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Sample records for additive electronic noise

  1. Single-electron thermal noise.

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, Katsuhiko; Ono, Yukinori; Fujiwara, Akira

    2014-07-11

    We report the observation of thermal noise in the motion of single electrons in an ultimately small dynamic random access memory (DRAM). The nanometer-scale transistors that compose the DRAM resolve the thermal noise in single-electron motion. A complete set of fundamental tests conducted on this single-electron thermal noise shows that the noise perfectly follows all the aspects predicted by statistical mechanics, which include the occupation probability, the law of equipartition, a detailed balance, and the law of kT/C. In addition, the counting statistics on the directional motion (i.e., the current) of the single-electron thermal noise indicate that the individual electron motion follows the Poisson process, as it does in shot noise. PMID:25093235

  2. Forensic detection of noise addition in digital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Gang; Zhao, Yao; Ni, Rongrong; Ou, Bo; Wang, Yongbin

    2014-03-01

    We proposed a technique to detect the global addition of noise to a digital image. As an anti-forensics tool, noise addition is typically used to disguise the visual traces of image tampering or to remove the statistical artifacts left behind by other operations. As such, the blind detection of noise addition has become imperative as well as beneficial to authenticate the image content and recover the image processing history, which is the goal of general forensics techniques. Specifically, the special image blocks, including constant and strip ones, are used to construct the features for identifying noise addition manipulation. The influence of noising on blockwise pixel value distribution is formulated and analyzed formally. The methodology of detectability recognition followed by binary decision is proposed to ensure the applicability and reliability of noising detection. Extensive experimental results demonstrate the efficacy of our proposed noising detector.

  3. Further Constraints on Electron Acceleration in Solar Noise Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Prasad; Becker, Peter A.

    2006-08-01

    We reexamine the energetics of nonthermal-electron acceleration in solar noise storms. A new result is obtained for the minimum nonthermal-electron number density required to produce a Langmuir-wave population of sufficient intensity to power the noise-storm emission. We combine this constraint with the stochastic electron acceleration formalism developed by Subramanian and Becker (2005) to derive a rigorous estimate for the efficiency of the overall noise-storm emission process, beginning with nonthermal-electron acceleration and culminating in the observed radiation. We also calculate separate efficiencies for the electron acceleration Langmuir wave generation stage and the Langmuir wave noise-storm production stage. In addition, we obtain a new theoretical estimate for the energy density of the Langmuir waves in noise-storm continuum sources.

  4. Measurements of Electronic Noise in Gyroklystrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calame, J. P.

    1999-11-01

    The noise properties of millimeter-wave gyroklystron amplifiers are an important issue in the design of advanced radar and communication systems. Therefore, experimental measurements of electron beam shot noise in a 35 GHz, 225 kW, 30 dB gain, three-cavity gyroklystron have been obtained from both the input and output cavities. This intrinsic noise was initially studied without an applied carrier (i.e. at zero drive power). The noise spectrum emitted by the input cavity has a Lorentzian shape, with peak noise power densities typically reaching 6.3x10-15 W/Hz (-112 dBm/Hz), and typical 3 dB bandwidths of 160 MHz. The output cavity noise spectrum is found to be equal to the input cavity noise spectrum multiplied by the measured linear frequency response of the gyroklystron. The input cavity noise power exhibits complex variations as a function of beam current, beam velocity ratio, and circuit magnetic field. Overall, the measured noise levels at the input cavity are 0 to 5 dB lower than theoretical predictions for shot noise unaltered by collective effects, with the largest reductions occurring at high currents. This implies that space charge has a role in shielding the shot noise. The measurements also fail to show noise growth from electrostatic cyclotron instabilities; analytic theory indicates that the lack of growth is due to the finite velocity spread of the beam and operation at a modest detuning from the cyclotron frequency. Experimental measurements of phase noise in a 4 cavity, 50 dB gain, 35 GHz gyroklystron producing a saturated 200 kW carrier are also under way. Contributions to the phase noise spectrum from shot noise, 1/f noise, and extrinsic noise have been observed.

  5. [Utility of noise addition image made by using water phantom and image addition and subtraction software].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ryo; Ogawa, Masato; Mituzono, Hiroki; Aoki, Takahiro; Hayano, Mizuho; Watanabe, Yuka

    2010-08-20

    In optimizing exposures, it is very important to evaluate the impact of image noise on image quality. To realize this, there is a need to evaluate how much image noise will make the subject disease invisible. But generally it is very difficult to shoot images of different quality in a clinical examination. Thus, a method to create a noise addition image by adding the image noise to raw data has been reported. However, this approach requires a special system, so it is difficult to implement in many facilities. We have invented a method to easily create a noise addition image by using the water phantom and image add-subtract software that accompanies the device. To create a noise addition image, first we made a noise image by subtracting the water phantom with different SD. A noise addition image was then created by adding the noise image to the original image. By using this method, a simulation image with intergraded SD can be created from the original. Moreover, the noise frequency component of the created noise addition image is as same as the real image. Thus, the relationship of image quality to SD in the clinical image can be evaluated. Although this method is an easy method of LDSI creation on image data, a noise addition image can be easily created by using image addition and subtraction software and water phantom, and this can be implemented in many facilities. PMID:20953102

  6. Reduction of Additive Colored Noise Using Coupled Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohar, Vivek; Kia, Behnam; Lindner, John F.; Ditto, William L.

    We study the effect of additive colored noise on the evolution of maps and demonstrate that the deviations caused by such noise can be reduced using coupled dynamics. We consider both Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process as well as 1/fα noise in our numerical simulations. We observe that though the variance of deviations caused by noise depends on the correlations in the noise, under optimal coupling strength, it decreases by a factor equal to the number of coupled elements in the array as compared to the variance of deviations in a single isolated map. This reduction in noise levels occurs in chaotic as well as periodic regime of the maps. Lastly, we examine the effect of colored noise in chaos computing and find that coupling the chaos computing elements enhances the robustness of chaos computing.

  7. Multiplicative noise effects on electroconvection in controlling additive noise by a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Jong-Hoon

    2015-12-01

    We report multiplicative noise-induced threshold shift of electroconvection (EC) in the presence of a magnetic field H . Controlling the thermal fluctuation (i.e., additive noise) of the rodlike molecules of nematic liquid crystals by H , the EC threshold is examined at various noise levels [characterized by their intensity and cutoff frequency (fc) ]. For a sufficiently strong H (i.e., ignorable additive noise), a modified noise sensitivity characterizing the shift problem is in good agreement with experimental results for colored as well as white noise (fc→∞ ) ; until now, there was a large deviation for (sufficiently) colored noises. The present study shows that H provides us with ideal conditions for studying the corresponding Carr-Helfrich theory considering pure multiplicative noise.

  8. Multiplicative noise effects on electroconvection in controlling additive noise by a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jong-Hoon

    2015-12-01

    We report multiplicative noise-induced threshold shift of electroconvection (EC) in the presence of a magnetic field H. Controlling the thermal fluctuation (i.e., additive noise) of the rodlike molecules of nematic liquid crystals by H, the EC threshold is examined at various noise levels [characterized by their intensity and cutoff frequency (f(c))]. For a sufficiently strong H (i.e., ignorable additive noise), a modified noise sensitivity characterizing the shift problem is in good agreement with experimental results for colored as well as white noise (f(c)→∞); until now, there was a large deviation for (sufficiently) colored noises. The present study shows that H provides us with ideal conditions for studying the corresponding Carr-Helfrich theory considering pure multiplicative noise. PMID:26764708

  9. Studies of electronic noise in gyroklystrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calame, J. P.; Danly, B. G.; Garven, M.; Levush, B.

    2000-05-01

    Direct measurements of phase noise in a four-cavity, 35 GHz gyroklystron producing 50 μs pulses of 175-210 kW output power with 50-53 dB saturated gain are presented. The measurements were performed at a 10.7 MHz frequency offset from the carrier, where the noise is expected to be dominated by shot noise and where the extrinsic noise from the electron gun's pulsed power supply is manageable. At an operating point with 70 kV beam voltage, 9 A beam current, and a beam velocity ratio of 1.3, a phase noise of -149±1 dBc/Hz was measured during the production of 180 kW output power at 50 dB gain. At a higher beam current of 10 A, the measured phase noise was -146±1 dBc/Hz during production of a 200 kW output power carrier with 53 dB gain. The directly measured phase noise levels were generally within 2-3 dB of the values expected on the basis of carrier-free noise temperature measurements. Overall, the measured gyroklystron noise levels are similar to those of conventional klystrons. Also presented are analytic calculations of the growth rates expected for electrostatic cyclotron instabilities in the region between the electron gun and the input cavity in a previous three-cavity gyroklystron. Very modest perpendicular velocity spreads (rms greater than 2%) are found to completely suppress such noise growth. This lack of significant noise growth above that of bare shot noise is in agreement with experimental results.

  10. Sub-electron noise charge coupled devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, Charles E.; Bredthauer, Richard A.; Janesick, James R.; Westphal, James A.; Gunn, James E.

    1990-01-01

    A charge coupled device designed for celestial spectroscopy has achieved readout noise as low as 0.6 electrons rms. A nondestructive output circuit was operated in a special manner to read a single pixel multiple times. Off-chip electronics averaged the multiple values, reducing the random noise by the square root of the number of readouts. Charge capacity was measured to be 500,000 electrons. The device format is 1600 pixels horizontal by 64 pixels vertical. Pixel size is 28 microns square. Two output circuits are located at opposite ends of the 1600 bit CCD register. The device was thinned and operated backside illuminated at -110 degrees C. Output circuit design, layout, and operation are described. Presented data includes the photon transfer curve, noise histograms, and bar-target images down to 3 electrons signal. The test electronics are described, and future improvements are discussed.

  11. Signal processing and electronic noise in LZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaitan, D.

    2016-03-01

    The electronics of the LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) experiment, the 10-tonne dark matter detector to be installed at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), consists of low-noise dual-gain amplifiers and a 100-MHz, 14-bit data acquisition system for the TPC PMTs. Pre-prototypes of the analog amplifiers and the 32-channel digitizers were tested extensively with simulated pulses that are similar to the prompt scintillation light and the electroluminescence signals expected in LZ. These studies are used to characterize the noise and to measure the linearity of the system. By increasing the amplitude of the test signals, the effect of saturating the amplifier and the digitizers was studied. The RMS ADC noise of the digitizer channels was measured to be 1.19± 0.01 ADCC. When a high-energy channel of the amplifier is connected to the digitizer, the measured noise remained virtually unchanged, while the noise added by a low-energy channel was estimated to be 0.38 ± 0.02 ADCC (46 ± 2 μV). A test facility is under construction to study saturation, mitigate noise and measure the performance of the LZ electronics and data acquisition chain.

  12. Threshold detection in generalized non-additive signals and noise

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, D., LLNL

    1997-12-22

    The classical theory of optimum (binary-on-off) threshold detection for additive signals and generalized (i.e. nongaussian) noise is extended to the canonical nonadditive threshold situation. In the important (and usual) applications where the noise is sampled independently, a canonical threshold optimum theory is outlined here, which is found formally to parallel the earlier additive theory, including the critical properties of locally optimum Bayes detection algorithms, which are asymptotically normal and optimum as well. The important Class A clutter model provides an explicit example of optimal threshold envelope detection, for the non-additive cases of signal and noise. Various extensions are noted in the concluding section, as are selected references.

  13. Intrinsic noise power spectrum for the electronic noise in radiography image detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Sik; Kim, Eun; Shin, Choul Woo

    2015-03-01

    In order to design low-dose imaging systems, the radiography detector should have a good noise performance especially at low incident exposures. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) performance at low incident exposures is influenced by the electronic noise of readout circuits as well as the quantum noise of x-rays. Hence, analyzing the electronic noise of a detector is of importance in developing good detectors. However, the SNR value for electronic noise is zero and does not provide any useful information. Observing the standard deviation of the acquired image without exposure may confuse the analysis due to the inconsistent electronic gains of the readout circuits. Hence, it is required to find an appropriate evaluation scheme for the electronic noise. A blind electronic noise evaluation approach, which uses a set of acquired images at various incident exposures, is considered in this paper. We calculate the electronic gain and then derive an intrinsic noise power spectrum (NPS), which is independent of the electronic gain. Furthermore, we can obtain the intrinsic NPS only for the electronic noise. The proposed evaluation schemes are experimentally tested for digital x-ray images, which are obtained from various development prototypes of direct and indirect detectors. It is shown that the proposed schemes can efficiently provide an evaluation for the electronic noise performance.

  14. Time jitter versus additive noise in a game theory context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidi, Abdellatif; Boyer, Remy; Duhamel, Pierre

    2005-03-01

    Imperfectly synchronized watermark communication is almost the most hostile watermark channel. A desynchronization attack can yield a very high probability of bit error rate by simply moving the watermark from elements it has been embedded in, inhibiting hence its reliable retrieval from the original. In this paper, we adress attacks that can be modelled by an Additive White Gaussian Noise and Jitter (AWGN&J) channel in a game theory context. The AWGN&J channel was initially introduced to model local time fluctuations in the context of magnetic recording media. This channel is first briefly presented and characterized in terms of induced objective and perceptual distorsions. Also, performance loss of the one-bit watermarking Spread-Spectrum based scheme over an AWGN&J channel is derived. Then, results are applied in a game theoretic context to answer some questions such as: (i) for a given distortion budget, and from the attacker point of view, what part should be allocated to the desynchronization, and what part should be allocated to the additive noise?, (ii) from the defender point of view, what is the worst distortion? and (iii) is there means to countermeasure the attacker (limit the amount of objective distorsion)?

  15. Equivalence of time and aperture domain additive noise in ultrasound coherence

    PubMed Central

    Bottenus, Nick B.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonic echoes backscattered from diffuse media, recorded by an array transducer and appropriately focused, demonstrate coherence predicted by the van Cittert–Zernike theorem. Additive noise signals from off-axis scattering, reverberation, phase aberration, and electronic (thermal) noise can all superimpose incoherent or partially coherent signals onto the recorded echoes, altering the measured coherence. An expression is derived to describe the effect of uncorrelated random channel noise in terms of the noise-to-signal ratio. Equivalent descriptions are made in the aperture dimension to describe uncorrelated magnitude and phase apodizations of the array. Binary apodization is specifically described as an example of magnitude apodization and adjustments are presented to minimize the artifacts caused by finite signal length. The effects of additive noise are explored in short-lag spatial coherence imaging, an image formation technique that integrates the calculated coherence curve of acquired signals up to a small fraction of the array length for each lateral and axial location. A derivation of the expected contrast as a function of noise-to-signal ratio is provided and validation is performed in simulation. PMID:25618045

  16. Automatic testing device facilitates noise checks and electronic calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrold, J. L.; Weegmann, C. F.

    1967-01-01

    Automatic Digital Noise Checker determines the noise content of the many analog imputs of a data acquisition system and whether the Electronic Calibrations /EC/ on some data channels are operating properly.

  17. RANKING TEM CAMERAS BY THEIR RESPONSE TO ELECTRON SHOT NOISE

    PubMed Central

    Grob, Patricia; Bean, Derek; Typke, Dieter; Li, Xueming; Nogales, Eva; Glaeser, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate two ways in which the Fourier transforms of images that consist solely of randomly distributed electrons (shot noise) can be used to compare the relative performance of different electronic cameras. The principle is to determine how closely the Fourier transform of a given image does, or does not, approach that of an image produced by an ideal camera, i.e. one for which single-electron events are modeled as Kronecker delta functions located at the same pixels where the electrons were incident on the camera. Experimentally, the average width of the single-electron response is characterized by fitting a single Lorentzian function to the azimuthally averaged amplitude of the Fourier transform. The reciprocal of the spatial frequency at which the Lorentzian function falls to a value of 0.5 provides an estimate of the number of pixels at which the corresponding line-spread function falls to a value of 1/e. In addition, the excess noise due to stochastic variations in the magnitude of the response of the camera (for single-electron events) is characterized by the amount to which the appropriately normalized power spectrum does, or does not, exceed the total number of electrons in the image. These simple measurements provide an easy way to evaluate the relative performance of different cameras. To illustrate this point we present data for three different types of scintillator-coupled camera plus a silicon-pixel (direct detection) camera. PMID:23747527

  18. Adaptive noise Wiener filter for scanning electron microscope imaging system.

    PubMed

    Sim, K S; Teh, V; Nia, M E

    2016-01-01

    Noise on scanning electron microscope (SEM) images is studied. Gaussian noise is the most common type of noise in SEM image. We developed a new noise reduction filter based on the Wiener filter. We compared the performance of this new filter namely adaptive noise Wiener (ANW) filter, with four common existing filters as well as average filter, median filter, Gaussian smoothing filter and the Wiener filter. Based on the experiments results the proposed new filter has better performance on different noise variance comparing to the other existing noise removal filters in the experiments. PMID:26235517

  19. Investigation of noise sources in SQUID electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Clem, T.R.; Goldstein, M.J.; Purpura, J.W.; Allen, L.H.; Claassen, J.H.; Gubser, D.U.; Wolf, S.A.

    1989-03-01

    The performance of SQUID-based electronics outside a laboratory-controlled environment may be degraded from that found in laboratory operation. Investigations on superconducting tubes, wires, and sheets have been conducted to identify contributions to such noise. Results have been obtained for bulk and thin film samples utilizing both the conventional low temperature materials, as well as the new high temperature oxide materials. Experiments have been conducted to quantify flux redistribution and flux motion in superconducting samples subjected to temperature changes, temperature gradients, and magnetic field gradients. These investigations have been conducted at magnetic fields typical of many SQUID applications, with field intensities much smaller than the critical values H/sub cl/. Penetration depth effects, flux pinning effects, and flux motion effects have been observed. The various types of experiments conducted along with specific results are described.

  20. The noise-cooling tradeoff in electronic equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, Richard H.

    2001-05-01

    The noise produced by cooling air passing through electronics packages arises from two sources. One source is the noise of the air-moving fan of either an axial or centrifugal type. This noise may have tonal components and both those components and the broad band noise are dependent on the way that the fan is placed in the unit and on how close the operation is to the design operating point. Often, this can be the dominant noise source. The other source produces random noise due to the turbulent flow of air through the unit. Because the turbulent airflow is also responsible for heat transfer between the components and the air stream, we can regard this part of the noise as the irreducible noise due to cooling. If fan noise were eliminated, this part of the noise must remain. There is a relation therefore between the irreducible noise and the cooling of the unit. But the fan noise must also be considered. The relation between total airflow related noise and cooling requirements is developed in this paper.

  1. Stochastic resonance in a piecewise nonlinear model driven by multiplicative non-Gaussian noise and additive white noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yongfeng; Shen, Yajun; Tan, Jianguo

    2016-09-01

    The phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR) in a piecewise nonlinear model driven by a periodic signal and correlated noises for the cases of a multiplicative non-Gaussian noise and an additive Gaussian white noise is investigated. Applying the path integral approach, the unified colored noise approximation and the two-state model theory, the analytical expression of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is derived. It is found that conventional stochastic resonance exists in this system. From numerical computations we obtain that: (i) As a function of the non-Gaussian noise intensity, the SNR is increased when the non-Gaussian noise deviation parameter q is increased. (ii) As a function of the Gaussian noise intensity, the SNR is decreased when q is increased. This demonstrates that the effect of the non-Gaussian noise on SNR is different from that of the Gaussian noise in this system. Moreover, we further discuss the effect of the correlation time of the non-Gaussian noise, cross-correlation strength, the amplitude and frequency of the periodic signal on SR.

  2. Detection of continuous-time quaternion signals in additive noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Moreno, Jesús; Ruiz-Molina, Juan Carlos; Oya, Antonia; Quesada-Rubio, José M.

    2012-12-01

    Different kinds of quaternion signal detection problems in continuous-time by using a widely linear processing are dealt with. The suggested solutions are based on an extension of the Karhunen-Loève expansion to the quaternion domain which provides uncorrelated scalar real-valued random coefficients. This expansion presents the notable advantage of transforming the original four-dimensional eigen problem to a one-dimensional problem. Firstly, we address the problem of detecting a quaternion deterministic signal in quaternion Gaussian noise and a version of Pitcher's Theorem is given. Also the particular case of a general quaternion Wiener noise is studied and an extension of the Cameron-Martin formula is presented. Finally, the problem of detecting a quaternion random signal in quaternion white Gaussian noise is tackled. In such a case, it is shown that the detector depends on the quaternion widely linear estimator of the signal.

  3. Molecular Electronic Angular Motion Transducer Broad Band Self-Noise.

    PubMed

    Zaitsev, Dmitry; Agafonov, Vadim; Egorov, Egor; Antonov, Alexander; Shabalina, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Modern molecular electronic transfer (MET) angular motion sensors combine high technical characteristics with low cost. Self-noise is one of the key characteristics which determine applications for MET sensors. However, until the present there has not been a model describing the sensor noise in the complete operating frequency range. The present work reports the results of an experimental study of the self-noise level of such sensors in the frequency range of 0.01-200 Hz. Based on the experimental data, a theoretical model is developed. According to the model, self-noise is conditioned by thermal hydrodynamic fluctuations of the operating fluid flow in the frequency range of 0.01-2 Hz. At the frequency range of 2-100 Hz, the noise power spectral density has a specific inversely proportional dependence of the power spectral density on the frequency that could be attributed to convective processes. In the high frequency range of 100-200 Hz, the noise is conditioned by the voltage noise of the electronics module input stage operational amplifiers and is heavily reliant to the sensor electrical impedance. The presented results allow a deeper understanding of the molecular electronic sensor noise nature to suggest the ways to reduce it. PMID:26610502

  4. Molecular Electronic Angular Motion Transducer Broad Band Self-Noise

    PubMed Central

    Zaitsev, Dmitry; Agafonov, Vadim; Egorov, Egor; Antonov, Alexander; Shabalina, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Modern molecular electronic transfer (MET) angular motion sensors combine high technical characteristics with low cost. Self-noise is one of the key characteristics which determine applications for MET sensors. However, until the present there has not been a model describing the sensor noise in the complete operating frequency range. The present work reports the results of an experimental study of the self-noise level of such sensors in the frequency range of 0.01–200 Hz. Based on the experimental data, a theoretical model is developed. According to the model, self-noise is conditioned by thermal hydrodynamic fluctuations of the operating fluid flow in the frequency range of 0.01–2 Hz. At the frequency range of 2–100 Hz, the noise power spectral density has a specific inversely proportional dependence of the power spectral density on the frequency that could be attributed to convective processes. In the high frequency range of 100–200 Hz, the noise is conditioned by the voltage noise of the electronics module input stage operational amplifiers and is heavily reliant to the sensor electrical impedance. The presented results allow a deeper understanding of the molecular electronic sensor noise nature to suggest the ways to reduce it. PMID:26610502

  5. Effect of multiplicative and additive noise on genetic transcriptional regulatory mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xue-Mei; Xie, Hui-Zhang; Liu, Liang-Gang; Li, Zhi-Bing

    2009-02-01

    A multiplicative noise and an additive noise are introduced in the kinetic model of Smolen-Baxter-Byrne [P. Smolen, D.A. Baxter, J.H. Byrne, Amer. J. Physiol. Cell. Physiol. 274 (1998) 531], in which the expression of gene is controlled by protein concentration of transcriptional activator. The Fokker-Planck equation is solved and the steady-state probability distribution is obtained numerically. It is found that the multiplicative noise converts the bistability to monostability that can be regarded as a noise-induced transition. The additive noise reduces the transcription efficiency. The correlation between the multiplicative noise and the additive noise works as a genetic switch and regulates the gene transcription effectively.

  6. Suppression of shot noise and spontaneous radiation in electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko,V.

    2009-08-23

    Shot noise in the electron beam distribution is the main source of noise in high-gain FEL amplifiers, which may affect applications ranging from single- and multi-stage HGHG FELs to an FEL amplifier for coherent electron cooling. This noise also imposes a fundamental limit of about 10{sup 6} on FEL gain, after which SASE FELs saturate. There are several advantages in strongly suppressing this shot noise in the electron beam, and the corresponding spontaneous radiation. For more than a half-century, a traditional passive method has been used successfully in practical low-energy microwave electronic devices to suppress shot noise. Recently, it was proposed for this purpose in FELs. However, being passive, the method has some significant limitations and is hardly suitable for the highly inhomogeneous beams of modern high-gain FELs. I present a novel active method of suppressing, by many orders-of-magnitude, the shot noise in relativistic electron beams. I give a theoretical description of the process, and detail its fundamental limitation.

  7. [Electronic noise compensation for improving speech discrimination in airplane pilots].

    PubMed

    Matschke, R G; Pösselt, C; Veit, I; Andresen, U

    1989-02-01

    Noise exposure measurements were performed in pilots of the Federal Navy during realistic flight situations. The ambient noise levels during regular flight service were maintained at levels nearly all the time above 90 dB. To avoid occupational hearing loss, the "Noise Injury Prevention Code" issued by the insurers would demand wearing personal ear protection, e.g. ear plugs. But such equipment in the aircraft cockpit would have precisely the opposite effect, because one of the reasons for possible damage to hearing is radio communication. To be able to understand radio traffic in spite of the noisy environment, headphone volume must be raised above the noise of the engines. The use of ear plugs can be of only limited value. Whereas pilots with normal hearing show only little impairment of speech intelligibility, those with noise-induced hearing loss show substantial impairment that varies in proportion to their hearing loss. Communication abilities may be drastically reduced which may compromise the reliability of radio traffic. Cockpit noise has its maximum intensity around 125 Hz and flight helmets and ear defenders are not very effective in low frequency ranges. Sennheiser electronic KG developed an active noise compensation circuit, which makes use of the "anti noise" principle. Here the outside noises picked up by two microphones integrated into the headset are processed electronically in such a way that they largely neutralise the original noise. It had to be made sure that the radio traffic signal was not also compensated and that the signal to noise ratio was clearly increased.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2706059

  8. Collective microdynamics and noise suppression in dispersive electron beam transport

    SciTech Connect

    Gover, Avraham; Dyunin, Egor; Duchovni, Tamir; Nause, Ariel

    2011-12-15

    A general formulation is presented for deep collective interaction micro-dynamics in dispersive e-beam transport. In the regime of transversely coherent interaction, the formulation is applicable to both coherent and random temporal modulation of the electron beam. We demonstrate its use for determining the conditions for suppressing beam current noise below the classical shot-noise level by means of transport through a dispersive section with a small momentum compaction parameter.

  9. Seperation of Ikonos Sensor's Electronic Noise from Atmospheric Induced Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobashery, M. R.; Dastfard, M.

    2013-09-01

    The quality of satellite images has always been of particular importance in remote sensing. Signals received from satellite sensors include some signals other than those of target signal that may be classified totally as the atmospheric effect and the sensor induced noise. Separating non-target signals and attempting in removing them from images is essential. One method for measuring and removing non-target signals is that of atmospheric correction by Dark Object Subtraction (DOS). This method is based on the sensor's output for the targets that should have almost zero reflectance in a given band. Next, the obtained value will be deducted from the remaining pixels values; regardless of the type of the sensors. Each Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) has its own noise behavior; therefore, the amount deducted values from each pixel can be different for each CCD unit and type. Among the various noises of the CCD and their related electronic circuits, dark current noise, non-uniform pixels noise and read noise were selected to be studied in this paper. The data were obtained from multispectral sensor images of IKONOS. This sensor can provide images in two forms of Panchromatic (PAN) and Multispectral (MS). The results of this study showed that the amount of dark object pixels and the total amount of CCD noises in each band are different. Separation of the noises introduced in this paper from the amount of dark object pixel values can result in an upgraded method for image atmosphere corrections.

  10. Algorithm for loading shot noise microbunching in multi-dimensional, free-electron laser simulation codes

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, William M.

    2002-03-25

    We discuss the underlying reasoning behind and the details of the numerical algorithm used in the GINGER free-electron laser(FEL) simulation code to load the initial shot noise microbunching on the electron beam. In particular, we point out that there are some additional subtleties which must be followed for multi-dimensional codes which are not necessary for one-dimensional formulations. Moreover, requiring that the higher harmonics of the microbunching also be properly initialized with the correct statistics leads to additional complexities. We present some numerical results including the predicted incoherent, spontaneous emission as tests of the shot noise algorithm's correctness.

  11. Algorithm for loading shot noise microbunching in multidimensional, free-electron laser simulation codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawley, William M.

    2002-07-01

    We discuss the underlying reasoning behind and the details of the numerical algorithm used in the GINGER free-electron laser simulation code to load the initial shot noise microbunching on the electron beam. In particular, we point out that there are some additional subtleties which must be followed for multidimensional codes which are not necessary for one-dimensional formulations. Moreover, requiring that the higher harmonics of the microbunching also be properly initialized with the correct statistics leads to additional complexities. We present some numerical results including the predicted incoherent, spontaneous emission as tests of the shot noise algorithm's correctness.

  12. Noise-Storm Continua: Power Estimates for Electron Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Prasad; Becker, Peter A.

    2004-11-01

    We use a generic stochastic acceleration formalism to examine the power Lin (erg s-1) input to non-thermal electrons that cause noise-storm continuum emission. The analytical approach includes the derivation of the Green’s function for a general second-order Fermi process, and its application to obtain the particular solution for the non-thermal electron distribution resulting from the acceleration of a Maxwellian source in the corona. We compare Lin with the power Lout observed in noise-storm radiation. Using typical values for the various parameters, we find that Lin ˜ 1023 1026 erg s-1, yielding an efficiency estimate η ≡ Lout/Lin in the range 10-10 ≲ η ≲ 10-6 for this non-thermal acceleration/radiation process. These results reflect the efficiency of the overall process, starting from electron acceleration and culminating in the observed noise-storm emission.

  13. Thermal magnetic field noise: electron optics and decoherence.

    PubMed

    Uhlemann, Stephan; Müller, Heiko; Zach, Joachim; Haider, Max

    2015-04-01

    Thermal magnetic field noise from magnetic and non-magnetic conductive parts close to the electron beam recently has been identified as a reason for decoherence in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Here, we report about new experimental results from measurements for a layered structure of magnetic and non-magnetic materials. For a simplified version of this setup and other situations we derive semi-analytical models in order to predict the strength, bandwidth and spatial correlation of the noise fields. The results of the simulations are finally compared to previous and new experimental data in a quantitative manner. PMID:25499019

  14. Noise in two-color electronic distance meter measurements revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langbein, J.

    2004-01-01

    Frequent, high-precision geodetic data have temporally correlated errors. Temporal correlations directly affect both the estimate of rate and its standard error; the rate of deformation is a key product from geodetic measurements made in tectonically active areas. Various models of temporally correlated errors are developed and these provide relations between the power spectral density and the data covariance matrix. These relations are applied to two-color electronic distance meter (EDM) measurements made frequently in California over the past 15-20 years. Previous analysis indicated that these data have significant random walk error. Analysis using the noise models developed here indicates that the random walk model is valid for about 30% of the data. A second 30% of the data can be better modeled with power law noise with a spectral index between 1 and 2, while another 30% of the data can be modeled with a combination of band-pass-filtered plus random walk noise. The remaining 10% of the data can be best modeled as a combination of band-pass-filtered plus power law noise. This band-pass-filtered noise is a product of an annual cycle that leaks into adjacent frequency bands. For time spans of more than 1 year these more complex noise models indicate that the precision in rate estimates is better than that inferred by just the simpler, random walk model of noise.

  15. Shot noise in an electron waveguide {radical}(NOT) gate

    SciTech Connect

    Reichl, Linda E.; Snyder, Michael G.

    2006-07-15

    We present a calculation of the shot noise in a ballistic electron waveguide {radical}(NOT) gate. A general expression for the shot noise in the leads connected to these types of gates is shown. We then parametrize an S-matrix which qualitatively describes the action of a {radical}(NOT) gate previously found through numerical methods for GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As based waveguide systems. Using this S-matrix, the shot noise in a single output lead and across two output leads is calculated. We find that the measurement of the shot noise across two output leads allows for the determination of the fidelity of the gate itself.

  16. Finite shot noise and electron heating at quantized conductance in high-mobility quantum point contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muro, Tatsuya; Nishihara, Yoshitaka; Norimoto, Shota; Ferrier, Meydi; Arakawa, Tomonori; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Ihn, Thomas; Rössler, Clemens; Ensslin, Klaus; Reichl, Christian; Wegscheider, Werner

    2016-05-01

    We report a precise experimental study on the shot noise of a quantum point contact (QPC) fabricated in a GaAs/AlGaAs based high-mobility two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). The combination of unprecedented cleanliness and very high measurement accuracy has enabled us to discuss the Fano factor to characterize the shot noise with a precision of 0.01. We observed that the shot noise at zero magnetic field exhibits a slight enhancement exceeding the single particle theoretical prediction, and that it gradually decreases as a perpendicular magnetic field is applied. We also confirmed that this additional noise completely vanishes in the quantum Hall regime. These phenomena can be explained by the electron heating effect near the QPC, which is suppressed with increasing magnetic field.

  17. Influence of mechanical noise inside a scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudenzi de Faria, Marcelo; Haddab, Yassine Le Gorrec, Yann; Lutz, Philippe

    2015-04-15

    The scanning electron microscope is becoming a popular tool to perform tasks that require positioning, manipulation, characterization, and assembly of micro-components. However, some of these applications require a higher level of performance with respect to dynamics and precision of positioning. One limiting factor is the presence of unidentified noises and disturbances. This work aims to study the influence of mechanical disturbances generated by the environment and by the microscope, identifying how these can affect elements in the vacuum chamber. To achieve this objective, a dedicated setup, including a high-resolution vibrometer, was built inside the microscope. This work led to the identification and quantification of main disturbances and noise sources acting on a scanning electron microscope. Furthermore, the effects of external acoustic excitations were analysed. Potential applications of these results include noise compensation and real-time control for high accuracy tasks.

  18. A laboratory study of the perceived benefit of additional noise attenuation by houses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flindell, I. H.

    1983-01-01

    Two Experiments were conducted to investigate the perceived benefit of additional house attenuation against aircraft flyover noise. First, subjects made annoyance judgments in a simulated living room while an operative window with real and dummy storm windows was manipulated in full view of those subjects. Second, subjects made annoyance judgments in an anechoic audiometric test chamber of frequency shaped noise signals having spectra closely matched to those of the aircraft flyover noises reproduced in the first experiment. These stimuli represented the aircraft flyover noises in levels and spectra but without the situational and visual cues present in the simulated living room. Perceptual constancy theory implies that annoyance tends to remain constant despite reductions in noise level caused by additional attenuation of which the subjects are fully aware. This theory was supported when account was taken for a reported annoyance overestimation for certain spectra and for a simulated condition cue overreaction.

  19. Quasi-thermal noise measurements on STEREO: Kinetic temperature deduction using electron shot noise model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinović, M. M.; Zaslavsky, A.; Maksimović, M.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Å egan, S.; Zouganelis, I.; Salem, C.; Pulupa, M.; Bale, S. D.

    2016-01-01

    Quasi-thermal noise (QTN) spectroscopy is an accurate technique for in situ measurements of electron density and temperature in space plasmas. A QTN spectrum is determined by plasma and antenna properties. On STEREO/WAVES, since the antennas are relatively short and thick, the QTN spectrum is dominated by electron shot noise, especially at low frequencies, which reduces the accuracy of the method. Here we use the STEREO low-frequency receiver, proton density measured by Plasma and Suprathermal Ion Composition instrument, and a QTN and shot noise models to provide electron temperature data from both STEREO A and B spacecraft. This derivation is important since no reliable measurements of electron temperature exist on board these spacecraft. We compare the results of our analysis with the electron temperature provided by the Wind spacecraft during the period when Wind and STEREO B were close to each other. The comparison shows that our technique is reliable when results are integrated on a time scale of the order of 50 to 60 min.

  20. Generation of broadband electrostatic noise by electron acoustic solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Dubouloz, N.; Pottelette, R.; Malingre, M. ); Treumann, R.A. )

    1991-02-01

    Broadband electrostatic noise (BEN) bursts whose amplitude sometimes reaches about 100 mV m{sup {minus}1} have been observed by the Viking satellite in the dayside auroral zone. These emissions have been shown to be greatly influenced by nonlinear effects and to occur simultaneously with the observation of particle distributions favouring the destabilization of the electron acoustic mode. It is shown that electron acoustic solitons passing by the satellite would generate spectra that can explain the high-frequency part of BEN, above the electron plasma frequency.

  1. Ultimate capacity of linear time-invariant bosonic channels with additive Gaussian noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Bardhan, Bhaskar; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2016-03-01

    Fiber-optic communications are moving to coherent detection in order to increase their spectral efficiency, i.e., their channel capacity per unit bandwidth. At power levels below the threshold for significant nonlinear effects, the channel model for such operation a linear time-invariant filter followed by additive Gaussian noise is one whose channel capacity is well known from Shannon's noisy channel coding theorem. The fiber channel, however, is really a bosonic channel, meaning that its ultimate classical information capacity must be determined from quantum-mechanical analysis, viz. from the Holevo-Schumacher-Westmoreland (HSW) theorem. Based on recent results establishing the HSW capacity of a linear (lossy or amplifying) channel with additive Gaussian noise, we provide a general continuous-time result, namely the HSW capacity of a linear time-invariant (LTI) bosonic channel with additive Gaussian noise arising from a thermal environment. In particular, we treat quasi-monochromatic communication under an average power constraint through a channel comprised of a stable LTI filter that may be attenuating at all frequencies or amplifying at some frequencies and attenuating at others. Phase-insensitive additive Gaussian noise-associated with the continuous-time Langevin noise operator needed to preserve free-field commutator brackets is included at the filter output. We compare the resulting spectral efficiencies with corresponding results for heterodyne and homodyne detection over the same channel to assess the increased spectral efficiency that might be realized with optimum quantum reception.

  2. A stochastic multi-symplectic scheme for stochastic Maxwell equations with additive noise

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Jialin; Zhang, Liying

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we investigate a stochastic multi-symplectic method for stochastic Maxwell equations with additive noise. Based on the stochastic version of variational principle, we find a way to obtain the stochastic multi-symplectic structure of three-dimensional (3-D) stochastic Maxwell equations with additive noise. We propose a stochastic multi-symplectic scheme and show that it preserves the stochastic multi-symplectic conservation law and the local and global stochastic energy dissipative properties, which the equations themselves possess. Numerical experiments are performed to verify the numerical behaviors of the stochastic multi-symplectic scheme.

  3. NB-PLC channel modelling with cyclostationary noise addition & OFDM implementation for smart grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Togis; Gupta, K. K.

    2016-03-01

    Power line communication (PLC) technology can be a viable solution for the future ubiquitous networks because it provides a cheaper alternative to other wired technology currently being used for communication. In smart grid Power Line Communication (PLC) is used to support communication with low rate on low voltage (LV) distribution network. In this paper, we propose the channel modelling of narrowband (NB) PLC in the frequency range 5 KHz to 500 KHz by using ABCD parameter with cyclostationary noise addition. Behaviour of the channel was studied by the addition of 11KV/230V transformer, by varying load location and load. Bit error rate (BER) Vs signal to noise ratio SNR) was plotted for the proposed model by employing OFDM. Our simulation results based on the proposed channel model show an acceptable performance in terms of bit error rate versus signal to noise ratio, which enables communication required for smart grid applications.

  4. Random attractors for the stochastic coupled fractional Ginzburg-Landau equation with additive noise

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Ji E-mail: 530282863@qq.com; Li, Ping E-mail: 530282863@qq.com; Zhang, Jia; Liao, Ou

    2015-10-15

    This paper is concerned with the stochastic coupled fractional Ginzburg-Landau equation with additive noise. We first transform the stochastic coupled fractional Ginzburg-Landau equation into random equations whose solutions generate a random dynamical system. Then we prove the existence of random attractor for random dynamical system.

  5. Numerical modeling of electron noise in nanoscale Si devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungemann, Christoph

    2007-06-01

    A deterministic solver for the Langevin Boltzmann equation is presented, which is based on a spherical harmonics expansion, box integration, and a maximum entropy dissipation principle. The numerical properties of this method are very similar to the classical approaches (drift-diffusion or hydrodynamic models), and the same numerical methods can be used (ac analysis, adjoint method, harmonic balance, etc). Since the equations can be solved directly in the frequency domain, the full frequency range down to zero frequency is accessible. In addition, rare events can be simulated without excessive CPU times. This is demonstrated for a silicon NPN BJT. Not only the terminal current noise is calculated, but also the spatial origin of noise and the corresponding Green's functions.

  6. Adjustment on subjective annoyance of low frequency noise by adding additional sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Guo-qing; Li, Zheng-guang; Zhang, Bang-jun; Shi, Yao

    2011-11-01

    Structure-borne noise originating from a heat pump unit was selected to study the influence on subjective annoyance of low frequency noise (LFN) combined with additional sound. Paired comparison test was used for evaluating the subjective annoyance of LFN combined with different sound pressure levels (SPL) of pink noise, frequency-modulated pure tones (FM pure tones) and natural sounds. The results showed that, with pink noise of 250-1000 Hz combined with the original LFN, the subjective annoyance value (SAV) first dropped then rose with increasing SPL. When SPL of the pink noise was 15-25 dB, SAV was lower than that of the original LFN. With pink noise of frequency 250-20,000 Hz added to LFN, SAV increased linearly with increasing SPL. SAV and the psychoacoustic annoyance value (PAV) obtained by semi-theoretical formulas were well correlated. The determination coefficient ( R2) was 0.966 and 0.881, respectively, when the frequency range of the pink noise was 250-1000 and 250-20,000 Hz. When FM pure tones with central frequencies of 500, 2000 and 8000 Hz, or natural sounds (including the sound of singing birds, flowing water, wind or ticking clock) were, respectively, added to the original sound, the SAV increased as the SPL of the added sound increased. However, when a FM pure tone of 15 dB with a central frequency of 2000 Hz and a modulation frequency of 10 Hz was added, the SAV was lower than that of the original LFN. With SPL and central frequency held invariable, the SAV declined primarily when modulation frequency increased. With SPL and modulation frequency held invariable, the SAV became lowest when the central frequency was 2000 Hz. This showed a preferable correlation between SAV and fluctuation extent of FM pure tones.

  7. On estimating the phase of periodic waveform in additive Gaussian noise, part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, L. L.

    1984-11-01

    Motivated by advances in signal processing technology that support more complex algorithms, a new look is taken at the problem of estimating the phase and other parameters of a periodic waveform in additive Gaussian noise. The general problem was introduced and the maximum a posteriori probability criterion with signal space interpretation was used to obtain the structures of optimum and some suboptimum phase estimators for known constant frequency and unknown constant phase with an a priori distribution. Optimal algorithms are obtained for some cases where the frequency is a parameterized function of time with the unknown parameters and phase having a joint a priori distribution. In the last section, the intrinsic and extrinsic geometry of hypersurfaces is introduced to provide insight to the estimation problem for the small noise and large noise cases.

  8. 21 CFR 874.1120 - Electronic noise generator for audiometric testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electronic noise generator for audiometric testing... noise generator for audiometric testing. (a) Identification. An electronic noise generator for audiometric testing is a device that consists of a swept frequency generator, an amplifier, and an...

  9. 21 CFR 874.1120 - Electronic noise generator for audiometric testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electronic noise generator for audiometric testing... noise generator for audiometric testing. (a) Identification. An electronic noise generator for audiometric testing is a device that consists of a swept frequency generator, an amplifier, and an...

  10. 21 CFR 874.1120 - Electronic noise generator for audiometric testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electronic noise generator for audiometric testing... noise generator for audiometric testing. (a) Identification. An electronic noise generator for audiometric testing is a device that consists of a swept frequency generator, an amplifier, and an...

  11. 21 CFR 874.1120 - Electronic noise generator for audiometric testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electronic noise generator for audiometric testing... noise generator for audiometric testing. (a) Identification. An electronic noise generator for audiometric testing is a device that consists of a swept frequency generator, an amplifier, and an...

  12. 21 CFR 874.1120 - Electronic noise generator for audiometric testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electronic noise generator for audiometric testing... noise generator for audiometric testing. (a) Identification. An electronic noise generator for audiometric testing is a device that consists of a swept frequency generator, an amplifier, and an...

  13. Sparsity based noise removal from low dose scanning electron microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, A.; Fodor, P. S.

    2015-03-01

    Scanning electron microscopes are some of the most versatile tools for imaging materials with nanometer resolution. However, images collected at high scan rates to increase throughput and avoid sample damage, suffer from low signalto- noise ratio (SNR) as a result of the Poisson distributed shot noise associated with the electron production and interaction with the surface imaged. The signal is further degraded by additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) from the detection electronics. In this work, denoising frameworks are applied to this type of images, taking advantage of their sparsity character, along with a methodology for determining the AWGN. A variance stabilization technique is applied to the raw data followed by a patch-based denoising algorithm. Results are presented both for images with known levels of mixed Poisson-Gaussian noise, and for raw images. The quality of the image reconstruction is assessed based both on the PSNR as well as on measures specific to the application of the data collected. These include accurate identification of objects of interest and structural similarity. High-quality results are recovered from noisy observations collected at short dwell times that avoid sample damage.

  14. Noise variance analysis using a flat panel x-ray detector: A method for additive noise assessment with application to breast CT applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Kai; Huang, Shih-Ying; Packard, Nathan J.; Boone, John M.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: A simplified linear model approach was proposed to accurately model the response of a flat panel detector used for breast CT (bCT). Methods: Individual detector pixel mean and variance were measured from bCT projection images acquired both in air and with a polyethylene cylinder, with the detector operating in both fixed low gain and dynamic gain mode. Once the coefficients of the linear model are determined, the fractional additive noise can be used as a quantitative metric to evaluate the system's efficiency in utilizing x-ray photons, including the performance of different gain modes of the detector. Results: Fractional additive noise increases as the object thickness increases or as the radiation dose to the detector decreases. For bCT scan techniques on the UC Davis prototype scanner (80 kVp, 500 views total, 30 frames/s), in the low gain mode, additive noise contributes 21% of the total pixel noise variance for a 10 cm object and 44% for a 17 cm object. With the dynamic gain mode, additive noise only represents approximately 2.6% of the total pixel noise variance for a 10 cm object and 7.3% for a 17 cm object. Conclusions: The existence of the signal-independent additive noise is the primary cause for a quadratic relationship between bCT noise variance and the inverse of radiation dose at the detector. With the knowledge of the additive noise contribution to experimentally acquired images, system modifications can be made to reduce the impact of additive noise and improve the quantum noise efficiency of the bCT system.

  15. Sub-additivity in Electron Emission from GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunkow, Evan; Clayburn, Nathan; Becker, Maria; Jones, Eric; Batelaan, Herman; Gay, Timothy

    2016-05-01

    When two spatially-overlapped laser pulses (775 nm center wavelength, 75 fs duration) are incident on an untreated <100> GaAs crystal surface, the electron emission rate depends on the temporal separation between the two pulses. We have shown that for delays between 0.2 and 1000ps, the emission rate is ``sub-additive'', i.e., is lower than when the beams have separation >> 1 ns. We believe the cause of this sub-additivity is an increase in reflectance and transmittance due to electrons occupying the excited state of the GaAs. We are now able to manipulate the magnitude of the sub-additivity by changing the number of electrons that are in the excited state. Sub-additivity is not observed with tungsten tip surfaces which have no excited state. Funded by NSF PHY-1505794, EPSCoR IIIA-1430519, and NSF 1306565 (HB).

  16. Additive non-Gaussian noise attacks on the scalar Costa scheme (SCS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzschoppe, Roman; Bauml, Robert; Fischer, Robert; Huber, Johannes; Kaup, Andre

    2005-03-01

    The additive attack public mutual information game is explicitly solved for one of the simplest quantization based watermarking schemes, the scalar Costa scheme (SCS). It is a zero-sum game played between the embedder and the attacker, and the payoff function is the mutual information. The solution of the game, a subgame perfect nash equilibrium, is found by backward induction. Therefore, the Blahut-Arimoto algorithm is employed for numerically optimizing the mutual information over noise distributions. Although the worst case distribution is in general strongly non-Gaussian, the capacity degradation compared to a suboptimal Gaussian noise attack is quite small. The loss, if the embedder optimizes SCS for a Gaussian attack but the worst case attack is employed, is negligible.

  17. Effect of Noise on DNA Sequencing via Transverse Electronic Transport

    PubMed Central

    Krems, Matt; Zwolak, Michael; Pershin, Yuriy V.; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Previous theoretical studies have shown that measuring the transverse current across DNA strands while they translocate through a nanopore or channel may provide a statistically distinguishable signature of the DNA bases, and may thus allow for rapid DNA sequencing. However, fluctuations of the environment, such as ionic and DNA motion, introduce important scattering processes that may affect the viability of this approach to sequencing. To understand this issue, we have analyzed a simple model that captures the role of this complex environment in electronic dephasing and its ability to remove charge carriers from current-carrying states. We find that these effects do not strongly influence the current distributions due to the off-resonant nature of tunneling through the nucleotides—a result we expect to be a common feature of transport in molecular junctions. In particular, only large scattering strengths, as compared to the energetic gap between the molecular states and the Fermi level, significantly alter the form of the current distributions. Since this gap itself is quite large, the current distributions remain protected from this type of noise, further supporting the possibility of using transverse electronic transport measurements for DNA sequencing. PMID:19804730

  18. Complete positivity, finite-temperature effects, and additivity of noise for time-local qubit dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lankinen, Juho; Lyyra, Henri; Sokolov, Boris; Teittinen, Jose; Ziaei, Babak; Maniscalco, Sabrina

    2016-05-01

    We present a general model of qubit dynamics which entails pure dephasing and dissipative time-local master equations. This allows us to describe the combined effect of thermalization and dephasing beyond the usual Markovian approximation. We investigate the complete positivity conditions and introduce a heuristic model that is always physical and provides the correct Markovian limit. We study the effects of temperature on the non-Markovian behavior of the system and show that the noise additivity property discussed by Yu and Eberly [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 140403 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.140403] holds beyond the Markovian limit.

  19. Recursive ideal observer detection of known M-ary signals in multiplicative and additive Gaussian noise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Painter, J. H.; Gupta, S. C.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents the derivation of the recursive algorithms necessary for real-time digital detection of M-ary known signals that are subject to independent multiplicative and additive Gaussian noises. The motivating application is minimum probability of error detection of digital data-link messages aboard civil aircraft in the earth reflection multipath environment. For each known signal, the detector contains one Kalman filter and one probability computer. The filters estimate the multipath disturbance. The estimates and the received signal drive the probability computers. Outputs of all the computers are compared in amplitude to give the signal decision. The practicality and usefulness of the detector are extensively discussed.

  20. Noise

    MedlinePlus

    Noise is all around you, from televisions and radios to lawn mowers and washing machines. Normally, you ... sensitive structures of the inner ear and cause noise-induced hearing loss. More than 30 million Americans ...

  1. Precision measurements with the single electron transistor: Noise and backaction in the normal and superconducting state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turek, Benjamin Anthony

    This thesis presents measurements of noise effects introduced by the Single Electron Transistor (SET) as it measures a nanoelectronic system, the single electron box/Cooper pair box. We consider the SET as a nanoscale charge amplifier, and show that the input noise of this amplifier---its "backaction"---can have a marked or even dominant effect on the system the SET measures. We report theoretical motivation and experimental results in both the normal and superconducting states. The SET is a nanoelectronic, three-terminal, tunnel junction device, where a capacitively coupled input voltage modulates a drain-source current serving as the amplifier output. As a charge amplifier, it has been able to produce some of the fastest and most precise charge measurements currently possible. We use the SET to measure the single electron box/Cooper pair box, a nanoscale circuit where a capacitively coupled voltage modulates the tunneling of single electrons or Cooper pairs on to and off of an isolated metallic island. Two different theoretical treatments of backaction effects motivate our experiments in the normal and superconducting states. In the normal state, backaction is modeled using a master equation for the coupled box-SET system. In the superconducting state, a density matrix treatment of the SET coupled to a qubit produces predictions about superconducting SET backaction on the Cooper pair box that are understood as quantum noise acting on a coherent two-level system. Samples were measured in an RF-SET configuration in a dilution refrigerator. A charge-noise vetoing algorithm was implemented to permit extremely precise measurements of time-averaged box behavior. Detailed measurements of the SET/box system as the we vary the operating parameters of the SET confirm our understanding of SET backaction. Fast time-domain measurements in the superconducting state are discussed as an additional tool to measure the SET's effects on the Cooper pair box. Additional experiments

  2. Does the Finite Size of Electrons Affect Quantum Noise in Electronic Devices?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colomés, E.; Marian, D.; Oriols, X.

    2015-10-01

    Quantum transport is commonly studied with the use of quasi-particle infinite- extended states. This leads to a powerful formalism, the scattering-states theory, able to capture in compact formulas quantities of interest, such as average current, noise, etc.. However, when investigating the spatial size-dependence of quasi-particle wave packets in quantum noise with exchange and tunneling, unexpected new terms appear in the quantum noise expression. For this purpose, the two particle transmission and reflection probabilities for two initial one-particle wave packets (with opposite central momentums) spatially localized at each side of a potential barrier are studied. After the interaction, each wave packet splits into a transmitted and a reflected component. It can be shown that the probability of detecting two (identically injected) electrons at the same side of the barrier is different from zero in very common (single or double barrier) scenarios. This originates an increase of quantum noise which cannot be obtained through the scattering states formalism.

  3. High- Tc dc SQUID readout electronics with low noise and high bandwidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, D. F.; Itozaki, H.

    2006-10-01

    Using AD797 low noise op amps and 2SA1048 low noise transistors, we have developed a composite preamplifier for use in dc SQUID readout electronics. This preamplifier has a small dc drift and super low noise at high frequencies. The equivalent input voltage noise of the preamplifier is about 0.35 nV/√Hz from 100 kHz to 10 MHz. Using this preamplifier, we developed dc SQUID readout electronics having low noise and high bandwidth. Used with a 3 mm2 high-Tc dc SQUID, the white flux noise was about 18 μΦ0/√Hz above 100 kHz and the FLL bandwidth was about 2 MHz. This readout electronics can be used for the applications of SQUID-based NDE and SQUID-based NQR.

  4. A method for predicting DCT-based denoising efficiency for grayscale images corrupted by AWGN and additive spatially correlated noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubel, Aleksey S.; Lukin, Vladimir V.; Egiazarian, Karen O.

    2015-03-01

    Results of denoising based on discrete cosine transform for a wide class of images corrupted by additive noise are obtained. Three types of noise are analyzed: additive white Gaussian noise and additive spatially correlated Gaussian noise with middle and high correlation levels. TID2013 image database and some additional images are taken as test images. Conventional DCT filter and BM3D are used as denoising techniques. Denoising efficiency is described by PSNR and PSNR-HVS-M metrics. Within hard-thresholding denoising mechanism, DCT-spectrum coefficient statistics are used to characterize images and, subsequently, denoising efficiency for them. Results of denoising efficiency are fitted for such statistics and efficient approximations are obtained. It is shown that the obtained approximations provide high accuracy of prediction of denoising efficiency.

  5. Measurements of plasma quasi-thermal noise on STEREO spacecraft and plasma temperature deduction using antenna electron shot noise model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinović, M.; Zaslavsky, A.; Maksimovic, M.; Zouganelis, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Quasi-thermal noise spectroscopy is very accurate technique for in situ measurements of electron density and temperature in space plasmas. This technique uses the voltage fluctuation spectrum, which is ubiquitous in interplanetary space, obtained by an electric antenna. It is independent of antenna orientation if velocity distribution function of plasma particles is considered to be isotropic. On STEREO/WAVES antennas electron shot noise spectrum dominates because of large antenna surface area, especially at lower frequencies. This feature of antennas disables simultaneous measurements of electron density and temperature. However, technique may work accurately in high-density filamentary structures, where Debye length is small. In this paper, it has been illustrated on magnetic clouds. Obtained results have been used to recalibrate the data of PLASTIC instrument. Further on, in unperturbed solar wind, electron shot noise has been used to infer electron temperature. Electron density data, necessary in data processing, has been estimated from recalibrated PLASTIC data. For this purpose, data of both STEREO A and STEREO B spacecraft have been processed by selecting only spectra from free solar wind.

  6. Evaluation of the additive noise of a flat panel detector and its effect on cone-beam CT applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kai; Huang, Shih-Ying C.; Packard, Nathan J.; Boone, John M.

    2009-02-01

    Cone-beam systems designed for breast cancer detection bear a unique radiation dose limitation and are vulnerable to the additive noise from the detector. Additive noise is the signal fluctuation from detector elements and is independent of the incident exposure level. In this study, two different approaches (single pixel based and region of interest based) to measure the additive noise were explored using continuously acquired air images at different exposure levels, with both raw images and flat-field corrected images. The influence from two major factors, inter-pixel variance and image lag, were studied. The pixel variance measured from dark images was used as the gold standard (for the entire detector 15.12+/-1.3 ADU2) for comparison. Image noise propagation through reconstruction procedures was also investigated and a mathematically derived quadratic relationship between the image noise and the inverse of the radiation dose was confirmed with experiment data. The additive noise level was proved to affect the CT image noise as the second order coefficient and thus determines the lower limit of the scan radiation dose, above which the scanner operates at quantum limited region and utilizes the x-ray photon most efficiently.

  7. Design of thermal-noise-harnessing single-electron circuit for efficient signal propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirashima, Ryo; Oya, Takahide

    2016-06-01

    We propose a new single-electron (SE) circuit that can improve the signal propagation speed by harnessing thermal noise efficiently. Generally, an SE circuit has some weaknesses. It is very sensitive to thermal noise and it takes a long time for signal propagation. To solve these problems, we focus on a unique function at an output terminal (an axon) of a neuron that can improve the signal propagation speed because of its distinctive structure. It is expected that a new high-speed SE circuit can be realized by mimicking the structure of the neuron. Here, we indicate the possibility of improving the signal propagation speed by harnessing the thermal noise in one-dimensional neuromorphic single-electron oscillators. Moreover, we designed a two-dimensional neuromorphic single-electron oscillator as an advanced circuit and confirmed its tolerance to thermal noise. Our study will be useful for constructing novel devices that actively use noise energy in the future.

  8. Direct Signal-to-Noise Quality Comparison between an Electronic and Conventional Stethoscope aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshburn, Thomas; Cole, Richard; Ebert, Doug; Bauer, Pete

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Evaluation of heart, lung, and bowel sounds is routinely performed with the use of a stethoscope to help detect a broad range of medical conditions. Stethoscope acquired information is even more valuable in a resource limited environments such as the International Space Station (ISS) where additional testing is not available. The high ambient noise level aboard the ISS poses a specific challenge to auscultation by stethoscope. An electronic stethoscope's ambient noise-reduction, greater sound amplification, recording capabilities, and sound visualization software may be an advantage to a conventional stethoscope in this environment. Methods: A single operator rated signal-to-noise quality from a conventional stethoscope (Littman 2218BE) and an electronic stethoscope (Litmann 3200). Borborygmi, pulmonic, and cardiac sound quality was ranked with both stethoscopes. Signal-to-noise rankings were preformed on a 1 to 10 subjective scale with 1 being inaudible, 6 the expected quality in an emergency department, 8 the expected quality in a clinic, and 10 the clearest possible quality. Testing took place in the Japanese Pressurized Module (JPM), Unity (Node 2), Destiny (US Lab), Tranquility (Node 3), and the Cupola of the International Space Station. All examinations were conducted at a single point in time. Results: The electronic stethoscope's performance ranked higher than the conventional stethoscope for each body sound in all modules tested. The electronic stethoscope's sound quality was rated between 7 and 10 in all modules tested. In comparison, the traditional stethoscope's sound quality was rated between 4 and 7. The signal to noise ratio of borborygmi showed the biggest difference between stethoscopes. In the modules tested, the auscultation of borborygmi was rated between 5 and 7 by the conventional stethoscope and consistently 10 by the electronic stethoscope. Discussion: This stethoscope comparison was limited to a single operator. However, we

  9. Electronic linearization of piezoelectric actuators and noise budget in scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisi, G.; Santucci, A.; Carlà, M.; Dolci, D.; Lanzi, L.

    2006-07-01

    The maximum resolution achievable with a scanning probe microscope is limited by the probe size, by the mechanism of interaction with the sample, as is widely known, and by the electronic noise in the instrument. The evaluation of this noise for the three motion axes of a linearized high resolution scanning electrochemical microscope has been carried through and the intrinsic maximum resolution is discussed.

  10. Low-noise ultra-high-speed dc SQUID readout electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drung, Dietmar; Hinnrichs, Colmar; Barthelmess, Henry-Jobes

    2006-05-01

    User-friendly ultra-high-speed readout electronics for dc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) are presented. To maximize the system bandwidth, the SQUID is directly read out without flux modulation. A composite preamplifier is used consisting of a slow dc amplifier in parallel with a fast ac amplifier. In this way, excellent dc precision and a high amplifier bandwidth of 50 MHz are achieved, simultaneously. A virtual 50 Ω amplifier input resistance with negligible excess noise is realized by active shunting, i.e., by applying feedback from preamplifier output to input via a high resistance. The white voltage and current noise levels are 0.33 nV Hz-1 and 2.6 pA Hz-1/2, respectively. The electronics is fully computer controlled via a microcontroller integrated into the flux-locked loop (FLL) board. Easy-to-use software makes the various electronic settings accessible. A wide bias voltage range of 1.3 mV enables the readout of series SQUID arrays. Furthermore, additional current sources allow the operation of two-stage SQUIDs or transition edge sensors. The electronics was tested using various SQUIDs with input inductances between 30 nH and 1.5 µH. Typically, the maximum FLL bandwidth was 20 MHz, which is close to the theoretical limit given by transmission line delay within the FLL. Slew rates of up to 4.6 Φ0 µs-1 were achieved with series SQUID arrays. Current noise levels as low as 0.47 pA Hz-1/2 and coupled energy sensitivities between 90 h and 500 h were measured at 4.2 K, where h is the Planck constant. The noise did not degrade when the system bandwidth was increased to the maximum value of about 20 MHz. With a two-stage set-up, intrinsic white energy sensitivities of 30 h and 2.3 h were measured at 4.2 and 0.3 K, respectively.

  11. EDFA-based coupled opto-electronic oscillator and its phase noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, Ertan; Yu, Nan; Tu, Meirong; Maleki, Lute

    2004-01-01

    EDFA-based coupled opto-electronic oscillator (COEO), an integrated optical and microwave oscillator that can generate picosecond optical pulses, is presented. the phase noise measurements of COEO show better performance than synthesizer-driven mode-locked laser.

  12. Addition of visual noise boosts evoked potential-based brain-computer interface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jun; Xu, Guanghua; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Sicong; Zhang, Feng; Li, Yeping; Han, Chengcheng; Li, Lili

    2014-01-01

    Although noise has a proven beneficial role in brain functions, there have not been any attempts on the dedication of stochastic resonance effect in neural engineering applications, especially in researches of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). In our study, a steady-state motion visual evoked potential (SSMVEP)-based BCI with periodic visual stimulation plus moderate spatiotemporal noise can achieve better offline and online performance due to enhancement of periodic components in brain responses, which was accompanied by suppression of high harmonics. Offline results behaved with a bell-shaped resonance-like functionality and 7-36% online performance improvements can be achieved when identical visual noise was adopted for different stimulation frequencies. Using neural encoding modeling, these phenomena can be explained as noise-induced input-output synchronization in human sensory systems which commonly possess a low-pass property. Our work demonstrated that noise could boost BCIs in addressing human needs. PMID:24828128

  13. 3D filtering technique in presence of additive noise in color videos implemented on DSP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomaryov, Volodymyr I.; Montenegro-Monroy, Hector; Palacios, Alfredo

    2014-05-01

    A filtering method for color videos contaminated by additive noise is presented. The proposed framework employs three filtering stages: spatial similarity filtering, neighboring frame denoising, and spatial post-processing smoothing. The difference with other state-of- the-art filtering methods, is that this approach, based on fuzzy logic, analyses basic and related gradient values between neighboring pixels into a 7 fi 7 sliding window in the vicinity of a central pixel in each of the RGB channels. Following, the similarity measures between the analogous pixels in the color bands are taken into account during the denoising. Next, two neighboring video frames are analyzed together estimating local motions between the frames using block matching procedure. In the final stage, the edges and smoothed areas are processed differently in a current frame during the post-processing filtering. Numerous simulations results confirm that this 3D fuzzy filter perform better than other state-of-the- art methods, such as: 3D-LLMMSE, WMVCE, RFMDAF, FDARTF G, VBM3D and NLM, in terms of objective criteria (PSNR, MAE, NCD and SSIM) as well as subjective perception via human vision system in the different color videos. An efficiency analysis of the designed and other mentioned filters have been performed on the DSPs TMS320 DM642 and TMS320DM648 by Texas Instruments through MATLAB and Simulink module showing that the novel 3D fuzzy filter can be used in real-time processing applications.

  14. A high signal-to-noise ratio toroidal electron spectrometer for the SEM.

    PubMed

    Hoang, H Q; Osterberg, M; Khursheed, A

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents a high signal-to-noise ratio electron energy spectrometer attachment for the scanning electron microscope (SEM), designed to measure changes in specimen surface potential from secondary electrons and extract specimen atomic number information from backscattered electrons. Experimental results are presented, which demonstrate that the spectrometer can in principle detect specimen voltage changes well into the sub-mV range, and distinguish close atomic numbers by a signal-to-noise ratio of better than 20. The spectrometer has applications for quantitatively mapping specimen surface voltage and atomic number variations on the nano-scale. PMID:21740873

  15. Direct assessment of recombination noise in semiconductors using electron beam-induced conductivity.

    PubMed

    Mil'shtein, S

    2002-01-01

    The level of internal noise of the transistors, diodes, and other semiconductor components limits the successful design of any low noise electronic system. All types of noise, namely, Johnson, 1/f, and so forth, are generated due to activity of crystalline defects such as vacancies, dislocations, and others. The intensity of the electron scattering and recombination processes, inflicted by defects (traps), controls the level of noise. Dependent on the dynamic operation condition of semiconductor devices, such as external biases and level of current injection, the traps will generate certain type and level of noise. Material growth or device processing technologies could introduce all kind of defects. Therefore, characterization of the semiconductor wafer in the early stages of processing (at least before packaging) could help to predict the level of noise due to the type and density of defects present on the wafer. Sorting out bad semiconductor chips could save money and effort in the radio frequency design of low-noise circuits. This current study focuses on 1/f noise modeling, which involves most powerful generators of noise and linear defects, named dislocations. The study also examines the possibility of assessing this noise by quantitative electron beam-induced conductivity (EBIC) measurements. These defects could be found in the bulk as well as at the epitaxial interfaces of a semiconductor device. The nanoscale size of these defects makes the scanning electron beam an instrument of choice for the proposed study. Conventional EBIC produces images of the defects, where contrast is proportional to the recombination rate at the site of a defect. Since contrast is measured as a fraction of one percent, the relative nature of contract value precludes quantitative measurements of the recombination rate, thus making quantitative assessment of 1/f noise impossible. In our model, using the Boltzman continuity equation, the recombination-generation processes per unit

  16. Reduction of 1/f noise in graphene after electron-beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahid Hossain, Md.; Rumyantsev, Sergey; Shur, Michael S.; Balandin, Alexander A.

    2013-04-01

    We investigated experimentally the effect of the electron-beam irradiation on the level of the low-frequency 1/f noise in graphene devices. It was found that 1/f noise in graphene reduces with increasing concentration of defects induced by irradiation. The increased amount of structural disorder in graphene under irradiation was verified with micro-Raman spectroscopy. The bombardment of graphene devices with 20-keV electrons reduced the noise spectral density, SI/I2 (I is the source-drain current) by an order-of magnitude at the radiation dose of 104 μC/cm2. We analyzed the observed noise reduction in the limiting cases of the mobility and carrier number fluctuation mechanisms. The obtained results are important for the proposed graphene applications in analog, mixed-signal, and radio-frequency systems, integrated circuits and sensors.

  17. Knowledge or noise. Scientific publication and the electronic journal.

    PubMed

    McLeod, S D; Gieser, J P

    1996-10-01

    Over the last few years, the Internet has grown exponentially and is developing a role in the exchange of scientific information. However, a number of problematic issues are associated with electronic publications, including limited transmission speed, undependable file longevity, poorly documented postpublication editing, copyright infringement, and cultural impediments to acceptance. By measure of citation frequency, electronic journals seem to have limited influence within scientific discourse, but this medium is as yet in its infancy. Since electronic publication enjoys many potential advantages over traditional print publication, it is expected to gain far greater influence over time. The American Medical Association group of publications recognizes this and intends to develop its electronic publications with attention to maintaining traditional critical scientific standards. PMID:8859092

  18. Ultra-low noise high electron mobility transistors for high-impedance and low-frequency deep cryogenic readout electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Q.; Liang, Y. X.; Ferry, D.; Cavanna, A.; Gennser, U.; Couraud, L.; Jin, Y.

    2014-07-07

    We report on the results obtained from specially designed high electron mobility transistors at 4.2 K: the gate leakage current can be limited lower than 1 aA, and the equivalent input noise-voltage and noise-current at 1 Hz can reach 6.3 nV/Hz{sup 1∕2} and 20 aA/Hz{sup 1∕2}, respectively. These results open the way to realize high performance low-frequency readout electronics under very low-temperature conditions.

  19. Ultra-low noise high electron mobility transistors for high-impedance and low-frequency deep cryogenic readout electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Q.; Liang, Y. X.; Ferry, D.; Cavanna, A.; Gennser, U.; Couraud, L.; Jin, Y.

    2014-07-01

    We report on the results obtained from specially designed high electron mobility transistors at 4.2 K: the gate leakage current can be limited lower than 1 aA, and the equivalent input noise-voltage and noise-current at 1 Hz can reach 6.3 nV/Hz1/2 and 20 aA/Hz1/2, respectively. These results open the way to realize high performance low-frequency readout electronics under very low-temperature conditions.

  20. Highly sensitive hBN/graphene hot electron bolometers with a Johnson noise readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efetov, Dmitri; Gao, Yuanda; Walsh, Evan; Shiue, Ren-Jye; Grosso, Gabriele; Peng, Cheng; Hone, James; Fong, Kin Chun; Englund, Dirk

    Graphene has remarkable opto-electronic and thermo-electric properties that make it an exciting functional material for various photo-detection applications. In particular, owed to graphenes unique combination of an exceedingly low electronic heat capacity and a strongly suppressed electron-phonon thermal conductivity Gth, the electronic and phononic temperatures are highly decoupled allowing an operation principle as a hot electron bolometer (HEB). Here we demonstrate highly sensitive HEBs made of high quality hBN/graphene/hBN stacks and employ a direct electronic temperature read out scheme via Johnson noise thermometry (JNT). We perform combined pump-probe and JNT measurements to demonstrate strongly damped Ce and Gth in the ultra-low impurity σi = 109 cm-2 hBN/G/hBN stacks, which result in unprecedented photo-detection sensitivity and noise equivalent power for graphene HEBs.

  1. [Denoising and assessing method of additive noise in the ultraviolet spectrum of SO2 in flue gas].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tao; Sun, Chang-Ku; Liu, Bin; Zhao, Yu-Mei

    2009-11-01

    The problem of denoising and assessing method of the spectrum of SO2 in flue gas was studied based on DOAS. The denoising procedure of the additive noise in the spectrum was divided into two parts: reducing the additive noise and enhancing the useful signal. When obtaining the absorption feature of measured gas, a multi-resolution preprocessing method of original spectrum was adopted for denoising by DWT (discrete wavelet transform). The signal energy operators in different scales were used to choose the denoising threshold and separate the useful signal from the noise. On the other hand, because there was no sudden change in the spectra of flue gas in time series, the useful signal component was enhanced according to the signal time dependence. And the standard absorption cross section was used to build the ideal absorption spectrum with the measured gas temperature and pressure. This ideal spectrum was used as the desired signal instead of the original spectrum in the assessing method to modify the SNR (signal-noise ratio). There were two different environments to do the proof test-in the lab and at the scene. In the lab, SO2 was measured several times with the system using this method mentioned above. The average deviation was less than 1.5%, while the repeatability was less than 1%. And the short range experiment data were better than the large range. In the scene of a power plant whose concentration of flue gas had a large variation range, the maximum deviation of this method was 2.31% in the 18 groups of contrast data. The experimental results show that the denoising effect of the scene spectrum was better than that of the lab spectrum. This means that this method can improve the SNR of the spectrum effectively, which is seriously polluted by additive noise. PMID:20101989

  2. On spurious and corrupted multifractality: The effects of additive noise, short-term memory and periodic trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludescher, Josef; Bogachev, Mikhail I.; Kantelhardt, Jan W.; Schumann, Aicko Y.; Bunde, Armin

    2011-07-01

    We study the performance of multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) applied to long-term correlated and multifractal data records in the presence of additive white noise, short-term memory and periodicities. Such additions and disturbances that can be typically found in the observational records of various complex systems ranging from climate dynamics to physiology, network traffic, and finance. In monofractal records, we find that (i) additive white noise hardly results in spurious multifractality, but causes underestimated generalized Hurst exponents h(q) for all q values; (ii) short-range correlations lead to pronounced crossovers in the generalized fluctuation functions Fq(s) at positions that decrease with increasing moment q, thus causing significantly overestimated h(q) for small q and spurious multifractality; (iii) periodicities like seasonal trends (with standard deviations comparable with the one of the studied process) result in spurious “reversed” multifractality where h(q) increases with increasing q (except for very short time windows). We also show that in multifractal cascades moderate additions of noise, short-range memory, or periodic trends cause flawed results for h(q) with q<2, while h(q) with q>2 remains nearly unchanged.

  3. Reduction of electronic noise from radiofrequency generator during radiofrequency ablation in interventional MRI.

    PubMed

    Oshiro, Thomas; Sinha, Usha; Lu, David; Sinha, Shantanu

    2002-01-01

    MRI has been used increasingly in the recent past for the guidance and monitoring of minimally invasive interventional procedures, using typically radiofrequency (RF) and laser energy, cryoablation, and percutaneous ethanol. RF energy has been used over the last 30 years for the ablation of tissues. Its use in conjunction with MRI for monitoring is limited, however, because of the electronic noise produced by the RF generators, which can significantly deteriorate image quality. The objective of this work was to devise methods by which this noise can be reduced to an acceptable level to allow simultaneous acquisition of MR images for monitoring purposes with the application of RF energy. Three different methods of noise reduction were investigated in a 0.2 T MR scanner: filtration using external hardware circuitry, MR scanner software-controlled filtration, and keyholing. The last two methods were unable by themselves to suppress the noise to an acceptable degree. Hardware filtration, however, provides excellent suppression of RF noise and is able to withstand up to 12 W of RF energy. When all the three approaches are combined, significant reduction of RF noise is achieved. The feasibility of creating an RF lesion of about 1.2 cm diameter in vivo in a porcine model simultaneously with temperature-sensitive MRI with adequate noise suppression is demonstrated. PMID:11884792

  4. Effects Of Radiation On Electronics-Additional References

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, Frank L.

    1988-01-01

    Bibliography abstracts summarizing literature on effects of radiation on new electronic devices. This and second volume cover years 1984 and 1985. Third volume, covers 1982 and 1983 (previously published).

  5. Noise exposure level while operating electronic arcade games as a leisure time activity.

    PubMed

    Mirbod, S M; Inaba, R; Yoshida, H; Nagata, C; Komura, Y; Iwata, H

    1992-01-01

    In order to study noise levels associated with electronic arcade games, noise measurements were made in 3 selected game centers and 192 samples were taken in each location. The background noise was recorded at a level of 61 dB(A) and 64 dB(C). When the electronic games were performed these levels of noise reached to 88 approximately 90 dB(A). The 1/3 octave bands analyzing sound pressure levels showed that more intense noise levels arose in a frequency range between 0.5 and 2.0 kHz. The computed values for noise pollution levels (LNP) and L90 (fast response A-weighted sound level exceeded 90% of the measurement time) ranged from 93.3 to 96.6 and from 85.1 to 87.3 dB(A), respectively. Concerning our results and according to Melnic (1979), it was estimated that these levels of noise might cause 4-8 dB temporary threshold shift (TTS) at 4.0 kHz in an individual with less than one hour of exposure to such a level of noise. As for the employees of the 3 game centers, the 8-hr equivalent continuous sound levels (Leq,8) were in the range of 80.3 approximately 87.5 dB(A), although their exposure time could not be exactly determined. It was suggested that: 1) The maximum levels should be limited to a reasonable level, either by the manufacturers or by the game center owners; 2) Education programs in industry should inform the employees about other factors outside the work that may affect their hearing; and 3) For policy-making on hearing conservation, recreational warning and standards should be established. PMID:1490870

  6. Preservation of physical properties of stochastic Maxwell equations with additive noise via stochastic multi-symplectic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuchu; Hong, Jialin; Zhang, Liying

    2016-02-01

    Stochastic Maxwell equations with additive noise are a system of stochastic Hamiltonian partial differential equations intrinsically, possessing the stochastic multi-symplectic conservation law. It is shown that the averaged energy increases linearly with respect to the evolution of time and the flow of stochastic Maxwell equations with additive noise preserves the divergence in the sense of expectation. Moreover, we propose three novel stochastic multi-symplectic methods to discretize stochastic Maxwell equations in order to investigate the preservation of these properties numerically. We make theoretical discussions and comparisons on all of the three methods to observe that all of them preserve the corresponding discrete version of the averaged divergence. Meanwhile, we obtain the corresponding dissipative property of the discrete averaged energy satisfied by each method. Especially, the evolution rates of the averaged energies for all of the three methods are derived which are in accordance with the continuous case. Numerical experiments are performed to verify our theoretical results.

  7. Cool Timepix - Electronic noise of the Timepix readout chip down to -125 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schön, R.; Alfonsi, M.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; Koffeman, E.

    2015-01-01

    The Timepix readout chip with its 65k pixels on a sensitive area of 14 mm×14 mm provides a fine spatial resolution for particle tracking or medical imaging. We explore the operation of Timepix in a dual-phase xenon environment (around -110 °C). Used in dual-phase xenon time projection chambers, e.g. for dark matter search experiments, the readout must have a sufficiently low detection limit for small energy deposits. We measured the electronic pixel noise of three bare Timepix chips. For the first time Timepix readout chips were cooled to temperatures as low as -125 °C. In this work, we present the results of analysing noise transition curves recorded while applying a well-defined charge to the pixel's input. The electronic noise reduces to an average of 99e-, a reduction of 23% compared to operation at room temperature.

  8. Electron concentrations calculated from the lower hybrid resonance noise band observed by Ogo 3.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burtis, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    A noise band at the lower hybrid resonance (LHR) is often detected by the VLF and ELF receivers on Ogo 3, using the electric antenna. In some cases the noise band is at the geometric mean gyrofrequency as measured by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) magnetometer, and local LHR in a dense H(+) plasma is indicated; in such cases, electron concentration can be calculated, if it is assumed that heavy ions are negligible. Observations at midlatitudes and altitudes of a few earth radii show local concentrations as low as 1.4 electrons/cu cm. In one case the concentrations obtained from the LHR noise band agree with those measured simultaneously by the GSFC ion mass spectrometer within a factor of 2. In another case the concentration is observed to fall by a factor of 2 in 150 km and then to decrease roughly as R to the minus fourth power, in agreement with whistler measurements outside the plasmapause.

  9. Quantum Optics Theory of Electronic Noise in Coherent Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimsmo, Arne L.; Qassemi, Farzad; Reulet, Bertrand; Blais, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    We consider the electromagnetic field generated by a coherent conductor in which electron transport is described quantum mechanically. We obtain an input-output relation linking the quantum current in the conductor to the measured electromagnetic field. This allows us to compute the outcome of measurements on the field in terms of the statistical properties of the current. We moreover show how under ac bias the conductor acts as a tunable medium for the field, allowing for the generation of single- and two-mode squeezing through fermionic reservoir engineering. These results explain the recently observed squeezing using normal tunnel junctions [G. Gasse et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 136601 (2013); J.-C. Forgues et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 130403 (2015)].

  10. Quantum Optics Theory of Electronic Noise in Coherent Conductors.

    PubMed

    Grimsmo, Arne L; Qassemi, Farzad; Reulet, Bertrand; Blais, Alexandre

    2016-01-29

    We consider the electromagnetic field generated by a coherent conductor in which electron transport is described quantum mechanically. We obtain an input-output relation linking the quantum current in the conductor to the measured electromagnetic field. This allows us to compute the outcome of measurements on the field in terms of the statistical properties of the current. We moreover show how under ac bias the conductor acts as a tunable medium for the field, allowing for the generation of single- and two-mode squeezing through fermionic reservoir engineering. These results explain the recently observed squeezing using normal tunnel junctions [G. Gasse et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 136601 (2013); J.-C. Forgues et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 130403 (2015)]. PMID:26871330

  11. Intensity noise in diode-pumped single-frequency Nd:YAG lasers and its control by electronic feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, Thomas J.

    1990-01-01

    The power spectrum of the relative intensity noise (RIN) of single-frequency diode-pumped Nd:YAG lasers is observed to be shot-noise limited at frequencies above 20 MHz for a photocurrent of up to 4.4 mA. Relaxation oscillations result in noise 60-70 dB above shot noise at a few hundred kHz. These relaxation oscillations have been suppressed using electronic feedback.

  12. Performance of peaky template matching under additive white Gaussian noise and uniform quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Matthew S.; Rigling, Brian D.

    2015-05-01

    Peaky template matching (PTM) is a special case of a general algorithm known as multinomial pattern matching originally developed for automatic target recognition of synthetic aperture radar data. The algorithm is a model- based approach that first quantizes pixel values into Nq = 2 discrete values yielding generative Beta-Bernoulli models as class-conditional templates. Here, we consider the case of classification of target chips in AWGN and develop approximations to image-to-template classification performance as a function of the noise power. We focus specifically on the case of a uniform quantization" scheme, where a fixed number of the largest pixels are quantized high as opposed to using a fixed threshold. This quantization method reduces sensitivity to the scaling of pixel intensities and quantization in general reduces sensitivity to various nuisance parameters difficult to account for a priori. Our performance expressions are verified using forward-looking infrared imagery from the Army Research Laboratory Comanche dataset.

  13. Cryogenic, low-noise high electron mobility transistor amplifiers for the Deep Space Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautista, J. J.

    1993-11-01

    The rapid advances recently achieved by cryogenically cooled high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) low-noise amplifiers (LNA's) in the 1- to 10-GHz range are making them extremely competitive with maser amplifiers. In order to address future spacecraft navigation, telemetry, radar, and radio science needs, the Deep Space Network is investing both maser and HEMT amplifiers for its Ka-band (32-GHz) downlink capability. This article describes the current state cryogenic HEMT LNA development at Ka-band for the DSN. Noise performance results at S-band (2.3 GHz) and X-band (8.5 GHz) for HEMT's and masers are included for completeness.

  14. Cryogenic, low-noise high electron mobility transistor amplifiers for the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautista, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    The rapid advances recently achieved by cryogenically cooled high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) low-noise amplifiers (LNA's) in the 1- to 10-GHz range are making them extremely competitive with maser amplifiers. In order to address future spacecraft navigation, telemetry, radar, and radio science needs, the Deep Space Network is investing both maser and HEMT amplifiers for its Ka-band (32-GHz) downlink capability. This article describes the current state cryogenic HEMT LNA development at Ka-band for the DSN. Noise performance results at S-band (2.3 GHz) and X-band (8.5 GHz) for HEMT's and masers are included for completeness.

  15. Electronic noise in high electron-mobility transistors under photo-excitation conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Marinchio, H.; Sabatini, G.; Varani, L.; Palermo, C.; Shiktorov, P.; Starikov, E.; Gruzinskis, V.; Ziade, P.; Kallassy, Z.

    2009-04-23

    The hydrodynamic approach based on the carrier concentration and velocity conservation equations is used to investigate the influence of photo-excitation of plasma waves at the beating frequency of two lasers on the intrinsic extra noise in InGaAs HEMTs caused by thermally-induced plasma oscillations. It is found that, by increasing the amplitude of the photo-excitation, a significant supression of the intrinsic excess noise is observed at the beating frequency as well as at all the frequencies where plasma waves can be excited.

  16. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  17. Heart Rate, Stress, and Occupational Noise Exposure among Electronic Waste Recycling Workers.

    PubMed

    Burns, Katrina N; Sun, Kan; Fobil, Julius N; Neitzel, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    Electronic waste (e-waste) is a growing occupational and environmental health issue around the globe. E-waste recycling is a green industry of emerging importance, especially in low-and middle-income countries where much of this recycling work is performed, and where many people's livelihoods depend on this work. The occupational health hazards of e-waste recycling have not been adequately explored. We performed a cross-sectional study of noise exposures, heart rate, and perceived stress among e-waste recycling workers at a large e-waste site in Accra, Ghana. We interviewed 57 workers and continuously monitored their individual noise exposures and heart rates for up to 24 h. More than 40% of workers had noise exposures that exceeded recommended occupational (85 dBA) and community (70 dBA) noise exposure limits, and self-reported hearing difficulties were common. Workers also had moderate to high levels of perceived stress as measured via Cohen's Perceived Stress Scale, and reported a variety of symptoms that could indicate cardiovascular disease. Noise exposures were moderately and significantly correlated with heart rate (Spearman's ρ 0.46, p < 0.001). A mixed effects linear regression model indicated that a 1 dB increase in noise exposure was associated with a 0.17 increase in heart rate (p-value = 0.01) even after controlling for work activities, age, smoking, perceived stress, and unfavorable physical working conditions. These findings suggest that occupational and non-occupational noise exposure is associated with elevations in average heart rate, which may in turn predict potential cardiovascular damage. PMID:26797626

  18. Heart Rate, Stress, and Occupational Noise Exposure among Electronic Waste Recycling Workers

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Katrina N.; Sun, Kan; Fobil, Julius N.; Neitzel, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    Electronic waste (e-waste) is a growing occupational and environmental health issue around the globe. E-waste recycling is a green industry of emerging importance, especially in low-and middle-income countries where much of this recycling work is performed, and where many people’s livelihoods depend on this work. The occupational health hazards of e-waste recycling have not been adequately explored. We performed a cross-sectional study of noise exposures, heart rate, and perceived stress among e-waste recycling workers at a large e-waste site in Accra, Ghana. We interviewed 57 workers and continuously monitored their individual noise exposures and heart rates for up to 24 h. More than 40% of workers had noise exposures that exceeded recommended occupational (85 dBA) and community (70 dBA) noise exposure limits, and self-reported hearing difficulties were common. Workers also had moderate to high levels of perceived stress as measured via Cohen’s Perceived Stress Scale, and reported a variety of symptoms that could indicate cardiovascular disease. Noise exposures were moderately and significantly correlated with heart rate (Spearman’s ρ 0.46, p < 0.001). A mixed effects linear regression model indicated that a 1 dB increase in noise exposure was associated with a 0.17 increase in heart rate (p-value = 0.01) even after controlling for work activities, age, smoking, perceived stress, and unfavorable physical working conditions. These findings suggest that occupational and non-occupational noise exposure is associated with elevations in average heart rate, which may in turn predict potential cardiovascular damage. PMID:26797626

  19. Laser-driven electron acceleration in a plasma channel with an additional electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Li-Hong; Xue, Ju-Kui; Liu, Jie

    2016-05-01

    We examine the electron acceleration in a two-dimensional plasma channel under the action of a laser field and an additional static electric field. We propose to design an appropriate additional electric field (its direction and location), in order to launch the electron onto an energetic trajectory. We find that the electron acceleration strongly depends on the coupled effects of the laser polarization, the direction, and location of the additional electric field. The additional electric field affects the electron dynamics by changing the dephasing rate. Particularly, a suitably designed additional electric field leads to a considerable energy gain from the laser pulse after the interaction with the additional electric field. The electron energy gain from the laser with the additional electric field can be much higher than that without the additional electric field. This engineering provides a possible means for producing high energetic electrons.

  20. On the ability of consumer electronics microphones for environmental noise monitoring.

    PubMed

    Van Renterghem, Timothy; Thomas, Pieter; Dominguez, Frederico; Dauwe, Samuel; Touhafi, Abdellah; Dhoedt, Bart; Botteldooren, Dick

    2011-03-01

    The massive production of microphones for consumer electronics, and the shift from dedicated processing hardware to PC-based systems, opens the way to build affordable, extensive noise measurement networks. Applications include e.g. noise limit and urban soundscape monitoring, and validation of calculated noise maps. Microphones are the critical components of such a network. Therefore, in a first step, some basic characteristics of 8 microphones, distributed over a wide range of price classes, were measured in a standardized way in an anechoic chamber. In a next step, a thorough evaluation was made of the ability of these microphones to be used for environmental noise monitoring. This was done during a continuous, half-year lasting outdoor experiment, characterized by a wide variety of meteorological conditions. While some microphones failed during the course of this test, it was shown that it is possible to identify cheap microphones that highly correlate to the reference microphone during the full test period. When the deviations are expressed in total A-weighted (road traffic) noise levels, values of less than 1 dBA are obtained, in excess to the deviation amongst reference microphones themselves. PMID:21157618

  1. Development of a cryogenic DC-low noise amplifier for SQuID-based readout electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macculi, C.; Torrioli, G.; Di Giorgio, A.; Spinoglio, L.; Piro, Luigi

    2014-07-01

    We present the preliminary results of the design and test activities for a DC cryogenic low noise amplifier for the SAFARI imaging spectrometer, planned to be onboard the SPICA mission, necessary not only to drive, as usual, the voltage signal produced by the SQuID but also to boost such signals over about 7 meter of path towards the warm feedback electronics. This development has been done in the framework of the mission preparation studies, within the European Consortium for the development of the SAFARI instrument. The actual configuration of the SAFARI focal plane assembly (FPA), indeed, foresees a long distance to the warm back end electronics. It is therefore mandatory to boost the faint electric signal coming from the SQuID device by keeping under control both power dissipation and noise: this is the main role of the designed Cryogenic Low Noise Amplifier (LNA). Working at 136K, it has a differential input gain-stage, and a differential balanced voltage buffer output stage, running at few mW target overall power. At present the design is based on the use of Heterojunction Si:Ge transistors, the required bandwidth is DC-4MHz and the required noise lower than 1 nV/rtHz.

  2. Conversion gain and noise of niobium superconducting hot-electron-mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekstrom, Hans; Karasik, Boris S.; Kollberg, Erik L.; Yngvesson, Sigfrid

    1995-01-01

    A study has been done of microwave mixing at 20 GHz using the nonlinear (power dependent) resistance of thin niobium strips in the resistive state. Our experiments give evidence that electron-heating is the main cause of the nonlinear phenomenon. Also a detailed phenomenological theory for the determination of conversion properties is presented. This theory is capable of predicting the frequency-conversion loss rather accurately for arbitrary bias by examining the I-V-characteristic. Knowing the electron temperature relaxation time, and using parameters derived from the I-V-characteristic also allows us to predict the -3 dB IF bandwidth. Experimental results are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions. The requirements on the mode of operation and on the film parameters for minimizing the conversion loss (and even achieving conversion gain) are discussed in some detail. Our measurements demonstrate an intrinsic conversion loss as low as 1 dB. The maximum IF frequency defined for -3 dB drop in conversion gain, is about 80 MHz. Noise measurements indicate a device output noise temperature of about 50 K and SSB mixer noise temperature below 250 K. This type of mixer is considered very promising for use in low-noise heterodyne receivers at THz frequencies.

  3. Giant shot noise due to mechanical transportation of spin-polarized electrons.

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, L. Y.; Kulinich, S. I.; Shekhter, R. I.; Jonson, M.; Vinokur, V. M.; Materials Science Division; Chalmers Univ. of Technology; Univ.of Goteborg; B.I. Verkin Inst. for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering; Goteborg Univ.; Heriot-Watt Univ.

    2008-05-01

    We show that single-electron 'shuttling' of electrons in a magnetic nanoelectromechanical single-electron transistor device can be an efficient tool for studying electron spin-flip relaxation on quantum dots. The reason is traced to a spin blockade of the mechanically aided shuttle current that occurs in devices with highly polarized and collinearly magnetized leads. This results in giant peaks in the shot-noise spectral function, wherein the peak heights are only limited by the rate of electronic spin flips. Therefore, we show that nanomechanical spectroscopy of the spin-flip rate is possible, allowing spin-flip relaxation times as long as 10 {micro}s to be detected.

  4. Radioactinide Additions to the Electronic Gamma-ray Spectrum Catalogue

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. Gehrke; J.R. Davidson; P.J. Taylor; R.G. Helmer; J.W. Mandler

    2001-05-01

    With the completion of a CD ROM version of the original R. L. HEATH''s Gamma-ray Spectrum Catalogue, it became obvious that a number of radionuclides are missing which are important to various fields of nuclear science and technology. With a large amount of transuranic waste awaiting permanent disposal across the Department of Energy (DOE) complex and the need for its assay in order to dispose of it, it was decided that the addition of the radioactinides encountered in transuranic waste should be the first priority. In response to this need, the spectra of 233U, 235U, 238U, 237Np, 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, 242Pu, 241Am and 243Am have been acquired with modern Ge detectors, and prepared for graphics presentation along with the parent and progeny decay chains and decay schemes. The associated tables of -ray energies and emission probabilities have been downloaded from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data file (ENSDF) database. This information is being incorporated into the Gamma-Ray Spectrometry Center Web Site at http://id.inel.gov/gamma

  5. Combined action of time-delay and colored cross-associated multiplicative and additive noises on stability and stochastic resonance for a stochastic metapopulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kang-Kang; Zong, De-Cai; Wang, Ya-Jun; Li, Sheng-Hong

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the transition between the stable state of a big density and the extinction state and stochastic resonance (SR) for a time-delayed metapopulation system disturbed by colored cross-correlated noises are investigated. By applying the fast descent method, the small time-delay approximation and McNamara and Wiesenfeld's SR theory, we investigate the impacts of time-delay, the multiplicative, additive noises and colored cross-correlated noise on the SNR and the shift between the two states of the system. Numerical results show that the multiplicative, additive noises and time-delay can all speed up the transition from the stable state to the extinction state, while the correlation noise and its correlation time can slow down the extinction process of the population system. With respect to SNR, the multiplicative noise always weakens the SR effect, while noise correlation time plays a dual role in motivating the SR phenomenon. Meanwhile, time-delay mainly plays a negative role in stimulating the SR phenomenon. Conversely, it could motivate the SR effect to increase the strength of the cross-correlation noise in the SNR-β plot, while the increase of additive noise intensity will firstly excite SR, and then suppress the SR effect.

  6. Protein structural ensembles are revealed by redefining X-ray electron density noise.

    PubMed

    Lang, P Therese; Holton, James M; Fraser, James S; Alber, Tom

    2014-01-01

    To increase the power of X-ray crystallography to determine not only the structures but also the motions of biomolecules, we developed methods to address two classic crystallographic problems: putting electron density maps on the absolute scale of e(-)/Å(3) and calculating the noise at every point in the map. We find that noise varies with position and is often six to eight times lower than thresholds currently used in model building. Analyzing the rescaled electron density maps from 485 representative proteins revealed unmodeled conformations above the estimated noise for 45% of side chains and a previously hidden, low-occupancy inhibitor of HIV capsid protein. Comparing the electron density maps in the free and nucleotide-bound structures of three human protein kinases suggested that substrate binding perturbs distinct intrinsic allosteric networks that link the active site to surfaces that recognize regulatory proteins. These results illustrate general approaches to identify and analyze alternative conformations, low-occupancy small molecules, solvent distributions, communication pathways, and protein motions. PMID:24363322

  7. 36 CFR 1236.24 - What are the additional requirements for managing unstructured electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the additional requirements for managing unstructured electronic records? 1236.24 Section 1236.24 Parks, Forests, and Public... Additional Requirements for Electronic Records § 1236.24 What are the additional requirements for...

  8. 36 CFR 1236.24 - What are the additional requirements for managing unstructured electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the additional requirements for managing unstructured electronic records? 1236.24 Section 1236.24 Parks, Forests, and Public... Additional Requirements for Electronic Records § 1236.24 What are the additional requirements for...

  9. 36 CFR 1236.24 - What are the additional requirements for managing unstructured electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are the additional requirements for managing unstructured electronic records? 1236.24 Section 1236.24 Parks, Forests, and Public... Additional Requirements for Electronic Records § 1236.24 What are the additional requirements for...

  10. 36 CFR 1236.24 - What are the additional requirements for managing unstructured electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true What are the additional requirements for managing unstructured electronic records? 1236.24 Section 1236.24 Parks, Forests, and Public... Additional Requirements for Electronic Records § 1236.24 What are the additional requirements for...

  11. 36 CFR 1236.24 - What are the additional requirements for managing unstructured electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are the additional requirements for managing unstructured electronic records? 1236.24 Section 1236.24 Parks, Forests, and Public... Additional Requirements for Electronic Records § 1236.24 What are the additional requirements for...

  12. Quantifying noise sources in the KSTAR 2014 Thomson Scattering system from the measured variation on electron temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, T.-S.; Kim, K. H.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, S. H.; Scannell, R.; Field, A. R.; Cho, K.; Bawa'aneh, M. S.; Ghim, Y.-c.

    2016-03-01

    With the Thomson scattering (TS) system in KSTAR, temporal evolution of electron temperature (Te) is estimated using a weighted look-up table method with fast sampling (1.25 or 2.5 GS/s) digitizers during the 2014 KSTAR campaign. Background noise level is used as a weighting parameter without considering the photon noise due to the absence of information on absolute photon counts detected by the TS system. Estimated electron temperature during a relatively quiescent discharge are scattered, i.e., 15% variation on Te with respect to its mean value. We find that this 15% variation on Te cannot be explained solely by the background noise level which leads us to include photon noise effects in our analysis. Using synthetic data, we have estimated the required photon noise level consistent with the observation and determined the dominant noise source in KSTAR TS system.

  13. On Certain New Methodology for Reducing Sensor and Readout Electronics Circuitry Noise in Digital Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizhner, Semion; Miko, Joseph; Bradley, Damon; Heinzen, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and upcoming cosmology science missions carry instruments with multiple focal planes populated with many large sensor detector arrays. These sensors are passively cooled to low temperatures for low-level light (L3) and near-infrared (NIR) signal detection, and the sensor readout electronics circuitry must perform at extremely low noise levels to enable new required science measurements. Because we are at the technological edge of enhanced performance for sensors and readout electronics circuitry, as determined by thermal noise level at given temperature in analog domain, we must find new ways of further compensating for the noise in the signal digital domain. To facilitate this new approach, state-of-the-art sensors are augmented at their array hardware boundaries by non-illuminated reference pixels, which can be used to reduce noise attributed to sensors. There are a few proposed methodologies of processing in the digital domain the information carried by reference pixels, as employed by the Hubble Space Telescope and the James Webb Space Telescope Projects. These methods involve using spatial and temporal statistical parameters derived from boundary reference pixel information to enhance the active (non-reference) pixel signals. To make a step beyond this heritage methodology, we apply the NASA-developed technology known as the Hilbert- Huang Transform Data Processing System (HHT-DPS) for reference pixel information processing and its utilization in reconfigurable hardware on-board a spaceflight instrument or post-processing on the ground. The methodology examines signal processing for a 2-D domain, in which high-variance components of the thermal noise are carried by both active and reference pixels, similar to that in processing of low-voltage differential signals and subtraction of a single analog reference pixel from all active pixels on the sensor. Heritage methods using the aforementioned statistical parameters in the

  14. Suppression of Low-Frequency Electronic Noise in Polymer Nanowire Field-Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Lezzi, Francesca; Ferrari, Giorgio; Pennetta, Cecilia; Pisignano, Dario

    2015-11-11

    The authors report on the reduction of low-frequency noise in semiconductor polymer nanowires with respect to thin-films made of the same organic material. Flicker noise is experimentally investigated in polymer nanowires in the range of 10-10(5) Hz by means of field-effect transistor architectures. The noise in the devices is well described by the Hooge empirical model and exhibits an average Hooge constant, which describes the current power spectral density of fluctuations, suppressed by 1-2 orders of magnitude compared to thin-film devices. To explain the Hooge constant reduction, a resistor network model is developed, in which the organic semiconducting nanostructures or films are depicted through a two-dimensional network of resistors with a square-lattice structure, accounting for the different anisotropy and degree of structural disorder of the active nanowires and films. Results from modeling agree well with experimental findings. These results support enhanced structural order through size-confinement in organic nanostructures as effective route to improve the noise performance in polymer electronic devices. PMID:26479330

  15. Inelastic electron tunnelling and noise spectroscopies in organic magnetic tunnel junctions with PTCDA barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Farkhad; Martinez, Isidoro; Hong, Jhen-Yong; Cascales, Juan Pedro; Andres, Pablo; Lin, Minn-Tsong

    2015-03-01

    The influence of internal barrier dynamics on spin, charge transport and their fluctuations in organic spintronics remains poorly understood. Here we present inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy (IETS) and low frequency noise (LFN) studies in magnetic tunnel junctions with thin (1.2-5nm) organic PTCDA barriers in the tunnelling regime at temperatures down to 0.3K. Shot noise is superpoissonian with a Fano factor exceeding in 1.5-2 times the maximum values reported for magnetic tunnel junctions with inorganic barriers, indicating spin dependent bunching in tunneling. IETS results show energy relaxation of tunneling electrons through the excitation of collective (librons) and internal (phonons) vibrational modes of the molecules. The bias dependence of the normalised 1/f noise studied up to 350mV reveals that the excitation of some phonon modes has a strong impact on LFN with over a 10-fold reproducible increase near some specific biases. The dependence of the IETS and LFN anomalies with the relative magnetic alignment of the electrodes will also be discussed.

  16. The DEPFET Sensor-Amplifier Structure: A Method to Beat 1/f Noise and Reach Sub-Electron Noise in Pixel Detectors.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Gerhard; Porro, Matteo; Aschauer, Stefan; Wölfel, Stefan; Strüder, Lothar

    2016-01-01

    Depleted field effect transistors (DEPFET) are used to achieve very low noise signal charge readout with sub-electron measurement precision. This is accomplished by repeatedly reading an identical charge, thereby suppressing not only the white serial noise but also the usually constant 1/f noise. The repetitive non-destructive readout (RNDR) DEPFET is an ideal central element for an active pixel sensor (APS) pixel. The theory has been derived thoroughly and results have been verified on RNDR-DEPFET prototypes. A charge measurement precision of 0.18 electrons has been achieved. The device is well-suited for spectroscopic X-ray imaging and for optical photon counting in pixel sensors, even at high photon numbers in the same cell. PMID:27136549

  17. The DEPFET Sensor-Amplifier Structure: A Method to Beat 1/f Noise and Reach Sub-Electron Noise in Pixel Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Gerhard; Porro, Matteo; Aschauer, Stefan; Wölfel, Stefan; Strüder, Lothar

    2016-01-01

    Depleted field effect transistors (DEPFET) are used to achieve very low noise signal charge readout with sub-electron measurement precision. This is accomplished by repeatedly reading an identical charge, thereby suppressing not only the white serial noise but also the usually constant 1/f noise. The repetitive non-destructive readout (RNDR) DEPFET is an ideal central element for an active pixel sensor (APS) pixel. The theory has been derived thoroughly and results have been verified on RNDR-DEPFET prototypes. A charge measurement precision of 0.18 electrons has been achieved. The device is well-suited for spectroscopic X-ray imaging and for optical photon counting in pixel sensors, even at high photon numbers in the same cell. PMID:27136549

  18. Narrow-band Electrostatic Noise generated by an electron velocity space hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, Robert L.; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha; Coroniti, Ferdinand V.

    1993-01-01

    Narrow-band Electrostatic Noise (NEN) is a common occurrence in the Earth's distant magnetotail. NEN is observed in a frequency range (100-316 Hz) that falls roughly between the electron and ion plasma frequencies. This mode may result from holes in the electron distribution function associated with slow shocks. An instability that is associated with this mode is studied using numerical simulations. The growth of the instability depends on the size and shape of the hole. The hole mode can also be driven unstable by either an anisotropy in the electron distribution function or an ion beam. In all these cases the instability saturates at a low level and only a fraction of the available free energy is released.

  19. Effects of image noise on contact edge roughness and critical dimension uniformity measurement in synthesized scanning electron microscope images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantoudis, Vassilios; Kuppuswamy, Vijaya-Kumar Murugesan; Gogolides, Evangelos

    2013-01-01

    We study the effects of noise in scanning electron microscope (SEM) images on the size and roughness of contact holes when they are measured using top-down SEM images. The applied methodology is based on the generation of synthesized top-down SEM images, including several model contact edges with controlled roughness, critical dimension (CD) uniformity, and noise. The sources of image noise can be the shot noise of SEM electron beams and microscope electronics. The results show that noise reduces CD and correlation length while it increases the rms value of contact edge roughness (CER). CD variation is increased with noise in images with smooth and identical contacts, whereas it remains almost unaltered in images including rough contacts with CD nonuniformity. Furthermore, we find that the application of a noise-smoothing filter before image analysis rectifies the values of CD (at small filter parameter) and of rms and correlation length (at larger filter parameters), whereas it leads to marginally larger deviations from the true values of CD variation. Quantitative assessment of the model predictions reveals that the noise-induced variations of CD and CER values are less important compared with those caused by process stochasticity and material inhomogeneities.

  20. Noise filtering of scanning-electron-microscope images for accurate analysis of line-edge and line-width roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraiwa, Atsushi; Nishida, Akio

    2012-10-01

    The control of line-edge or line-width roughness (LER/LWR) is a challenge, especially for future devices that are fabricated using extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Accurate analysis of the LER/LWR plays an essential role in this challenge and requires the noise involved in scanning-electron-microscope (SEM) images to be reduced by appropriate noise filtering prior to analysis. To achieve this, we simulated the SEM images using a Monte Carlo method, and detected line edges in both experimental and theoretical images after noise filtering using new image-analysis software. The validity of this software and these simulations was confirmed by a good agreement between the experimental and theoretical results. In the case when the image pixels aligned perpendicular (crosswise) to line edges were averaged, the variance var(φ) that was additionally induced by the image noise decreased with a number N of averaged pixels, with exceptions when N was relatively large, whereupon the variance increased. The optimal N to minimize var(φ) was formulated based on a statistical mechanism of this change. LER/LWR statistics estimated using the crosswise filtering remained unaffected when N was smaller than the aforementioned optimal value, but monotonically changed when N was larger contrary to expectations. This change was possibly caused by an asymmetric scan-signal profile at edges. On the other hand, averaging image pixels aligned parallel (longitudinal) to line edges not only reduced var(φ) but smoothed real LER/LWR. As a result, the nominal variance of real LWR, obtained using simple arithmetic, monotonically decreased with a number N of averaged pixels. Artifactual oscillations were additionally observed in power spectral densities. Var(φ) in this case decreased in inverse proportion to the square root of N according to the statistical mechanism clarified here. In this way, the noise filtering has a marked effect on the LER/LWR analysis and needs to be appropriately

  1. Effect of tunnel injection through the Schottky gate on the static and noise behavior of GaInAs/AlInAs high electron mobility transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Moro-Melgar, Diego; Mateos, Javier González, Tomás Vasallo, Beatriz G.

    2014-12-21

    By using a Monte Carlo simulator, the influence of the tunnel injection through the Schottky contact at the gate electrode of a GaInAs/AlInAs High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) has been studied in terms of the static and noise performance. The method used to characterize the quantum tunnel current has been the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approach. The possibility of taking into account the influence of the image charge effect in the potential barrier height has been included as well. Regarding the static behavior, tunnel injection leads to a decrease in the drain current I{sub D} due to an enhancement of the potential barrier controlling the carrier transport through the channel. However, the pinch-off is degraded due to the tunneling current. Regarding the noise behavior, since the fluctuations in the potential barrier height caused by the tunnel-injected electrons are strongly coupled with the drain current fluctuations, a significant increase in the drain-current noise takes place, even when the tunnel effect is hardly noticeable in the static I-V characteristics, fact that must be taken into account when designing scaled HEMT for low-noise applications. In addition, tunnel injection leads to the appearance of full shot noise in the gate current.

  2. On noise sources in hot electron-degraded bipolar junction transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llinares, P.; Ghibaudo, G.; Chroboczek, J. A.

    1997-09-01

    The effects of electrical stress on static characteristics and power spectral density, SIb, of base current, Ib, fluctuations at low frequencies, f<1 kHz, have been studied in quasiself-aligned bipolar n-p-n junction. In as-fabricated devices SIb∝1/AE, where AE is the transistor emitter area, whereas in strongly degraded transistors Sib∝1/PE, where PE is the transistor perimeter. The latter demonstrates directly that hot carrier-induced noise sources are generated at the periphery of the transistors, in agreement with former work on hot electron-induced aging of bipolar junction transistors.

  3. Photon-noise-limited direct detector based on disorder-controlled electron heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasik, Boris S.; McGrath, William R.; Gershenson, Michael E.; Sergeev, Andrew V.

    2000-05-01

    We present a concept for a hot-electron direct detector capable of counting single millimeter-wave photons. The detector is based on a microbridge (1 μm size) transition edge sensor made from a disordered superconducting film. The electron-phonon coupling strength at temperatures of 100-300 mK is proportional to the elastic electron mean free path l and can be reduced by over an order of magnitude by decreasing l. The microbridge contacts are made from a different superconductor with higher critical temperature Nb, which blocks the thermal diffusion of hot carriers into the contacts. The low electron-phonon heat conductance and the high thermal resistance of the contacts determine the noise equivalent power of ˜10-20-10-21 W/√Hz at 100 mK, which is 102-103 times better than that of state-of-the-art bolometers. Due to the effect of disorder, the electron cooling time is ˜10-1-10-2 s at 0.1 K. By exploiting negative electrothermal feedback, the detector time constant can be made as short as 10-3-10-4 s without sacrificing sensitivity.

  4. The Majorana Low-noise Low-background Front-end Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, E.; Avignone, F. T.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y.-D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Combs, D. C.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Doe, P. J.; Efremenko, Yu.; Egorov, V.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Fast, J. E.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, F. M.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Gusev, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Hegai, A.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Kochetov, O.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J.; Leviner, L. E.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, J.; MacMullin, S.; Martin, R. D.; Meijer, S.; Mertens, S.; Nomachi, M.; Orrell, J. L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, N. R.; Phillips, D. G.; Poon, A. W. P.; Pushkin, K.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, A. G.; Shanks, B.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, K. J.; Snyder, N.; Suriano, A. M.; Thompson, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, S.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A. R.; Yu, C.-H.; Yumatov, V.

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR will search for the neutrinoless double beta decay (ββ(0ν)) of the isotope 76Ge with a mixed array of enriched and natural germanium detectors. In view of the next generation of tonne-scale germanium-based ββ(0ν)-decay searches, a major goal of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is to demonstrate a path forward to achieving a background rate at or below 1 cnt/(ROI-t-y) in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) around the 2039-keV Q-value of the 76Ge ββ(0ν)-decay. Such a requirement on the background level significantly constrains the design of the readout electronics, which is further driven by noise and energy resolution performances. We present here the low-noise low- background front-end electronics developed for the low-capacitance p-type point contact (P-PC) germanium detectors of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR. This resistive-feedback front-end, specifically designed to have low mass, is fabricated on a radioassayed fused-silica substrate where the feedback resistor consists of a sputtered thin film of high purity amorphous germanium and the feedback capacitor is based on the capacitance between gold conductive traces.

  5. The Majorana low-noise low-background front-end electronics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, E.; Avignone, III, F. T.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; et al

    2015-03-24

    The Majorana Demonstrator will search for the neutrinoless double beta decay (ββ(0ν)) of the isotope ⁷⁶Ge with a mixed array of enriched and natural germanium detectors. In view of the next generation of tonne-scale germanium-based ββ(0ν)-decay searches, a major goal of the Majorana Demonstrator is to demonstrate a path forward to achieving a background rate at or below 1 cnt/(ROI-t-y) in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) around the 2039-keV Q-value of the ⁷⁶Ge ββ(0ν)-decay. Such a requirement on the background level significantly constrains the design of the readout electronics, which is further driven by noise and energy resolutionmore » performances. We present here the low-noise low-background front-end electronics developed for the low-capacitance p-type point contact (P-PC) germanium detectors of the Majorana Demonstrator. This resistive-feedback front-end, specifically designed to have low mass, is fabricated on a radioassayed fused-silica substrate where the feedback resistor consists of a sputtered thin film of high purity amorphous germanium and the feedback capacitor is based on the capacitance between gold conductive traces.« less

  6. Reduction of electronic delay in active noise control systems--a multirate signal processing approach.

    PubMed

    Bai, Mingsian R; Lin, Yuanpei; Lai, Jienwen

    2002-02-01

    Electronic delay has been a critical problem in active noise control (ANC) systems. This is true whether a feedforward structure or a feedback structure is adopted. In particular, excessive delays would create a causality problem in a feedforward ANC system of a finite-length duct. This paper suggests a multirate signal-processing approach for minimizing the electronic delay in the control loop. In this approach, digital controllers are required in decimation and interpolation of discrete-time signals. The computation efficiency is further enhanced by a polyphase method, where the phases of low-pass finite impulse response (FIR) filters must be carefully designed to avoid unnecessary delays. Frequency domain optimization procedures based on H1, H2, and Hinfinity norms, respectively, are utilized in the FIR filter design. The proposed method was implemented by using a floating-point digital signal processor. Experimental results showed that the multirate approach remains effective for suppressing a broadband (200-600 Hz) noise in a duct with a minimum upstream measurement microphone placement of 20 cm. PMID:11863193

  7. The Majorana low background low noise front-end electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abgrall, Nicolas

    2014-03-01

    The Majorana Demonstrator will search for the neutrinoless double beta decay (ββ (0 ν)) of 76Ge with a mixed array of enriched and natural germanium detectors. In view of the next generation of tonne-scale germanium-based ββ (0 ν)-decay searches that will probe the neutrino mass scale in the inverted-hierarchy region, a major goal of the experiment is to demonstrate a path forward to achieving a background rate at or below 1 cnt/(ROI-t-y) in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) around the 2039-keV Q-value of the 76Ge ββ (0 ν)-decay. Such a requirement on the background level in conjunction with the best possible energy resolution to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in the ROI significantly constrain the readout electronics. We present here the low background low noise front-end electronics developed for the low-capacitance P-type point-contact (PPC) germanium detectors of the Majorana Demonstrator. This resistive-feedback front-end, specifically designed to have low mass, is fabricated on a radioactivity-assayed fused silica substrate where the feedback resistor consists of a sputtered thin film of high purity amorphous germanium and the feedback capacitor is based on the stray capacitance between circuit Au traces.

  8. The Majorana low-noise low-background front-end electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, E.; Avignone, III, F. T.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y. -D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Combs, D. C.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Doe, P. J.; Efremenko, Yu.; Egorov, V.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Fast, J. E.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, F. M.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Gusev, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Hegai, A.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Kochetov, O.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J.; Leviner, L. E.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, J.; MacMullin, S.; Martin, R. D.; Meijer, S.; Mertens, S.; Nomachi, M.; Orrell, J. L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, N. R.; Phillips, II, D. G.; Poon, A. W.P.; Pushkin, K.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G.H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, A. G.; Shanks, B.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, K. J.; Snyder, N.; Suriano, A. M.; Thompson, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, S.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A. R.; Yu, C. -H.; Yumatov, V.

    2015-03-24

    The Majorana Demonstrator will search for the neutrinoless double beta decay (ββ(0ν)) of the isotope ⁷⁶Ge with a mixed array of enriched and natural germanium detectors. In view of the next generation of tonne-scale germanium-based ββ(0ν)-decay searches, a major goal of the Majorana Demonstrator is to demonstrate a path forward to achieving a background rate at or below 1 cnt/(ROI-t-y) in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) around the 2039-keV Q-value of the ⁷⁶Ge ββ(0ν)-decay. Such a requirement on the background level significantly constrains the design of the readout electronics, which is further driven by noise and energy resolution performances. We present here the low-noise low-background front-end electronics developed for the low-capacitance p-type point contact (P-PC) germanium detectors of the Majorana Demonstrator. This resistive-feedback front-end, specifically designed to have low mass, is fabricated on a radioassayed fused-silica substrate where the feedback resistor consists of a sputtered thin film of high purity amorphous germanium and the feedback capacitor is based on the capacitance between gold conductive traces.

  9. Formation and nonlinear dynamics of the squeezed state of a helical electron beam with additional deceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, E. N.; Koronovskii, A. A.; Kurkin, S. A.; Hramov, A. E.

    2013-11-01

    Results of numerical simulations and analysis of the formation and nonlinear dynamics of the squeezed state of a helical electron beam in a vircator with a magnetron injection gun as an electron source and with additional electron deceleration are presented. The ranges of control parameters where the squeezed state can form in such a system are revealed, and specific features of the system dynamics are analyzed. It is shown that the formation of a squeezed state of a nonrelativistic helical electron beam in a system with electron deceleration is accompanied by low-frequency longitudinal dynamics of the space charge.

  10. Formation and nonlinear dynamics of the squeezed state of a helical electron beam with additional deceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Egorov, E. N. Koronovskii, A. A.; Kurkin, S. A.; Hramov, A. E.

    2013-11-15

    Results of numerical simulations and analysis of the formation and nonlinear dynamics of the squeezed state of a helical electron beam in a vircator with a magnetron injection gun as an electron source and with additional electron deceleration are presented. The ranges of control parameters where the squeezed state can form in such a system are revealed, and specific features of the system dynamics are analyzed. It is shown that the formation of a squeezed state of a nonrelativistic helical electron beam in a system with electron deceleration is accompanied by low-frequency longitudinal dynamics of the space charge.

  11. Additive effects of electronic and nuclear energy losses in irradiation-induced amorphization of zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Toulemonde, Marcel; Weber, William J.

    2015-12-28

    We used a combination of ion cascades and the unified thermal spike model to study the electronic effects from 800 keV Kr and Xe ion irradiation in zircon. We compared the damage production for four cases: (a) due to ion cascades alone, (b) due to ion cascades with the electronic energy loss activated as a friction term, (c) due to the thermal spike from the combined electronic and nuclear energy losses, and (d) due to ion cascades with electronic stopping and the electron-phonon interactions superimposed. We found that taking the electronic energy loss out as a friction term results in reduced damage, while the electronic electron-phonon interactions have additive impact on the final damage created per ion.

  12. Additive effects of electronic and nuclear energy loss in irradiation-induced amorphization of zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Toulemonde, Marcel; Weber, William J.

    2015-12-29

    We used a combination of ion cascades and the unified thermal spike model to study the electronic effects from 800 keV Kr and Xe ion irradiation in zircon. We compared the damage production for four cases: (a) due to ion cascades alone, (b) due to ion cascades with the electronic energy loss activated as a friction term, (c) due to the thermal spike from the combined electronic and nuclear energy losses, and (d) due to ion cascades with electronic stopping and the electron-phonon interactions superimposed. As a result, we found that taking the electronic energy loss out as a friction term results in reduced damage, while the electronic electron-phonon interactions have additive impact on the final damage created per ion.

  13. Additive effects of electronic and nuclear energy loss in irradiation-induced amorphization of zircon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Toulemonde, Marcel; Weber, William J.

    2015-12-29

    We used a combination of ion cascades and the unified thermal spike model to study the electronic effects from 800 keV Kr and Xe ion irradiation in zircon. We compared the damage production for four cases: (a) due to ion cascades alone, (b) due to ion cascades with the electronic energy loss activated as a friction term, (c) due to the thermal spike from the combined electronic and nuclear energy losses, and (d) due to ion cascades with electronic stopping and the electron-phonon interactions superimposed. As a result, we found that taking the electronic energy loss out as a frictionmore » term results in reduced damage, while the electronic electron-phonon interactions have additive impact on the final damage created per ion.« less

  14. Ion acceleration enhanced by additional neutralizing electrons in a magnetically expanding double layer plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Fujiwara, Tamiya

    2010-10-15

    Electrons neutralizing an ion beam are additionally supplied to a magnetically expanding double layer (DL) plasma from the downstream side of the DL. The rf power and the argon gas pressure are maintained at 200 W and 55 mPa, respectively, and the source magnetic field is varied in the range of about 70-550 G. It is observed that the ion beam energy corresponding to the DL potential drop increases up to 30 eV with an increase in the magnetic field when supplying the additional electrons, while it saturates at 20 eV for the case of the absence of the additional electrons. The supplied electrons are believed to be an energy source for the DL such that increasing the magnetic field is able to increase the potential drop beyond the limit found in the absence of the supplied electrons.

  15. Design and performance of the Majorana low-noise low-background front-end electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abgrall, Nicolas; Majorana Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The Majorana Demonstrator will search for the neutrinoless double beta decay (ββ (0 ν)) of the isotope 76Ge. In view of the next generation of tonne-scale germanium-based ββ (0 ν)-decay searches, a major goal of the Majorana Demonstrator is to demonstrate a path forward to achieving a background rate at or below 1 cnt/(ROI-t-y) in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) around the 2039-keV Q-value of the 76Ge ββ (0 ν)-decay. Such a requirement on the background level significantly constrains the design of the readout electronics which is further driven by noise performances. We present here the low-noise low-background front-end electronics developed for the low-capacitance P-type point-contact (PPC) germanium detectors of the Majorana Demonstrator. This resistive-feedback front-end, specifically designed to have low mass, is fabricated on a radioactivity-assayed fused silica substrate where the feedback resistor consists of a sputtered thin film of high purity amorphous germanium and the feedback capacitor is based on the capacitance between circuit Au traces. Performance studies of the front-end and associated back-end electronics in single and multi-detector systems, as well as on-site performances are reported. The Majorana Demonstrator will search for the neutrinoless double beta decay (ββ (0 ν)) of the isotope 76Ge. In view of the next generation of tonne-scale germanium-based ββ (0 ν)-decay searches, a major goal of the Majorana Demonstrator is to demonstrate a path forward to achieving a background rate at or below 1 cnt/(ROI-t-y) in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) around the 2039-keV Q-value of the 76Ge ββ (0 ν)-decay. Such a requirement on the background level significantly constrains the design of the readout electronics which is further driven by noise performances. We present here the low-noise low-background front-end electronics developed for the low-capacitance P-type point-contact (PPC) germanium detectors of the Majorana

  16. Atomic electron affinities and the role of symmetry between electron addition and subtraction in a corrected Koopmans approach.

    PubMed

    Teale, A M; De Proft, F; Geerlings, P; Tozer, D J

    2014-07-28

    The essential aspects of zero-temperature grand-canonical ensemble density-functional theory are reviewed in the context of spin-density-functional theory and are used to highlight the assumption of symmetry between electron addition and subtraction that underlies the corrected Koopmans approach of Tozer and De Proft (TDP) for computing electron affinities. The issue of symmetry is then investigated in a systematic study of atomic electron affinities, comparing TDP affinities with those from a conventional Koopmans evaluation and electronic energy differences. Although it cannot compete with affinities determined from energy differences, the TDP expression yields results that are a significant improvement over those from the conventional Koopmans expression. Key insight into the results from both expressions is provided by an analysis of plots of the electronic energy as a function of the number of electrons, which highlight the extent of symmetry between addition and subtraction. The accuracy of the TDP affinities is closely related to the nature of the orbitals involved in the electron addition and subtraction, being particularly poor in cases where there is a change in principal quantum number, but relatively accurate within a single manifold of orbitals. The analysis is then extended to a consideration of the ground state Mulliken electronegativity and chemical hardness. The findings further emphasize the key role of symmetry in determining the quality of the results. PMID:24406854

  17. A Low-Noise NbTiN Hot Electron Bolometer Mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, C. Edward; Stern, Jeffrey; Megerian, Krikor; LeDuc, Henry; Sridharan, T. K.; Gibson, Hugh; Blundell, Raymond

    2001-01-01

    Hot electron bolometer (HEB) mixer elements, based on niobium titanium nitride (NbTiN) thin film technology, have been fabricated on crystalline quartz substrates over a 20 nm thick AlN buffer layer. The film was patterned by optical lithography, yielding bolometer elements that measure about 1 micrometer long and between 2 and 12 micrometers wide. These mixer chips were mounted in a fixed-tuned waveguide mixer block, and tested in the 600 and 800 GHz frequency range. The 3-dB output bandwidth of these mixers was determined to be about 2.5 GHz and we measured a receiver noise temperature of 270 K at 630 GHz using an intermediate frequency of 1.5 GHz. The receiver has excellent amplitude stability and the noise temperature measurements are highly repeatable. An 800 GHz receiver incorporating one of these mixer chips has recently been installed at the Sub-Millimeter Telescope in Arizona for field test and for astronomical observations.

  18. Noise models and cryo-EM drift correction with a direct-electron camera

    PubMed Central

    Shigematsu, H.; Sigworth, F. J.

    2013-01-01

    Blurring due to specimen-holder drift is a common occurrence in cryo-EM images. Cameras employing active-pixel sensors are capable of high frame rates such that a single low-dose exposure can be acquired as a series of frames. In this paper we consider the possibility of tracking and compensating for overall drift in typical single-particle specimens through the analysis of frame sequences. A problem that arises in tracking through cross-correlation of frames obtained with the DE-12 camera from Direct Electron LLC is the presence of “hot-pixel noise”. This random pattern of bright pixels is highly correlated among frames. We show how a model of this noise can be employed to greatly reduce its effects. A filter function is derived that optimizes the tracking of image shifts by cross-correlation, and we demonstrate the tracking of specimen drift in typical cryo-EM specimens. PMID:23748163

  19. Relaxation oscillator-realized artificial electronic neurons, their responses, and noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hyungkwang; Ahn, Hyung-Woo; Kornijcuk, Vladimir; Kim, Guhyun; Seok, Jun Yeong; Kim, Inho; Hwang, Cheol Seong; Jeong, Doo Seok

    2016-05-01

    neuron spiking. In an attempt to generalize our proposed model, we theoretically examine ROLIF neuron circuits adopting different non-ideal op-amps having different gains and slew rates. The simulation results indicate the importance of gain in postsynaptic neuron spiking, irrespective of the slew rate (as long as the rate exceeds a particular value), providing the basis for the ROLIF neuron circuit design. Eventually, the behavior of a postsynaptic neuron in connection to multiple presynaptic neurons via synapses is highlighted in terms of EPSP evolution amid simultaneously incident asynchronous presynaptic spikes, which in fact reveals an important role of the random noise in spatial integration. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01278g

  20. Observations of correlated broadband electrostatic noise and electron-cyclotron emissions in the plasma sheet. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Roeder, J.L.; Angelopoulos, V.; Baumjohann, W.; Anderson, R.R.

    1991-11-15

    Electric field wave observations in the central plasma sheet of the earth's magnetosphere show the correlated occurrence of broadband electrostatic noise and electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic emissions. A model is proposed in which the broadband emissions are electron acoustic waves generated by an observed low energy electron beam, and the cyclotron emissions are generated by the hot electron loss cone instability. The high degree of correlation between the two emissions is provided in the model by the presence of the cold electron beam population, which allows both of the plasma instabilities to grow.

  1. Improvement in perception of image sharpness through the addition of noise and its relationship with memory texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xiazi; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Naokazu

    2015-03-01

    In a preceding study, we investigated the effects of image noise on the perception of image sharpness using white noise, and one- and two-dimensional single-frequency sinusoidal patterns as stimuli. This study extends our preceding study by evaluating natural color images, rather than black-and-white patterns. The results showed that the effect of noise in improving image sharpness perception is more evident in blurred images than in sharp images. This is consistent with the results of the preceding study. In another preceding study, we proposed "memory texture" to explain the preferred granularity of images, as a concept similar to "memory color" for preferred color reproduction. We observed individual differences in type of memory texture for each object, that is, white or 1/f noise. This study discusses the relationship between improvement of sharpness perception by adding noise, and the memory texture, following its individual differences. We found that memory texture is one of the elements that affect sharpness perception.

  2. Analysis of electron multiplying charge coupled device and scientific CMOS readout noise models for Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basden, Alastair G.

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, detectors with subelectron readout noise have been used very effectively in astronomical adaptive optics systems. Here, we compare readout noise models for the two key faint flux level detector technologies that are commonly used: electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) and scientific CMOS (sCMOS) detectors. We find that in almost all situations, EMCCD technology is advantageous, and that the commonly used simplified model for EMCCD readout is appropriate. We also find that the commonly used simple models for sCMOS readout noise are optimistic, and we recommend that a proper treatment of the sCMOS root mean square readout noise probability distribution should be considered during instrument performance modeling and development.

  3. Photocurrent enhancement in nonpolar liquids by the addition of electron scavengers

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, G.A.; Lee, K.; Tweeten, D.W.; Lipsky, S.

    1988-07-14

    The photocurrent from anthracene, triphenylamine, and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine excited above their ionization thresholds in liquid n-pentane or n-hexane is found to be enhanced by the addition of low concentrations (/approx lt/0.02 M) of the electron scavengers perfluoromethylcyclohexane or perfluorodecalin. The enhancement is not observed in solvents of higher electron mobility (e.g.,. cyclohexane, isooctane, etc.) or for scavengers of lower electron affinity (e.g., n-perfluorohexane). For the solute naphthalene, no enhancement is observed under any conditions. The effects of excitation energy and applied electric field strength are reported.

  4. Mixed-Color Multiphoton Transitions as Additional Quantum Channels for Electron Photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wayne; Becker, Maria; Beck, Joshua; Batelaan, Herman

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate mixed-color electron photoemission from tungsten nanotips. In the experiment, second-harmonic photons were introduced to modify the multiphoton emission process. A twofold increase in quantum efficiency results from the opening up of an additional three-photon quantum channel. The super-additive photoelectron signal can be controlled by input power, field polarization, and pulse overlap. The results of our study provide new prospects for quantum photonics, multiphoton microscopy, and spin-polarized electron sources. We acknowledge supports from NSF, Grant Number 1306565, 1430519. NSF Grant Number 1306565, 1430519.

  5. Ultrawide Noise Bandwidth of NbN Hot-Electron Bolometer Mixers With In Situ Gold Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretyakov, Ivan; Ryabchun, Sergey; Finkel, Matvey; Maslennikov, Sergey; Maslennikova, Anna; Kaurova, Natalia; Lobastova, Anastasia; Voronov, Boris; Gol'tsman, Gregory

    2011-06-01

    We report a noise bandwidth of 7 GHz in the new generation of NbN hot-electron bolometer (HEB) mixers that are being developed for the space observatory Millimetron. The HEB receiver driven by a 2.5-THz local oscillator offered a noise temperature of 600 K in a 50-MHz final detection bandwidth. As the filter center frequency was swept this value remained nearly constant up to the cutoff frequency of the cryogenic amplifier at 7 GHz. We believe that such a low value of the noise temperature is due to reduced radio frequency (RF) loss at the interface between the superconducting film and the gold contacts. We have also performed gain bandwidth measurements at the superconducting transition on HEB mixers with various lengths and found them to be in excellent agreement with the results of the analytical and numerical models developed for the HEB mixer with both diffusion and phonon cooling of hot electrons.

  6. Quantum electronics. Probing Johnson noise and ballistic transport in normal metals with a single-spin qubit.

    PubMed

    Kolkowitz, S; Safira, A; High, A A; Devlin, R C; Choi, S; Unterreithmeier, Q P; Patterson, D; Zibrov, A S; Manucharyan, V E; Park, H; Lukin, M D

    2015-03-01

    Thermally induced electrical currents, known as Johnson noise, cause fluctuating electric and magnetic fields in proximity to a conductor. These fluctuations are intrinsically related to the conductivity of the metal. We use single-spin qubits associated with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond to probe Johnson noise in the vicinity of conductive silver films. Measurements of polycrystalline silver films over a range of distances (20 to 200 nanometers) and temperatures (10 to 300 kelvin) are consistent with the classically expected behavior of the magnetic fluctuations. However, we find that Johnson noise is markedly suppressed next to single-crystal films, indicative of a substantial deviation from Ohm's law at length scales below the electron mean free path. Our results are consistent with a generalized model that accounts for the ballistic motion of electrons in the metal, indicating that under the appropriate conditions, nearby electrodes may be used for controlling nanoscale optoelectronic, atomic, and solid-state quantum systems. PMID:25636797

  7. Inductively coupled plasma spectrometry: Noise characteristics of aerosols, application of generalized standard additions method, and Mach disk as an emission source

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Luan

    1995-10-06

    This dissertation is focused on three problem areas in the performance of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source. The noise characteristics of aerosols produced by ICP nebulizers are investigated. A laser beam is scattered by aerosol and detected by a photomultiplier tube and the noise amplitude spectrum of the scattered radiation is measured by a spectrum analyzer. Discrete frequency noise in the aerosol generated by a Meinhard nebulizer or a direct injection nebulizer is primarily caused by pulsation in the liquid flow from the pump. A Scott-type spray chamber suppresses white noise, while a conical, straight-pass spray chamber enhances white noise, relative to the noise seen from the primary aerosol. Simultaneous correction for both spectral interferences and matrix effects in ICP atomic emission spectrometry (AES) can be accomplished by using the generalized standard additions method (GSAM). Results obtained with the application of the GSAM to the Perkin-Elmer Optima 3000 ICP atomic emission spectrometer are presented. The echelle-based polychromator with segmented-array charge-coupled device detectors enables the direct, visual examination of the overlapping lines Cd (1) 228.802 nm and As (1) 228.812 nm. The slit translation capability allows a large number of data points to be sampled, therefore, the advantage of noise averaging is gained. An ICP is extracted into a small quartz vacuum chamber through a sampling orifice in a water-cooled copper plate. Optical emission from the Mach disk region is measured with a new type of echelle spectrometer equipped with two segmented-array charge-coupled-device detectors, with an effort to improve the detection limits for simultaneous multielement analysis by ICP-AES.

  8. The effect of additives on charge decay in electron-beam charged polypropylene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillenbrand, J; Motz, T; Sessler, G M; Zhang, X; Behrendt, N; von Salis-Soglio, C; Erhard, D P; Altstädt, V; Schmidt, H-W

    2009-03-01

    The charge decay in isotactic polypropylene (i-PP) films of 50 µm thickness, containing three kinds of additives, namely a trisamide, a bisamide and a fluorinated compound, with concentrations in the range 0.004-1 wt% was studied. Compression molding was used to produce the films. The samples were either surface-charged by a corona method or volume-charged by mono-energetic electron beams of different energies, having penetration depths up to 6 µm. In all cases, surface potentials of about 200 V were chosen. After charging the films, the decay of the surface potential was studied either by an isothermal discharge method at 90 °C or by thermally stimulated discharge measurements. The results show a dependence of the decay rate on the kind of additive used, on additive concentration and on the energy of the injected charges. In particular, for samples with fluorinated additives, the stability of the surface potential decreases markedly with increasing electron energy, while such a dependence is very weak for samples containing the bisamide additive and does not exist at all for samples with the trisamide additive. These observations are tentatively explained by the radiation-induced generation of relatively mobile negative ions originating from the bisamide and fluorinated additives.

  9. A white noise approach to the Feynman integrand for electrons in random media

    SciTech Connect

    Grothaus, M. Riemann, F.; Suryawan, H. P.

    2014-01-15

    Using the Feynman path integral representation of quantum mechanics it is possible to derive a model of an electron in a random system containing dense and weakly coupled scatterers [see F. Edwards and Y. B. Gulyaev, “The density of states of a highly impure semiconductor,” Proc. Phys. Soc. 83, 495–496 (1964)]. The main goal of this paper is to give a mathematically rigorous realization of the corresponding Feynman integrand in dimension one based on the theory of white noise analysis. We refine and apply a Wick formula for the product of a square-integrable function with Donsker's delta functions and use a method of complex scaling. As an essential part of the proof we also establish the existence of the exponential of the self-intersection local times of a one-dimensional Brownian bridge. As a result we obtain a neat formula for the propagator with identical start and end point. Thus, we obtain a well-defined mathematical object which is used to calculate the density of states [see, e.g., F. Edwards and Y. B. Gulyaev, “The density of states of a highly impure semiconductor,” Proc. Phys. Soc. 83, 495–496 (1964)].

  10. Large-scale variation of electron parameters from Quasi‑Thermal Noise during WIND perigees in the Earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issautier, Karine; Ongala-Edoumou, Samuel; Moncuquet, Michel

    2016-04-01

    The quasi-thermal noise (QTN) method consists in measuring the electrostatic fluctuations produced by the thermal motion of the ambient particles. This noise is detected with a sensitive wave receiver and measured at the terminal of a passive electric antenna, which is immersed in a stable plasma. The analysis of the so-called QTN provides in situ measurements, mainly the total electron density, with a good accuracy, and thermal temperature in a large number of space media. We create a preliminary electron database to analyse the anti-correlation between electron density and temperature deduced from WIND perigees in the Earth's plasmasphere. We analyse the radio power spectra measured by the Thermal Noise Receiver (TNR), using the 100-m long dipole antenna, onboard WIND spacecraft. We develop a systematic routine to determine the electron density, core and halo temperature and the magnitude of the magnetic field based on QTN in Bernstein modes. Indeed, the spectra are weakly banded between gyroharmonics below the upper hybrid frequency, from which we derive the local electron density. From the gyrofrequency determination, we obtain an independent measure of the magnetic field magnitude, which is in close agreement with the onboard magnetometer.

  11. Electron-beam processing effect on photoemitting-structures parameters and the noise factor of microchannel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdeev, Sergey P.; Kravchenko, Aleksandr A.; Gusev, Evgeny Yu.; Petrov, Sergey N.

    2007-05-01

    This paper presents invesigation findings of electron-beam influence on parameters and characteristics of trialcali and bialkali photocathocles of vacuum photoelectric devices and electron-beam amplification channels modification of microchannel plate image intensifier (MCP) of the electrooptical transducer. The electron-beam processing (EBP) increases total sensitivity by 10 - 12% and reduces spoilage in photocathode production to a fourth. The noise factor of MCP subjected EBP before recovery procedure MCP, reduces in 1.5 - 2.0 times, the sensibility of electrooptical transducer increases.

  12. Studies of the temperature dependence of the photomultiplier FEU-157 noise characteristics in the single-electron mode.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevodovskij, P. V.; Sosonkin, M. G.; Fomenko, A. A.

    The sensitivity of FEU-157 photomultipliers with GaAs photocathode in the wavelength range 700 - 900 nm is higher than that of widely used photomultipliers FEU-79. When operated with faint light sources at room temperatures, the FEU-157 noises exceed the useful signal. The noises can be reduced by cooling the photocathode. A device for studying the temperature dependence of the FEU-157 noise characteristics in the single-electron mode is described. The results of measurements are given for the photon-counting mode. The conclusion is drawn that FEU-157 is feasible for observations of faint sources in the photon-counting mode only when it is cooled to about -30°C.

  13. Electronic device increases threshold sensitivity and removes noise from FM communications receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, W. M.; Loch, F. J.

    1971-01-01

    Threshold extension device connected between demodulator output and filter output minimizes clicking noise. Device consists of click-eliminating signal transfer channel with follow-and-hold circuit and detector for sensing click impulses. Final output consists of signal plus low level noise without high amplitude impulses.

  14. Properties of Inconel 625 Mesh Structures Grown by Electron Beam Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    List III, Frederick Alyious; Dehoff, Ryan R; Lowe, Larry E; Sames, William J

    2014-01-01

    Relationships between electron beam parameters (beam current, beam speed, and beam focus) and physical properties (mass, diameter, elastic modulus, and yield strength) have been investigated for Inconel 625 mesh cubes fabricated using an additive manufacturing technology based on electron beam melting. The elastic modulus and yield strength of the mesh cubes have been systematically varied by approximately a factor of ten by changing the electron beam parameters. Simple models have been used to understand better these relationships. Structural anisotropies of the mesh associated with the layered build architecture have been observed and may contribute, along with microstructural anisotropies, to the anisotropic mechanical properties of the mesh. Knowledge of this kind is likely applicable to other metal and alloy systems and is essential to rapidly realize the full potential of this burgeoning technology.

  15. Increasing the noise immunity of optical-electronic systems based on video cameras with an optical converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boronenko, M. P.; Gulyaev, P. Yu; Seregin, A. E.; Poluhina, K. G.

    2015-11-01

    The luminophor coating of an electro- optical converter afterglow introduces an additional error to the measurement. The ratio that allows to calculate the intensity of spurious illumination at each subsequent frame have been determinate according to experimental data of luminescence kinetics. The proposed method increases the noise immunity of the electrooptical converter by eliminating luminophor afterglow.

  16. Control of linear accelerator noise in the Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL)

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, M.T.

    1986-01-01

    The Los Alamos FEL requires tight control of the amplitudes and phases of the fields in two linear accelerator tanks to obtain stable lasing. The accelerator control loops must establish constant, stable, repeatable amplitudes and phases of the rf fields and must have excellent bandwidth to control high-frequency noise components. A model of the feedback loops has been developed that agrees well with measurements and allows easy substitution of components and circuits, thus reducing breadboarding requirements. The model permits both frequency and time-domain analysis. This paper describes the accelerator control scheme and our model and discusses the control of noise in feedback loops, showing how low-frequency-noise components (errors) can be corrected, but high-frequency-noise components (errors) are actually amplified by the feedback circuit. Measurements of noise in both open- and closed-loop modes are shown and comparison is made with results from the model calculations.

  17. Influence of modifying additives on the electronic state of supported palladium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestryakov, A. N.; Lunin, V. V.; Fuentes, S.; Bogdanchikova, N.; Barrera, A.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of modifying additives of Ce, Zr, La and Cs oxides on the electronic state of palladium supported on γ-Al 2O 3 has been studied by IR-spectroscopy of adsorbed CO, diffuse reflectance UV-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and H 2 chemisorption. The modified supports have been prepared using impregnation, coprecipitation and sol-gel methods. It is established that Ce and Zr oxide additives increase the effective charge of palladium ions whereas La and Cs oxides lower it. The effect of metal-support interaction is stronger in samples prepared by sol-gel than by coprecipitation

  18. Performance Analysis of a New Coded TH-CDMA Scheme in Dispersive Infrared Channel with Additive Gaussian Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdi, Mazda; Kenari, Masoumeh Nasiri

    2013-06-01

    We consider a time-hopping based multiple access scheme introduced in [1] for communication over dispersive infrared links, and evaluate its performance for correlator and matched filter receivers. In the investigated time-hopping code division multiple access (TH-CDMA) method, the transmitter benefits a low rate convolutional encoder. In this method, the bit interval is divided into Nc chips and the output of the encoder along with a PN sequence assigned to the user determines the position of the chip in which the optical pulse is transmitted. We evaluate the multiple access performance of the system for correlation receiver considering background noise which is modeled as White Gaussian noise due to its large intensity. For the correlation receiver, the results show that for a fixed processing gain, at high transmit power, where the multiple access interference has the dominant effect, the performance improves by the coding gain. But at low transmit power, in which the increase of coding gain leads to the decrease of the chip time, and consequently, to more corruption due to the channel dispersion, there exists an optimum value for the coding gain. However, for the matched filter, the performance always improves by the coding gain. The results show that the matched filter receiver outperforms the correlation receiver in the considered cases. Our results show that, for the same bandwidth and bit rate, the proposed system excels other multiple access techniques, like conventional CDMA and time hopping scheme.

  19. Performance analysis for time-frequency MUSIC algorithm in presence of both additive noise and array calibration errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodja, Mohamed; Belouchrani, Adel; Abed-Meraim, Karim

    2012-12-01

    This article deals with the application of Spatial Time-Frequency Distribution (STFD) to the direction finding problem using the Multiple Signal Classification (MUSIC)algorithm. A comparative performance analysis is performed for the method under consideration with respect to that using data covariance matrix when the received array signals are subject to calibration errors in a non-stationary environment. An unified analytical expression of the Direction Of Arrival (DOA) error estimation is derived for both methods. Numerical results show the effect of the parameters intervening in the derived expression on the algorithm performance. It is particularly observed that for low Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) and high Signal to sensor Perturbation Ratio (SPR) the STFD method gives better performance, while for high SNR and for the same SPR both methods give similar performance.

  20. Observation of Shot Noise Suppression at Optical Wavelengths in a Relativistic Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, Daniel; Stupakov, Gennady; /SLAC

    2012-06-19

    Control of collective properties of relativistic particles is increasingly important in modern accelerators. In particular, shot noise affects accelerator performance by driving instabilities or by competing with coherent processes. We present experimental observations of shot noise suppression in a relativistic beam at the Linac Coherent Light Source. By adjusting the dispersive strength of a chicane, we observe a decrease in the optical transition radiation emitted from a downstream foil. We show agreement between the experimental results, theoretical models, and 3D particle simulations.

  1. Proton and Electron Additions to Iron (II) Dinitrogen Complexes Containing Pendant Amines

    SciTech Connect

    Heiden, Zachariah M.; Chen, Shentan; Labios, Liezel AN; Bullock, R. Morris; Walter, Eric D.; Tyson, Elizabeth L.; Mock, Michael T.

    2014-03-10

    We describe a single site cis-(H)FeII-N2 complex, generated by the protonation of an iron-carbon bond of a "reduced" iron complex, that models key aspects of proposed protonated intermediates of the E4 state of nitrogenase. The influence on N2 binding from the addition of protons to the pendant amine sites in the second coordination sphere is described. Furthermore, the addition of electrons to the protonated complexes results in H2 loss. The mechanism of H2 loss is explored to draw a parallel to the origin of H2 loss (homolytic or heterolytic) and the nature of N2 coordination in intermediates of the E4 state of nitrogenase.

  2. Next Generation Orthopaedic Implants by Additive Manufacturing Using Electron Beam Melting

    PubMed Central

    Murr, Lawrence E.; Gaytan, Sara M.; Martinez, Edwin; Medina, Frank; Wicker, Ryan B.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents some examples of knee and hip implant components containing porous structures and fabricated in monolithic forms utilizing electron beam melting (EBM). In addition, utilizing stiffness or relative stiffness versus relative density design plots for open-cellular structures (mesh and foam components) of Ti-6Al-4V and Co-29Cr-6Mo alloy fabricated by EBM, it is demonstrated that stiffness-compatible implants can be fabricated for optimal stress shielding for bone regimes as well as bone cell ingrowth. Implications for the fabrication of patient-specific, monolithic, multifunctional orthopaedic implants using EBM are described along with microstructures and mechanical properties characteristic of both Ti-6Al-4V and Co-29Cr-6Mo alloy prototypes, including both solid and open-cellular prototypes manufactured by additive manufacturing (AM) using EBM. PMID:22956957

  3. Theory of signal and noise in double-gated nanoscale electronic pH sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Go, Jonghyun; Nair, Pradeep R.; Alam, Muhammad A.

    2012-08-01

    The maximum sensitivity of classical nanowire (NW)-based pH sensors is defined by the Nernst limit of 59 mV/pH. For typical noise levels in ultra-small single-gated nanowire sensors, the signal-to-noise ratio is often not sufficient to resolve pH changes necessary for a broad range of applications. Recently, a new class of double-gated devices was demonstrated to offer apparent 'super-Nernstian' response (>59 mV/pH) by amplifying the original pH signal through innovative biasing schemes. However, the pH-sensitivity of these nanoscale devices as a function of biasing configurations, number of electrodes, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) remains poorly understood. Even the basic question such as 'Do double-gated sensors actually resolve smaller changes in pH compared to conventional single-gated sensors in the presence of various sources of noise?' remains unanswered. In this article, we provide a comprehensive numerical and analytical theory of signal and noise of double-gated pH sensors to conclude that, while the theoretical lower limit of pH-resolution does not improve for double-gated sensors, this new class of sensors does improve the (instrument-limited) pH resolution.

  4. Tracking performance of a combined Costas/AFC-loop under noisy Rayleigh/Rician channel conditions with additive Gaussian noise jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleine, Achim

    Models were developed to investigate the tracking behavior of combined Costas/AFC (Automatic Frequency Control) feedback loops under Rayleigh/Rician fading conditions with additive Gaussian noise jamming. A general linearized tracking model was developed for land-mobile channels. The model can be used for the nonlinearized case with sinusoidal phase detection characteristic using a standard solution of the Fokker-Planck equation. A tracking analysis for Costas/AFC loops with coherent automatic gain control, and an accuracy analysis for interferometers equipped with Costas/AFC loops are treated as examples. The tracking model is the most inaccurate in the case of quasistationary channels.

  5. Performance of signal-to-noise ratio estimation for scanning electron microscope using autocorrelation Levinson-Durbin recursion model.

    PubMed

    Sim, K S; Lim, M S; Yeap, Z X

    2016-07-01

    A new technique to quantify signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) value of the scanning electron microscope (SEM) images is proposed. This technique is known as autocorrelation Levinson-Durbin recursion (ACLDR) model. To test the performance of this technique, the SEM image is corrupted with noise. The autocorrelation function of the original image and the noisy image are formed. The signal spectrum based on the autocorrelation function of image is formed. ACLDR is then used as an SNR estimator to quantify the signal spectrum of noisy image. The SNR values of the original image and the quantified image are calculated. The ACLDR is then compared with the three existing techniques, which are nearest neighbourhood, first-order linear interpolation and nearest neighbourhood combined with first-order linear interpolation. It is shown that ACLDR model is able to achieve higher accuracy in SNR estimation. PMID:26871742

  6. A low noise front end electronics for micro-channel plate detector with wedge and strip anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, K.; Li, F.; Liang, F.; Chen, L.; Jin, G.

    2016-03-01

    A low noise Front End Electronics (FEE) for two-dimensional position sensitive Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) detector has been developed. The MCP detector is based on Wedge and Strip Anode (WSA) with induction readout mode. The WSA has three electrodes, the wedge electrode, the strip electrode, and the zigzag electrode. Then, three readout channels are designed in the Printed Circuit Board (PCB). The FEE is calibrated by a pulse generator from Agilent. We also give an analysis of the charge loss from the CSA. The noise levels of the three channels are less than 1 fC RMS at the shaping time of 200 ns. The experimental result shows that the position resolution of the MCP detector coupled with the designed PCB can reach up to 110 μm.

  7. The consequence of continuous current branching on current-noise spectra in field-effect and high-electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Starikov, E.; Shiktorov, P.; Gruzinskis, V.; Varani, L.; Marinchio, H.; Reggiani, L.

    2009-04-23

    The problems related with the intrinsic noise in FET/HEMT channels induced by continuous branching of the total current between channel and gate are considered in the framework of a simple analytical model and its predictions on the current-noise spectra. Main branching-induced effects such as the appearance of an additional noise related to the excitation of plasma waves, its dependence on FET/HEMT embedding circuits, interference properties, etc. are analysed.

  8. The enhancement of cosmic radio noise absorption due to hiss-driven energetic electron precipitation during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haimeng; Yuan, Zhigang; Yu, Xiongdong; Huang, Shiyong; Wang, Dedong; Wang, Zhenzhen; Qiao, Zheng; Wygant, John R.

    2015-07-01

    The Van Allen probes, low-altitude NOAA satellite, MetOp satellite, and riometer are used to analyze variations of precipitating energetic electron fluxes and cosmic radio noise absorption (CNA) driven by plasmaspheric hiss with respect to geomagnetic activities. The hiss-driven energetic electron precipitations (at L ~ 4.7-5.3, magnetic local time (MLT) ~ 8-9) are observed during geomagnetic quiet condition and substorms, respectively. We find that the CNA detected by riometers increased very little in the hiss-driven event during quiet condition on 6 September 2012. The hiss-driven enhancement of riometer was still little during the first substorm on 30 September 2012. However, the absorption detected by the riometer largely increased, while the energies of the injected electrons became higher during the second substorm on 30 September 2012. The enhancement of CNA (ΔCNA) observed by the riometer and calculated with precipitating energetic electrons is in agreement during the second substorm, implying that the precipitating energetic electrons increase CNA to an obviously detectable level of the riometer during the second substorm on 30 September 2012. The conclusion is consistent with Rodger et al. (2012), which suggest that the higher level of ΔCNA prefers to occur in the substorms, because substorms may produce more intense energetic electron precipitation associated with electron injection. Furthermore, the combination of the observations and theory calculations also suggests that higher-energy electron (>55 keV) precipitation contributes more to the ΔCNA than the lower energy electron precipitation. In this paper, the higher-energy electron precipitation is related to lower frequency hiss.

  9. Chemostat Studies of TCE-Dehalogenating Anaerobic Consortia under Excess and Limited Electron Donor Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semprini, L.; Azizian, M.; Green, J.; Mayer-Blackwell, K.; Spormann, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Two cultures - the Victoria Strain (VS) and the Evanite Strain (EV), enriched with the organohalide respiring bacteria Dehalococcoides mccartyi - were grown in chemostats for more than 4 years at a mean cell residence time of 50 days. The slow doubling rate represents growth likely experienced in the subsurface. The chemostats were fed formate as an electron donor and trichloroethene (TCE) as the terminal electron acceptor. Under excess formate conditions, stable operation was observed with respect to TCE transformation, steady-state hydrogen (H2) concentrations (40 nM), and the structure of the dehalogenating community. Both cultures completely transformed TCE to ethene, with minor amounts of vinyl chloride (VC) observed, along with acetate formation. When formate was limited, TCE was transformed incompletely to ethene (40-60%) and VC (60- 40%), and H2 concentrations ranged from 1 to 3 nM. The acetate concentration dropped below detection. Batch kinetic studies of TCE transformation with chemostat harvested cells found transformation rates of c-DCE and VC were greatly reduced when the cells were grown with limited formate. Upon increasing formate addition to the chemostats, from limited to excess, essentially complete transformation of TCE to ethene was achieved. The increase in formate was associated with an increase in H2 concentration and the production of acetate. Results of batch kinetic tests showed increases in transformation rates for TCE and c-DCE by factors of 3.5 and 2.5, respectively, while VC rates increased by factors of 33 to 500, over a six month period. Molecular analysis of chemostat samples is being performed to quantify the changes in copy numbers of reductase genes and to determine whether shifts in the strains of Dehalococcoides mccartyi where responsible for the observed rate increases. The results demonstrate the importance of electron donor supply for successful in-situ remediation.

  10. Temperature dependency and reliability of through substrate via InAlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors as determined using low frequency noise measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hsien-Chin; Peng, Li-Yi; Wang, Hou-Yu; Wang, Hsiang-Chun; Kao, Hsuan-Ling; Chien, Feng-Tso; Lin, Jia-Ching; Chang, Kuo-Jen; Cheng, Yi-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    The reliability of a InAlN/GaN/Si high electron mobility transistor device was studied using low frequency noise measurements under various stress conditions. By applying the through substrate via (TSV) technology beneath the active region of the device, buffer/transition layer trapping caused by the GaN/Si lattice mismatch was suppressed. In addition, a backside SiO2/Al heat sink material improved thermal stability and eliminated the vertical leakage current of the proposed device. Applying the TSV technology improved the subthreshold swing slope from 260 to 230 mV/dec, owing to the stronger channel modulation ability and reduced leakage current of the device. The latticed-matched InAlN/GaN heterostructure had a stable performance after high current operation stress. The suppression of buffer/transition layer traps of the TSV device is a dominant factor in device reliability after long-term high-electric-field stress.

  11. Wide-bandwidth electron bolometric mixers - A 2DEG prototype and potential for low-noise THz receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Jian-Xun; Agahi, Farid; Dai, Dong; Musante, Charles F.; Grammer, Wes; Lau, Kei M.; Yngvesson, K. S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a new type of electron bolometric ('hot electron') mixer. We have demonstrated a 3 order-of-magnitude improvement in the bandwidth compared with previously known types of electron bolometric mixers, by using the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) medium at the heterointerface between AlGaAs and GaAs. We have tested both in-house MOCVD-grown material and MBE material, with similar results. The conversion loss (Lc) at 94 GHz is presently 18 dB for a mixer operating at 20 K, and calculations indicate that Lc can be decreased to about 10 dB in future devices. Calculated and measured curves of Lc versus P(LO), and I(DC), respectively, agree well. We argue that there are several different configurations of electron bolometric mixers, which will all show wide bandwidth, and that these devices are likely to become important as low-noise THz receivers in the future.

  12. Noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Catlin, F I

    1986-03-01

    Hearing loss affects 30 million people in the United States; of these, 21 million are over the age of 65 years. This disorder may have several causes: heredity, noise, aging, and disease. Hearing loss from noise has been recognized for centuries but was generally ignored until some time after the Industrial Revolution. Hearing loss from occupational exposure to hazardous noise was identified as a compensable disability by the United States courts in 1948 to 1959. Development of noisy jet engines and supersonic aircraft created additional claims for personal and property damage in the 1950s and 1960s. These conditions led to legislation for noise control in the form of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 and the Noise Control Act of 1972. Protection of the noise-exposed employee was also an objective of the Hearing Conservation Act of 1971. Subsequent studies have confirmed the benefits of periodic hearing tests for workers exposed to hazardous noise and of otologic evaluation as part of the hearing conservation process. Research studies in laboratory animals, using scanning electron microscopical techniques, have demonstrated that damage to the inner ear and organ of hearing can occur even though subjective (conditioned) response to sound stimuli remains unaffected. Some investigators have employed an epidemiologic approach to identify risk factors and to develop profiles to susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss. The need for joint involvement of workers and employers in the reduction and control of occupational noise hazards is evident. PMID:2938482

  13. Noise-induced hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Catlin, F.I.

    1986-03-01

    Hearing loss affects 30 million people in the United States; of these, 21 million are over the age of 65 years. This disorder may have several causes: heredity, noise, aging, and disease. Hearing loss from noise has been recognized for centuries but was generally ignored until some time after the Industrial Revolution. Hearing loss from occupational exposure to hazardous noise was identified as a compensable disability by the United States courts in 1948 to 1959. Development of noisy jet engines and supersonic aircraft created additional claims for personal and property damage in the 1950s and 1960s. These conditions led to legislation for noise control in the form of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 and the Noise Control Act of 1972. Protection of the noise-exposed employee was also an objective of the Hearing Conservation Act of 1971. Subsequent studies have confirmed the benefits of periodic hearing tests for workers exposed to hazardous noise and of otologic evaluation as part of the hearing conservation process. Research studies in laboratory animals, using scanning electron microscopical techniques, have demonstrated that damage to the inner ear and organ of hearing can occur even though subjective (conditioned) response to sound stimuli remains unaffected. Some investigators have employed an epidemiologic approach to identify risk factors and to develop profiles to susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss. The need for joint involvement of workers and employers in the reduction and control of occupational noise hazards is evident. 19 references.

  14. MEDUSA-32: A low noise, low power silicon strip detector front-end electronics, for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicuttin, Andres; Colavita, Alberto; Cerdeira, Alberto; Fratnik, Fabio; Vacchi, Andrea

    1997-02-01

    In this report we describe a mixed analog-digital integrated circuit (IC) designed as the front-end electronics for silicon strip-detectors for space applications. In space power consumption, compactness and robustness become critical constraints for a pre-amplifier design. The IC is a prototype with 32 complete channels, and it is intended for a large area particle tracker of a new generation of gamma ray telescopes. Each channel contains a charge sensitive amplifier, a pulse shaper, a discriminator and two digital buffers. The reference trip point of the discriminator is adjustable. This chip also has a custom PMOSFET transistor per channel, included in order to provide the high dynamic resistance needed to reverse-bias the strip diode. The digital part of the chip is used to store and serially shift out the state of the channels. There is also a storage buffer that allows the disabling of non-functioning channels if it is required by the data acquisition system. An input capacitance of 30 pF introduced at the input of the front-end produces less than 1000 electrons of RMS equivalent noise charge (ENC), for a total power dissipation of only 60 μW per channel. The chip was made using Orbit's 1.2 μm double poly, double metal n-well low noise CMOS process. The dimensions of the IC are 2400 μm × 8840 μm.

  15. Experimental violation of bell-like inequalities by electronic shot noise.

    PubMed

    Forgues, Jean-Charles; Lupien, Christian; Reulet, Bertrand

    2015-04-01

    We report measurements of the correlations between electromagnetic field quadratures at two frequencies f1=7  GHz and f1=7.5  GHz of the radiation emitted by a tunnel junction placed at very low temperature and excited at frequency f1+f2. We demonstrate the existence of two-mode squeezing and violation of a Bell-like inequality, thereby proving the existence of entanglement in the quantum shot noise radiated by the tunnel junction. PMID:25884119

  16. Theory of Light Emission from Quantum Noise in Plasmonic Contacts: Above-Threshold Emission from Higher-Order Electron-Plasmon Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaasbjerg, Kristen; Nitzan, Abraham

    2015-03-01

    We develop a theoretical framework for the description of light emission from plasmonic contacts based on the nonequilibrium Green function formalism. Our theory establishes a fundamental link between the finite-frequency quantum noise and ac conductance of the contact and the light emission. Calculating the quantum noise to higher orders in the electron-plasmon interaction, we identify a plasmon-induced electron-electron interaction as the source of experimentally observed above-threshold light emission from biased STM contacts. Our findings provide important insight into the effect of interactions on the light emission from atomic-scale contacts.

  17. Relaxation oscillator-realized artificial electronic neurons, their responses, and noise.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyungkwang; Ahn, Hyung-Woo; Kornijcuk, Vladimir; Kim, Guhyun; Seok, Jun Yeong; Kim, Inho; Hwang, Cheol Seong; Jeong, Doo Seok

    2016-05-14

    A proof-of-concept relaxation oscillator-based leaky integrate-and-fire (ROLIF) neuron circuit is realized by using an amorphous chalcogenide-based threshold switch and non-ideal operational amplifier (op-amp). The proposed ROLIF neuron offers biologically plausible features such as analog-type encoding, signal amplification, unidirectional synaptic transmission, and Poisson noise. The synaptic transmission between pre- and postsynaptic neurons is achieved through a passive synapse (simple resistor). The synaptic resistor coupled to the non-ideal op-amp realizes excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) evolution that evokes postsynaptic neuron spiking. In an attempt to generalize our proposed model, we theoretically examine ROLIF neuron circuits adopting different non-ideal op-amps having different gains and slew rates. The simulation results indicate the importance of gain in postsynaptic neuron spiking, irrespective of the slew rate (as long as the rate exceeds a particular value), providing the basis for the ROLIF neuron circuit design. Eventually, the behavior of a postsynaptic neuron in connection to multiple presynaptic neurons via synapses is highlighted in terms of EPSP evolution amid simultaneously incident asynchronous presynaptic spikes, which in fact reveals an important role of the random noise in spatial integration. PMID:27103542

  18. Thermographic In-Situ Process Monitoring of the Electron Beam Melting Technology used in Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Dehoff, Ryan R; Lloyd, Peter D; Lowe, Larry E; Ulrich, Joseph B

    2013-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been utilizing the ARCAM electron beam melting technology to additively manufacture complex geometric structures directly from powder. Although the technology has demonstrated the ability to decrease costs, decrease manufacturing lead-time and fabricate complex structures that are impossible to fabricate through conventional processing techniques, certification of the component quality can be challenging. Because the process involves the continuous deposition of successive layers of material, each layer can be examined without destructively testing the component. However, in-situ process monitoring is difficult due to metallization on inside surfaces caused by evaporation and condensation of metal from the melt pool. This work describes a solution to one of the challenges to continuously imaging inside of the chamber during the EBM process. Here, the utilization of a continuously moving Mylar film canister is described. Results will be presented related to in-situ process monitoring and how this technique results in improved mechanical properties and reliability of the process.

  19. Addition of alcohols and hydrocarbons to fullerenes by photosensitized electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Lem, G.; Schuster, D.I.; Courtney, S.H.; Lu, Q.; Wilson, S.R. )

    1995-01-11

    We report the formation of C[sub 60] radical cations by photosensitized electron transfer and the capture of the cation by nucleophiles such as alcohols to yield alkoxy-substituted fullerenes. In addition, we report selective trapping of the radical cation by reactive hydrogen donors to produce alkyl-substituted fullerenes. The finding that fullerene radical cations in the vapor phase are unreactive toward alcohols was rationalized in terms of resistance to formation of product in which the previously highly delocalized positive charge becomes strongly localized upon the oxygen atom of the nucleophile. This inhibition is not the case in solution, probably because of solvation effects. We expect to utilize these novel reactions of fullerenes to add other types of nucleophiles (such as cyanide) and hydrogen donors (such as thiols) to C[sub 60], thus opening a wider window for functionalization of fullerenes for synthetic purposes. These studies once again demonstrate the value of using the crown ether-methanofullerene (1) to conveniently follow the progress of new chemical reactions of C[sub 60] in solution by ESI-MS. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Loophole-free Bell test using electron spins in diamond: second experiment and additional analysis.

    PubMed

    Hensen, B; Kalb, N; Blok, M S; Dréau, A E; Reiserer, A; Vermeulen, R F L; Schouten, R N; Markham, M; Twitchen, D J; Goodenough, K; Elkouss, D; Wehner, S; Taminiau, T H; Hanson, R

    2016-01-01

    The recently reported violation of a Bell inequality using entangled electronic spins in diamonds (Hensen et al., Nature 526, 682-686) provided the first loophole-free evidence against local-realist theories of nature. Here we report on data from a second Bell experiment using the same experimental setup with minor modifications. We find a violation of the CHSH-Bell inequality of 2.35 ± 0.18, in agreement with the first run, yielding an overall value of S = 2.38 ± 0.14. We calculate the resulting P-values of the second experiment and of the combined Bell tests. We provide an additional analysis of the distribution of settings choices recorded during the two tests, finding that the observed distributions are consistent with uniform settings for both tests. Finally, we analytically study the effect of particular models of random number generator (RNG) imperfection on our hypothesis test. We find that the winning probability per trial in the CHSH game can be bounded knowing only the mean of the RNG bias. This implies that our experimental result is robust for any model underlying the estimated average RNG bias, for random bits produced up to 690 ns too early by the random number generator. PMID:27509823

  1. Loophole-free Bell test using electron spins in diamond: second experiment and additional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hensen, B.; Kalb, N.; Blok, M. S.; Dréau, A. E.; Reiserer, A.; Vermeulen, R. F. L.; Schouten, R. N.; Markham, M.; Twitchen, D. J.; Goodenough, K.; Elkouss, D.; Wehner, S.; Taminiau, T. H.; Hanson, R.

    2016-01-01

    The recently reported violation of a Bell inequality using entangled electronic spins in diamonds (Hensen et al., Nature 526, 682–686) provided the first loophole-free evidence against local-realist theories of nature. Here we report on data from a second Bell experiment using the same experimental setup with minor modifications. We find a violation of the CHSH-Bell inequality of 2.35 ± 0.18, in agreement with the first run, yielding an overall value of S = 2.38 ± 0.14. We calculate the resulting P-values of the second experiment and of the combined Bell tests. We provide an additional analysis of the distribution of settings choices recorded during the two tests, finding that the observed distributions are consistent with uniform settings for both tests. Finally, we analytically study the effect of particular models of random number generator (RNG) imperfection on our hypothesis test. We find that the winning probability per trial in the CHSH game can be bounded knowing only the mean of the RNG bias. This implies that our experimental result is robust for any model underlying the estimated average RNG bias, for random bits produced up to 690 ns too early by the random number generator. PMID:27509823

  2. 36 CFR 1236.28 - What additional requirements apply to the selection and maintenance of electronic records storage...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What additional requirements apply to the selection and maintenance of electronic records storage media for permanent records? 1236.28 Section 1236.28 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT ELECTRONIC...

  3. Photon-Noise Limited Direct Detector Based on Disorder-Controlled Electron Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, B.; McGrath, W.; Gershenson, M.; Sergeev, A.

    1999-01-01

    We present a new concept for a hot-electron direct detector (HEDD) capable of counting single millimeter-wave photons. The detector is based on a transition edge sensor (1-meu size bridge) made form a disordered superconducting film.

  4. Spin noise of electrons and holes in (In,Ga)As quantum dots: Experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasenapp, Ph.; Smirnov, D. S.; Greilich, A.; Hackmann, J.; Glazov, M. M.; Anders, F. B.; Bayer, M.

    2016-05-01

    The spin fluctuations of electron and hole doped self-assembled quantum dot ensembles are measured optically in the low-intensity limit of a probe laser for absence and presence of longitudinal or transverse magnetic fields. The experimental results are modeled by two complementary approaches based either on a semiclassical or quantum mechanical description. This allows us to characterize the hyperfine interaction of electron and hole spins with the surrounding bath of nuclei on time scales covering several orders of magnitude. Our results demonstrate (i) the intrinsic precession of the electron spin fluctuations around the effective Overhauser field caused by the host lattice nuclear spins, (ii) the comparably long time scales for electron and hole spin decoherence, as well as (iii) the dramatic enhancement of the spin lifetimes induced by a longitudinal magnetic field due to the decoupling of nuclear and charge carrier spins.

  5. Noise parameters and light sensitivity of low-noise high-electron-mobility transistors at 300 and 12.5 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pospieszalski, Marian W.; Weinreb, Sander; Chao, Pane-Chane; Palmateer, Susan C.; Smith, Phillip M.

    1986-01-01

    The four noise parameters of cryogenically cooled HEMTs have been investigated. Two different HEMT structures, with and without a spacer layer, were tested. The noise parameters of both structures were similar at room temperature, while they were dramatically different at cryogenic temperatures. The minimum noise temperatures measured at 8.4 GHz were 75 + or 5 K at room temperature and 8.5 + or - 1.5 K at the temperature of 12.5 K. The cryogenic performance is the best ever observed for field-effect transistors.

  6. Additive manufacturing of Inconel 718 using electron beam melting: Processing, post-processing, & mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sames, William James, V.

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) process parameters were studied for production of the high temperature alloy Inconel 718 using Electron Beam Melting (EBM) to better understand the relationship between processing, microstructure, and mechanical properties. Processing parameters were analyzed for impact on process time, process temperature, and the amount of applied energy. The applied electron beam energy was shown to be integral to the formation of swelling defects. Standard features in the microstructure were identified, including previously unidentified solidification features such as shrinkage porosity and non-equilibrium phases. The as-solidified structure does not persist in the bulk of EBM parts due to a high process hold temperature (˜1000°C), which causes in situ homogenization. The most significant variability in as-fabricated microstructure is the formation of intragranular delta-phase needles, which can form in samples produced with lower process temperatures (< 960°C). A novel approach was developed and demonstrated for controlling the temperature of cool down, thus providing a technique for in situ heat treatment of material. This technique was used to produce material with hardness of 478+/-7 HV with no post-processing, which exceeds the hardness of peak-aged Inconel 718. Traditional post-processing methods of hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and solution treatment and aging (STA) were found to result in variability in grain growth and phase solution. Recrystallization and grain structure are identified as possible mechanisms to promote grain growth. These results led to the conclusion that the first step in thermal post-processing of EBM Inconel 718 should be an optimized solution treatment to reset phase variation in the as-fabricated microstructure without incurring significant grain growth. Such an optimized solution treatment was developed (1120°C, 2hr) for application prior to aging or HIP. The majority of as-fabricated tensile properties met ASTM

  7. A study of the temperature dependence of the noise characteristics of the FEU-157 photomultiplier in the single-electron mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevodovskij, P. V.; Sosonkin, M. G.; Fomenko, A. A.

    1993-04-01

    The sensitivity of the FEU-157 photomultiplier with a GaAs photocathode in the wavelength range 700-900 nm is higher than that of the widely used FEU-79 photomultiplier. When operated with faint light sources, however, the noises of the former at room temperatures exceed the useful signal. The noises could be reduced by cooling the photocathode. A device is described which has been designed for studying the temperature dependence of FEU-157 noise characteristics in the single-electron mode. Results of measurements are given. It is concluded that, for observations of faint light sources, the photocathode must be cooled to about -30 C.

  8. The development of extremely low-noise InAs electron APDs for SWIR active or passive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Andrew R. J.; Tan, Chee Hing; David, John P. R.

    2009-05-01

    We report on the characterisation of impact ionisation in InAs and the development of practical InAs avalanche photodiodes (APDs) to exploit the properties identified. Avalanche multiplication measurements show that the hole ionisation coefficient is negligible in InAs. We have demonstrated that this results in extremely low excess multiplication noise, F<2, for electron initiated gain. Indeed the excess noise measured was comparable to the excellent results reported for HgCdTe APDs and notably lower than those reported for other III-V based APDs. It could be desirable to exploit this extremely low excess noise characteristic, now demonstrated in a III-V material, in a number of applications. In this work we consider in particular the exploitation in an InAs APD focal plane array, to achieve enhanced sensitivity imaging in the SWIR. The greatest barrier to such exploitation is the requirement to sufficiently suppress the reverse leakage current, typically present in InAs diodes under high reverse bias at room temperature. We report on initial developments in this respect, presenting leakage current results for the temperature ranges accessible by both thermoelectric and Stirling engine cooling. These demonstrate that InAs APDs have the potential to operate at higher temperatures than the sMWIR sensitive composition of HgCdTe currently used in emerging APD focal plane array applications. We also show that InAs APDs are capable of operating at bias voltages below 10V, supporting easy integration with fine pitch read out ICs, without band to band tunnelling contributing significantly to the leakage current, even at low operating temperatures.

  9. Phosphite radicals and their reactions. Examples of redox, substitution, and addition reactions. [Gamma rays and electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, K.; Asmus, K.D.

    1980-08-21

    Phosphite radicals HPO/sub 3/- and PO/sub 3//sup 2/-, which exist in an acid-base equilibrium with pK = 5.75, are shown to take part in various types of reactions. In the absence of scavengers, they disappear mainly by second-order disproportionation and combination; a first-order contribution to the decay is also indicated. HPO/sub 3/- and PO/sub 3//sup 2/- are good reductants toward electron acceptors such as tetranitromethane. In this reaction phosphate and C(NO/sub 2/)/sub 3/- are formed. Phosphite radicals can, however, also act as good oxidants, e.g., toward thiols and thiolate ions. These reactions lead to the formation of RS. radicals which were identified either directly, as in the case of penicillamine, through the optical absorption of PenS. or more indirectly through equilibration of RS. with RS- to the optically absorbing RSSR-. disulfide radical anion. A homolytic substitution reaction (S/sub H/2) occurs in the reaction of the phosphite radicals with aliphatic disulfides, yielding RS. radicals and phosphate thioester RSPO/sub 3//sup 2/-. Lipoic acid, as an example of a cyclic disulfide, is reduced to the corresponding RSSR-. radical anion and also undergoes the S/sub H/2 reaction with about equal probability. An addition reaction is observed between phosphite radicals and molecular oxygen. The resulting peroxo phosphate radicals establish an acid-base equilibrium HPO/sub 5//sup -/. reversible PO/sub 5//sup 2 -/. + H+ with a pK = 3.4. Absolute rate constants were determined for all reactions discussed.

  10. Low-noise low-power readout electronics circuit development in standard CMOS technology for 4 K applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merken, Patrick; Souverijns, Tim; Putzeys, Jan; Creten, Ybe; Van Hoof, Chris

    2006-06-01

    In the framework of the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) project IMEC designed the Cold Readout Electronics (CRE) for the Ge:Ga far-infrared detector array. Key specifications for this circuit were high linearity, low power consumption and low noise at an operating temperature of 4.2K. We have implemented this circuit in a standard CMOS technology which guarantees high yield and uniformity, and design portability. A drawback of this approach is the anomalous behavior of CMOS transistors at temperatures below 30-40K. These cryogenic phenomena disturb the normal functionality of commonly used circuits. We were able to overcome these problems and developed a library of digital and analog building blocks based on the modeling of cryogenic behavior, and on adapted design and layout techniques. We will present the design of the 18 channel CRE circuit, its interface with the Ge:Ga sensor, and its electrical performance. We will show how the library that was developed for PACS served as a baseline for the designs used in the Darwin-far-infrared detector array, where a cryogenic 180 channel, 30μm pitch, Readout Integrated Circuit (ROIC) for flip-chip integration was developed. Other designs and topologies for low noise and low power applications will be equally presented.

  11. Performance analysis of precoding-based asymmetrically clipped optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing wireless system in additive white Gaussian noise and indoor multipath channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjha, Bilal; Zhou, Zhou; Kavehrad, Mohsen

    2014-08-01

    We have compared the bit error rate (BER) performance of precoding-based asymmetrically clipped optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (ACO-OFDM) and pulse amplitude modulated discrete multitone (PAM-DMT) optical wireless (OW) systems in additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) and indoor multipath frequency selective channel. Simulation and analytical results show that precoding schemes such as discrete Fourier transform, discrete cosine transform, and Zadoff-Chu sequences do not affect the performance of the OW systems in the AWGN channel while they do reduce the peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) of the OFDM output signal. However, in a multipath indoor channel, using zero forcing frequency domain equalization precoding-based systems give better BER performance than their conventional counterparts. With additional clipping to further reduce the PAPR, precoding-based systems also show better BER performance compared to nonprecoded systems when clipped relative to the peak of nonprecoded systems. Therefore, precoding-based ACO-OFDM and PAM-DMT systems offer better BER performance, zero signaling overhead, and low PAPR compared to conventional systems.

  12. Properties of the solar wind electrons between 1.1 and 3.3 AU from Ulysses thermal noise measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Maksimovic, M.; Hoang, S.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    1996-07-20

    Using the distribution function f(v) of the solar wind electrons made of two Maxwellians: a core (density n{sub c}, temperature T{sub c}) and a halo (density n{sub h}, temperature T{sub h}), we determine the quasi-thermal noise (QTN) induced by the ambient electrons on the long wire dipole antenna connected to the radio receiver on the Ulysses Unified Radio and Plasma Wave (URAP) Experiment. The QTN spectroscopy yields the total electron density n{sub e}, the core temperature T{sub c}, and the core and halo kinetic pressures n{sub c}T{sub c} and n{sub h}T{sub h}. We present the results of n{sub e} and T{sub c} measured between 1.1 and 3.3 AU in the ecliptic plane, from November 1990 to June 1991. We investigate the variation of T{sub c} with the heliocentric distance. We also study this radial gradient as a function of three classes of n{sub e} normalized to 1 AU: Low, intermediate and high densities. The T{sub c} gradient is found to increase with increasing plasma density.

  13. Fano-noise-limited CCDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janesick, James; Elliott, Tom; Bredthauer, Richard; Chandler, Charles; Burke, Barry

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments of scientific CCDs have produced sensors that achieve ultra low read noise performance (less than 2 electrons rms) and near perfect charge transfer efficiency (0.9999996) without the addition of a fat-zero. This progress has now made it possible to achieve Fano-noise-limited performance in the soft X-ray where the detector's energy resolution is primarily limited by the statistical variation in the charge generated by the interacting X-ray photon. In this paper, Fano-noise-limited test data is presented for two different CCD types and a CCD derived estimate of the Fano factor is determined. By evaluating ultra low-modulation images (less than 1 electron peak-to-peak) it is shown that the CCD's global CTE is now superior to its read noise floor. To capitalize on this capability CCD manufacturers are now focusing their attention on reducing the noise floor below the 1 electron level thereby matching the sensor's CTE performance. This improvement, if accomplished, will push Fano-noise-limited performance for the CCD into the extreme ultra-violet.

  14. Electronic transport in graphene: p-n junctions, shot noise, and nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, James Ryan

    2009-12-01

    Novel, two-dimensional materials have allowed for the inception and elucidation of a plethora of physical phenomena. On such material, a hexagonal lattice of carbon atoms called graphene, is a unique, truly two-dimensional molecular conductor. This thesis describes six experiments that elucidate some interesting physical properties and technological applications of graphene, with an emphasis on graphene-based p-n junctions. A technique for the creation of high-quality p-n junctions of graphene is described. Transport measurements at zero magnetic field demonstrate local control of the carrier type and density bipolar graphene-based junctions. In the quantum Hall regime, new plateaus in the conductance are observed and explained in terms of mode mixing at the p-n interface. Shot noise in unipolar and bipolar graphene devices is measured. A density-independent Fano factor is observed, contrary to theoretical expectations. Further, an independence on device geometry is also observed. The role of disorder on the measured Fano factor is discussed, and comparison to recent theory for disordered graphene is made. The effect of a two-terminal geometry, where the device aspect ratio is different from unity, is measured experimentally and analyzed theoretically. A method for extracting layer number from the conductance extrema is proposed. A method for a conformal mapping of a device with asymmetric contacts to a rectangle is demonstrated. Finally, possible origins of discrepancies between theory and experiment are discussed. Transport along p-n junctions in graphene is reported. Enhanced transport along the junction is observed and attributed to states that exist at the p-n interface. A correspondence between the observed phenomena at low-field and in the quantum Hall regime is observed. An electric field perpendicular to the junction is found to reduce the enhanced conductance at the p-n junction. A corollary between the p-n interface states and "snake states" in an

  15. Effects of low-frequency noise on cardiac collagen and cardiomyocyte ultrastructure: an immunohistochemical and electron microscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Eduardo; Borrecho, Gonçalo; Oliveira, Pedro; Alves de Matos, António P; Brito, José; Águas, Artur; Martins dos Santos, José

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Low-frequency noise (LFN) leads to the development of tissue fibrosis. We previously reported the development of myocardial and perivascular fibrosis and a reduction of cardiac connexin43 in rats, but data is lacking concerning the affected type of collagen as well as the ultrastructural myocardial modifications. Objectives: The aim of this study was to quantify cardiac collagens I and III and to evaluate myocardial ultrastructural changes in Wistar rats exposed to LFN. Methods: Two groups of rats were considered: A LFN-exposed group with 8 rats continuously submitted to LFN during 3 months and a control group with 8 rats. The hearts were sectioned and the mid-ventricular fragment was selected. After immunohistochemical evaluation, quantification of the collagens and muscle were performed using the image J software in the left ventricle, interventricular septum and right ventricle and the collagen I/muscle and collagen III/muscle ratios were calculated. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to analyze mid-ventricular samples taken from each group. Results: The collagen I/muscle and collagen III/muscle ratios increased in totum respectively 80% (p<0.001) and 57.4% (p<0.05) in LFN-exposed rats. TEM showed interstitial collagen deposits and changes in mitochondria and intercalated discs of the cardiomyocytes in LFN-exposed animals. Conclusions: LFN increases collagen I and III in the extracellular matrix and induces ultrastructural alterations in the cardiomyocytes. These new morphological data open new and promising paths for further experimental and clinical research regarding the cardiac effects of low-frequency noise. PMID:24228094

  16. Effects of industrial noise on circumpulpar dentin - a field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cavacas, Maria Alzira; Tavares, Vitor; Oliveira, Maria João; Oliveira, Pedro; Sezinando, Ana; Martins dos Santos, José

    2013-01-01

    Chronic exposure to Industrial Noise (IN), rich in Low Frequency Noise (LFN), causes systemic fibrotic transformation and sustained stress. Dental wear, significantly increased with exposure to LFN, affects the teeth particularly through the circumpulpar dentin. Our goal is to understand the consequences of IN exposure on the circumpulpar dentin of Wistar rats. 10 Wistar rats were exposed to IN for 4 months, according to an occupationally simulated time schedule and 10 animals were used as age-matched controls. The first and the second upper and lower molars of each animal were processed for observation by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis was performed. In exposed animals FESEM showed a 2.0 to 6.0 μm-dense mineral band between dentin and the pulp with no regular continuity with the tubules. This structure had a few tubules where the odontoblasts processes could be observed embedded within the band and collagen fibers were trapped inside. EDS analysis revealed that it was hydroxyapatite similar to dentin, with a higher carbon content. FESEM results show that the band may be tertiary reparative dentin formed by odontoblast-like cells, but the increased amount of carbon (EDS) could mean that it is sclerotic dentin. IN should be acknowledge as a strong stimulus, able to cause an injury to odontoblasts and to the formation of reparative tertiary dentin, in a process that may accelerate the aging of the teeth, either by direct impact of acoustic pressure pulsations or by increased stress and dental wear. PMID:24294356

  17. Judgments of aircraft noise in a traffic noise background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, C. A.; Rice, C. G.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine subjective response to aircraft noise in different road traffic backgrounds. In addition, two laboratory techniques for presenting the aircraft noise with the background noise were evaluated. For one technique, the background noise was continuous over an entire test session; for the other, the background noise level was changed with each aircraft noise during a session. Subjective response to aircraft noise was found to decrease with increasing background noise level, for a range of typical indoor noise levels. Subjective response was found to be highly correlated with the Noise Pollution Level (NPL) measurement scale.

  18. Additive Manufacturing Modeling and Simulation A Literature Review for Electron Beam Free Form Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seufzer, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is coming into industrial use and has several desirable attributes. Control of the deposition remains a complex challenge, and so this literature review was initiated to capture current modeling efforts in the field of additive manufacturing. This paper summarizes about 10 years of modeling and simulation related to both welding and additive manufacturing. The goals were to learn who is doing what in modeling and simulation, to summarize various approaches taken to create models, and to identify research gaps. Later sections in the report summarize implications for closed-loop-control of the process, implications for local research efforts, and implications for local modeling efforts.

  19. Investigation and optimization of low-frequency noise performance in readout electronics of dc superconducting quantum interference device

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Yi; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Lee, Yong-Ho

    2014-05-15

    We investigated and optimized the low-frequency noise characteristics of a preamplifier used for readout of direct current superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). When the SQUID output was detected directly using a room-temperature low-voltage-noise preamplifier, the low-frequency noise of a SQUID system was found to be dominated by the input current noise of the preamplifiers in case of a large dynamic resistance of the SQUID. To reduce the current noise of the preamplifier in the low-frequency range, we investigated the dependence of total preamplifier noise on the collector current and source resistance. When the collector current was decreased from 8.4 mA to 3 mA in the preamplifier made of 3 parallel SSM2220 transistor pairs, the low-frequency total voltage noise of the preamplifier (at 0.1 Hz) decreased by about 3 times for a source resistance of 30 Ω whereas the white noise level remained nearly unchanged. Since the relative contribution of preamplifier's input voltage and current noise is different depending on the dynamic resistance or flux-to-voltage transfer of the SQUID, the results showed that the total noise of a SQUID system at low-frequency range can be improved significantly by optimizing the preamplifier circuit parameters, mainly the collector current in case of low-noise bipolar transistor pairs.

  20. Investigation and optimization of low-frequency noise performance in readout electronics of dc superconducting quantum interference device.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Yi; Lee, Yong-Ho; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2014-05-01

    We investigated and optimized the low-frequency noise characteristics of a preamplifier used for readout of direct current superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). When the SQUID output was detected directly using a room-temperature low-voltage-noise preamplifier, the low-frequency noise of a SQUID system was found to be dominated by the input current noise of the preamplifiers in case of a large dynamic resistance of the SQUID. To reduce the current noise of the preamplifier in the low-frequency range, we investigated the dependence of total preamplifier noise on the collector current and source resistance. When the collector current was decreased from 8.4 mA to 3 mA in the preamplifier made of 3 parallel SSM2220 transistor pairs, the low-frequency total voltage noise of the preamplifier (at 0.1 Hz) decreased by about 3 times for a source resistance of 30 Ω whereas the white noise level remained nearly unchanged. Since the relative contribution of preamplifier's input voltage and current noise is different depending on the dynamic resistance or flux-to-voltage transfer of the SQUID, the results showed that the total noise of a SQUID system at low-frequency range can be improved significantly by optimizing the preamplifier circuit parameters, mainly the collector current in case of low-noise bipolar transistor pairs. PMID:24880395

  1. Tantalum hot-electron bolometers for low-noise heterodyne receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skalare, A.; McGrath, W.; Bumble, B.; LeDuc, H. G.

    2002-01-01

    We describe superconducting diffusion-cooled hot-electron bolometers that were fabricated fromtantalum films grown on a thin niobium seed layer. The seed layer promotes single-phase growth of the Ta films, resulting in high-quality bolometers with transition temperatures up to 2.35 K and transition widths of less than 0.2 K. An S-parameter measurement set-up in a He-3 cryostat was used to measure device impedance versus frequency of a 400 nm long device at a temperature of 400 mK. It is shown that a 3 dB roll-off frequency of about 1 GHz can be achieved when the device resistance matches the impedance of the embedding network (no electrothermal feedback). This would lead to a prediction of 16 GHz for a 100 nm device, and indicates that a heterodyne mixer using a Ta HEB should be able to operate at several GHz even with a significant amount of electrothermal feedback.

  2. Thermal Imaging for Assessment of Electron-Beam Free Form Fabrication (EBF(sup 3)) Additive Manufacturing Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Burke, Eric R.; Hafley, Robert A.; Taminger, Karen M.; Domack, Christopher S.; Brewer, Amy R.; Martin, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapidly growing field where 3-dimensional parts can be produced layer by layer. NASA s electron beam free-form fabrication (EBF(sup 3)) technology is being evaluated to manufacture metallic parts in a space environment. The benefits of EBF(sup 3) technology are weight savings to support space missions, rapid prototyping in a zero gravity environment, and improved vehicle readiness. The EBF(sup 3) system is composed of 3 main components: electron beam gun, multi-axis position system, and metallic wire feeder. The electron beam is used to melt the wire and the multi-axis positioning system is used to build the part layer by layer. To insure a quality weld, a near infrared (NIR) camera is used to image the melt pool and solidification areas. This paper describes the calibration and application of a NIR camera for temperature measurement. In addition, image processing techniques are presented for weld assessment metrics.

  3. Transportation of high-current ion and electron beams in the accelerator drift gap in the presence of an additional electron background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karas', V. I.; Kornilov, E. A.; Manuilenko, O. V.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Fedorovskaya, O. V.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of a high-current ion beam propagating in the drift gap of a linear induction accelerator with collective focusing is studied using 3D numerical simulations in the framework of the full system of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations (code KARAT). The ion beam is neutralized by a comoving electron beam in the current density and, partially, in space charge, since the velocities of electrons and ions differ substantially. The dynamics of the high-current ion beam is investigated for different versions of additional neutralization of its space charge. It is established that, for a given configuration of the magnetic field and in the presence of a specially programmed injection of additional electrons from the boundary opposite to the ion injection boundary, the angular divergence of the ion beam almost vanishes, whereas the current of the ion beam at the exit from the accelerator drift gap changes insignificantly and the beam remains almost monoenergetic.

  4. Transportation of high-current ion and electron beams in the accelerator drift gap in the presence of an additional electron background

    SciTech Connect

    Karas’, V. I. Kornilov, E. A.; Manuilenko, O. V.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Fedorovskaya, O. V.

    2015-12-15

    The dynamics of a high-current ion beam propagating in the drift gap of a linear induction accelerator with collective focusing is studied using 3D numerical simulations in the framework of the full system of the Vlasov–Maxwell equations (code KARAT). The ion beam is neutralized by a comoving electron beam in the current density and, partially, in space charge, since the velocities of electrons and ions differ substantially. The dynamics of the high-current ion beam is investigated for different versions of additional neutralization of its space charge. It is established that, for a given configuration of the magnetic field and in the presence of a specially programmed injection of additional electrons from the boundary opposite to the ion injection boundary, the angular divergence of the ion beam almost vanishes, whereas the current of the ion beam at the exit from the accelerator drift gap changes insignificantly and the beam remains almost monoenergetic.

  5. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Noise-Induced Hearing Loss On this page: What is noise-induced hearing ... additional information about NIHL? What is noise-induced hearing loss? Every day, we experience sound in our environment, ...

  6. Field Evidence for Co-Metabolism of Trichloroethene Stimulated by Addition of Electron Donor to Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, Mark E.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Radtke, Corey W.; Bill, Markus; Delwiche, Mark E.; Lee, M. Hope; Swift, Dana L.; Colwell, Frederick S.

    2010-05-17

    For more than 10 years, electron donor has been injected into the Snake River aquifer beneath the Test Area North site of the Idaho National Laboratory for the purpose of stimulating microbial reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater. This has resulted in significant TCE removal from the source area of the contaminant plume and elevated dissolved CH4 in the groundwater extending 250 m from the injection well. The delta13C of the CH4 increases from 56o/oo in the source area to -13 o/oo with distance from the injection well, whereas the delta13C of dissolved inorganic carbon decreases from 8 o/oo to -13 o/oo, indicating a shift from methanogenesis to methane oxidation. This change in microbial activity along the plume axis is confirmed by PhyloChip microarray analyses of 16S rRNA genes obtained from groundwater microbial communities, which indicate decreasing abundances of reductive dechlorinating microorganisms (e.g., Dehalococcoides ethenogenes) and increasing CH4-oxidizing microorganisms capable of aerobic co-metabolism of TCE (e.g., Methylosinus trichosporium). Incubation experiments with 13C-labeled TCE introduced into microcosms containing basalt and groundwater from the aquifer confirm that TCE co-metabolism is possible. The results of these studies indicate that electron donor amendment designed to stimulate reductive dechlorination of TCE may also stimulate co-metabolism of TCE.

  7. Field evidence for co-metabolism of trichloroethene stimulated by addition of electron donor to groundwater.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Mark E; Brodie, Eoin L; Radtke, Corey W; Bill, Markus; Delwiche, Mark E; Lee, M Hope; Swift, Dana L; Colwell, Frederick S

    2010-06-15

    For more than 10 years, electron donor has been injected into the Snake River aquifer beneath the Test Area North site of the Idaho National Laboratory for the purpose of stimulating microbial reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater. This has resulted in significant TCE removal from the source area of the contaminant plume and elevated dissolved CH(4) in the groundwater extending 250 m from the injection well. The delta(13)C of the CH(4) increases from -56 per thousand in the source area to -13 per thousand with distance from the injection well, whereas the delta(13)C of dissolved inorganic carbon decreases from 8 per thousand to -13 per thousand, indicating a shift from methanogenesis to methane oxidation. This change in microbial activity along the plume axis is confirmed by PhyloChip microarray analyses of 16S rRNA genes obtained from groundwater microbial communities, which indicate decreasing abundances of reductive dechlorinating microorganisms (e.g., Dehalococcoides ethenogenes) and increasing CH(4)-oxidizing microorganisms capable of aerobic co-metabolism of TCE (e.g., Methylosinus trichosporium). Incubation experiments with (13)C-labeled TCE introduced into microcosms containing basalt and groundwater from the aquifer confirm that TCE co-metabolism is possible. The results of these studies indicate that electron donor amendment designed to stimulate reductive dechlorination of TCE may also stimulate co-metabolism of TCE. PMID:20476753

  8. Low-noise cold-field emission current obtained between two opposed carbon cone nanotips during in situ transmission electron microscope biasing

    SciTech Connect

    Knoop, L. de; Gatel, C.; Houdellier, F.; Monthioux, M.; Masseboeuf, A.; Snoeck, E.; Hÿtch, M. J.

    2015-06-29

    A dedicated transmission electron microscope sample holder has been used to study in situ the cold-field emission process of carbon cone nanotips (CCnTs). We show that when using a CCnT instead of a Au plate-anode, the standard deviation of the emission current noise can be decreased from the 10 nA range to the 1 nA range under vacuum conditions of 10{sup −5 }Pa. This shows the strong influence of the anode on the cold-field emission current noise.

  9. Effects of different additives with assistance of microwave heating for heavy metal stabilization in electronic industry sludge.

    PubMed

    Jothiramalingam, R; Lo, Shang-Lien; Chen, Ching-lung

    2010-01-01

    Electronic industrial wastewater sludge in Taiwan is normally passed through an acid-extraction process to reclaim most of the copper ions, the remaining residue may still need to be treated by various stabilization technologies using suitable additives. Cement solidification is used as the common method to stabilize the industrial wastewater sludge in Taiwan. However, this method has the disadvantage of an increase in waste volume. In the present study selective additives such as sodium sulfide, barium manganate and different phase of alumina were tested as a possible alternate additive to stabilize the heavy metal ion in the treated solid waste sludge via microwave heating treatment. The effects of additive amount, power of microwave irradiation and reaction time have been studied. Heavy metal leaching capacity is determined by using standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure test and elemental content in the leachate is analyzed by inductively coupled plasma analysis. Sodium sulfide is effectively stabilizing the leaching copper ion with high selectivity in the presence of microwave irradiation and finally stabilized in the form of copper sulfide, which is a significant reaction to stabilize the copper ion leaching in the waste sludge. Complete stabilization of heavy metal ion and copper ion content (<5mgL(-1)) in industrial sludge is achieved by heating the microwave treated barium manganate and alumina additives by adopting suitable reaction conditions. Hybrid microwave and conventional heating process with minor amount of additive providing the efficient heavy metal stabilization for treated electronic industry waste sludge. PMID:19945139

  10. Determination of the Path Loss from Passenger Electronic Devices to Radio Altimeter with Additional EMI Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüür, J.; Nunes, R. R.

    2012-05-01

    Emitters of current and future wireless ultra wideband technology (UWB) inside the cabin should not interfere with any aircraft system. Especially the radio altimeter (RA) system using antennas mounted outside the fuselage is potentially sensitive to UWB devices in the frequency range between 4.1 and 4.8 GHz. The measurement of the interference path loss (IPL) to the RA is therefore of interest and is presented for different aircraft. The need of a high dynamic setup with low parasitic coupling in the IPL measurement is stressed. In addition, electromagnetic interference (EMI) tests with different transmitted signals are made, showing that the susceptibility of the RA system actually increases with UWB modulation.

  11. A bootstrapped, low-noise, and high-gain photodetector for shot noise measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Haijun; Yang, Wenhai; Li, Zhixiu; Li, Xuefeng; Zheng, Yaohui

    2014-01-15

    We presented a low-noise, high-gain photodetector based on the bootstrap structure and the L-C (inductance and capacitance) combination. Electronic characteristics of the photodetector, including electronic noise, gain and frequency response, and dynamic range, were verified through a single-frequency Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser at 1064 nm with coherent output. The measured shot noise of 50 μW laser was 13 dB above the electronic noise at the analysis frequency of 2 MHz, and 10 dB at 3 MHz. And a maximum clearance of 28 dB at 2 MHz was achieved when 1.52 mW laser was illuminated. In addition, the photodetector showed excellent linearities for both DC and AC amplifications in the laser power range between 12.5 μW and 1.52 mW.

  12. Optical Johnson noise thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, R. L.; Blalock, T. V.; Maxey, L. C.; Roberts, M. J.; Simpson, M. L.

    1989-01-01

    A concept is being explored that an optical analog of the electrical Johnson noise may be used to measure temperature independently of emissivity. The concept is that a laser beam may be modulated on reflection from a hot surface by interaction of the laser photons with the thermally agitated conduction electrons or the lattice phonons, thereby adding noise to the reflected laser beam. If the reflectance noise can be detected and quantified in a background of other noise in the optical and signal processing systems, the reflectance noise may provide a noncontact measurement of the absolute surface temperature and may be independent of the surface's emissivity.

  13. Shanghai alleviates noise pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Runling

    1983-07-14

    ''Environmental noise is now under control in Shanghai, the level of environmental noise is basically holding steady, and in some areas industrial and traffic noise has decreased.'' These were the conclusions of research by Hong Zonghui (3163 1350 6540) and Wang Shixian (3769 6164 6343) of Tongji University's Acoustics Laboratory, as put forward at a recent public academic lecture at Tongji University. In order to eliminate noise from the environment, Tongji University in the early 1970's began conducting investigations and research on noise pollution and its control together with concerned units in this city. After tests in a network of 2,117 points throughout the city, they determined that the most common form of noise pollution is traffic, which accounts for 50 percent of all noise. Since 1979, this city has adopted successive measures in the area of traffic control in order to eliminate the source of noise. Traffic noise has now dropped about 3 decibels in the city. This research report also pointed out that according to the results of regional environmental noise tests, this city does not meet the noise pollution standards set by the state. Tugboats on the Suzhou He blow their whistles late at night, and the noise at riverside homes can reach 82 decibels; the Fangua Lane residential district is close to a railroad where engine noise can reach 89 decibels and affect the residents' health. In addition, rather serious noise pollution is produced by more than 300 handicraft, light industry, textile, and electrical machinery plants.

  14. Modeling of Noise and Resistance of Semimetal Hg1-xCdxTe Quantum Well used as a Channel for THz Hot-Electron Bolometer.

    PubMed

    Melezhik, E O; Gumenjuk-Sichevska, J V; Sizov, F F

    2016-12-01

    Noise characteristics and resistance of semimetal-type mercury-cadmium-telluride quantum wells (QWs) at the liquid nitrogen temperature are studied numerically, and their dependence on the QW parameters and on the electron concentration is established. The QW band structure calculations are based on the full 8-band k.p Hamiltonian. The electron mobility is simulated by the direct iterative solution of the Boltzmann transport equation, which allows us to include correctly all the principal scattering mechanisms, elastic as well as inelastic.We find that the generation-recombination noise is strongly suppressed due to the very fast recombination processes in semimetal QWs. Hence, the thermal noise should be considered as a main THz sensitivity-limiting mechanism in those structures. Optimization of a semimetal Hg1-xCdxTe QW to make it an efficient THz bolometer channel should include the increase of electron concentration in the well and tuning the molar composition x close to the gapless regime. PMID:27067729

  15. Novel microstructural growth in the surface of Inconel 625 by the addition of SiC under electron beam melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, M.; Ali, G.; Ahmed, Ejaz; Haq, M. A.; Akhter, J. I.

    2011-06-01

    Electron beam melting is being used to modify the microstructure of the surfaces of materials due to its ability to cause localized melting and supercooling of the melt. This article presents an experimental study on the surface modification of Ni-based superalloy (Inconel 625) reinforced with SiC ceramic particles under electron beam melting. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques have been applied to characterize the resulted microstructure. The results revealed growth of novel structures like wire, rod, tubular, pyramid, bamboo and tweezers type morphologies in the modified surface. In addition to that fibrous like structure was also observed. Formation of thin carbon sheet has been found at the regions of decomposed SiC. Electron beam modified surface of Inconel 625 alloy has been hardened twice as compared to the as-received samples. Surface hardening effect may be attributed to both the formation of the novel structures as well as the introduction of Si and C atom in the lattice of Inconel 625 alloy.

  16. Modeling of Noise and Resistance of Semimetal Hg1-xCdxTe Quantum Well used as a Channel for THz Hot-Electron Bolometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melezhik, E. O.; Gumenjuk-Sichevska, J. V.; Sizov, F. F.

    2016-04-01

    Noise characteristics and resistance of semimetal-type mercury-cadmium-telluride quantum wells (QWs) at the liquid nitrogen temperature are studied numerically, and their dependence on the QW parameters and on the electron concentration is established. The QW band structure calculations are based on the full 8-band k.p Hamiltonian. The electron mobility is simulated by the direct iterative solution of the Boltzmann transport equation, which allows us to include correctly all the principal scattering mechanisms, elastic as well as inelastic.

  17. NO x and PAHs removal from industrial flue gas by using electron beam technology with alcohol addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, A. G.; Sun, Yong-Xia; Licki, J.; Bułka, S.; Kubica, K.; Zimek, Z.

    2003-06-01

    The removal of NO x and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from flue gas was investigated, as a preliminary test, with alcohol addition by using electron beam irradiation in EPS Kawęczyn. The experimental conditions were the followings: flue gas flow rate 5000 nm 3/h; humidity 4-5%; inlet concentrations of SO 2 and NO x, which were emitted from power station, were 192 and 106 ppm, respectively; ammonia addition was 2.75 m 3/h; alcohol addition was 600 l/h. It was found that below 6 kGy applied doses the NO x removal efficiency increased by 10% in the presence of alcohol as compared to the absence of alcohol; on the other hand, the NO x removal efficiency decreased at doses higher than 10 kGy. In order to understand the behavior of these aromatic hydrocarbons under electron irradiation, unirradiated samples (i.e. as emitted from the coal combustion process, called inlet) and irradiated samples (called outlet) were collected by using a condense bottle connected with an XAD-2 adsorbent and an active carbon adsorbent and were then analyzed by a GC-MS. It was found that using 8 kGy absorbed dose the concentration of aromatic hydrocarbons of small aromatic rings (<3, except acenaphthylene) were reduced, but the concentration of these hydrocarbons of large aromatic rings (⩾4) were increased. A possible mechanism is proposed.

  18. Laser and electron-beam powder-bed additive manufacturing of metallic implants: A review on processes, materials and designs.

    PubMed

    Sing, Swee Leong; An, Jia; Yeong, Wai Yee; Wiria, Florencia Edith

    2016-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM), also commonly known as 3D printing, allows the direct fabrication of functional parts with complex shapes from digital models. In this review, the current progress of two AM processes suitable for metallic orthopaedic implant applications, namely selective laser melting (SLM) and electron beam melting (EBM) are presented. Several critical design factors such as the need for data acquisition for patient-specific design, design dependent porosity for osteo-inductive implants, surface topology of the implants and design for reduction of stress-shielding in implants are discussed. Additive manufactured biomaterials such as 316L stainless steel, titanium-6aluminium-4vanadium (Ti6Al4V) and cobalt-chromium (CoCr) are highlighted. Limitations and future potential of such technologies are also explored. PMID:26488900

  19. High-resolution noise substitution to measure overfitting and validate resolution in 3D structure determination by single particle electron cryomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaoxia; McMullan, Greg; Faruqi, Abdul R; Murshudov, Garib N; Short, Judith M; Scheres, Sjors H W; Henderson, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) structure determination by single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM) involves the calculation of an initial 3D model, followed by extensive iterative improvement of the orientation determination of the individual particle images and the resulting 3D map. Because there is much more noise than signal at high resolution in the images, this creates the possibility of noise reinforcement in the 3D map, which can give a false impression of the resolution attained. The balance between signal and noise in the final map at its limiting resolution depends on the image processing procedure and is not easily predicted. There is a growing awareness in the cryoEM community of how to avoid such over-fitting and over-estimation of resolution. Equally, there has been a reluctance to use the two principal methods of avoidance because they give lower resolution estimates, which some people believe are too pessimistic. Here we describe a simple test that is compatible with any image processing protocol. The test allows measurement of the amount of signal and the amount of noise from overfitting that is present in the final 3D map. We have applied the method to two different sets of cryoEM images of the enzyme beta-galactosidase using several image processing packages. Our procedure involves substituting the Fourier components of the initial particle image stack beyond a chosen resolution by either the Fourier components from an adjacent area of background, or by simple randomisation of the phases of the particle structure factors. This substituted noise thus has the same spectral power distribution as the original data. Comparison of the Fourier Shell Correlation (FSC) plots from the 3D map obtained using the experimental data with that from the same data with high-resolution noise (HR-noise) substituted allows an unambiguous measurement of the amount of overfitting and an accompanying resolution assessment. A simple formula can be used to calculate an

  20. Modeling the Effect of External Carbon Source Addition under Different Electron Acceptor Conditions in Biological Nutrient Removal Activated Sludge Systems.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiang; Wisniewski, Kamil; Czerwionka, Krzysztof; Zhou, Qi; Xie, Li; Makinia, Jacek

    2016-02-16

    The aim of this study was to expand the International Water Association Activated Sludge Model No. 2d (ASM2d) to predict the aerobic/anoxic behavior of polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) and "ordinary" heterotrophs in the presence of different external carbon sources and electron acceptors. The following new aspects were considered: (1) a new type of the readily biodegradable substrate, not available for the anaerobic activity of PAOs, (2) nitrite as an electron acceptor, and (3) acclimation of "ordinary" heterotrophs to the new external substrate via enzyme synthesis. The expanded model incorporated 30 new or modified process rate equations. The model was evaluated against data from several, especially designed laboratory experiments which focused on the combined effects of different types of external carbon sources (acetate, ethanol and fusel oil) and electron acceptors (dissolved oxygen, nitrate and nitrite) on the behavior of PAOs and "ordinary" heterotrophs. With the proposed expansions, it was possible to improve some deficiencies of the ASM2d in predicting the behavior of biological nutrient removal (BNR) systems with the addition of external carbon sources, including the effect of acclimation to the new carbon source. PMID:26783836

  1. Rotorcraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, R. J. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    The establishment of a realistic plan for NASA and the U.S. helicopter industry to develop a design-for-noise methodology, including plans for the identification and development of promising noise reduction technology was discussed. Topics included: noise reduction techniques, scaling laws, empirical noise prediction, psychoacoustics, and methods of developing and validing noise prediction methods.

  2. Core-Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation is a technical progress report and near-term outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external work on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Noise-Aircraft Technical Challenge; the current research activities in the core-noise area, with some additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustion-noise prediction capability; the need for a core-noise diagnostic capability to generate benchmark data for validation of both high-fidelity work and improved models, as well as testing of future noise-reduction technologies; relevant existing core-noise tests using real engines and auxiliary power units; and examples of possible scenarios for a future diagnostic facility. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Noise-Aircraft Technical Challenge aims to enable concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical for enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor designs could increase

  3. Effect of Powder Reuse Times on Additive Manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V by Selective Electron Beam Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, H. P.; Qian, M.; Liu, N.; Zhang, X. Z.; Yang, G. Y.; Wang, J.

    2015-03-01

    An advantage of the powder-bed-based metal additive manufacturing (AM) processes is that the powder can be reused. The powder reuse or recycling times directly affect the affordability of the additively manufactured parts, especially for the AM of titanium parts. This study examines the influence of powder reuse times on the characteristics of Ti-6Al-4V powder, including powder composition, particle size distribution (PSD), apparent density, tap density, flowability, and particle morphology. In addition, tensile samples were manufactured and evaluated with respect to powder reuse times and sample locations in the powder bed. The following findings were made from reusing the same batch of powder 21 times for AM by selective electron beam melting: (i) the oxygen (O) content increased progressively with increasing reuse times but both the Al content and the V content remained generally stable (a small decrease only); (ii) the powder became less spherical with increasing reuse times and some particles showed noticeable distortion and rough surfaces after being reused 16 times; (iii) the PSD became narrower and few satellite particles were observed after 11 times of reuse; (iv) reused powder showed improved flowability; and (v) reused powder showed no measurable undesired influence on the AM process and the samples exhibited highly consistent tensile properties, irrespective of their locations in the powder bed. The implications of these findings were discussed.

  4. Insights into the Electronic Structure of Ozone and Sulfur Dioxide from Generalized Valence Bond Theory: Addition of Hydrogen Atoms.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Beth A; Takeshita, Tyler Y; Dunning, Thom H

    2016-05-01

    Ozone (O3) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) are valence isoelectronic species, yet their properties and reactivities differ dramatically. In particular, O3 is highly reactive, whereas SO2 is chemically relatively stable. In this paper, we investigate serial addition of hydrogen atoms to both the terminal atoms of O3 and SO2 and to the central atom of these species. It is well-known that the terminal atoms of O3 are much more amenable to bond formation than those of SO2. We show that the differences in the electronic structure of the π systems in the parent triatomic species account for the differences in the addition of hydrogen atoms to the terminal atoms of O3 and SO2. Further, we find that the π system in SO2, which is a recoupled pair bond dyad, facilitates the addition of hydrogen atoms to the sulfur atom, resulting in stable HSO2 and H2SO2 species. PMID:27070292

  5. Noise Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    ... here: EPA Home Air and Radiation Noise Pollution Noise Pollution This page has moved. You should be ... epa.gov/clean-air-act-overview/title-iv-noise-pollution Local Navigation Air & Radiation Home Basic Information ...

  6. Core Noise - Increasing Importance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustor-noise prediction capability as well as activities supporting the development of improved reduced-order, physics-based models for combustor-noise prediction. The need for benchmark data for validation of high-fidelity and modeling work and the value of a potential future diagnostic facility for testing of core-noise-reduction concepts are indicated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor

  7. Photochemically induced intramolecular six-electron reductive elimination and oxidative addition of nitric oxide by the nitridoosmate(VIII) anion.

    PubMed

    Thornley, Wyatt A; Bitterwolf, Thomas E

    2015-02-01

    UV photolysis of the nitridoosmate(VIII) anion, OsO3 N(-) , in low-temperature frozen matrices results in nitrogen-oxygen bond formation to give the Os(II) nitrosyl complex OsO2 (NO)(-) . Photolysis of the Os(II) nitrosyl product with visible wavelengths results in reversion to the parent Os(VIII) complex. Formally a six-electron reductive elimination and oxidative addition, respectively, this represents the first reported example of such an intramolecular transformation. DFT modelling of this reaction proceeds through a step-wise mechanism taking place through a side-on nitroxyl Os(VI) intermediate, OsO2 (η(2) -NO)(-) . PMID:25537499

  8. Spin noise spectroscopy of ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, H.; Berski, F.; Hübner, J.; Oestreich, M.; Balocchi, A.; Marie, X.; Mansur-Al-Suleiman, M.; Bakin, A.; Waag, A.

    2013-12-04

    We investigate the thermal equilibrium dynamics of electron spins bound to donors in nanoporous ZnO by optical spin noise spectroscopy. The spin noise spectra reveal two noise contributions: A weak spin noise signal from undisturbed localized donor electrons with a dephasing time of 24 ns due to hyperfine interaction and a strong spin noise signal with a spin dephasing time of 5 ns which we attribute to localized donor electrons which interact with lattice defects.

  9. Problems associated with noise measurements in the mining industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Eric R.; Vipperman, Jeffrey S.

    2002-05-01

    In response to the continuing problem of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) among mine workers, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has been conducting numerous noise- and hearing-loss research efforts in the mining industry. Research is underway to determine worker noise exposure, equipment noise, hearing loss and hearing protection use, and to evaluate engineering controls. Issues that are peculiar to the mining industry have complicated these efforts. A few of the issues that must be overcome to conduct meaningful research include constantly moving equipment, changing work environments, confined space, varying production rates, multiple noise sources, and electronic permissibility of instrumentation. This presentation will address the factors that affect the measurement and analysis of noise in the mining industry and how these factors are managed. In addition, some examples of research results will be included.

  10. Hydroxyl ion addition to one-electron oxidized thymine: Unimolecular interconversion of C5 to C6 OH-adducts

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Kumar, Anil; Heizer, Alicia N.; Palmer, Brian J.; Pottiboyina, Venkata; Liang, Yong; Wnuk, Stanislaw F.; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, addition of OH− to one-electron oxidized thymidine (dThd) and thymine nucleotides in basic aqueous glasses is investigated. At pHs ca. 9–10 where the thymine base is largely deprotonated at N3, one-electron oxidation of the thymine base by Cl2•− at ca. 155 K results in formation of a neutral thyminyl radical, T(−H)•. Assignment to T(−H)• is confirmed by employing 15N substituted 5'-TMP. At pH ≥ ca. 11.5, formation of the 5-hydroxythymin-6-yl radical, T(5OH)•, is identified as a metastable intermediate produced by OH− addition to T(−H)• at C5 at ca. 155 K. Upon further annealing to ca. 170 K, T(5OH)• readily converts to the 6-hydroxythymin-5-yl radical, T(6OH)•. One-electron oxidation of N3-methyl-thymidine (N3-Me-dThd) by Cl2•− at ca. 155 K produces the cation radical (N3-Me-dThd•+) for which we find a pH dependent competition between deprotonation from the methyl group at C5 and addition of OH− to C5. At pH 7 the 5-methyl deprotonated species is found; however, at pH ca. 9, N3-Me-dThd•+ produces T(5OH)• that on annealing up to 180 K forms T(6OH)•. Through use of deuterium substitution at C5' and on the thymine base, i.e., specifically employing [5',5”-D,D]-5'-dThd, [5',5”-D,D]-5'-TMP, [CD3]-dThd and [CD3,6D]-dThd, we find unequivocal evidence for T(5OH)• formation and its conversion to T(6OH)•. The addition of OH− to the C5 position in T(−H)• and N3-Me-dThd•+ is governed by spin and charge localization. DFT calculations predict that the conversion of the “reducing” T(5OH)• to the “oxidizing” T(6OH)• occurs by a unimolecular OH group transfer from C5 to C6 in the thymine base. The T(5OH)• to T(6OH)• conversion is found to occur more readily for deprotonated dThd and its nucleotides than for N3-Me-dThd. In agreement, calculations predict that the deprotonated thymine base has a lower energy barrier (ca. 6 kcal/mol) for OH transfer than its corresponding N3-protonated thymine

  11. Noise prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Methods for noise abatement are discussed. Noise nuisance, types of noise (continuous, fluctuating, intermittent, pulsed), and types of noise abatement (absorption, vibration damping, isolation) are defined. Rockwool panels, industrial ceiling panels, baffles, acoustic foam panels, vibration dampers, acoustic mats, sandwich panels, isolating cabins and walls, ear protectors, and curtains are presented.

  12. Noise and Bandwidth Measurements of Diffusion-Cooled Nb Hot-Electron Bolometer Mixers at Frequencies Above the Superconductive Energy Gap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyss, R. A.; Karasik, B. S.; McGrath, W. R.; Bumble, B.; LeDuc, H.

    1999-01-01

    Diffusion-cooled Nb hot-electron bolometer (HEB) mixers have the potential to simultaneously achieve high intermediate frequency (IF) bandwidths and low mixer noise temperatures for operation at THz frequencies (above the superconductive gap energy). We have measured the IF signal bandwidth at 630 GHz of Nb devices with lengths L = 0.3, 0.2, and 0.1 micrometer in a quasioptical mixer configuration employing twin-slot antennas. The 3-dB EF bandwidth increased from 1.2 GHz for the 0.3 gm long device to 9.2 GHz for the 0.1 gm long device. These results demonstrate the expected 1/L squared dependence of the IF bandwidth at submillimeter wave frequencies for the first time, as well as the largest EF bandwidth obtained to date. For the 0.1 gm device, which had the largest bandwidth, the double sideband (DSB) noise temperature of the receiver was 320-470 K at 630 GHz with an absorbed LO power of 35 nW, estimated using the isothermal method. A version of this mixer with the antenna length scaled for operation at 2.5 THz has also been tested. A DSB receiver noise temperature of 1800 plus or minus 100 K was achieved, which is about 1,000 K lower than our previously reported results. These results demonstrate that large EF bandwidth and low-noise operation of a diffusion-cooled HEB mixer is possible at THz frequencies with the same device geometry.

  13. Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    The Acoustics Branch is responsible for reducing noise levels for jet and fan components on aircraft engines. To do this, data must be measured and calibrated accurately to ensure validity of test results. This noise reduction is accomplished by modifications to hardware such as jet nozzles, and by the use of other experimental hardware such as fluidic chevrons, elliptic cores, and fluidic shields. To insure validity of data calibration, a variety of software is used. This software adjusts the sound amplitude and frequency to be consistent with data taken on another day. Both the software and the hardware help make noise reduction possible. work properly. These software programs were designed to make corrections for atmosphere, shear, attenuation, electronic, and background noise. All data can be converted to a one-foot lossless condition, using the proper software corrections, making a reading independent of weather and distance. Also, data can be transformed from model scale to full scale for noise predictions of a real flight. Other programs included calculations of Over All Sound Pressure Level (OASPL), Effective Perceived Noise Level (EPNL). OASPL is the integration of sound with respect to frequency, and EPNL is weighted for a human s response to different sound frequencies and integrated with respect to time. With the proper software correction, data taken in the NATR are useful in determining ways to reduce noise. display any difference between two or more data files. Using this program and graphs of the data, the actual and predicted data can be compared. This software was tested on data collected at the Aero Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory (AAPL) using a variety of window types and overlaps. Similarly, short scripts were written to test each individual program in the software suite for verification. Each graph displays both the original points and the adjusted points connected with lines. During this summer, data points were taken during a live experiment

  14. Comparison of the polynomial model against explicit measurements of noise components for different mammography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnin, P.; Bosmans, H.; Verdun, F. R.; Marshall, N. W.

    2014-10-01

    Given the adverse impact of image noise on the perception of important clinical details in digital mammography, routine quality control measurements should include an evaluation of noise. The European Guidelines, for example, employ a second-order polynomial fit of pixel variance as a function of detector air kerma (DAK) to decompose noise into quantum, electronic and fixed pattern (FP) components and assess the DAK range where quantum noise dominates. This work examines the robustness of the polynomial method against an explicit noise decomposition method. The two methods were applied to variance and noise power spectrum (NPS) data from six digital mammography units. Twenty homogeneously exposed images were acquired with PMMA blocks for target DAKs ranging from 6.25 to 1600 µGy. Both methods were explored for the effects of data weighting and squared fit coefficients during the curve fitting, the influence of the additional filter material (2 mm Al versus 40 mm PMMA) and noise de-trending. Finally, spatial stationarity of noise was assessed. Data weighting improved noise model fitting over large DAK ranges, especially at low detector exposures. The polynomial and explicit decompositions generally agreed for quantum and electronic noise but FP noise fraction was consistently underestimated by the polynomial method. Noise decomposition as a function of position in the image showed limited noise stationarity, especially for FP noise; thus the position of the region of interest (ROI) used for noise decomposition may influence fractional noise composition. The ROI area and position used in the Guidelines offer an acceptable estimation of noise components. While there are limitations to the polynomial model, when used with care and with appropriate data weighting, the method offers a simple and robust means of examining the detector noise components as a function of detector exposure.

  15. Combustion noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahle, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A review of the subject of combustion generated noise is presented. Combustion noise is an important noise source in industrial furnaces and process heaters, turbopropulsion and gas turbine systems, flaring operations, Diesel engines, and rocket engines. The state-of-the-art in combustion noise importance, understanding, prediction and scaling is presented for these systems. The fundamentals and available theories of combustion noise are given. Controversies in the field are discussed and recommendations for future research are made.

  16. Airport noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendley, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of airport noise at several airports and air bases is detailed. Community reactions to the noise, steps taken to reduce jet engine noise, and the effect of airport use restrictions and curfews on air transportation are discussed. The adverse effect of changes in allowable operational noise on airport safety and altenative means for reducing noise pollution are considered. Community-airport relations and public relations are discussed.

  17. Effect of oxidant addition on the elimination of 2-naphthalenesulfonate in aqueous solutions by electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkhuraiji, Turki S.; Karpel Vel Leitner, Nathalie

    2016-09-01

    Aromatic sulfonated compounds and naphthalene derivatives are major chemical compounds used in the industry. Electron beam irradiation of aqueous solutions of 2-naphthalenesulfonate (90 μM) was investigated under various experimental conditions. The results obtained demonstrate that the 2-NS concentration decreased dramatically on increasing the absorbed dose in the range 0-1000 Gy. The effectiveness of the radiolytic system was demonstrably enhanced by the addition of oxidants (S2O82- or H2O2). 2-NS removal was higher with S2O82- than with H2O2. For the EB, EB/H2O2, and EB/S2O82- systems, the absorbed doses for 90% elimination of 2-NS (D90) were 700, 480, and 274 Gy, respectively. 2-NS is poorly mineralized by EB but more than 35% mineralization was reached for 15 kGy when oxidants (820 μM S2O82- or 935 μM H2O2) were added. In all systems, the mineralization yield was markedly higher when air (i.e. dissolved oxygen increase) was introduced between successive doses. For 50% 2-NS removal, seven sulfonated transformation products were identified using LC/MS analyses. For the highest absorbed doses the sulfonate group in 2-NS was converted to sulfate ions in the radiolytic systems.

  18. Thermographic in-situ process monitoring of the electron-beam melting technology used in additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinwiddie, Ralph B.; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Lloyd, Peter D.; Lowe, Larry E.; Ulrich, Joe B.

    2013-05-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been utilizing the ARCAM electron beam melting technology to additively manufacture complex geometric structures directly from powder. Although the technology has demonstrated the ability to decrease costs, decrease manufacturing lead-time and fabricate complex structures that are impossible to fabricate through conventional processing techniques, certification of the component quality can be challenging. Because the process involves the continuous deposition of successive layers of material, each layer can be examined without destructively testing the component. However, in-situ process monitoring is difficult due to metallization on inside surfaces caused by evaporation and condensation of metal from the melt pool. This work describes a solution to one of the challenges to continuously imaging inside of the chamber during the EBM process. Here, the utilization of a continuously moving Mylar film canister is described. Results will be presented related to in-situ process monitoring and how this technique results in improved mechanical properties and reliability of the process.

  19. Electron-impact total ionization cross sections of DNA sugar-phosphate backbone and an additivity principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Dateo, Christopher E.

    2005-01-01

    The improved binary-encounter dipole (iBED) model [W.M. Huo, Phys. Rev. A64, 042719-1 (2001)l is used to study the total ionization cross sections of the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone by electron impact. Calculations using neutral fragments found that the total ionization cross sections of C3' - and C5', -deoxyribose-phospate, two conformers of the sugar-phosphate backbone, are close to each other. Furthermore, the sum of the ionization cross sections of the separate deoxyribose and phosphate fragments is in close agreement with the C3' - and C5" -deoxyribose-phospate cross sections, differing by less than 10%. The result implies that certain properties of the-DNA, like the total singly ionization cross section, are localized properties and a building-up or additivity principle may apply. This allows us to obtain accurate properties of larger molecular systems built up from the results of smaller subsystem fragments. Calculations are underway using a negatively charged sugar-phosphate backbone with a metal counter-ion.

  20. 77 FR 12226 - Sadex Corp.; Filing of Food Additive Petition (Animal Use); Electron Beam and X-Ray Sources for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... Petition (Animal Use); Electron Beam and X-Ray Sources for Irradiation of Poultry Feed and Poultry Feed... regulations be amended to provide for the safe use of electron beam and x-ray sources for irradiation of... use of electron beam and x- ray sources for irradiation of poultry feed and poultry feed...

  1. Core-Noise Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015 (N+1), 2020 (N+2), and 2025 (N+3) timeframes; SFW strategic thrusts and technical challenges; SFW advanced subsystems that are broadly applicable to N+3 vehicle concepts, with an indication where further noise research is needed; the components of core noise (compressor, combustor and turbine noise) and a rationale for NASA's current emphasis on the combustor-noise component; the increase in the relative importance of core noise due to turbofan design trends; the need to understand and mitigate core-noise sources for high-efficiency small gas generators; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about forthcoming updates to NASA's Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP) core-noise prediction capabilities, two NRA efforts (Honeywell International, Phoenix, AZ and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, respectively) to improve the understanding of core-noise sources and noise propagation through the engine core, and an effort to develop oxide/oxide ceramic-matrix-composite (CMC) liners for broadband noise attenuation suitable for turbofan-core application. Core noise must be addressed to ensure that the N+3 noise goals are met. Focused, but long-term, core-noise research is carried out to enable the advanced high-efficiency small gas-generator subsystem, common to several N+3 conceptual designs, needed to meet NASA's technical challenges. Intermediate updates to prediction tools are implemented as the understanding of the source structure and engine-internal propagation effects is improved. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The

  2. Fractional shot noise in partially gapped Tomonaga-Luttinger liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornfeld, Eyal; Neder, Izhar; Sela, Eran

    2015-03-01

    We depict a family of one-dimensional systems where one can create and detect fractional charges. These charges are produced via interacting one-dimensional conductors connected to noninteracting leads. At certain electron densities, some distinct modes develop an energy gap due to electron-electron interactions. This gap allows for tunneling events inside the conductor, which generate electric current noise. The resulting fractional noise's Fano factor depends only on the identification of the gapped mode, and is insensitive to additional interactions in the conductor. These effects can be realized in either quantum wires or edges of quantum Hall systems.

  3. Catalysis via homolytic substitutions with C-O and Ti-O bonds: oxidative additions and reductive eliminations in single electron steps.

    PubMed

    Gansäuer, Andreas; Fleckhaus, André; Lafont, Manuel Alejandre; Okkel, Andreas; Kotsis, Konstantinos; Anoop, Anakuthil; Neese, Frank

    2009-11-25

    In a combined theoretical and experimental study, an efficient catalytic reaction featuring epoxide opening and tetrahydrofuran formation through homolytic substitution reactions at C-O and Ti-O bonds was devised. The performance of these two key steps of the catalytic cycle was studied and could be adjusted by modifying the electronic properties of the catalysts through introduction of electron-donating or -withdrawing substituents to the titanocene catalysts. By regarding both steps as single electron versions of oxidative addition and reductive elimination, a mechanism-based platform for the design of catalysts and reagents for electron transfer reactions evolved that opens broad perspectives for further investigations. PMID:19919150

  4. Community noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragdon, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    Airport and community land use planning as they relate to airport noise reduction are discussed. Legislation, community relations, and the physiological effect of airport noise are considered. Noise at the Logan, Los Angeles, and Minneapolis/St. Paul airports is discussed.

  5. A low-noise low-power readout electronics circuit at 4 K in standard CMOS technology for PACS/Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merken, Patrick; Creten, Ybe; Putzeys, Jan; Souverijns, Tim; Van Hoof, Chris

    2004-10-01

    IMEC has designed, in the framework of the PACS project (for the European Herschel Space Observatory) the Cold Readout Electronics (CRE) for the Ge:Ga far-infrared detector array. Key specifications for the CRE were high linearity (3 %), low power consumption (80 μW for an 18 channel array), and very low noise (200 e-) at an operating temperature of 4.2 K (LHT - Liquid Helium Temperature). IMEC has implemented this circuit in a standard CMOS technology (AMIS 0.7 μm), which guarantees high production yield and uniformity, relatively easy availability of the technology and portability of the design. However, the drawback of this approach is the anomalous behavior of CMOS transistors at temperatures below 30-40K, known as kink and hysteresis effects and under certain conditions the presence of excess noise. These cryogenic phenomena disturb the normal functionality of commonly used circuits or building blocks like buffer amplifiers and opamps. We were able to overcome these problems and developed a library of digital and analog building blocks based on the modeling of cryogenic behavior, and on adapted design and layout techniques. These techniques have been validated in an automated cryogenic test set-ups developed at IMEC. We will present here in detail the full design of the 18 channel CRE circuit, its interface with the Ge:Ga sensor, and its electrical performance and demonstrate that all major specifications at 4.2 K were met. Future designs and implementations will be equally presented.

  6. Fano resonance in the nonadiabatically pumped shot noise of a time-dependent quantum well in a two-dimensional electron gas and graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Rui Dai, Jiao-Hua; Guo, Yong

    2015-04-28

    Interference between different quantum paths can generate Fano resonance. One of the examples is transport through a quasibound state driven by a time-dependent scattering potential. Previously it is found that Fano resonance occurs as a result of energy matching in one-dimensional systems. In this work, we demonstrate that when transverse motion is present, Fano resonance occurs precisely at the wavevector matching situation. Using the Floquet scattering theory, we considered the transport properties of a nonadiabatic time-dependent well both in a two-dimensional electron gas and monolayer graphene structure. Dispersion of the quasibound state of a static quantum well is obtained with transverse motion present. We found that Fano resonance occurs when the wavevector in the transport direction of one of the Floquet sidebands is exactly identical to that of the quasibound state in the well at equilibrium and follows the dispersion pattern of the latter. To observe the Fano resonance phenomenon in the transmission spectrum, we also considered the pumped shot noise properties when time and spatial symmetry secures vanishing current in the considered configuration. Prominent Fano resonance is found in the differential pumped shot noise with respect to the reservoir Fermi energy.

  7. Noise Abatement Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    A former NASA employee who discovered a kind of plastic that soaked up energy, dampened vibrations, and was a good noise abatement material, founded a company to market noise deadening adhesives, sheets, panels and enclosures. Known as SMART products, they are 75-80% lighter than ordinary soundproofing material and have demonstrated a high degree of effectiveness. The company, Varian Associates, makes enclosures for high voltage terminals and other electronic system components, and easily transportable audiometric test booths.

  8. Noise in biological circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, Michael L; Allen, Michael S.; Cox, Chris D.; Dar, Roy D.; Karig, David K; McCollum, James M.; Cooke, John F

    2009-01-01

    Noise biology focuses on the sources, processing, and biological consequences of the inherent stochastic fluctuations in molecular transitions or interactions that control cellular behavior. These fluctuations are especially pronounced in small systems where the magnitudes of the fluctuations approach or exceed the mean value of the molecular population. Noise biology is an essential component of nanomedicine where the communication of information is across a boundary that separates small synthetic and biological systems that are bound by their size to reside in environments of large fluctuations. Here we review the fundamentals of the computational, analytical, and experimental approaches to noise biology. We review results that show that the competition between the benefits of low noise and those of low population has resulted in the evolution of genetic system architectures that produce an uneven distribution of stochasticity across the molecular components of cells and, in some cases, use noise to drive biological function. We review the exact and approximate approaches to gene circuit noise analysis and simulation, and reviewmany of the key experimental results obtained using flow cytometry and time-lapse fluorescent microscopy. In addition, we consider the probative value of noise with a discussion of using measured noise properties to elucidate the structure and function of the underlying gene circuit. We conclude with a discussion of the frontiers of and significant future challenges for noise biology.

  9. Studying the issues in the additive manufacturing of dental implants by Electron Beam MeltingRTM (EBM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamshidinia, Mahdi

    The ability of additive manufacturing (AM) processes to produce complex geometries is resulting in their rapid acceptance by a number of industries. This unique capability could be used for the optimization of the design of functional components that could find an application in different industries such as aerospace, automotive, energy, medical, and implants. However, there are still some challenges confronting this technology such as surface finish, residual stress, dimensional tolerance, processing speed, and anisotropy in microstructure and mechanical properties. Any of the mentioned issues could be influenced by the thermal history of a 3D printed component during the layer-by-layer manufacturing. Therefore, an understanding of the thermal cycling during the AM process is essential. In recent years, significant advances have been achieved in the design, manufacturing, and materials used for dental implants. However, there are still some differences between the natural tooth and a dental implant that might decrease patient satisfaction. One of the differences between the natural tooth and a dental implant is in its modulus of elasticity, which could result in an issue known as bone atrophy. The second important difference between a dental implant and a natural tooth is the fact that a natural tooth is surrounded by a periodontal ligament that allows the tooth to move in three directions. However, the periodontal ligament is destroyed during the extraction of a natural tooth. In the absence of the periodontal ligament, the biting force is directly transferred to the jawbone, resulting in discomfort for the patient. Also, the implant cannot be incorporated with the surrounding natural tooth and form a bridge. In this study, the application of a lattice structure for the manufacturing of a biocompatible dental implant is investigated. Three different lattice structures with different unit cell sizes were experimentally and numerically analyzed. The mechanical

  10. Rotor noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.

    1991-01-01

    The physical characteristics and sources of rotorcraft noise as they exist today are presented. Emphasis is on helicopter-like vehicles, that is, on rotorcraft in nonaxial flight. The mechanisms of rotor noise are reviewed in a simple physical manner for the most dominant sources of rotorcraft noise. With simple models, the characteristic time- and frequency-domain features of these noise sources are presented for idealized cases. Full-scale data on several rotorcraft are then reviewed to allow for the easy identification of the type and extent of the radiating noise. Methods and limitations of using scaled models to test for several noise sources are subsequently presented. Theoretical prediction methods are then discussed and compared with experimental data taken under very controlled conditions. Finally, some promising noise reduction technology is reviewed.

  11. 36 CFR 1236.28 - What additional requirements apply to the selection and maintenance of electronic records storage...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... storage media containing permanent and unscheduled records within the following temperature and relative humidity ranges: (1) Temperature—62° to 68 °F. (2) Relative humidity—35% to 45%. (b) Electronic...

  12. 36 CFR 1236.28 - What additional requirements apply to the selection and maintenance of electronic records storage...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... storage media containing permanent and unscheduled records within the following temperature and relative humidity ranges: (1) Temperature—62° to 68 °F. (2) Relative humidity—35% to 45%. (b) Electronic...

  13. 36 CFR 1236.28 - What additional requirements apply to the selection and maintenance of electronic records storage...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... storage media containing permanent and unscheduled records within the following temperature and relative humidity ranges: (1) Temperature—62° to 68 °F. (2) Relative humidity—35% to 45%. (b) Electronic...

  14. Effect of a Simulated Analogue Telephone Channel on the Performance of a Remote Automatic System for the Detection of Pathologies in Voice: Impact of Linear Distortions on Cepstrum-Based Assessment - Band Limitation, Frequency Response and Additive Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraile, Rubén; Sáenz-Lechón, Nicolás; Godino-Llorente, Juan Ignacio; Osma-Ruiz, Víctor; Fredouille, Corinne

    Advances in speech signal analysis during the last decade have allowed the development of automatic algorithms for a non-invasive detection of laryngeal pathologies. Performance assessment of such techniques reveals that classification success rates over 90 % are achievable. Bearing in mind the extension of these automatic methods to remote diagnosis scenarios, this paper analyses the performance of a pathology detector based on Mel Frequency Cepstral Coefficients when the speech signal has undergone the distortion of an analogue communications channel, namely the phone channel. Such channel is modeled as a concatenation of linear effects. It is shown that while the overall performance of the system is degraded, success rates in the range of 80% can still be achieved. This study also shows that the performance degradation is mainly due to band limitation and noise addition.

  15. Attosecond pulse carrier-envelope phase effects on ionized electron momentum and energy distributions: roles of frequency, intensity and an additional IR pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Liang-You; Pronin, Evgeny A.; Starace, Anthony F.

    2008-02-01

    The effects of the carrier-envelope phase (CEP) of a few-cycle attosecond pulse on ionized electron momentum and energy spectra are analyzed, both with and without an additional few-cycle IR pulse. In the absence of an IR pulse, the CEP-induced asymmetries in the ionized electron momentum distributions are shown to vary as the 3/2 power of the attosecond pulse intensity. These asymmetries are also found to satisfy an approximate scaling law involving the frequency and intensity of the attosecond pulse. In the presence of even a very weak IR pulse (having an intensity of the order of 1011 1012 W cm-2), the attosecond pulse CEP-induced asymmetries in the ionized electron momentum distributions are found to be significantly augmented. In addition, for higher IR laser intensities, we observe for low electron energies peaks separated by the IR photon energy in one electron momentum direction along the laser polarization axis; in the opposite direction, we find structured peaks that are spaced by twice the IR photon energy. Possible physical mechanisms for such asymmetric, low-energy structures in the ionized electron momentum distribution are proposed. Our results are based on single-active-electron solutions of the three-dimensional, time-dependent Schrödinger equation including atomic potentials appropriate for the H and He atoms.

  16. Investigation of the oxidation states of Cu additive in colored borosilicate glasses by electron energy loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guang; Cheng, Shaodong; Li, Chao; Zhong, Jiasong; Ma, Chuansheng; Wang, Zhao; Xiang, Weidong

    2014-12-01

    Three optically transparent colorful (red, green, and blue) glasses were synthesized by the sol-gel method. Nano-sized precipitates were found in scanning electron microscopy images. The precipitates were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM. The measured lattice parameters of these precipitates were found to fit the metallic copper in red glass but deviate from single valenced Cu oxides in green and blue glasses. The chemistry of these nano-sized particles was confirmed by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). By fitting the EELS spectra obtained from the precipitates with the linear combination of reference spectra from Cu reference compounds, the oxidation states of Cu in the precipitates have been derived. First principle calculations suggested that the Cu nano-particles, which are in the similar oxidation states as our measurement, would show green color in the visible light range.

  17. Investigation of the oxidation states of Cu additive in colored borosilicate glasses by electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Guang Cheng, Shaodong; Li, Chao; Ma, Chuansheng; Zhong, Jiasong; Xiang, Weidong; Wang, Zhao

    2014-12-14

    Three optically transparent colorful (red, green, and blue) glasses were synthesized by the sol-gel method. Nano-sized precipitates were found in scanning electron microscopy images. The precipitates were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM. The measured lattice parameters of these precipitates were found to fit the metallic copper in red glass but deviate from single valenced Cu oxides in green and blue glasses. The chemistry of these nano-sized particles was confirmed by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). By fitting the EELS spectra obtained from the precipitates with the linear combination of reference spectra from Cu reference compounds, the oxidation states of Cu in the precipitates have been derived. First principle calculations suggested that the Cu nano-particles, which are in the similar oxidation states as our measurement, would show green color in the visible light range.

  18. Addition of water, methanol, and ammonia to Al3O3- clusters: Reaction products, transition states, and electron detachment energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara-García, Alfredo; Martínez, Ana; Ortiz, J. V.

    2005-06-01

    Products of reactions between the book and kite isomers of Al3O3- and three important molecules are studied with electronic structure calculations. Dissociative adsorption of H2O or CH3OH is highly exothermic and proton-transfer barriers between anion-molecule complexes and the products of these reactions are low. For NH3, the reaction energies are less exothermic and the corresponding barriers are higher. Depending on experimental conditions, Al3O3- (NH3) coordination complexes or products of dissociative adsorption may be prepared. Vertical electron detachment energies of stable anions are predicted with ab initio electron propagator calculations and are in close agreement with experiments on Al3O3- and its products with H2O and CH3OH. Changes in the localization properties of two Al-centered Dyson orbitals account for the differences between the photoelectron spectra of Al3O3- and those of the product anions.

  19. Low Noise Electron Microscopy by Merging Multiple Images Digitized from Conventional Films with Reference to the Mouse Kidney

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Xiao-Yue; Ilsø Christensen, Erik; Andreasen, Arne

    2006-07-01

    In a conventional transmission electron microscope system, the resolution is regarded as an absolute limitation, that is, 0.2 nm in theory and 0.6 nm in sections of biological materials. However, in an oversampled system, this limitation can be broken. In the present study, 60-nm-thick Epon sections from a mouse kidney were used. From these sections tight junctions located in the distal tubule were selected as test objects. Sets of up to 15 electron microscope images of the same target were recorded on negatives at ×10,000, ×13,000, and ×63,000, respectively. The recorded films were digitized using a light microscope equipped with a digital camera. In each set the images were expanded, aligned, and merged into a more highly resolved output image. Each output image revealed details in the tight junction, which were not visible at the original magnifications. Two different sizes of colloidal gold particles (10 nm and 1 nm) conjugated with an immunoglobin G (IgG) served as references. With this improvement of resolution, it becomes possible to inspect some barely visible biologic (virus) particles and structures, such as glycogen and free ribosomes in their native environment.

  20. Airframe noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crighton, David G.

    1991-08-01

    Current understanding of airframe noise was reviewed as represented by experiment at model and full scale, by theoretical modeling, and by empirical correlation models. The principal component sources are associated with the trailing edges of wing and tail, deflected trailing edge flaps, flap side edges, leading edge flaps or slats, undercarriage gear elements, gear wheel wells, fuselage and wing boundary layers, and panel vibration, together with many minor protrusions like radio antennas and air conditioning intakes which may contribute significantly to perceived noise. There are also possibilities for interactions between the various mechanisms. With current engine technology, the principal airframe noise mechanisms dominate only at low frequencies, typically less than 1 kHz and often much lower, but further reduction of turbomachinery noise in particular may make airframe noise the principal element of approach noise at frequencies in the sensitive range.

  1. Interior Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mixson, John S.; Wilby, John F.

    1991-01-01

    The generation and control of flight vehicle interior noise is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms of transmission through airborne and structure-borne paths and the control of cabin noise by path modification. Techniques for identifying the relative contributions of the various source-path combinations are also discussed along with methods for the prediction of aircraft interior noise such as those based on the general modal theory and statistical energy analysis.

  2. Noise Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Environmental Health Systems puts forth an increasing effort in the U.S. to develop ways of controlling noise, particularly in industrial environments due to Federal and State laws, labor union insistence and new findings relative to noise pollution impact on human health. NASA's Apollo guidance control system aided in the development of a noise protection product, SMART. The basis of all SMART products is SMART compound a liquid plastic mixture with exceptional energy/sound absorbing qualities. The basic compound was later refined for noise protection use.

  3. 36 CFR 1236.28 - What additional requirements apply to the selection and maintenance of electronic records storage...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-free. (c) For additional guidance on the maintenance and storage of CDs and DVDS, agencies may consult... retention. This test should verify that the magnetic computer tape media are free of permanent errors and...

  4. Equalization-enhanced phase noise for 100 Gb/s transmission and beyond with coherent detection.

    PubMed

    Lau, Alan Pak Tao; Shen, Thomas Shun Rong; Shieh, William; Ho, Keang-Po

    2010-08-01

    The probability density function and impact of equalizationenhanced phase noise (EEPN) is analytically investigated and simulated for 100 Gb/s coherent systems using electronic dispersion compensation. EEPN impairment induces both phase noise and amplitude noise with the former twice as much as the latter. The effects of transmitter phase noise on EEPN are negligible for links with residual dispersion in excess of 700 ps/nm. Optimal linear equalizer in the presence of EEPN is derived but show only marginal performance improvement, indicating that EEPN is difficult to mitigate using simple DSP techniques. In addition, the effects of EEPN on carrier recovery techniques and corresponding cycle slip probabilities are studied. PMID:20721112

  5. Viscosity-dependent drain current noise of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor in polar liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, J. Y.; Hsu, C. P.; Kang, Y. W.; Fang, K. C.; Kao, W. L.; Yao, D. J.; Chen, C. C.; Li, S. S.; Yeh, J. A.; Wang, Y. L.; Lee, G. Y.; Chyi, J. I.; Hsu, C. H.; Huang, Y. F.; Ren, F.

    2013-11-28

    The drain current fluctuation of ungated AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) measured in different fluids at a drain-source voltage of 0.5 V was investigated. The HEMTs with metal on the gate region showed good current stability in deionized water, while a large fluctuation in drain current was observed for HEMTs without gate metal. The fluctuation in drain current for the HEMTs without gate metal was observed and calculated as standard deviation from a real-time measurement in air, deionized water, ethanol, dimethyl sulfoxide, ethylene glycol, 1,2-butanediol, and glycerol. At room temperature, the fluctuation in drain current for the HEMTs without gate metal was found to be relevant to the dipole moment and the viscosity of the liquids. A liquid with a larger viscosity showed a smaller fluctuation in drain current. The viscosity-dependent fluctuation of the drain current was ascribed to the Brownian motions of the liquid molecules, which induced a variation in the surface dipole of the gate region. This study uncovers the causes of the fluctuation in drain current of HEMTs in fluids. The results show that the AlGaN/GaN HEMTs may be used as sensors to measure the viscosity of liquids within a certain range of viscosity.

  6. Aircraft Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Ulf; Dobrzynski, Werner; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Delfs, Jan; Isermann, Ullrich; Obermeier, Frank

    Aircraft industry is exposed to increasing public pressure aiming at a continuing reduction of aircraft noise levels. This is necessary to both compensate for the detrimental effect on noise of the expected increase in air traffic and improve the quality of living in residential areas around airports.

  7. Environmental Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumberg, Martin

    Environmental noise may be defined as unwanted sound that is caused by emissions from traffic (roads, air traffic corridors, and railways), industrial sites and recreational infrastructures, which may cause both annoyance and damage to health. Noise in the environment or community seriously affects people, interfering with daily activities at school, work and home and during leisure time.

  8. An Additional Approach to Model Current Followers and Amplifiers with Electronically Controllable Parameters from Commercially Available ICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotner, R.; Kartci, A.; Jerabek, J.; Herencsar, N.; Dostal, T.; Vrba, K.

    2012-12-01

    Several behavioral models of current active elements for experimental purposes are introduced in this paper. These models are based on commercially available devices. They are suitable for experimental tests of current- and mixed-mode filters, oscillators, and other circuits (employing current-mode active elements) frequently used in analog signal processing without necessity of onchip fabrication of proper active element. Several methods of electronic control of intrinsic resistance in the proposed behavioral models are discussed. All predictions and theoretical assumptions are supported by simulations and experiments. This contribution helps to find a cheaper and more effective way to preliminary laboratory tests without expensive on-chip fabrication of special active elements.

  9. The effect of Ni addition on the structure of Pt–Sn/C nanoparticles by electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Beyhan, Seden; Pronier, Stéphane

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • A typical Pt/SnO{sub 2} core–shell structure is present in Pt–Sn. • The most of SnO{sub 2} species are likely clustered in Pt–Sn. • SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles prefer to locate close to Pt–Sn–Ni nanoclusters. • Main crystallographic structures are either cubic Pt or PtSn{sub 2}. - Abstract: Carbon supported bimetallic Pt–Sn and trimetallic Pt–Sn–Ni nanoparticles were synthesized by Bönnemann's colloidal precursor method and characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) techniques. HR-TEM and EDX results demonstrated that SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles tend to form clusters in Pt–Sn/C; however, the presence of Ni in the Pt–Sn/C gives rise to an induced interaction between SnO{sub 2} and Pt nanoparticles. Electron diffraction patterns of Pt–Sn–Ni/C showed that either cubic Pt or PtSn{sub 2} structures are present. From the selected area EDX analysis, it was found that both of these structures contain Sn. This suggests that Pt–Sn–Ni/C nanoparticles may be partially covered by Sn-richer PtSn{sub 2} alloyed structure.

  10. Different Effect of the Additional Electron-Withdrawing Cyano Group in Different Conjugation Bridge: The Adjusted Molecular Energy Levels and Largely Improved Photovoltaic Performance.

    PubMed

    Li, Huiyang; Fang, Manman; Hou, Yingqin; Tang, Runli; Yang, Yizhou; Zhong, Cheng; Li, Qianqian; Li, Zhen

    2016-05-18

    Four organic sensitizers (LI-68-LI-71) bearing various conjugated bridges were designed and synthesized, in which the only difference between LI-68 and LI-69 (or LI-70 and LI-71) was the absence/presence of the CN group as the auxiliary electron acceptor. Interestingly, compared to the reference dye of LI-68, LI-69 bearing the additional CN group exhibited the bad performance with the decreased Jsc and Voc values. However, once one thiophene moiety near the anchor group was replaced by pyrrole with the electron-rich property, the resultant LI-71 exhibited a photoelectric conversion efficiency increase by about 3 folds from 2.75% (LI-69) to 7.95% (LI-71), displaying the synergistic effect of the two moieties (CN and pyrrole). Computational analysis disclosed that pyrrole as the auxiliary electron donor (D') in the conjugated bridge can compensate for the lower negative charge in the electron acceptor, which was caused by the CN group as the electron trap, leading to the more efficient electron injection and better photovoltaic performance. PMID:27101840

  11. Noise in Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beristain, Sergio

    2001-05-01

    Mexico City is known to be the largest city in the world, inhabited by some 20 percent of the national population, so noise pollution is not strange to it, particularly in view of the fact that industry is not concentrated, but rather spread throughout the city. The international airport also lies within the city limits, in the midst of residential areas. The heavy traffic during rush hours in the morning and in the evening and the activities of the populace, together with special events, produce a noise problem that is difficult to assess and to solve. Nevertheless, with educational programs begun several years ago and noise campaigns planned for the near future, in addition to existing regulations, the problem is not completely out of control. This paper presents a discussion of the general noise problem and describes how authorities and institutions are dealing with it.

  12. Airframe noise prediction evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, Kingo J.; Donelson, Michael J.; Huang, Shumei C.; Joshi, Mahendra C.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the accuracy and adequacy of current airframe noise prediction methods using available airframe noise measurements from tests of a narrow body transport (DC-9) and a wide body transport (DC-10) in addition to scale model test data. General features of the airframe noise from these aircraft and models are outlined. The results of the assessment of two airframe prediction methods, Fink's and Munson's methods, against flight test data of these aircraft and scale model wind tunnel test data are presented. These methods were extensively evaluated against measured data from several configurations including clean, slat deployed, landing gear-deployed, flap deployed, and landing configurations of both DC-9 and DC-10. They were also assessed against a limited number of configurations of scale models. The evaluation was conducted in terms of overall sound pressure level (OASPL), tone corrected perceived noise level (PNLT), and one-third-octave band sound pressure level (SPL).

  13. Highly E-Selective and Enantioselective Michael Addition to Electron-Deficient Internal Alkynes Under Chiral Iminophosphorane Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Uraguchi, Daisuke; Yamada, Kohei; Ooi, Takashi

    2015-08-17

    A highly E-selective and enantioselective conjugate addition of 2-benzyloxythiazol-5(4H)-ones to β-substituted alkynyl N-acyl pyrazoles is achieved under the catalysis of a P-spiro chiral iminophosphorane. Simultaneous control of the newly generated central chirality and olefin geometry is possible with a wide array of the alkynyl Michael acceptors possessing different aromatic and aliphatic β-substituents, as well as the various α-amino acid-derived thiazolone nucleophiles. This protocol provides access to structurally diverse, optically active α-amino acids bearing a geometrically defined trisubstituted olefinic component at the α-position. PMID:26138611

  14. A practical exposure-equivalent metric for instrumentation noise in x-ray imaging systems

    PubMed Central

    Yadava, G K; Kuhls-Gilcrist, A T; Rudin, S; Patel, V K; Hoffmann, K R; Bednarek, D R

    2008-01-01

    The performance of high-sensitivity x-ray imagers may be limited by additive instrumentation noise rather than by quantum noise when operated at the low exposure rates used in fluoroscopic procedures. The equipment-invasive instrumentation noise measures (in terms of electrons) are generally difficult to make and are potentially not as helpful in clinical practice as would be a direct radiological representation of such noise that may be determined in the field. In this work, we define a clinically relevant representation for instrumentation noise in terms of noise-equivalent detector entrance exposure, termed the instrumentation noise-equivalent exposure (INEE), which can be determined through experimental measurements of noise-variance or signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The INEE was measured for various detectors, thus demonstrating its usefulness in terms of providing information about the effective operating range of the various detectors. A simulation study is presented to demonstrate the robustness of this metric against post-processing, and its dependence on inherent detector blur. These studies suggest that the INEE may be a practical gauge to determine and compare the range of quantum-limited performance for clinical x-ray detectors of different design, with the implication that detector performance at exposures below the INEE will be instrumentation-noise limited rather than quantum-noise limited. PMID:18723932

  15. Noise and mental performance: personality attributes and noise sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Belojevic, G; Jakovljevic, B; Slepcevic, V

    2003-01-01

    The contradictory and confusing results in noise research on humans may partly be due to individual differences between the subjects participating in different studies. This review is based on a twelve year research on the role of neuroticism, extroversion and subjective noise sensitivity during mental work in noisy environment. Neurotic persons might show enhanced "arousability" i.e. their arousal level increases more in stress. Additional unfavorable factors for neurotics are worrying and anxiety, which might prevent them coping successfully with noise, or some other stressors during mental performance. In numerous experiments introverts have showed higher sensitivity to noise during mental performance compared to extroverts, while extroverts often cope with a boring task even by requesting short periods of noise during performance. Correlation analyses have regularly revealed a highly significant negative relation between extroversion and noise annoyance during mental processing. Numerous studies have shown that people with high noise sensitivity may be prevented from achieving the same work results as other people in noisy environment, thus leading to psychosomatic, neurotic or other difficulties. Positive relation between noise annoyance and subjective noise sensitivity might be very strong. Our results have shown, after matching with the results of other relevant studies, that more stable personality, with extroversive tendencies and with a relatively lower subjective noise sensitivity measured with standard questionnaires, may be expected to better adapt to noise during mental performance, compared to people with opposite personality traits. PMID:14965455

  16. Photon-Assisted Shot Noise in Graphene in the Terahertz Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, F. D.; Serkovic-Loli, L. N.; Roulleau, P.; Glattli, D. C.

    2016-06-01

    When subjected to electromagnetic radiation, the fluctuation of the electronic current across a quantum conductor increases. This additional noise, called photon-assisted shot noise, arises from the generation and subsequent partition of electron-hole pairs in the conductor. The physics of photon-assisted shot noise has been thoroughly investigated at microwave frequencies up to 20 GHz, and its robustness suggests that it could be extended to the terahertz (THz) range. Here, we present measurements of the quantum shot noise generated in a graphene nanoribbon subjected to a THz radiation. Our results show signatures of photon-assisted shot noise, further demonstrating that hallmark time-dependant quantum transport phenomena can be transposed to the THz range.

  17. Photon-Assisted Shot Noise in Graphene in the Terahertz Range.

    PubMed

    Parmentier, F D; Serkovic-Loli, L N; Roulleau, P; Glattli, D C

    2016-06-01

    When subjected to electromagnetic radiation, the fluctuation of the electronic current across a quantum conductor increases. This additional noise, called photon-assisted shot noise, arises from the generation and subsequent partition of electron-hole pairs in the conductor. The physics of photon-assisted shot noise has been thoroughly investigated at microwave frequencies up to 20 GHz, and its robustness suggests that it could be extended to the terahertz (THz) range. Here, we present measurements of the quantum shot noise generated in a graphene nanoribbon subjected to a THz radiation. Our results show signatures of photon-assisted shot noise, further demonstrating that hallmark time-dependant quantum transport phenomena can be transposed to the THz range. PMID:27314736

  18. Health Effects of Noise Exposure in Children.

    PubMed

    Stansfeld, Stephen; Clark, Charlotte

    2015-06-01

    Environmental noise exposure, such as road traffic noise and aircraft noise, is associated with a range of health outcomes in children. Children demonstrate annoyance responses to noise, and noise is also related to lower well-being and stress responses, such as increased levels of adrenaline and noradrenaline. Noise does not cause more serious mental health problems, but there is growing evidence for an association with increased hyperactivity symptoms. Studies also suggest that noise might cause changes in cardiovascular functioning, and there is some limited evidence for an effect on low birth weight. There is robust evidence for an effect of school noise exposure on children's cognitive skills such as reading and memory, as well as on standardised academic test scores. Environmental noise does not usually reach levels that are likely to affect children's hearing; however, increasing use of personal electronic devices may leave some children exposed to harmful levels of noise. PMID:26231366

  19. Numerical modeling of heat-transfer and the influence of process parameters on tailoring the grain morphology of IN718 in electron beam additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Raghavan, Narendran; Dehoff, Ryan; Pannala, Sreekanth; Simunovic, Srdjan; Kirka, Michael; Turner, John; Carlson, Neil; Babu, Sudarsanam S.

    2016-04-26

    The fabrication of 3-D parts from CAD models by additive manufacturing (AM) is a disruptive technology that is transforming the metal manufacturing industry. The correlation between solidification microstructure and mechanical properties has been well understood in the casting and welding processes over the years. This paper focuses on extending these principles to additive manufacturing to understand the transient phenomena of repeated melting and solidification during electron beam powder melting process to achieve site-specific microstructure control within a fabricated component. In this paper, we have developed a novel melt scan strategy for electron beam melting of nickel-base superalloy (Inconel 718) andmore » also analyzed 3-D heat transfer conditions using a parallel numerical solidification code (Truchas) developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The spatial and temporal variations of temperature gradient (G) and growth velocity (R) at the liquid-solid interface of the melt pool were calculated as a function of electron beam parameters. By manipulating the relative number of voxels that lie in the columnar or equiaxed region, the crystallographic texture of the components can be controlled to an extent. The analysis of the parameters provided optimum processing conditions that will result in columnar to equiaxed transition (CET) during the solidification. Furthermore, the results from the numerical simulations were validated by experimental processing and characterization thereby proving the potential of additive manufacturing process to achieve site-specific crystallographic texture control within a fabricated component.« less

  20. The Airframe Noise Reduction Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhard, David P.; Lilley, Geoffrey M.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA goal of reducing external aircraft noise by 10 dB in the near-term presents the acoustics community with an enormous challenge. This report identifies technologies with the greatest potential to reduce airframe noise. Acoustic and aerodynamic effects will be discussed, along with the likelihood of industry accepting and implementing the different technologies. We investigate the lower bound, defined as noise generated by an aircraft modified with a virtual retrofit capable of eliminating all noise associated with the high lift system and landing gear. However, the airframe noise of an aircraft in this 'clean' configuration would only be about 8 dB quieter on approach than current civil transports. To achieve the NASA goal of 10 dB noise reduction will require that additional noise sources be addressed. Research shows that energy in the turbulent boundary layer of a wing is scattered as it crosses trailing edge. Noise generated by scattering is the dominant noise mechanism on an aircraft flying in the clean configuration. Eliminating scattering would require changes to much of the aircraft, and practical reduction devices have yet to receive serious attention. Evidence suggests that to meet NASA goals in civil aviation noise reduction, we need to employ emerging technologies and improve landing procedures; modified landing patterns and zoning restrictions could help alleviate aircraft noise in communities close to airports.

  1. Assessment of the Electronic Factors Determining the Thermodynamics of "Oxidative Addition" of C-H and N-H Bonds to Ir(I) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, David Y; Choliy, Yuriy; Haibach, Michael C; Hartwig, John F; Krogh-Jespersen, Karsten; Goldman, Alan S

    2016-01-13

    A study of electronic factors governing the thermodynamics of C-H and N-H bond addition to Ir(I) complexes was conducted. DFT calculations were performed on an extensive series of trans-(PH3)2IrXL complexes (L = NH3 and CO; X = various monodentate ligands) to parametrize the relative σ- and π-donating/withdrawing properties of the various ligands, X. Computed energies of oxidative addition of methane to a series of three- and four-coordinate Ir(I) complexes bearing an ancillary ligand, X, were correlated with the resulting (σ(X), π(X)) parameter set. Regression analysis indicates that the thermodynamics of addition of methane to trans-(PH3)2IrX are generally strongly disfavored by increased σ-donation from the ligand X, in contradiction to widely held views on oxidative addition. The trend for oxidative addition of methane to four-coordinate Ir(I) was closely related to that observed for the three-coordinate complexes, albeit slightly more complicated. The computational analysis was found to be consistent with the rates of reductive elimination of benzene from a series of isoelectronic Ir(III) phenyl hydride complexes, measured experimentally in this work and previously reported. Extending the analysis of ancillary ligand energetic effects to the oxidative addition of ammonia to three-coordinate Ir(I) complexes leads to the conclusion that increasing σ-donation by X also disfavors oxidative addition of N-H bonds to trans-(PH3)2IrX. However, coordination of NH3 to the Ir(I) center is disfavored even more strongly by increasing σ-donation by X, which explains why the few documented examples of H-NH2 oxidative addition to transition metals involve complexes with strongly σ-donating ligands situated trans to the site of addition. An orbital-based rationale for the observed results is presented. PMID:26652221

  2. Effects of the addition of alcohols, cryoprotective agents, and salts on the photoionization yield of chlorophyll a in frozen vesicle solutions with and without electron acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hiff, T.; Kevan, L. )

    1989-04-20

    The photoionization yield of chlorophyll a (Chla) in rapidly frozen vesicles with and without potassium ferricyanide (FC) or tetrachloro-p-benzoquinone (TCBQ) has been studied versus several structural variations of phospholipid vesicles, including the addition of medium chain length alcohols, the effect of added salts (metal chlorides), the presence of a double bond in the alkyl tail of the surfactant, and the addition of dimethyl sulfoxide or glycerol which tend to enhance vesicular structure retention upon freezing. Variations in the photoionization yield versus these structural parameters are discussed in terms of distance variations between Chla and electron acceptors, loss of integrity of the vesicle structure, and differences in the degree of hydration of the headgroups of the surfactant molecules. Electron spin echo (ESE) deuterium modulation associated with a 5-doxylstearic acid spin probe interacting with deuterated water probes the degree of water interaction at the vesicle interface. The ESE data support a correlation between the degree of interface hydration and the photoionization yield for vesicles containing Chla and FC as an electron acceptor. Parallel ESE studies of 5-doxylstearic acid spin probes in anionic and cationic surfactant vesicles reveal changes in the interface hydration if the surfactant counterion is changed; this can be roughly correlated to the Chla photoionization yields.

  3. Functionalisation of graphene by edge-halogenation and radical addition using polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon models: edge electron density-binding energy relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Amarjeet; Mishra, P. C.

    2015-04-01

    Structures and properties of functionalised graphene were investigated using several derivatives of some small polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) taken as finite size models employing unrestricted density functional theory. The functionalisation reactions included fluorination or chlorination of all the edge carbon sites, addition of H, F or Cl atom, OH or OOH group at the different sites and addition of OH or OOH group at the different sites of the edge-halogenated PAHs. σ-inductive effects of fluorine and chlorine in the edge-fluorinated and edge-chlorinated PAHs, respectively, were found to affect electron density and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) distributions significantly. σ-holes were located at the MEP surfaces along the CH and CCl bonds of the unmodified and edge-chlorinated PAHs, respectively. The H and F atoms and the OH group were found to add to all the carbon sites of PAHs exothermically, while addition of the Cl atom and the OOH group was found to be exothermic at a few carbon sites and endothermic at the other carbon sites. Enhanced electron densities at the edge carbon sites of the PAHs and binding energies of adducts of H and F atoms and the OH group at these sites were found to be linearly correlated.

  4. Fan and pump noise control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misoda, J.; Magliozzi, B.

    1973-01-01

    The development is described of improved, low noise level fan and pump concepts for the space shuttle. In addition, a set of noise design criteria for small fans and pumps was derived. The concepts and criteria were created by obtaining Apollo hardware test data to correlate and modify existing noise estimating procedures. A set of space shuttle selection criteria was used to determine preliminary fan and pump concepts. These concepts were tested and modified to obtain noise sources and characteristics which yield the design criteria and quiet, efficient space shuttle fan and pump concepts.

  5. 15N electron nuclear double resonance of the primary donor cation radical P+.865 in reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides: additional evidence for the dimer model.

    PubMed Central

    Lubitz, W; Isaacson, R A; Abresch, E C; Feher, G

    1984-01-01

    Four 15N hyperfine coupling constants, including signs, have been measured by electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and electron nuclear nuclear triple resonance (TRIPLE) for the bacteriochlorophyll a radical cation, BChla+., in vitro and for the light-induced primary donor radical cation, P+.865, in reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides R-26. A comparison of the data shows that the hyperfine coupling constants have the same sign in both radicals and are, on the average, smaller by a factor of 2 in P+.865. These results provide additional evidence that P+.865 is a bacteriochlorophyll dimer and are in contradiction with the monomer structure of P+.865 recently proposed by O'Malley and Babcock. The reduction factors of the individual 15N couplings, together with the evidence from proton ENDOR data and molecular orbital calculations, indicate a dimer structure in which only two rings (either I and I or III and III) of the bacteriochlorophyll macrocycles overlap. PMID:6096857

  6. Advanced Study for Active Noise Control in Aircraft (ASANCA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borchers, Ingo U.; Emborg, Urban; Sollo, Antonio; Waterman, Elly H.; Paillard, Jacques; Larsen, Peter N.; Venet, Gerard; Goeransson, Peter; Martin, Vincent

    1992-01-01

    Aircraft interior noise and vibration measurements are included in this paper from ground and flight tests. In addition, related initial noise calculations with and without active noise control are conducted. The results obtained to date indicate that active noise control may be an effective means for reducing the critical low frequency aircraft noise.

  7. Aerodynamic Noise Generated by Shinkansen Cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KITAGAWA, T.; NAGAKURA, K.

    2000-03-01

    The noise value (A -weighted sound pressure level, SLOW) generated by Shinkansen trains, now running at 220-300 km/h, should be less than 75 dB(A) at the trackside. Shinkansen noise, such as rolling noise, concrete support structure noise, and aerodynamic noise are generated by various parts of Shinkansen trains. Among these aerodynamic noise is important because it is the major contribution to the noise generated by the coaches running at high speed. In order to reduce the aerodynamic noise, a number of improvements to coaches have been made. As a result, the aerodynamic noise has been reduced, but it still remains significant. In addition, some aerodynamic noise generated from the lower parts of cars remains. In order to investigate the contributions of these noises, a method of analyzing Shinkansen noise has been developed and applied to the measured data of Shinkansen noise at speeds between 120 and 315 km/h. As a result, the following conclusions have been drawn: (1) Aerodynamic noise generated from the upper parts of cars was reduced considerably by smoothing car surfaces. (2) Aerodynamic noise generated from the lower parts of cars has a major influence upon the wayside noise.

  8. Mechanisms of radical formation in beef and chicken meat during high pressure processing evaluated by electron spin resonance detection and the addition of antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Bolumar, Tomas; Andersen, Mogens L; Orlien, Vibeke

    2014-05-01

    The generation of radicals during high pressure (HP) processing of beef loin and chicken breast was studied by spin trapping and electron spin resonance detection. The pressurization resulted in a higher level of spin adducts in the beef loin than in the chicken breast. It was shown that radicals were formed in the sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar fractions as well as in the non-soluble protein fraction due to the HP treatment, indicating that other radicals than iron-derived radicals were formed, and most likely protein-derived radicals. The addition of iron as well as the natural antioxidants caffeic acid, rosemary extract, and ascorbic acid resulted in an increased formation of radicals during the HP treatment, whereas addition of ethylendiamintetraacetic acid (EDTA) reduced the radical formation. This suggests that iron-species (protein-bound or free) catalyses the formation of radicals when meat systems are submitted to HP. PMID:24360471

  9. Helicopter internal noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niesl, G.; Laudien, E.

    1994-09-01

    Compared to fixed wing aircraft, helicopter interior noise is higher, and subjectively more annoying. This is mainly due to discrete frequencies by the main transmission system, and also from other components like main and tail rotor, engines, or cooling fans. Up to now, mainly passive measures have been used for interior noise reduction. Despite intensive experimental and theoretical investigation to improve acoustic treatment, their weight penalties remain high especially in the low frequency range. Here, active noise control offers additional capacities without excessive weight efforts. Loud-speaker based systems are sufficiently well developed for implementing a prototype system in the helicopter. Two other principles are in development: active panel control which introduces mechanical actuators to excite the cabin walls, and active control of gearbox struts with actuators in the load path between gearbox and fuselage.

  10. Investigation of noise and contrast sensitivity of an electron multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) based cone beam micro-CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bysani Krishnakumar, Sumukh; Podgorsak, Alexander R.; Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Jain, Amit; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Ionita, Ciprian N.

    2016-03-01

    A small animal micro-CT system was built using an EMCCD detectors having complex pre-digitization amplification technology, high-resolution, high-sensitivity and low-noise. Noise in CBCT reconstructed images when using predigitization amplification behaves differently than commonly used detectors and warrants a detailed investigation. In this study, noise power and contrast sensitivity were estimated for the newly built system. Noise analysis was performed by scanning a water phantom. Tube voltage was lowered to minimum delivered by the tube (20 kVp and 0.5 mA) and detector gain was varied. Contrast sensitivity was analyzed by using a phantom containing different iodine contrast solutions (20% to 70%) filled in six different tubes. First, we scanned the phantom using various x-ray exposures at 40 kVp while changing the gain to maintain the background air value of the projection images constant. Next, the exposure was varied while the detector gain was maintained constant. Radial NPS plots show that noise power level increases as gain increases. Contrast sensitivity was analyzed by calculating ratio of signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) for increased gain with those of low constant gain at each exposure. The SNR value at low constant gain was always lower than SNR of high detector gain at all x-ray settings and iodine contrast. The largest increase of SNR approached 1.3 for low contrast feature for an iodine concentration of 20%. Despite an increase in noise level as gain increases, the SNR improvement shows that signal level also increases because of the unique on-chip gain of the detector.

  11. Noise Prediction for Maneuvering Rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentner, Kenneth S.; Jones, Henry E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the initial work toward first-principles noise prediction for maneuvering rotors. Both the aeromechanical and acoustics aspects of the maneuver noise problem are discussed. The comprehensive analysis code, CAMRAD 2. was utilized to predict the time-dependent aircraft position and attitude, along - with the rotor blade airloads and motion. The major focus of this effort was the enhancement of the acoustic code WOPWOP necessary to compute the noise from a maneuvering rotorcraft. Full aircraft motion, including arbitrary transient motion, is modeled together with arbitrary rotor blade motions. Noise from a rotorcraft in turning and descending flight is compared to level flight. A substantial increase in the rotor noise is found both for turning flight and during a transient maneuver. Additional enhancements to take advantage of parallel computers and clusters of workstations, in addition to a new compact-chordwise loading formulation, are also described.

  12. Noise in Graphene Superlattices Grown on Hexagonal Boron Nitride.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuefei; Lu, Xiaobo; Li, Tiaoyang; Yang, Wei; Fang, Jianming; Zhang, Guangyu; Wu, Yanqing

    2015-11-24

    Existing in almost all electronic systems, the current noise spectral density, originated from the fluctuation of current, is by nature far more sensitive than the mean value of current, the most common characteristic parameter in electronic devices. Existing models on its origin of either carrier number or mobility are adopted in practically all electronic devices. For the past few decades, there has been no experimental evidence for direct association between 1/f noise and any other kinetic phenomena in solid state devices. Here, in the study of a van der Waals heterostructure of graphene on hexagonal BN superlattice, satellite Dirac points have been characterized through 1/f noise spectral density with pronounced local minima and asymmetric magnitude associated with its unique energy dispersion spectrum, which can only be revealed by scanning tunneling microscopy and low temperature magneto-transport measurement. More importantly, these features even emerge in the noise spectra of devices showing no minima in electric current, and are robust at all temperatures down to 4.3 K. In addition, graphene on h-BN exhibits a record low noise level of 1.6 × 10(-9) μm(2) Hz(-1) at 10 Hz, more than 1 order of magnitude lower than previous results for graphene on SiO2. Such an epitaxial van der Waals material system not only enables an unprecedented characterization of fundamentals in solids by 1/f noise, but its superior interface also provides a key and feasible solution for further improvement of the noise level for graphene devices. PMID:26435195

  13. Forward-bias diode parameters, electronic noise, and photoresponse of graphene/silicon Schottky junctions with an interfacial native oxide layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yanbin; Behnam, Ashkan; Pop, Eric; Bosman, Gijs; Ural, Ant

    2015-09-01

    Metal-semiconductor Schottky junction devices composed of chemical vapor deposition grown monolayer graphene on p-type silicon substrates are fabricated and characterized. Important diode parameters, such as the Schottky barrier height, ideality factor, and series resistance, are extracted from forward bias current-voltage characteristics using a previously established method modified to take into account the interfacial native oxide layer present at the graphene/silicon junction. It is found that the ideality factor can be substantially increased by the presence of the interfacial oxide layer. Furthermore, low frequency noise of graphene/silicon Schottky junctions under both forward and reverse bias is characterized. The noise is found to be 1/f dominated and the shot noise contribution is found to be negligible. The dependence of the 1/f noise on the forward and reverse current is also investigated. Finally, the photoresponse of graphene/silicon Schottky junctions is studied. The devices exhibit a peak responsivity of around 0.13 A/W and an external quantum efficiency higher than 25%. From the photoresponse and noise measurements, the bandwidth is extracted to be ˜1 kHz and the normalized detectivity is calculated to be 1.2 ×109 cm Hz1/2 W-1. These results provide important insights for the future integration of graphene with silicon device technology.

  14. Noise in Nonlinear Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Frank; McClintock, P. V. E.

    2009-08-01

    List of contributors; Preface; Introduction to volume three; 1. The effects of coloured quadratic noise on a turbulent transition in liquid He II J. T. Tough; 2. Electrohydrodynamic instability of nematic liquid crystals: growth process and influence of noise S. Kai; 3. Suppression of electrohydrodynamic instabilities by external noise Helmut R. Brand; 4. Coloured noise in dye laser fluctuations R. Roy, A. W. Yu and S. Zhu; 5. Noisy dynamics in optically bistable systems E. Arimondo, D. Hennequin and P. Glorieux; 6. Use of an electronic model as a guideline in experiments on transient optical bistability W. Lange; 7. Computer experiments in nonlinear stochastic physics Riccardo Mannella; 8. Analogue simulations of stochastic processes by means of minimum component electronic devices Leone Fronzoni; 9. Analogue techniques for the study of problems in stochastic nonlinear dynamics P. V. E. McClintock and Frank Moss; Index.

  15. Noise-induced transitions in optomechanical synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Talitha; Kronwald, Andreas; Marquardt, Florian

    2016-01-01

    We study how quantum and thermal noise affects synchronization of two optomechanical limit-cycle oscillators. Classically, in the absence of noise, optomechanical systems tend to synchronize either in-phase or anti-phase. Taking into account the fundamental quantum noise, we find a regime where fluctuations drive transitions between these classical synchronization states. We investigate how this ‘mixed’ synchronization regime emerges from the noiseless system by studying the classical-to-quantum crossover and we show how the time scales of the transitions vary with the effective noise strength. In addition, we compare the effects of thermal noise to the effects of quantum noise.

  16. Shot noise in a toroidal carbon nanotube coupled with Majorana fermion states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Zhao, Hong-Kang; Wang, Qing

    2016-03-01

    The shot noise of a toroidal carbon nanotube (TCN) interferometer coupled with Majorana fermions is deduced from evaluating the current correlation. Many novel channels are opened for electrons to transport, and the energy gap of the semiconducting TCN becomes narrower. The Majorana fermions cause additional current correlations among the normal tunneling currents and Andreev reflection currents, and hence the shot noise and Fano factor are enhanced. The conductance, current, and shot noise are modified by Majorana fermions to exhibit different oscillation and resonance structures. The detailed behaviors of these quantities are quite different from the metal and semiconducting TCNs.

  17. Noise-induced transitions in a double-well oscillator with nonlinear dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Vladimir V.; Neiman, Alexander B.; Vadivasova, Tatyana E.; Anishchenko, Vadim S.

    2016-05-01

    We develop a model of bistable oscillator with nonlinear dissipation. Using a numerical simulation and an electronic circuit realization of this system we study its response to additive noise excitations. We show that depending on noise intensity the system undergoes multiple qualitative changes in the structure of its steady-state probability density function (PDF). In particular, the PDF exhibits two pitchfork bifurcations versus noise intensity, which we describe using an effective potential and corresponding normal form of the bifurcation. These stochastic effects are explained by the partition of the phase space by the nullclines of the deterministic oscillator.

  18. Noise-induced transitions in a double-well oscillator with nonlinear dissipation.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Vladimir V; Neiman, Alexander B; Vadivasova, Tatyana E; Anishchenko, Vadim S

    2016-05-01

    We develop a model of bistable oscillator with nonlinear dissipation. Using a numerical simulation and an electronic circuit realization of this system we study its response to additive noise excitations. We show that depending on noise intensity the system undergoes multiple qualitative changes in the structure of its steady-state probability density function (PDF). In particular, the PDF exhibits two pitchfork bifurcations versus noise intensity, which we describe using an effective potential and corresponding normal form of the bifurcation. These stochastic effects are explained by the partition of the phase space by the nullclines of the deterministic oscillator. PMID:27300883

  19. Community noise sources and noise control issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nihart, Gene L.

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: community noise sources and noise control issues; noise components for turbine bypass turbojet engine (TBE) turbojet; engine cycle selection and noise; nozzle development schedule; NACA nozzle design; NACA nozzle test results; nearly fully mixed (NFM) nozzle design; noise versus aspiration rate; peak noise test results; nozzle test in the Low Speed Aeroacoustic Facility (LSAF); and Schlieren pictures of NACA nozzle.

  20. Error Sensitivity to Environmental Noise in Quantum Circuits for Chemical State Preparation.

    PubMed

    Sawaya, Nicolas P D; Smelyanskiy, Mikhail; McClean, Jarrod R; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2016-07-12

    Calculating molecular energies is likely to be one of the first useful applications to achieve quantum supremacy, performing faster on a quantum than a classical computer. However, if future quantum devices are to produce accurate calculations, errors due to environmental noise and algorithmic approximations need to be characterized and reduced. In this study, we use the high performance qHiPSTER software to investigate the effects of environmental noise on the preparation of quantum chemistry states. We simulated 18 16-qubit quantum circuits under environmental noise, each corresponding to a unitary coupled cluster state preparation of a different molecule or molecular configuration. Additionally, we analyze the nature of simple gate errors in noise-free circuits of up to 40 qubits. We find that, in most cases, the Jordan-Wigner (JW) encoding produces smaller errors under a noisy environment as compared to the Bravyi-Kitaev (BK) encoding. For the JW encoding, pure dephasing noise is shown to produce substantially smaller errors than pure relaxation noise of the same magnitude. We report error trends in both molecular energy and electron particle number within a unitary coupled cluster state preparation scheme, against changes in nuclear charge, bond length, number of electrons, noise types, and noise magnitude. These trends may prove to be useful in making algorithmic and hardware-related choices for quantum simulation of molecular energies. PMID:27254482

  1. In-situ experimental investigations of electron space-charge instabilities and noise mechanisms in a reentrant crossed-field amplifier via distributed-cathode emission and gated-beam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, J.Z.; MacGregor, R.; Chan, C.; Ruden, T.E.

    1995-12-31

    Experimental investigations of the true physical conditions inside the crossed-field devices are of fundamental importance for the understanding of the operation of these devices and may lead to eventual improvement of the present tubes. At Northeastern University, tube research has taken up a combined approach of in situ plasma diagnostics and computer simulation using two frequency scaled CFA`s as test vehicles. A collection of temporal and time-averaged diagnostic techniques have been developed through the research. Probe measurements as well as device performance of the linear CFA and the beam-injected, reentrant CFA have been directly compared with computer simulation results from MASK and NEAMP codes. The authors have recently incorporated in their reentrant CFA a secondary emission cathode for the purpose of gaining insight on improving the noise performance of both military and commercial devices. It has long been speculated, and appears more so as a result of the improved diagnostic techniques, that the instabilities in the space charge cloud are the major source of noise in crossed-field devices. Long electron transit time facilitates large-scale energy exchanges between hub electrons and eliminates the condition for the classical Brillouin flow. Their time-averaged density measurements confirmed that electron cloud extends beyond that predicted by the classical theory; preliminary observations showed organized space charge oscillations for static operating regimes. These oscillations can interact with the applied RF drive signal at different levels resulting in noise on the RF circuit. Other instabilities associated with the cathode secondary emission and due to reentrant electrons are, among other factors, evaluated in terms of their contribution to the turbulent behavior via spatial probes that monitor the anode current, back bombardment current and space charge fluctuation.

  2. Semiconductor Laser Low Frequency Noise Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lute; Logan, Ronald T.

    1996-01-01

    This work summarizes the efforts in identifying the fundamental noise limit in semiconductor optical sources (lasers) to determine the source of 1/F noise and it's associated behavior. In addition, the study also addresses the effects of this 1/F noise on RF phased arrays. The study showed that the 1/F noise in semiconductor lasers has an ultimate physical limit based upon similar factors to fundamental noise generated in other semiconductor and solid state devices. The study also showed that both additive and multiplicative noise can be a significant detriment to the performance of RF phased arrays especially in regard to very low sidelobe performance and ultimate beam steering accuracy. The final result is that a noise power related term must be included in a complete analysis of the noise spectrum of any semiconductor device including semiconductor lasers.

  3. Control of Environmental Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Paul

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the physical properties, sources, physiological effects, and legislation pertaining to noise, especially noise characteristics in the community. Indicates that noise reduction steps can be taken more intelligently after determination of the true noise sources and paths. (CC)

  4. Noise determination in silicon micro strips

    SciTech Connect

    Dubbs, T.; Kashigin, S.; Kratzer, M.

    1996-06-01

    The authors report the study of amplifier noise on silicon micro strip detectors. They have used a fast, low noise amplifier-comparator VLSI chip with 22ns shaping time developed for the LHC to determine the noise at the pre-amp as a function of strip length and strip geometry, i.e., interstrip capacitance and ohmic strip resistance. In addition, they have tested the noise in irradiated detectors. They have compared the results with simulations using SPICE.

  5. Development of low read noise high conversion gain CMOS image sensor for photon counting level imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Min-Woong; Kawahito, Shoji; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Yasutomi, Keita

    2016-05-01

    A CMOS image sensor with deep sub-electron read noise and high pixel conversion gain has been developed. Its performance is recognized through image outputs from an area image sensor, confirming the capability of photoelectroncounting- level imaging. To achieve high conversion gain, the proposed pixel has special structures to reduce the parasitic capacitances around FD node. As a result, the pixel conversion gain is increased due to the optimized FD node capacitance, and the noise performance is also improved by removing two noise sources from power supply. For the first time, high contrast images from the reset-gate-less CMOS image sensor, with less than 0.3e- rms noise level, have been generated at an extremely low light level of a few electrons per pixel. In addition, the photon-counting capability of the developed CMOS imager is demonstrated by a measurement, photoelectron-counting histogram (PCH).

  6. Variation in mechanical behavior due to different build directions of Titanium6Aluminum4Vanadium fabricated by electron beam additive manufacturing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Lalit

    Titanium has always been a metal of great interest since its discovery especially for critical applications because of its excellent mechanical properties such as light weight (almost half of that of the steel), low density (4.4 gm/cc) and high strength (almost similar to steel). It creates a stable and adherent oxide layer on its surface upon exposure to air or water which gives it a great resistance to corrosion and has made it a great choice for structures in severe corrosive environment and sea water. Its non-allergic property has made it suitable for biomedical application for manufacturing implants. Having a very high melting temperature, it has a very good potential for high temperature applications. But high production and processing cost has limited its application. Ti6Al4V is the most used titanium alloy for which it has acquired the title as `workhouse' of the Ti family. Additive layer Manufacturing (ALM) has brought revolution in manufacturing industries. Today, this additive manufacturing has developed into several methods and formed a family. This method fabricates a product by adding layer after layer as per the geometry given as input into the system. Though the conception was developed to fabricate prototypes and making tools initially, but its highly economic aspect i.e., very little waste material for less machining and comparatively lower production lead time, obviation of machine tools have drawn attention for its further development towards mass production. Electron Beam Melting (EBM) is the latest addition to ALM family developed by Arcam, ABRTM located in Sweden. The electron beam that is used as heat source melts metal powder to form layers. For this thesis work, three different types of specimens have been fabricated using EBM system. These specimens differ in regard of direction of layer addition. Mechanical properties such as ultimate tensile strength, elastic modulus and yield strength, have been measured and compared with standard data

  7. Effect of Ni and Pd Addition on Mechanical, Thermodynamic, and Electronic Properties of AuSn4-Based Intermetallics: A Density Functional Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yali; Zhou, Wei; Wu, Ping

    2016-05-01

    The effects of Ni and Pd addition on the mechanical, thermodynamic, and electronic properties of AuSn4-based intermetallic compounds (IMCs) have been investigated by first-principles calculations to reveal the essence of Au embrittlement. Three kinds of doped (namely Ni-doped, Pd-doped, and Ni/Pd-codoped) IMCs are considered in this work. The polycrystalline elastic properties are deduced from single-crystal elastic constants. It is found that the doped systems together with nondoped AuSn4 are all ductile phases. For Ni-doped AuSn4, the modulus, hardness, brittleness, Debye temperature, and minimum thermal conductivity increase with the Ni fraction, but this is not the case for the Pd-doped material, since Au0.75Pd0.25Sn4 is the more brittle phase. For Au0.5Pd0.25Ni0.25Sn4, the mechanical, thermodynamic, and electronic properties are similar to those of Au0.5Pd0.5Sn4.

  8. Effect of Ni and Pd Addition on Mechanical, Thermodynamic, and Electronic Properties of AuSn4-Based Intermetallics: A Density Functional Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yali; Zhou, Wei; Wu, Ping

    2016-08-01

    The effects of Ni and Pd addition on the mechanical, thermodynamic, and electronic properties of AuSn4-based intermetallic compounds (IMCs) have been investigated by first-principles calculations to reveal the essence of Au embrittlement. Three kinds of doped (namely Ni-doped, Pd-doped, and Ni/Pd-codoped) IMCs are considered in this work. The polycrystalline elastic properties are deduced from single-crystal elastic constants. It is found that the doped systems together with nondoped AuSn4 are all ductile phases. For Ni-doped AuSn4, the modulus, hardness, brittleness, Debye temperature, and minimum thermal conductivity increase with the Ni fraction, but this is not the case for the Pd-doped material, since Au0.75Pd0.25Sn4 is the more brittle phase. For Au0.5Pd0.25Ni0.25Sn4, the mechanical, thermodynamic, and electronic properties are similar to those of Au0.5Pd0.5Sn4.

  9. Additional heat treatment of non-porous coatings obtained on medium carbon steel substrates by electron beam cladding of a Ti-Mo-C powder composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mul, D. O.; Drobyaz, E. A.; Zimoglyadova, T. A.; Bataev, V. A.; Lazurenko, D. V.; Shevtsova, L. I.

    2016-04-01

    The structure and microhardness of surface layers, obtained by non-vacuum electron beam cladding of Ti-Mo-C powder mixture on a steel substrate after different types of heat treatment, were investigated. After cladding samples were heat treated in a furnace at 200...500 °C, as well as quenched at 860 ° C and then underwent high-temperature tempering. Heat treatment of cladded coatings induced tempering of martensite and precipitation of cementite particles (Fe3C). Transmission electron microscopy of the samples after heating and holding at 300 ° C revealed precipitation of nanosized cubical TiC particles. The formation of hard nanosized particles led to the surface layer microhardness growth. The highest level of microhardness (which was 1.2...1.5-fold higher in comparison with coating microhardness after heat treatment) was achieved after heating of the claded material at 300 °C and 400 °C Additional quenching of samples at 860 °C did not increase the microhardness level.

  10. Aircraft noise problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-01-01

    The problems related to aircraft noise were studied. Physical origin (sound), human reaction (noise), quantization of noise and sound sources of aircraft noise are discussed. Noise abatement at the source, technical, fleet-political and air traffic measures are explained. The measurements and future developments are also discussed. The position of Lufthansa as regards aircraft noise problems is depicted.

  11. Noise pollution resources compendium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Abstracts of reports concerning noise pollution are presented. The abstracts are grouped in the following areas of activity: (1) sources of noise, (2) noise detection and measurement, (3) noise abatement and control, (4) physical effects of noise and (5) social effects of noise.

  12. Noise Abatement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    SMART, Sound Modification and Regulated Temperature compound, is a liquid plastic mixture with exceptional energy and sound absorbing qualities. It is derived from a very elastic plastic which was an effective noise abatement material in the Apollo Guidance System. Discovered by a NASA employee, it is marketed by Environmental Health Systems, Inc. (EHS). The product has been successfully employed by a diaper company with noisy dryers and a sugar company with noisy blowers. The company also manufactures an audiometric test booth and acoustical office partitions.

  13. Spin-dependent shot noise in semiconductor and graphene nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragomirova, Ralitsa L.

    Shot noise is the name given to the time-dependent non-equilibrium current (or voltage) fluctuations which persist down to zero temperature and are fundamentally related to the discrete nature of the electron charge. Over the past two decades it has become a major tool for gathering information about microscopic mechanisms of transport and correlations between charges which cannot be extracted from traditional conductance measurements. Recently a handful of theoretical and experimental studies have suggested that shot noise in systems with spin-dependent interactions provides a sensitive probe to differentiate between scattering from magnetic impurities, spin-flip scattering, and continuous spin precession effects on semiclassical or quantum transport of injected spin-polarized currents. This is due to the fact that any spin flip converts spin-↑ subsystem particle into a spin-↓ subsystem particle, where the two subsystems differ when spin degeneracy is lifted. Thus, the nonconservation of the number of particles in each subsystem generates additional source of current fluctuations. Here we generalize the scattering theory of quantum shot noise to include the full spin-density matrix of electrons. This formalism yields the spin-resolved shot noise power applicable for a generic spintronic device where partially polarized charge current or even pure spin current is injected from a spin-filtering or ferromagnetic electrode into a quantum-coherent nanostructure governed by arbitrary spin-dependent interactions. The developed formalism [2, 5] is applied in Chapter 5 to diffusive multichannel quantum wires with the Rashba spin-orbit (SO) coupling sandwiched between ferromagnetic source and ferromagnetic or normal drain electrodes. The crucial role played by the SO interactions in all-electrical control of spin in semiconductor nanostructures has ignited recent studies of their signatures on the shot noise. We investigate what is the effect of the Rahsba SO coupling

  14. Interim prediction method for low frequency core engine noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, R. G.; Clark, B. J.; Dorsch, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    A literature survey on low-frequency core engine noise is presented. Possible sources of low frequency internally generated noise in core engines are discussed with emphasis on combustion and component scrubbing noise. An interim method is recommended for predicting low frequency core engine noise that is dominant when jet velocities are low. Suggestions are made for future research on low frequency core engine noise that will aid in improving the prediction method and help define possible additional internal noise sources.

  15. Spin noise explores local magnetic fields in a semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhov, Ivan I.; Kozlov, Gleb G.; Smirnov, Dmitrii S.; Glazov, Mikhail M.; Efimov, Yurii P.; Eliseev, Sergei A.; Lovtcius, Viacheslav A.; Petrov, Vladimir V.; Kavokin, Kirill V.; Kavokin, Alexey V.; Zapasskii, Valerii S.

    2016-02-01

    Rapid development of spin noise spectroscopy of the last decade has led to a number of remarkable achievements in the fields of both magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy. In this report, we demonstrate a new - magnetometric - potential of the spin noise spectroscopy and use it to study magnetic fields acting upon electron spin-system of an n-GaAs layer in a high-Q microcavity probed by elliptically polarized light. Along with the external magnetic field, applied to the sample, the spin noise spectrum revealed the Overhauser field created by optically oriented nuclei and an additional, previously unobserved, field arising in the presence of circularly polarized light. This “optical field” is directed along the light propagation axis, with its sign determined by sign of the light helicity. We show that this field results from the optical Stark effect in the field of the elliptically polarized light. This conclusion is supported by theoretical estimates.

  16. Spin noise explores local magnetic fields in a semiconductor

    PubMed Central

    Ryzhov, Ivan I.; Kozlov, Gleb G.; Smirnov, Dmitrii S.; Glazov, Mikhail M.; Efimov, Yurii P.; Eliseev, Sergei A.; Lovtcius, Viacheslav A.; Petrov, Vladimir V.; Kavokin, Kirill V.; Kavokin, Alexey V.; Zapasskii, Valerii S.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid development of spin noise spectroscopy of the last decade has led to a number of remarkable achievements in the fields of both magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy. In this report, we demonstrate a new – magnetometric – potential of the spin noise spectroscopy and use it to study magnetic fields acting upon electron spin-system of an n-GaAs layer in a high-Q microcavity probed by elliptically polarized light. Along with the external magnetic field, applied to the sample, the spin noise spectrum revealed the Overhauser field created by optically oriented nuclei and an additional, previously unobserved, field arising in the presence of circularly polarized light. This “optical field” is directed along the light propagation axis, with its sign determined by sign of the light helicity. We show that this field results from the optical Stark effect in the field of the elliptically polarized light. This conclusion is supported by theoretical estimates. PMID:26882994

  17. 1/f Noise in Gated Epitaxial Graphene Nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vail, Owen; Yang, Jeremy; Miettinen, Anna; Hankinson, John; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walter; Jiang, Zhigang

    Epitaxial Graphene Nanoribbons (EGNR) grown on sidewall SiC have gained interest as a high-quality interconnect enabling room temperature ballistic transport over micron lengths. To be useful as an interconnect a proper characterization of the noise level in the EGNR needs to be determined. Toward this end, we fabricated EGNR devices with an Aluminum-Oxide top gate and use field effect to tune the fermi energy in the graphene channel. Our studies of the electronic noise and its dependence on the charge density in the ribbon reveal information about the subband structure of the density of states in addition to the ribbon's spectral density at low frequencies. Comparisons to the widely reported 1/f noise in silicon and other forms of graphene provide strong references for analyzing our results.

  18. Spin noise explores local magnetic fields in a semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Ryzhov, Ivan I; Kozlov, Gleb G; Smirnov, Dmitrii S; Glazov, Mikhail M; Efimov, Yurii P; Eliseev, Sergei A; Lovtcius, Viacheslav A; Petrov, Vladimir V; Kavokin, Kirill V; Kavokin, Alexey V; Zapasskii, Valerii S

    2016-01-01

    Rapid development of spin noise spectroscopy of the last decade has led to a number of remarkable achievements in the fields of both magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy. In this report, we demonstrate a new - magnetometric - potential of the spin noise spectroscopy and use it to study magnetic fields acting upon electron spin-system of an n-GaAs layer in a high-Q microcavity probed by elliptically polarized light. Along with the external magnetic field, applied to the sample, the spin noise spectrum revealed the Overhauser field created by optically oriented nuclei and an additional, previously unobserved, field arising in the presence of circularly polarized light. This "optical field" is directed along the light propagation axis, with its sign determined by sign of the light helicity. We show that this field results from the optical Stark effect in the field of the elliptically polarized light. This conclusion is supported by theoretical estimates. PMID:26882994

  19. Effects of combined treatments of electron-beam irradiation and addition of leek (Allium tuberosum) extract on reduction of pathogens in pork jerky.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mingu; Kim, Hyun-Joo; Jayasena, Dinesh D; Bae, Young Sik; Yong, Hae In; Lee, Mooha; Jo, Cheorun

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated the combined effect of electron-beam irradiation and addition of leek (Allium tuberosum R.) extract on pork jerky inoculated with selected foodborne pathogens. Prepared pork jerky samples (control and samples with 1.0% leek extract) were inoculated with pathogens and subsequently irradiated at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 4 kGy doses. In comparison with the control, samples with 1.0% leek extract showed significant reduction in the numbers of Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella Typhimurium. No viable counts were detected for Salmonella Typhimurium in both control and leek-extract samples, and for E. coli and L. monocytogenes in the leek-extract sample exposed to 3 kGy irradiation dose. The D(10) values for E. coli, L. monocytogenes, and Salmonella Typhimurium observed in the irradiated samples with leek extract were 0.39, 0.34, and 0.32 kGy, while the D(10) values in those without leek extract were 0.65, 0.65, and 0.39 kGy, respectively. Therefore, our results clearly showed that irradiation combined with leek extract was effective in reducing pathogens, suggesting that a low dose of irradiation combined with the addition of a natural antimicrobial agent can enhance the microbial safety and shelf-life of pork jerky. PMID:23199493

  20. Application of the standard addition method for the determination of acrylamide in heat-processed starchy foods by gas chromatography with electron capture detector.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yonghong; Li, Genrong; Duan, Yunpeng; Chen, Shiqi; Zhang, Chun; Li, Yanfei

    2008-08-15

    A gas chromatography electron capture detector (GC-ECD) using the standard addition method was developed for the determination of acrylamide in heat-processed foods. The method entails extraction of acrylamide with water, filtration, defatting with n-hexane, derivatization with hydrobromic acid and saturated bromine-water, and liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate. The sample pretreatment required no SPE clean-up and concentration steps prior to injection. The final extract was analyzed by GC-ECD. The chromatographic analysis was performed on polar columns, e.g. Supelcowax-10 capillary column, and good retention and peak response of the analyte were achieved under the optimal conditions. The qualification of the analyte was by identifying the peak with same retention time as standard compound 2,3-DBPA and confirmed by GC-MS. GC-MS analysis confirmed that 2,3-DBPA was converted to 2-BPA nearly completely on the polar capillary column, whether or not treated with triethylamine. A four-point standard addition protocol was used to quantify acrylamide in food samples. The limit of detection (LOD) was estimated to be 0.6μg/kg on the basis of ECD technique. Validation and quantification results demonstrated that the method should be regarded as a low-cost, convenient, and reliable alternative for conventional investigation of acrylamide. PMID:26050006

  1. Curing the noise epidemic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazer, Susan

    2005-09-01

    The argument is made that design does not stop when the fixed architectural and acoustical components are in place. Spaces live and breathe with the people who reside in them. Research and examples are presented that show that noise, auditory clutter, thrives on itself in hospitals. Application of the Lombard reflex studies fit into the hospital setting, but do not offer solutions as to how one might reduce the impact. In addition, the basis for looking at the noise component as a physical as well cultural dynamic will be addressed. Whether the result of the wrong conversation in the wrong place or the right conversation in an unfortunate place, talk mixed with sounds of technology is shown to cause its own symptoms. From heightened anxiety and stress to medical errors, staff burnout, or HIPAA violations, the case is made that noise is pandemic in hospitals and demands financial and operational investment. An explanation of how to reduce noise by design of the dynamic environment - equipment, technology, staff protocols is also provided.

  2. Microstructural architecture developed in the fabrication of solid and open-cellular copper components by additive manufacturing using electron beam melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Diana Alejandra

    The fabrication of Cu components were first built by additive manufacturing using electron beam melting (EBM) from low-purity, atomized Cu powder containing a high density of Cu2O precipitates leading to a novel example of precipitate-dislocation architecture. These microstructures exhibit cell-like arrays (1-3microm) in the horizontal reference plane perpendicular to the build direction with columnar-like arrays extending from ~12 to >60 microm in length and corresponding spatial dimensions of 1-3 microm. These observations were observed by the use of optical metallography, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The hardness measurements were taken both on the atomized powder and the Cu components. The hardness for these architectures ranged from ~HV 83 to 88, in contrast to the original Cu powder microindentation hardness of HV 72 and the commercial Cu base plate hardness of HV 57. These observations were utilized for the fabrication of open-cellular copper structures by additive manufacturing using EBM and illustrated the ability to fabricate some form of controlled microstructural architecture by EBM parameter alteration or optimizing. The fabrication of these structures ranged in densities from 0.73g/cm3 to 6.67g/cm3. These structures correspond to four different articulated mesh arrays. While these components contained some porosity as a consequence of some unmelted regions, the Cu2O precipitates also contributed to a reduced density. Using X-ray Diffraction showed the approximate volume fraction estimated to be ~2%. The addition of precipitates created in the EBM melt scan formed microstructural arrays which contributed to hardening contributing to the strength of mesh struts and foam ligaments. The measurements of relative stiffness versus relative density plots for Cu compared very closely with Ti-6Al-4V open cellular structures - both mesh and foams. The Cu reticulated mesh structures exhibit a slope of n = 2 in contrast to a slope of n = 2

  3. Construction Noise Decreases Reproductive Efficiency in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Skye; Glickman, Gary; Norinsky, Rada; Quimby, Fred W; Tolwani, Ravi J

    2009-01-01

    Excessive noise is well known to impair rodent health. To better understand the effect of construction noise and to establish effective noise limits during a planned expansion of our vivarium, we analyzed the effects of construction noise on mouse gestation and neonatal growth. Our hypothesis was that high levels of construction noise would reduce the number of live births and retard neonatal growth. Female Swiss Webster mice were individually implanted with 15 B6CBAF1/J embryos and then exposed to 70- and 90-dBA concrete saw cutting noise samples at defined time points during gestation. In addition, groups of mice with litters were exposed to noise at 70, 80, or 90 dBA for 1 h daily during the first week after parturition. Litter size, birth weight, incidence of stillborn pups, and rate of neonatal weight gain were analyzed. Noise decreased reproductive efficiency by decreasing live birth rates and increasing the number of stillborn pups. PMID:19653943

  4. Construction noise decreases reproductive efficiency in mice.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Skye; Glickman, Gary; Norinsky, Rada; Quimby, Fred W; Tolwani, Ravi J

    2009-07-01

    Excessive noise is well known to impair rodent health. To better understand the effect of construction noise and to establish effective noise limits during a planned expansion of our vivarium, we analyzed the effects of construction noise on mouse gestation and neonatal growth. Our hypothesis was that high levels of construction noise would reduce the number of live births and retard neonatal growth. Female Swiss Webster mice were individually implanted with 15 B6CBAF1/J embryos and then exposed to 70- and 90-dBA concrete saw cutting noise samples at defined time points during gestation. In addition, groups of mice with litters were exposed to noise at 70, 80, or 90 dBA for 1 h daily during the first week after parturition. Litter size, birth weight, incidence of stillborn pups, and rate of neonatal weight gain were analyzed. Noise decreased reproductive efficiency by decreasing live birth rates and increasing the number of stillborn pups. PMID:19653943

  5. Determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in house dust using standard addition method and gas chromatography with electron capture and mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Król, Sylwia; Zabiegała, Bożena; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2012-08-01

    Monitoring of the environmental fate of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) involves determination of their concentration in air, airborne particles and settled dust. This requires the implementation of appropriate analytical tools like measuring instruments, reference materials and analytical procedures. In this study an analytical procedure was developed for determining PBDEs in samples with a complex matrix composition. The efficiencies of three different extraction techniques - Soxhlet extraction (SE), Accelerated Solvent Extraction (ASE) and Ultrasound Assisted Extraction (UAE) - were compared. The study investigated the possibility of using the standard addition method for estimating PBDEs levels. The GC-μECD system was successfully applied as an alternative to low resolution mass spectrometry (LRMS) for determining BDE-209 in dust samples. The developed analytical procedure was then used to analyze dust samples, collected from houses and computer suites in the Tri-city area (Gdansk, Gdynia and Sopot), in order to detect and quantify the presence of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in the indoor environment. Concentrations of studied congeners (from triBDE to heptaBDE), obtained by chromatographic analysis of dust samples extracts, performed applying two measurement systems (GC-EIMS and GC-μECD) ranged between 331 and 3102 ng g(-1) for house dust and between electronic dust. The highest concentrations were obtained for congeners with four, five and six bromine atoms (BDE-47, BDE-99, BDE-100 and BDE-153). Concentrations of BDE-209 ranged from 384 ng g(-1) (house dust) to 12,553 ng g(-1) (electronic dust). PMID:22749362

  6. Helicopter engine core noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonglahn, U. H.

    1982-07-01

    Calculated engine core noise levels, based on NASA Lewis prediction procedures, for five representative helicopter engines are compared with measured total helicopter noise levels and ICAO helicopter noise certification requirements. Comparisons are made for level flyover and approach procedures. The measured noise levels are generally significantly greater than those predicted for the core noise levels, except for the Sikorsky S-61 and S-64 helicopters. However, the predicted engine core noise levels are generally at or within 3 dB of the ICAO noise rules. Consequently, helicopter engine core noise can be a significant contributor to the overall helicopter noise signature.

  7. Helicopter engine core noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonglahn, U. H.

    1982-01-01

    Calculated engine core noise levels, based on NASA Lewis prediction procedures, for five representative helicopter engines are compared with measured total helicopter noise levels and ICAO helicopter noise certification requirements. Comparisons are made for level flyover and approach procedures. The measured noise levels are generally significantly greater than those predicted for the core noise levels, except for the Sikorsky S-61 and S-64 helicopters. However, the predicted engine core noise levels are generally at or within 3 dB of the ICAO noise rules. Consequently, helicopter engine core noise can be a significant contributor to the overall helicopter noise signature.

  8. Noise characterization of the linear CCD

    SciTech Connect

    McConaghy, C.F.

    1980-05-01

    Work in evaluating the noise performance of the linear charge-coupled devices (CCD) is summarized. The noise determines the minimum amplitude signal the CCD is capable of capturing and therefore is one of the prime parameters in determining dynamic range. The noise after correlated double sampling and correction of some ground loops will be shown equivalent to 150 rms electrons at the floating diffusion sensor on the CCD.

  9. Airframe noise: A design and operating problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    A critical assessment of the state of the art in airframe noise is presented. Full-scale data on the intensity, spectra, and directivity of this noise source are evaluated in light of the comprehensive theory developed by Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings. Vibration of panels on the aircraft is identified as a possible additional source of airframe noise. The present understanding and methods for prediction of other component sources - airfoils, struts, and cavities - are discussed. Operating problems associated with airframe noise as well as potential design methods for airframe noise reduction are identified.

  10. Community Response to Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidell, Sandy

    The primary effects of community noise on residential populations are speech interference, sleep disturbance, and annoyance. This chapter focuses on transportation noise in general and on aircraft noise in particular because aircraft noise is one of the most prominent community noise sources, because airport/community controversies are often the most contentious and widespread, and because industrial and other specialized formsofcommunitynoise generally posemorelocalized problems.

  11. The Influence of As-Built Surface Conditions on Mechanical Properties of Ti-6Al-4V Additively Manufactured by Selective Electron Beam Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. Y.; Gulizia, S.; Oh, C. H.; Fraser, D.; Leary, M.; Yang, Y. F.; Qian, M.

    2016-03-01

    Achieving a high surface finish is a major challenge for most current metal additive manufacturing processes. We report the first quantitative study of the influence of as-built surface conditions on the tensile properties of Ti-6Al-4V produced by selective electron beam melting (SEBM) in order to better understand the SEBM process. Tensile ductility was doubled along with noticeable improvements in tensile strengths after surface modification of the SEBM-fabricated Ti-6Al-4V by chemical etching. The fracture surfaces of tensile specimens with different surface conditions were characterised and correlated with the tensile properties obtained. The removal of a 650- μm-thick surface layer by chemical etching was shown to be necessary to eliminate the detrimental influence of surface defects on mechanical properties. The experimental results and analyses underline the necessity to modify the surfaces of SEBM-fabricated components for structural applications, particularly for those components which contain complex internal concave and convex surfaces and channels.

  12. The effect of multifunctional monomers/oligomers Additives on electron beam radiation crosslinking of poly (styrene-block-isoprene/butadiene-block-styrene) (SIBS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jinping; Soucek, Mark D.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of multifunctional monomers or oligomers (MFM/O) additives on electron beam (E-beam) radiation induced crosslinking of poly (styrene-block-isoprene/butadiene-block-styrene) (SIBS) was studied. Ten types of MFM/O were investigated, including trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA), trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA), triallyl cyanurate (TAC), polybutadiene diacrylate (PB-diacrylate), ethylene glycol dimethylacrylate (EGDMA), butylene glycol dimethacrylate (BGDMA), 1,2-polybutadiene. The effects of MFM/O concentration and E-beam radiation dose on properties of SIBS were studied including tensile strength, elongation-at-break, modulus, gel content, equilibrium swelling and crosslink density. TMPTA significantly improved the tensile modulus and crosslink density of SIBS. SIBS with TMPTMA and TMTPMA with inhibitor showed a 50% increase in tensile strength. The solubility of MFM/O in SIBS was also investigated by a selective swelling method. The MFM/O were found to be soluble in both phases of SIBS. The viscosity of SIBS with methacrylate type MFM/O was stable at 200 °C.

  13. Modeling the Microstructure Evolution During Additive Manufacturing of Ti6Al4V: A Comparison Between Electron Beam Melting and Selective Laser Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vastola, G.; Zhang, G.; Pei, Q. X.; Zhang, Y.-W.

    2016-05-01

    Beam-based additive manufacturing (AM) is an innovative technique in which parts are built layerwise, starting from the material in powder form. As a developing manufacturing technique, achievement of excellent mechanical properties in the final part is of paramount importance for the mainstream adoption of this technique in industrial manufacturing lines. At the same time, AM offers an unprecedented opportunity to precisely control the manufacturing conditions locally within the part during build, enabling local influence on the formation of the texture and microstructure. In order to achieve the control of microstructure by tailoring the AM machine parameters, a full understanding and modeling of the heat transfer and microstructure evolution processes is needed. Here, we show the implementation of the non-equilibrium equations for phase formation and dissolution in an AM modeling framework. The model is developed for the Ti6Al4V alloy and allows us to show microstructure evolution as given by the AM process. The developed capability is applied to the cases of electron beam melting and selective laser melting AM techniques to explain the significantly different microstructures observed in the two processes.

  14. Improvement of microbiological safety and sensorial quality of pork jerky by electron beam irradiation and by addition of onion peel extract and barbecue flavor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Joo; Jung, Samooel; Yong, Hae In; Bae, Young Sik; Kang, Suk Nam; Kim, Il Suk; Jo, Cheorun

    2014-05-01

    The combined effects of electron-beam (EB) irradiation and addition of onion peel (OP) extract and barbecue flavor (BF) on inactivation of foodborne pathogens and the quality of pork jerky was investigated. Prepared pork jerky samples were irradiated (0, 1, 2, and 4 kGy) and stored for 2 month at 25 °C. The D10 values of Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella typhimurium observed in the OP treated samples were 0.19, 0.18, and 0.19 kGy, whereas those in control were 0.25, 0.23, and 0.20 kGy, respectively. Irradiated samples with OP extract and BF had substantially lower total aerobic bacterial counts than the control had. Samples with added OP extract and BF had lower peroxide values than the control had. Sensory evaluation indicated that overall acceptability of treated samples was not changed up to 2 kGy. Therefore, EB irradiation, combined with OP extract and BF, has improved the microbiological safety with no negative effects on the quality of pork jerky.

  15. A Honeycomb-Structured Ti-6Al-4V Oil-Gas Separation Rotor Additively Manufactured by Selective Electron Beam Melting for Aero-engine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, H. P.; Wang, Q. B.; Yang, G. Y.; Gu, J.; Liu, N.; Jia, L.; Qian, M.

    2016-03-01

    Oil -gas separation is a key process in an aero-engine lubrication system. This study reports an innovative development in oil -gas separation. A honeycomb-structured rotor with hexagonal cone-shaped pore channels has been designed, additively manufactured from Ti-6Al-4V using selective electron beam melting (SEBM) and assessed for oil -gas separation for aero-engine application. The Ti-6Al-4V honeycomb structure showed a high compressive strength of 110 MPa compared to less than 20 MPa for metal foam structures. The oil -gas separation efficiency of the honeycomb-structured separation rotor achieved 99.8% at the rotation speed of 6000 rpm with much lower ventilation resistance (17.3 kPa) than that of the separator rotor constructed using a Ni-Cr alloy foam structure (23.5 kPa). The honeycomb-structured Ti-6Al-4V separator rotor produced by SEBM provides a promising solution to more efficient oil -gas separation in the aero-engine lubrication system.

  16. Noise control in aeroacoustics; Proceedings of the 1993 National Conference on Noise Control Engineering, NOISE-CON 93, Williamsburg, VA, May 2-5, 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, Harvey H. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    In the conference over 100 papers were presented in eight sessions: (1) Emission: Noise Sources; (2) Physical Phenomena; (3) Noise ControlElements; (4) Vibration and Shock: Generation, Transmission, Isolation, and Reduction; (5) Immission: Physical Aspects of Environmental Noise; (6) Immission: Effects of Noise; (7) Analysis; and (8) Requirements. In addition, the distinguished lecture series included presentations on the High Speed Civil Transport and on research from the United Kingdom on aircraft noise effects.

  17. Noise spectroscopy near phase transitions in nanoscale systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhenzhong

    Strongly correlated electron systems manifest themselves in various phases, due to a delicate balance between many types of competing interactions, such as electron-electron interaction, electron-phonon interaction, and disorder induced interaction. Application of certain external stimuli, such as temperature, electric field, stress to such systems often breaks this balance, leading to phase transitions. Furthermore, in systems with reduced dimensions, confinement effects often play important roles in driving these phase transitions. Among the many experimental tools that have been used to study phase transitions in strongly correlated electron systems, resistance noise spectroscopy, assisted with conventional transport measurements, provides an unique perspective in exploring the microscopic dynamics near well-studied phase transitions in superconductors, magnetic materials, semiconductors, 2D electron systems etc.. In this thesis, using noise spectroscopy and transport measurements, two classes of strongly correlated electron systems in the nanoribbon form were studied: charge density wave systems (NbSe3 and o-TaS 3), and tungsten (W) doped vanadium dioxide (VO2) system. Due to the size of the samples, finite size effects were found to be important in the transport and noise measurements of both NbSe3 and o-TaS3. A model that treats the pinning by bulk, surface and contacts separately was proposed to explain an anomaly, which was observed in the differential resistance vs. electric field at temperatures below the Peierls transition in NbSe3. This model, combined with slow motions of the CDW due to the fast freezing of the thermal excitations over the Peierls gap, were suggested to account for discrete peaks in the Ohmic regime of o-TaS 3, at temperatures below 100 K. In addition, a nonmonotonic behaivor in the electric field dependence of noise magnitude was seen in NbSe 3 in certain temperature ranges, and can be explained as signatures of thermally activated

  18. Turbomachinery noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, John F.; Sofrin, Thomas G.; Rice, Edward J.; Gliebe, Phillip R.

    1991-01-01

    Summarized here are key advances in experimental techniques and theoretical applications which point the way to a broad understanding and control of turbomachinery noise. On the experimental side, the development of effective inflow control techniques makes it possible to conduct, in ground based facilities, definitive experiments in internally controlled blade row interactions. Results can now be valid indicators of flight behavior and can provide a firm base for comparison with analytical results. Inflow control coupled with detailed diagnostic tools such as blade pressure measurements can be used to uncover the more subtle mechanisms such as rotor strut interaction, which can set tone levels for some engine configurations. Initial mappings of rotor wake-vortex flow fields have provided a data base for a first generation semiempirical flow disturbance model. Laser velocimetry offers a nonintrusive method for validating and improving the model. Digital data systems and signal processing algorithms are bringing mode measurement closer to a working tool that can be frequently applied to a real machine such as a turbofan engine. On the analytical side, models of most of the links in the chain from turbomachine blade source to far field observation point have been formulated. Three dimensional lifting surface theory for blade rows, including source noncompactness and cascade effects, blade row transmission models incorporating mode and frequency scattering, and modal radiation calculations, including hybrid numerical-analytical approaches, are tools which await further application.

  19. Noise Amplification in HGHG Seeding

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    An essential element of seeded FEL based on high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG) or echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) is an undulator-modulator, in which interaction with a laser beam modulates the beam energy. We study how the interaction of electrons in this undulator-modulator changes the noise properties of the beam.

  20. Relations between environmental noise and electronic coupling for optimal exciton transfer in one- and two-dimensional homogeneous and inhomogeneous quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Forgy, Charles C.; Mazziotti, David A.

    2014-12-14

    Recent studies have indicated that environmental noise may increase energy-transfer efficiency in quantum systems. For homogeneous networks of chromophores previous studies have primarily considered excitonic transport in one-dimensional (linear) networks. In our study, we expand previous research to a two-dimensional fully coupled topology of chromophore molecules. We demonstrate that not only does an optimal dephasing rate exist in both one- and two-dimensional networks but also that it increases in magnitude with increasing coupling strength between chromophores. Optimal transport occurs when the noise quenches the entanglement between local modes that prevent the exciton from moving efficiently to the target site. We find that these results are insensitive to minor site defects such as those found in realistic systems. We contrast these findings to systems with a high degree of inhomogeneity, in which the optimal dephasing rate is largely set by the system topology and does not vary significantly with respect to coupling strength. Our findings have potential applications to systems such as quantum dot arrays and carbon nanotube structures.

  1. Equilibrium and shot noise in mesoscopic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, T.

    1994-10-01

    Within the last decade, there has been a resurgence of interest in the study of noise in Mesoscopic devices, both experimentally and theoretically. Noise in solid state devices can have different origins: there is 1/f noise, which is believed to arise from fluctuations in the resistance of the sample due to the motion of impurities. On top of this contribution is a frequency independent component associated with the stochastic nature of electron transport, which will be the focus of this paper. If the sample considered is small enough that dephasing and inelastic effects can be neglected, equilibrium (thermal) and excess noise can be completely described in terms of the elastic scattering properties of the sample. As mentioned above, noise arises as a consequence of random processes governing the transport of electrons. Here, there are two sources of randomness: first, electrons incident on the sample occupy a given energy state with a probability given by the Fermi-Dirac distribution function. Secondly, electrons can be transmitted across the sample or reflected in the same reservoir where they came from with a probability given by the quantum mechanical transmission/reflection coefficients. Equilibrium noise refers to the case where no bias voltage is applied between the leads connected to the sample, where thermal agitation alone allows the electrons close to the Fermi level to tunnel through the sample. In general, equilibrium noise is related to the conductance of the sample via the Johnson-Nyquist formula. In the presence of a bias, in the classical regime, one expects to recover the full shot noise < {Delta}{sup 2}I >= 2I{Delta}{mu} as was observed a long time ago in vacuum diodes. In the Mesoscopic regime, however, excess noise is reduced below the shot noise level. The author introduces a more intuitive picture, where the current passing through the device is a superposition of pulses, or electron wave packets, which can be transmitted or reflected.

  2. Comparison of noise reduction systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, S. D.; Whitaker, R. W.

    1991-06-01

    When using infrasound as a tool for verification, the most important measurement to determine yield has been the peak-to-peak pressure amplitude of the signal. Therefore, there is a need to operate at the most favorable signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) possible. Winds near the ground can degrade the SNR, thereby making accurate signal amplitude measurement difficult. Wind noise reduction techniques were developed to help alleviate this problem; however, a noise reducing system should reduce the noise, and should not introduce distortion of coherent signals. An experiment is described to study system response for a variety of noise reducing configurations to a signal generated by an underground test (UGT) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). In addition to the signal, background noise reduction is examined through measurements of variance. Sensors using two particular geometries of noise reducing equipment, the spider and the cross appear to deliver the best SNR. Because the spider configuration is easier to deploy, it is now the most commonly used.

  3. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe. PMID:27320418

  4. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Christian

    2016-06-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe.

  5. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs.

    PubMed

    Beck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe. PMID:27320418

  6. Attenuation of noise-induced hearing loss using methylene blue

    PubMed Central

    Park, J-S; Jou, I; Park, S M

    2014-01-01

    The overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) has been known to contribute to the pathogenesis of noise-induced hearing loss. In this study, we discovered that in BALB/c mice pretreatment with methylene blue (MB) for 4 consecutive days significantly protected against cochlear injury by intense broad-band noise for 3 h. It decreased both compound threshold shift and permanent threshold shift and, further, reduced outer hair cell death in the cochlea. MB also reduced ROS and RNS formation after noise exposure. Furthermore, it protected against rotenone- and antimycin A-induced cell death and also reversed ATP generation in the in vitro UB-OC1 cell system. Likewise, MB effectively attenuated the noise-induced impairment of complex IV activity in the cochlea. In addition, it increased the neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) level, which could affect the synaptic connections between hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons in the noise-exposed cochlea, and also promoted the conservation of both efferent and afferent nerve terminals on the outer and inner hair cells. These findings suggest that the amelioration of impaired mitochondrial electron transport and the potentiation of NT-3 expression by treatment with MB have a significant therapeutic value in preventing ROS-mediated sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:24763057

  7. Dynamical symmetries of Markov processes with multiplicative white noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aron, Camille; Barci, Daniel G.; Cugliandolo, Leticia F.; González Arenas, Zochil; Lozano, Gustavo S.

    2016-05-01

    We analyse various properties of stochastic Markov processes with multiplicative white noise. We take a single-variable problem as a simple example, and we later extend the analysis to the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation for the stochastic dynamics of a magnetic moment. In particular, we focus on the non-equilibrium transfer of angular momentum to the magnetization from a spin-polarised current of electrons, a technique which is widely used in the context of spintronics to manipulate magnetic moments. We unveil two hidden dynamical symmetries of the generating functionals of these Markovian multiplicative white-noise processes. One symmetry only holds in equilibrium and we use it to prove generic relations such as the fluctuation-dissipation theorems. Out of equilibrium, we take profit of the symmetry-breaking terms to prove fluctuation theorems. The other symmetry yields strong dynamical relations between correlation and response functions which can notably simplify the numerical analysis of these problems. Our construction allows us to clarify some misconceptions on multiplicative white-noise stochastic processes that can be found in the literature. In particular, we show that a first-order differential equation with multiplicative white noise can be transformed into an additive-noise equation, but that the latter keeps a non-trivial memory of the discretisation prescription used to define the former.

  8. Cooled Low-Noise HEMT Microwave Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautista, J. Javier; Ortiz, Gerardo G.; Duh, Kuanghann George

    1992-01-01

    Prototype cooled low-noise microwave amplifiers based on high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMT's) considered as replacements for cooled ruby masers used as low-noise receiver-front-end amplifiers in communications, radio science, radar systems, radio astronomy, and telemetry. HEMT amplifier operates at 12 K, requires less cooling power and operates at lower cost with simpler, more-reliable cooling system.

  9. Graphene-based terahertz photodetector by noise thermometry technique

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ming-Jye; Wang, Ji-Wun; Wang, Chun-Lun; Chiang, Yen-Yu; Chang, Hsian-Hong

    2014-01-20

    We report the characteristics of graphene-based terahertz (THz) photodetector based on noise thermometry technique by measuring its noise power at frequency from 4 to 6 GHz. Hot electron system in graphene microbridge is generated after THz photon pumping and creates extra noise power. The equivalent noise temperature and electron temperature increase rapidly in low THz pumping regime and saturate gradually in high THz power regime which is attributed to a faster energy relaxation process involved by stronger electron-phonon interaction. Based on this detector, a conversion efficiency around 0.15 from THz power to noise power in 4–6 GHz span has been achieved.

  10. The Alternative Low Noise Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, James H.; Elliott, David M.; Jeracki, Robert J.; Moore, Royce D.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2000-01-01

    A 106 bladed fan with a design takeoff tip speed of 1100 ft/sec was hypothesized as reducing perceived noise because of the shift of the blade passing harmonics to frequencies beyond the perceived noise rating range. A 22 in. model of this Alternative Low Noise Fan, ALNF, was tested in the NASA Glenn 9x 15 Wind Tunnel. 'Me fan was tested with a 7 vane long chord stator assembly and a 70 vane conventional stator assembly in both hard and acoustically treated configurations. In addition a partially treated 7 vane configuration was tested wherein the acoustic material between the 7 long chord stators was made inactive. The noise data from the 106 bladed fan with 7 long chord stators in a hard configuration was shown to be around 4 EPNdB quieter than a low tip speed Allison fan at takeoff and around 5 EPNdB quieter at approach. Although the tone noise behaved as hypothesized, the majority of this noise reduction was from reduced broadband noise related to the large number of rotor blades. This 106 bladed ALNF is a research fan designed to push the technology limits and as such is probably not a practical device with present materials technology. However, a low tip speed fan with around 50 blades would be a practical device and calculations indicate that it could be 2 to 3 EPNdB quieter at takeoff and 3 to 4 EPNdB quieter at approach than the Allison fan. 7 vane data compared with 70 vane data indicated that the tone noise was controlled by rotor wake-stator interaction but that the broadband noise is probably controlled by the interaction of the rotor with incoming flows. A possible multiple pure tone noise reduction technique for a fan/acoustic treatment system was identified. The data from the fully treated configuration showed significant noise reductions over a large frequency range thereby providing a real tribute to this bulk absorber treatment design. The tone noise data with the partially treated 7 vane configuration indicated that acoustic material in the

  11. Acoustic noise during functional magnetic resonance imaginga)

    PubMed Central

    Ravicz, Michael E.; Melcher, Jennifer R.; Kiang, Nelson Y.-S.

    2007-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) enables sites of brain activation to be localized in human subjects. For studies of the auditory system, acoustic noise generated during fMRI can interfere with assessments of this activation by introducing uncontrolled extraneous sounds. As a first step toward reducing the noise during fMRI, this paper describes the temporal and spectral characteristics of the noise present under typical fMRI study conditions for two imagers with different static magnetic field strengths. Peak noise levels were 123 and 138 dB re 20 μPa in a 1.5-tesla (T) and a 3-T imager, respectively. The noise spectrum (calculated over a 10-ms window coinciding with the highest-amplitude noise) showed a prominent maximum at 1 kHz for the 1.5-T imager (115 dB SPL) and at 1.4 kHz for the 3-T imager (131 dB SPL). The frequency content and timing of the most intense noise components indicated that the noise was primarily attributable to the readout gradients in the imaging pulse sequence. The noise persisted above background levels for 300-500 ms after gradient activity ceased, indicating that resonating structures in the imager or noise reverberating in the imager room were also factors. The gradient noise waveform was highly repeatable. In addition, the coolant pump for the imager’s permanent magnet and the room air handling system were sources of ongoing noise lower in both level and frequency than gradient coil noise. Knowledge of the sources and characteristics of the noise enabled the examination of general approaches to noise control that could be applied to reduce the unwanted noise during fMRI sessions. PMID:11051496

  12. Thermal-noise suppression in nano-scale Si field-effect transistors by feedback control based on single-electron detection

    SciTech Connect

    Chida, Kensaku Nishiguchi, Katsuhiko; Yamahata, Gento; Tanaka, Hirotaka; Fujiwara, Akira

    2015-08-17

    We perform feedback (FB) control for suppressing thermal fluctuation in the number of electrons in a silicon single-electron (SE) device composed of a small transistor and capacitor. SEs enter and leave the capacitor via the transistor randomly at thermal equilibrium, which is monitored in real time using a high-charge-sensitivity detector. In order to suppress such random motion or thermal fluctuation of the electrons, SEs are injected and removed using the transistor according to the monitored change in the number of electrons in the capacitor, which is exactly the FB control. As a result, thermal fluctuation in the number of electrons in a SE device is suppressed by 60%, which corresponds to the so-called FB cooling from 300 to 110 K. Moreover, a thermodynamics analysis of this FB cooling reveals that entropy in the capacitor is reduced and the device is at non-equilibrium; i.e., the free energy of the device increases. Since this entropy reduction originates from information about the electrons' motion monitored by the detector, our results by the FB control represent one type of information-to-energy conversion.

  13. A comprehensive model for quantum noise characterization in digital mammography.

    PubMed

    Monnin, P; Bosmans, H; Verdun, F R; Marshall, N W

    2016-03-01

    A version of cascaded systems analysis was developed specifically with the aim of studying quantum noise propagation in x-ray detectors. Signal and quantum noise propagation was then modelled in four types of x-ray detectors used for digital mammography: four flat panel systems, one computed radiography and one slot-scan silicon wafer based photon counting device. As required inputs to the model, the two dimensional (2D) modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectra (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were measured for six mammography systems that utilized these different detectors. A new method to reconstruct anisotropic 2D presampling MTF matrices from 1D radial MTFs measured along different angular directions across the detector is described; an image of a sharp, circular disc was used for this purpose. The effective pixel fill factor for the FP systems was determined from the axial 1D presampling MTFs measured with a square sharp edge along the two orthogonal directions of the pixel lattice. Expectation MTFs were then calculated by averaging the radial MTFs over all possible phases and the 2D EMTF formed with the same reconstruction technique used for the 2D presampling MTF. The quantum NPS was then established by noise decomposition from homogenous images acquired as a function of detector air kerma. This was further decomposed into the correlated and uncorrelated quantum components by fitting the radially averaged quantum NPS with the radially averaged EMTF(2). This whole procedure allowed a detailed analysis of the influence of aliasing, signal and noise decorrelation, x-ray capture efficiency and global secondary gain on NPS and detector DQE. The influence of noise statistics, pixel fill factor and additional electronic and fixed pattern noises on the DQE was also studied. The 2D cascaded model and decompositions performed on the acquired images also enlightened the observed quantum NPS and DQE anisotropy. PMID:26895467

  14. A comprehensive model for quantum noise characterization in digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnin, P.; Bosmans, H.; Verdun, F. R.; Marshall, N. W.

    2016-03-01

    A version of cascaded systems analysis was developed specifically with the aim of studying quantum noise propagation in x-ray detectors. Signal and quantum noise propagation was then modelled in four types of x-ray detectors used for digital mammography: four flat panel systems, one computed radiography and one slot-scan silicon wafer based photon counting device. As required inputs to the model, the two dimensional (2D) modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectra (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were measured for six mammography systems that utilized these different detectors. A new method to reconstruct anisotropic 2D presampling MTF matrices from 1D radial MTFs measured along different angular directions across the detector is described; an image of a sharp, circular disc was used for this purpose. The effective pixel fill factor for the FP systems was determined from the axial 1D presampling MTFs measured with a square sharp edge along the two orthogonal directions of the pixel lattice. Expectation MTFs were then calculated by averaging the radial MTFs over all possible phases and the 2D EMTF formed with the same reconstruction technique used for the 2D presampling MTF. The quantum NPS was then established by noise decomposition from homogenous images acquired as a function of detector air kerma. This was further decomposed into the correlated and uncorrelated quantum components by fitting the radially averaged quantum NPS with the radially averaged EMTF2. This whole procedure allowed a detailed analysis of the influence of aliasing, signal and noise decorrelation, x-ray capture efficiency and global secondary gain on NPS and detector DQE. The influence of noise statistics, pixel fill factor and additional electronic and fixed pattern noises on the DQE was also studied. The 2D cascaded model and decompositions performed on the acquired images also enlightened the observed quantum NPS and DQE anisotropy.

  15. Mitigation of structureborne noise nuisance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Wing P.

    2005-09-01

    This paper presents a noise complaint case which was solved by me a few years ago in Hong Kong. A newlywed couple in the residential unit complained to the Government that the noise emitted from the pump room directly beneath their unit was very annoying, especially in the night-time period. The owner of the building was then required by the Government to mitigate the noise to the night-time statutory noise requirement within 30 days, otherwise he would be prosecuted. Ideally, the structureborne noise from the pump room could be effectively mitigated by installation of floating slab and vibration isolators under the pumps. Also, the water tanks and water pipes were required to be isolated from the walls and floor. However, this work was impossible to be completed within 30 days to stop the prosecution. Water supply to the above residents would be seriously interrupted during the construction period. As the only noise parameter of the statutory requirement was 30 minute A-weighted Leq, the most effective and practical way in this exigent situation was to reduce the pump operation time within any 30 minute period to decrease the Leq values. In addition, the water pipes and pumps were also required to be isolated from the walls and floor with resilient materials to break the vibration channels. These noise mitigation measures were successfully applied to the pump room before the end of the 30 days. Finally, the noise levels inside the complainant's unit were found to meet the statutory requirement. The noise complaint case was then closed by the Government.

  16. Patrol Officer Daily Noise Exposure.

    PubMed

    Gilbertson, Lynn R; Vosburgh, Donna J H

    2015-01-01

    Previous research shows that police officers are at a higher risk for noise induced hearing loss (NIHL). Little data exists on the occupational tasks, outside of the firing range, that might lead to the increased risk of NIHL. The current study collected noise dosimetry from patrol officers in a smaller department and a larger department in southern Wisconsin, United States. The noise dosimeters simultaneously measured noise in three virtual dosimeters that had different thresholds, criterion levels, and exchange rates. The virtual dosimeters were set to: the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) hearing conservation criteria (OSHA-HC), the OSHA permissible exposure level criteria (OSHA-PEL), and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). In addition to wearing a noise dosimeter during their respective work days, officers completed a log form documenting the type of task performed, the duration of that task, if the task involved the use of a siren, and officer characteristics that may have influenced their noise exposure, such as the type of dispatch radio unit worn. Analysis revealed that the normalized 8-hour time weighted averages (TWA) for all officers fell below the recommended OSHA and ACGIH exposure limits. The tasks involving the use of the siren had significantly higher levels than the tasks without (p = 0.005). The highest noise exposure levels were encountered when patrol officers were assisting other public safety agencies such as a fire department or emergency medical services (79 dBA). Canine officers had higher normalized 8-hr TWA noise exposure than regular patrol officers (p = 0.002). Officers with an evening work schedule had significantly higher noise exposure than the officers with a day or night work schedule (p = 0.023). There were no significant differences in exposure levels between the two departments (p = 0.22). Results suggest that this study population is unlikely to experience NIHL as

  17. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    Food additives are substances that become part of a food product when they are added during the processing or making of that food. "Direct" food additives are often added during processing to: Add nutrients ...

  18. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  19. Minimal noise subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoting; Byrd, Mark; Jacobs, Kurt

    2016-03-01

    A system subjected to noise contains a decoherence-free subspace or subsystem (DFS) only if the noise possesses an exact symmetry. Here we consider noise models in which a perturbation breaks a symmetry of the noise, so that if S is a DFS under a given noise process it is no longer so under the new perturbed noise process. We ask whether there is a subspace or subsystem that is more robust to the perturbed noise than S . To answer this question we develop a numerical method that allows us to search for subspaces or subsystems that are maximally robust to arbitrary noise processes. We apply this method to a number of examples, and find that a subsystem that is a DFS is often not the subsystem that experiences minimal noise when the symmetry of the noise is broken by a perturbation. We discuss which classes of noise have this property.

  20. Study of the intensity noise and intensity modulation in a of hybrid soliton pulsed source

    SciTech Connect

    Dogru, Nuran; Oziazisi, M Sadetin

    2005-10-31

    The relative intensity noise (RIN) and small-signal intensity modulation (IM) of a hybrid soliton pulsed source (HSPS) with a linearly chirped Gaussian apodised fibre Bragg grating (FBG) are considered in the electric-field approximation. The HSPS is described by solving the dynamic coupled-mode equations. It is shown that consideration of the carrier density noise in the HSPS in addition to the spontaneous noise is necessary to analyse accurately noise in the mode-locked HSPS. It is also shown that the resonance peak spectral splitting (RPSS) of the IM near the frequency inverse to the round-trip time of light in the external cavity can be eliminated by selecting an appropriate linear chirp rate in the Gaussian apodised FBG. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  1. Low-noise pulse conditioner

    DOEpatents

    Bird, David A.

    1983-01-01

    A low-noise pulse conditioner is provided for driving electronic digital processing circuitry directly from differentially induced input pulses. The circuit uses a unique differential-to-peak detector circuit to generate a dynamic reference signal proportional to the input peak voltage. The input pulses are compared with the reference signal in an input network which operates in full differential mode with only a passive input filter. This reduces the introduction of circuit-induced noise, or jitter, generated in ground referenced input elements normally used in pulse conditioning circuits, especially speed transducer processing circuits.

  2. Low noise optical position sensor

    DOEpatents

    Spear, J.D.

    1999-03-09

    A novel optical position sensor is described that uses two component photodiodes electrically connected in parallel, with opposing polarities. A lens provides optical gain and restricts the acceptance angle of the detector. The response of the device to displacements of an optical spot is similar to that of a conventional bi-cell type position sensitive detector. However, the component photodiode design enables simpler electronic amplification with inherently less electrical noise than the bi-cell. Measurements by the sensor of the pointing noise of a focused helium-neon laser as a function of frequency demonstrate high sensitivity and suitability for optical probe beam deflection experiments. 14 figs.

  3. Low noise optical position sensor

    DOEpatents

    Spear, Jonathan David

    1999-01-01

    A novel optical position sensor is described that uses two component photodiodes electrically connected in parallel, with opposing polarities. A lens provides optical gain and restricts the acceptance angle of the detector. The response of the device to displacements of an optical spot is similar to that of a conventional bi-cell type position sensitive detector. However, the component photodiode design enables simpler electronic amplification with inherently less electrical noise than the bi-cell. Measurements by the sensor of the pointing noise of a focused helium-neon laser as a function of frequency demonstrate high sensitivity and suitability for optical probe beam deflection experiments.

  4. Progress Toward N+1 Noise Goal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    2008-01-01

    A review of the progress made towards achieving the Subsonic Fixed Wing project's noise goal for the next generation single aisle aircraft is presented. The review includes the technology path selected for achieving the goal as well as highlights from several in-house and partnership test programs that have contributed to this effort. In addition, a detailed, self-consistent, analysis of the aircraft system noise for a conceptual next generation single aisle aircraft is also presented. The results indicate that with the current suite of noise reduction technologies incorporated into the conceptual aircraft a cumulative noise reduction margin of 26 EPNdB could be expected. This falls 6 dB short of the N+1 goal, which is 32 EPNdB below Stage 4 noise standard. Potential additional noise reduction technologies to help achieve the goal are briefly discussed.

  5. Stochastic noise characteristics in matrix inversion tomosynthesis (MITS).

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Devon J; McAdams, H P; Dobbins, James T Third

    2009-05-01

    = 71) does not incur any appreciable additive electronic noise penalty compared to using fewer projections for roughly equivalent cumulative exposure. Stochastic noise is minimized by maximizing N and NP but increases with increasing ANG. The noise trend results for NP and ANG are contrary to what would be predicted by simply considering the MITS matrix conditioning and likely result from the interplay between noise correlation and the polarity of the MITS filters. From this study, the authors conclude that the previously determined optimal MITS imaging strategy based on impulse response considerations produces somewhat suboptimal stochastic noise characteristics, but is probably still the best technique for MITS imaging of the chest. PMID:19544768

  6. Stochastic noise characteristics in matrix inversion tomosynthesis (MITS)

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, Devon J.; McAdams, H. P.; Dobbins, James T. III

    2009-05-15

    not incur any appreciable additive electronic noise penalty compared to using fewer projections for roughly equivalent cumulative exposure. Stochastic noise is minimized by maximizing N and NP but increases with increasing ANG. The noise trend results for NP and ANG are contrary to what would be predicted by simply considering the MITS matrix conditioning and likely result from the interplay between noise correlation and the polarity of the MITS filters. From this study, the authors conclude that the previously determined optimal MITS imaging strategy based on impulse response considerations produces somewhat suboptimal stochastic noise characteristics, but is probably still the best technique for MITS imaging of the chest.

  7. Nanoscale direct mapping of localized and induced noise sources on conducting polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhar, Shashank; Cho, Duckhyung; Lee, Hyungwoo; Cho, Dong-Guk; Hong, Seunghun

    2015-12-01

    increased NT, which is explained by the structural deformation at high bias-voltages. On photo-illumination, the ordered-phase-regions exhibited a rather large increase in the conductivity and NT. Presumably, the illumination released carriers from deep-traps which should work as additional noise-sources. These results show that our methods provide valuable insights into noise-sources and, thus, can be powerful tools for basic research and practical applications of conducting polymer films. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06896g

  8. Nuclear spin noise in NMR revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrand, Guillaume; Luong, Michel

    2015-09-07

    The theoretical shapes of nuclear spin-noise spectra in NMR are derived by considering a receiver circuit with finite preamplifier input impedance and a transmission line between the preamplifier and the probe. Using this model, it becomes possible to reproduce all observed experimental features: variation of the NMR resonance linewidth as a function of the transmission line phase, nuclear spin-noise signals appearing as a “bump” or as a “dip” superimposed on the average electronic noise level even for a spin system and probe at the same temperature, pure in-phase Lorentzian spin-noise signals exhibiting non-vanishing frequency shifts. Extensive comparisons to experimental measurements validate the model predictions, and define the conditions for obtaining pure in-phase Lorentzian-shape nuclear spin noise with a vanishing frequency shift, in other words, the conditions for simultaneously obtaining the spin-noise and frequency-shift tuning optima.

  9. Nuclear spin noise in NMR revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrand, Guillaume; Huber, Gaspard; Luong, Michel; Desvaux, Hervé

    2015-09-01

    The theoretical shapes of nuclear spin-noise spectra in NMR are derived by considering a receiver circuit with finite preamplifier input impedance and a transmission line between the preamplifier and the probe. Using this model, it becomes possible to reproduce all observed experimental features: variation of the NMR resonance linewidth as a function of the transmission line phase, nuclear spin-noise signals appearing as a "bump" or as a "dip" superimposed on the average electronic noise level even for a spin system and probe at the same temperature, pure in-phase Lorentzian spin-noise signals exhibiting non-vanishing frequency shifts. Extensive comparisons to experimental measurements validate the model predictions, and define the conditions for obtaining pure in-phase Lorentzian-shape nuclear spin noise with a vanishing frequency shift, in other words, the conditions for simultaneously obtaining the spin-noise and frequency-shift tuning optima.

  10. Robustness of Ant Colony Optimization to Noise.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Tobias; Kötzing, Timo; Krejca, Martin S; Sutton, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    Recently, ant colony optimization (ACO) algorithms have proven to be efficient in uncertain environments, such as noisy or dynamically changing fitness functions. Most of these analyses have focused on combinatorial problems such as path finding. We rigorously analyze an ACO algorithm optimizing linear pseudo-Boolean functions under additive posterior noise. We study noise distributions whose tails decay exponentially fast, including the classical case of additive Gaussian noise. Without noise, the classical [Formula: see text] EA outperforms any ACO algorithm, with smaller [Formula: see text] being better; however, in the case of large noise, the [Formula: see text] EA fails, even for high values of [Formula: see text] (which are known to help against small noise). In this article, we show that ACO is able to deal with arbitrarily large noise in a graceful manner; that is, as long as the evaporation factor [Formula: see text] is small enough, dependent on the variance [Formula: see text] of the noise and the dimension n of the search space, optimization will be successful. We also briefly consider the case of prior noise and prove that ACO can also efficiently optimize linear functions under this noise model. PMID:26928850

  11. Kramers' rate for systems with multiplicative noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas, Alexandre; Pinto, Italo'Ivo Lima Dias; Lindenberg, Katja

    2016-07-01

    Kramers' rate for the passage of trajectories X (t ) over an energy barrier due to thermal or other fluctuations is usually associated with additive noise. We present a generalization of Kramers' rate for systems with multiplicative noise. We show that the expression commonly used in the literature for multiplicative noise is not correct, and we present results of numerical integrations of the Langevin equation for d X (t )/d t evolving in a quartic bistable potential which corroborate our claim.

  12. Kramers' rate for systems with multiplicative noise.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Alexandre; Pinto, Italo'Ivo Lima Dias; Lindenberg, Katja

    2016-07-01

    Kramers' rate for the passage of trajectories X(t) over an energy barrier due to thermal or other fluctuations is usually associated with additive noise. We present a generalization of Kramers' rate for systems with multiplicative noise. We show that the expression commonly used in the literature for multiplicative noise is not correct, and we present results of numerical integrations of the Langevin equation for dX(t)/dt evolving in a quartic bistable potential which corroborate our claim. PMID:27575071

  13. Constraints on a synthetic-noise source for Johnson noise thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, D. R.; Benz, S. P.

    2008-02-01

    Conventional Johnson noise thermometers based on switching correlators have conflicting matching requirements for the sensing resistance. To mitigate distortion effects in the correlator, the RT products of the two sensors must be the same, and to mitigate frequency-response errors in nominally identical input circuits, the two sensing resistances should be the same. A noise thermometer using synthetic noise for the primary reference signal overcomes this conflict because the output voltage and output resistance are independent. This paper presents the rationale and design constraints for a noise thermometer using a synthetic-noise source based on Josephson junctions. The quantized voltage noise source developed at NIST produces tunable waveforms with a spectral density composed of a comb of frequencies of equal amplitude and random phase. In addition to the conventional noise-power and impedance constraints, it has additional constraints relating to the number of tones and the tone spacing.

  14. On the way to extended noise reductions in propeller aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiers, R. F. C.

    1984-08-01

    Origins of cabin noise in propeller driven aircraft (PDE) and the importance of further reductions are described. Trends in propeller technology and fuselage construction are aimed at the development of extremely fuel-efficient PDE. However, the related increase of cabin noise levels urges the extension of noise reduction in PDE. Fokker noise reduction methodology for meeting the challenge of maintaining and improving noise levels in future PDE is discussed. Additional noise reduction is hard to obtain. Sophisticated techniques were used to acquire the necessary data and take effective noise reduction measures.

  15. Effect of build geometry on the β-grain structure and texture in additive manufacture of Ti-6Al-4V by selective electron beam melting

    SciTech Connect

    Antonysamy, A.A.; Meyer, J.; Prangnell, P.B.

    2013-10-15

    With titanium alloys, the solidification conditions in Additive Manufacturing (AM) frequently lead to coarse columnar β-grain structures. The effect of geometry on the variability in the grain structure and texture, seen in Ti-6Al-4V alloy components produced by Selective Electron Beam Melting (SEBM), has been investigated. Reconstruction of the primary β-phase, from α-phase EBSD data, has confirmed that in bulk sections where in-fill “hatching” is employed growth selection favours columnar grains aligned with an <001> {sub β} direction normal to the deposited powder layers; this results in a coarse β-grain structure with a strong < 001 > {sub β} fibre texture (up 8 x random) that can oscillate between a near random distribution around the fibre axis and cube reinforcement with build height. It is proposed that this behaviour is related to the highly elongated melt pool and the raster directions alternating between two orthogonal directions every layer, which on average favours grains with cube alignment. In contrast, the outline, or “contour”, pass produces a distinctly different grain structure and texture resulting in a skin layer on wall surfaces, where nucleation occurs off the surrounding powder and growth follows the curved surface of the melt pool. This structure becomes increasingly important in thin sections. Local heterogeneities have also been found within different section transitions, resulting from the growth of skin grain structures into thicker sections. Texture simulations have shown that the far weaker α-texture (∼ 3 x random), seen in the final product, arises from transformation on cooling occurring with a near random distribution of α-plates across the 12 variants possible from the Burgers relationship. - Highlights: • Distinctly different skin and bulk structures are produced by the contour and hatching passes. • Bulk sections contain coarse β-grains with a < 001 > fibre texture in the build direction. • This

  16. Noise, Health, and Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beranek, Leo L.

    There is reasonable agreement that hearing impairment is related to noise exposure. This hearing loss due to noise is considered a serious health injury, but there is still difficulty in delineating the importance of noise related to people's general non-auditory well-being and health. Beside hearing loss, noise inhibits satisfactory speech…

  17. Research In Helicopter Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Yung H.; Schmitz, Frederic H.; Morse, Andrew H.

    1991-01-01

    Progress in aeroacoustical theory and experiments reviewed. Report summarizes continuing U.S. Army programs of research into causes of noise generated by helicopters. Topics of study include high-speed impulsive noise, blade/vortex-interaction noise, and low-frequency harmonic noise.

  18. The reaction of an iridium PNP complex with parahydrogen facilitates polarisation transfer without chemical change† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Sample preparation, signal enhancements and raw data. CCDC 1026865. For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c4dt03088e Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Arthur J.; Rayner, Peter J.; Cowley, Michael J.; Green, Gary G. R.; Whitwood, Adrian C.

    2015-01-01

    The short lived pincer complex [(C5H3N(CH2P(tBu)2)2)Ir(H)2(py)]BF4 is shown to be active for signal amplification by reversible exchange. This catalyst formulation enables the efficient transfer of polarization from parahydrogen to be placed into just a single molecule of the hyperpolarisation target, pyridine. When the catalysts 1H nuclei are replaced by 2H, increased levels of substrate hyperpolarization result and when the reverse situation is examined the catalyst itself is clearly visible through hyperpolarised signals. The ligand exchange pathways of [(C5H3N(CH2P(tBu)2)2)Ir(H)2(py)]BF4 that are associated with this process are shown to involve the formation of 16-electron [(C5H3N(CH2P(tBu)2)2)Ir(H)2]BF4 and the 18-electron H2 addition product [(C5H3N(CH2P(tBu)2)2)Ir(H)2(H2)]BF4. PMID:25410259

  19. Development of components and subsystems for low noise receivers at micro- and millimeter waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltonen, Juhani K.

    1990-09-01

    The development of low noise receivers at micro- and millimeter wave frequencies mainly intended for radio astronomical studies and remote sensing applications are discussed. The work is divided into three parts: design and construction of cryogenic, low noise MESFET (Metal Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor) and HEMT (High Electron Mobility Transistor) amplifiers, studies on semiconductor local oscillators and phase locking of mm wave Gunn oscillators. The basic theory of low noise transistor amplifiers employing scattering and noise parameters of an active device is reviewed. Stability problems of amplifiers and noise measurement techniques especially applicable to cryogenic systems are discussed. Several low noise amplifiers were constructed for the frequency range of 1 to 22 GHz. As an example, a 4 GHz cryogenic MESFET IF amplifier with 20 K noise temperature was developed. A two stage coaxial HEMT amplifier with T(sub A) = 300 K at room temperature was constructed. Various designs of semiconductor local oscillators needed for mm wave receivers are reviewed. Experimental verification of the theoretical model for the waveguide mounting structure of Gunn diodes is given at frequencies of 35 to 53 GHz. Fundamental frequency local oscillators with an output power of approximately 50 mW and mechanical tuning range of 5 to 10 GHz (center frequency of 45 GHz) were constructed. Description of the phase locking scheme (exploiting bias tuning of Gunn oscillators) of the 72 to 115 GHz receiver is given. The additional factors needed in application of the basic phaselock theory to mm wave oscillators are discussed.

  20. Plasmonic mass and Johnson-Nyquist noise.

    PubMed

    Chee, Jingyee; Yoon, Hosang; Qin, Ling; Ham, Donhee

    2015-09-01

    The fluctuation-dissipation theorem relates the thermal noise spectrum of a conductor to its linear response properties, with the ohmic resistance arising from the electron scattering being the most notable linear response property. But the linear response also includes the collective inertial acceleration of electrons, which should in principle influence the thermal noise spectrum as well. In practice, this effect would be largely masked by the Planck quantization for traditional conductors with short electron scattering times. But recent advances in nanotechnology have enabled the fabrication of conductors with greatly increased electron scattering times, with which the collective inertial effect can critically affect the thermal noise spectrum. In this paper we highlight this collective inertial effect-that is, the plasmonic effect-on the thermal noise spectrum under the framework of semiclassical electron dynamics, from both fundamental microscopic and practical modeling points of view. In graphene, where non-zero collective inertia arises from zero single-electron effective mass and where both electron and hole bands exist together, the thermal noise spectrum shows rich temperature and frequency dependencies, unseen in traditional conductors. PMID:26266548

  1. Helicopter rotor trailing edge noise. [noise prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amier, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    A two dimensional section of a helicopter main rotor blade was tested in an acoustic wind tunnel at close to full-scale Reynolds numbers to obtain boundary layer data and acoustic data for use in developing an acoustic scaling law and testing a first principles trailing edge noise theory. Results were extended to the rotating frame coordinate system to develop a helicopter rotor trailing edge noise prediction. Comparisons of the calculated noise levels with helicopter flyover spectra demonstrate that trailing edge noise contributes significantly to the total helicopter noise spectrum at high frequencies. This noise mechanism is expected to control the minimum rotor noise. In the case of noise radiation from a local blade segment, the acoustic directivity pattern is predicted by the first principles trailing edge noise theory. Acoustic spectra are predicted by a scaling law which includes Mach number, boundary layer thickness and observer position. Spectrum shape and sound pressure level are also predicted by the first principles theory but the analysis does not predict the Strouhal value identifying the spectrum peak.

  2. Negative differential conductance and super-Poissonian shot noise in single-molecule magnet junctions

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Hai-Bin; Liang, Jiu-Qing; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Molecular spintroinic device based on a single-molecule magnet is one of the ultimate goals of semiconductor nanofabrication technologies. It is thus necessary to understand the electron transport properties of a single-molecule magnet junction. Here we study the negative differential conductance and super-Poissonian shot noise properties of electron transport through a single-molecule magnet weakly coupled to two electrodes with either one or both of them being ferromagnetic. We predict that the negative differential conductance and super-Poissonian shot noise, which can be tuned by a gate voltage, depend sensitively on the spin polarization of the source and drain electrodes. In particular, the shot noise in the negative differential conductance region can be enhanced or decreased originating from the different formation mechanisms of negative differential conductance. The effective competition between fast and slow transport channels is responsible for the observed negative differential conductance and super-Poissonian shot noise. In addition, we further discuss the skewness and kurtosis properties of transport current in the super-Poissonian shot noise regions. Our findings suggest a tunable negative differential conductance molecular device, and the predicted properties of high-order current cumulants are very interesting for a better understanding of electron transport through single-molecule magnet junctions. PMID:25736094

  3. Spin noise spectroscopy in semiconductors: from a billion down to single spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, J.; Dahbashi, R.; Berski, F.; Wiegand, J.; Kuhn, H.; Lonnemann, J.; Oestreich, M.

    2014-08-01

    Spin noise spectroscopy in semiconductors has matured during the past nine years into a versatile and well developed technique being capable to unveil the intrinsic and unaltered spin dynamics in a wide range of semiconductor systems. Originating from atom and quantum optics as a potential true quantum non-demolition measurement technique, SNS is capable of unearthing the intricate dynamics of free or localized electron and hole spins in semiconductors being eventually coupled to the nuclear spin bath as well. In this contribution, we review shortly the major steps which inspired the success of spin noise spectroscopy in semiconductors and present the most recent extensions into the low-invasive detection regime of the spin dynamics for the two extreme limits of very high and extremely low rates of spin decoherence, respectively. On the one hand, merging ultrafast laser spectroscopy with spin noise spectroscopy enables the detection of spin noise with picosecond resolution, i.e., with THz bandwidths yielding access to otherwise concealed microscopic electronic processes. On the other hand, we present very high sensitivity SNS being capable to measure the extremely long spin coherence of single holes enclosed in individual quantum dots venturing a step forward towards true optical quantum non-demolition experiments in semiconductors. In addition, higher-order spin noise statistics of, e.g., single charges can give information beyond the linear response regime governed by the fundamental fluctuationdissipation theorem and thereby possibly shed some light on the nested coupling between electronic and nuclear spins.

  4. Low Frequency Noise Contamination in Fan Model Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford A.; Schifer, Nicholas A.

    2008-01-01

    Aircraft engine noise research and development depends on the ability to study and predict the noise created by each engine component in isolation. The presence of a downstream pylon for a model fan test, however, may result in noise contamination through pylon interactions with the free stream and model exhaust airflows. Additionally, there is the problem of separating the fan and jet noise components generated by the model fan. A methodology was therefore developed to improve the data quality for the 9 15 Low Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT) at the NASA Glenn Research Center that identifies three noise sources: fan noise, jet noise, and rig noise. The jet noise and rig noise were then measured by mounting a scale model of the 9 15 LSWT model fan installation in a jet rig to simulate everything except the rotating machinery and in duct components of fan noise. The data showed that the spectra measured in the LSWT has a strong rig noise component at frequencies as high as 3 kHz depending on the fan and airflow fan exit velocity. The jet noise was determined to be significantly lower than the rig noise (i.e., noise generated by flow interaction with the downstream support pylon). A mathematical model for the rig noise was then developed using a multi-dimensional least squares fit to the rig noise data. This allows the rig noise to be subtracted or removed, depending on the amplitude of the rig noise relative to the fan noise, at any given frequency, observer angle, or nozzle pressure ratio. The impact of isolating the fan noise with this method on spectra, overall power level (OAPWL), and Effective Perceived Noise Level (EPNL) is studied.

  5. Analysis of handling noises on wound strings.

    PubMed

    Pakarinen, J; Penttinen, H; Bank, B

    2007-12-01

    This study analyzes the handling noises that occur when a finger is slid along a wound string. The resulting noise has a harmonic structure due to the periodic texture of the wound string. The frequency of the harmonics and the root-mean-square amplitude of the noise were found to be linearly proportional to the sliding speed. In addition, the sliding excites the longitudinal modes of the string, thus resulting in a set of static harmonics in the noise spectrum. The sliding excites different longitudinal modes depending on the sliding location. PMID:18247641

  6. Helicopter internal noise control: Three case histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, B. D.; Cox, C. R.

    1978-01-01

    Case histories are described in which measurable improvements in the cabin noise environments of the Bell 214B, 206B, and 222 were realized. These case histories trace the noise control efforts followed in each vehicle. Among the design approaches considered, the addition of a fluid pulsation damper in a hydraulic system and the installation of elastomeric engine mounts are highlighted. It is concluded that substantial weight savings result when the major interior noise sources are controlled by design, both in altering the noise producing mechanism and interrupting the sound transmission paths.

  7. Food additives.

    PubMed

    Berglund, F

    1978-01-01

    The use of additives to food fulfils many purposes, as shown by the index issued by the Codex Committee on Food Additives: Acids, bases and salts; Preservatives, Antioxidants and antioxidant synergists; Anticaking agents; Colours; Emulfifiers; Thickening agents; Flour-treatment agents; Extraction solvents; Carrier solvents; Flavours (synthetic); Flavour enhancers; Non-nutritive sweeteners; Processing aids; Enzyme preparations. Many additives occur naturally in foods, but this does not exclude toxicity at higher levels. Some food additives are nutrients, or even essential nutritents, e.g. NaCl. Examples are known of food additives causing toxicity in man even when used according to regulations, e.g. cobalt in beer. In other instances, poisoning has been due to carry-over, e.g. by nitrate in cheese whey - when used for artificial feed for infants. Poisonings also occur as the result of the permitted substance being added at too high levels, by accident or carelessness, e.g. nitrite in fish. Finally, there are examples of hypersensitivity to food additives, e.g. to tartrazine and other food colours. The toxicological evaluation, based on animal feeding studies, may be complicated by impurities, e.g. orthotoluene-sulfonamide in saccharin; by transformation or disappearance of the additive in food processing in storage, e.g. bisulfite in raisins; by reaction products with food constituents, e.g. formation of ethylurethane from diethyl pyrocarbonate; by metabolic transformation products, e.g. formation in the gut of cyclohexylamine from cyclamate. Metabolic end products may differ in experimental animals and in man: guanylic acid and inosinic acid are metabolized to allantoin in the rat but to uric acid in man. The magnitude of the safety margin in man of the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) is not identical to the "safety factor" used when calculating the ADI. The symptoms of Chinese Restaurant Syndrome, although not hazardous, furthermore illustrate that the whole ADI

  8. Aviation noise effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, J. S.; Beattie, K. R.

    1985-03-01

    This report summarizes the effects of aviation noise in many areas, ranging from human annoyance to impact on real estate values. It also synthesizes the findings of literature on several topics. Included in the literature were many original studies carried out under FAA and other Federal funding over the past two decades. Efforts have been made to present the critical findings and conclusions of pertinent research, providing, when possible, a bottom line conclusion, criterion or perspective. Issues related to aviation noise are highlighted, and current policy is presented. Specific topic addressed include: annoyance; Hearing and hearing loss; noise metrics; human response to noise; speech interference; sleep interference; non-auditory health effects of noise; effects of noise on wild and domesticated animals; low frequency acoustical energy; impulsive noise; time of day weightings; noise contours; land use compatibility; and real estate values. This document is designed for a variety of users, from the individual completely unfamiliar with aviation noise to experts in the field.

  9. Field study on the impact of nocturnal road traffic noise on sleep: the importance of in- and outdoor noise assessment, the bedroom location and nighttime noise disturbances.

    PubMed

    Pirrera, Sandra; De Valck, Elke; Cluydts, Raymond

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this field study is to gain more insight into the way nocturnal road traffic noise impacts the sleep of inhabitants living in noisy regions, by taking into account several modifying variables. Participants were tested during five consecutive nights in their homes and comparisons between effective indoor and outdoor noise levels (LAeq, LAmax, number of noise events), sleep (actigraphy and sleep logs) and aspects of well-being (questionnaires) were made. Also, we investigated into what extent nocturnal noise exposure - objectively measured as well as perceived - directly relates to sleep outcomes and how the bedroom location influenced our measurements. We found that subjects living and sleeping in noisy regions correctly perceive their environment in terms of noise exposure and reported an overall discomfort due to traffic noise. In the evaluation of the objective noise levels, the inside noise levels did not follow the outside noise levels, though the different noise patterns could be described as characteristic for a noise and quiet environment. The impact on sleep, however, was only modest and we did not find any influence of noise intrusion on mood or pre-sleep arousal levels. Concerning the subjectively reported noise disturbances during the night, a clear relationship between noise and sleep outcomes could be established; with sleep onset latencies and judged sleep quality being particularly affected. The importance of inside and outside noise assessment as well as the use of multiple noise indicators in a home environment is further described. Additional emphasis is put on the determination of quiet control regions and the bedroom location, as this can alter noise levels and sleep outcomes. Also, including subjective noise evaluations during the night might not only provide crucial information on how participants experience the noise, but also allows for a more qualitative interpretation of the actual noise situation. PMID:25217747

  10. A technique for noise measurement optimization with spectrum analyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniti, P.; Cassina, L.; Gotti, C.; Maino, M.; Pessina, G.

    2015-08-01

    Measuring low noise of electronic devices with a spectrum analyzer requires particular care as the instrument could add significant contributions. A Low Noise Amplifier, LNA, is therefore necessary to be connected between the source to be measured and the instrument, to mitigate its effect at the LNA input. In the present work we suggest a technique for the implementation of the LNA that allows to optimize both low frequency noise and white noise, obtaining outstanding performance in a very broad frequency range.

  11. Annoyance of helicopter impulsive noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dambra, F.; Damongeot, A.

    1978-01-01

    Psychoacoustic studies of helicopter impulsive noise were conducted in order to qualify additional annoyance due to this feature and to develop physical impulsiveness descriptors to develop impulsivity correction methods. The currently proposed descriptors and methods of impulsiveness correction are compared using a multilinear regression analysis technique. It is shown that the presently recommended descriptor and correction method provides the best correlation with the subjective evaluations of real helicopter impulsive noises. The equipment necessary for data processing in order to apply the correction method is discussed.

  12. UHB engine fan broadband noise reduction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliebe, Philip R.; Ho, Patrick Y.; Mani, Ramani

    1995-06-01

    A study has been completed to quantify the contribution of fan broadband noise to advanced high bypass turbofan engine system noise levels. The result suggests that reducing fan broadband noise can produce 3 to 4 EPNdB in engine system noise reduction, once the fan tones are eliminated. Further, in conjunction with the elimination of fan tones and an increase in bypass ratio, a potential reduction of 7 to 10 EPNdB in system noise can be achieved. In addition, an initial assessment of engine broadband noise source mechanisms has been made, concluding that the dominant source of fan broadband noise is the interaction of incident inlet boundary layer turbulence with the fan rotor. This source has two contributors, i.e., unsteady life dipole response and steady loading quadrupole response. The quadrupole contribution was found to be the most important component, suggesting that broadband noise reduction can be achieved by the reduction of steady loading field-turbulence field quadrupole interaction. Finally, for a controlled experimental quantification and verification, the study recommends that further broadband noise tests be done on a simulated engine rig, such as the GE Aircraft Engine Universal Propulsion Simulator, rather than testing on an engine statically in an outdoor arena The rig should be capable of generating forward and aft propagating fan noise, and it needs to be tested in a large freejet or a wind tunnel.

  13. UHB Engine Fan Broadband Noise Reduction Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, Philip R.; Ho, Patrick Y.; Mani, Ramani

    1995-01-01

    A study has been completed to quantify the contribution of fan broadband noise to advanced high bypass turbofan engine system noise levels. The result suggests that reducing fan broadband noise can produce 3 to 4 EPNdB in engine system noise reduction, once the fan tones are eliminated. Further, in conjunction with the elimination of fan tones and an increase in bypass ratio, a potential reduction of 7 to 10 EPNdB in system noise can be achieved. In addition, an initial assessment of engine broadband noise source mechanisms has been made, concluding that the dominant source of fan broadband noise is the interaction of incident inlet boundary layer turbulence with the fan rotor. This source has two contributors, i.e., unsteady life dipole response and steady loading quadrupole response. The quadrupole contribution was found to be the most important component, suggesting that broadband noise reduction can be achieved by the reduction of steady loading field-turbulence field quadrupole interaction. Finally, for a controlled experimental quantification and verification, the study recommends that further broadband noise tests be done on a simulated engine rig, such as the GE Aircraft Engine Universal Propulsion Simulator, rather than testing on an engine statically in an outdoor arena The rig should be capable of generating forward and aft propagating fan noise, and it needs to be tested in a large freejet or a wind tunnel.

  14. Landing approach airframe noise measurements and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasagna, P. L.; Mackall, K. G.; Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Putnam, T. W.

    1980-01-01

    Flyover measurements of the airframe noise produced by the AeroCommander, JetStar, CV-990, and B-747 airplanes are presented for various landing approach configurations. Empirical and semiempirical techniques are presented to correlate the measured airframe noise with airplane design and aerodynamic parameters. Airframe noise for the jet-powered airplanes in the clean configuration (flaps and gear retracted) was found to be adequately represented by a function of airplane weight and the fifth power of airspeed. Results show the airframe noise for all four aircraft in the landing configuration (flaps extended and gear down) also varied with the fifth power of airspeed, but this noise level could not be represented by the addition of a constant to the equation for clean-configuration airframe noise.

  15. Sources of noise in magneto-optical readout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansuripur, M.

    1991-01-01

    The various sources of noise which are often encountered in magneto-optical readout systems are analyzed. Although the focus is on magneto-optics, most sources of noise are common among the various optical recording systems and one can easily adapt the results to other media and systems. A description of the magneto-optical readout system under consideration is given, and the standard methods and the relevant terminology of signal and noise measurement are described. The characteristics of thermal noise, which originates in the electronic circuitry of the readout system, are described. The most fundamental of all sources of noise, the shot noise, is considered, and a detailed account of its statistical properties is given. Shot noise, which is due to random fluctuations in photon arrival times, is an ever-present noise in optical detection. Since the performance of magneto-optical recording devices in use today is approaching the limit imposed by the shot noise, it is important that the reader have a good grasp of this particular source of noise. A model for the laser noise is described, and measurement results which yield numerical values for the strength of the laser power fluctuations are presented. Spatial variations of the disk reflectivity and random depolarization phenomena also contribute to the overall level of noise in readout; these and related issues are treated. Numerical simulation results describing some of the more frequently encountered sources of noise which accompany the recorded waveform itself, namely, jitter noise and signal-amplitude fluctuation noise are presented.

  16. Direct Student Loans: Additional Steps Would Increase Borrowers' Awareness of Electronic Debiting and Reduce Federal Administrative Costs. Report to the Honorable James M. Jeffords, U.S. Senate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, Cornelia M.

    In November 1999, the U.S. Department of Education began offering a 0.25% interest rate reduction to borrowers under the Direct Loan program who agree to have their monthly loan payments automatically withdrawn from a bank account through its electronic debit account (EDA) program. The Department of Education submitted a justification to the…

  17. On Observer Internal Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Arthur E.

    1986-06-01

    Human observers behave as if they have two sources of intrinsic variability, commonly referred to as internal noise. One component (here referred to as "constant") is independent of the external noise level but does depend on mean display luminance. The other component (referred to as "induced") is directly proportional to the external noise level and dominates when the display noise is easily visible. The induced internal noise is predicted by two models - one based on intrinsic signal parameter jitter and the other on a zone of indecision. Spectral density is the appropriate measure for internal noise.

  18. Continuous miner noise

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.

    1981-08-01

    Noise generated by continuous miners in underground coal production is an important health hazard. Laboratory tests of simulated cutting operations and in-mine noise measurements have been made. These show that coal cutting noise and conveyor noise are the dominant sources of miner operational noise. Typical noise levels for cutting and conveying operations are 97 dBA. For full operation of all machine systems, the overall sound pressure level is approximately 101 dBA. In-mine and laboratory test results show excellent agreement in both A-weighted overall levels as well as A-weighted one-third octave band spectra.

  19. Signal detection in l/f noise of SQUID magnetometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrera, B.; Anderson, J. T.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that the variance on the SQUID power spectrum in the l/f low frequency region is well behaved, i.e., any small frequency band may be treated as white noise in standard power spectrum estimation theory. Specifically a calibration signal is examined at 0.017 Hz with an equivalent energy referred to the SQUID input coil of 1 times 10 to the -30th J and a digitally recorded and analyzed record of 140 hr duration obtained an optimum S/N better than 400. The results are in good agreement with theory. In addition no deviation from the l/f dependence of the noise energy spectrum is seen down to frequencies below 10 to the -5th Hz. A commercially available SQUID and electronics system were used.

  20. On the effect of experimental noise on the classification of biological samples using Raman micro-spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Sinead J.; Kerr, Laura T.; Domijan, Katarina; Hennelly, Bryan M.

    2016-04-01

    Raman micro-spectroscopy is an optoelectronic technique that can be used to evaluate the chemical composition of biological samples and has been shown to be a powerful diagnostic tool for the investigation of various cancer related diseases including bladder, breast, and cervical cancer. Raman scattering is an inherently weak process with approximately 1 in 107 photons undergoing scattering and for this reason, noise from the recording system can have a significant impact on the quality of the signal, and its suitability for diagnostic classification. The main sources of noise in the recorded signal are shot noise, CCD dark current, and CCD readout noise. Shot noise results from the low signal photon count while dark current results from thermally generated electrons in the semiconductor pixels. Both of these noise sources are time dependent; readout noise is time independent but is inherent in each individual recording and results in the fundamental limit of measurement, arising from the internal electronics of the camera. In this paper, each of the aforementioned noise sources are analysed in isolation, and used to experimentally validate a mathematical model. This model is then used to simulate spectra that might be acquired under various experimental conditions including the use of different cameras, different source wavelength, and power etc. Simulated noisy datasets of T24 and RT112 cell line spectra are generated based on true cell Raman spectrum irradiance values (recorded using very long exposure times) and the addition of simulated noise. These datasets are then input to multivariate classification using Principal Components Analysis and Linear Discriminant Analysis. This method enables an investigation into the effect of noise on the sensitivity and specificity of Raman based classification under various experimental conditions and using different equipment.

  1. Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP) Fan Noise Prediction for Small Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hough, Joe W.; Weir, Donald S.

    1996-01-01

    The Fan Noise Module of ANOPP is used to predict the broadband noise and pure tones for axial flow compressors or fans. The module, based on the method developed by M. F. Heidmann, uses empirical functions to predict fan noise spectra as a function of frequency and polar directivity. Previous studies have determined the need to modify the module to better correlate measurements of fan noise from engines in the 3000- to 6000-pound thrust class. Additional measurements made by AlliedSignal have confirmed the need to revise the ANOPP fan noise method for smaller engines. This report describes the revisions to the fan noise method which have been verified with measured data from three separate AlliedSignal fan engines. Comparisons of the revised prediction show a significant improvement in overall and spectral noise predictions.

  2. Organocatalytic asymmetric addition of naphthols and electron-rich phenols to isatin-derived ketimines: highly enantioselective construction of tetrasubstituted stereocenters.

    PubMed

    Montesinos-Magraner, Marc; Vila, Carlos; Cantón, Rubén; Blay, Gonzalo; Fernández, Isabel; Muñoz, M Carmen; Pedro, José R

    2015-05-18

    A quinine-derived thiourea organocatalyst promoted the highly enantioselective addition of naphthols and activated phenols to ketimines derived from isatins. The reaction afforded chiral 3-amino-2-oxindoles with a quaternary stereocenter in high yields (up to 99%) with excellent enantioselectivity (up to 99% ee). To the best of our knowledge, this transformation is the first highly enantioselective addition of naphthols to ketimines. PMID:25845341

  3. Chapter 9: Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Grupen, Claus; Shwartz, Boris A.

    2006-12-19

    Sophisticated front-end electronics are a key part of practically all modern radiation detector systems. This chapter introduces the basic principles and their implementation. Topics include signal acquisition, electronic noise, pulse shaping (analog and digital), and data readout techniques.

  4. Governing the morphology of Pt–Au heteronanocrystals with improved electrocatalytic performance† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional tabulated data, TEM, HAADF-STEM, HRTEM images, UV-visible measurements, XPS spectra, ICP elemental analysis, EDX-mapping, cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry measurements and tomography videos. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07481e Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Mourdikoudis, Stefanos; Chirea, Mariana; Zanaga, Daniele; Altantzis, Thomas; Mitrakas, Manasis; Bals, Sara; Liz-Marzán, Luis M.

    2015-01-01

    Platinum–gold heteronanostructures comprising either dimer (Pt–Au) or core–satellite (Pt@Au) configurations were synthesized by means of a seeded growth procedure using platinum nanodendrites as seeds. Careful control of the reduction kinetics of the gold precursor can be used to direct the nucleation and growth of gold nanoparticles on either one or multiple surface sites simultaneously, leading to the formation of either dimers or core–satellite nanoparticles, respectively, in high yields. Characterization by electron tomography and high resolution electron microscopy provided a better understanding of the actual three-dimensional particle morphology, as well as the Au–Pt interface, revealing quasi-epitaxial growth of Au on Pt. The prepared Pt–Au bimetallic nanostructures are highly efficient catalysts for ethanol oxidation in alkaline solution, showing accurate selectivity, high sensitivity, and improved efficiency by generating higher current densities than their monometallic counterparts. PMID:25904481

  5. Chiral Phosphorus-Olefin Ligands for the Rh(I) -Catalyzed Asymmetric Addition of Aryl Boronic Acids to Electron-Deficient Olefins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Li, Liang; Zhou, Guangli; Ma, Xiaoli; Zhang, Lu; Guo, Fang; Luo, Yi; Xia, Wujiong

    2016-05-20

    New chiral phosphorus-olefin hybrid ligands derived from the rigid "privileged" l-proline have been conveniently prepared and applied in the rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric arylation of electron-deficient olefins with arylboronic acids at room temperature; this reaction provides the desired products in excellent yields and high enantioselectivities. The origin of observed stereoselectivity has been investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. PMID:27017447

  6. Asymmetric Conjugate Addition of Benzofuran-2-ones to Alkyl 2-Phthalimidoacrylates: Modeling Structure-Stereoselectivity Relationships with Steric and Electronic Parameters.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chen; Zhang, En-Ge; Li, Xin; Cheng, Jin-Pei

    2016-05-23

    A highly predictive model to correlate the steric and electronic parameters of tertiary amine thiourea catalysts with the stereoselectivity of Michael reactions of 3-substituted benzofuranones and alkyl 2-phthalimidoacrylates is described. As predicted, new 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)benzyl- and methyl-substituted tertiary amine thioureas turned out to be highly suitable catalysts for this reaction and enabled the synthesis of enantioenriched α-amino acid derivatives with 1,3-nonadjacent stereogenic centers. PMID:27080558

  7. Supersonic jet shock noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Shock-cell noise is identified to be a potentially significant problem for advanced supersonic aircraft at takeoff. Therefore NASA conducted fundamental studies of the phenomena involved and model-scale experiments aimed at developing means of noise reduction. The results of a series of studies conducted to determine means by which supersonic jet shock noise can be reduced to acceptable levels for advanced supersonic cruise aircraft are reviewed. Theoretical studies were conducted on the shock associated noise of supersonic jets from convergent-divergent (C-D) nozzles. Laboratory studies were conducted on the influence of narrowband shock screech on broadband noise and on means of screech reduction. The usefulness of C-D nozzle passages was investigated at model scale for single-stream and dual-stream nozzles. The effect of off-design pressure ratio was determined under static and simulated flight conditions for jet temperatures up to 960 K. Annular and coannular flow passages with center plugs and multi-element suppressor nozzles were evaluated, and the effect of plug tip geometry was established. In addition to the far-field acoustic data, mean and turbulent velocity distributions were measured with a laser velocimeter, and shadowgraph images of the flow field were obtained.

  8. The MEMSamp: using (RF-)MEMS switches for the micromechanical amplification of electronic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlijn van Spengen, W.; Roobol, Sander B.; Klaassen, Wouter P.; Oosterkamp, Tjerk H.

    2010-12-01

    Semiconductor-based electronic amplifiers are ubiquitous in the modern world, but have fundamental limitations, such as the impossibility of using them at extreme temperatures and their sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Also, they inherently have various sources of electronic noise. We have developed a MEMS (micro-electromechanical systems) switch based amplifier in which an electronic signal is mechanically amplified in power: the MEMSamp. The new device is suitable for the same applications as semiconductor-based amplifiers, with the additional advantage of a purely mechanical operation, circumventing the limitations mentioned above. A thermal noise analysis shows that a MEMSamp may be operated with much lower input noise than state-of-the-art semiconductor amplifiers. We expect optimized amplifiers based on this principle to be applicable in fields ranging from low-noise preamplifiers to radiation-hard power amplifiers, and from ultra-high temperature electronics to spacecrafts.

  9. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  10. Phosphazene additives

    SciTech Connect

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  11. Predicting Aircraft Noise Levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B. J.

    1983-01-01

    Computer program developed for predicting aircraft noise levels either in flight or in ground tests. Noise sources include fan inlet and exhaust jet flap (for powered lift), core (combustor), turbine and airframe. Program written in FORTRAN IV.

  12. NASA propeller noise research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, G. C.

    1980-01-01

    The research in propeller noise prediction, noise/performance optimization, and interior reduction is described. Selected results are presented to illustrate the status of the technology and the direction of future research.

  13. Propagation of Environmental Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyon, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    Solutions for environmental noise pollution lie in systematic study of many basic processes such as reflection, scattering, and spreading. Noise propagation processes should be identified in different situations and assessed for their relative importance. (PS)

  14. Johnson Noise Thermometry System Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Britton Jr, Charles L; Roberts, Michael; Ezell, N Dianne Bull; Qualls, A L; Holcomb, David Eugene

    2013-01-01

    This document is intended to capture the requirements for the architecture of the developmental electronics for the ORNL-lead drift-free Johnson Noise Thermometry (JNT) project conducted under the Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) research pathway of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Research and Development (R&D) program. The requirements include not only the performance of the system but also the allowable measurement environment of the probe and the allowable physical environment of the associated electronics. A more extensive project background including the project rationale is available in the initial project report [1].

  15. Low-noise cryogenic transmission line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, D.

    1987-01-01

    New low-noise cryogenic input transmission lines have been developed for the Deep Space Network (DSN) at 1.668 GHz for cryogenically cooled Field Effect Transistors (FET) and High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) amplifiers. These amplifiers exhibit very low noise temperatures of 5 K to 15 K, making the requirements for a low-noise input transmission line critical. Noise contribution to the total amplifier system from the low-noise line is less than 0.5 K for both the 1.668-GHz and 2.25-GHz FET systems. The 1.668-GHz input line was installed in six FET systems which were implemented in the DSN for the Venus Balloon Experiment. The 2.25-GHz input line has been implemented in three FET systems for the DSN 34-m HEF antennas, and the design is currently being considered for use at higher frequencies.

  16. Characteristics of USB noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, J. S.; Searle, N.

    1976-01-01

    An extensive series of noise measurements, for a variety of geometric and operational parameters, was made on models of upper surface blowing (USB) powered lift systems. The data obtained were analyzed and the effects and trends of parametric variation defined. The behavior and nature of USB noise and the design of USB systems with low noise characteristics is examined.

  17. Dragline noise survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vipperman, Jeffrey S.; Bauer, Eric R.

    2002-05-01

    It is estimated that 70%-90% of miners have enough noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) to be classified as a disability (NIOSH, Publication No. 76-172, 1976; Franks, NIOSH Internal Report, 1996). In response, NIOSH is conducting a cross-sectional survey of the mining industry in order to determine the sources of mining noise and offer recommendations on how to mitigate high noise levels, and bring mining operations into compliance with the recent mining noise regulation: 30CFR, Part 62. This paper will outline the results from noise surveys of eight draglines which operate in above-ground coal mining operations. The data recorded include noise dosimetry in conjunction with time-at-task studies and 1/3-octave sound level (Leq, Lmin, and Lmax) measurements. The 1/3-octave band readings were used to create noise contour maps which allowed the spatial and frequency information of the noise to be considered. Comparison of Lmin and Lmax levels offer insight into the variability of the noise levels inside the dragline. The potential for administrative controls is limited due to consistently high noise levels throughout the deck. Implementation of engineering controls is also hindered by the size and number of the noise sources and the frequency content of the noise.

  18. Handbook of noise ratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearsons, K. S.; Bennett, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    The handbook was compiled to provide information in a concise form, describing the multitude of noise rating schemes. It is hoped that by describing the noise rating methods in a single volume the user will have better access to the definitions, application and calculation procedures of the current noise rating methods.

  19. The Problem of "Noise"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vagianos, Louis

    1972-01-01

    The library problem consists of equal parts of external and internal noise. The external noise consists of the volume of publication. The internal noise can be characterized by the present and continuing brouhaha concerning reform of library education. Scientists frankly regard librarians as impediments to information. (Author/NH)

  20. Local noise in a diffusive conductor.

    PubMed

    Tikhonov, E S; Shovkun, D V; Ercolani, D; Rossella, F; Rocci, M; Sorba, L; Roddaro, S; Khrapai, V S

    2016-01-01

    The control and measurement of local non-equilibrium configurations is of utmost importance in applications on energy harvesting, thermoelectrics and heat management in nano-electronics. This challenging task can be achieved with the help of various local probes, prominent examples including superconducting or quantum dot based tunnel junctions, classical and quantum resistors, and Raman thermography. Beyond time-averaged properties, valuable information can also be gained from spontaneous fluctuations of current (noise). From these perspective, however, a fundamental constraint is set by current conservation, which makes noise a characteristic of the whole conductor, rather than some part of it. Here we demonstrate how to remove this obstacle and pick up a local noise temperature of a current biased diffusive conductor with the help of a miniature noise probe. This approach is virtually noninvasive for the electronic energy distributions and extends primary local measurements towards strongly non-equilibrium regimes. PMID:27466216

  1. Local noise in a diffusive conductor

    PubMed Central

    Tikhonov, E. S.; Shovkun, D. V.; Ercolani, D.; Rossella, F.; Rocci, M.; Sorba, L.; Roddaro, S.; Khrapai, V. S.

    2016-01-01

    The control and measurement of local non-equilibrium configurations is of utmost importance in applications on energy harvesting, thermoelectrics and heat management in nano-electronics. This challenging task can be achieved with the help of various local probes, prominent examples including superconducting or quantum dot based tunnel junctions, classical and quantum resistors, and Raman thermography. Beyond time-averaged properties, valuable information can also be gained from spontaneous fluctuations of current (noise). From these perspective, however, a fundamental constraint is set by current conservation, which makes noise a characteristic of the whole conductor, rather than some part of it. Here we demonstrate how to remove this obstacle and pick up a local noise temperature of a current biased diffusive conductor with the help of a miniature noise probe. This approach is virtually noninvasive for the electronic energy distributions and extends primary local measurements towards strongly non-equilibrium regimes. PMID:27466216

  2. Local noise in a diffusive conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonov, E. S.; Shovkun, D. V.; Ercolani, D.; Rossella, F.; Rocci, M.; Sorba, L.; Roddaro, S.; Khrapai, V. S.

    2016-07-01

    The control and measurement of local non-equilibrium configurations is of utmost importance in applications on energy harvesting, thermoelectrics and heat management in nano-electronics. This challenging task can be achieved with the help of various local probes, prominent examples including superconducting or quantum dot based tunnel junctions, classical and quantum resistors, and Raman thermography. Beyond time-averaged properties, valuable information can also be gained from spontaneous fluctuations of current (noise). From these perspective, however, a fundamental constraint is set by current conservation, which makes noise a characteristic of the whole conductor, rather than some part of it. Here we demonstrate how to remove this obstacle and pick up a local noise temperature of a current biased diffusive conductor with the help of a miniature noise probe. This approach is virtually noninvasive for the electronic energy distributions and extends primary local measurements towards strongly non-equilibrium regimes.

  3. The development of a noise annoyance scale for rating residential noises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jong Kwan; Jeon, Jin Yong

    2005-09-01

    In this study, 5-point and 7-point verbal noise annoyance scales were developed. The 5-point annoyance scale for outside environmental noise was developed from a survey conducted in four Korean cities. An auditory experiment using residential noises such as airborne, bathroom drainage, and traffic noises was conducted to compare the effectiveness of the 5-point and 7-point scales for rating residential indoor noise. Result showed that the 7-point scale yielded more detailed responses to indoor residential noise. In addition, auditory experiments were conducted to develop a noise annoyance scale for the classification of common residential noises. The modifiers used in the scales were selected according to the method proposed by ICBEN (International Commission on the Biological 12Effect of Noise) Team 6. As a result, the difference between the intensity of 21 modifiers investigated in the survey and the auditory experiment was very small. It was also found that the intensity of the selected modifiers in the 7-point noise annoyance scale was highly correlated with noise levels, and that the intensity difference between each pair of successive levels in the 7-point annoyance scale was almost identical.

  4. An adaptive noise reduction stethoscope for auscultation in high noise environments.

    PubMed

    Patel, S B; Callahan, T F; Callahan, M G; Jones, J T; Graber, G P; Foster, K S; Glifort, K; Wodicka, G R

    1998-05-01

    Auscultation of lung sounds in patient transport vehicles such as an ambulance or aircraft is unachievable because of high ambient noise levels. Aircraft noise levels of 90-100 dB SPL are common, while lung sounds have been measured in the 22-30 dB SPL range in free space and 65-70 dB SPL within a stethoscope coupler. Also, the bandwidth of lung sounds and vehicle noise typically has significant overlap, limiting the utility of traditional band-pass filtering. In this study, a passively shielded stethoscope coupler that contains one microphone to measure the (noise-corrupted) lung sound and another to measure the ambient noise was constructed. Lung sound measurements were made on a healthy subject in a simulated USAF C-130 aircraft environment within an acoustic chamber at noise levels ranging from 80 to 100 dB SPL. Adaptive filtering schemes using a least-mean-squares (LMS) and a normalized least-mean-squares (NLMS) approach were employed to extract the lung sounds from the noise-corrupted signal. Approximately 15 dB of noise reduction over the 100-600 Hz frequency range was achieved with the LMS algorithm, with the more complex NLMS algorithm providing faster convergence and up to 5 dB of additional noise reduction. These findings indicate that a combination of active and passive noise reduction can be used to measure lung sounds in high noise environments. PMID:9604343

  5. Aeroacoustic investigation on the noise from ultralight aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlen, Helmut; Dobrzynski, Werner; Heller, Hanno

    1987-08-01

    Flyover and ground/static noise measurements as well as wind tunnel tests on individual propellers of ultralight aircraft led to the identification of the essential noise sources and to recommendations for noise reduction. For undisturbed inflow conditions (tractor propellers) and blade tip Mach numbers below 0.5 the resulting propeller noise is of broadband nature, while above that limit discrete-frequency rotational-noise sources dominate. Additional sources occur with pusher-propeller configurations as a consequence of the disturbed inflow. It is demonstrated that ground/static noise measurements are not suitable for certification testing.

  6. Classical noise, quantum noise and secure communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannous, C.; Langlois, J.

    2016-01-01

    Secure communication based on message encryption might be performed by combining the message with controlled noise (called pseudo-noise) as performed in spread-spectrum communication used presently in Wi-Fi and smartphone telecommunication systems. Quantum communication based on entanglement is another route for securing communications as demonstrated by several important experiments described in this work. The central role played by the photon in unifying the description of classical and quantum noise as major ingredients of secure communication systems is highlighted and described on the basis of the classical and quantum fluctuation dissipation theorems.

  7. Effects of TiO{sub 2} addition and electron irradiation on superconducting and mechanical properties of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} (Bi-2212) superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Hamid, Nasri A. Abdullah, Mohamad Hafizi Pandak; Abdullah, Yusof

    2014-02-12

    Titanium Oxide (TiO{sub 2}) compounds having very high melting point with lower heat capacity, is an excellent candidate for reinforcement of brittle materials such as superconductor ceramics. In addition to high melting point, the TiO{sub 2} is also capable of establishing flux pinning centers in bismuth-based superconductors such as the Bi-2212. To further enhance the flux pinning properties, irradiation is one of the techniques that can be used to re-create the required point defects. In this study, the effects of TiO{sub 2} addition and electron irradiation on Bi-2212 superconductor were studied. TiO{sub 2} added Bi-2212 superconductor samples with 5%, 10% and 15% weight percentage addition respectively, were prepared using the conventional solid-state reaction method. The samples were irradiated with electron beam with radiation dose of 100 KGray. Characterization was performed by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The transition temperature (T{sub c}) and the critical current density (J{sub c}) of the samples were also measured. The XRD patterns for all the samples show well-defined peaks all of which could be indexed on the basis of a Bi-2212 phase structure. In addition, the XRD patterns indicate that electron irradiation did not change the structure of Bi-2212 superconducting phase. Results of SEM micrographs show disorientation in the texture of the microstructure for samples that are subjected to electron irradiation. The grains are seen to align randomly with higher degree of orientation. With regard to TiO{sub 2} additions, only small TiO{sub 2} addition sustained the superconducting properties upon irradiation. Addition of more than 5% weight percentage of TiO{sub 2} degrades the superconducting properties of the irradiated samples. Formation of weak-links may result in higher grain boundaries orientation within the superconducting grains and thus deteriorates the inter-grains connectivity and resulted in lower T{sub c

  8. Hybrid Analysis of Engine Core Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Jeffrey; Kim, Jeonglae; Ihme, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    Core noise, or the noise generated within an aircraft engine, is becoming an increasing concern for the aviation industry as other noise sources are progressively reduced. The prediction of core noise generation and propagation is especially challenging for computationalists since it involves extensive multiphysics including chemical reaction and moving blades in addition to the aerothermochemical effects of heated jets. In this work, a representative engine flow path is constructed using experimentally verified geometries to simulate the physics of core noise. A combustor, single-stage turbine, nozzle and jet are modeled in separate calculations using appropriate high fidelity techniques including LES, actuator disk theory and Ffowcs-Williams Hawkings surfaces. A one way coupling procedure is developed for passing fluctuations downstream through the flowpath. This method effectively isolates the core noise from other acoustic sources, enables straightforward study of the interaction between core noise and jet exhaust, and allows for simple distinction between direct and indirect noise. The impact of core noise on the farfield jet acoustics is studied extensively and the relative efficiency of different disturbance types and shapes is examined in detail.

  9. Noise exposures in US coal mines

    SciTech Connect

    Seiler, J.P.; Valoski, M.P.; Crivaro, M.A.

    1994-05-01

    Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) inspectors conduct full-shift environmental noise surveys to determine the occupational noise levels to which coal miners are exposed. These noise surveys are performed to determine compliance with the noise standard promulgated under the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977. Data from over 60,000 full-shift noise surveys conducted from fiscal year 1986 through 1992 were entered into a computer data base to facilitate analysis. This paper presents the mean and standard deviation of over 60,000 full-shift noise dose measurements for various underground and surface coal mining occupations. Additionally, it compares and contrasts the levels with historical noise exposure measurements for selected coal mining occupations that were published in the 1970`s. The findings were that the percentage of miners surveyed that were subjected to noise exposures above 100%, neglecting personal hearing protectors, were 26.5% and 21.6% for surface and underground mining, respectively. Generally, the trend is that the noise exposures for selected occupations have decreased since the 1970`s.

  10. The negative affect hypothesis of noise sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Daniel; Heinonen-Guzejev, Marja; Heikkilä, Kauko; Dirks, Kim N; Hautus, Michael J; Welch, David; McBride, David

    2015-05-01

    Some studies indicate that noise sensitivity is explained by negative affect, a dispositional tendency to negatively evaluate situations and the self. Individuals high in such traits may report a greater sensitivity to other sensory stimuli, such as smell, bright light and pain. However, research investigating the relationship between noise sensitivity and sensitivity to stimuli associated with other sensory modalities has not always supported the notion of a common underlying trait, such as negative affect, driving them. Additionally, other explanations of noise sensitivity based on cognitive processes have existed in the clinical literature for over 50 years. Here, we report on secondary analyses of pre-existing laboratory (n = 74) and epidemiological (n = 1005) data focusing on the relationship between noise sensitivity to and annoyance with a variety of olfactory-related stimuli. In the first study a correlational design examined the relationships between noise sensitivity, noise annoyance, and perceptual ratings of 16 odors. The second study sought differences between mean noise and air pollution annoyance scores across noise sensitivity categories. Results from both analyses failed to support the notion that, by itself, negative affectivity explains sensitivity to noise. PMID:25993104

  11. The Negative Affect Hypothesis of Noise Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Daniel; Heinonen-Guzejev, Marja; Heikkilä, Kauko; Dirks, Kim N.; Hautus, Michael J.; Welch, David; McBride, David

    2015-01-01

    Some studies indicate that noise sensitivity is explained by negative affect, a dispositional tendency to negatively evaluate situations and the self. Individuals high in such traits may report a greater sensitivity to other sensory stimuli, such as smell, bright light and pain. However, research investigating the relationship between noise sensitivity and sensitivity to stimuli associated with other sensory modalities has not always supported the notion of a common underlying trait, such as negative affect, driving them. Additionally, other explanations of noise sensitivity based on cognitive processes have existed in the clinical literature for over 50 years. Here, we report on secondary analyses of pre-existing laboratory (n = 74) and epidemiological (n = 1005) data focusing on the relationship between noise sensitivity to and annoyance with a variety of olfactory-related stimuli. In the first study a correlational design examined the relationships between noise sensitivity, noise annoyance, and perceptual ratings of 16 odors. The second study sought differences between mean noise and air pollution annoyance scores across noise sensitivity categories. Results from both analyses failed to support the notion that, by itself, negative affectivity explains sensitivity to noise. PMID:25993104

  12. Tuning of the Electronic Properties of Armchair Graphene Nanoribbons through Functionalization: Theoretical Study of (1)Δg O2 Border Addition.

    PubMed

    Ghigo, Giovanni; Maranzana, Andrea; Tonachini, Glauco

    2015-10-01

    We report the results of a DFT study of the border oxidation by (1) Δg O2 of molecular models of armchair graphene nanoribbons (a-GNRs). The aim of this work is to propose a new method, as an alternative or complementary method to the tuning of the size, to modify the electronic properties of a-GNRs. Here, we investigate modification of the HOMO and LUMO energies, which are some of the most important parameters to be controlled in the design of organic electronic devices. We study the oxidation reaction mechanism of medium-size polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, mimicking the stiffness and reactivity of a-GNRs. Thermodynamics and kinetics indicate that the reaction should bring about a decoration of the borders with vicinal dialdehyde groups. We also study the effect of this oxidation on the HOMO and LUMO energies of two series of molecular models of a-GNRs with increasing lengths. The results suggest that the oxidized a-GNRs should present LUMO energies lowered by 0.3-0.5 eV with respect to the original material, whereas the HOMO energies are barely lowered. PMID:26401974

  13. Criteria for multiple noises in residential buildings using combined rating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Jin Yong; Ryu, Jong Kwan; Jeong, Young

    2005-04-01

    Multiple residential noises such as floor impact, air-borne, bathroom, drainage, and traffic noises were classified using a combined rating system developed from a social noise survey and auditory experiments. The effect of individual noise perception on the evaluation of the overall noise environment was investigated through a questionnaire survey on annoyance, disturbance, and noise sensitivity. In addition, auditory experiments were undertaken to determine the allowable sound pressure level for each residential noise source and the percent satisfaction for individual noise levels. From the results of the survey and the auditory experiments, a combined rating system was developed and annoyance criteria for multiple residential noises were suggested.

  14. Suppressing Rayleigh backscatter and code noise from all-fiber digital interferometers.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Silvie; Shaddock, Daniel A; McRae, Terry G; Lam, Timothy T-Y; Chow, Jong H; Gray, Malcolm B

    2016-01-01

    We configure an all-fiber digital interferometer to eliminate both code noise and Rayleigh backscatter noise from bidirectional measurements. We utilize a sawtooth phase ramp to upconvert code noise beyond our signal bandwidth, demonstrating an in-band noise reduction of approximately two orders of magnitude. In addition, we demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, the use of relative code delays within a digital-interferometer system to eliminate Rayleigh-backscatter noise, resulting in a noise reduction of a factor of 50. Finally, we identify double Rayleigh-backscatter noise as our limiting noise source and suggest two methods to minimize this noise source. PMID:26696164

  15. Current structural vibration problems associated with noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mixson, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    As the performance of aerospace vehicles has increased, the noise generated by the propulsion system and by the passage of the vehicle through the air has also increased. Further increases in performance are now underway for space vehicles such as the space shuttle vehicle and for short distance takeoff and landing (STOL) aircraft, and are being planned for supersonic aircraft. The flight profiles and design features of these high-performance vehicles are reviewed and an estimate made of selected noise-induced structural vibration problems. Considerations for the prevention of acoustic fatigue, noise transmission, and electronic instrument malfunction are discussed.

  16. Combustion and core noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahan, J. Robert; Karchmer, Allen

    1991-08-01

    Two types of aircraft power plant are considered: the gas turbine and the reciprocating engine. The engine types considered are: the reciprocating engine, the turbojet engine, the turboprop engine, and the turbofan engine. Combustion noise in gas turbine engines is discussed, and reciprocating-engine combustion noise is also briefly described. The following subject areas are covered: configuration variables, operational variables, characteristics of combustion and core noise, sources of combustion noise, combustion noise theory and comparison with experiment, available prediction methods, diagnostic techniques, measurement techniques, data interpretation, and example applications.

  17. Infrared sky noise study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The hardware and techniques to measure and compare sky noise at several sites were studied, and a device was developed that would maximize its output and minimize its output for modulation. The instrument and its functions are described. The nature of sky emissions and the fluctuation, gaseous sources of sky noise, and aerosol sources are discussed. It is concluded that sky noise really exists, and the spatial distribution of the sky noise sources are such that observed noise values are linear functions of chopping stroke.

  18. Interpreting Transistor Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospieszalski, M. W.

    2010-10-01

    The simple noise models of field effect and bipolar transistors reviewed in this article are quite useful in engineering practice, as illustrated by measured and modeled results. The exact and approximate expressions for the noise parameters of FETs and bipolar transistors reveal certain common noise properties and some general noise properties of both devices. The usefulness of these expressions in interpreting the dependence of measured noise parameters on frequency, bias, and temperature and, consequently, in checking of consistency of measured data has been demonstrated.

  19. Characterization of noise contaminations in lung sound recordings.

    PubMed

    Emmanouilidou, Dimitra; Elhilal, Mounya

    2013-01-01

    Lung sound auscultation in non-ideal or busy clinical settings is challenged by contaminations of environmental noise. Digital pulmonary measurements are inevitably degraded, impeding the physician's work or any further processing of the acquired signals. The task is even harder when the patient population includes young children. Agitation and/or crying are captured into the recordings, additionally to any existing ambient noise. This study focuses on characterizing the different types of signal contaminations, expected to be encountered during lung sound measurements in non-ideal environments. Different noise types were considered, including background talk, radio playing, subject's crying, electronic interference sounds and stethoscope displacement artifacts. The individual characteristics were extracted, discussed and further compared to characteristics of clean segments. Additional exploration of discriminatory features led to a spectro-temporal signal representation followed by a standard SVM classifier. Although pulmonary and ambient sounds were both dominant in most sound clips, such a complex representation was deemed to be adequate, capturing most of the signal's distinguishing characteristics. PMID:24110247

  20. Spin noise spectroscopy from acoustic to GHz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, Jens

    2010-03-01

    Performing perturbation free measurements on semiconductor quantum systems has long been banished to textbooks on quantum mechanics. The emergent technique of spin noise spectroscopy is challenging this restriction. Empowered only by the ever present intrinsic spin fluctuation dynamics in thermal equilibrium, spin noise spectroscopy is capable to directly deduce several physical properties of carriers spins in semiconductors from these fluctuations. Originating from spin noise measurements on alkali metal vapors in quantum optics [1] the method has become a powerful technique to unravel the intrinsic spin dynamics in semiconductors [2]. In this talk I will present the recent progress of spin noise spectroscopy and how it is used to monitor the spin dynamic in semiconductor quantum wells at thermal equilibrium and as a consequence thereof directly detect the spatial dynamics of the carriers being marked with their own spin on a microscopic scale [3]. Further I will present measurements of how the non-perturbative nature of spin noise spectroscopy gives valuable insight into the delicate dependence of the spin relaxation time of electrons on doping density and temperature in semiconductors n-doped in the vicinity of the metal-insulator transition where hyperfine and intra-band depolarization compete [4]. Also the measurement bandwidth can be extended to GHz frequencies by ultrafast optical probing [5] yielding in conjunction with depth resolved spin noise measurements insights into the origin of inhomogeneous spin dephasing effects at high magnetic fields [5]. Additionally I will present how spin noise spectroscopy can be employed to spatially depth resolve doping profiles with optical resolution [6] and give a summary on easy to implement techniques of spin noise spectroscopy at acoustic frequencies in alkali metal vapors. [4pt] [1] E. Aleksandrov and V. Zapassky, Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 81, 132 (1981); S. A. Crooker, D. G. Rickel, A. V. Balatsky, and D. L. Smith

  1. Acoustical measurement separates core noise and jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.

    1980-01-01

    Measuring technique discriminates between jet noise and core noise of jet engine. Results of experimentation confirmed that core noise and jet noise can be separated by examining cross-correlation of far-field microphone signals and that crossover point between core noise and jet noise moves toward higher velocities at higher angles with respect to jet axis.

  2. Core Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core noise area. Recent work1 on the turbine-transmission loss of combustor noise is briefly described, two2,3 new NRA efforts in the core-noise area are outlined, and an effort to develop CMC-based acoustic liners for broadband noise reduction suitable for turbofan-core application is delineated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project's Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries.

  3. Low frequency cultural noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, Dong-Hoon; Shin, Jin Soo; Kang, Tae-Seob; Baag, Chang-Eob

    2009-09-01

    Abnormal cultural seismic noise is observed in the frequency range of 0.01-0.05 Hz. Cultural noise generated by human activities is generally observed in frequencies above 1 Hz, and is greater in the daytime than at night. The low-frequency noise presented in this paper exhibits a characteristic amplitude variation and can be easily identified from time domain seismograms in the frequency range of interest. The amplitude variation is predominantly in the vertical component, but the horizontal components also show variations. Low-frequency noise is markedly periodic, which reinforces its interpretation as cultural noise. Such noise is observed world-wide, but is limited to areas in the vicinity of railways. The amplitude variation in seismograms correlates strongly with railway timetables, and the waveform shows a wavelength shift associated with the Doppler effect, which indicates that the origin of seismic background noise in the frequency range 0.01-0.05 Hz is railways.

  4. Continuous miner noise

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.; Kovac, J.; Bartholomae, R.

    1981-08-01

    Noise generated by continuous miners in underground coal production is an important health hazard. Bureau of Mines contract J0387229 charters investigation and control of this noise through laboratory tests of simulated cutting operations and through in-mine noise measurements. The results of these investigations indicate that coal cutting noise and conveyor noise are dominant sources of miner operational noise. Typical noise levels for both cutting and conveying operations are approximately 97 dBA. For full operation of all machine systems, the overall sound pressure level is approximately 101 dBA. In-mine and laboratory test results show agreement in both A-weighted overall levels as well as A-weighted one-third octave band spectra. 4 refs.

  5. Shot-Noise in a Quantum Dot as a Spin-current Diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, F. M.; Penteado, P. H.; Merchant, C. A.; Markovic, N.; Egues, J. C.

    2010-03-01

    Shot-noise is an unavoidable non-equilibrium current fluctuation that arises from the granularity of the electron charge. In the present work, we investigate shot-noise for the recently proposed spin diode system (1,2). This consists of a quantum dot coupled to two metallic leads, one nonmagnetic (NM) and another ferromagnetic (FM). In the Coulomb blockade regime this system displays a spin-diode effect (1,2), which has recently been probed in a carbon nanotube based quantum dot (2). Our calculation shows that the shot-noise provides a robust signature for this spin-polarization rectification effect. In the bias range for which the current polarization is zero the shot-noise is super-Poissonian. In contrast, for voltages such that the current is spin polarized, the shot-noise becomes sub-Poissonian. Hence shot noise can provide an interesting additional tool to probe spin-polarized transport in these systems. We shall also discuss recent experimental progress in this direction (3). (1) F. M. Souza, J. C. Egues, and A. P. Jauho, Phys. Rev. B 75, 165303 (2007). (2) C. A. Merchant and N. Markovic, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 156601 (2008). (3) C. A. Merchant and N. Markovic, J. Appl. Phys. 105, 07C711 (2009).

  6. Applications of digital processing for noise removal from plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, R.J.; Candy, J.V.; Casper, T.A.

    1985-11-11

    The use of digital signal techniques for removal of noise components present in plasma diagnostic signals is discussed, particularly with reference to diamagnetic loop signals. These signals contain noise due to power supply ripple in addition to plasma characteristics. The application of noise canceling techniques, such as adaptive noise canceling and model-based estimation, will be discussed. The use of computer codes such as SIG is described. 19 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Signal and noise analysis of a-Si:H radiation detector-amplifier system

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Gyuseong

    1992-03-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) has potential advantages in making radiation detectors for many applications because of its deposition capability on a large-area substrate and its high radiation resistance. Position-sensitive radiation detectors can be made out of a 1d strip or a 2-d pixel array of a Si:H pin diodes. In addition, signal processing electronics can be made by thin-film transistors on the same substrate. The calculated radiation signal, based on a simple charge collection model agreed well with results from various wave length light sources and 1 MeV beta particles on sample diodes. The total noise of the detection system was analyzed into (a) shot noise and (b) 1/f noise from a detector diode, and (c) thermal noise and (d) 1/f noise from the frontend TFT of a charge-sensitive preamplifier. the effective noise charge calculated by convoluting these noise power spectra with the transfer function of a CR-RC shaping amplifier showed a good agreement with the direct measurements of noise charge. The derived equations of signal and noise charge can be used to design an a-Si:H pixel detector amplifier system optimally. Signals from a pixel can be readout using switching TFTs, or diodes. Prototype tests of a double-diode readout scheme showed that the storage time and the readout time are limited by the resistances of the reverse-biased pixel diode and the forward biased switching diodes respectively. A prototype charge-sensitive amplifier was made using poly-Si TFTs to test the feasibility of making pixel-level amplifiers which would be required in small-signal detection. The measured overall gain-bandwidth product was {approximately}400 MHz and the noise charge {approximately}1000 electrons at a 1 {mu}sec shaping time. When the amplifier is connected to a pixel detector of capacitance 0.2 pF, it would give a charge-to-voltage gain of {approximately}0.02 mV/electron with a pulse rise time less than 100 nsec and a dynamic range of 48 dB.

  8. Effects of noise suppression on intelligibility: dependency on signal-to-noise ratios.

    PubMed

    Hilkhuysen, Gaston; Gaubitch, Nikolay; Brookes, Mike; Huckvale, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The effects on speech intelligibility of three different noise reduction algorithms (spectral subtraction, minimal mean squared error spectral estimation, and subspace analysis) were evaluated in two types of noise (car and babble) over a 12 dB range of signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Results from these listening experiments showed that most algorithms deteriorated intelligibility scores. Modeling of the results with a logit-shaped psychometric function showed that the degradation in intelligibility scores was largely congruent with a constant shift in SNR, although some additional degradation was observed at two SNRs, suggesting a limited interaction between the effects of noise suppression and SNR. PMID:22280614

  9. Statistical assessment of night vision goggle noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wales, Jesse G.; Marasco, Peter L.

    2006-05-01

    New advancements in charged-coupled device (CCD) technology allow for further investigation into the spatial nature of night vision goggle (NVG) noise distributions. This is significant because it is common practice in new NVG technology to combine image intensifiers with CCDs for night vision imaging. In this study, images of NVG noise are recorded by a CCD camera while varying input radiance and using multiple goggle types. Noise distributions characterized using histograms of these images are analyzed and fitted with curves. Using the changes in the distribution and relating distribution changes (coefficient changes) to input radiance and goggle performance provides a very accurate noise characterization. This study finds that a Weibull distribution seems more appropriate than a Poisson distribution, producing higher correlation coefficient fits. In addition, the paper suggests possible ways the noise models developed here can impact advancements in NVG image enhancement using this new technology.

  10. Brownian thermal noise in multilayer coated mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Ting; Yang, Huan; Gustafson, Eric K.; Adhikari, Rana X.; Chen, Yanbei

    2013-04-01

    We analyze the Brownian thermal noise of a multilayer dielectric coating used in high-precision optical measurements, including interferometric gravitational-wave detectors. We assume the coating material to be isotropic, and therefore study thermal noises arising from shear and bulk losses of the coating materials. We show that coating noise arises not only from layer thickness fluctuations, but also from fluctuations of the interface between the coating and substrate, driven by fluctuating shear stresses of the coating. Although thickness fluctuations of different layers are statistically independent, there exists a finite coherence between the layers and the substrate-coating interface. In addition, photoelastic coefficients of the thin layers (so far not accurately measured) further influence the thermal noise, although at a relatively low level. Taking into account uncertainties in material parameters, we show that significant uncertainties still exist in estimating coating Brownian noise.

  11. Collective electronic excitations in the ultra violet regime in 2-D and 1-D carbon nanostructures achieved by the addition of foreign atoms

    PubMed Central

    Bangert, U.; Pierce, W.; Boothroyd, C.; Pan, C.-T.; Gwilliam, R.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmons in the visible/UV energy regime have attracted great attention, especially in nano-materials, with regards to applications in opto-electronics and light harvesting; tailored enhancement of such plasmons is of particular interest for prospects in nano-plasmonics. This work demonstrates that it is possible, by adequate doping, to create excitations in the visible/UV regime in nano-carbon materials, i.e., carbon nanotubes and graphene, with choice of suitable ad-atoms and dopants, which are introduced directly into the lattice by low energy ion implantation or added via deposition by evaporation. Investigations as to whether these excitations are of collective nature, i.e., have plasmonic character, are carried out via DFT calculations and experiment-based extraction of the dielectric function. They give evidence of collective excitation behaviour for a number of the introduced impurity species, including K, Ag, B, N, and Pd. It is furthermore demonstrated that such excitations can be concentrated at nano-features, e.g., along nano-holes in graphene through metal atoms adhering to the edges of these holes. PMID:27271352

  12. Collective electronic excitations in the ultra violet regime in 2-D and 1-D carbon nanostructures achieved by the addition of foreign atoms.

    PubMed

    Bangert, U; Pierce, W; Boothroyd, C; Pan, C-T; Gwilliam, R

    2016-01-01

    Plasmons in the visible/UV energy regime have attracted great attention, especially in nano-materials, with regards to applications in opto-electronics and light harvesting; tailored enhancement of such plasmons is of particular interest for prospects in nano-plasmonics. This work demonstrates that it is possible, by adequate doping, to create excitations in the visible/UV regime in nano-carbon materials, i.e., carbon nanotubes and graphene, with choice of suitable ad-atoms and dopants, which are introduced directly into the lattice by low energy ion implantation or added via deposition by evaporation. Investigations as to whether these excitations are of collective nature, i.e., have plasmonic character, are carried out via DFT calculations and experiment-based extraction of the dielectric function. They give evidence of collective excitation behaviour for a number of the introduced impurity species, including K, Ag, B, N, and Pd. It is furthermore demonstrated that such excitations can be concentrated at nano-features, e.g., along nano-holes in graphene through metal atoms adhering to the edges of these holes. PMID:27271352

  13. Collective electronic excitations in the ultra violet regime in 2-D and 1-D carbon nanostructures achieved by the addition of foreign atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangert, U.; Pierce, W.; Boothroyd, C.; Pan, C.-T.; Gwilliam, R.

    2016-06-01

    Plasmons in the visible/UV energy regime have attracted great attention, especially in nano-materials, with regards to applications in opto-electronics and light harvesting; tailored enhancement of such plasmons is of particular interest for prospects in nano-plasmonics. This work demonstrates that it is possible, by adequate doping, to create excitations in the visible/UV regime in nano-carbon materials, i.e., carbon nanotubes and graphene, with choice of suitable ad-atoms and dopants, which are introduced directly into the lattice by low energy ion implantation or added via deposition by evaporation. Investigations as to whether these excitations are of collective nature, i.e., have plasmonic character, are carried out via DFT calculations and experiment-based extraction of the dielectric function. They give evidence of collective excitation behaviour for a number of the introduced impurity species, including K, Ag, B, N, and Pd. It is furthermore demonstrated that such excitations can be concentrated at nano-features, e.g., along nano-holes in graphene through metal atoms adhering to the edges of these holes.

  14. Noise Mapping and Annoyance.

    PubMed

    Knauss, D.

    2002-01-01

    The EC has published a Green Paper on noise policy in the EU and has issued a directive on the assessment and reduction of environmental noise. This directive will make noise mapping mandatory for cities with at least 250.000 inhabitants. Due to the development in computer technology it is possible to calculate noise maps for large urban areas using the available data on buildings, ground profile, road and rail traffic. Examples for noise mapping are Birmingham (GB), Linz (A) and various German cities. Based on noise maps and empirical data on the correlation between annoyance and noise levels annoyance maps for different sources (rail, road, aircraft) can be calculated. Under the assumption that the annoyance for the different sources are only weakly correlated, a combined annoyance map can be calculated. In a second step using the distribution of the population the actual number of annoyed people can be evaluated. This analysis can be used, for example, to identify noise hot spots and to assess the impact of major traffic projects - roads, airports- on the noise situation as well as the impact on the population. Furthermore, the combined annoyance maps can be used to investigate on health effects and to check whether or not empirical correlations between annoyance and noise levels are sufficiently correct. PMID:12678944

  15. Urban Noise Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäcker-Cüppers, Michael

    Noise belongs to the severest environmental impairments in towns, with road traffic being the most annoying noise source. The reduction of these impairments and the precaution against new noise impacts is an important task of the communities. However, many of the potential abatement measures are not in the responsibility of the communities. In most European countries, noise emission regulations for road and rail vehicles and outdoor machinery are nowadays enforced by the European Union. Noise reception limits are generally enforced by national laws. Therefore, efficient noise abatement in towns has to be coordinated with the regional, national and supranational, i.e. European noise policy. The most important fields of action for the urban noise abatement are the roads, railways and airports with heavy traffic. For the avoidance of health risks due to noise here short-term reductions are needed, which can generally be achieved only by a combination of measures for which different stakeholders are responsible. This underlines the importance of integrated and coordinated noise abatement concepts.

  16. Airframe noise prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-11-01

    This Data Item 90023, an addition to the Noise Sub-series, provides the FORTRAN listing of a computer program for a semi-empirical method that calculates the far-field airframe aerodynamic noise generated by turbo-fan powered transport aircraft or gliders in one-third octave bands over a frequency range specified by the user. The overall sound pressure level is also output. The results apply for a still, lossless atmosphere; other ESDU methods may be used to correct for atmospheric attenuation, ground reflection, lateral attenuation, and wind and temperature gradients. The position of the aircraft relative to the observer is input in terms of the height at minimum range, and the elevation and azimuthal angles to the aircraft; if desired the user may obtain results over a range of those angles in 10 degree intervals. The method sums the contributions made by various components, results for which can also be output individually. The components are: the wind (conventional or delta), tailplane, fin, flaps (single/double slotted or triple slotted), leading-edge slats, and undercarriage legs and wheels (one/two wheel or four wheel units). The program requires only geometric data for each component (area and span in the case of lifting elements, flap deflection angle, and leg length and wheel diameter for the undercarriage). The program was validated for aircraft with take-off masses from 42,000 to 390,000 kg (92,000 to 860,000 lb) at airspeeds from 70 to 145 m/s (135 to 280 kn). Comparisons with available experimental data suggest a prediction rms accuracy of 1 dB at minimum range, rising to between 2 and 3 dB at 60 degrees to either side.

  17. Low-noise pulse conditioner

    DOEpatents

    Bird, D.A.

    1981-06-16

    A low-noise pulse conditioner is provided for driving electronic digital processing circuitry directly from differentially induced input pulses. The circuit uses a unique differential-to-peak detector circuit to generate a dynamic reference signal proportional to the input peak voltage. The input pulses are compared with the reference signal in an input network which operates in full differential mode with only a passive input filter. This reduces the introduction of circuit-induced noise, or jitter, generated in ground referenced input elements normally used in pulse conditioning circuits, especially speed transducer processing circuits. This circuit may be used for conditioning the sensor signal from the Fidler coil in a gas centrifuge for separation of isotopic gaseous mixtures.

  18. Strong quantum memory at resonant Fermi edges revealed by shot noise.

    PubMed

    Ubbelohde, N; Roszak, K; Hohls, F; Maire, N; Haug, R J; Novotný, T

    2012-01-01

    Studies of non-equilibrium current fluctuations enable assessing correlations involved in quantum transport through nanoscale conductors. They provide additional information to the mean current on charge statistics and the presence of coherence, dissipation, disorder, or entanglement. Shot noise, being a temporal integral of the current autocorrelation function, reveals dynamical information. In particular, it detects presence of non-Markovian dynamics, i.e., memory, within open systems, which has been subject of many current theoretical studies. We report on low-temperature shot noise measurements of electronic transport through InAs quantum dots in the Fermi-edge singularity regime and show that it exhibits strong memory effects caused by quantum correlations between the dot and fermionic reservoirs. Our work, apart from addressing noise in archetypical strongly correlated system of prime interest, discloses generic quantum dynamical mechanism occurring at interacting resonant Fermi edges. PMID:22530093

  19. Noise and critical behavior of the pupil light reflex at oscillation onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longtin, André; Milton, John G.; Bos, Jelte E.; Mackey, Michael C.

    1990-06-01

    We have induced oscillations in the human pupil light reflex using two different kinds of external electronic feedback: smooth negative feedback (SNF) and piecewise constant negative feedback (PCNF). The behavior of the mean amplitude and period at oscillation onset are shown to be in good agreement with a model of this neural system incorporating the external feedback. The critical behavior displayed through amplitude and period fluctuations is different in each case. The observation that amplitude fluctuations are larger (smaller) than period fluctuations for SNF (PCNF) is explained theoretically and by numerical integration of a stochastic delay-differential equation with additive and multiplicative colored noise. We find that both types of noise postpone the Hopf bifurcation in SNF by an amount proportional to the noise intensity and inversely proportional to the correlation time. The implications for analyzing bifurcations in neural systems are discussed.

  20. Experimental Study of Wake / Flap Interaction Noise and the Reduction of Flap Side Edge Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Stead, Daniel J.; Plassman, Gerald E.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of the interaction of a wake with a half-span flap on radiated noise are examined. The incident wake is generated by bars of various widths and lengths or by a simplified landing gear model. Single microphone and phased array measurements are used to isolate the effects of the wake interaction on the noise radiating from the flap side edge and flap cove regions. The effects on noise of the wake generator's geometry and relative placement with respect to the flap are assessed. Placement of the wake generators upstream of the flap side edge is shown to lead to the reduction of flap side edge noise by introducing a velocity deficit and likely altering the instabilities in the flap side edge vortex system. Significant reduction in flap side edge noise is achieved with a bar positioned directly upstream of the flap side edge. The noise reduction benefit is seen to improve with increased bar width, length and proximity to the flap edge. Positioning of the landing gear model upstream of the flap side edge also leads to decreased flap side edge noise. In addition, flap cove noise levels are significantly lower than when the landing gear is positioned upstream of the flap mid-span. The impact of the local flow velocity on the noise radiating directly from the landing gear is discussed. The effects of the landing gear side-braces on flap side edge, flap cove and landing gear noise are shown.

  1. Phase noise in oscillators as differential-algebraic systems with colored noise sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Alper

    2004-05-01

    Oscillators are key components of many kinds of systems, particularly electronic and opto-electronic systems. Undesired perturbations, i.e. noise, in practical systems adversely affect the spectral and timing properties of the signals generated by oscillators resulting in phase noise and timing jitter, which are key performance limiting factors, being major contributors to bit-error-rate (BER) of RF and possibly optical communication systems, and creating synchronization problems in clocked and sampled-data electronic systems. In this paper, we review our work on the theory and numerical methods for nonlinear perturbation and noise analysis of oscillators described by a system of differential-algebraic equations (DAEs) with white and colored noise sources. The bulk of the work reviewed in this paper first appeared in [1], then in [2] and [3]. Prior to the work mentioned above, we developed a theory and numerical methods for nonlinear perturbation and noise analysis of oscillators described by a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with white noise sources only [4, 5]. In this paper, we also discuss some open problems and issues in the modeling and analysis of phase noise both in free running oscillators and in phase/injection-locked ones.

  2. Development of rotorcraft interior noise control concepts. Phase 3: Development of noise control concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoerkie, Charles A.; Gintoli, P. J.; Ingraham, S. T.; Moore, J. A.

    1986-07-01

    The goal of this research is the understanding of helicopter internal noise mechanisms and the development, design, and testing of noise control concepts which will produce significant reductions in the acoustic environment to which passengers are exposed. The Phase 3 effort involved the identification and evaluation of current and advanced treatment concepts, including isolation of structure-borne paths. In addition, a plan was devised for the full-scale evaluation of an isolation concept. Specific objectives were as follows: (1) identification and characterization of various noise control concepts; (2) implementation of noise control concepts within the S-76 SEA (statistical energy analysis) model; (3) definition and evaluation of a preliminary acoustic isolation design to reduce structure-borne transmission of acoustic frequency main gearbox gear clash vibrations into the airframe; (4) formulation of a plan for the full-scale validation of the isolation concept; and (5) prediction of the cabin noise environment with various noise control concepts installed.

  3. Development of rotorcraft interior noise control concepts. Phase 3: Development of noise control concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoerkie, Charles A.; Gintoli, P. J.; Ingraham, S. T.; Moore, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    The goal of this research is the understanding of helicopter internal noise mechanisms and the development, design, and testing of noise control concepts which will produce significant reductions in the acoustic environment to which passengers are exposed. The Phase 3 effort involved the identification and evaluation of current and advanced treatment concepts, including isolation of structure-borne paths. In addition, a plan was devised for the full-scale evaluation of an isolation concept. Specific objectives were as follows: (1) identification and characterization of various noise control concepts; (2) implementation of noise control concepts within the S-76 SEA (statistical energy analysis) model; (3) definition and evaluation of a preliminary acoustic isolation design to reduce structure-borne transmission of acoustic frequency main gearbox gear clash vibrations into the airframe; (4) formulation of a plan for the full-scale validation of the isolation concept; and (5) prediction of the cabin noise environment with various noise control concepts installed.

  4. Understanding Slat Noise Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Medhi R.

    2003-01-01

    Model-scale aeroacoustic tests of large civil transports point to the leading-edge slat as a dominant high-lift noise source in the low- to mid-frequencies during aircraft approach and landing. Using generic multi-element high-lift models, complementary experimental and numerical tests were carefully planned and executed at NASA in order to isolate slat noise sources and the underlying noise generation mechanisms. In this paper, a brief overview of the supporting computational effort undertaken at NASA Langley Research Center, is provided. Both tonal and broadband aspects of slat noise are discussed. Recent gains in predicting a slat s far-field acoustic noise, current shortcomings of numerical simulations, and other remaining open issues, are presented. Finally, an example of the ever-expanding role of computational simulations in noise reduction studies also is given.

  5. Noise and public health.

    PubMed

    Lipscomb, D M; Roettger, R W

    1976-01-01

    Environmental noise has increased to the point that it affects large numbers of people. The most consistently demonstrated health effect of exposure to noise is hearing impairment. Other effects, such as stress reaction, irritability, fatigue and disturbances to physiologic function have been seen in laboratory research but are highly individualized and restricted to such specific populations as industrial workers. Rising background sound levels in communities due to increased traffic flow, industralization, work saving machinery, and other noise sources have caused community noise levels to become dangerously high. This factor is complicated by exposure to high sound level recreational activities with greater frequency and for longer periods. Recognizing the existence of the problem, governmental agencies have begun to identify the scope of the problem, to designate standards and regulations controlling noise sources, and to regulate allowable noise exposure for workers. PMID:10297834

  6. Poultry Plant Noise Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A demonstration conducted last winter at the Tip Top Poultry Plant intended to show poultry plant managers from all over the U.S. potential solutions to the problem of plant noise. Plastic covers used over sound absorbing materials need to meet cleanability requirements, high- pressure water cleaning and other harsh maintenance procedures peculiar to the poultry processing industry. For the demonstration, Fiber Flex, Inc. manufactured and donated 750 noise panels; Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corporation donated the fiberglas cores; and the cover material was purchased from Howe and Bainbridge. The Engineering Experiment Station (EES) conducted before and after noise surveys and is evaluating the effect of noise reduction on turnover and productivity in the demonstration plant. EES plans to conduct a noise abatement workshop and update a handbook to help poultry processors with noise problems. EES study and demonstration may be applicable to other food processing plants where similar sanitary constraints exist.

  7. An aircraft noise study in Norway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gjestland, Truls T.; Liasjo, Kare H.; Bohn, Hans Einar

    1990-01-01

    An extensive study of aircraft noise is currently being conducted in Oslo, Norway. The traffic at Oslo Airport Fornebu that includes both national and international flights, totals approximately 350 movements per day: 250 of these are regular scheduled flights with intermediate and large size aircraft, the bulk being DC9 and Boeing 737. The total traffic during the summer of 1989 was expected to resemble the maximum level to which the regular traffic will increase before the new airport can be put into operation. The situation therefore represented a possibility to study the noise impact on the communities around Fornebu. A comprehensive social survey was designed, including questions on both aircraft and road traffic noise. A random sample of 1650 respondents in 15 study areas were contacted for an interview. These areas represent different noise levels and different locations relative to the flight paths. The interviews were conducted in a 2 week period just prior to the transfer of charter traffic from Gardemoen to Fornebu. In the same period the aircraft noise was monitored in all 15 areas. In addition the airport is equipped with a permanent flight track and noise monitoring system. The noise situation both in the study period and on an average basis can therefore be accurately described. In August a group of 1800 new respondents were subjected to identical interviews in the same 15 areas, and the noise measurement program was repeated. Results of the study are discussed.

  8. Active noise silencing

    SciTech Connect

    Jay, M.A.

    1995-02-01

    Many natural gas compressor stations which were previously located away from residential areas are now being encroached upon by surrounding building developments. An increased awareness of community noise issues has proved to be the impetus for investigating and developing more effective noise control methods and treatments for natural gas compressor facilities. This project investigates the feasibility of applying Active Noise Cancellation (ANC) to the exhaust of a large, internal combustion reciprocating type engine.

  9. Prediction of airframe noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, J. C.; Fratello, D. J.; Hayden, R. E.; Kadman, Y.; Africk, S.

    1975-01-01

    Methods of predicting airframe noise generated by aircraft in flight under nonpowered conditions are discussed. Approaches to predictions relying on flyover data and component theoretical analyses are developed. A nondimensional airframe noise spectrum of various aircraft is presented. The spectrum was obtained by smoothing all the measured spectra to remove any peculiarities due to airframe protrusions, normalizing each spectra by its overall sound pressure level and a characteristics frequency, and averaging the spectra together. A chart of airframe noise sources is included.

  10. Ab initio molecular orbital study of substituent effects in vaska type complexes (trans-IrL{sub 2}(CO)X): Electron affinities, ionization potentials, carbonyl stretch frequencies, and the thermodynamics of H{sub 2} dissociative addition

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Hasanayn, F.; Goldman, A.S.; Krogh-Jespersen, K.

    1994-10-26

    Ab initio electronic structure calculations are used to study substituent effects in Vaska-type complexes, trans-IrL{sub 2}(CO)X (1-X) (X = F, Cl, Br, I, CN, H, CH{sub 3}, SiH{sub 3}, OH, and SH; L = PH{sub 3}). Both the electron affinity and the ionization potential of 1-X are computed to increase upon descending the halogen series of complexes, which indicates, surprisingly, that the complexes with more electronegative halogens are more difficult to reduce and easier to oxidize. The computed electron affinity trend is consistent with the half-wave reduction potential trend known for 1-X (L = PPh{sub 3}; X = F, Cl, Br, and I). Computed carbonyl stretch frequencies for 1-X are greater than experimental values (L = PPh{sub 3}), but observed trends are well reproduced. The redox and spectroscopic trends are discussed in terms of the substituent effects on the electronic structure of 1-X, particularly as revealed in the molecular orbital energy level diagrams of these complexes. The reaction energy for H{sub 2} addition to 1-X, leading to the cis,trans-(H){sub 2}IrL{sub 2}(CO)X (2-X) product, has been computed. After electron correlation effects are included (MP4(SDTQ)), the reaction enthalpy computed for 1-CI is {minus}18.4 kcal/mol (L = PH{sub 3}) as compared to a reported experimental value of {minus}14 kcal/mol (L = PPh{sub 3}). Compared with available experimental data, the electronic effects of L(L = PH{sub 3}, NH{sub 3}, or AsH{sub 3}) and X on the thermodynamics of the H{sub 2} addition reaction are accurately reproduced by the model calculations at all levels of theory (HF and MPn). Formation of the hypothetical products cis,trans- and trans,trans-(H){sub 2}IrL{sub 2}(CO)X(2-X and 3-X) (X = BH{sub 2}, NH{sub 2}, and PH{sub 2}) is used to demonstrate that {pi}-acceptor substituents promote the H{sub 2} addition reaction to 1-X while {pi}-donor substituents disfavor addition.

  11. Landing gear noise attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moe, Jeffrey W. (Inventor); Whitmire, Julia (Inventor); Kwan, Hwa-Wan (Inventor); Abeysinghe, Amal (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A landing gear noise attenuator mitigates noise generated by airframe deployable landing gear. The noise attenuator can have a first position when the landing gear is in its deployed or down position, and a second position when the landing gear is in its up or stowed position. The noise attenuator may be an inflatable fairing that does not compromise limited space constraints associated with landing gear retraction and stowage. A truck fairing mounted under a truck beam can have a compliant edge to allow for non-destructive impingement of a deflected fire during certain conditions.

  12. Perspectives on jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribner, H. S.

    1981-01-01

    Jet noise is a byproduct of turbulence. Until recently turbulence was assumed to be known statistically, and jet noise was computed therefrom. As a result of new findings though on the behavior of vortices and instability waves, a more integrated view of the problem has been accepted lately. After presenting a simple view of jet noise, the paper attempts to resolve the apparent differences between Lighthill's and Lilley's interpretations of mean-flow shear, and examines a number of ad hoc approaches to jet noise suppression.

  13. A LOW NOISE RF SOURCE FOR RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    HAYES,T.

    2004-07-05

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) requires a low noise rf source to ensure that beam lifetime during a store is not limited by the rf system. The beam is particularly sensitive to noise from power line harmonics. Additionally, the rf source must be flexible enough to handle the frequency jump required for rebucketing (transferring bunches from the acceleration to the storage rf systems). This paper will describe the design of a Direct Digital Synthesizer (DDS) based system that provides both the noise performance and the flexibility required.

  14. Predicting Rocket or Jet Noise in Real Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Kader

    2007-01-01

    A semi-empirical theoretical model and a C++ computer program that implements the model have been developed for use in predicting the noise generated by a rocket or jet engine. The computer program, entitled the Realtime Rocket and Jet Engine Noise Analysis and Prediction Software, is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for real-time prediction and measurement of noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. [The other main subsystem, consisting largely of acoustic instrumentation and electronic hardware, is described in Wireless Acoustic Measurement System, which appears elsewhere in this section.] The theoretical model was derived from the fundamental laws of fluid mechanics, as first was done by M. J. Lighthill in his now famous theory of aerodynamically generated sound. The far-field approximation of the Lighthill theory is incorporated into this model. Many other contributions from various researchers have also been introduced into the model. The model accounts for two noise components: shear noise and self noise. The final result of the model is expressed in terms of a volume integral of the acoustic intensities attributable to these two components, subject to various directivity coefficients. The computer program was written to solve the volume integral. The inputs required by the program are two data files from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of the flow of interest: the computational-grid file and the solution file. The CFD solution should be one that has been obtained for conditions that closely approximate those of an experimental test that is yet to be performed. In the current state of development of the model and software, it is recommended that the observation points lie along a radius at an angle >60 from the jet axis. The software provides, and is driven via, a graphical user interface

  15. An analytical formulation for phase noise in MEMS oscillators.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Deepak; Seshia, Ashwin

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, there has been much interest in the design of low-noise MEMS oscillators. This paper presents a new analytical formulation for noise in a MEMS oscillator encompassing essential resonator and amplifier nonlinearities. The analytical expression for oscillator noise is derived by solving a second-order nonlinear stochastic differential equation. This approach is applied to noise modeling of an electrostatically addressed MEMS resonator-based square-wave oscillator in which the resonator and oscillator circuit nonlinearities are integrated into a single modeling framework. By considering the resulting amplitude and phase relations, we derive additional noise terms resulting from resonator nonlinearities. The phase diffusion of an oscillator is studied and the phase diffusion coefficient is proposed as a metric for noise optimization. The proposed nonlinear phase noise model provides analytical insight into the underlying physics and a pathway toward the design optimization for low-noise MEMS oscillators. PMID:25474770

  16. Radiation properties and sound quality characteristics of refrigerator noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Jin Yong; Jeong, Jeong Ho; You, Jin

    2005-09-01

    The characteristics of refrigerator noise in an anechoic chamber and in an actual environment were investigated. In order to predict the noise propagation in real apartment house, room acoustic simulations and measurements using different types of refrigerators were conducted. The sound-pressure level of the refrigerator noise in the real living room was much higher than in the anechoic chamber. In addition, an allowable sound-pressure level for refrigerator noise was determined by auditory experiments. For the stimuli of auditory experiments, the dry source of refrigerator noise was presented using a loud speaker at the position of the refrigerator. When the result of the subjective evaluation was at the level 2 (the noise rarely aware but comfortable), in which sound pressure level was about 25 dB(A), 95% of people were satisfied with the refrigerator noise. A semantic differential test using various adjectives was also conducted to evaluate the sound quality of refrigerator noise.

  17. Adaptive cancellation of floor vibrations in standing ballistocardiogram measurements using a seismic sensor as a noise reference.

    PubMed

    Inan, Omer T; Etemadi, Mozziyar; Widrow, Bernard; Kovacs, Gregory T A

    2010-03-01

    An adaptive noise canceller was used to reduce the effect of floor vibrations on ballistocardiogram (BCG) measurements from a modified electronic bathroom scale. A seismic sensor was placed next to the scale on the floor and used as the noise reference input to the noise canceller. BCG recordings were acquired from a healthy subject while another person stomped around the scale, thus causing increased floor vibrations. The noise canceller substantially eliminated the artifacts in the BCG signal due to these vibrations without distorting the morphology of the measured BCG. Additionally, recordings were obtained from another subject standing inside a parked bus while the engine was running. The artifacts due to the vibrations of the engine, and the other vehicles moving on the road next to the bus, were also effectively eliminated by the noise canceller. The system with automatic floor vibration cancellation could be used to increase BCG measurement robustness in home monitoring applications. Additionally, the noise cancellation approach may enable BCG recording in ambulances-or other transport vehicles-where noninvasive hemodynamic monitoring may otherwise not be feasible. PMID:19362900

  18. 1/f Noise in a Coulomb Glass.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Clare C.; Shtengel, Kirill

    2002-03-01

    Low frequency 1/f noise is found in Coulomb glasses, among other systems with slow relaxation. It has been recently studied in detail in Si:B in the experimental work of Massey and Lee [1]. They concluded that their findings were inconsistent with the single-particle mechanisms proposed earlier. We show that the observed noise can be produced by charge fluctuations due to electrons hopping between isolated sites and a percolating network at low temperatures [2]. Coulomb interactions are included through the Coulomb gap in the density of states. The low frequency noise spectrum goes as ω^-α with α slightly larger than 1. This result, together with the temperature dependence of α and the noise amplitude are in good agreement with the experiments of Massey and Lee. [1] J. G. Massey and Mark Lee, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 3986 (1997). [2] Kirill Shtengel and Clare C. Yu (2001), cond-mat/0111302.

  19. External noise control in inherently stochastic biological systems.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Likun; Chen, Meng; Nie, Qing

    2012-11-01

    Biological systems are often subject to external noise from signal stimuli and environmental perturbations, as well as noises in the intracellular signal transduction pathway. Can different stochastic fluctuations interact to give rise to new emerging behaviors? How can a system reduce noise effects while still being capable of detecting changes in the input signal? Here, we study analytically and computationally the role of nonlinear feedback systems in controlling external noise with the presence of large internal noise. In addition to noise attenuation, we analyze derivatives of Fano factor to study systems' capability of differentiating signal inputs. We find effects of internal noise and external noise may be separated in one slow positive feedback loop system; in particular, the slow loop can decrease external noise and increase robustness of signaling with respect to fluctuations in rate constants, while maintaining the signal output specific to the input. For two feedback loops, we demonstrate that the influence of external noise mainly depends on how the fast loop responds to fluctuations in the input and the slow loop plays a limited role in determining the signal precision. Furthermore, in a dual loop system of one positive feedback and one negative feedback, a slower positive feedback always leads to better noise attenuation; in contrast, a slower negative feedback may not be more beneficial. Our results reveal interesting stochastic effects for systems containing both extrinsic and intrinsic noises, suggesting novel noise filtering strategies in inherently stochastic systems. PMID:23213267

  20. Assessment of Traffic Noise on Highway Passing from Urban Agglomeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijay, Ritesh; Kori, Chandan; Kumar, Manoj; Chakrabarti, T.; Gupta, Rajesh

    2014-09-01

    Assessment of traffic noise pollution in developing countries is complex due to heterogeneity in traffic conditions like traffic volume, road width, honking, etc. To analyze the impact of such variables, a research study was carried out on a national highway passing from an urban agglomeration. Traffic volume and noise levels (L10, Lmin, Lmax, Leq and L90) were measured during morning and evening peak hours. Contribution of noise by individual vehicle was estimated using passenger car noise unit. Extent of noise pollution and impact of noisy vehicles were estimated using noise pollution level and traffic noise index, respectively. Noise levels were observed to be above the prescribed Indian and International standards. As per audio spectrum analysis of traffic noise, honking contributed an additional 3-4 dB(A) noise. Based on data analysis, a positive relationship was observed between noise levels and honking while negative correlation was observed between noise levels and road width. The study suggests that proper monitoring and analysis of traffic data is required for better planning of noise abatement measures.

  1. Investigation of helium addition for laser-induced plasma spectroscopy of pure gas phase systems: Analyte interactions and signal enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, C. A.; Diwakar, P. K.; Hahn, D. W.

    2007-12-01

    The role of helium addition on the analyte signal enhancement in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for analysis of pure gaseous systems was examined using carbon and hydrogen atomic emission lines. Increased analyte response, as measured by peak-to-base and signal-to-noise ratios, was observed with increasing helium addition, with maximum enhancement approaching a factor of 7. Additional measurements revealed a significant decrease in plasma electron density with increasing helium addition. To explore the mechanisms of analyte signal enhancement, the helium emission lines were also examined and found to be effectively quenched with nitrogen addition. In consideration of the data, it is concluded that the role of metastable helium is not as important as the overall changes in plasma properties, namely electron density and laser-plasma coupling. Helium addition is concluded to affect the electron density via Penning ionization, as well as to play a role in the initial plasma breakdown processes.

  2. Proceedings of Noise-con 81: Applied noise control technology

    SciTech Connect

    Royster, L.H.; Hart, F.D.; Stewart, N.D.

    1981-01-01

    The conference was divided into sessions covering noise control regulations and benefits; noise source identification; barriers and enclosures; mufflers; hearing protection devices; textile and fibre industries; metal fabrication industry; transportation and aircraft noise control; punch-press noise control and miscellaneous topics; woodworking industry; tobacco and packaging industries; community noise; and applications of damping materials. One paper has been abstracted separately.

  3. Sounds and Noises. A Position Paper on Noise Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Thomas L.

    This position paper focuses on noise pollution and the problems and solutions associated with this form of pollution. The paper is divided into the following five sections: Noise and the Ear, Noise Measurement, III Effects of Noise, Acoustics and Action, and Programs and Activities. The first section identifies noise and sound, the beginnings of…

  4. Effects of band-limited noise on human observer performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Salem; Jacobs, Eddie; Moore, Richard; Hogervorst, Maarten; Bijl, Piet; Halford, Carl

    2007-04-01

    Perception tests establish the effects of spatially band-limited noise and blur on human observer performance. Previously, Bijl showed that the contrast threshold of a target image with spatially band-limited noise is a function of noise spatial frequency. He used the method of adjustment to find the contrast thresholds for each noise frequency band. A noise band exists in which the target contrast threshold reaches a peak relative to the threshold for higher- or lower-noise frequencies. Bijl also showed that the peak of this noise band shifts as high frequency information is removed from the target images. To further establish these results, we performed forced-choice experiments. First, a Night Vision and Electronics Sensors Directorate (NVESD) twelve (12)-target infrared tracked vehicle image set identification (ID) experiment, second, a bar-pattern resolving experiment, and third, a Triangle Orientation Discrimination (TOD) experiment. In all of the experiments, the test images were first spatially blurred, then spatially band-limited noise was added. The noise center spatial frequency was varied in half-octave increments over seven octaves. Observers were shown images of varying target-to-noise contrasts, and a contrast threshold was calculated for each spatial noise band. Finally, we compared the Targeting Task Performance (TTP) human observer model predictions for performance in the presence of spatially band-limited noise with these experimental results.

  5. Measurements of intrinsic shot noise in a 35 GHz gyroklystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calame, J. P.; Danly, B. G.; Garven, M.

    1999-07-01

    Experimental measurements of electron beam shot noise in a 35 GHz, 225 kW, three-cavity gyroklystron have been obtained from both the input and output cavities. This intrinsic noise was studied in the absence of an applied carrier (i.e., at zero drive power). The spectrum of the noise emitted by the input cavity is found to have a Lorentzian shape, with peak noise power densities from the input cavity typically reaching 6.3×10-15 W/Hz (-112 dBm/Hz), and typical 3 dB bandwidths of 160 MHz. The output cavity noise spectrum is found to be equal to the input cavity noise spectrum multiplied by the measured linear frequency response of the gyroklystron. The measured noise levels at the input cavity are 0-5 dB lower than theoretical predictions for shot noise unaltered by collective effects. Furthermore, the input cavity noise power exhibits complex variations as a function of beam current, beam velocity ratio, and circuit magnetic field that are not predicted by present theory. Noise-to-carrier ratios expected in the input cavity during full power amplifier operation are inferred from the noise measurements and known values of drive power required to saturate the gyroklystron. The noise-to-carrier ratio, with typical values of -90 to -80 dBc, is found to be a strong function of the operating parameters.

  6. Shot noise in ballistic graphene.

    PubMed

    Danneau, R; Wu, F; Craciun, M F; Russo, S; Tomi, M Y; Salmilehto, J; Morpurgo, A F; Hakonen, P J

    2008-05-16

    We have investigated shot noise in graphene field effect devices in the temperature range of 4.2-30 K at low frequency (f=600-850 MHz). We find that for our graphene samples with a large width over length ratio W/L, the Fano factor F reaches a maximum F ~ 1/3 at the Dirac point and that it decreases strongly with increasing charge density. For smaller W/L, the Fano factor at Dirac point is significantly lower. Our results are in good agreement with the theory describing that transport at the Dirac point in clean graphene arises from evanescent electronic states. PMID:18518472

  7. Near-field noise prediction for aircraft in cruising flight: Methods manual. [laminar flow control noise effects analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbetts, J. G.

    1979-01-01

    Methods for predicting noise at any point on an aircraft while the aircraft is in a cruise flight regime are presented. Developed for use in laminar flow control (LFC) noise effects analyses, they can be used in any case where aircraft generated noise needs to be evaluated at a location on an aircraft while under high altitude, high speed conditions. For each noise source applicable to the LFC problem, a noise computational procedure is given in algorithm format, suitable for computerization. Three categories of noise sources are covered: (1) propulsion system, (2) airframe, and (3) LFC suction system. In addition, procedures are given for noise modifications due to source soundproofing and the shielding effects of the aircraft structure wherever needed. Sample cases, for each of the individual noise source procedures, are provided to familiarize the user with typical input and computed data.

  8. Shot noise measurement in a strongly correlated material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Panpan; Hardy, Will; Cho, Ethan; Cybart, Shane; Dynes, Robert; Natelson, Douglas

    In strongly correlated materials, the motion of an electron is strongly affected by interactions with other electrons, leading to many interesting phenomena including metal-insulator transitions, colossal magnetoresistance, and high temperature superconductivity. Shot noise is one experimental probe for electronic correlations beyond simple electronic transport. Shot noise, which originates from the discrete nature of the charge-carrying particles, can be strongly affected by electronic correlations. Here we report initial shot noise measurements in tunnel junctions prepared from a YBa2Cu3O7-x film sample, with nanoscale junctions written by focused helium ion beam. We will discuss a comparison of the shot noise between the YBCO film sample and standard tunnel junctions, as a function of temperature and bias, and the implications of these results.

  9. Jet Noise Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  10. Speech communications in noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The physical characteristics of speech, the methods of speech masking measurement, and the effects of noise on speech communication are investigated. Topics include the speech signal and intelligibility, the effects of noise on intelligibility, the articulation index, and various devices for evaluating speech systems.

  11. Noise: The Ignored Contaminant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Maurice H.

    1977-01-01

    Noise is the single most omnipresent noxious contaminant in the American environment, yet little attention has been paid to its dangers and relatively small amounts of money spent to control it. Compares the effects and management of hearing impairment due to noise with those resulting from other causes. (Editor)

  12. Predicted airframe noise levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raney, J. P.

    1980-09-01

    Calculated values of airframe noise levels corresponding to FAA noise certification conditions for six aircraft are presented. The aircraft are: DC-9-30; Boeing 727-200; A300-B2 Airbus; Lockheed L-1011; DC-10-10; and Boeing 747-200B. The prediction methodology employed is described and discussed.

  13. Noise Pollution, Teachers' Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Patrick A.; Lavaroni, Charles W.

    One of three in a series about pollution, this teacher's guide for a unit on noise pollution is designed for use in junior high school grades. It offers suggestions for extending the information and activities contained in the textual material for students. Chapter 1 discusses the problem of noise pollution and involves students in processes of…

  14. Sounding Off about Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crumpton, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    Noise in a community college library can be part of the nature of the environment. It can also become a huge distraction for those who see the library as their sanctuary for quiet study and review of resources. This article describes the steps that should be taken by library staff in order to be proactive about noise and the library environment,…

  15. Ultra-low noise mechanically cooled germanium detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, P.; Amman, M.; Martin, R.; Vetter, K.

    2016-03-01

    Low capacitance, large volume, high purity germanium (HPGe) radiation detectors have been successfully employed in low-background physics experiments. However, some physical processes may not be detectable with existing detectors whose energy thresholds are limited by electronic noise. In this paper, methods are presented which can lower the electronic noise of these detectors. Through ultra-low vibration mechanical cooling and wire bonding of a CMOS charge sensitive preamplifier to a sub-pF p-type point contact HPGe detector, we demonstrate electronic noise levels below 40 eV-FWHM.

  16. The properties of the anti-tumor model with coupling non-Gaussian noise and Gaussian colored noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qin; Sun, Zhongkui; Xu, Wei

    2016-05-01

    The anti-tumor model with correlation between multiplicative non-Gaussian noise and additive Gaussian-colored noise has been investigated in this paper. The behaviors of the stationary probability distribution demonstrate that the multiplicative non-Gaussian noise plays a dual role in the development of tumor and an appropriate additive Gaussian colored noise can lead to a minimum of the mean value of tumor cell population. The mean first passage time is calculated to quantify the effects of noises on the transition time of tumors between the stable states. An increase in both the non-Gaussian noise intensity and the departure from the Gaussian noise can accelerate the transition from the disease state to the healthy state. On the contrary, an increase in cross-correlated degree will slow down the transition. Moreover, the correlation time can enhance the stability of the disease state.

  17. Critical Low-Noise Technologies Being Developed for Engine Noise Reduction Systems Subproject

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.; Civinskas, Kestutis C.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's previous Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Noise Reduction Program delivered the initial technologies for meeting a 10-year goal of a 10-dB reduction in total aircraft system noise. Technology Readiness Levels achieved for the engine-noise-reduction technologies ranged from 4 (rig scale) to 6 (engine demonstration). The current Quiet Aircraft Technology (QAT) project is building on those AST accomplishments to achieve the additional noise reduction needed to meet the Aerospace Technology Enterprise's 10-year goal, again validated through a combination of laboratory rig and engine demonstration tests. In order to meet the Aerospace Technology Enterprise goal for future aircraft of a 50- reduction in the perceived noise level, reductions of 4 dB are needed in both fan and jet noise. The primary objectives of the Engine Noise Reduction Systems (ENRS) subproject are, therefore, to develop technologies to reduce both fan and jet noise by 4 dB, to demonstrate these technologies in engine tests, and to develop and experimentally validate Computational Aero Acoustics (CAA) computer codes that will improve our ability to predict engine noise.

  18. Community noise model

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    MVMA has sponsored a study to assist the motor vehicle manufacturers and others in assessing the impact of motor vehicle noise on the community. As part of this study, a computer model was developed to quantify, by mathematical simulation, the impact of traffic noise on the community, with particular emphasis on passenger cars, light trucks and vans under 10,000 pounds gross vehicle weight rating. The primary objective of the program was to evaluate the incremental changes in exposure to traffic noise which would result from the promulgation of various new-vehicle emission standards and to compare these incremental changes with those which result from alternative approaches to vehicle noise abatement. The model is available for use on microcomputers and is capable of evaluating local, as well as national, noise control strategies.

  19. [Urban noise pollution].

    PubMed

    Chouard, C H

    2001-07-01

    Noise is responsible for cochlear and general damages. Hearing loss and tinnitus greatly depend on sound intensity and duration. Short-duration sound of sufficient intensity (gunshot or explosion) will not be described because they are not currently encountered in our normal urban environment. Sound levels of less than 75 d (A) are unlikely to cause permanent hearing loss, while sound levels of about 85 d (A) with exposures of 8 h per day will produce permanent hearing loss after many years. Popular and largely amplified music is today one of the most dangerous causes of noise induced hearing loss. The intensity of noises (airport, highway) responsible for stress and general consequences (cardiovascular) is generally lower. Individual noise sensibility depends on several factors. Strategies to prevent damage from sound exposure should include the use of individual hearing protection devices, education programs beginning with school-age children, consumer guidance, increased product noise labelling, and hearing conservation programs for occupational settings. PMID:11476007

  20. Rotorcraft Noise Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, Michael J.; Marcolini, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    The Rotorcraft Noise Model (RNM) is an aircraft noise impact modeling computer program being developed for NASA-Langley Research Center which calculates sound levels at receiver positions either on a uniform grid or at specific defined locations. The basic computational model calculates a variety of metria. Acoustic properties of the noise source are defined by two sets of sound pressure hemispheres, each hemisphere being centered on a noise source of the aircraft. One set of sound hemispheres provides the broadband data in the form of one-third octave band sound levels. The other set of sound hemispheres provides narrowband data in the form of pure-tone sound pressure levels and phase. Noise contours on the ground are output graphically or in tabular format, and are suitable for inclusion in Environmental Impact Statements or Environmental Assessments.