makes modeling much more complex computationally than with one-dimensional problems, such as RDX self- and laser-supported deflagration. In addition, little is known about the nature, concentration, and evolution rates of the gaseous chemical species produced by the various binders as they decompose. This makes comparison with models quite difficult. Alternatively, counterflow flames provide an excellent geometric configuration within which AP/binder diffusion flames can be studied both experimentally and computationally.

  7. Vortex/Flame Interactions in Microgravity Pulsed Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadori, M. Y.; Hegde, U.; Stocker, D. P.

    2001-01-01

    Significant differences have been observed between the structure of laminar, transitional, and turbulent flames under downward, upward, and microgravity conditions. These include flame height, jet shear layer, flame instability, flicker, lift-off height, blow-off Reynolds number, and radiative properties. The primary objective of this investigation is to identify the mechanisms involved in the generation and interaction of large-scale structures in microgravity flames. This involves a study of vortex/flame interactions in a space-flight experiment utilizing a controlled, well-defined set of disturbances imposed on a laminar diffusion flame. The results provide a better understanding of the naturally occurring structures that are an inherent part of microgravity turbulent flames. The paper presents the current progress in this program.

  8. In search of stratospheric bromine oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lestrade, John Patrick

    1986-01-01

    The Imaging Spectrometric Observatory (ISO) is capable of recording spectra in the wavelength range of 200 to 12000 Angstroms. Data from a recent Spacelab 1 ATLAS mission has imaged the terrestrial airglow at tangent ray heights of 90 and 150 km. These data contain information about trace atmospheric constituents such as bromine oxide (BrO), hydroxyl (OH), and chlorine dioxide (OClO). The abundances of these species are critical to stratospheric models of catalytic ozone destruction. Heretofore, very few observations were made especially for BrO. Software was developed to purge unwanted solar features from the airglow spectra. The next step is a measure of the strength of the emission features for BrO. The final analysis will yield the scale height of this important compound.

  9. Flame Retardant Applications in Camping Tents and Potential Exposure.

    PubMed

    Keller, Alexander S; Raju, Nikhilesh P; Webster, Thomas F; Stapleton, Heather M

    2014-02-11

    Concern has mounted over health effects caused by exposure to flame retardant additives used in consumer products. Significant research efforts have focused particularly on exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) used in furniture and electronic applications. However, little attention has focused on applications in textiles, particularly textiles meeting a flammability standard known as CPAI-84. In this study, we investigated flame retardant applications in camping tents that met CPAI-84 standards by analyzing 11 samples of tent fabrics for chemical flame retardant additives. Furthermore, we investigated potential exposure by collecting paired samples of tent wipes and hand wipes from 27 individuals after tent setup. Of the 11 fabric samples analyzed, 10 contained flame retardant additives, which included tris(1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate (TDCPP), decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209), triphenyl phosphate, and tetrabromobisphenol-A. Flame retardant concentrations were discovered to be as high as 37.5 mg/g (3.8% by weight) in the tent fabric samples, and TDCPP and BDE-209 were the most frequently detected in these samples. We also observed a significant association between TDCPP levels in tent wipes and those in paired hand wipes, suggesting that human contact with the tent fabric material leads to the transfer of the flame retardant to the skin surface and human exposure. These results suggest that direct contact with flame retardant-treated textiles may be a source of exposure. Future studies will be needed to better characterize exposure, including via inhalation and dermal sorption from air. PMID:24804279

  10. Flame Retardant Applications in Camping Tents and Potential Exposure

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Concern has mounted over health effects caused by exposure to flame retardant additives used in consumer products. Significant research efforts have focused particularly on exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) used in furniture and electronic applications. However, little attention has focused on applications in textiles, particularly textiles meeting a flammability standard known as CPAI-84. In this study, we investigated flame retardant applications in camping tents that met CPAI-84 standards by analyzing 11 samples of tent fabrics for chemical flame retardant additives. Furthermore, we investigated potential exposure by collecting paired samples of tent wipes and hand wipes from 27 individuals after tent setup. Of the 11 fabric samples analyzed, 10 contained flame retardant additives, which included tris(1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate (TDCPP), decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209), triphenyl phosphate, and tetrabromobisphenol-A. Flame retardant concentrations were discovered to be as high as 37.5 mg/g (3.8% by weight) in the tent fabric samples, and TDCPP and BDE-209 were the most frequently detected in these samples. We also observed a significant association between TDCPP levels in tent wipes and those in paired hand wipes, suggesting that human contact with the tent fabric material leads to the transfer of the flame retardant to the skin surface and human exposure. These results suggest that direct contact with flame retardant-treated textiles may be a source of exposure. Future studies will be needed to better characterize exposure, including via inhalation and dermal sorption from air. PMID:24804279

  11. Polymeric Additives For Graphite/Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Nir, Z.

    1990-01-01

    Report describes experimental studies of properties of several graphite/epoxy composites containing polymeric additives as flexibilizing or toughening agents. Emphasizes effects of brominated polymeric additives (BPA's) with or without carboxy-terminated butadiene acrylonitrile rubber. Reviews effects of individual and combined additives on fracture toughnesses, environmental stabilities, hot/wet strengths, thermomechanical behaviors, and other mechanical properties of composites.

  12. Large Scale Flame Spread Environmental Characterization Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayman, Lauren K.; Olson, Sandra L.; Gokoghi, Suleyman A.; Brooker, John E.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Kacher, Henry F.

    2013-01-01

    Under the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Spacecraft Fire Safety Demonstration Project (SFSDP), as a risk mitigation activity in support of the development of a large-scale fire demonstration experiment in microgravity, flame-spread tests were conducted in normal gravity on thin, cellulose-based fuels in a sealed chamber. The primary objective of the tests was to measure pressure rise in a chamber as sample material, burning direction (upward/downward), total heat release, heat release rate, and heat loss mechanisms were varied between tests. A Design of Experiments (DOE) method was imposed to produce an array of tests from a fixed set of constraints and a coupled response model was developed. Supplementary tests were run without experimental design to additionally vary select parameters such as initial chamber pressure. The starting chamber pressure for each test was set below atmospheric to prevent chamber overpressure. Bottom ignition, or upward propagating burns, produced rapid acceleratory turbulent flame spread. Pressure rise in the chamber increases as the amount of fuel burned increases mainly because of the larger amount of heat generation and, to a much smaller extent, due to the increase in gaseous number of moles. Top ignition, or downward propagating burns, produced a steady flame spread with a very small flat flame across the burning edge. Steady-state pressure is achieved during downward flame spread as the pressure rises and plateaus. This indicates that the heat generation by the flame matches the heat loss to surroundings during the longer, slower downward burns. One heat loss mechanism included mounting a heat exchanger directly above the burning sample in the path of the plume to act as a heat sink and more efficiently dissipate the heat due to the combustion event. This proved an effective means for chamber overpressure mitigation for those tests producing the most total heat release and thusly was determined to be a feasible mitigation

  13. Direct Flame Impingement

    SciTech Connect

    2005-09-01

    During the DFI process, high velocity flame jets impinge upon the material being heated, creating a high heat transfer rate. As a result, refractory walls and exhaust gases are cooler, which increases thermal efficiency and lowers NOx emissions. Because the jet nozzles are located a few inches from the load, furnace size can be reduced significantly.

  14. Flame Radiation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, R. W.; Humenik, F. M.; Neely, G. M.

    1983-01-01

    Spectral and total flame radiation measurements exhibited: (1) that radiant heat flux increases with vision combustor inlet air pressure; (2) the effect of fuel atomization characteristics on radiant heat flux; and (3) that a reduction in fuel hydrogen content produces a significant increase in radiant heat flux primarily at low combustor pressures.

  15. Modeling turbulent flame propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Ashurst, W.T.

    1994-08-01

    Laser diagnostics and flow simulation techniques axe now providing information that if available fifty years ago, would have allowed Damkoehler to show how turbulence generates flame area. In the absence of this information, many turbulent flame speed models have been created, most based on Kolmogorov concepts which ignore the turbulence vortical structure, Over the last twenty years, the vorticity structure in mixing layers and jets has been shown to determine the entrainment and mixing behavior and these effects need to be duplicated by combustion models. Turbulence simulations reveal the intense vorticity structure as filaments and simulations of passive flamelet propagation show how this vorticity Creates flame area and defines the shape of the expected chemical reaction surface. Understanding how volume expansion interacts with flow structure should improve experimental methods for determining turbulent flame speed. Since the last decade has given us such powerful new tools to create and see turbulent combustion microscopic behavior, it seems that a solution of turbulent combustion within the next decade would not be surprising in the hindsight of 2004.

  16. "Magic Eraser" Flame Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landis, Arthur M.; Davies, Malonne I.; Landis, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Cleaning erasers are used to support methanol-fueled flame tests. This safe demonstration technique requires only small quantities of materials, provides clean colors for up to 45 seconds, and can be used in the classroom or the auditorium. (Contains 1 note.)

  17. Extinction of premixed H{sub 2}/air flames: Chemical kinetics and molecular diffusion effects

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yufei; Holley, Adam T.; Andac, Mustafa G.; Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.; Wang, Hai; Davis, Scott G.; Middha, Prankul

    2005-09-01

    Laminar flame speed has traditionally been used for the partial validation of flame kinetics. In most cases, however, its accurate determination requires extensive data processing and/or extrapolations, thus rendering the measurement of this fundamental flame property indirect. Additionally, the presence of flame front instabilities does not conform to the definition of laminar flame speed. This is the case for Le<1 flames, with the most notable example being ultralean H{sub 2}/air flames, which develop cellular structures at low strain rates so that determination of laminar flame speeds for such mixtures is not possible. Thus, this low-temperature regime of H{sub 2} oxidation has not been validated systematically in flames. In the present investigation, an alternative/supplemental approach is proposed that includes the experimental determination of extinction strain rates for these flames, and these rates are compared with the predictions of direct numerical simulations. This approach is meaningful for two reasons: (1) Extinction strain rates can be measured directly, as opposed to laminar flame speeds, and (2) while the unstretched lean H{sub 2}/air flames are cellular, the stretched ones are not, thus making comparisons between experiment and simulations meaningful. Such comparisons revealed serious discrepancies between experiments and simulations for ultralean H{sub 2}/air flames by using four kinetic mechanisms. Additional studies were conducted for lean and near-stoichiometric H{sub 2}/air flames diluted with various amounts of N{sub 2}. Similarly to the ultralean flames, significant discrepancies between experimental and predicted extinction strain rates were also found. To identify the possible sources of such discrepancies, the effect of uncertainties on the diffusion coefficients was assessed and an improved treatment of diffusion coefficients was advanced and implemented. Under the conditions considered in this study, the sensitivity of diffusion

  18. Occurrence and distribution of brominated flame retardants and perfluoroalkyl substances in Australian landfill leachate and biosolids.

    PubMed

    Gallen, C; Drage, D; Kaserzon, S; Baduel, C; Gallen, M; Banks, A; Broomhall, S; Mueller, J F

    2016-07-15

    The levels of perfluroalkyl substances (PFASs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDDs) were studied in Australian landfill leachate and biosolids. Leachate was collected from 13 landfill sites and biosolids were collected from 16 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), across Australia. Perfluorohexanoate (PFHxA) (12-5700ng/L) was the most abundant investigated persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic (PBT) chemical in leachate. With one exception, mean concentrations of PFASs were higher in leachate of operating landfills compared to closed landfills. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecane isomers (HBCDDs) were detected typically at operating landfills in comparatively lower concentrations than the PFASs. Decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) (<0.4-2300ng/g) and perfluoroctanesulfonate (PFOS) (

  19. Characterization of polychlorinated biphenyls and brominated flame retardants in surface soils from Surabaya, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, Muhammad; Sudaryanto, Agus; Setiawan, Iwan Eka; Riyadi, Adi Slamet; Isobe, Tomohiko; Ogawa, Shohei; Takahashi, Shin; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2011-04-01

    In this study, soil contamination by PCBs, PBDEs, HBCDs and two novel BFRs such as 1,2-bis-(2,4,6-tribromopenoxy) ethane (BTBPE) and decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) in various locations such as industrial, urban, rural, dumping site and agricultural areas of Surabaya, Indonesia has been characterized in order to evaluate their contamination status, profiles, potential sources, fate and behavior. Range and median concentrations of PCBs, PBDEs, HBCDs, BTBPE and DBDPE were ND - 9.6 (1.2), 0.069 - 24 (7.4), ND - 1.8 (0.48), ND - 1.7 (0.14) and ND - 7.6 (2.2) ng g(-1)dw, respectively. Industrial, urban and dumping areas were inventoried as the main sources of these pollutants. Decreasing gradient levels were observed for these contaminants from industrial district, urban, dumping site, rural and agricultural areas, in that order. Furthermore, organic carbon contents and proximity to the point sources were found as the major controlling factors. Contaminant profiles were characterized by the predominance of hexa-, hepta- and penta-homologues for PCBs; deca-, nona- and octa- for PBDEs and α-isomer for HBCDs. Product mixtures such as Ar1260/KC600 and Ar1254/KC500 for PCBs, deca- and octa-BDEs for PBDEs were the possible common formulations used in study area. To our knowledge, this is a first comprehensive study on characterization of soil contamination by PCBs, PBDEs and HBCDs together with two novel BFRs in a highly industrialized city located in tropical region. This study provides baseline information for establishing national monitoring programs in Indonesia. PMID:21429558

  20. Disposition of the brominated flame retardant HBCD alpha and gamma in developing mice over time

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is a developmental neurotoxicant in mice following a single exposure on postnatal day 10 (PND 10). HBCD is a mixture of 3 stereoisomers, alpha (a), beta (~) and gamma (y). Evidence oftoxicity and lack of stereoisomer studies drives the importance of ...